Science.gov

Sample records for absorber element lifetime

  1. Positron lifetime calculation for the elements of the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Campillo Robles, J M; Ogando, E; Plazaola, F

    2007-04-30

    Theoretical positron lifetime values have been calculated systematically for most of the elements of the periodic table. Self-consistent and non-self-consistent schemes have been used for the calculation of the electronic structure in the solid, as well as different parametrizations for the positron enhancement factor and correlation energy. The results obtained have been studied and compared with experimental data, confirming the theoretical trends. As is known, positron lifetimes in bulk show a periodic behaviour with atomic number. These calculations also confirm that monovacancy lifetimes follow the same behaviour. The effects of enhancement factors used in calculations have been commented upon. Finally, we have analysed the effects that f and d electrons have on positron lifetimes.

  2. Relief diffracted elements recorded on absorbent photopolymers.

    PubMed

    Gallego, S; Márquez, A; Ortuño, M; Francés, J; Pascual, I; Beléndez, A

    2012-05-01

    Relief surface changes provide interesting possibilities for storing diffractive optical elements on photopolymers and are an important source of information for characterizing and understanding the material behavior. In this paper we use a 3-dimensional model, based on direct parameter measurements, for predicting the relief structures generated on without-coverplate photopolymers. We have analyzed different spatial frequency and recording intensity distributions such as binary and blazed periodic patterns. This model was successfully applied to different photopolymers with different values of monomer diffusion.

  3. Magic wavelengths, matrix elements, polarizabilities, and lifetimes of Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Clark, Charles W.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent interest in their applications, we report a systematic study of Cs atomic properties calculated by a high-precision relativistic all-order method. Excitation energies, reduced matrix elements, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for levels with principal quantum numbers n ≤12 and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers l ≤3 . Recommended values and estimates of uncertainties are provided for a number of electric-dipole transitions and the electric dipole polarizabilities of the n s , n p , and n d states. We also report a calculation of the electric quadrupole polarizability of the ground state. We display the dynamic polarizabilities of the 6 s and 7 p states for optical wavelengths between 1160 and 1800 nm and identify corresponding magic wavelengths for the 6 s -7 p1 /2 and 6 s -7 p3 /2 transitions. The values of relevant matrix elements needed for polarizability calculations at other wavelengths are provided.

  4. Modal element method for scattering of sound by absorbing bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1992-01-01

    The modal element method for acoustic scattering from 2-D body is presented. The body may be acoustically soft (absorbing) or hard (reflecting). The infinite computational region is divided into two subdomains - the bounded finite element domain, which is characterized by complicated geometry and/or variable material properties, and the surrounding unbounded homogeneous domain. The acoustic pressure field is represented approximately in the finite element domain by a finite element solution, and is represented analytically by an eigenfunction expansion in the homogeneous domain. The two solutions are coupled by the continuity of pressure and velocity across the interface between the two subdomains. Also, for hard bodies, a compact modal ring grid system is introduced for which computing requirements are drastically reduced. Analysis for 2-D scattering from solid and coated (acoustically treated) bodies is presented, and several simple numerical examples are discussed. In addition, criteria are presented for determining the number of modes to accurately resolve the scattered pressure field from a solid cylinder as a function of the frequency of the incoming wave and the radius of the cylinder.

  5. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  6. Automated Hybridization of X-ray Absorber Elements-A Path to Large Format Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Kelley, R.; Allen, C.; Kilbourne, C.; Costen, N.; Miller, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the design of microcalorimeters, it is often desirable to produce the X-ray absorber separately from the detector element. In this case, the attachment of the absorber to the detector element with the required thermal and mechanical characteristics is a major challenge. In such arrays, the attachment has been done by hand. This process is not easily extended to the large format arrays required for future X- ray astronomy missions such as the New x-ray Telescope or NeXT. In this paper we present an automated process for attaching absorber tiles to the surface of a large-scale X-ray detector array. The absorbers are attached with stycast epoxy to a thermally isolating polymer structure made of SU-8. SU-8 is a negative epoxy based photo resist produced by Microchem. We describe the fabrication of the X-ray absorbers and their suspension on a handle die in an adhesive matrix. We describe the production process for the polymer isolators on the detector elements. We have developed a new process for the alignment, and simultaneous bonding of the absorber tiles to an entire detector array. This process uses equipment and techniques used in the flip-chip bonding industry and approaches developed in the fabrication of the XRS-2 instrument. XRS-2 was an X-ray spectrometer that was launched on the Suzaku telescope in July 10, 2005. We describe the process and show examples of sample arrays produced by this process. Arrays with up to 300 elements have been bonded. The present tests have used dummy absorbers made of Si. In future work, we will demonstrate bonding of HgTe absorbers.

  7. Distributions of 12 elements on 64 absorbers from simulated Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW)

    SciTech Connect

    Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.; Marsh, S.F.

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 64 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) (pH 14.2). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y) and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 768 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2304 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing NCAW solutions.

  8. Distributions of 15 elements on 58 absorbers from simulated Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 58 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, pillared layered materials, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) (pH 14.0). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 870 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2610 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing DSSF solutions.

  9. A new conformal absorbing boundary condition for finite element meshes and parallelization of FEMATS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, J. L.; Nguyen, J.; Nurnberger, M.; Ross, D.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the progress toward the development and parallelization of an improved version of the finite element code FEMATS is described. This is a finite element code for computing the scattering by arbitrarily shaped three dimensional surfaces composite scatterers. The following tasks were worked on during the report period: (1) new absorbing boundary conditions (ABC's) for truncating the finite element mesh; (2) mixed mesh termination schemes; (3) hierarchical elements and multigridding; (4) parallelization; and (5) various modeling enhancements (antenna feeds, anisotropy, and higher order GIBC).

  10. A comparative study of an ABC and an artificial absorber for truncating finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oezdemir, T.; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The type of mesh termination used in the context of finite element formulations plays a major role on the efficiency and accuracy of the field solution. The performance of an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) and an artificial absorber (a new concept) for terminating the finite element mesh was evaluated. This analysis is done in connection with the problem of scattering by a finite slot array in a thick ground plane. The two approximate mesh truncation schemes are compared with the exact finite element-boundary integral (FEM-BI) method in terms of accuracy and efficiency. It is demonstrated that both approximate truncation schemes yield reasonably accurate results even when the mesh is extended only 0.3 wavelengths away from the array aperture. However, the artificial absorber termination method leads to a substantially more efficient solution. Moreover, it is shown that the FEM-BI method remains quite competitive with the FEM-artificial absorber method when the FFT is used for computing the matrix-vector products in the iterative solution algorithm. These conclusions are indeed surprising and of major importance in electromagnetic simulations based on the finite element method.

  11. Finite element analysis of electromagnetic propagation in an absorbing wave guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1986-01-01

    Wave guides play a significant role in microwave space communication systems. The attenuation per unit length of the guide depends on its construction and design frequency range. A finite element Galerkin formulation has been developed to study TM electromagnetic propagation in complex two-dimensional absorbing wave guides. The analysis models the electromagnetic absorptive characteristics of a general wave guide which could be used to determine wall losses or simulate resistive terminations fitted into the ends of a guide. It is believed that the general conclusions drawn by using this simpler two-dimensional geometry will be fundamentally the same for other geometries.

  12. Retention of elements absorbed by juvenile fish (Menidia menidia, Menidia Beryllina) from zooplankton prey

    SciTech Connect

    Reinfelder, J.R.; Fisher, N.S.

    1994-12-01

    Radiolabeled copepods (Acartia spp.) were fed to juvenile silversides (Menidia menidia and Menidia beryllina) to study element absorption in the fish. Copepods were reared from nauplii in the presence of different radiotracers ({sup 14}C,{sup 109}Cd,{sup 57}Co,{sup 32}P,{sup 35}S,{sup 75}Se, o;r {sup 65}Zn) and were analyzed for relative concentrations of these elements in their tissue fractions. Copepod exoskeletons contained nearly all of the trace metals (>97%), 60% of the Se, and less than half of the C,P, and S accumulated by the copepods. Within the nonexoskeleton tissues of the copepods, nonpolar (CHCl{sub 3} extractable) material contained 34 and 24% of the total C and P, but only 8 and 2% of the total S and Se. Absorption efficiencies of trace metals in juvenile silversides (2.7% for Cd, 2.1% for Co, 6.2% for Zn) were an order of magnitude lower than those for nonmetals (29% for Se, 50% for S and C, 60% for P). The absorption efficiencies in the juvenile silversides of all seven elements studied were directly related to the percent of each element in the nonexoskeleton fractions of the copepod prey, indicating that the fish absorbed the soft tissues of the copepods and egested the chitinous exoskeleton and its associated elements. 32 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. A novel pre-oxidation method for elemental mercury removal utilizing a complex vaporized absorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Hao, Runlong; Guo, Qing

    2014-09-15

    A novel semi-dry integrative method for elemental mercury (Hg(0)) removal has been proposed in this paper, in which Hg(0) was initially pre-oxidized by a vaporized liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) composed of a Fenton reagent, peracetic acid (CH3COOOH) and sodium chloride (NaCl), after which Hg(2+) was absorbed by the resultant Ca(OH)2. The experimental results indicated that CH3COOOH and NaCl were the best additives for Hg(0) oxidation. Among the influencing factors, the pH of the LCA and the adding rate of the LCA significantly affected the Hg(0) removal. The coexisting gases, SO2 and NO, were characterized as either increasing or inhibiting in the removal process, depending on their concentrations. Under optimal reaction conditions, the efficiency for the single removal of Hg(0) was 91%. Under identical conditions, the efficiencies of the simultaneous removal of SO2, NO and Hg(0) were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Finally, the reaction mechanism for the simultaneous removal of SO2, NO and Hg(0) was proposed based on the characteristics of the removal products as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), the analysis of the electrode potentials, and through data from related research references. PMID:25146096

  14. Tricholoma matsutake can absorb and accumulate trace elements directly from rock fragments in the shiro.

    PubMed

    Vaario, Lu-Min; Pennanen, Taina; Lu, Jinrong; Palmén, Jorma; Stenman, Jarkko; Leveinen, Jussi; Kilpeläinen, Petri; Kitunen, Veikko

    2015-07-01

    Tricholoma matsutake, a highly valued delicacy in Japan and East Asia, is an ectomycorrhizal fungus typically found in a complex soil community of mycorrhizae, soil microbes, and host-tree roots referred to as the shiro in Japan. A curious characteristic of the shiro is an assortment of small rock fragments that have been implicated as a direct source of minerals and trace elements for the fungus. In this study, we measured the mineral content of 14 samples of shiro soil containing live matsutake mycelium and the extent to which the fungus can absorb minerals directly from the rock fragments. X-ray powder diffraction identified major phases of quartz, microcline, orthoclase, and albite in all shiro samples. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and direct sequencing confirmed the presence of T. matsutake on 32 of 33 rock fragments. Piloderma sp. co-occurred on 40% of fragments and was positively correlated with locations known to produce good mushroom crops. The ability of T. matsutake to absorb trace elements directly from rock fragments was examined in vitro on nutrient-agar plates supplemented with rock fragments from the shiro. In comparison to the mineral content of tissues grown on control media, the concentration of Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, P, and Zn increased from 1.1 to 106.4 times for both T. matsutake and Piloderma sp. Mineral content of dried sporocarps sampled from the study site partially reflected the results of the in vitro study. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the natural development and artificial culture of this important fungus. PMID:25355073

  15. Tricholoma matsutake can absorb and accumulate trace elements directly from rock fragments in the shiro.

    PubMed

    Vaario, Lu-Min; Pennanen, Taina; Lu, Jinrong; Palmén, Jorma; Stenman, Jarkko; Leveinen, Jussi; Kilpeläinen, Petri; Kitunen, Veikko

    2015-07-01

    Tricholoma matsutake, a highly valued delicacy in Japan and East Asia, is an ectomycorrhizal fungus typically found in a complex soil community of mycorrhizae, soil microbes, and host-tree roots referred to as the shiro in Japan. A curious characteristic of the shiro is an assortment of small rock fragments that have been implicated as a direct source of minerals and trace elements for the fungus. In this study, we measured the mineral content of 14 samples of shiro soil containing live matsutake mycelium and the extent to which the fungus can absorb minerals directly from the rock fragments. X-ray powder diffraction identified major phases of quartz, microcline, orthoclase, and albite in all shiro samples. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and direct sequencing confirmed the presence of T. matsutake on 32 of 33 rock fragments. Piloderma sp. co-occurred on 40% of fragments and was positively correlated with locations known to produce good mushroom crops. The ability of T. matsutake to absorb trace elements directly from rock fragments was examined in vitro on nutrient-agar plates supplemented with rock fragments from the shiro. In comparison to the mineral content of tissues grown on control media, the concentration of Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, P, and Zn increased from 1.1 to 106.4 times for both T. matsutake and Piloderma sp. Mineral content of dried sporocarps sampled from the study site partially reflected the results of the in vitro study. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the natural development and artificial culture of this important fungus.

  16. Finite element analysis of MMIC structures and electronic packages using absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-She; Mittra, Raj

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element method (FEM) is employed in conjunction with first and second-order absorbing boundary conditions (ABC's) to analyze waveguide discontinuities and to derive their scattering parameters. While the application of FEM for the analysis of MMIC structures is not new, to the best of the knowledge of the authors the technique for mesh truncation for microstrip lines using the first and higher-order ABC's, described in this paper, has not been reported elsewhere. The scattering parameters of a microstrip discontinuity are computed in two steps. As a first step, the field distribution of the fundamental mode in a uniform microstrip is obtained by exciting the uniform line with the quasi-static transverse electric field, letting it propagate, and then extracting the dominant mode pattern after the higher order modes have decayed. In step two, the discontinuity problem is solved by exciting the structure by using the fundamental mode obtained in step one. The scattering parameters based on the voltage definition are calculated by using the line integral of electric fields underneath the strip. Numerical solutions for several waveguide discontinuities and electronic packages are obtained and compared with the published data.

  17. Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated.

  18. Spontaneous Fission Modes and Lifetimes of Superheavy Elements in the Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A,

    2013-01-01

    Background: The reactions with the neutron-rich 48Ca beam and actinide targets resulted in the detection of new superheavy (SH) nuclides with Z=104 118. The unambiguous identification of the new isotopes, however, still poses a problem because their -decay chains terminate by spontaneous fission (SF) before reaching the known region of the nuclear chart. The understanding of the competition between -decay and SF channels in SH nuclei is, therefore, of crucial importance for our ability to map the SH region and to assess its extent.

    Purpose: We perform self-consistent calculations of the competing decay modes of even-even SH isotopes with 108 Z 126 and 148 N 188.

    Methods: We use the state-of-the-art computational framework based on self-consistent symmetry-unrestricted nuclear density functional theory capable of describing the competition between nuclear attraction and electrostatic repulsion. We apply the SkM* Skyrme energy density functional. The collective mass tensor of the fissioning superfluid nucleus is computed by means of the cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approach. This paper constitutes a systematic self-consistent study of spontaneous fission in the SH region, carried out at a full HFB level, that simultaneously takes into account both triaxiality and reflection asymmetry.

    Results: Breaking axial symmetry and parity turns out to be crucial for a realistic estimate of collective action; it results in lowering SF lifetimes by more than 7 orders of magnitude in some cases. We predict two competing SF modes: reflection symmetric modes and reflection asymmetric modes.

    Conclusions: The shortest-lived SH isotopes decay by SF; they are expected to lie in a narrow corridor formed by 280Hs, 284Fl, and 118284Uuo that separates the regions of SH nuclei synthesized in cold-fusion and hot-fusion reactions. The region of long-lived SH nuclei is expected to be centered on 294Ds with a total half-life of

  19. Organic and elemental carbon measurements during ACE-Asia suggest a longer atmospheric lifetime for elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Lim, H J; Turpin, B J; Russell, L M; Bates, T S

    2003-07-15

    During the ACE-Asia intensive field campaign (March 14-April 20, 2001), PM1.0 organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations were measured onboard the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown over the Northwest Pacific Ocean using a semi-continuous automated carbon analyzer downstream of a carbon-impregnated filter denuder. This OC and EC measurement achieved a mean time resolution of about 200 min over the Pacific Ocean, substantially lower than that achieved previously (24 h). The semi-continuous measurements, in which the adsorption artifact was substantially reduced using the denuder, showed good agreement with integrated artifact-corrected measurements made without a denuder. Mean particulate OC and EC concentrations were 0.21 and 0.09, 0.70 and 0.29, 1.00 and 0.27, and 2.43 and 0.66 microg of C m(-3) over the background Pacific Ocean, Asian-influenced Pacific Ocean, offshore of Japan, and Sea of Japan, respectively. On April 11, 90-min average OC and EC concentrations peaked at 4.0 and 1.3 microg of C m(-3), respectively, offshore of Korea over the Sea of Japan. The OC/EC ratio of 3.7 over the Sea of Japan and offshore of Japan was substantially higher than that of 2.5 over the Asian-influenced Pacific Ocean, even though backward air mass trajectories put the "Asian-influenced Pacific Ocean" sample downwind. The OC/EC ratio decreased with increasing time since the air mass encountered the source regions of China, Japan, and Korea. This suggests a longer atmospheric residence time for EC than for OC.

  20. System-Integrated Finite Element Analysis of a Full-Scale Helicopter Crash Test with Deployable Energy Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter was conducted in December 2009 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research facility (LandIR). The MD-500 helicopter was fitted with a composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) and tested under vertical and horizontal impact velocities of 26-ft/sec and 40-ft/sec, respectively. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the performance of the DEA concept under realistic crash conditions and to generate test data for validation of a system integrated finite element model. In preparation for the full-scale crash test, a series of sub-scale and MD-500 mass simulator tests was conducted to evaluate the impact performances of various components, including a new crush tube and the DEA blocks. Parameters defined within the system integrated finite element model were determined from these tests. The objective of this paper is to summarize the finite element models developed and analyses performed, beginning with pre-test predictions and continuing through post-test validation.

  1. Modernisation of a test rig for determination of vehicle shock absorber characteristics by considering vehicle suspension elements and unsprung masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniowski, M.; Para, S.; Knapczyk, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a modernization approach of a standard test bench for determination of damping characteristics of automotive shock absorbers. It is known that the real-life work conditions of wheel-suspension dampers are not easy to reproduce in laboratory conditions, for example considering a high frequency damper response or a noise emission. The proposed test bench consists of many elements from a real vehicle suspension. Namely, an original tyre-wheel with additional unsprung mass, a suspension spring, an elastic top mount, damper bushings and a simplified wheel guiding mechanism. Each component was tested separately in order to identify its mechanical characteristics. The measured data serve as input parameters for a numerical simulation of the test bench behaviour by using a vibratory model with 3 degrees of freedom. Study on the simulation results and the measurements are needed for further development of the proposed test bench.

  2. The influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings: Experimental analysis of the lubricant film and surface wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, William; Van Hooreweder, Brecht; Boonen, Rene; Sas, Paul; Moens, David

    2016-06-01

    Precise prediction of the lifetime of rolling element bearings is a crucial step towards a reliable design of many rotating machines. For bearings subjected to highly varying loads, recent research emphasises a strong reduction of the actual bearing lifetime w.r.t. the classically calculated bearing lifetime. This paper experimentally analyses the influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings. A novel bearing test rig is introduced. The test rig is able to apply a fully controlled multi-axial static and dynamic load on a single test bearing. Also, different types and sizes of bearings can be tested. Two separate investigations are conducted. First, the behaviour of the lubricant film between the rolling elements and raceways is analysed. Increased metallic contact or breakdown of the film during dynamic excitation is investigated based on the measured electrical resistance through the bearing. The study shows that the lubricant film thickness follows the imposed variations of the load. Variations of the lubricant film thickness are similar to the variations when the magnitude of the static bearing load is changed. Second, wear of the raceway surfaces is analysed. Surface wear is investigated after a series of accelerated lifetime tests under high dynamic load. Due to sliding motion between asperities of the contacting surfaces in the bearing, polishing of the raceway honing structure occurs. This polishing is clearly observed on SEM images of the inner raceway after a test duration of only 0.5% of the calculated L10 life. Polishing wear of the surfaces, such as surface induced cracks and material delamination, is expected when the bearing is further exposed to the high dynamic load.

  3. NEW ACTIVE MEDIA AND ELEMENTS OF LASER SYSTEMS: Influence of short-lived color centers on the lifetime of a metastable level of neodymium in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhibladze, M. I.; Lazarev, L. E.

    1987-11-01

    It was found that the short-lived color centers formed in neodymium-activated silicate glasses under the action of the violet part of the pump spectrum increased the lifetime of a neodymium metastable level by more than an order of magnitude in needle-shaped waveguide lasers. The highly efficient suppression of superradiance and a strong increase in the gain of the active element were due to stimulated decay of the color centers accompanying absorption of photons emitted by the neodymium.

  4. 3D finite element analysis of a metallic sphere scatterer comparison of first and second order vector absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanellopoulos, V. N.; Webb, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    A 3D vector analysis of plane wave scattering by a metallic sphere using finite elements and Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) is presented. The ABCs are applied on the outer surface that truncates the infinitely extending domain. Mixed order curvilinear covariantprojection elements are used to avoid spurious corruptions. The second order ABC is superior to the first at no extra computational cost. The errors due to incomplete absorption decrease as the outer surface is moved further away from the scatterer. An error of about 1% in near-field values was obtained with the second order ABC, when the outer surface was less than half a wavelength from the scatterer. Une analyse tridimensionnelle vectorielle de la diffusion d'onde plane sur une sphère métallique utilisant des éléments finis et des Conditions aux Limites Absorbantes (CLA) est présentée. Les CLA sont appliquées sur la surface exteme tronquant le domaine s'étendant à l'infini. Des éléments curvilignes mixtes utilisant des projections covariantes sont utilisés pour éviter des solutions parasites. La CLA de second ordre est supérieure à celle de premier ordre sans effort de calcul additionnel. Les erreurs dues à l'absorption incomplète décroissent à mesure que l'on déplace la surface externe à une distance croissante du diffuseur. Un taux d'erreur d'environ 1 % dans les valeurs du champ proche a été obtenu avec les CLA de second ordre lorsque la surface externe était placée à une distance inférieure à une demi-longueur de la source de diffusion.

  5. Simulation of patch and slot antennas using FEM with prismatic elements and investigations of artificial absorber mesh termination schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Ozdemir, T.; Volakis, J; Nurnberger, M.

    1995-01-01

    Year 1 progress can be characterized with four major achievements which are crucial toward the development of robust, easy to use antenna analysis code on doubly conformal platforms. (1) A new FEM code was developed using prismatic meshes. This code is based on a new edge based distorted prism and is particularly attractive for growing meshes associated with printed slot and patch antennas on doubly conformal platforms. It is anticipated that this technology will lead to interactive, simple to use codes for a large class of antenna geometries. Moreover, the codes can be expanded to include modeling of the circuit characteristics. An attached report describes the theory and validation of the new prismatic code using reference calculations and measured data collected at the NASA Langley facilities. The agreement between the measured and calculated data is impressive even for the coated patch configuration. (2) A scheme was developed for improved feed modeling in the context of FEM. A new approach based on the voltage continuity condition was devised and successfully tested in modeling coax cables and aperture fed antennas. An important aspect of this new feed modeling approach is the ability to completely separate the feed and antenna mesh regions. In this manner, different elements can be used in each of the regions leading to substantially improved accuracy and meshing simplicity. (3) A most important development this year has been the introduction of the perfectly matched interface (PMI) layer for truncating finite element meshes. So far the robust boundary integral method has been used for truncating the finite element meshes. However, this approach is not suitable for antennas on nonplanar platforms. The PMI layer is a lossy anisotropic absorber with zero reflection at its interface. (4) We were able to interface our antenna code FEMA_CYL (for antennas on cylindrical platforms) with a standard high frequency code. This interface was achieved by first generating

  6. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  7. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  8. KENO lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, L.; Parsons, D.K.; Spriggs, G.D.

    1997-01-30

    When performing k-eigenvalue solutions with KENO-V.a, two different prompt neutron lifetimes are estimated - a system lifetime and a neutron generation time. The meaning of these two lifetimes has been ascertained by comparing values of various neutron lifespans/lifetimes predicted by MCNP and DANTSYS based on the neutron-balance theory. The system lifetime in KENO-Va corresponds to the unweighted removal lifetime calculated by both MCNP and DANTSYS. The unweighted removal lifetime is the average time between removal events resulting from a neutron absorption or a neutron leakage. The generation time in KENO-V.a corresponds to the fission lifespan calculated by MCNP, where the fission lifespan in MCNP represents the average time for a newly born neutron to cause another fission. As such, the generation time in KENO-Va does not represent the generation time that appears in the point kinetic model. The generation time in the point kinetic model is the adjoint-weighted removal lifetime divided by k{sub eff}, which is identically equal to the adjoint-weighted neutron production rate. In small bare systems operating in the vicinity of delayed critical, the difference between the adjoint-weighted neutron generation time and the fission lifespan can be as small as a few percent. However, in reflected systems, the difference between these two quantities can be several orders of magnitude. In conclusion, the prompt neutron generation time predicted by KENO-Va corresponds to the fission lifespan of a prompt neutron in a given system. The fission lifespan is the average time from birth-to-fission and, in general, is not a good approximation for the adjoint-weighted neutron generation time that appears in the point-kinetic model.

  9. Characterization of compliant thermal conductive tungsten material for thermionic element application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, V.; Merrigan, M.; Ranken, W.

    The two compliant, thermally conductive, tungsten-based materials that have been developed for use by the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification program are to be inserted between UO2 fuel cylinders and the copper cladding thst surrounds them in order to absorb swelling and reduce tungsten emitter element stress. Test procedures and test results are presented, with attention to the anticipated effects on thermionic element lifetime; lifetimes of the order of 7 years appear to be achievable by means of the buffer materials.

  10. Structure property relations and finite element analysis of ram horns: A pathway to energy absorbent bio-inspired designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trim, Michael Wesley

    2011-12-01

    A recently emerging engineering design approach entails studying the brilliant design solutions found in nature with an aim to develop design strategies that mimic the remarkable efficiency found in biological systems. This novel engineering approach is referred to as bio-inspired design. In this context, the present study quantifies the structure-property relations in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) horn keratin, qualitatively characterizes the effects of a tapered spiral geometry (the same form as in a ram's horn) on pressure wave and impulse mitigation, describes the stress attenuation capabilities and features of a ram's head, and compares the structures and mechanical properties of some energy absorbent natural materials. The results and ideas presented herein can be used in the development of lightweight, energy absorbent, bio-inspired material designs. Among the most notable conclusions garnered from this research include: (1) Horn keratin behaves in an anisotropic manner similar to a long fiber composite. (2) Moisture content dominates the material behavior of horn keratin more than anisotropy, age, and stress-state. This makes moisture content the most influential parameter on the mechanical behavior of horn keratin. (3) Tapered geometries mitigate the impulse generated by a stress wave due to the convergent boundary and a continually decreasing cross sectional area such that greater uniaxial stresses and subsequent axial deformation arises. Furthermore, the tapered geometry introduces small shear stresses that further decrease the impulse. (4) Spiral geometries attenuate the impulse generated by a stress wave by the introduction of shear stresses along the length of the spiral. These shear stresses introduce transverse displacements that function to lessen the impulse. (5) When both a taper and spiral geometry are used in a design, their synergistic effects multiplicatively reduce the impulse (6) Tough natural materials have a high porosity, which makes

  11. Starspot lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, G. A. J.

    2002-07-01

    Photometry and Doppler imaging are both powerful techniques that can be used to evaluate the timescales of surface activity phenomena on active rapidly rotating objects. Active longitudes are most easily detected through photometry. These are found to have lifetimes of between 4-8 years. Many RSCVn binary systems and single stars show the ``flip-flop'' effect, where dominant spotted regions switch back and forth by 180deg longitude over a set number of years. Doppler imaging is most effective at evaluating the presence of polar spots and smaller scale spots in the mid to low latitude regions (up to 3deg resolution at the equator). This technique enables the monitoring of spot group lifetimes with greater accuracy than with photometry alone. Polar spots are found to have lifetimes of over a decade in RSCVn binary systems (V711 Tau & EI Eri) and in single MS stars, (AB Dor). In AB Dor, long-term photometry and Doppler imaging show that when the star was at its most spotted, there was no polar spot. Recent results indicate that surface shear was also suppressed in AB Dor at the same epoch. This implies that spot lifetimes can also be affected by changing surface shear rates over the course of an activity cycle. Mid to low latitude spots on single MS stars are found to have lifetimes of under 1 month. Spots in active components of RSCVn binaries show less modulation over a month compared to single MS rapid rotators. This indicates that either less flux is injected into the stellar surface over one month, or else that flux emergence is confined to small preferred regions in tidally locked systems. More long-term monitoring of these and other rapidly rotating systems using Doppler imaging, photometry and molecular band mapping using TiO and OH will enable us to evaluate whether or not these initial trends are representative of active cool stars.

  12. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system.

  13. Predicting the Dynamic Crushing Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber Using Solid-Element-Based Models in LS-DYNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical study that was performed as part of the development of an externally deployable energy absorber (DEA) concept. The concept consists of a composite honeycomb structure that can be stowed until needed to provide energy attenuation during a crash event, much like an external airbag system. One goal of the DEA development project was to generate a robust and reliable Finite Element Model (FEM) of the DEA that could be used to accurately predict its crush response under dynamic loading. The results of dynamic crush tests of 50-, 104-, and 68-cell DEA components are presented, and compared with simulation results from a solid-element FEM. Simulations of the FEM were performed in LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark) to compare the capabilities of three different material models: MAT 63 (crushable foam), MAT 26 (honeycomb), and MAT 126 (modified honeycomb). These material models are evaluated to determine if they can be used to accurately predict both the uniform crushing and final compaction phases of the DEA for normal and off-axis loading conditions

  14. Analysis of cylindrical wrap-around and doubly conformal patch antennas by way of the finite element-artificial absorber method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, J. L.; Kempel, L. C.; Sliva, R.; Wang, H. T. G.; Woo, A. G.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop analysis codes for computing the scattering and radiation of antennas on cylindrically and doubly conformal platforms. The finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) method has been shown to accurately model the scattering and radiation of cavity-backed patch antennas. Unfortunately extension of this rigorous technique to coated or doubly curved platforms is cumbersome and inefficient. An alternative approximate approach is to employ an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for terminating the finite element mesh thus avoiding use of a Green's function. A FE-ABC method is used to calculate the radar cross section (RCS) and radiation pattern of a cavity-backed patch antenna which is recessed within a metallic surface. It is shown that this approach is accurate for RCS and antenna pattern calculations with an ABC surface displaced as little as 0.3 lambda from the cavity aperture. These patch antennas may have a dielectric overlay which may also be modeled with this technique.

  15. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  16. Absorber coatings' degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report is intended to document some of the Los Alamos efforts that have been carried out under the Department of Energy (DOE) Active Heating and Cooling Materials Reliability, Maintainability, and Exposure Testing program. Funding for these activities is obtained directly from DOE although they represent a variety of projects and coordination with other agencies. Major limitations to the use of solar energy are the uncertain reliability and lifetimes of solar systems. This program is aimed at determining material operating limitations, durabilities, and failure modes such that materials improvements can be made and lifetimes can be extended. Although many active and passive materials and systems are being studied at Los Alamos, this paper will concentrate on absorber coatings and degradation of these coatings.

  17. Mechanical energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An energy absorbing system for controlling the force where a moving object engages a stationary stop and where the system utilized telescopic tubular members, energy absorbing diaphragm elements, force regulating disc springs, and a return spring to return the telescoping member to its start position after stroking is presented. The energy absorbing system has frusto-conical diaphragm elements frictionally engaging the shaft and are opposed by a force regulating set of disc springs. In principle, this force feedback mechanism serves to keep the stroking load at a reasonable level even if the friction coefficient increases greatly. This force feedback device also serves to desensitize the singular and combined effects of manufacturing tolerances, sliding surface wear, temperature changes, dynamic effects, and lubricity.

  18. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  19. Heavy flavor lifetimes and lifetime differences

    SciTech Connect

    Jonas Rademacker

    2003-09-17

    The authors give an overview of heavy flavour lifetime measurements, focusing on recent results from the Tevatron and the B factories. In the first part of this article we summarize the status and latest measurements of B-hadron lifetimes and lifetime ratios, including some recent result from the Tevatron and the B factories, and compare those results with the predictions from Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE). Future prospects for lifetime measurements at the B factories and the Tevatron are discussed. In the second part, we review the status and prospects of measuring the difference between the lifetimes of the two CP eigenstates in the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system.

  20. Measurements of defect structures by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of the tellurite glass TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 doped with ions of rare earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golis, E.; Yousef, El. S.; Reben, M.; Kotynia, K.; Filipecki, J.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was the structural analysis of the TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 tellurite glasses doped with ions of the rare-earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+ based on the PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy) method of measuring positron lifetimes. Values of positron lifetimes and the corresponding intensities may be connected with the sizes and number of structural defects, such as vacancies, mono-vacancies, dislocations or pores, the sizes of which range from a few angstroms to a few dozen nanometres. Experimental positron lifetime spectrum revealed existence of two positron lifetime components τ1 and τ2. Their interpretation was based on two-state positron trapping model where the physical parameters are the annihilation velocity and positron trapping rate.

  1. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  2. Detection of Matrix Elements and Trace Impurities in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Photovoltaic Absorbers Using Surface Analytical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Haidong; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee

    2015-10-01

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films are well known as the next-generation solar cell materials notable for their high absorption coefficient for solar radiation, suitable band gap, and ability for deposition on flexible substrate materials, allowing the production of highly flexible and lightweight solar panels. To improve solar cell performances, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is much needed. In this study, Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin films were prepared on molybdenum back contacts deposited on soda-lime glass substrates via three-stage evaporation. Surface analyses via AES and SIMS were used to characterize the CIGS thin films and compare their depth profiles. We determined the average concentration of the matrix elements, Cu, In, Ga, and Se, using ICP-AES, XRF, and EPMA. We also obtained depth profiling results using TOF-SIMS, magnetic sector SIMS and AES, and APT, a sub-nanometer resolution characterization technique that enables three-dimensional elemental mapping. The SIMS technique, with its high detection limit and ability to obtain the profiles of elements in parallel, is a powerful tool for monitoring trace elements in CIGS thin films. To identify impurities in a CIGS layer, the distribution of trace elements was also observed according to depth by SIMS and APT.

  3. Detection of Matrix Elements and Trace Impurities in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Photovoltaic Absorbers Using Surface Analytical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Haidong; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee

    2015-10-01

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films are well known as the next-generation solar cell materials notable for their high absorption coefficient for solar radiation, suitable band gap, and ability for deposition on flexible substrate materials, allowing the production of highly flexible and lightweight solar panels. To improve solar cell performances, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is much needed. In this study, Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin films were prepared on molybdenum back contacts deposited on soda-lime glass substrates via three-stage evaporation. Surface analyses via AES and SIMS were used to characterize the CIGS thin films and compare their depth profiles. We determined the average concentration of the matrix elements, Cu, In, Ga, and Se, using ICP-AES, XRF, and EPMA. We also obtained depth profiling results using TOF-SIMS, magnetic sector SIMS and AES, and APT, a sub-nanometer resolution characterization technique that enables three-dimensional elemental mapping. The SIMS technique, with its high detection limit and ability to obtain the profiles of elements in parallel, is a powerful tool for monitoring trace elements in CIGS thin films. To identify impurities in a CIGS layer, the distribution of trace elements was also observed according to depth by SIMS and APT. PMID:26726401

  4. Satellite lifetime routine user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, H. U.; Myler, T. R.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program which determines secular variations in mean orbital elements of earth satellites and the lifetime of the orbit is described. The dynamical model treats a point mass satellite subject to solar and lunar disturbing gravitational fields, second, third and fourth harmonics of the earth's oblate potential, earth's atmospheric drag, and solar radiation pressure. Each of these disturbing functions may be selectively simulated. Data preparation instructions, a sample problem, and definitions of output quantities are included.

  5. Laser-assisted manufacturing of micro-optical volume elements for enhancing the amount of light absorbed by solar cells in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peharz, Gerhard; Kuna, Ladislav; Leiner, Claude

    2015-03-01

    The laser-generation of micro-optical volume elements is a promising approach to decrease the optical shadowing of front side metal contacts of solar cells. Focusing a femtosecond laser beam into the volume of the encapsulation material causes a local modification its optical constants. Suchlike fabricated micro-optical elements can be used to decrease the optical shadowing of the front side metallization of c-Si solar cells. Test samples comprising of a sandwich structure of a glass sheet with metallic grid-lines, an Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant and another glass sheet were manufactured in order to investigate the optical performance of the volume optics. Transmission measurements show that the shadowing of the metalling grid-lines is substantially decreased by the micro-optical volume elements created in the EVA bulk right above the grid-fingers. A detailed investigation of the optical properties of these volume elements was performed: (i) experimentally on the basis of goniometric measurements, as well as (ii) theoretically by applying optical modelling and optimization procedures. This resulted in a better understanding of the effectiveness of the optical volume elements in decreasing the optical shadowing of metal grid lines on the active cell surfaces. Moreover, results of photovoltaic mini-modules with incorporated micro-optical volume elements are presented. Results of optical simulation and Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) experiments show that the losses due to the grid fingers can be reduced by about 50%, when using this fs-laser structuring approach for the fabrication of micro-optical volume elements in the EVA material.

  6. Analysis of burnable poison in Ford Nuclear Reactor fuel to extend fuel lifetime. Final report, August 1, 1994--September 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, R.R.; Lee, J.C.

    1996-12-01

    The objective of the project was to establish the feasibility of extending the lifetime of fuel elements for the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) by replacing current aluminide fuel with silicide fuel comprising a heavier uranium loading but with the same fissile enrichment of 19.5 wt% {sup 235}U. The project has focused on fuel designs where burnable absorbers, in the form of B{sub 4}C, are admixed with uranium silicide in fuel plates so that increases in the control reactivity requirements and peak power density, due to the heavier fuel loading, may be minimized. The authors have developed equilibrium cycle models simulating current full-size aluminide core configurations with 43 {approximately} 45 fuel elements. Adequacy of the overall equilibrium cycle approach has been verified through comparison with recent FNR experience in spent fuel discharge rates and simulation of reactor physics characteristics for two representative cycles. Fuel cycle studies have been performed to compare equilibrium cycle characteristics of silicide fuel designs, including burnable absorbers, with current aluminide fuel. These equilibrium cycle studies have established the feasibility of doubling the fuel element lifetime, with minimal perturbations to the control reactivity requirements and peak power density, by judicious additions of burnable absorbers to silicide fuel. Further study will be required to investigate a more practical silicide fuel design, which incorporates burnable absorbers in side plates of each fuel element rather than uniformly mixes them in fuel plates.

  7. The Lifetimes of Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2015-08-01

    For members of the American Astronomical Society, I collected data on their lifetimes from (1) 489 obituaries published in 1991-2015, (2) about 127 members listed as deceased but without published obituaries, and (3) a sample of AAS members without obituaries or not known to the AAS as being deceased. These show that the most frequent lifetimes is 85 years. Of 674 deceased members with known lifetimes, 11.0 ± 1.3% lived to be 90 or more years. In comparison to the astronomers, the most frequent lifetime for the general population is 77 years, showing that astronomers live an average of 8 years longer than the general population.

  8. Waveform-Dependent Absorbing Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Kim, Sanghoon; Rushton, Jeremiah J.; Sievenpiper, Daniel F.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first use of a waveform-dependent absorbing metasurface for high-power pulsed surface currents. The new type of nonlinear metasurface, composed of circuit elements including diodes, is capable of storing high-power pulse energy to dissipate it between pulses, while allowing propagation of small signals. Interestingly, the absorbing performance varies for high-power pulses but not for high-power continuous waves (CW’s), since the capacitors used are fully charged up. Thus, the waveform dependence enables us to distinguish various signal types (i.e., CW or pulse) even at the same frequency, which potentially creates new kinds of microwave technologies and applications.

  9. Lifetime risk of ESRD.

    PubMed

    Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Tonelli, Marcello; Manns, Braden J; Ahmed, Sofia B; Ravani, Pietro; James, Matthew; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2012-09-01

    Lifetime risk is the cumulative risk of experiencing an outcome between a disease-free index age and death. The lifetime risk of ESRD for a middle-aged individual is a relevant and easy to communicate measure of disease burden. We estimated lifetime risk of ESRD in a cohort of 2,895,521 adults without ESRD from 1997 to 2008. To estimate lifetime risk of ESRD by level of baseline kidney function, we analyzed a cohort of participants who had a serum creatinine measurement. We also estimated the sex- and index age-specific lifetime risk of incident ESRD and accounted for the competing risk of death. Among those individuals without ESRD at age 40 years, the lifetime risk of ESRD was 2.66% for men and 1.76% for women. The risk was higher in persons with reduced kidney function: for eGFR=44-59 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), the lifetime risk of ESRD was 7.51% for men and 3.21% for women, whereas men and women with relatively preserved kidney function (eGFR=60-89 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) had lifetime risks of ESRD of 1.01% and 0.63%, respectively. The lifetime risk of ESRD was consistently higher for men at all ages and eGFR strata compared with women. In conclusion, approximately 1 in 40 men and 1 in 60 women of middle age will develop ESRD during their lifetimes (living into their 90s). These population-based estimates may assist individuals who make decisions regarding public health policy.

  10. TPX/TFTR Neutral Beam energy absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlgren, F.; Wright, K.; Kamperschroer, J.; Grisham, L.; Lontai, L.; Peters, C.; VonHalle, A.

    1993-11-01

    The present beam energy absorbing surfaces on the TFTR Neutral Beams such as Ion Dumps, Calorimeters, beam defining apertures, and scrapers, are simple water cooled copper plates which wee designed to absorb (via their thermal inertia) the incident beam power for two seconds with a five minute coal down interval between pulses. These components are not capable of absorbing the anticipated beam power loading for 1000 second TPX pulses and will have to be replaced with an actively cooled design. While several actively cooled energy absorbing designs were considered,, the hypervapotron elements currently being used on the JET beamlines were chosen due to their lower cooling water demands and reliable performance on JET.

  11. Dynamical Lifetimes of Mars Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, H.; Marzari, F.; Tricarico, P.

    2004-05-01

    Several authors investigated within the last ten years the stability of known Mars Trojans. A maximum of five Trojans were quoted to librate around L5 and one around L4. Recent orbital data yield less Mars Trojans. According to our computations using orbital elements of Bowell's catalogue (march 2004), only three of the known asteroids, (5261) Eureka, 1998 VF31 and 2001 DH47 appear to librate around L5 over at least 1 Myr. Other previously quoted Mars Trojans are no more in the Trojan region, presumably due to an orbital improvement. We investigated the dynamical lifetime of the longest observed Trojan, Eureka, by two methods: i) by applying Laskar's frequency analysis and ii) by integrating the orbit of Eureka surrounded by a cloud of clones over several Gyrs. The Yarkovski effect is also taken into account in some integrations. The dynamical lifetime of Eureka is found to be of the order of 2-3 Gyrs. Spectroscopic and photometric results by Rivkin et al. (2003) suggest that Eureka is a highly differentiated kilometer-sized body. Its parent body was a much larger body. The physical properties of Eureka and its comparatively short dynamical lifetime rise the question for its origin.

  12. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  13. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    The GNC software onboard ISS utilizes TORS command loads, and a simplistic model of TORS orbital motion to generate onboard TORS state vectors. Each TORS command load contains five "invariant" orbital elements which serve as inputs to the onboard propagation algorithm. These elements include semi-major axis, inclination, time of last ascending node crossing, right ascension of ascending node, and mean motion. Running parallel to the onboard software is the TORS Command Builder Tool application, located in the JSC Mission Control Center. The TORS Command Builder Tool is responsible for building the TORS command loads using a ground TORS state vector, mirroring the onboard propagation algorithm, and assessing the fidelity of current TORS command loads onboard ISS. The tool works by extracting a ground state vector at a given time from a current TORS ephemeris, and then calculating the corresponding "onboard" TORS state vector at the same time using the current onboard TORS command load. The tool then performs a comparison between these two vectors and displays the relative differences in the command builder tool GUI. If the RSS position difference between these two vectors exceeds the tolerable lim its, a new command load is built using the ground state vector and uplinked to ISS. A command load's lifetime is therefore defined as the time from when a command load is built to the time the RSS position difference exceeds the tolerable limit. From the outset of TORS command load operations (STS-98), command load lifetime was limited to approximately one week due to the simplicity of both the onboard propagation algorithm, and the algorithm used by the command builder tool to generate the invariant orbital elements. It was soon desired to extend command load lifetime in order to minimize potential risk due to frequent ISS commanding. Initial studies indicated that command load lifetime was most sensitive to changes in mean motion. Finding a suitable value for mean motion

  14. (Anti)hypertriton lifetime puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang

    2016-05-01

    Most calculations on the lifetime of (anti)hypertriton gave a similar lifetime which is close to the lifetime of free Λ decays. However, recent measurements on (anti)hypertriton lifetime demonstrate a much short lifetime. All results for (anti)hypertriton lifetime by two-body decay channel of 3He + π for Au+Au collision at RHIC, Pb+Pb collision at LHC and Li + C collisions at GSI show a significant short lifetime in comparison with lifetime of free Λ decays. However, theoretical interpretation remains puzzle.

  15. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  16. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  17. The extended Touschek lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Bizek, H.M.

    1996-02-01

    With the advent of synchrotron radiation sources, the issue of beam lifetime becomes increasingly important. Users of these machines need to perform experiments which seldom last 15 minutes, but require hours for their completion. Therefore, the beam should circulate stably for hours. The beam of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring at Argonne National Laboratory is assumed to circulate stably for a minimum of 10 hours. The main contributions to the total beam lifetime (which is the inverse of the loss rate) come from residual gas scattering and Touschek scattering. The residual gas scattering is comprised of single Coulomb scattering and bremsstrahlung. The single-Coulomb scattering involves elastic collisions, while bremsstrahlung involves inelastic collisions, between the bunch and the surrounding residual gas. In the calculation the authors take the gas to be nitrogen at a pressure of 1 nTorr. Touschek scattering involves scattering of particles within the bunch, transferring energy among themselves. Such an energy transfer, if large enough, may eject the particle out of the bunch, thus causing it to be lost. Let us not forget the residual-gas lifetime. As pointed out, the calculation of this lifetime is done for the very low pressure of 1 nTorr. If the pressure is higher, the residual-gas lifetime will be smaller. This will further reduce the total beam lifetime, causing it to slip deeper below the minimum lifetime for stable storage ring operation. They begin this article by reviewing the Touschek integral and the associated limits of integration. The program ZAP has been altered to take into account the possible loss due to induced betatron oscillations. At each lattice position the energy loss required to produce, by coupling, a vertical oscillation that exceeds the vertical aperture is calculated. When this energy loss is less than the rf bucket half-height, it replaces the rf bucket half-height in the Touschek integral.

  18. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions. (LEW)

  19. Optical analysis of solar energy tubular absorbers.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, C; Sokolov, M

    1982-11-15

    The energy absorbed by a solar energy tubular receiver element for a single incident ray is derived. Two types of receiver elements were analyzed: (1) an inner tube with an absorbing coating surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube, and (2) a semitransparent inner tube filled with an absorbing fluid surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube. The formation of ray cascades in the semitransparent tubes is considered. A numerical simulation to investigate the influence of the angle of incidence, sizing, thickness, and coefficient of extinction of the tubes was performed. A comparison was made between receiver elements with and without cover tubes. Ray tracing analyses in which rays were followed within the tubular receiver element as well as throughout the rest of the collector were performed for parabolic and circular trough concentrating collectors.

  20. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid.

  1. Collisional lifetimes of meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, R. H.; Schwarzkopf, G. J.; Sommer, M.; Vaubaillon, J.; Albin, T.; Rodmann, J.; Grün, E.; Srama, R.

    2016-01-01

    Collisions of meteoroids with interplanetary dust grain fragments particles, dispersing larger particles amongst lower mass intervals. Here we use the method of Grün et al. (1985) and the IMEM interplanetary dust model to calculate the collisional lifetimes for different orbits, and for particles in different meteor showers. The timescales are usually long - of order 10^4 years for 1mm grains on Jupiter-family and Hally-type comet orbits. However, near-sun orbits particles suffer more frequent collisions and therefore have much shorter lifetimes. We discuss factors that affect the accuracy of these calculations.

  2. Calculating the Muon Cooling within a MICE Solid and LiquidAbsorber

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2006-06-10

    The key elements of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) cooling channel are the absorbers that are a part of the MICE absorber focus coil modules (AFC modules). The boundaries of room temperature solid absorbers are well defined. The density of most solid absorber materials is also well understood. The properties of solid absorber are most certainly understood to 0.3 percent. The MICE liquid absorbers are different in that their dimensions are a function of the absorber temperature and the fluid pressure within the absorber. The second element in the liquid absorber is the variability of the liquid density with temperature and pressure. While one can determine the absorber boundary within 0.3 percent, the determination of the liquid density within 0.3 percent is more difficult (particularly with liquid helium in the absorber). This report presents a method of calculating absorber boundary and the cooling performance of the MICE absorbers as a function of fluid temperature and pressure.

  3. Modelling Absorbent Phenomena of Absorbent Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeb, S.; Ladhari, N.; Ben Hassen, M.; Sakli, F.

    Absorption, retention and strike through time, as evaluating criteria of absorbent structures quality were studied. Determination of influent parameters on these criteria were realized by using the design method of experimental sets. In this study, the studied parameters are: Super absorbent polymer (SAP)/fluff ratio, compression and the porosity of the non woven used as a cover stock. Absorption capacity and retention are mostly influenced by SAP/fluff ratio. However, strike through time is affected by compression. Thus, a modelling of these characteristics in function of the important parameter was established.

  4. Aging behavior and lifetime modeling for polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper, polycarbonate (PC) as a material candidate for solar absorber applications is investigated as to the aging behavior at different temperatures in air and water. The aging conditioning was performed in air in the temperature range from 120 to 140 C and in water between 70 and 95 C. Tensile tests were performed on unaged and aged PC film specimens at ambient temperature using strain-to-break values as a performance indicator for the degree of aging. For PC the effect of aging was found to strongly depend on the aging conditions. Activation energy based lifetime prediction models according to various methods described in the literature were applied. The activation energies and corresponding lifetime predictions for the temperature range from 40 to 60 C in water and from 90 to 110 C in air derived from these models are compared and interpreted as to their practical relevance. (author)

  5. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P.; Longhurst, Glen R.; Porter, Douglas L.; Parry, James R.

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  6. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  7. Our Allotted Lifetimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that measured by the internal clock of heartbeats or breathing, all mammals live a similar lifespan. This is based on the fact that mammals, regardless of size, breathe about 200 million times in their lifetime at a rate of 1 breath for every 4 heartbeats. (AJ)

  8. Lifetimes and heavy quark expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Kolya Uraltsev was one of the inventors of the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), that describes inclusive weak decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks and in particular lifetimes. Besides giving a pedagogic introduction to the subject, we review the development and the current status of the HQE, which just recently passed several non-trivial experimental tests with an unprecedented precision. In view of many new experimental results for lifetimes of heavy hadrons, we also update several theory predictions: τ (B+)/τ (Bd) = 1.04+0.05-0.01 ± 0.02 ± 0.01, τ(Bs)/τ(Bd) = 1.001 ±0.002, τ(Λb)/τ(Bd) = 0.935 ±0.054 and \\bar {τ } (Ξ b0)/\\bar {τ } (Ξ b+) = 0.95 ± 0.06. The theoretical precision is currently strongly limited by the unknown size of the non-perturbative matrix elements of four-quark operators, which could be determined with lattice simulations.

  9. Absorbing Outflows in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this program was a comprehensive multiwavelength study of absorption phenomena in active galactic nuclei (AGN). These include a variety of associated absorption systems: X-ray warm absorbers, X-ray cold absorbers. UV absorbers with high ionization lines, MgII absorbers, red quasars and BALQSOs. The aim is to determine the physical conditions in the absorbing outflows, study their inter-relations and their role in AGN. We designed several observing programs to achieve this goal: X-ray spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, FLAY spectroscopy and X-ray imaging. We were very successful towards achieving the goal over the five year period as shown through following observing programs and papers. Copies of a few papers are attached with this report.

  10. Lifetime-weighted photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, A.; Shao, P.; Shi, Wei; Zemp, Roger J.

    2015-03-01

    It has previously been shown that photoacoustic imaging can interrogate lifetimes of exogenous agents by a sequence of pulses with varying pump-probe delay intervals. Rather than attempt to unmix molecules based on their composite lifetime profile, we introduce a technique called lifetime weighted imaging, which preferentially weights signals from chromophores with long lifetimes (including exogenous contrast agents such as methylene blue and porphyrins with microsecond-scale lifetimes) while nulling chromophores with short lifetimes (including hemoglobin with ps-ns-scale lifetimes). A probe beam is used to interrogate samples with or without a pump beam. By subtracting probe-beam photoacoustic signals with pump- from those without a pump excitation, we effectively eliminate probe signals from chromophores with short lifetimes while preserving excited-state photoacoustic signals from long-lifetimes. This differential signal will be weighted by a decaying exponential function of the pump-probe delay divided by the exogenous agent lifetime. This technique enabled the imaging of both triplet excited state lifetime and ground-state recovery lifetime. We demonstrate the oxygen-dependent lifetime of both methylene blue and porphyrins. Lifetimeweighted imaging could be used for photodynamic therapy dosimetry guidance, oxygen sensing, or other molecular imaging applications.

  11. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  12. Lifetime of a Chemically Bound Helium Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Lundell, Jan; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rare-gas atoms are chemically inert, to an extent unique among all elements. This is due to the stable electronic structure of the atoms. Stable molecules with chemically bound rare-gas atoms are, however, known. A first such compound, XePtF6, W2S prepared in 1962 and since then a range of molecules containing radon, xenon and krypton have been obtained. Most recently, a first stable chemically bound compound of argon was prepared, leaving neon and helium as the only elements for which stable chemically bound molecules are not yet known. Electronic structure calculations predict that a metastable species HHeF exists, but significance of the result depends on the unknown lifetime. Here we report quantum dynamics calculations of the lifetime of HHeF, using accurate interactions computed from electronic structure theory. HHeF is shown to disintegrate by tunneling through energy barriers into He + HF and H + He + F the first channel greatly dominating. The lifetime of HHeF is more than 120 picoseconds, that of DHeF is 14 nanoseconds. The relatively long lifetimes are encouraging for the preparation prospects of this first chemically bound helium compound.

  13. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  14. Charm lifetime measurements from TASSO

    SciTech Connect

    Forden, G.E.

    1987-10-09

    Recent measurements by TASSO of the lifetimes of charmed mesons is reviewed. The lifetime reported for the D/sub s/ meson utilizes the entire data sample collected. The lifetime of the neutral charmed meson, D/sup o/, is from a subsample of the total data set. Special emphases is given to the experimental procedures used.

  15. The Sprint to Lifetime Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    Describes the trend in high school physical education programs toward lifetime sports, defined by the author as physical activities that will serve the interests of students for a lifetime. Included are a special report on program costs and a model of a performance-based lifetime sports program. (Author/DN)

  16. B Lifetimes and Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Harold G.; /Indiana U.

    2009-05-01

    The Tevatron experiments, CDF and D0, have produced a wealth of new B-physics results since the start of Run II in 2001. We've observed new B-hadrons, seen new effects, and increased many-fold the precision with which we know the properties of b-quark systems. In these proceedings, we will discuss two of the most fruitful areas in the Tevatron B-physics program: lifetimes and mixing. We'll examine the experimental issues driving these analyses, present a summary of the latest results, and discuss prospects for the future.

  17. Measurement of the Ds lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermilab E791 Collaboration; Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report the results of a precise measurement of the Ds meson lifetime based on 1662+/-56 fully reconstructed Ds-->φπ decays, from the charm hadroproduction experiment E791 at Fermilab. Using an unbinned maximum likelihood fit, we measure the Ds lifetime to be 0.518+/-0.014+/-0.007 ps. The ratio of the measured Ds lifetime to the world average D0 lifetime [1] is 1.25+/-0.04. This result differs from unity by six standard deviations, indicating significantly different lifetimes for the Ds and the D0.

  18. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  19. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  20. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  1. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  2. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-09-12

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  3. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  4. Exits in order: How crowding affects particle lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penington, Catherine J.; Baker, Ruth E.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-06-01

    Diffusive processes are often represented using stochastic random walk frameworks. The amount of time taken for an individual in a random walk to intersect with an absorbing boundary is a fundamental property that is often referred to as the particle lifetime, or the first passage time. The mean lifetime of particles in a random walk model of diffusion is related to the amount of time required for the diffusive process to reach a steady state. Mathematical analysis describing the mean lifetime of particles in a standard model of diffusion without crowding is well known. However, the lifetime of agents in a random walk with crowding has received much less attention. Since many applications of diffusion in biology and biophysics include crowding effects, here we study a discrete model of diffusion that incorporates crowding. Using simulations, we show that crowding has a dramatic effect on agent lifetimes, and we derive an approximate expression for the mean agent lifetime that includes crowding effects. Our expression matches simulation results very well, and highlights the importance of crowding effects that are sometimes overlooked.

  5. Exits in order: How crowding affects particle lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Penington, Catherine J; Baker, Ruth E; Simpson, Matthew J

    2016-06-28

    Diffusive processes are often represented using stochastic random walk frameworks. The amount of time taken for an individual in a random walk to intersect with an absorbing boundary is a fundamental property that is often referred to as the particle lifetime, or the first passage time. The mean lifetime of particles in a random walk model of diffusion is related to the amount of time required for the diffusive process to reach a steady state. Mathematical analysis describing the mean lifetime of particles in a standard model of diffusion without crowding is well known. However, the lifetime of agents in a random walk with crowding has received much less attention. Since many applications of diffusion in biology and biophysics include crowding effects, here we study a discrete model of diffusion that incorporates crowding. Using simulations, we show that crowding has a dramatic effect on agent lifetimes, and we derive an approximate expression for the mean agent lifetime that includes crowding effects. Our expression matches simulation results very well, and highlights the importance of crowding effects that are sometimes overlooked. PMID:27369497

  6. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  7. Solar concentrator/absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Collector/energy converter, consisting of dual-slope optical concentrator and counterflow thermal energy absorber, is attached to multiaxis support structure. Efficient over wide range of illumination levels, device may be used to generate high temperature steam, serve as solar powered dryer, or power absorption cycle cooler.

  8. The Double Absorbing Boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Givoli, Dan; Rabinovich, Daniel; Bielak, Jacobo

    2014-02-01

    A new approach is devised for solving wave problems in unbounded domains. It has common features to each of two types of existing techniques: local high-order Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABC) and Perfectly Matched Layers (PML). However, it is different from both and enjoys relative advantages with respect to both. The new method, called the Double Absorbing Boundary (DAB) method, is based on truncating the unbounded domain to produce a finite computational domain Ω, and on applying a local high-order ABC on two parallel artificial boundaries, which are a small distance apart, and thus form a thin non-reflecting layer. Auxiliary variables are defined on the two boundaries and inside the layer bounded by them, and participate in the numerical scheme. The DAB method is first introduced in general terms, using the 2D scalar time-dependent wave equation as a model. Then it is applied to the 1D Klein-Gordon equation, using finite difference discretization in space and time, and to the 2D wave equation in a wave guide, using finite element discretization in space and dissipative time stepping. The computational aspects of the method are discussed, and numerical experiments demonstrate its performance.

  9. Extended lifetime railgap switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, D.B.; Mendoza, P.J.

    1988-02-02

    In a railgap switch of the type having an elongate blade electrode made of conductive material, an elongate housing made of insulating material for supporting the blade electrode and plate electrode in opposed relation extending in the same direction with the blade centered over the plate and separated therefrom by a gap, and a gas filling the housing and the gap, the gas being selected to breakdown and switch from a highly insulative state to a highly conductive state upon application of a high voltage across the blade and plate electrodes, the improvement is described comprising: forming the blade with laterally extending transverse wing portions at the edge of the blade and adjacent the gap so as to extend in spaced parallel relation to the surface of the plate, the blade generally following the contour thereof to form an inverted T-shape structure with the wing portions extending transversely of the elongate dimension of the blade. The wing portions terminating in a pair of spaced parallel edges extending along the elongate direction of the blade to thereby create two spaced elongate edges along which arcs form serving to divide the erosion effects of discharge between them, the current through each edge being one-half of that in single-edge devices with ablation wear reduced accordingly to give significantly larger switch lifetime. The blade and wing portions limiting ablation erosion of the edges in a direction generally align with the plate contour so that the edge-to-plate separation remains substantially constant.

  10. Pinhole shifting lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramshesh, Venkat K; Lemasters, John J

    2008-01-01

    Lifetime imaging microscopy is a powerful tool to probe biological phenomena independent of luminescence intensity and fluorophore concentration. We describe time-resolved imaging of long-lifetime luminescence with an unmodified commercial laser scanning confocal/multiphoton microscope. The principle of the measurement is displacement of the detection pinhole to collect delayed luminescence from a position lagging the rasting laser beam. As proof of principle, luminescence from microspheres containing europium (Eu(3+)), a red emitting probe, was compared to that of short-lifetime green-fluorescing microspheres and/or fluorescein and rhodamine in solution. Using 720-nm two-photon excitation and a pinhole diameter of 1 Airy unit, the short-lifetime fluorescence of fluorescein, rhodamine and green microspheres disappeared much more rapidly than the long-lifetime phosphorescence of Eu(3+) microspheres as the pinhole was repositioned in the lagging direction. In contrast, repositioning of the pinhole in the leading and orthogonal directions caused equal loss of short- and long-lifetime luminescence. From measurements at different lag pinhole positions, a lifetime of 270 micros was estimated for the Eu(3+) microspheres, consistent with independent measurements. This simple adaptation is the basis for quantitative 3-D lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:19123648

  11. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  12. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  13. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGES

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  14. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  15. Absorbed dose water calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Domen, S.R.

    1982-01-26

    An absorbed dose water calorimeter that takes advantage of the low thermal diffusivity of water and the water-imperviousness of polyethylene film. An ultra-small bead thermistor is sandwiched between two thin polyethylene films stretched between insulative supports in a water bath. The polyethylene films insulate the thermistor and its leads, the leads being run out from between the films in insulated sleeving and then to junctions to form a wheatstone bridge circuit. Convection barriers may be provided to reduce the effects of convection from the point of measurement. Controlled heating of different levels in the water bath is accomplished by electrical heater circuits provided for controlling temperature drift and providing adiabatic operation of the calorimeter. The absorbed dose is determined from the known specific heat of water and the measured temperature change.

  16. Tunable microwave metamaterial absorbers using varactor-loaded split loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinfeng; Li, Delong; Yan, Shuang; Cai, Yijun; Huo Liu, Qing; Lin, Timothy

    2015-12-01

    Currently, implementation of active circuit elements within metamaterials is an effective way to make them electrically tunable. We combine varactors with split copper loops in a metamaterial absorber in order to obtain an electrically tunable microwave response. This absorber has a compact planar structure and a simplified back feeding network. Flexible frequency tunability of the microwave reflection in the range of 5-6 GHz is experimentally achieved. The design, simulation, and experimental results are systematically presented. The proposed method is scalable for developing active metamaterial absorbers based on metal loops, and shows a promising potential of active metamaterial absorbers for extensive microwave applications.

  17. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  18. Radiative lifetimes in Co I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitz, D. E.; Bergeson, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    1995-03-01

    New radiative-lifetime measurements based on time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence are reported for 133 odd-parity and 2 even-parity levels of Co I, ranging in energy from 28300 to 59400 cm-1. Our lifetimes agree with earlier, but much less extensive, lifetime measurements based on laser-induced fluorescence. Satisfactory agreement is also found with the critical compilation of atomic transition probabilities from the U.S. National Bureau of Standards [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 17, Suppl 4 (1988)]. Our measurements provide a reliable absolute normalization for a much more comprehensive determination of Co I atomic transition probabilities.

  19. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  20. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  1. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  2. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  3. On sunspot and starspot lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S. J.; Hartigan, P. E-mail: hartigan@sparky.rice.edu

    2014-11-01

    We consider the lifetimes of spots on the Sun and other stars from the standpoint of magnetic diffusion. While normal magnetic diffusivity predicts lifetimes of sunspots that are too large by at least two orders of magnitude, turbulent magnetic diffusivity accounts for both the functional form of the solar empirical spot-lifetime relation and for the observed sunspot lifetimes, provided that the relevant diffusion length is the supergranule size. Applying this relation to other stars, the value of turbulent diffusivity depends almost entirely on supergranule size, with very weak dependence on other variables such as magnetic field strength and density. Overall, the best observational data for other stars is consistent with the extension of the solar relation, provided that stellar supergranule sizes for some stars are significantly larger than they are on the Sun.

  4. High energy beam lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Hartley, J.; Cowan, T.E.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a positron lifetime defect analysis capability based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational with a 60 mCi {sup 22}Na source providing a current of 7 10{sup 5} positrons per second. Lifetime data are derived from a thin plastic transmission detector providing an implantation time and a BaF{sub 2} detector to determine the annihilation time. Positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick sample specimens at counting rates in excess of 2000 per second. The instrument is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for in situ measurements.

  5. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  6. Index grating lifetime in photorefractive GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Partovi, Afshin

    1988-01-01

    The index grating lifetime in liquid encapsulated Czochralski-grown undoped semi-insulating GaAs was measured using a beam coupling technique. The largest lifetime measure was about 8 s under a read beam intensity of 0.7 mW/sq cm with the grating periodicity being 0.63 microns. The measured value decreases to milliseconds as the read beam intensity and the grating periodicity increase to about 10 mW/sq cm and 4 microns, respectively. This range of grating lifetime in this material is adequate for its use in real-time spatial light modulators, reconfigurable beam steering devices, and dynamic memory elements, for optical computing. In addition, the results suggest that the lifetime is sensitive to residual imperfections in the crystal.

  7. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1960-09-13

    A novel composite neutronic reactor control element is offered. The element comprises a multiplicity of sections arranged in end-to-end relationship, each of the sections having a markedly different neutron-reactive characteristic. For example, a three-section control element could contain absorber, moderator, and fuel sections. By moving such an element longitudinally through a reactor core, reactivity is decreased by the absorber, increased slightly by the moderator, or increased substantially by the fuel. Thus, control over a wide reactivity range is provided.

  9. Advanced Models and Controls for Prediction and Extension of Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-01

    Predictive models of capacity and power fade must consider a multiplicity of degradation modes experienced by Li-ion batteries in the automotive environment. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must presently be absorbed by overdesign and excess warranty costs. To reduce these costs and extend life, degradation models are under development that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. The lifetime models provide engineering feedback for cell, pack and system designs and are being incorporated into real-time control strategies.

  10. Dual broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ju; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-02-23

    We propose polarization-independent and dual-broadband metamaterial absorbers at microwave frequencies. This is a periodic meta-atom array consisting of metal-dielectric-multilayer truncated cones. We demonstrate not only one broadband absorption from the fundamental magnetic resonances but additional broadband absorption in high-frequency range using the third-harmonic resonance, by both simulation and experiment. In simulation, the absorption was over 90% in 3.93-6.05 GHz, and 11.64-14.55 GHz. The corresponding experimental absorption bands over 90% were 3.88-6.08 GHz, 9.95-10.46 GHz and 11.86-13.84 GHz, respectively. The origin of absorption bands was elucidated. Furthermore, it is independent of polarization angle owing to the multilayered circular structures. The design is scalable to smaller size for the infrared and the visible ranges.

  11. System size expansion for systems with an absorbing state.

    PubMed

    Di Patti, Francesca; Azaele, Sandro; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos

    2011-01-01

    The well-known van Kampen system size expansion, while of rather general applicability, is shown to fail to reproduce some qualitative features of the time evolution for systems with an absorbing state, apart from a transient initial time interval. We generalize the van Kampen ansatz by introducing a new prescription leading to non-Gaussian fluctuations around the absorbing state. The two expansion predictions are explicitly compared for the infinite range voter model with speciation as a paradigmatic model with an absorbing state. The new expansion, both for a finite size system in the large time limit and at finite time in the large size limit, converges to the exact solution as obtained in a numerical implementation using the Gillespie algorithm. Furthermore, the predicted lifetime distribution is shown to have the correct asymptotic behavior. PMID:21405654

  12. System size expansion for systems with an absorbing state.

    PubMed

    Di Patti, Francesca; Azaele, Sandro; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos

    2011-01-01

    The well-known van Kampen system size expansion, while of rather general applicability, is shown to fail to reproduce some qualitative features of the time evolution for systems with an absorbing state, apart from a transient initial time interval. We generalize the van Kampen ansatz by introducing a new prescription leading to non-Gaussian fluctuations around the absorbing state. The two expansion predictions are explicitly compared for the infinite range voter model with speciation as a paradigmatic model with an absorbing state. The new expansion, both for a finite size system in the large time limit and at finite time in the large size limit, converges to the exact solution as obtained in a numerical implementation using the Gillespie algorithm. Furthermore, the predicted lifetime distribution is shown to have the correct asymptotic behavior.

  13. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Madsen, Mette; Uldall, Peter

    2009-08-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs. The population analysed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analysed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about 860,000 euro for men and about 800,000 euro for women. The largest component was social care costs, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP. PMID:19416329

  14. Lifetimes of lunar satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kurt W.; Buglia, James J.; Desai, Prasun N.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative has generated a renewed interest in lunar mission planning. The lunar missions currently under study, unlike the Apollo missions, involve long stay times. Several lunar gravity models have been formulated, but mission planners do not have enough confidence in the proposed models to conduct detailed studies of missions with long stay times. In this report, a particular lunar gravitational model, the Ferrari 5 x 5 model, was chosen to determine the lifetimes for 100-km and 300-km perilune altitude, near-circular parking orbits. The need to analyze orbital lifetimes for a large number of initial orbital parameters was the motivation for the formulation of a simplified gravitational model from the original model. Using this model, orbital lifetimes were found to be heavily dependent on the initial conditions of the nearly circular orbits, particularly the initial inclination and argument of perilune. This selected model yielded lifetime predictions of less than 40 days for some orbits, and other orbits had lifetimes exceeding a year. Although inconsistencies and limitations are inherent in all existing lunar gravity models, primarily because of a lack of information about the far side of the moon, the methods presented in this analysis are suitable for incorporating the moon's nonspherical gravitational effects on the preliminary design level for future lunar mission planning.

  15. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrated phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, Tayebeh; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out to compute, at human-body temperature, the vibrational modes and lifetimes of pure and hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids. The projected atomic vibrations calculated from the spectral energy density are used to compute the vibrational modes and the lifetimes. All the normal modes of the pure and hydrated DPPC and their frequencies are identified. The computed lifetimes incorporate the full anharmonicity of the atomic interactions. The vibrational modes of the water molecules close to the head group of DPPC are active (possess large projected spectrum amplitudes) in the frequency range 0.5-55 THz, with a peak at 2.80 THz in the energy spectrum. The computed lifetimes for the high-frequency modes agree well with the recent data measured at room temperature where high-order phonon scattering is not negligible. The computed lifetimes of the low-frequency modes can be tested using the current experimental capabilities. Moreover, the approach may be applied to other lipids and biomolecules, in order to predict their vibrational dispersion relations, and to study the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer.

  16. Phytoplankton-Fluorescence-Lifetime Vertical Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.; Guignon, Ernest F.; St. Louis, Ernest

    2004-01-01

    A battery-operated optoelectronic instrument is designed to be lowered into the ocean to measure the intensity and lifetime of fluorescence of chlorophyll A in marine phytoplankton as a function of depth from 0 to 300 m. Fluorescence lifetimes are especially useful as robust measures of photosynthetic productivity of phytoplankton and of physical and chemical mechanisms that affect photosynthesis. The knowledge of photosynthesis in phytoplankton gained by use of this and related instruments is expected to contribute to understanding of global processes that control the time-varying fluxes of carbon and associated biogenic elements in the ocean. The concentration of chlorophyll in the ocean presents a major detection challenge because in order to obtain accurate values of photosynthetic parameters, the intensity of light used to excite fluorescence must be kept very low so as not to disturb the photosynthetic system. Several innovations in fluorometric instrumentation were made in order to make it possible to reach the required low detection limit. These innovations include a highly efficient optical assembly with an integrated flow-through sample interface, and a high-gain, low-noise electronic detection subsystem. The instrument also incorporates means for self-calibration during operation, and electronic hardware and software for control, acquisition and analysis of data, and communications. The electronic circuitry is highly miniaturized and designed to minimize power demand. The instrument is housed in a package that can withstand the water pressure at the maximum depth of 300 m. A light-emitting diode excites fluorescence in the sample flow cell, which is placed at one focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector. A photomultiplier tube is placed at the other focal point. This optical arrangement enables highly efficient collection of fluorescence emitted over all polar directions. Fluorescence lifetime is measured indirectly, by use of a technique based on the

  17. Integrated tuned vibration absorbers: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, Paolo; Zilletti, Michele

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a simulation study on two integrated tuned vibration absorbers (TVAs) designed to control the global flexural vibration of lightly damped thin structures subject to broad frequency band disturbances. The first one consists of a single axial switching TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on variable axial spring and damper elements so that the characteristic damping and natural frequency of the absorber can be switched iteratively to control the resonant response of three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The second one consists of a single three-axes TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on axial and rotational springs and dampers, which are arranged in such a way that the suspended mass is characterized by uncoupled heave and pitch-rolling vibrations. In this case the three damping and natural frequency parameters of the absorber are tuned separately to control three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The simulation study shows that the proposed single-unit absorbers produce, respectively, 5.3 and 8.7 dB reductions of the global flexural vibration of a rectangular plate between 20 and 120 Hz.

  18. Lifetime measurements in 180Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. M.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Li, C. B.; Gao, Z. C.; Li, G. S.; Chen, F. Q.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, S. P.; Zhong, J.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, H. W.; Luo, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Lifetimes of the yrast states in 180Pt have been measured from 4+ to 8+ using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. These states were populated by the reaction 156Gd(28Si,4 n )180Pt at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The differential decay curve method was applied to determine the lifetimes from experimental coincidence data. The B (E 2 ) values extracted from lifetimes increase with increasing spin, implying rotor behavior, but do not show the typical shape coexistence where the B (E 2 ) values present a rapid increase at very low spins. Calculations based on the triaxial projected shell model were performed for the yrast states in 180Pt and the results of both energies and E 2 transition probabilities reproduce the experimental data very well. The result also shows that a better description of the yrast band in 180Pt requires consideration of the γ degree of freedom.

  19. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  20. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  1. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  2. How shorter black carbon lifetime alters its climate effect.

    PubMed

    Hodnebrog, Øivind; Myhre, Gunnar; Samset, Bjørn H

    2014-01-01

    Black carbon (BC), unlike most aerosol types, absorbs solar radiation. However, the quantification of its climate impact is uncertain and presently under debate. Recently, attention has been drawn both to a likely underestimation of global BC emissions in climate models, and an overestimation of BC at high altitudes. Here we show that doubling present day BC emissions in a model simulation, while reducing BC lifetime based on observational evidence, leaves the direct aerosol effect of BC virtually unchanged. Increased emissions, together with increased wet removal that reduces the lifetime, yields modelled BC vertical profiles that are in strongly improved agreement with recent aircraft observations. Furthermore, we explore the consequences of an altered BC profile in a global circulation model, and show that both the vertical profile of BC and rapid climate adjustments need to be taken into account in order to assess the total climate impact of BC. PMID:25255429

  3. How shorter black carbon lifetime alters its climate effect.

    PubMed

    Hodnebrog, Øivind; Myhre, Gunnar; Samset, Bjørn H

    2014-09-25

    Black carbon (BC), unlike most aerosol types, absorbs solar radiation. However, the quantification of its climate impact is uncertain and presently under debate. Recently, attention has been drawn both to a likely underestimation of global BC emissions in climate models, and an overestimation of BC at high altitudes. Here we show that doubling present day BC emissions in a model simulation, while reducing BC lifetime based on observational evidence, leaves the direct aerosol effect of BC virtually unchanged. Increased emissions, together with increased wet removal that reduces the lifetime, yields modelled BC vertical profiles that are in strongly improved agreement with recent aircraft observations. Furthermore, we explore the consequences of an altered BC profile in a global circulation model, and show that both the vertical profile of BC and rapid climate adjustments need to be taken into account in order to assess the total climate impact of BC.

  4. Plants absorb heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, J.

    1995-02-01

    Decontamination of heavy metals-polluted soils remains one of the most intractable problems of cleanup technology. Currently available techniques include extraction of the metals by physical and chemical means, such as acid leaching and electroosmosis, or immobilization by vitrification. There are presently no techniques for cleanup which are low cost and retain soil fertility after metals removal. But a solution to the problem could be on the horizon. A small but growing number of plants native to metalliferous soils are known to be capable of accumulating extremely high concentrations of metals in their aboveground portions. These hyperaccumulators, as they are called, contain up to 1,000 times larger metal concentrations in their aboveground parts than normal species. Their distribution is global, including many different families of flowering plants of varying growth forms, from herbaceous plants to trees. Hyperaccumulators absorb metals they do not need for their own nutrition. The metals are accumulated in the leaf and stem vacuoles, and to a lesser extent in the roots.

  5. Flexible subterahertz metamaterial absorber fabrication using inkjet printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongju; Sung, Hyuk-Kee; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a flexible metamaterial (MM) absorber was designed at 0.1 THz and fabricated using inkjet printing technology. The unit cell of the MM absorber was designed using a finite element method-based full-wave simulation. The unit cell comprised square rings, and it was printed with silver nanoparticle ink on flexible Kapton polyimide film. The fabrication processes were performed using a material printer. The absorber's reflection coefficient was measured using a vector network analyzer and a WR-10 waveguide. The absorption ratio was 93.5 % at 0.102 THz. Therefore, we demonstrated the possibility of inkjet printing at a subterahertz band.

  6. Encouraging the Lifetime Reading Habit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanacore, Joseph

    Educators must accept the challenge of encouraging the lifetime reading habit in school. Students who are surrounded with books, newspapers, magazines, and other materials will be tempted to browse and to read from these sources. When selecting materials for the classroom, educators should work closely with the library media specialist who is…

  7. The Work of a Lifetime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2012-01-01

    If there's one message that Joan Hillsman wants to get across to music directors, it's this: Teaching is a lifetime commitment. Hillsman is a longtime music educator, African-American music historian, author, consultant, music producer, clinician, radio show host, and current member of the Academic Board of the James Cleveland Gospel Music…

  8. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  9. Hydraulic shock absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a hydraulic shock absorber including a piston reciprocating in a cylinder, a piston upper chamber and a piston lower chamber which are oil-tightly separated by the piston, piston ports formed through the piston in a circle for communicating the piston upper chamber with the piston lower chamber, and return ports formed outside of the piston ports in a circle for communicating the piston upper chamber with the piston lower chamber. It also includes a sheet ring-like non-return valve provided above the piston and fitted to a piston rod, valve holes formed through the non-return valve in opposed relation with the piston ports. A ring-like non-return valve stopper fixed to the piston rod on an upper side of the non-return valve with a small spaced defined between the non-return valve and the non-return valve stopper, and a spring is interposed between the non-return valve and the non-return valve stopper for normally urging the non-return valve to an upper surface of the piston. Movement of the piston to the piston upper chamber allows oil to flow from the piston upper chamber through the piston ports to the piston lower chamber, while the return ports are closed by the non-return valve to generate a vibration damping force by resistance upon pass of the oil through the piston parts. The improvement described here comprises a groove formed in an upper surface of the piston facing the non-return valve and aligned with the valve holes, the groove being in the circle where the piston ports lie and being in communication with the piston ports.

  10. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  11. The broadband dynamic vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. B.; Nissen, J.-C.

    1982-08-01

    The limited effectiveness of the linear passive dynamic vibration absorber is described. This is followed by an analysis producing the response of a primary system when a non-linear softening Belleville spring is used in the absorber. It is shown that the suppression bandwidth can be doubled by this means.

  12. A novel broadband waterborne acoustic absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changxian; Wen, Weibin; Huang, Yixing; Chen, Mingji; Lei, Hongshuai; Fang, Daining

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we extended the ray tracing theory in polar coordinate system, and originally proposed the Snell-Descartes law in polar coordinates. Based on these theories, a novel broadband waterborne acoustic absorber device was proposed. This device is designed with gradient-distributing materials along radius, which makes the incidence acoustic wave ray warps. The echo reduction effects of this device were investigated by finite element analysis, and the numerical results show that the reflectivity of acoustic wave for the new device is lower than that of homogenous and Alberich layers in almost all frequency 0-30 kHz at the same loss factor.

  13. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  14. High-Efficiency Absorber for Damping the Transverse Wake Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Weathersby, S.; /SLAC

    2007-02-28

    Transverse wake fields generated by intense beams may propagate long distances in the vacuum chamber and dissipate power in different shielded elements such as bellows, vacuum valves or vacuum pumps. Induced heating in these elements may be high enough to deteriorate vacuum conditions. We have developed a broadband water-cooled bellows-absorber to capture and damp these harmful transverse fields without impacting the longitudinal beam impedance. Experimental results at the PEP-II SLAC B-factory demonstrate high efficiency of this device. This absorber may be useful in other machines like synchrotron light sources or International Linear Collider.

  15. High-efficiency absorber for damping transverse wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Weathersby, S.

    2007-04-01

    Transverse wakefields generated by intense beams may propagate long distances in a vacuum chamber and dissipate power in different shielded elements such as bellows, vacuum valves, or vacuum pumps. Induced heating in these elements may be high enough to deteriorate vacuum conditions. We have developed a broadband water-cooled bellows absorber to capture and damp these harmful transverse fields without impacting the longitudinal beam impedance. Experimental results at the PEP-II SLAC B-factory demonstrate a high efficiency for this device. This absorber may be useful in super B-factories, the International Linear Collider, the Large Hadron Collider, or synchrotron light sources.

  16. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  17. Influences on lifetime of wire ropes in traction lifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, W.

    2016-05-01

    Traction lifts are complex systems with rotating and translating moving masses, springs and dampers and several system inputs from the lifts and the users. The wire ropes are essential mechanical elements. The mechanical properties of the ropes in use depend on the rope construction, the load situation, nonlinearities and the lift dimensions. The mechanical properties are important for the proper use in lifts and the ride quality. But first of all the wire ropes (for all other suspension means as well) have to satisfy the safety relevant requirements sufficient lifetime, reliable determination of discard and sufficient and limited traction capacity. The lifetime of the wire ropes better the number of trips until rope discard depends on a lot of parameters of the rope and the rope application eg use of plastic deflection sheaves and reverse bending layouts. New challenges for rope lifetime are resulting from the more or less open D/d-ratio limits possible by certificates concerning the examination of conformity by notified bodies. This paper will highlight the basics of wire rope technology, the endurance and lifetime of wire ropes running over sheaves, and the different influences from the ropes and more and more important from the lift application parameters. Very often underestimated are the influences of transport, storage, installation and maintenance. With this background we will lead over to the calculation methods of wire rope lifetime considering the actual findings of wire rope endurance research. We'll show in this paper new and innovative facts as the influence of rope length and size factor in the lifetime formular, the reduction of lifetime caused by traction grooves, the new model for the calculation in reverse bending operations and the statistically firmed possibilities for machine roomless lifts (MRL) under very small bending conditions.

  18. Exploring Lifetime Effects in Femtoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D; Soltz, R; Newby, J; Kisiel, A

    2005-09-06

    We investigate the role of lifetime effects from resonances and emission duration tails in femtoscopy at RHIC in two Blast-Wave models. We find the non-Gaussian components compare well with published source imaged data, but the value of R{sub out} obtained from Gaussian fits is not insensitive to the non-Gaussian contributions when realistic acceptance cuts are applied to models.

  19. Lifetime of MCP-PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    The hadron identification in the PANDA experiment at FAIR will be done with DIRC detectors. Because of design and space reasons the sensors of the DIRCs have to be placed inside the strong magnetic field of the solenoid. As the favored photon sensors microchannel-plate photomultipliers (MCP-PMTs) were identified. However, these devices showed serious aging problems until very recently, which manifest themselves by a fast degrading quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode (PC). This is mainly due to feedback ions from the residual gas. In this paper we discuss the recently accomplished huge improvements in the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. With innovative countermeasures applied to the MCP-PMTs in the attempt to reduce the aging effects the manufacturers were able to increase the lifetime of MCP-PMT prototypes by almost two orders of magnitude compared to the former commercially available devices. Our group has studied the aging of MCP-PMTs for more than four years by simultaneously illuminating different types of lifetime-enhanced MCP-PMTs at the same photon rate. Gain, dark count rate, and QE as a function of the wavelength and the PC surface were measured in regular time intervals and studied in dependence of the integrated anode charge. We observe that MCP-PMTs treated with an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique are by far the best devices available now. A lifetime of up to 10 C/cm2 integrated anode charge was reached with these sensors. This is sufficient for both PANDA DIRCs.

  20. Stratospheric lifetime ratio of CFC-11 and CFC-12 from satellite and model climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Hoppe, C. M.; Müller, R.; Dutton, G. S.; Gille, J. C.; Griessbach, S.; Jones, A.; Meyer, C. I.; Spang, R.; Volk, C. M.; Walker, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone loss and are strong infrared absorbers that contribute to global warming. The stratospheric lifetimes of CFCs are a measure of their stratospheric loss rates that are needed to determine global warming and ozone depletion potentials. We applied the tracer-tracer correlation approach to zonal mean climatologies from satellite measurements and model data to assess the lifetimes of CFCl3 (CFC-11) and CF2Cl2 (CFC-12). We present estimates of the CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of CFC-12, based on a reference lifetime of 52 years for CFC-11. We analyzed climatologies from three satellite missions, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). We found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.47±0.08 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 112(96-133) years for ACE-FTS, a ratio of 0.46±0.07 and a lifetime of 113(97-134) years for HIRDLS, and a ratio of 0.46±0.08 and a lifetime of 114(98-136) years for MIPAS. The error-weighted, combined CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio is 0.46±0.04 and the CFC-12 lifetime estimate is 113(103-124) years. These results agree with the recent Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) reassessment, which recommends lifetimes of 52(43-67) years and 102(88-122) years, respectively. Having smaller uncertainties than the results from other recent studies, our estimates can help to better constrain CFC-11 and CFC-12 lifetime recommendations in future scientific studies and assessments. Furthermore, the satellite observations were used to validate first simulation results from a new coupled model system, which integrates a Lagrangian chemistry transport model into a climate model. For the coupled model we found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.48±0.07 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 110(95-129) years

  1. Stratospheric lifetime ratio of CFC-11 and CFC-12 from satellite and model climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Hoppe, C. M.; Müller, R.; Dutton, G. S.; Gille, J. C.; Griessbach, S.; Jones, A.; Meyer, C. I.; Spang, R.; Volk, C. M.; Walker, K. A.

    2014-06-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone loss and are strong infrared absorbers that contribute to global warming. The stratospheric lifetimes of CFCs are a measure of their global loss rates that are needed to determine global warming and ozone depletion potentials. We applied the tracer-tracer correlation approach to zonal mean climatologies from satellite measurements and model data to assess the lifetimes of CFCl3 (CFC-11) and CF2Cl2 (CFC-12). We present estimates of the CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of CFC-12, based on a reference lifetime of 52 yr for CFC-11. We analyzed climatologies from three satellite missions, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). We found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.47±0.08 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 111(96-132) yr for ACE-FTS, a ratio of 0.46±0.07 and a lifetime of 112(97-133) yr for HIRDLS, and a ratio of 0.46±0.08 and a lifetime of 112(96-135) yr for MIPAS. The error-weighted, combined CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio is 0.47±0.04 and the CFC-12 lifetime estimate is 112(102-123) yr. These results agree with the recent Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) reassessment, which recommends lifetimes of 52(43-67) yr and 102(88-122) yr, respectively. Having smaller uncertainties than the results from other recent studies, our estimates can help to better constrain CFC-11 and CFC-12 lifetime recommendations in future scientific studies and assessments. Furthermore, the satellite observations were used to validate first simulation results from a new coupled model system, which integrates a Lagrangian chemistry transport model into a climate model. For the coupled model we found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.48±0.07 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 110(95-129) yr, based on a ten-year perpetual

  2. Self-Regulating Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical shock absorber keeps frictional damping force within tolerable limit. Its damping force does not increase with coefficient of friction between energy-absorbing components; rather, frictional damping force varies only slightly. Relatively insensitive to manufacturing variations and environmental conditions altering friction. Does not exhibit high breakaway friction and consequent sharp increase followed by sharp decrease in damping force at beginning of stroking. Damping force in absorber does not vary appreciably with speed of stroking. In addition, not vulnerable to leakage of hydraulic fluid.

  3. RADIATIVE LIFETIMES OF V I AND V II

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Wood, M. P. E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu

    2014-11-01

    New radiative lifetimes are reported for 168 levels of V I ranging in energy from 18086 cm{sup –1} to 47702 cm{sup –1}, and for 31 levels of V II ranging in energy from 34593 cm{sup –1} to 47420 cm{sup –1}. These lifetimes are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic/ionic beam as part of an ongoing study of the radiative properties of the iron group elements. All but two of the V II lifetimes have been measured before using modern laser-based methods, but a large fraction of the V I lifetimes are reported here for the first time. Comparison to earlier measurements is discussed. These new lifetimes are, for the most part, accurate to ±5%. They will be combined with branching fraction measurements to produce a large set of transition probabilities for V I and V II which are needed by the astrophysics community for stellar abundance determinations.

  4. Indications of short minority-carrier lifetime in kesterite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repins, I. L.; Moutinho, H.; Choi, S. G.; Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Dippo, P.; Beall, C. L.; Carapella, J.; DeHart, C.; Huang, B.; Wei, S. H.

    2013-08-01

    Solar cells based on kesterite absorbers consistently show lower voltages than those based on chalcopyrites with the same bandgap. We use three different experimental methods and associated data analysis to determine minority-carrier lifetime in a 9.4%-efficient Cu2ZnSnSe4 device. The methods are cross-sectional electron-beam induced current, quantum efficiency, and time-resolved photoluminescence. These methods independently indicate minority-carrier lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. A comparison of current-voltage measurements and device modeling suggests that these short minority-carrier lifetimes cause a significant limitation on the voltage produced by the device. The comparison also implies that low minority-carrier lifetime alone does not account for all voltage loss in these devices.

  5. Minority carrier lifetime in indium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Weinberg, Irving; Kneisel, Keith

    1991-01-01

    Transient photoluminescence is used to measure the minority carrier lifetime on n-type and p-type InP wafers. The measurements show that unprocessed InP wafers have very high minority carrier lifetimes. Lifetimes of 200 ns and 700 ns were observed for lightly-doped p- and n-type material respectively. Lifetimes over 5 ns were found in heavily doped n-type material.

  6. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  7. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  8. A circuit method to integrate metamaterial and graphene in absorber design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuojia; Zhou, Min; Lin, Xiao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Huaping; Yu, Faxin; Lin, Shisheng; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2014-10-01

    We theoretically investigate a circuit analog approach to integrate graphene and metamaterial in electromagnetic wave absorber design. In multilayer graphene-metamaterial (GM) absorbers, ultrathin metamaterial elements are theoretically modeled as equivalent loads which attached to the junctions between two transmission lines. Combining with the benefits of tunable chemical potential in graphene, an optimized GM absorber is proposed as a proof of the circuit method. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the circuit analytical model. The operating frequency of the GM absorber can be varied in terahertz frequency, indicating the potential applications of the GM absorber in sensors, modulators, and filters.

  9. Photoluminescence-based quality control for thin film absorber layers of photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Repins, Ingrid L.; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2015-07-07

    A time-resolved photoluminescence-based system providing quality control during manufacture of thin film absorber layers for photovoltaic devices. The system includes a laser generating excitation beams and an optical fiber with an end used both for directing each excitation beam onto a thin film absorber layer and for collecting photoluminescence from the absorber layer. The system includes a processor determining a quality control parameter such as minority carrier lifetime of the thin film absorber layer based on the collected photoluminescence. In some implementations, the laser is a low power, pulsed diode laser having photon energy at least great enough to excite electron hole pairs in the thin film absorber layer. The scattered light may be filterable from the collected photoluminescence, and the system may include a dichroic beam splitter and a filter that transmit the photoluminescence and remove scattered laser light prior to delivery to a photodetector and a digital oscilloscope.

  10. Principles and applications of fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranová, Lenka; Humpolícková, Jana; Hof, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Two fluorescence spectroscopy concepts, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) are employed in fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) - a relatively new technique with several experimental benefits. In FLCS experiments, pulsed excitation is used and data are stored in a special time-tagged time-resolved mode. Mathematical treatment of TCSPC decay patterns of distinct fluorophores and their mixture enables to calculate autocorrelation functions of each of the fluorophores and thus their diffusion properties and concentrations can be determined separately. Moreover, crosscorrelation of the two signals can be performed and information on interaction of the species can be obtained. This technique is particularly helpful for distinguishing different states of the same fluorophore in different microenvironments. The first application of that concept represents the simultaneous determination of two-dimensional diffusion in planar lipid layers and three-dimensional vesicle diffusion in bulk above the lipid layers. The lifetime in both investigated systems differed because the lifetime of the dye is considerably quenched in the layer near the light-absorbing surface. This concept was also used in other applications: a) investigation of a conformational change of a labeled protein, b) detection of small amounts of labeled oligonucleotides bound to metal particles or c) elucidation of the compaction mechanism of different sized labeled DNA molecules. Moreover, it was demonstrated that FLCS can help to overcome some FCS experimental drawbacks.

  11. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-09-01

    Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must be absorbed by overdesign and warranty costs. Degradation models are needed that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. Models should also provide engineering feedback for next generation battery designs. This presentation reviews both multi-dimensional physical models and simpler, lumped surrogate models of battery electrochemical and mechanical degradation. Models are compared with cell- and pack-level aging data from commercial Li-ion chemistries. The analysis elucidates the relative importance of electrochemical and mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms in real-world operating environments. Opportunities for extending the lifetime of commercial battery systems are explored.

  12. Minority carrier lifetimes in very long-wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Kim, Jin K.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, significantly improved carrier lifetimes in very-long wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattice(SL) absorbers are demonstrated by using time-resolved microwave reflectance (TMR) measurements. A nominal 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb SLstructure that produces an approximately 25 μm response at 10 K has a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at 18 K, which is markedly long for SL absorber with such a narrow bandgap. This improvement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design. Such SL employs a shorter period with reduced gallium in order to achieve good optical absorption and epitaxial advantages, which ultimately leads to the improvements in themore » minority carrier lifetime by reducing Shockley–Read–Hall (SRH) defects. By analyzing the temperature-dependence of TMR decay data, the recombination mechanisms and trap states that currently limit the performance of this SL absorber have been identified. The results show a general decrease in the long-decay lifetime component, which is dominated by the SRH recombination at temperature below ~30 K, and by Auger recombination at temperatures above ~45 K.« less

  13. Minority carrier lifetimes in very long-wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Kim, Jin K.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, significantly improved carrier lifetimes in very-long wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattice(SL) absorbers are demonstrated by using time-resolved microwave reflectance (TMR) measurements. A nominal 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb SLstructure that produces an approximately 25 μm response at 10 K has a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at 18 K, which is markedly long for SL absorber with such a narrow bandgap. This improvement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design. Such SL employs a shorter period with reduced gallium in order to achieve good optical absorption and epitaxial advantages, which ultimately leads to the improvements in the minority carrier lifetime by reducing Shockley–Read–Hall (SRH) defects. By analyzing the temperature-dependence of TMR decay data, the recombination mechanisms and trap states that currently limit the performance of this SL absorber have been identified. The results show a general decrease in the long-decay lifetime component, which is dominated by the SRH recombination at temperature below ~30 K, and by Auger recombination at temperatures above ~45 K.

  14. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters are powerful tools to analyze cell signaling and function at single cell resolution in standard two-dimensional cell cultures, but these reporters rarely have been applied to three-dimensional environments. FRET interactions between donor and acceptor molecules typically are determined by changes in relative fluorescence intensities, but wavelength-dependent differences in absorption of light complicate this analysis method in three-dimensional settings. Here we report fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with phasor analysis, a method that displays fluorescence lifetimes on a pixel-wise basis in real time, to quantify apoptosis in breast cancer cells stably expressing a genetically encoded FRET reporter. This microscopic imaging technology allowed us to identify treatment-induced apoptosis in single breast cancer cells in environments ranging from two-dimensional cell culture, spheroids with cancer and bone marrow stromal cells, and living mice with orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts. Using this imaging strategy, we showed that combined metabolic therapy targeting glycolysis and glutamine pathways significantly reduced overall breast cancer metabolism and induced apoptosis. We also determined that distinct subpopulations of bone marrow stromal cells control resistance of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy, suggesting heterogeneity of treatment responses of malignant cells in different bone marrow niches. Overall, this study establishes FLIM with phasor analysis as an imaging tool for apoptosis in cell-based assays and living mice, enabling real-time, cellular-level assessment of treatment efficacy and heterogeneity. PMID:26771007

  15. Simulation of GRETINA Lifetime Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littley, Cody; Iwasaki, Hironori; Lemasson, Antoine

    2011-10-01

    In order to understand properties of exotic atomic nuclei, the research group has developed a method to measure the rate of decay of excited states in certain unstable isotopes, for example 66Fe. By measuring the Doppler shift of gamma rays with a so-called plunger device it is possible to deduce with great accuracy the excited-state lifetime. This technique, which is called the Recoil Distance Doppler-shift Method, has precision on the order of one pico second. I will present the development a simulation software package which will help the research team to quantize and to analyze the data from experimental runs. This software is based upon existing software which was used for simulations of the SeGA project. It has been modified to support the GRETINA detector, which is used in the experimental setup for the lifetime measurements. The software makes use GEANT and ROOT toolkits, which are essential for the calculations of the interactions of particles with the detector and the recording of that data.

  16. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: HD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  17. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  18. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  19. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  20. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  1. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  2. Nonventing, Regenerable, Lightweight Heat Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, regenerable heat absorber (RHA), developed for rejecting metabolic heat from a space suit, may also be useful on Earth for short-term cooling of heavy protective garments. Unlike prior space-suit-cooling systems, a system that includes this RHA does not vent water. The closed system contains water reservoirs, tubes through which water is circulated to absorb heat, an evaporator, and an absorber/radiator. The radiator includes a solution of LiCl contained in a porous material in titanium tubes. The evaporator cools water that circulates through a liquid-cooled garment. Water vapor produced in the evaporator enters the radiator tubes where it is absorbed into the LiCl solution, releasing heat. Much of the heat of absorption is rejected to the environment via the radiator. After use, the RHA is regenerated by heating it to a temperature of 100 C for about 2 hours to drive the absorbed water back to the evaporator. A system including a prototype of the RHA was found to be capable of maintaining a temperature of 20 C while removing heat at a rate of 200 W for 6 hours.

  3. A method for measuring picosecond phenomena in photolabile species: the emission lifetime of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, M D; Marcus, M A; Lewis, A; Mahr, H; Frigo, N

    1976-01-01

    We have measured the emission lifetime of bacteriorhodopsin at physiological temperatures to be 15 +/- 3 ps using a technique which employs a mode-locked dye laser, a sum frequency light gate, and a continuous flow system. We observe no concentration dependence of the lifetime over the range of 1.1 X 10(-4) M to 1.0 X 10(-5) M. We conclude that the emission which we observe comes from bacteriorhodopsin and not one of its photochemically produced intermediates, and that the emission cannot originate from the state into which light is absorbed. PMID:990393

  4. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  5. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  6. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  7. B meson lifetimes at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.E.; CDF Collaboration

    1994-08-01

    Measurements of the B{sub u}, B{sub d}, and B{sub s} meson lifetime using semileptonic B{sub U} {yields} e{nu}D* X, B{sub s} {yields} l{nu}D{sub s}X events and exclusive B{sub u} {yields} {psi}({prime})K({sub s})(*)B{sub s} {yields} {psi}{phi} events are presented. These results used the precise position measurements of the CDF SVX silicon vertex detector and were obtained from a 19.3 pb{sup {minus}1} sample of 1.8 TeV {bar p}p collisions collected in 1992--93 at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Comparisons with previous measurements will be shown.

  8. Effect of the neutron lifetime on processes in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechkin, A. V.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Serebrov, A. P.; Bobashev, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the neutron lifetime on the abundance of light elements produced during the primordial nucleosynthesis early in the birth of the Universe is considered. Among light elements, namely, D, 3He, 4He, and 7Li, 4He proves to be most sensitive to neutron lifetime τ n . Astronomic data on the light element abundance also provide the best accuracy for 4He. The solution of a number of problems discussed in this paper requires improving the accuracy of observations for the 4He abundance and refining the value of τ n .

  9. Oil and fat absorbing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for forming a solid network polymer having a minimal amount of crosslinking for use in absorbing fats and oils. The polymer remains solid at a swelling ratio in oil or fat of at least ten and provides an oil absorption greater than 900 weight percent.

  10. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  11. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I.; Neubauer, A.; Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F.; Becker, W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  12. Parallel-Plate Acoustic Absorbers For Hot Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, Joseph; Parrot, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    Stacking patterns and materials chosen to suppress noise. Acoustic liners incorporating parallel-plate absorbing elements proposed for use in suppressing broadband aerodynamic noise originating in flows of hot gases in ducts. One potential application lies in suppressing noise generated in exhaust-jet mixer/ejectors in propulsion system of proposed High-Speed Civil Transport. In addition, such absorbers useful in any situation in which high temperature limits use of such conventional resonant acoustic-liner materials as perforated face sheets bonded to honey-comb-core panels.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  14. Systems and methods for circuit lifetime evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, Timothy L. (Inventor); Sheldon, Douglas J. (Inventor); Bowerman, Paul N. (Inventor); Everline, Chester J. (Inventor); Shalom, Eddy (Inventor); Rasmussen, Robert D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods for estimating the lifetime of an electrical system in accordance with embodiments of the invention are disclosed. One embodiment of the invention includes iteratively performing Worst Case Analysis (WCA) on a system design with respect to different system lifetimes using a computer to determine the lifetime at which the worst case performance of the system indicates the system will pass with zero margin or fail within a predetermined margin for error given the environment experienced by the system during its lifetime. In addition, performing WCA on a system with respect to a specific system lifetime includes identifying subcircuits within the system, performing Extreme Value Analysis (EVA) with respect to each subcircuit to determine whether the subcircuit fails EVA for the specific system lifetime, when the subcircuit passes EVA, determining that the subcircuit does not fail WCA for the specified system lifetime, when a subcircuit fails EVA performing at least one additional WCA process that provides a tighter bound on the WCA than EVA to determine whether the subcircuit fails WCA for the specified system lifetime, determining that the system passes WCA with respect to the specific system lifetime when all subcircuits pass WCA, and determining that the system fails WCA when at least one subcircuit fails WCA.

  15. Effects of Low Activity Solar Cycle on Orbital Debris Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Samual B.; Sutton, Eric K.; Lin, chin S.; Liou, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    Long duration of low solar activity in the last solar minimum has an undesirable consequence of extending the lifetime of orbital debris. The AFRL TacSat-2 satellite decommissioned in 2008 has finally re-entered into the atmosphere on February 5th after more than one year overdue. Concerning its demise we have monitored its orbital decay and monthly forecasted Tacsat-2 re-entry since September 2010 by using the Orbital Element Prediction (OEP) model developed by the AFRL Orbital Drag Environment program. The model combines estimates of future solar activity with neutral density models, drag coefficient models, and an orbit propagator to predict satellite lifetime. We run the OEP model with solar indices forecast by the NASA Marshall Solar Activity Future Estimation model, and neutral density forecast by the MSIS-00 neutral density model. Based on the two line elements in 2010 up to mid September, we estimated at a 50% confidence level TacSat-2's re-entry time to be in early February 2011, which turned out to be in good agreement with Tacsat-2's actual re-entry date. The potential space weather effects of the coming low activity solar cycle on satellite lifetime and orbital debris population are examined. The NASA long-term orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND, is used to quantify the effects of solar flux on the orbital debris population in the 200-600 km altitude environment. The results are discussed for developing satellite orbital drag application product.

  16. Measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D.E.

    1986-06-01

    This thesis reports a measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks. It is based on data taken with the DELCO detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV. The decays of hadrons containing bottom quarks are tagged in hadronic events by the presence of electrons with a large component of momentum transverse to the event axis. Such electrons are identified in the DELCO detector by an atmospheric pressure Cherenkov counter assisted by a lead/scintillator electromagnetic shower counter. The lifetime measured is 1.17 psec, consistent with previous measurements. This measurement, in conjunction with a limit on the non-charm branching ratio in b-decay obtained by other experiments, can be used to constrain the magnitude of the V/sub cb/ element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix to the range 0.042 (+0.005 or -0.004 (stat.), +0.004 or -0.002 (sys.)), where the errors reflect the uncertainty on tau/sub b/ only and not the uncertainties in the calculations which relate the b-lifetime and the element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix.

  17. Cosmology in Mr. Tompkins' Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mr. Tompkins, the hero of George Gamow's most famous book, was born in the first decade of the twentieth century and lived until its end. A bank clerk by day, Mr. Tompkins had wide-ranging interests, and his curiosity led him to popular scientific presentations, and these in turn brought him a long and happy marriage to Maud, the daughter of a professor of physics. His lifetime offers an appropriate framework for a meditation on the history of cosmology during the century in which cosmology became a scientific enterprise. As it happens, Mr. Tompkins' first exposure to cosmology, in which he observed both the expansion and contraction of an oscillating universe in 1939, happened during the long night of relativity, the generation in which relativity specialists became few and, like the galaxies, far between. This talk will consider the heyday of early relativistic cosmology from 1917 to 1935, the causes and consequences of the "long night" from 1935 until 1963, and the renaissance of cosmology, which, occurring as it did upon the retirement of Mr. Tompkins, afforded him great pleasure in his later years.

  18. Aspects of silicon bulk lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsberg, P. T.

    1985-01-01

    The best lifetimes attained for bulk crytalline silicon as a function of doping concentrations are analyzed. It is assumed that the dopants which set the Fermi level do not contribute to the recombination traffic which is due to the unknown defect. This defect is assumed to have two charge states: neutral and negative, the neutral defect concentration is frozen-in at some temperature T sub f. The higher doping concentrations should include the band-band Auger effect by using a generalization of the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism. The generalization of the SRH mechanism is discussed. This formulation gives a straightforward procedure for incorporating both band-band and band-trap Auger effects in the SRH procedure. Two related questions arise in this context: (1) it may sometimes be useful to write the steady-state occupation probability of the traps implied by SRH procedure in a form which approximates to the Fermi-Dirac distribution; and (2) the effect on the SRH mechanism of spreading N sub t levels at one energy uniformly over a range of energies is discussed.

  19. Thermal analysis of the crotch absorber in APS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Howell, J.

    1992-10-01

    A crotch absorber design for use in the Advanced Photon source (APS) has been proposed and analyzed. the absorber is placed downstream of sectors S2 and S4 in the curved storage ring chamber and will be subjected to a peak power of 120 W/mm{sup 2} per 100mA synchrotron radiation. A beryllium ring is brazed on the GlidCop cooling cylinder in order to diffuse the concentrated bending magnet heating. One concentric water channel and two annular return water channels are arranged in the GlidCop cylinder to enhance the cooling. A Bodner-Partom thermoviscoplastic constitutive equation and a modified Manson-Coffin fatigue relation are proposed to simulate the cyclic thermal loading, as well as to predict the thermal fatigue life of the crotch absorber. Results of temperature and stress using finite element computations are displayed and series of e-beam welder tests and microstructure measurements are reported.

  20. Thermal analysis of the crotch absorber in APS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Howell, J.

    1992-01-01

    A crotch absorber design for use in the Advanced Photon source (APS) has been proposed and analyzed. the absorber is placed downstream of sectors S2 and S4 in the curved storage ring chamber and will be subjected to a peak power of 120 W/mm{sup 2} per 100mA synchrotron radiation. A beryllium ring is brazed on the GlidCop cooling cylinder in order to diffuse the concentrated bending magnet heating. One concentric water channel and two annular return water channels are arranged in the GlidCop cylinder to enhance the cooling. A Bodner-Partom thermoviscoplastic constitutive equation and a modified Manson-Coffin fatigue relation are proposed to simulate the cyclic thermal loading, as well as to predict the thermal fatigue life of the crotch absorber. Results of temperature and stress using finite element computations are displayed and series of e-beam welder tests and microstructure measurements are reported.

  1. On estimating mean lifetimes by a weighted sum of lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosper, Harrison Bertrand

    1987-10-01

    Given N lifetime measurements an estimate of the mean lifetime can be obtained from a weighted sum of these measurements. We derive exact expressions for the probability density function, the moment-generating function, and the cumulative distribution function for the weighted sum. We indicate how these results might be used in the estimation of particle lifetimes. The probability distribution function of Yost for the distribution of lifetime measurements with finite measurement error is our starting point.

  2. Digital Alloy Absorber for Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the spectral response range and improve the mobility of the photo-generated carriers (e.g. in an nBn photodetector), a digital alloy absorber may be employed by embedding one (or fraction thereof) to several monolayers of a semiconductor material (insert layers) periodically into a different host semiconductor material of the absorber layer. The semiconductor material of the insert layer and the host semiconductor materials may have lattice constants that are substantially mismatched. For example, this may performed by periodically embedding monolayers of InSb into an InAsSb host as the absorption region to extend the cutoff wavelength of InAsSb photodetectors, such as InAsSb based nBn devices. The described technique allows for simultaneous control of alloy composition and net strain, which are both key parameters for the photodetector operation.

  3. Stochastic Analysis of Orbital Lifetimes of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasamoto, Washito; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses (1) a Monte-Carlo-based methodology for probabilistic prediction and analysis of orbital lifetimes of spacecraft and (2) Orbital Lifetime Monte Carlo (OLMC)--a Fortran computer program, consisting of a previously developed long-term orbit-propagator integrated with a Monte Carlo engine. OLMC enables modeling of variances of key physical parameters that affect orbital lifetimes through the use of probability distributions. These parameters include altitude, speed, and flight-path angle at insertion into orbit; solar flux; and launch delays. The products of OLMC are predicted lifetimes (durations above specified minimum altitudes) for the number of user-specified cases. Histograms generated from such predictions can be used to determine the probabilities that spacecraft will satisfy lifetime requirements. The document discusses uncertainties that affect modeling of orbital lifetimes. Issues of repeatability, smoothness of distributions, and code run time are considered for the purpose of establishing values of code-specific parameters and number of Monte Carlo runs. Results from test cases are interpreted as demonstrating that solar-flux predictions are primary sources of variations in predicted lifetimes. Therefore, it is concluded, multiple sets of predictions should be utilized to fully characterize the lifetime range of a spacecraft.

  4. Measurement of the meson lifetime using decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-05-01

    The lifetime of the meson is measured using semileptonic decays having a meson and a muon in the final state. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of , are collected by the LHCb detector in collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The measured lifetime is where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  5. Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

  6. Red fluorescent protein with reversibly photoswitchable absorbance for photochromic FRET

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Fedor V.; Zhang, Lijuan; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Gurskaya, Nadya G.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed the first red fluorescent protein, named rsTagRFP, which possesses reversibly photoswitchable absorbance spectra. Illumination with blue and yellow light switches rsTagRFP into a red fluorescent state (ON state) or non-fluorescent state (OFF state), respectively. The ON and OFF states exhibit absorbance maxima at 567 and 440 nm, respectively. Due to the photoswitchable absorbance, rsTagRFP can be used as an acceptor for a photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer (pcFRET). The photochromic acceptor facilitates determination of a protein-protein interaction by providing an internal control for FRET. Using pcFRET with EYFP as a donor we observed an interaction between epidermal growth factor receptor and growth factor receptor-binding protein 2 in live cells by detecting the modulation of both the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the EYFP donor upon the ON-OFF photoswitching of the rsTagRFP acceptor. PMID:20659687

  7. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  8. Relationship Between Absorber Layer Properties and Device Operation Modes For High Efficiency Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Ram; Kokenyesi, Robert; Wager, John; Keszler, Douglas; CenterInverse Design Team

    2014-03-01

    A thin film solar cell (TFSC) can be differentiated into two distinct operation modes based on the transport mechanism. Current TFSCs predominantly exploit diffusion to extract photogenerated minority carriers. For efficient extraction, the absorber layer requires high carrier mobilities and long minority carrier lifetimes. Materials exhibiting a strong optical absorption onset near the fundamental band gap allows reduction of the absorber layer thickness to significantly less than 1 μm. In such a TFSC, a strong intrinsic electric field drives minority carrier extraction, resulting in drift-based transport. The basic device configuration utilized in this simulation study is a heterojunction TFSC with a p-type absorber layer. The diffusion/drift device operation modes are simulated by varying the thickness and carrier concentration of the absorber layer, and device performance between the two modes is compared. In addition, the relationship between device operation mode and transport properties, including carrier mobility and minority carrier lifetime are explored. Finally, candidate absorber materials that enable the advantages of a drift-based TFSC developed within the Center for Inverse Design are presented. School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

  9. The lifetime of axion stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, Joshua; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the decay of condensates of scalars in a field theory defined by V (𝒜) = m2f2[1 -cos(𝒜/f)], where m and f are the mass and decay constant of the scalar field. An example of such a theory is that of the axion, in which case the condensates are called axion stars. The axion field, 𝒜, is self-adjoint. As a result, the axion number is not an absolutely conserved quantity. Therefore, axion stars are not stable and have finite lifetimes. Bound axions, localized on the volume of the star, have a coordinate uncertainty δx ˜ R ˜ 1/(maΔ), where R is the radius of the star and Δ = 1 - E0 2/ma 2. Here ma and E0 are the mass, and the ground state energy of the bound axion. Then the momentum distribution of axions has a width of δp ˜ maΔ. At strong binding, Δ = 𝒪(1), bound axions can easily transfer a sufficient amount of momentum to create and emit a free axion, leading to fast decay of the star with a transition rate Γ ˜ ma. However, when Δ ≪ 1, the momentum distribution is more restricted, and as shown in this paper, the transition rate for creating a free axion decreases as exp(-pδx) ˜exp(-Δ-1). Then sufficiently large, weakly bound axion stars, produced after the Big Bang, survive until the present time. We plot the region of their stability, limited by decay through axion loss and by gravitational instability, as a function of the mass of the axion and the mass of the star.

  10. The lifetime of axion stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, Joshua; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the decay of condensates of scalars in a field theory defined by V (𝒜) = m2f2[1 ‑cos(𝒜/f)], where m and f are the mass and decay constant of the scalar field. An example of such a theory is that of the axion, in which case the condensates are called axion stars. The axion field, 𝒜, is self-adjoint. As a result, the axion number is not an absolutely conserved quantity. Therefore, axion stars are not stable and have finite lifetimes. Bound axions, localized on the volume of the star, have a coordinate uncertainty δx ˜ R ˜ 1/(maΔ), where R is the radius of the star and Δ = 1 ‑ E0 2/ma 2. Here ma and E0 are the mass, and the ground state energy of the bound axion. Then the momentum distribution of axions has a width of δp ˜ maΔ. At strong binding, Δ = 𝒪(1), bound axions can easily transfer a sufficient amount of momentum to create and emit a free axion, leading to fast decay of the star with a transition rate Γ ˜ ma. However, when Δ ≪ 1, the momentum distribution is more restricted, and as shown in this paper, the transition rate for creating a free axion decreases as exp(‑pδx) ˜exp(‑Δ‑1). Then sufficiently large, weakly bound axion stars, produced after the Big Bang, survive until the present time. We plot the region of their stability, limited by decay through axion loss and by gravitational instability, as a function of the mass of the axion and the mass of the star.

  11. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, A; Khalafi, H; Kazeminejad, H

    2013-05-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  12. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, A; Khalafi, H; Kazeminejad, H

    2013-05-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change.

  13. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, A.; Khalafi, H.; Kazeminejad, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  14. Electrically tunable metasurface absorber based on dissipating behavior of embedded varactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhangjie; Long, Jiang; Chen, Xing; Sievenpiper, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    An electrically tunable metasurface that absorbs continuous electromagnetic (EM) surface waves is proposed by taking advantage of varactor diodes embedded in the surface. On the one hand, the varactors perform as the main dissipating components due to their parasitic series resistance; on the other hand, they function as the tuning elements because the dissipation is highly dependent on their capacitance. Therefore, the absorption of the surface can be tuned by the direct current biasing voltage across the varactors, which is validated numerically and experimentally in this letter. This absorbing mechanism of the surface differs from prior surface-wave absorbers and can lead to greater flexibility for absorbing metasurfaces. In this work, a power-dependent absorbing performance is achieved by loading microwave power sensors. If incorporated with other types of sensors, the absorption could potentially be controlled by corresponding physical variables such as light, pressure, or temperature, thus giving rise to various absorbing applications in a complex EM environment.

  15. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-04-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

  16. Phytoplankton. The fate of photons absorbed by phytoplankton in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hanzhi; Kuzminov, Fedor I; Park, Jisoo; Lee, SangHoon; Falkowski, Paul G; Gorbunov, Maxim Y

    2016-01-15

    Solar radiation absorbed by marine phytoplankton can follow three possible paths. By simultaneously measuring the quantum yields of photochemistry and chlorophyll fluorescence in situ, we calculate that, on average, ~60% of absorbed photons are converted to heat, only 35% are directed toward photochemical water splitting, and the rest are reemitted as fluorescence. The spatial pattern of fluorescence yields and lifetimes strongly suggests that photochemical energy conversion is physiologically limited by nutrients. Comparison of in situ fluorescence lifetimes with satellite retrievals of solar-induced fluorescence yields suggests that the mean values of the latter are generally representative of the photophysiological state of phytoplankton; however, the signal-to-noise ratio is unacceptably low in extremely oligotrophic regions, which constitute 30% of the open ocean.

  17. The fate of photons absorbed by phytoplankton in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hanzhi; Kuzminov, Fedor I.; Park, Jisoo; Lee, SangHoon; Falkowski, Paul G.; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.

    2016-01-01

    Solar radiation absorbed by marine phytoplankton can follow three possible paths. By simultaneously measuring the quantum yields of photochemistry and chlorophyll fluorescence in situ, we calculate that, on average, ~60% of absorbed photons are converted to heat, only 35% are directed toward photochemical water splitting, and the rest are reemitted as fluorescence. The spatial pattern of fluorescence yields and lifetimes strongly suggests that photochemical energy conversion is physiologically limited by nutrients. Comparison of in situ fluorescence lifetimes with satellite retrievals of solar-induced fluorescence yields suggests that the mean values of the latter are generally representative of the photophysiological state of phytoplankton; however, the signal-to-noise ratio is unacceptably low in extremely oligotrophic regions, which constitute 30% of the open ocean.

  18. The atmospheric lifetime of black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cape, J. N.; Coyle, M.; Dumitrean, P.

    2012-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) in the atmosphere contributes to the human health effects of particulate matter and contributes to radiative forcing of climate. The lifetime of BC, particularly the smaller particle sizes (PM2.5) which can be transported over long distances, is therefore an important factor in determining the range of such effects, and the spatial footprint of emission controls. Theory and models suggest that the typical lifetime of BC is around one week. The frequency distributions of measurements of a range of hydrocarbons at a remote rural site in southern Scotland (Auchencorth Moss) between 2007 and 2010 have been used to quantify the relationship between atmospheric lifetime and the geometric standard deviation of observed concentration. The analysis relies on an assumed common major emission source for hydrocarbons and BC, namely diesel-engined vehicles. The logarithm of the standard deviation of the log-transformed concentration data is linearly related to hydrocarbon lifetime, and the same statistic for BC can be used to assess the lifetime of BC relative to the hydrocarbons. Annual average data show BC lifetimes in the range 4-12 days, for an assumed OH concentration of 7 × 105 cm-3. At this site there is little difference in BC lifetime between winter and summer, despite a 3-fold difference in relative hydrocarbon lifetimes. This observation confirms the role of wet deposition as an important removal process for BC, as there is no difference in precipitation between winter and summer at this site. BC lifetime was significantly greater in 2010, which had 23% less rainfall than the preceding 3 years.

  19. Improving the laboratory monitoring of absorbent oil

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Shved; S.S. Sychev; I.V. Safina; S.A. Klykov

    2009-05-15

    The performance of absorbent coal tar oil is analyzed as a function of the constituent and group composition. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the oil that ensures the required absorbent properties is determined. Operative monitoring may be based on absorbent characteristics that permit regulation of the beginning and end of regeneration.

  20. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  1. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  2. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  3. Improved Single-Source Precursors for Solar-Cell Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Improved single-source precursor compounds have been invented for use in spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) of chalcopyrite semiconductor absorber layers of thin-film cells. A "single-source precursor compound" is a single molecular compound that contains all the required elements, which when used under the spray CVD conditions, thermally decomposes to form CuIn(x)Ga(1-x)S(y)Se(2-y).

  4. Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-03-01

    Models describing battery degradation physics are needed to more accurately understand how battery usage and next-generation battery designs can be optimized for performance and lifetime. Such lifetime models may also reduce the cost of battery aging experiments and shorten the time required to validate battery lifetime. Models for chemical degradation and mechanical stress are reviewed. Experimental analysis of aging data from a commercial iron-phosphate lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell elucidates the relative importance of several mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms.

  5. Measurement of Rydberg positronium fluorescence lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the fluorescence lifetimes of positronium (Ps) atoms with principal quantum numbers n =10 -19 . Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states were produced via a two-color two-step 1 3S→2 3P→n 3S/n lifetimes of the Rydberg levels, yielding values ranging from 3 μ s to 26 μ s . Our data are in accord with the expected radiative lifetimes of Rydberg-Stark states of Ps.

  6. Demonstration of long minority carrier lifetimes in very narrow bandgap ternary InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Kim, Jin K.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.

    2015-09-28

    Minority carrier lifetimes in very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) InAs/GaInSb superlattices (SLs) are reported using time-resolved microwave reflectance measurements. A strain-balanced ternary SL absorber layer of 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb, corresponding to a bandgap of ~50 meV, is found to have a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at ~18 K. This lifetime is extraordinarily long, when compared to lifetime values previously reported for other VLWIR SL detector materials. As a result, this enhancement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design, which offers a variety of epitaxial advantages and ultimately leads to a reduction of defect-mediated recombination centers.

  7. Demonstration of long minority carrier lifetimes in very narrow bandgap ternary InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Kim, Jin K.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.

    2015-09-28

    Minority carrier lifetimes in very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) InAs/GaInSb superlattices (SLs) are reported using time-resolved microwave reflectance measurements. A strain-balanced ternary SL absorber layer of 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb, corresponding to a bandgap of ~50 meV, is found to have a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at ~18 K. This lifetime is extraordinarily long, when compared to lifetime values previously reported for other VLWIR SL detector materials. As a result, this enhancement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design, which offers a variety of epitaxial advantages and ultimately leads to a reduction of defect-mediated recombinationmore » centers.« less

  8. Stratospheric lifetime ratio of CFC-11 and CFC-12 from satellite and model climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Hoppe, Charlotte; Müller, Rolf; Dutton, Geoffrey S.; Gille, John C.; Griessbach, Sabine; Jones, Ashley; Meyer, Catrin I.; Spang, Reinhold; Volk, C. Michael; Walker, Kaley A.

    2015-04-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone loss and are strong infrared absorbers that contribute to global warming. The stratospheric lifetimes of CFCs are a measure of their stratospheric loss rates that are needed to determine global warming and ozone depletion potentials. We applied the tracer-tracer correlation approach to zonal mean climatologies from satellite measurements and model data to assess the lifetimes of CFCl3 (CFC-11) and CF2Cl2 (CFC-12). We present new estimates of the CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of CFC-12, based on a reference lifetime of 52 yr for CFC-11. We analyzed climatologies from three satellite missions, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). We found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.47 ± 0.08 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 112(96 - 133) yr for ACE-FTS, a ratio of 0.46 ± 0.07 and a lifetime of 113(97 - 134) yr for HIRDLS, and a ratio of 0.46 ± 0.08 and a lifetime of 114(98 - 136) yr for MIPAS. The error-weighted, combined CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio is 0.46 ± 0.04 and the CFC-12 lifetime estimate is 113(103 - 124) yr. These results are in excellent agreement with the recent Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) reassessment, which recommends lifetimes of 52(43 - 67) yr for CFC-11 and 102(88 - 122) yr for CFC-12, respectively. Having smaller uncertainties than the results from other recent studies, our estimates can help to better constrain CFC-11 and CFC-12 lifetime recommendations in future scientific studies and assessments. Furthermore, the satellite observations were used to validate first simulation results from a new coupled model system, which integrates a Lagrangian chemistry transport model into a climate model. For the coupled EMAC/CLaMS model we found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio

  9. Sound-absorbing slabs and structures based on granular materials (bound and unbound). [energy absorbing efficiency of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre-Lazar, S.; Popeea, G.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorbing slabs and structures made up of bound or unbound granular materials are considered and how to manufacture these elements at the building site. The raw material is a single grain powder (sand, expanded blast furnace slag, etc.) that imparts to the end products an apparent porosity of 25-45% and an energy dissipation within the structure leading to absorption coefficients that can be compared with those of mineral wool and urethane.

  10. A polarization-independent broadband terahertz absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cheng; Zang, XiaoFei E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn; Wang, YiQiao; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn

    2014-07-21

    A highly efficient broadband terahertz absorber is designed, fabricated, and experimentally as well as theoretically evaluated. The absorber comprises a heavily doped silicon substrate and a well-designed two-dimensional grating. Due to the destructive interference of waves and diffraction, the absorber can achieve over 95% absorption in a broad frequency range from 1 to 2 THz and for angles of incidence from 0° to 60°. Such a terahertz absorber is also polarization-independent due to its symmetrical structure. This omnidirectional and broadband absorber have potential applications in anti-reflection coatings, imaging systems, and so on.

  11. Hadamard-transform fluorescence-lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takahiko; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2016-04-18

    We discuss a Hadamard-transform-based fluorescence-lifetime-imaging (HT-FLI) technique for fluorescence-lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM). The HT-FLI uses a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer (FT-PMF) for fluorescence-lifetime measurements, where the modulation frequency of the excitation light is swept linearly in frequency from zero to a specific maximum during a fixed duration of time. Thereafter, fluorescence lifetimes are derived through Fourier transforms for the fluorescence and reference waveforms. The FT-PMF enables the analysis of multi-component samples simultaneously. HT imaging uses electronic exchange of HT illumination mask patterns, and a high-speed, high-sensitivity photomultiplier, to eliminate frame-rate issues that accompany two-dimensional image detectors. PMID:27137259

  12. Lifetime and Temperature of Incandescent Lamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Dulli C.; Menon, V. Jayaram

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure based on the assumption that during the rated lifetime of a light bulb roughly half of the radius of the filament evaporates. Explains how the filament's operating temperature can be deduced. (DDR)

  13. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  14. Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-02

    The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

  15. Efficiency and lifetime of carbon foils

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Kostin, M.; Tang, Z.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    Charge-exchange injection by means of carbon foils is a widely used method in accelerators. This paper discusses two critical issues concerning the use of carbon foils: efficiency and lifetime. An energy scaling of stripping efficiency was suggested and compared with measurements. Several factors that determine the foil lifetime--energy deposition, heating, stress and buckling--were studied by using the simulation codes MARS and ANSYS.

  16. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  17. Passive Vibration Reduction with Silicone Springs and Dynamic Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-hoon; Dong, Yanlu; Lee, Moon G.

    In the precision manufacturing field, the major structural components are often made of rigid and massive elements. Those mechanisms are so fluctuated by swaying of building and resonating of ground floor that the precision gets lower. As a result, quality of products is declined. So far, to minimize the influences of result from external irregular vibration, various technical methods of the absorbing vibration are used. For example, vibration isolation table which use air damper and heavy granite surface plate are used. But, these devices need high cost and low mobility. In this paper, our target is to analyze the external vibration and then to develop a mechanism which is able to reduce the effect. It is also able to be produced at a lower cost. Firstly, a silicone support is proposed as a simple vibration isolating mechanism. Swaying and resonating of a building have 2∼4 Hz vibrating frequency when a person is running on a treadmill, similar phenomena happen. Therefore, the supports are mounted under the running pad of a treadmill. This is a passive vibration isolator. The support is designed to have low stiffness and high deformation to isolate and absorb the vibration. As a result, it reduces the peak amplitude of vibration by about 80%. Secondly, a dynamic vibration absorber is developed to minimize the repetitive vibration. The absorber has a fundamental resonating frequency by its spring and mass. The resonating frequency is designed to have close value to the vibrating frequency of the treadmill. The length of beam can be adjusted to have variable resonance according to the external vibration. This absorber also reduces vibration by 84%. The passive vibration isolator and dynamic vibration absorber can be applied to precision equipments with repetitive motion or with disturbance of swaying of building.

  18. Lifetime estimation of moving subcellular objects in frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Roudot, Philippe; Kervrann, Charles; Blouin, Cedric M; Waharte, Francois

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence lifetime is usually defined as the average nanosecond-scale delay between excitation and emission of fluorescence. It has been established that lifetime measurements yield numerous indications on cellular processes such as interprotein and intraprotein mechanisms through fluorescent tagging and Förster resonance energy transfer. In this area, frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is particularly appropriate to probe a sample noninvasively and quantify these interactions in living cells. The aim is then to measure the fluorescence lifetime in the sample at each location in space from fluorescence variations observed in a temporal sequence of images obtained by phase modulation of the detection signal. This leads to a sensitivity of lifetime determination to other sources of fluorescence variations such as intracellular motion. In this paper, we propose a robust statistical method for lifetime estimation for both background and small moving structures with a focus on intracellular vesicle trafficking. PMID:26479936

  19. Theoretical study of the K, Rb, and Fr lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrenova Tchoukova, Eugeniya; Safronova, Marianna

    2008-05-01

    We calculate ns, np, and nd lifetimes in K, Rb, and Fr using relativistic high-precision all-order method where all single and double excitations of the Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Additional calculations are carried out where necessary to account in part for effects of valence triple excitations and to evaluate the uncertainty of the calculations. The data are compared with available experimental values. Our calculations provide benchmark data for a number of E1 matrix elements and branching ratios. We identify lifetimes that are particular useful for tests of high-precision theory owing to extremely large correlations to certain electric-dipole matrix elements. Fr calculations are motivated also by the study of parity nonconservation with this atom [1]. [1] G. Gwinner, E. Gomez, L. A. Orozco, A. Perez Galvan, D. Sheng, Y. Zhao, G. D. Sprouse, J. A. Behr, K. P. Jackson, M. R. Pearson, S. Aubin, and V. V. Flambaum, Hyp. Int. 172 , 45 (2006).

  20. Analysis of Old Copper Synchrotron Light Absorbers from the Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, S.R.; Scott, B.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    Synchrotron light absorbers intercept synchrotron radiation to protect chamber walls from excessive heat. When subjected to the high temperature of the beam, these absorbers undergo thermal stress. If the stress is too great or fatigues the material, the absorbers may fail. These absorbers are designed to last the lifetime of the machine. Any premature cracking could result in a leak and, consequently, loss of the ultra high vacuum environment. Using secondary and backscattered electron techniques, several sections of a used copper absorber were analyzed for material damage. Chemical analyses were performed on these samples as well. Comparing the unexposed sections to the sections exposed to the electron beam, few cracks were seen in the copper. However, the exposed samples showed heavy surface damage, in addition to crevices that could eventually result in material failure. Significant corrosion was also evident along the water cooling passage of the samples. These findings suggest that further investigation and periodic inspection of absorbers in SPEAR3 are necessary to control corrosion of the copper.

  1. Warming of the Arctic Lower Stratosphere by Light Absorbing Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.; Kok, G.; Anderson, B.

    2003-12-01

    Light absorption by particles such as soot and dust change the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere and contribute to regional and global climate change. The lower stratosphere is particularly sensitive to the presence of light absorbing particles (LAP) since particles in this region can reside from months to years, in contrast to upper tropospheric lifetimes of days to weeks. The source of particles in the lower stratosphere may be aircraft, meteorites or transport from tropospheric sources. There is a serious deficiency of accurate and quantitative measurements of these particles that limits our understanding of the origin and lifetime of aerosols in this region of the atmosphere and how their presence alters radiative fluxes that lead to climate change. Here we present measurements in the Arctic lower stratosphere with a new, single particle soot photometer (SP2) that has detected black carbon (BC) mass concentrations of 20-1000 ng m-3. These concentrations are 10-1000 times larger than those reported in previous experimental studies and are at least 30 times larger than predictions based on fuel consumption by commercial aircraft. The comparison of the measurements of BC with published 3D model predictions suggests that particles transported from the troposphere are the likely source of LAP in the Arctic lower stratosphere. Radiative transfer calculations that include the presence of a layer of LAP between 9 and 12 km, indicate an increase in the localised heating of this layer by approximately 25%.

  2. Cascaded Perforates as One-Dimensional, Bulk Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Jones, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    Porous cell honeycomb liners for aircraft engine nacelles offer the possibility of exploiting extended reaction effects to improve liner attenuation bandwidth as generally attributed to the performance of bulk absorbers. This paper describes an analytical procedure, starting with an impedance prediction model for a single perforated plate, to estimate the bulk-absorber parameters for a cascade of such perforates - a first step to modeling a porous wall honeycomb structure. The objective is to build confidence in a lumped element impedance model, when applied to a uniformly-spaced set of porous plates to predict its .bulk. absorber properties. The model is based upon a modified version of the two-parameter flow resistance model of the form A + BV(sub inc), where A and B are physics-based, semi-empirical parameters that are adjusted to provide an optimum fit to a composite dataset from three plate porosities of 2.5, 5 and 10%. The composite dataset is achieved by reformulating the two-parameter flow resistance model into a .reduced pressure drop coefficient. dependency on perforate hole Reynolds number. The resulting impedance model is employed to calculate surface impedance spectra for N and 2N-layer perforate cascades. The well-known two-thickness method for experimental determination of bulk-absorber parameters is then applied to these .synthesized. data sets to predict the characteristic impedance and propagation constant for the perforate cascades. These results are then compared with experimental results reported in a companion paper.

  3. Magnetorheological elastomers in tunable vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginder, John M.; Schlotter, William F.; Nichols, Mark E.

    2001-07-01

    Filling an elastomeric material with magnetizable particles leads to mechanical properties -shear moduli, tensile moduli, and magnetostriction coefficients - that are reversibly and rapidly controllable by an applied magnetic field. The origin of the field dependence of these properties is the existence of field-induced dipole magnetic forces between the particles. These 'smart' composites, which are sometimes termed magnetorheological (MR) elastomers, have been explored for use in a number of components, including automotive suspension bushings. In these and other applications, the tunability of the stiffness can enhance the compliance-control or vibration-transfer performance of the complex mechanical systems in which they are used. In the present study, we have constructed a simple one-degree-of-freedom mass-spring system - an adaptive tuned vibration absorber - that utilizes MR elastomers as variable-spring-rate elements. This device was used not only to explore the performance of such tunable components, but also to extend measurements of the shear moduli of these materials to higher frequencies than has previously been reported. We find that the field-induced increase in moduli of these materials is effective to mechanical frequencies well above 1 kHz, and that the moduli are consistent with the behavior expected for filled elastomers.

  4. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  5. Damage Mechanics Approach for Bearing Lifetime Prognostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jing; Seth, Brij B.; Liang, Steven Y.; Zhang, Cheng

    2002-09-01

    The ability to achieve accurate bearing prognostics is critical to the optimal maintenance of rotating machinery in the interest of cost and productivity. However, techniques to real time predict the lifetime of a bearing under practical operating conditions have not been well developed. In this paper, a stiffness-based prognostic model for bearing systems based on vibration response analysis and damage mechanics is discussed. As the bearing system is considered as a single-degree-of-freedom vibratory system, its natural frequency and its acceleration amplitude at the natural frequency can be related to the system stiffness. On the other hand, the relationship between failure lifetime, running time and stiffness variation can be established from the damage mechanics. Combining the above two, the natural frequency and the acceleration amplitude of a bearing system can be related to its running time and failure lifetime. Thus, the failure lifetime of a bearing system can be predicted on-line based on vibration measurement. Experiments have been performed on a tapered roller bearing life testing stand under various operation conditions to calibrate and to validate the proposed model. The comparison between model-calculated data and experimental results indicates that this model can be used to effectively predict the failure lifetime and the remaining life of a bearing system.

  6. Supercontinuum Stimulated Emission Depletion Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoine, Michael; Bose, Sayantan; Petrich, Jacob; Smith, Emily

    2012-06-13

    Supercontinuum (SC) stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime imaging is demonstrated by using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) detection. The spatial resolution of the developed STED instrument was measured by imaging monodispersed 40-nm fluorescent beads and then determining their fwhm, and was 36 ± 9 and 40 ± 10 nm in the X and Y coordinates, respectively. The same beads measured by confocal microscopy were 450 ± 50 and 430 ± 30 nm, which is larger than the diffraction limit of light due to underfilling the microscope objective. Underfilling the objective and time gating the signal were necessary to achieve the stated STED spatial resolution. The same fluorescence lifetime (2.0 ± 0.1 ns) was measured for the fluorescent beads by using confocal or STED lifetime imaging. The instrument has been applied to study Alexa Fluor 594-phalloidin labeled F-actin-rich projections with dimensions smaller than the diffraction limit of light in cultured cells. Fluorescence lifetimes of the actin-rich projections range from 2.2 to 2.9 ns as measured by STED lifetime imaging.

  7. Lifetime Blinking in Non Blinking Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Victor; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrueck, Andrea; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Htoon, Han; Galland, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) blinking is a common property of nanoscale light emitters. Nanocrystal quantum dots have often been used as model systems in studies of this intriguing phenomenon. Here, we use recently developed thick-shell CdSe/CdS NQDs to demonstrate a new regime of blinking where discrete fluctuations in the PL lifetime (``lifetime blinking'') occur without appreciable changes in the PL intensity. Single-dot measurements under controlled electrochemical charge injection [1] yield the PL lifetimes of neutral and charged excitons. We show that the observed ``lifetime blinking'' are due to random charging/discharging of the nanocrystal [2]. Indeed, the injection of electrons does not appreciably modify the PL quantum yield, which explains the coexistence of a nonblinking intensity with a ``blinking'' lifetime. At higher excitation power, charged excitons dominate the PL emission. We build a quantitative model showing that nanocrystal charging is caused by Auger-assisted ejection of a hole, producing negatively charged species. Importantly, Auger recombination that involves excitation of an electron is suppressed while hole-based processes remain efficient.[4pt] [1] Galland et al., Nature 479, 203-207 (2011)[0pt] [2] Galland et al., Submitted (2011)

  8. On the lifetimes of evaporating droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen; Stauber, Jutta; Duffy, Brian; Sefiane, Khellil

    2013-11-01

    The evaporation of a fluid droplet on a solid substrate is a practically important problem which has been the subject of considerable research in recent years, much of it motivated by a range of technological applications, such as the application of pesticides to plants, DNA microarray analysis, inkjet printing, micro-fabrication, and spray cooling. In particular, the lifetime of a fluid droplet is not only of fundamental scientific interest, but is also important in a number of technological applications, such as inkjet printing and spray cooling applications (in which shorter droplet lifetimes are often needed) and the application of pesticides to plants (in which longer droplet lifetimes are often needed). In this talk we will analyse the lifetimes of fluid droplets evaporating in a variety of modes and, in particular, show that the widely believed folklore that the lifetime of a droplet is always longer than that of an identical droplet evaporating in the constant radius (i.e. pinned contact line) mode and shorter than that of an identical droplet evaporating in the constant angle mode is not, in general, true.

  9. A novel self-locked energy absorbing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuli; Qiao, Chuan; Qiu, Xinming; Zhao, Shougen; Zhen, Cairu; Liu, Bin

    2016-02-01

    Metallic thin-walled round tubes are widely used as energy absorption elements. However, lateral splash of the round tubes under impact loadings reduces the energy absorption efficiency and may cause secondary damage. Therefore, it is necessary to assemble and fasten round tubes together by boundary constraints and/or fasteners between tubes, which increases the time and labor cost and affects the mechanical performance of round tubes. In an effort to break through this limitation, a novel self-locked energy-absorbing system has been proposed in this paper. The proposed system is made up of thin-walled tubes with dumbbell-shaped cross section, which are specially designed to interlock with each other and thus provide lateral constraint under impact loadings. Both finite element simulations and impact experiment demonstrated that without boundary constraints or fasteners between tubes, the proposed self-locked energy-absorbing system can still effectively attenuate impact loads while the round tube systems fail to carry load due to the lateral splashing of tubes. Furthermore, the geometric design for a single dumbbell-shaped tube and the stacking arrangement for the system are discussed, and a general guideline on the structural design of the proposed self-locked energy absorbing system is provided.

  10. Lifetime Predictions of a Titanium Silicate Glass with Machined Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly

    2003-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate glass to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure and to compare the results with those of a previous study. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions. The material strength and lifetime was seen to increase due to the removal of residual stress through grinding and polishing. Influence on time-to-failure is addressed for the case with and without residual stress present. Titanium silicate glass otherwise known as ultra-low expansion (ULE)* glass is a candidate for use in applications requiring low thermal expansion characteristics such as telescope mirrors. The Hubble Space Telescope s primary mirror was manufactured from ULE glass. ULE contains 7.5% titanium dioxide which in combination with silica results in a homogenous glass with a linear expansion coefficient near zero. delayed failure . This previous study was based on a 230/270 grit surface. The grinding and polishing process reduces the surface flaw size and subsurface damage, and relieves residual stress by removing the material with successively smaller grinding media. This results in an increase in strength of the optic during the grinding and polishing sequence. Thus, a second study was undertaken using samples with a surface finish typically achieved for mirror elements, to observe the effects of surface finishing on the time-to-failure predictions. An allowable stress can be calculated for this material based upon modulus of rupture data; however, this does not take into account the problem of delayed failure, most likely due to stress corrosion, which can significantly shorten lifetime. Fortunately, a theory based on fracture mechanics has been developed enabling lifetime predictions to be made for brittle materials susceptible to delayed failure. Knowledge of the factors governing the rate of subcritical flaw growth in a given environment enables the development of

  11. Methods for Determining Operation Lifetime of Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schriener, Timothy M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2007-01-30

    Space fission reactors can provide reliable, high power levels for periods of more than 10 years to support human outposts and for space travel to the farthest planets in the solar system. The operation lifetimes of these reactors depend on many factors chief among which are the hot-clean excess reactivity and the fuel burnup rate (or operation power) and the accumulation and decay of fission products. Other important parameters are the fuel average temperature and fissile inventory and the Doppler reactivity effect. Determining the operation lifetime for space reactors is a critical input to mission planning, requiring the use of sophisticated fuel burnup and criticality computational tools and benchmarking the results against actual data, if readily available. This paper performs parametric and comparative studies using widely used codes and a simplified approach for determining the operation lifetimes of two space reactors: the Sectored, Compact Reactor (SCoRe) that is liquid metal cooled, and the Submersion-Subcritical, Safe Space (S and 4) reactor that is cooled by a He-Xe binary gas mixture. The codes investigated against experimental data from a LWR are: (a) Monteburns 2.0, coupling MCNP5 1.30 to Origen2.2, (b) MCNPX 2.6b's internal burn package incorporating CINDER90, and (c) TRITON a code in the SCALE5 package using NEWT and Origen-S. From the results Monteburns and MCNPX performed the best, and are selected to compare their predictions of the lifetimes of the two space reactors with those of a simplified method. This method couples MCNP5 to a burnup analysis model in Simulink registered considering only the 10 most probable low Z and 10 most probable high Z elements of the fission yield peaks plus 149Sm. Results show that the predicted operational lifetimes using the simplified method are within -6.6 to 12.8% of those calculated using the widely used Monteburns 2.0 and MCNPX 2.6bc1 codes.

  12. Methods for Determining Operation Lifetime of Space Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriener, Timothy M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2007-01-01

    Space fission reactors can provide reliable, high power levels for periods of more than 10 years to support human outposts and for space travel to the farthest planets in the solar system. The operation lifetimes of these reactors depend on many factors chief among which are the hot-clean excess reactivity and the fuel burnup rate (or operation power) and the accumulation and decay of fission products. Other important parameters are the fuel average temperature and fissile inventory and the Doppler reactivity effect. Determining the operation lifetime for space reactors is a critical input to mission planning, requiring the use of sophisticated fuel burnup and criticality computational tools and benchmarking the results against actual data, if readily available. This paper performs parametric and comparative studies using widely used codes and a simplified approach for determining the operation lifetimes of two space reactors: the Sectored, Compact Reactor (SCoRe) that is liquid metal cooled, and the Submersion-Subcritical, Safe Space (S∧4) reactor that is cooled by a He-Xe binary gas mixture. The codes investigated against experimental data from a LWR are: (a) Monteburns 2.0, coupling MCNP5 1.30 to Origen2.2, (b) MCNPX 2.6b's internal burn package incorporating CINDER90, and (c) TRITON a code in the SCALE5 package using NEWT and Origen-S. From the results Monteburns and MCNPX performed the best, and are selected to compare their predictions of the lifetimes of the two space reactors with those of a simplified method. This method couples MCNP5 to a burnup analysis model in Simulink® considering only the 10 most probable low Z and 10 most probable high Z elements of the fission yield peaks plus 149Sm. Results show that the predicted operational lifetimes using the simplified method are within -6.6 to 12.8% of those calculated using the widely used Monteburns 2.0 and MCNPX 2.6bc1 codes.

  13. Polarization-independent wide-angle triple-band metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaopeng; Cui, Tie Jun; Zhao, Junming; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Li, Hui

    2011-05-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and measurement of a microwave triple-band absorber. The compact single unit cell consists of three nested electric closed-ring resonators and a metallic ground plane separated by a dielectric layer. Simulation and experimental results show that the absorber has three distinctive absorption peaks at frequencies 4.06 GHz, 6.73 GHz, and 9.22 GHz with the absorption rates of 0.99, 0.93, and 0.95, respectively. The absorber is valid to a wide range of incident angles for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations. The triple-band absorber is a promising candidate as absorbing elements in scientific and technical applications because of its multiband absorption, polarization insensitivity, and wide-angle response.

  14. Investigation of a Shock Absorber for Safeguard of Fuel Assemblies Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Karalevicius, Renatas; Dundulis, Gintautas; Rimkevicius, Sigitas; Uspuras, Eugenijus

    2006-07-01

    The Ignalina NPP has two reactors. The Unit 1 was shut down, therefore the special equipment was designed for transportation of the fuel from Unit 1 to Unit 2. The fuel-loaded basket can drop during transportation. The special shock absorber was designed in order to avoid failure of fuel assemblies during transportation. In case of drop of fuel loaded basket, the failure of fuel assemblies can occur. This shock absorber was studied by scaled experiments at Lithuanian Energy Institute. Static and dynamic investigations of shock absorber are presented in this paper, including dependency of axial force versus axial compression. The finite element codes BRIGADE/Plus and ABAQUS/Explicit were used for analysis. Static simulation was used to optimize the dimensions of shock absorber. Dynamic analysis shows that shock absorber is capable to withstand the dynamic load for successful force suppression function in case of an accident. (authors)

  15. Absorbent product and articles made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multilayer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is described. The product has a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, and a first fibrous wicking layer overlaying the water pervious layer. A first container section is defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material in between a first absorbent mass and a second container section defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material between what is disposed a second absorbent mass, and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer overlaying the second fibrous wicking layer.

  16. Improved lifetime of microchannel-plate PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Uhlig, F.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Höhler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The charged particle identification at the PANDA experiment will be mainly performed with DIRC detectors. Because of their advantageous properties the preferred photon sensors are MCP-PMTs. However, until recently these devices showed serious aging problems which resulted in a diminishing quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode. By applying innovative countermeasures against the aging causes, the manufacturers recently succeeded in drastically improving the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. Especially the application of an ALD coating technique to seal the material of the micro-channels proves very powerful and results in a lifetime of ≈ 6 C /cm2 integrated anode charge without a substantial QE degradation for the latest PHOTONIS XP85112. This paper will present a comparative measurement of the lifetime of several older and recent MCP-PMTs demonstrating this progress.

  17. Lifetime blinking in nonblinking nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Christophe; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrück, Andrea; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I.

    2012-06-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots are attractive materials for applications as nanoscale light sources. One impediment to these applications is fluctuations of single-dot emission intensity, known as blinking. Recent progress in colloidal synthesis has produced nonblinking nanocrystals; however, the physics underlying blinking suppression remains unclear. Here we find that ultra-thick-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals can exhibit pronounced fluctuations in the emission lifetimes (lifetime blinking), despite stable nonblinking emission intensity. We demonstrate that lifetime variations are due to switching between the neutral and negatively charged state of the nanocrystal. Negative charging results in faster radiative decay but does not appreciably change the overall emission intensity because of suppressed nonradiative Auger recombination for negative trions. The Auger process involving excitation of a hole (positive trion pathway) remains efficient and is responsible for charging with excess electrons, which occurs via Auger-assisted ionization of biexcitons accompanied by ejection of holes.

  18. Lifetime blinking in nonblinking nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Galland, Christophe; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrück, Andrea; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I

    2012-06-19

    Nanocrystal quantum dots are attractive materials for applications as nanoscale light sources. One impediment to these applications is fluctuations of single-dot emission intensity, known as blinking. Recent progress in colloidal synthesis has produced nonblinking nanocrystals; however, the physics underlying blinking suppression remains unclear. Here we find that ultra-thick-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals can exhibit pronounced fluctuations in the emission lifetimes (lifetime blinking), despite stable nonblinking emission intensity. We demonstrate that lifetime variations are due to switching between the neutral and negatively charged state of the nanocrystal. Negative charging results in faster radiative decay but does not appreciably change the overall emission intensity because of suppressed nonradiative Auger recombination for negative trions. The Auger process involving excitation of a hole (positive trion pathway) remains efficient and is responsible for charging with excess electrons, which occurs via Auger-assisted ionization of biexcitons accompanied by ejection of holes.

  19. Tunable lifetime multiplexing using luminescent nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiqing; Zhao, Jiangbo; Zhang, Run; Liu, Yujia; Liu, Deming; Goldys, Ewa M.; Yang, Xusan; Xi, Peng; Sunna, Anwar; Lu, Jie; Shi, Yu; Leif, Robert C.; Huo, Yujing; Shen, Jian; Piper, James A.; Robinson, J. Paul; Jin, Dayong

    2014-01-01

    Optical multiplexing plays an important role in applications such as optical data storage, document security, molecular probes and bead assays for personalized medicine. Conventional fluorescent colour coding is limited by spectral overlap and background interference, restricting the number of distinguishable identities. Here, we show that tunable luminescent lifetimes τ in the microsecond region can be exploited to code individual upconversion nanocrystals. In a single colour band, one can generate more than ten nanocrystal populations with distinct lifetimes ranging from 25.6 µs to 662.4 µs and decode their well-separated lifetime identities, which are independent of both colour and intensity. Such `τ-dots' potentially suit multichannel bioimaging, high-throughput cytometry quantification, high-density data storage, as well as security codes to combat counterfeiting. This demonstration extends the optical multiplexing capability by adding the temporal dimension of luminescent signals, opening new opportunities in the life sciences, medicine and data security.

  20. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  1. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, C.E.

    1979-08-29

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  2. Multispectral terahertz sensing with highly flexible ultrathin metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiaoui, Riad; Tan, Siyu; Cong, Longqing; Singh, Ranjan; Yan, Fengping; Zhang, Weili

    2015-08-01

    We report the simulation, fabrication, and experimental characterization of a multichannel metamaterial absorber with the aim to be used as a label-free sensing platform in the terahertz regime. The topology of the investigated resonators deposited on a thin flexible polymer by means of optical lithography is capable of supporting multiple resonances over a broad frequency range due to the individual contribution of each sub-element of the unit cell. In order to explore the performance of the chosen structure in terms of sensing phenomenon, the reflection feature is monitored upon variation of the refractive index and the thickness of the analyte. We achieve numerically maximum frequency sensitivity of about 139.2 GHz/refractive index unit. Measurements carried out using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy show good agreement with the numerical predictions. The results are very promising, suggesting a potential use of the metamaterial absorber in wide variety of multispectral terahertz sensing applications.

  3. Fluorescence Lifetime Techniques in Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of time-resolved (lifetime) fluorescence techniques used in biomedical diagnostics. In particular, we review the development of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) instrumentation and associated methodologies which allows for in vivo characterization and diagnosis of biological tissues. Emphasis is placed on the translational research potential of these techniques and on evaluating whether intrinsic fluorescence signals provide useful contrast for the diagnosis of human diseases including cancer (gastrointestinal tract, lung, head and neck, and brain), skin and eye diseases, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:22273730

  4. Prompt Neutron Lifetime for the NBSR Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2012-06-24

    In preparation for the proposed conversion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, certain point kinetics parameters must be calculated. We report here values of the prompt neutron lifetime that have been calculated using three independent methods. All three sets of calculations demonstrate that the prompt neutron lifetime is shorter for the LEU fuel when compared to the HEU fuel and longer for the equilibrium end-of-cycle (EOC) condition when compared to the equilibrium startup (SU) condition for both the HEU and LEU fuels.

  5. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Iori, M.; Ayan, A.S.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, L.J.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 {+-} 19 reconstructed {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in the {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} decay modes. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is measured to be 65 {+-} 13(stat) {+-} 9(sys) fs.

  6. B lifetimes and mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, Franco; /INFN, Pisa

    2005-05-01

    The authors present recent results on b-hadron lifetimes and mixing obtained from the analysis of the data collected at the Tevatron Collider by the CDF and D0 Collaborations in the period 2002-2004. Many lifetime measurements have been updated since the Summer 2004 conferences, sometimes improving significantly the accuracy. Likewise the measurement of the B{sub d} oscillation frequency has been updated. New limits on the B{sub s} oscillation frequency have been determined using for the first time Run II data.

  7. Measurement of the D(s)+ lifetime.

    PubMed

    Link, J M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Castromonte, C; Machado, A A; Magnin, J; Massafferi, A; de Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Stenson, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F L; Pacetti, S; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; DiCorato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Göbel, C; Hernandez, H; Lopez, A M; Mendez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramirez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Luiggi, E; Moore, J E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2005-07-29

    A high statistics measurement of the D(s)+ lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. We describe the analysis of the two decay modes, D(s)+ --> phi(1020)pi+ and D(s)+ -->K*(892)0K+, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 +/- 5.5(stat) +/- 5.1(syst) fs using 8961 +/- 105 D(s)+ --> phi(1020)pi+ and 4680 +/- 90 D(s)+ --> K*(892)0K+ decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average. PMID:16090867

  8. Touschek Lifetime Calculations for NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Nash,B.; Kramer, S.

    2009-05-04

    The Touschek effect limits the lifetime for NSLS-II. The basic mechanism is Coulomb scattering resulting in a longitudinal momentum outside the momentum aperture. The momentum aperture results from a combination of the initial betatron oscillations after the scatter and the non-linear properties determining the resultant stability. We find that higher order multipole errors may reduce the momentum aperture, particularly for scattered particles with energy loss. The resultant drop in Touschek lifetime is minimized, however, due to less scattering in the dispersive regions. We describe these mechanisms, and present calculations for NSLS-II using a realistic lattice model including damping wigglers and engineering tolerances.

  9. An approach for longer lifetime MCFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Masaru; Tatsumi, Masahiko; Hayano, Takuro

    1996-12-31

    For entering into commercialization of MCFC power plants in the beginning of the 21st century, we will devote to research for increasing lifetime as long as 40,000 hours with cell performance decay rate of 0.25 %/1000hrs as the target in FY 1999. This paper will discuss on our approach for longer lifetime MCFCs through electrolyte-loss management and NiO precipitation management as well as micro-structural control of electrodes and matrix plates. Cell voltage decay rate will be estimated by simulation through series of experiments on accelerated conditions.

  10. Impact resistance of fiber composites: Energy absorbing mechanisms and environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Energy absorbing mechanisms were identified by several approaches. The energy absorbing mechanisms considered are those in unidirectional composite beams subjected to impact. The approaches used include: mechanic models, statistical models, transient finite element analysis, and simple beam theory. Predicted results are correlated with experimental data from Charpy impact tests. The environmental effects on impact resistance are evaluated. Working definitions for energy absorbing and energy releasing mechanisms are proposed and a dynamic fracture progression is outlined. Possible generalizations to angle-plied laminates are described.

  11. Impact resistance of fiber composites - Energy-absorbing mechanisms and environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Energy absorbing mechanisms were identified by several approaches. The energy absorbing mechanisms considered are those in unidirectional composite beams subjected to impact. The approaches used include: mechanic models, statistical models, transient finite element analysis, and simple beam theory. Predicted results are correlated with experimental data from Charpy impact tests. The environmental effects on impact resistance are evaluated. Working definitions for energy absorbing and energy releasing mechanisms are proposed and a dynamic fracture progression is outlined. Possible generalizations to angle-plied laminates are described.

  12. First principle analyses of direct bandgap solar cells with absorbing substrates versus mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Alexander P.; Kirk, Wiley P.

    2013-11-07

    Direct bandgap InP, GaAs, CdTe, and Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P solar cells containing backside mirrors as well as parasitically absorbing substrates are analyzed for their limiting open circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency with comparison to record solar cells. From the principle of detailed balance, it is shown quantitatively that mirror solar cells have greater voltage and power conversion efficiency than their substrate counterparts. Next, the radiative recombination coefficient and maximum radiative lifetime of GaAs mirror and substrate solar cells are calculated and compared to the nonradiative Auger and Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes. Mirror solar cells have greater radiative lifetime than their substrate variants. Auger lifetime exceeds radiative lifetime for both substrate and mirror cells while SRH lifetime may be less or greater than radiative lifetime depending on trap concentration and capture cross section. Finally, the change in free energy of the photogenerated carriers is analyzed in a comparison between InP, GaAs, CdTe, and Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P mirror and substrate solar cells in order to characterize the relationship between solar photon quality and free energy management in solar cells with differing bandgaps. Wider bandgap visible threshold Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P solar cells make better use of the available change in free energy of the photogenerated charge carriers, even when normalized to the bandgap energy, than narrower bandgap near-IR threshold InP, GaAs, and CdTe solar cells.

  13. Minority Carrier Lifetime and Photoluminescence Studies of Antimony-Based Superlattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we have used the OMR technique to study the minority carrier lifetimes in three InAs/GaSb-photoluminescence (PL) structures with different number of periods in the absorber: 300, 400 and 600 periods respectively. The feasibility of using a visible 643 nm laser source with short penetration depth for lifetime measurements was studied by comparing the achieved results to measurements performed on the same samples with a 1550 nm IR laser source, which penetrates much deeper into the sample. Despite the differences in excitation wavelengths and penetration depths, the results from both measurements were very similar. This indicates that the diffusion length is long enough to facilitate a homogeneous distribution of excess carriers in the material.

  14. Geometry-dependent lifetime of Interatomic coulombic decay using equation-of-motion coupled cluster method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana

    2014-12-21

    Electronically excited atom or molecule in an environment can relax via transferring its excess energy to the neighboring atoms or molecules. The process is called Interatomic or Intermolecular coulombic decay (ICD). The ICD is a fast decay process in environment. Generally, the ICD mechanism predominates in weakly bound clusters. In this paper, we have applied the complex absorbing potential approach/equation-of-motion coupled cluster (CAP/EOMCCSD) method which is a combination of CAP and EOMCC approach to study the lifetime of ICD at various geometries of the molecules. We have applied this method to calculate the lifetime of ICD in Ne-X; X = Ne, Mg, Ar, systems. We compare our results with other theoretical and experimental results available in literature.

  15. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A...

  16. Comments on liquid hydrogen absorbers for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the heat transfer problems associatedwith a liquid hydrogen absorber for the MICE experiment. This reportdescribes a technique for modeling heat transfer from the outside world,to the abosrber case and in its vacuum vessel, to the hydrogen and theninto helium gas at 14 K. Also presented are the equation for freeconvection cooling of the liquid hydrogen in the absorber.

  17. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A...

  18. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A...

  1. Radiative Lifetimes for High Levels of Neutral Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, E.; Guzman, A.

    2013-01-01

    New radiative lifetime measurements for ~ 50 high lying levels of Fe I are reported. Laboratory astrophysics faces a challenge to provide basic spectroscopic data, especially reliable atomic transition probabilities, in the IR region for abundance studies. The availability of HgCdTe (HAWAII) detector arrays has opened IR spectral regions for extensive new spectroscopic studies. The SDSS III APOGEE project in the H-Band is an important example which will penetrate the dust obscuring the Galactic bulge. APOGEE will survey elemental abundances of 100,000 red giant stars in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. Many stellar spectra in the H-Band are, as expected, dominated by transitions of Fe I. Most of these IR transitions connect high levels of Fe. Our program has started an effort to meet this challenge with new radiative lifetime measurements on high lying levels of Fe I using time resolved laser induced fluorescence (TRLIF). The TRLIF method is typically accurate to 5% and is efficient. Our goal is to combine these accurate, absolute radiative lifetimes with emission branching fractions [1] to determine log(gf) values of the highest quality for Fe I lines in the UV, visible, and IR. This method was used very successfully by O’Brian et al. [2] on lower levels of Fe I. This method is still the best available for all but very simple spectra for which ab-initio theory is more accurate. Supported by NSF grant AST-0907732. [1] Branching fractions are being measured by M. Ruffoni and J. C. Pickering at Imperial College London. [2] O'Brian, T. R., Wickliffe, M. E., Lawler, J. E., Whaling, W., & Brault, J. W. 1991, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 8, 1185

  2. STK/Lifetime as a Replacement for Heritage Orbital Lifetime Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB) of NASNGSFC is tasked with determining the orbital lifetime of several developmental and operational satellites, which include the Hubble Space Telescope. A DOS based program developed by the FDAB many years ago, called PC Lifetime, is used to determine a satellite s lifetime and could soon be in need of a replacement. STK s Lifetime Object Tool is a possible candidate. Due to the reduced support of the PC Lifetime program, and the growing incompatibility of older programs with new operating systems, a comparative analysis was done to determine if STWLifetime could meet the stringent requirements that were laid before it. The use of highly accurate numerical propagators such as STK s High Precision Orbit Propagator ( OP) and the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) provided a basis on which to compare STWLifetime s results. Several test cases were run, but the main four test cases would determine whether or not STWLifetime could be PC- Lifetime s replacement. These four cases include a geotransfer orbit, two circular LEOS, and a Poiar LEO. Following rigorous testmg procedures, a conclusion will be determined. STK has proved to be a versatile program on many satellite missions and the FDAB has high hopes that it can pass FDAB s requirements for orbital lifetime prediction.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang; Klocke, Axel

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide insights int eh dynamic and structural properties of dyes and their micro- environment. The implementation of fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometric systems allows to monitor large cell and particle populations with high statistical significance. In our system, a modulated laser beam is used for excitation and the phase shift of the fluorescence signal recorded with a fast computer controlled digital oscilloscope is processed digitally to determine the phase shift with respect to a reference beam by fast fourier transform. Total fluorescence intensity as well as other parameters can be determined simultaneously from the same fluorescence signal. We use the epi-illumination design to allow the use of high numerical apertures to collect as much light as possible to ensure detection of even weak fluorescence. Data storage and processing is done comparable to slit-scan flow cytometric data using data analysis system. The results are stored, displayed, combined with other parameters and analyzed as normal listmode data. In our report we discuss carefully the signal to noise ratio for analog and digital processed lifetime signals to evaluate the theoretical minimum fluorescence intensity for lifetime measurements. Applications to be presented include DNA staining, parameters of cell functions as well as different applications in non-mammalian cells such as algae.

  4. Measurement of lifetimes in 23Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsebom, O. S.; Bender, P.; Cheeseman, A.; Christian, G.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D. S.; Davids, B.; Evitts, L. J.; Fallis, J.; Galinski, N.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Lighthall, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Machule, P.; Miller, D.; Nielsen, S. T.; Nobs, C. R.; Pearson, C. J.; Rajabali, M. M.; Radich, A. J.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Sanetullaev, A.; Unsworth, C. D.; Wrede, C.

    2016-02-01

    Several lifetimes in 23Mg have been determined for the first time using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. A Monte Carlo simulation code has been written to model the γ -ray line shape. An upper limit of τ <12 fs at the 95% C.L. has been obtained for the astrophysically important 7787 keV state.

  5. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  6. An Advanced Undergraduate Nuclear Lifetime experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollefson, A. A.; Prior, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment for measuring the lifetime of the 60-keV state in 237-Np which is populated in the alpha decay of 241-Am. The technique used is the delayed coincidence method using a time-to-pulse-height converter. (Author/GA)

  7. Materials Education: Opportunities over a Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver E.; Schwartz, Lyle H.; Faber, Katherine T.; Cargill III, G. Slade; Houston, Betsy

    2003-10-28

    A report, in the form of abbreviated notes, of the 17th Biennial Conference on National Materials Policy ''Materials Education: Opportunities over a Lifetime'' held May 20-21, 2002 in College Park, MD, sponsored by the Federation of Materials Societies and the University Materials Council.

  8. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  9. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  10. Residual Lifetimes in Random Parallel Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Frederick

    1990-01-01

    Explored are the distributions of residual components in two model systems. A system of components with exponentially distributed lifetimes and the two-dimensional "leaf model" in which objects fall on a plane with positions independent and normally distributed are discussed. Included are the definition, application, computations, and theorem. (KR)

  11. Structured Metal Film as Perfect Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2014-03-01

    With standing U-shaped resonators, fish-spear-like resonator has been designed for the first time as the building block to assemble perfect absorbers. The samples have been fabricated with two-photon polymerization process and FTIR measurement results support the effectiveness of the perfect absorber design. In such a structure the polarization-dependent resonance occurs between the tines of the spears instead of the conventional design where the resonance occurs between the metallic layers separated by a dielectric interlayer. The incident light neither transmits nor reflects back which results in unit absorbance. The power of light is trapped between the tines of spears and finally be absorbed. The whole structure is covered with a continuous metallic layer with good thermo-conductance, which provides an excellent approach to deal with heat dissipation, is enlightening in exploring metamaterial absorbers.

  12. Lifetime characteristics of ohmic MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, John; Majumder, Sumit; Morrison, Richard; Lampen, James

    2004-01-01

    In the future, MEMS switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, smart antennas, cell phones and switched filters for military and commercial markets, to name a few. Low power consumption, large ratio of off-impedance to on-impedance and the ability to be integrated with other electronics makes MEMS switches an attractive alternative to other mechanical and solid-state switches. Radant MEMS has developed an electrostatically actuated broadband ohmic microswitch that has applications from DC through the microwave region. The microswitch is a 3-terminal device based on a cantilever beam and is fabricated using an all-metal, surface micromachining process. It operates in a hermetic environment obtained through a wafer-bonding process. We have developed PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads. Best-case lifetimes of 1011 cycles have been achieved in T0-8 cans (a precursor to our wafer level cap) while greater than 1010 cycles have been achieved in the wafer level package. Several switches from different lots have been operated to 1010 cycles. Current typical lifetime exceeds 2 billion cycles and is limited by contact stiction resulting in stuck-closed failures. Stuck-closed failures can be intermittent with a large number of switches continuing to operate with occasional sticks beyond several billion cycles. To eliminate contact stiction, we need to better control the ambient gas composition in the die cavity. We expect lifetime to improve as we continue to develop and optimize the wafer capping process. We present DC and RF lifetime data under varying conditions.

  13. Lifetime characteristics of ohmic MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, John; Majumder, Sumit; Morrison, Richard; Lampen, James

    2003-12-01

    In the future, MEMS switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, smart antennas, cell phones and switched filters for military and commercial markets, to name a few. Low power consumption, large ratio of off-impedance to on-impedance and the ability to be integrated with other electronics makes MEMS switches an attractive alternative to other mechanical and solid-state switches. Radant MEMS has developed an electrostatically actuated broadband ohmic microswitch that has applications from DC through the microwave region. The microswitch is a 3-terminal device based on a cantilever beam and is fabricated using an all-metal, surface micromachining process. It operates in a hermetic environment obtained through a wafer-bonding process. We have developed PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads. Best-case lifetimes of 1011 cycles have been achieved in T0-8 cans (a precursor to our wafer level cap) while greater than 1010 cycles have been achieved in the wafer level package. Several switches from different lots have been operated to 1010 cycles. Current typical lifetime exceeds 2 billion cycles and is limited by contact stiction resulting in stuck-closed failures. Stuck-closed failures can be intermittent with a large number of switches continuing to operate with occasional sticks beyond several billion cycles. To eliminate contact stiction, we need to better control the ambient gas composition in the die cavity. We expect lifetime to improve as we continue to develop and optimize the wafer capping process. We present DC and RF lifetime data under varying conditions.

  14. Lifetime measurements in transitional nuclei by fast electronic scintillation timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, M. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Casten, R. F.; Amro, H.; Barton, C. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Cooper, J. R.; Gürdal, G.; Hecht, A. A.; Hutter, C.; Krücken, R.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Ressler, J. J.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D. S.; Gill, R. L.; Regan, P. H.

    2002-10-01

    A new generation of experiments studying nuclei in spherical-deformed transition regions has been motivated by the introduction of innovative theoretical approaches to the treatment of these nuclei. The important structural signatures in the transition regions, beyond the basic yrast level properties, involve γ-ray transitions between low-spin, non-yrast levels, and so information on γ-ray branching ratios and absolute matrix elements (or level lifetimes) for these transitions is crucial. A fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) system [H. Mach, R. L. Gill, and M. Moszyński, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 280, 49 (1989)], making use of BaF2 and plastic scintillation detectors, has been implemented at the Yale Moving Tape Collector for the measurement of lifetimes of states populated in β^ decay. Experiments in the A100 (Pd, Ru) and A150 (Dy, Yb) regions have been carried out, and a few examples will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under grants and contracts DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-88ER-40417, and DE-AC02-98CH10886 and by the German DFG under grant Pi 393/1.

  15. Long-Lifetime Low-Scatter Neutron Polarization Target

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jonathan M. Richardson

    2004-07-09

    Polarized neutrons scattering is an important technology for characterizing magnetic and other materials. Polarized helium three (P-3He) is a novel technology for creating polarized beams and, perhaps more importantly, for the analysis of polarization in highly divergent scattered beams. Analysis of scattered beams requires specialized targets with complex geometries to ensure accurate results. Special materials and handling procedures are required to give the targets a long useful lifetime. In most cases, the targets must be shielded from stray magnetic fields from nearby equipment. SRL has developed and demonstrated hybrid targets made from glass and aluminum. We have also developed and calibrated a low-field NMR system for measuring polarization lifetimes. We have demonstrated that our low-field system is able to measure NMR signals in the presence of conducting (metallic) cell elements. We have also demonstrated a non-magnetic valve that can be used to seal the cells. We feel that these accomplishments in Phase I are sufficient to ensure a successful Phase II program. The commercial market for this technology is solid. There are over nine neutron scattering centers in the US and Canada and over 22 abroad. Currently, the US plans to build a new $1.4B scattering facility called the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The technology developed in this project will allow SRL to supply targets to both existing and future facilities. SRL is also involved with the application of P-3He to medical imaging.

  16. A new laboratory-scale experimental facility for detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Garcia, Fabrisio; Santiago, Sergio; Luque, Salvador; Romero, Manuel; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new modular laboratory-scale experimental facility that was designed to conduct detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers for use in concentrating solar power plants. Absorbers are generally considered to be the element with the highest potential for efficiency gains in solar thermal energy systems. The configu-ration of volumetric absorbers enables concentrated solar radiation to penetrate deep into their solid structure, where it is progressively absorbed, prior to being transferred by convection to a working fluid flowing through the structure. Current design trends towards higher absorber outlet temperatures have led to the use of complex intricate geometries in novel ceramic and metallic elements to maximize the temperature deep inside the structure (thus reducing thermal emission losses at the front surface and increasing efficiency). Although numerical models simulate the conjugate heat transfer mechanisms along volumetric absorbers, they lack, in many cases, the accuracy that is required for precise aerothermal validations. The present work aims to aid this objective by the design, development, commissioning and operation of a new experimental facility which consists of a 7 kWe (1.2 kWth) high flux solar simulator, a radiation homogenizer, inlet and outlet collector modules and a working section that can accommodate volumetric absorbers up to 80 mm × 80 mm in cross-sectional area. Experimental measurements conducted in the facility include absorber solid temperature distributions along its depth, inlet and outlet air temperatures, air mass flow rate and pressure drop, incident radiative heat flux, and overall thermal efficiency. In addition, two windows allow for the direct visualization of the front and rear absorber surfaces, thus enabling full-coverage surface temperature measurements by thermal imaging cameras. This paper presents the results from the aerothermal characterization of a siliconized silicon

  17. A Broadband Micro-Machined Far-Infrared Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Datesman, A. M.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Miller, K. H.; Quijada, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The experimental investigation of a broadband far-infrared meta-material absorber is described. The observed absorptance is greater than 0.95 from 1 to 20 terahertz (300-15 microns) over a temperature range spanning 5-300 degrees Kelvin. The meta-material, realized from an array of tapers approximately 100 microns in length, is largely insensitive to the detailed geometry of these elements and is cryogenically compatible with silicon-based micro-machined technologies. The electromagnetic response is in general agreement with a physically motivated transmission line model.

  18. A broadband micro-machined far-infrared absorber.

    PubMed

    Wollack, E J; Datesman, A M; Jhabvala, C A; Miller, K H; Quijada, M A

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of a broadband far-infrared meta-material absorber is described. The observed absorptance is >0.95 from 1 to 20 THz (300-15 μm) over a temperature range spanning 5-300 K. The meta-material, realized from an array of tapers ≈100 μm in length, is largely insensitive to the detailed geometry of these elements and is cryogenically compatible with silicon-based micro-machined technologies. The electromagnetic response is in general agreement with a physically motivated transmission line model. PMID:27250445

  19. A broadband micro-machined far-infrared absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Datesman, A. M.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Miller, K. H.; Quijada, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of a broadband far-infrared meta-material absorber is described. The observed absorptance is >0.95 from 1 to 20 THz (300-15 μm) over a temperature range spanning 5-300 K. The meta-material, realized from an array of tapers ≈100 μm in length, is largely insensitive to the detailed geometry of these elements and is cryogenically compatible with silicon-based micro-machined technologies. The electromagnetic response is in general agreement with a physically motivated transmission line model.

  20. All-semiconductor negative-index plasmonic absorbers.

    PubMed

    Law, S; Roberts, C; Kilpatrick, T; Yu, L; Ribaudo, T; Shaner, E A; Podolskiy, V; Wasserman, D

    2014-01-10

    We demonstrate epitaxially grown all-semiconductor thin-film midinfrared plasmonic absorbers and show that absorption in these structures is linked to the excitation of highly confined negative-index surface plasmon polaritons. Strong (>98%) absorption is experimentally observed, and the spectral position and intensity of the absorption resonances are studied by reflection and transmission spectroscopy. Numerical models as well as an analytical description of the excited guided modes in our structures are presented, showing agreement with experiment. The structures investigated demonstrate a wavelength-flexible, all-semiconductor, plasmonic architecture with potential for both sensing applications and enhanced interaction of midinfrared radiation with integrated semiconductor optoelectronic elements. PMID:24483930

  1. The association of lifetime insight and cognition in psychosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Zarzuela, Amalia; Peralta, Victor; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2015-03-01

    Poor insight has been related to poor course in psychosis. However, the role of cognition in insight remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of cognition and lifetime psychopathological dimensions on insight in psychosis. We followed up 42 patients with psychotic disorders over 10years. Lifetime psychopathological dimensions and cognitive performance were assessed. Patients were divided into two groups by lifetime patterns of insight and compared with 42 healthy volunteers. Lower IQ and poorer social cognition were associated with higher risks of poorer lifetime insight of feeling ill and global insight respectively. Lifetime negative symptoms were associated with a higher risk of poorer lifetime insight into symptoms. Lifetime lack of insight is independent of cognitive impairment in specific domains, except for social cognition. Higher IQ may contribute to better lifetime awareness of illness, while better ability to manage emotions is involved in lifetime global insight.

  2. Lifetimes of superdeformed rotational states in {sup 36}Ar.

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, C. E.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Juodagalvis, A.; Poves, A.; Ragnarsson, I.; Aberg, S.; Appelbe, D. E.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Caurier, E.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M. A.; Diamond, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lane, G. J.; Lee, I. Y.; Nowacki, F.; Sarantites, D. G.; Stephens, F. S.; Vetter, K.; Ward, D.; Physics; LBNL; Lund Inst. of Tech.; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid; McMaster Univ.; TRIUMF; Univ. Louis Pasteur; Washington Univ.

    2001-06-01

    Lifetimes have been measured in a superdeformed rotational band recently identified in the N=Z nucleus {sup 36}Ar. A large low-spin quadrupole deformation ({beta}{sub 2}=0.46{+-}0.03) is confirmed and a decrease in the collectivity is observed as the high-spin band termination at I{sup {pi}}=16{sup +} is approached. Detailed comparisons of the experimental B(E2) values with the results of cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky and large-scale (s{sub 1/2}d{sub 3/2})-pf spherical shell model calculations indicate the need for a more refined treatment of transition matrix elements close to termination in the former, and the inclusion of the complete sd-pf model space in the latter description of this highly-collective rotational band.

  3. Thin film absorber for a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, William G.

    1985-01-01

    This invention pertains to energy absorbers for solar collectors, and more particularly to high performance thin film absorbers. The solar collectors comprising the absorber of this invention overcome several problems seen in current systems, such as excessive hardware, high cost and unreliability. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame with a thin film window bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber in accordance with the present invention is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. In a preferred embodiment, thin film layers are formed from a metal/plastic laminate. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. The absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  4. Multiple frequency fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Squire, A; Verveer, P J; Bastiaens, P I

    2000-02-01

    The experimental configuration and the computational algorithms for performing multiple frequency fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (mfFLIM) are described. The mfFLIM experimental set-up enables the simultaneous homodyne detection of fluorescence emission modulated at a set of harmonic frequencies. This was achieved in practice by using monochromatic laser light as an excitation source modulated at a harmonic set of frequencies. A minimum of four frequencies were obtained by the use of two standing wave acousto-optic modulators placed in series. Homodyne detection at each of these frequencies was performed simultaneously by mixing with matching harmonics present in the gain characteristics of a microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier. These harmonics arise as a natural consequence of applying a high frequency sinusoidal voltage to the photocathode of the device, which switches the flow of photoelectrons 'on' and 'off' as the sinus voltage swings from negative to positive. By changing the bias of the sinus it was possible to control the duration of the 'on' state of the intensifier relative to its 'off' state, enabling the amplitude of the higher harmonic content in the gain to be controlled. Relative modulation depths of 400% are theoretically possible from this form of square-pulse modulation. A phase-dependent integrated image is formed by the sum of the mixed frequencies on the phosphor of the MCP. Sampling this signal over a full period of the fundamental harmonic enables each harmonic to be resolved, provided that the Nyquist sampling criterion is satisfied for the highest harmonic component in the signal. At each frequency both the phase and modulation parameters can be estimated from a Fourier analysis of the data. These parameters enable the fractional populations and fluorescence lifetimes of individual components of a complex fluorescence decay to be resolved on a pixel-by-pixel basis using a non-linear fit to the dispersion relationships. The

  5. Wireless device for activation of an underground shock wave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, M.; Akhvlediani, I.; Bochorishvili, N.; Mataradze, E.

    2011-10-01

    The paper describes the mechanism and design of the wireless device for activation of energy absorber for localization of blast energy in underground openings. The statistics shows that the greatest share of accidents with fatal results associate with explosions in coal mines due to aero-methane and/or air-coal media explosion. The other significant problem is terrorist or accidental explosions in underground structures. At present there are different protective systems to reduce the blast energy. One of the main parts of protective Systems is blast Identification and Registration Module. The works conducted at G. Tsulukidze Mining Institute of Georgia enabled to construct the wireless system of explosion detection and mitigation of shock waves. The system is based on the constant control on overpressure. The experimental research continues to fulfill the system based on both threats, on the constant control on overpressure and flame parameters, especially in underground structures and coal mines. Reaching the threshold value of any of those parameters, the system immediately starts the activation. The absorber contains a pyrotechnic device ensuring the discharge of dispersed water. The operational parameters of wireless device and activation mechanisms of pyrotechnic element of shock wave absorber are discussed in the paper.

  6. Ultraviolet absorbance screening for DNAPL site compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Misquitta, N.; Foster, D.; Coll, F.; Brourman, M.

    1997-12-31

    The UV Absorbance Effectiveness Demonstration was developed to evaluate the feasibility of using UV absorbance as a surrogate for oil & grease methods of measuring the concentration of coal tar-related constituents in groundwater. Since the current oil & grease method via Freon{reg_sign} extraction is being phased out, a new alternative oil & grease method using a hexane extraction will be introduced in the near future. A secondary objective of this evaluation was to compare the two oil & grease methods, as they relate to facility groundwater, in order to demonstrate the overall robustness of UV absorbance as a surrogate for oil & grease analysis, regardless of the method of extraction.

  7. Bond integrity of microwave absorbers for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    A. Ananda; Y. Verma; B.T. Smith; P.H. Johnson; I.E. Campisi; K.E. Finger

    1992-10-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses superconducting niobium cavities. Specially developed microwave absorbing ceramics are used in the cavities to absorb the higher order mode power. The ceramic absorbers are brazed to copper mounts. The structural integrity and the thermal contact of the braze joints are essential. The ultrasonic reflection signal from the various bonds is evaluated to locate voids and partial braze surfaces. The acoustic wave properties of the four components of the structure are used as input to an ultrasonic transmission line model which is compared to the experimental data. There is good correlation between the ultrasonic reflection data and destructive testing of the bonds.

  8. Photoluminescence lifetime measurements in InP wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    A simple apparatus to measure the minority carrier lifetime in InP has been developed. The technique stimulates the sample with a short pulse of light from a diode laser and measures the photoluminescence decay to extract the minority carrier lifetime. The photoluminescence lifetime in InP as a function of doping on both n- and p-type material is examined. The results also show a marked difference in the lifetime of n-type InP and p-type InP of similar doping levels. N-type InP shows a lifetime considerably longer than the expected radiative limited lifetime.

  9. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  10. Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2007-05-22

    Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

  11. Lifetime cover in private insurance markets.

    PubMed

    Brown, H Shelton; Connelly, Luke B

    2005-03-01

    In the last few decades, private health insurance rates have declined in many countries. In countries and states with community rating, a major cause is adverse selection. In order to address age-based adverse selection, Australia has recently begun a novel approach which imposes stiff penalties for buying private insurance later in life, when expected costs are higher. In this paper, we analyze Australia's Lifetime Cover in the context of a modified version of the Rothschild-Stiglitz insurance model (Rothschild and Stiglitz, 1976). We allow empirically-based probabilities to increase by age for low-risk types. The model highlights the shortcomings of the Australian plan. Based on empirically-based probabilities of illness, we predict that Lifetime Cover will not arrest adverse selection. The model has many policy implications for government regulation encouraging long-term health coverage.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in heterogeneous scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Goro; Awasthi, Kamlesh; Furukawa, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence lifetime in heterogeneous multiple light scattering systems is analyzed by an algorithm without solving the diffusion or radiative transfer equations. The algorithm assumes that the optical properties of medium are constant in the excitation and emission wavelength regions. If the assumption is correct and the fluorophore is a single species, the fluorescence lifetime can be determined by a set of measurements of temporal point-spread function of the excitation light and fluorescence at two different concentrations of the fluorophore. This method is not dependent on the heterogeneity of the optical properties of the medium as well as the geometry of the excitation-detection on an arbitrary shape of the sample. The algorithm was validated by an indocyanine green fluorescence in phantom measurements and demonstrated by an in vivo measurement.

  13. Measurement of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, W.W.; Band, H.R.; Bloom, E.D.; Bosman, M.; Camporesi, T.; Chadwick, G.B.; Delfino, M.C.; De Sangro, R.; Ford, W.T.; Gettner, M.W.

    1986-09-01

    Data from e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions collected by the MAC detector at the SLAC storage ring PEP with a new vertex chamber having position resolution of 50 ..mu..m have been analyzed with a new method to make a determination of the lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks. In addition, data collected with MAC before the vertex chamber was installed have been re-analyzed using the new method. The combined result for the B lifetime is tau/sub b/ = (1.16 +- 0.16(stat.) +- 0.07(syst.)ps) x (1 +- 0.15), where the last factor is the scale. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. RDM lifetime measurements in 107Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Andgren, K.; Ashley, S.F.; Regan, P.H.; McCutchan, E.A.; Zamfir,N.V.; Amon, L.; Cakirli, R.B.; Casten, R.F.; Clark, R.M.; Gurdal, G.; Keyes, K.L.; Meyer, D.A.; Erduran, M.N.; Papenberg, A.; Pietralla, N.; Plettner, C.; Rainovski, G.; Ribas, R.V.; Thomas, N.J.; Vinson, J.; Warner, D.D.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.

    2005-03-18

    Lifetimes for decays linking near-yrast states in {sup 107}Cd have been measured using the recoil distance method (RDM). The nucleus of interest was populated via the {sup 98}Mo({sup 12}C,3n){sup 107}Cd fusion-evaporation reaction at an incident beam energy of 60 MeV. From the measured lifetimes, transition probabilities have been deduced and compared with the theoretical B(E2) values for limiting cases of harmonic vibrational and axially deformed rotational systems. Our initial results suggest a rotor-like behavior for the structure based on the unnatural-parity, h{sub 11/2} orbital in {sup 107}Cd, providing further evidence for the role of this 'shape-polarizing' orbital in stabilizing the nuclear deformation in the A {approx} 100 transitional region.

  15. New parameters influencing hydraulic runner lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourin, M.; Thibault, D.; Bouffard, D. A.; Lévesque, M.

    2010-08-01

    Traditionally, hydraulic runner mechanical design is based on calculation of static stresses. Today, validation of hydraulic runner design in terms of reliability requires taking into account the fatigue effect of dynamics loads. A damage tolerant approach based on fracture mechanics is the method chosen by Alstom and Hydro-Québec to study fatigue damage in runners. This requires a careful examination of all factors influencing material fatigue behavior. Such material behavior depends mainly on the chemical composition, microstructure and thermal history of the component, and on the resulting residual stresses. Measurement of fracture mechanics properties of various steels have demonstrated that runner lifetime can be significantly altered by differences in the manufacturing process, although remaining in accordance with agreed practices and standards such as ASTM. Carbon content and heat treatment are suspected to influence fatigue lifetime. This will have to be investigated by continuing the current research.

  16. Extending the lifetime of a quantum bit with error correction in superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Ofek, Nissim; Petrenko, Andrei; Heeres, Reinier; Reinhold, Philip; Leghtas, Zaki; Vlastakis, Brian; Liu, Yehan; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, S M; Jiang, L; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2016-08-25

    Quantum error correction (QEC) can overcome the errors experienced by qubits and is therefore an essential component of a future quantum computer. To implement QEC, a qubit is redundantly encoded in a higher-dimensional space using quantum states with carefully tailored symmetry properties. Projective measurements of these parity-type observables provide error syndrome information, with which errors can be corrected via simple operations. The 'break-even' point of QEC--at which the lifetime of a qubit exceeds the lifetime of the constituents of the system--has so far remained out of reach. Although previous works have demonstrated elements of QEC, they primarily illustrate the signatures or scaling properties of QEC codes rather than test the capacity of the system to preserve a qubit over time. Here we demonstrate a QEC system that reaches the break-even point by suppressing the natural errors due to energy loss for a qubit logically encoded in superpositions of Schrödinger-cat states of a superconducting resonator. We implement a full QEC protocol by using real-time feedback to encode, monitor naturally occurring errors, decode and correct. As measured by full process tomography, without any post-selection, the corrected qubit lifetime is 320 microseconds, which is longer than the lifetime of any of the parts of the system: 20 times longer than the lifetime of the transmon, about 2.2 times longer than the lifetime of an uncorrected logical encoding and about 1.1 longer than the lifetime of the best physical qubit (the |0〉f and |1〉f Fock states of the resonator). Our results illustrate the benefit of using hardware-efficient qubit encodings rather than traditional QEC schemes. Furthermore, they advance the field of experimental error correction from confirming basic concepts to exploring the metrics that drive system performance and the challenges in realizing a fault-tolerant system. PMID:27437573

  17. Extending the lifetime of a quantum bit with error correction in superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofek, Nissim; Petrenko, Andrei; Heeres, Reinier; Reinhold, Philip; Leghtas, Zaki; Vlastakis, Brian; Liu, Yehan; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, S. M.; Jiang, L.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum error correction (QEC) can overcome the errors experienced by qubits and is therefore an essential component of a future quantum computer. To implement QEC, a qubit is redundantly encoded in a higher-dimensional space using quantum states with carefully tailored symmetry properties. Projective measurements of these parity-type observables provide error syndrome information, with which errors can be corrected via simple operations. The ‘break-even’ point of QEC—at which the lifetime of a qubit exceeds the lifetime of the constituents of the system—has so far remained out of reach. Although previous works have demonstrated elements of QEC, they primarily illustrate the signatures or scaling properties of QEC codes rather than test the capacity of the system to preserve a qubit over time. Here we demonstrate a QEC system that reaches the break-even point by suppressing the natural errors due to energy loss for a qubit logically encoded in superpositions of Schrödinger-cat states of a superconducting resonator. We implement a full QEC protocol by using real-time feedback to encode, monitor naturally occurring errors, decode and correct. As measured by full process tomography, without any post-selection, the corrected qubit lifetime is 320 microseconds, which is longer than the lifetime of any of the parts of the system: 20 times longer than the lifetime of the transmon, about 2.2 times longer than the lifetime of an uncorrected logical encoding and about 1.1 longer than the lifetime of the best physical qubit (the |0>f and |1>f Fock states of the resonator). Our results illustrate the benefit of using hardware-efficient qubit encodings rather than traditional QEC schemes. Furthermore, they advance the field of experimental error correction from confirming basic concepts to exploring the metrics that drive system performance and the challenges in realizing a fault-tolerant system.

  18. $B$ mixing and lifetimes at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Piedra, J.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. Both the D0 and CDF experiments have collected a sample of about 1 fb{sup -1}. they report results on three topics: b-hadron lifetimes, polarization amplitudes and the decay width difference in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  19. Extended Jarosite Lifetimes in High Salinity Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwood Madden, M. E.; Madden, A. S.

    2008-12-01

    Particle lifetime calculations utilizing olivine (Olsen and Rimstidt, 2007; Stopar et al., 2006) and jarosite (Elwood Madden et al. 2008) dissolution rates have been used to constrain the duration of aqueous environments on the surface of Mars. Previous rate experiments have shown that jarosite dissolves relatively quickly in dilute aqueous solutions leading to short particle lifetimes. However, mineralogy and bulk chemistry of outcrops containing jarosite at Meridiani Planum suggest high salinity fluids were active in the region. The goal of this study is to determine the effects of high salinity (low activity of water) on jarosite dissolution rates. K-jarosite was synthesized using the methods of Baron and Palmer (1996) and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, BET surface area analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microcopy. Dissolution experiments were conducted by adding 0.5 g K- jarosite to 500 g ultrapure water at 293K. Samples were collected from the continuously-stirred batch reaction at predetermined intervals and filtered using 0.2 micron filters. K+ concentrations in the resulting supernatants were measured using atomic adsorption spectroscopy to determine the rate of jarosite dissolution. Jarosite dissolution experiments in halite saturated brine result in dissolution rates over one order of magnitude slower than similar experiments conducted in dilute solutions. Dissolution in ultrapure water proceeds at log k= -8.5. Jarosite dissolution in halite saturated brine is significantly slower: log k = -10. Using a shrinking sphere model to calculate particle lifetimes, the lifetime of a 10 micron diameter jarosite particle is extended from 1-2 years in dilute solutions to 100 years in high salinity brine. This suggests that while jarosite is an ephemeral phase in dilute solutions, it may persist for significantly longer time periods in high salinity waters, such as those interpreted at Meridiani Planum based on bulk chemistry

  20. Lifetimes of agents under external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Claus O.; Martinetz, Thomas

    1999-03-01

    An exact formula for the distribution of lifetimes in coherent-noise models and related models is derived. For certain stress distributions, this formula can be analytically evaluated and yields simple closed expressions. For those types of stress for which a closed expression is not available, a numerical evaluation can be done in a straightforward way. All results obtained are in perfect agreement with numerical experiments. The implications for the coherent-noise models' application to macroevolution are discussed.

  1. B lifetimes and mixing with the SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The lifetimes of B{sup 0} and B{sup {plus_minus}} mesons have been measured with the SLD detector at the SLC using topological reconstructions of the B mesons. Studies of B{sub s} mixing, using similar techniques, show that the prospects for measuring B{sub s} mixing with an upgraded vertex detector are good if x{sub x} {le} 15.

  2. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition. PMID:26500051

  3. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition.

  4. Predicting metapopulation lifetime from macroscopic network properties.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Martin

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a comparatively simple approximation formula for the mean life time of a metapopulation in a habitat network where habitat patch arrangement may be irregular and patch sizes differ. It is based on previous work on the development of an analytical approximation formula by Frank and Wissel [K. Frank, C. Wissel, A formula for the mean lifetime of metapopulations in heterogeneous landscapes, Am. Nat. 159 (2002) 530] and extends it by abstracting from individual patch locations. The mean metapopulation lifetime is expressed as a function of four macroscopic network properties: the ratio of dispersal range and network size, the ratio of range of environmental correlation and network size, and the total number and (geometric mean) size of the patches. The analysis takes into account that (ceteris paribus) patches close to the boundary of the habitat network contribute less to metapopulation survival than patches close to the centre of the network. Ignoring this fact can lead to a substantial overestimation of the mean metapopulation lifetime. Due to its numerical simplicity, the formula can be used as a conservation objective function even in complex network design problems where the number of patches to be allocated is very large. Numerical tests of the formula show that it performs very well within a wide range of network structures. PMID:19159631

  5. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Wright, Richard N.; Swank, William D.; Lister, Tedd E.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2007-10-23

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  6. Energy absorber uses expanded coiled tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Mechanical shock mitigating device, based on working material to its failure point, absorbs mechanical energy by bending or twisting tubing. It functions under axial or tangential loading, has no rebound, is area independent, and is easy and inexpensive to build.

  7. Attenuation of external Bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaliwal, A.S.; Powar, M.S.; Singh, M. )

    1990-12-01

    In this paper attenuation of bremsstrahlung from {sup 147}Pm and {sup 170}Tm beta emitters has been studied in aluminum, copper, tin, and lead metallic absorbers. Bremsstrahlung spectra and mass attenuation coefficients for monoenergetic gamma rays are used to calculate theoretical attenuation curves. Magnetic deflection and beta stopping techniques are used to measure the integral bremsstrahlung intensities above 30 keV in different target thicknesses. Comparison of measured and calculated attenuation curves shows a good agreement for various absorbers, thus providing a test of this technique, which may be useful in understanding bremsstrahlung intensity buildup and in the design of optimum shielding for bremsstrahlung sources. It is found that the absorption of bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers does not obey an exponential law and that absorbers act as energy filters.

  8. Shock absorber for an oil well pumping unit

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, D.H. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    A shock absorber is disclosed for the pumping unit of an oil well, adapted to be placed between the walking beam and a string of sucker rods in the borehole. The shock absorber has a tubular body of steel (or an equivalent structural material) having a closed top and an open bottom. A circular top on the tubular body has a central opening through which the polished rod is adapted to pass; and a rod clamp is affixed to the polished rod-above the tubular body. A plurality of elastomeric discs, typically four or five, are positioned in a stack within the tubular body; and each disc has an external diameter which is slightly less than the internal diameter of the tubular body. The plurality of elastomeric discs rest on top of a rigid circular plate having an OD smaller than the ID of the tubular body; and the circular plate, in turn, rests on top of a rigid spool. The spool has a central opening which is significantly larger than the diameter of the polished rod, so that there is no risk of establishing rubbing contact between the spool and the carefully machined and highly polished rod. The spool rests upon and bears against the top of the hanger bar, such that upwardly directed vertical loads on the hanger bar are passed first to the spool, then to the circular plate, and then to the elastomeric discs-which constitute the vibration damping and shock insulating elements of the shock absorber. Because of the closed top and open bottom, no water can accumulate within the shock absorber; and there is no possibility of the device ''freezing up'' in very cold weather.

  9. Porous absorber for solar air heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, J.A.

    1980-09-10

    A general discussion of the factors affecting solar collector performance is presented. Bench scale tests done to try to determine the heat transfer characteristics of various screen materials are explained. The design, performance, and evaluation of a crude collector with a simple screen stack absorber is treated. The more sophisticated absorber concept, and its first experimental approximation is examined. A short summary of future plans for the collector concept is included. (MHR)

  10. Taming electromagnetic metamaterials for isotropic perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anh, Doan Tung; Viet, Do Thanh; Trang, Pham Thi; Thang, Nguyen Manh; Quy, Ho Quang; Hieu, Nguyen Van; Lam, Vu Dinh; Tung, Nguyen Thanh

    2015-07-01

    Conventional metamaterial absorbers, which consist of a dielectric spacer sandwiched between metamaterial resonators and a metallic ground plane, have been inherently anisotropic. In this paper, we present an alternative approach for isotropic perfect absorbers using symmetric metamaterial structures. We show that by systematically manipulating the electrically and magnetically induced losses, one can achieve a desired absorption without breaking the structural homogeneity. Finite integration simulations and standard retrieval method are performed to elaborate on our idea.

  11. Structured metal film as a perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Hu, Yu-Hui; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2013-08-01

    A new type of absorber, a four-tined fish-spear-like resonator (FFR), constructed by the two-photon polymerization process, is reported. An absorbance of more than 90% is experimentally realized and the resonance occurs in the space between the tines. Since a continuous layer of metallic thin film covers the structure, it is perfectly thermo- and electroconductive, which is the mostly desired feature for many applications. PMID:23661582

  12. Perfect terahertz absorber using fishnet based metafilm

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu; Chen, Houtong; Taylor, Antoinette; Smirnova, E I; O' Hara, John F

    2009-01-01

    We present a perfect terahertz (THz) absorber working for a broad-angle of incidence. The two fold symmetry of rectangular fishnet structure allows either complete absorption or mirror like reflection depending on the polarization of incident the THz beam. Metamaterials enable the ability to control the electromagnetic wave in a unique fashion by designing the permittivity or permeability of composite materials with desired values. Although the initial idea of metamaterials was to obtain a negative index medium, however, the evolution of metamaterials (MMs) offers a variety of practically applicable devices for controlling electromagnetic wave such as tunable filters, modulators, phase shifters, compact antenna, absorbers, etc. Terahertz regime, a crucial domain of the electromagnetic wave, is suffering from the scarcity of the efficient devices and might take the advantage of metamaterials. Here, we demonstrate design, fabrication, and characterization of a terahertz absorber based on a simple fishnet metallic film separated from a ground mirror plane by a dielectric spacer. Such absorbers are in particular important for bolometric terahertz detectors, high sensitivity imaging, and terahertz anechoic chambers. Recently, split-ring-resonators (SRR) have been employed for metamaterial-based absorbers at microwave and THz frequencies. The experimental demonstration reveals that such absorbers have absorptivity close to unity at resonance frequencies. However, the downside of these designs is that they all employ resonators of rather complicated shape with many fine parts and so they are not easy to fabricate and are sensitive to distortions.

  13. Fiberglass honeycomb elements formed quickly and cheaply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    Cookie cutter device initiates production of identical, double-contoured fiber glass elements used as shock absorbers. Three-bladed edges convert triangular honeycomb elements into hexagonal shapes which are then stamped to desired length by concave and convex dies. Sandpaper smoothing completes the process.

  14. Glory on Venus cloud tops and the unknown UV absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiewicz, W. J.; Petrova, E.; Shalygina, O.; Almeida, M.; Titov, D. V.; Limaye, S. S.; Ignatiev, N.; Roatsch, T.; Matz, K. D.

    2014-05-01

    We report on the implications of the observations of the glory phenomenon made recently by Venus Express orbiter. Glory is an optical phenomenon that poses stringent constraints on the cloud properties. These observations thus enable us to constrain two properties of the particles at the cloud tops (about 70 km altitude) which are responsible for a large fraction of the solar energy absorbed by Venus. Firstly we obtain a very accurate estimate of the cloud particles size to be 1.2 μm with a very narrow size distribution. We also find that for the two observations presented here the clouds are homogenous, as far as cloud particles sizes are concerned, on scale of at least 1200 km. This is in contrast to previous estimates that were either local, from entry probes data, or averaged over space and time from polarization data. Secondly we find that the refractive index for the data discussed here is higher than that of sulfuric acid previously proposed for the clouds composition (Hansen, J.E., Hovenier, J.W. [1974]. J. Atmos. Sci. 31, 1137-1160; Ragent, B. et al. [1985]. Adv. Space Res. 5, 85-115). Assuming that the species contributing to the increase of the refractive index is the same as the unknown UV absorber, we are able to constrain the list of candidates. We investigated several possibilities and argue that either small ferric chloride (FeCl3) cores inside sulfuric acid particles or elemental sulfur coating their surface are good explanations of the observation. Both ferric chloride and elemental sulfur have been suggested in the past as candidates for the as yet unknown UV absorber (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2006]. Planet. Space Sci. 54, 1352-1359; Mills, F.P. et al. [2007]. In: Esposito, L.W., Stofan, E.R., Cravens, T.E. (Eds.), Exploring Venus as a Terrestrial Planet, vol. 176. AGU Monogr. Ser., Washington, DC, pp. 73-100).

  15. In-Orbit Lifetime Prediction for LEO and HEO Based on Orbit Determination from TLE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueda, A.; Aivar, L.; Tirado, J.; Dolado, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Objects in Low-Earth Orbits (LEO) and Highly Elliptical Orbits (HEO) are subjected to decay and re-entry into the atmosphere due mainly to the drag force. While being this process the best solution to avoid the proliferation of debris in space and ensure the sustainability of future space activities, it implies a threat to the population on ground. Thus, the prediction of the in-orbit lifetime of an object and the evaluation of the risk on population and ground assets constitutes a crucial task. This paper will concentrate on the first of these tasks. Unfortunately the lifetime of an object in space is remarkably difficult to predict. This is mainly due to the dependence of the atmospheric drag on a number of uncertain elements such as the density profile and its dependence on the solar activity, the atmospheric conditions, the mass and surface area of the object (very difficult to evaluate), its uncontrolled attitude, etc. In this paper we will present a method for the prediction of this lifetime based on publicly available Two-Line Elements (TLEs) from the American USSTRATCOM's Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC). TLEs constitute an excellent source to access routinely orbital information for thousands of objects even though of their reduced and unpredictable accuracy. Additionally, the implementation of the method on a CNES's Java-based tool will be presented. This tool (OPERA) is executed routinely at CNES to predict the orbital lifetime of a whole catalogue of objects.

  16. Lifetime increase using passive harmonic cavities insynchrotronlight sources

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Georgsson, M.

    2000-09-22

    Harmonic cavities have been used in storage rings to increase beam lifetime and Landau damping by lengthening the bunch.The need for lifetime increase is particularly great in the present generation of low to medium energy synchrotron light sources where the small transverse beam sizes lead to relatively short lifetimes from large-angle intrabeam (Touschek) scattering. We review the beam dynamics of harmonic radiofrequency (RF) systems and discuss optimization of the beam lifetime using passive harmonic cavities.

  17. Optimization of a bolometer detector for ITER based on Pt absorber on SiN membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Meister, H.; Eich, T.; Endstrasser, N.; Giannone, L.; Kannamueller, M.; Kling, A.; Koll, J.; Trautmann, T.; Detemple, P.; Schmitt, S.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-10-15

    Any plasma diagnostic in ITER must be able to operate at temperatures in excess of 200 deg. C and neutron loads corresponding to 0.1 dpa over its lifetime. To achieve this aim for the bolometer diagnostic, a miniaturized metal resistor bolometer detector based on Pt absorbers galvanically deposited on SiN membranes is being developed. The first two generations of detectors featured up to 4.5 {mu}m thick absorbers. Results from laboratory tests are presented characterizing the dependence of their calibration constants under thermal loads up to 450 deg. C. Several detectors have been tested in ASDEX Upgrade providing reliable data but also pointing out the need for further optimization. A laser trimming procedure has been implemented to reduce the mismatch in meander resistances below 1% for one detector and the thermal drifts from this mismatch.

  18. Optimization of a bolometer detector for ITER based on Pt absorber on SiN membrane.

    PubMed

    Meister, H; Eich, T; Endstrasser, N; Giannone, L; Kannamüller, M; Kling, A; Koll, J; Trautmann, T; Detemple, P; Schmitt, S

    2010-10-01

    Any plasma diagnostic in ITER must be able to operate at temperatures in excess of 200 °C and neutron loads corresponding to 0.1 dpa over its lifetime. To achieve this aim for the bolometer diagnostic, a miniaturized metal resistor bolometer detector based on Pt absorbers galvanically deposited on SiN membranes is being developed. The first two generations of detectors featured up to 4.5 μm thick absorbers. Results from laboratory tests are presented characterizing the dependence of their calibration constants under thermal loads up to 450 °C. Several detectors have been tested in ASDEX Upgrade providing reliable data but also pointing out the need for further optimization. A laser trimming procedure has been implemented to reduce the mismatch in meander resistances below 1% for one detector and the thermal drifts from this mismatch.

  19. Lifetime's Limited Feminism: Defining and Deconstructing Television for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundley, Heather

    The Lifetime Television Network has established itself within the cable industry as the only network that explicitly gendercasts its programming. Lifetime specifically markets itself as "Television for Women"; however, what that means exactly is not clear. On the one hand, Lifetime does not want to be noted as the "feminist network." Yet, former…

  20. 42 CFR 409.65 - Lifetime reserve days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Scope of Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.65 Lifetime reserve days. (a... days, the hospital or CAH may bill Medicare for lifetime reserve days unless the beneficiary elects not.... (3) If the beneficiary elects not to use lifetime reserve days for a particular hospital or CAH...

  1. On the definition of absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before.

  2. Long-term global observations of UV-absorbing aerosols from ERS-2/GOME data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.

    2003-04-01

    Absorbing aerosols are important in the Earth's climate system, as they absorb solar radiation in the Earth's atmosphere. The main species of UV-absorbing aerosols are desert dust and biomass burning aerosols. Their lifetimes in the atmosphere are usually short, in the order of days to weeks, resulting in strong temporal and spatial variations in aerosol concentrations with peak concentrations near the source, creating a necessity for long-term global observations of aerosol properties and concentrations. Global distributions of UV-absorbing aerosols are obtained using the absorbing aerosol index (AAI), which measures the departure of the observed spectral contrast at 340 nm and 380 nm from that of a molecular atmosphere. It is a measure for the presence of elevated absorbing aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere using space-borne sensors operating in the UV, like TOMS, and recently GOME and SCIAMACHY. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) on board the ERS-2 satellite has been observing the atmosphere continuously since 1995. It is a nadir-looking spectrometer measuring from about 240 to 790 nm, with a resolution of 0.2 nm in the UV range. The basic quantities observed by GOME are the spectral irradiance of the Sun and the spectral radiance of the Earth at the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA). These data were used to create a long-term data set of global AAI distributions, ranging from 1995 to 2002. Sensitivity studies have shown that polarisation has a considerable effect on the AAI computation. Therefore, the molecular atmosphere radiation is calculated with the Doubling-Adding KNMI (DAK) radiative transfer code in which polarisation effects are included. Here the results of the data set are presented.

  3. Photoexcited triplet states of new UV absorbers, cinnamic acid 2-methylphenyl esters.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Azusa; Saito, Haruo; Mori, Masao; Yagi, Mikio

    2011-12-01

    Phosphorescence spectra of nonphosphorescent or very weakly phosphorescent new UV absorbers, 2-methylphenyl cinnamate (MePC), 2-methylphenyl 4-methoxycinnamate (MePMC) and 2-methylphenyl 4-ethoxycinnamate (MePEC) have been observed by using external heavy atom effects of ethyl iodide in ethanol at 77 K. The lowest excited triplet (T(1)) energies of these new UV absorbers are lower than those of a widely used UV-A absorber, 4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzoylmethane (BM-DBM), in both keto and enol forms. The intermolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer from photolabile BM-DBM to MePMC was observed by measuring the time-resolved phosphorescence spectra. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra have been observed for the T(1) states of these new UV absorbers in ethanol at 77 K by using benzophenone as a triplet sensitizer. The observed T(1) lifetimes, zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters and molecular orbital calculations of the ZFS parameters suggest that T(1) states of these new UV absorbers posses mainly (3)ππ* character. The deactivation processes of the lowest excited singlet (S(1)) states are predominantly fluorescence and internal conversion to the ground (G) states in MePMC and MePEC, while the main deactivation process of the S(1) state of MePC is internal conversion to the G state. The molar absorption coefficients of MePMC and MePEC in the UV-A and UV-B regions are larger than that of most widely used UV-B absorber, octyl methoxycinnamate. PMID:22002255

  4. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  5. Absorbed dose rates in tissue from prompt gamma emissions from near-thermal neutron absorption

    DOE PAGES

    Schwahn, Scott O.

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency s Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment.

  6. Lifetime Assessment of the NEXT Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    Ion thrusters are low thrust, high specific impulse devices with required operational lifetimes on the order of 10,000 to 100,000 hr. The NEXT ion thruster is the latest generation of ion thrusters under development. The NEXT ion thruster currently has a qualification level propellant throughput requirement of 450 kg of xenon, which corresponds to roughly 22,000 hr of operation at the highest throttling point. Currently, a NEXT engineering model ion thruster with prototype model ion optics is undergoing a long duration test to determine wear characteristics and establish propellant throughput capability. The NEXT thruster includes many improvements over previous generations of ion thrusters, but two of its component improvements have a larger effect on thruster lifetime. These include the ion optics with tighter tolerances, a masked region and better gap control, and the discharge cathode keeper material change to graphite. Data from the NEXT 2000 hr wear test, the NEXT long duration test, and further analysis is used to determine the expected lifetime of the NEXT ion thruster. This paper will review the predictions for all of the anticipated failure mechanisms. The mechanisms will include wear of the ion optics and cathode s orifice plate and keeper from the plasma, depletion of low work function material in each cathode s insert, and spalling of material in the discharge chamber leading to arcing. Based on the analysis of the NEXT ion thruster, the first failure mode for operation above a specific impulse of 2000 sec is expected to be the structural failure of the ion optics at 750 kg of propellant throughput, 1.7 times the qualification requirement. An assessment based on mission analyses for operation below a specific impulse of 2000 sec indicates that the NEXT thruster is capable of double the propellant throughput required by these missions.

  7. It's elemental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Periodic Table of the elements will now have to be updated. An international team of researchers has added element 110 to the Earth's armory of elements. Though short-lived—of the order of microseconds, element 110 bottoms out the list as the heaviest known element on the planet. Scientists at the Heavy Ion Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany, made the 110-proton element by colliding a lead isotope with nickel atoms. The element, which is yet to be named, has an atomic mass of 269.

  8. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  9. Finite quasiparticle lifetime in disordered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žemlička, M.; Neilinger, P.; Trgala, M.; Rehák, M.; Manca, D.; Grajcar, M.; Szabó, P.; Samuely, P.; Gaži, Š.; Hübner, U.; Vinokur, V. M.; Il'ichev, E.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the complex conductivity of a highly disordered MoC superconducting film with kFl ≈1 , where kF is the Fermi wave number and l is the mean free path, derived from experimental transmission characteristics of coplanar waveguide resonators in a wide temperature range below the superconducting transition temperature Tc. We find that the original Mattis-Bardeen model with a finite quasiparticle lifetime, τ , offers a perfect description of the experimentally observed complex conductivity. We show that τ is appreciably reduced by scattering effects. Characteristics of the scattering centers are independently found by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and agree with those determined from the complex conductivity.

  10. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging and its biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi

    Even though oxygen plays a crucial role in body function and cancer biology, methods of measuring oxygen level in tissue are all limited. The current gold standard relies on an invasive electrode for only single-point reading at a time. The photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) approach overcomes these major limitations by applying photoacoustic probing to oxygen-sensitive optical transient absorption. The capability of assessing oxygen distribution is demonstrated by imaging tumor hypoxia in a small animal model, and monitoring changes of tissue oxygen induced by external modulations. Proposed applications of this imaging technique includes imaging-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) and activatable probes for molecular imaging.

  11. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  12. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  13. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, Kenneth T; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G.; Terrill, Edward R.; Borowczak, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  14. Measurement of the {tau} lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; (The SLD Collabor...

    1995-11-01

    A measurement of the lifetime of the {tau} lepton has been made using a sample of 1671 {ital Z}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} decays collected by the SLD detector at the SLC. The measurement benefits from the small and stable collision region at the SLC and the precision pixel vertex detector of the SLD. Three analysis techniques have been used: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The combined result is {tau}{sub {tau}}=297{plus_minus}9 (stat){plus_minus}5(syst) fs.

  15. UCNtau: Study of Lifetime Measurement in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Alexander; Salvat, D.; Adamek, E.; Bowman, D.; Clayton, S.; Cude, C.; Fox, W.; Hogan, G.; Hickerson, K.; Holley, A. T.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M.; Manus, G.; Morris, C.; Penttila, S.; Ramsey, J.; Sawtelle, S.; Solberg, K.; Vanderwerp, J.; VornDick, B.; Walstrom, P.; Wang, Z.; Young, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The UCNtau project is intended to develop a new measurement of the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons (UCNs) stored in a magneto-gravitational trap. In this article, we will describe the development of the experiment so far, including the trap itself, the UCN transport and monitoring system, the neutron detection methods, and the Monte Carlo simulations that have been used to model these elements. Finally, we will describe the first systematic effects that we plan to study using this apparatus.

  16. Ultrathin flexible dual band terahertz absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yan; Chen, Lin; Shi, Cheng; Cheng, Zhaoxiang; Zang, Xiaofei; Xu, Boqing; Zhu, Yiming

    2015-09-01

    We propose an ultrathin and flexible dual band absorber operated at terahertz frequencies based on metamaterial. The metamaterial structure consists of periodical split ring resonators with two asymmetric gaps and a metallic ground plane, separated by a thin-flexible dielectric spacer. Particularly, the dielectric spacer is a free-standing polyimide film with thickness of 25 μm, resulting in highly flexible for our absorber and making it promising for non-planar applications such as micro-bolometers and stealth aircraft. Experimental results show that the absorber has two resonant absorption frequencies (0.41 THz and 0.75 THz) with absorption rates 92.2% and 97.4%, respectively. The resonances at the absorption frequencies come from normal dipole resonance and high-order dipole resonance which is inaccessible in the symmetrical structure. Multiple reflection interference theory is used to analyze the mechanism of the absorber and the results are in good agreement with simulated and experimental results. Furthermore, the absorption properties are studied under various spacer thicknesses. This kind of metamaterial absorber is insensitive to polarization, has high absorption rates (over 90%) with wide incident angles range from 0° to 45° and the absorption rates are also above 90% when wrapping it to a curved surface.

  17. Ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds in marine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Chalker, B.E.; Dunlap, W.C. )

    1990-01-09

    Studies on the biological effects of solar ultraviolet radiations are becoming increasingly common, in part due to recent interest in the Antarctic ozone hole and in the perceived potential for global climate change. Marine organisms possess many strategies for ameliorating the potentially damaging effects of UV-B (280-320 nm) and the shorter wavelengths of UV-A (320-400nm). One mechanism is the synthesis of bioaccumulation of ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds. Several investigators have noted the presence of absorbing compounds in spectrophotometer scans of extracts from a variety of marine organisms, particularly algae and coelenterates containing endosymbiotic algae. The absorbing compounds are often mycosporine-like amino acids. Thirteen mycosporine-like amino acids have already been described, and several others have recently been detected. Although, the mycosporine-like amino acids are widely distributed. these compounds are by no means the only type of UV-B absorbing compounds which has been identified. Coumarins from green algae, quinones from sponges, and indoles from a variety of sources are laternative examples which are documented in the natural products literature. When the biological impact of solar ultraviolet radiation is assessed, adequate attention must be devoted to the process of photoadaptation, including the accumulation of ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds.

  18. Oxygen absorbers in food preservation: a review.

    PubMed

    Cichello, Simon Angelo

    2015-04-01

    The preservation of packaged food against oxidative degradation is essential to establish and improve food shelf life, customer acceptability, and increase food security. Oxygen absorbers have an important role in the removal of dissolved oxygen, preserving the colour, texture and aroma of different food products, and importantly inhibition of food spoilage microbes. Active packaging technology in food preservation has improved over decades mostly due to the sealing of foods in oxygen impermeable package material and the quality of oxygen absorber. Ferrous iron oxides are the most reliable and commonly used oxygen absorbers within the food industry. Oxygen absorbers have been transformed from sachets of dried iron-powder to simple self-adhesive patches to accommodate any custom size, capacity and application. Oxygen concentration can be effectively lowered to 100 ppm, with applications spanning a wide range of food products and beverages across the world (i.e. bread, meat, fish, fruit, and cheese). Newer molecules that preserve packaged food materials from all forms of degradation are being developed, however oxygen absorbers remain a staple product for the preservation of food and pharmaceutical products to reduce food wastage in developed nations and increased food security in the developing & third world. PMID:25829570

  19. An extremely wideband and lightweight metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Pei, Zhibin; Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Zhang, Anxue; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional microwave metamaterial absorber based on the stand-up resistive film patch array. The absorber has wideband absorption, lightweight, and polarization-independent properties. Our design comes from the array of unidirectional stand-up resistive film patches backed by a metallic plane, which can excite multiple standing wave modes. By rolling the resistive film patches as a square enclosure, we obtain the polarization-independent property. Due to the multiple standing wave modes, the most incident energy is dissipated by the resistive film patches, and thus, the ultra-wideband absorption can be achieved by overlapping all the absorption modes at different frequencies. Both the simulated and experimental results show that the absorber possesses a fractional bandwidth of 148.2% with the absorption above 90% in the frequency range from 3.9 to 26.2 GHz. Moreover, the proposed absorber is extremely lightweight. The areal density of the fabricated sample is about 0.062 g/cm2, which is approximately equivalent to that of eight stacked standard A4 office papers. It is expected that our proposed absorber may find potential applications such as electromagnetic interference and stealth technologies.

  20. Ultra-broadband infrared metasurface absorber.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenliang; Liu, Yuexia; Han, Tiancheng

    2016-09-01

    By using sub-wavelength resonators, metamaterial absorber shows great potential in many scientific and technical applications due to its perfect absorption characteristics. For most practical applications, the absorption bandwidth is one of the most important performance metrics. In this paper, we demonstrate the design of an ultra-broadband infrared absorber based on metasurface. Compared with the prior work [Opt. Express22(S7), A1713-A1724 (2014)], the proposed absorber shows more than twice the absorption bandwidth. The simulated total absorption exceeds 90% from 7.8 to 12.1 um and the full width at half maximum is 50% (from 7.5 to 12.5 μm), which is achieved by using a single layer of metasurface. Further study demonstrates that the absorption bandwidth can be greatly expanded by using two layers of metasurface, i.e. dual-layered absorber. The total absorption of the dual-layered absorber exceeds 80% from 5.2 to 13.7 um and the full width at half maximum is 95% (from 5.1 to 14.1 μm), much greater than those previously reported for infrared spectrum. The absorption decreases with fluctuations as the incident angle increases but remains quasi-constant up to relatively large angles. PMID:27607662

  1. Solar absorber material reflectivity measurements at temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bonometti, J.A.; Hawk, C.W.

    1999-07-01

    Assessment of absorber shell material properties at high operating temperatures is essential to the full understanding of the solar energy absorption process in a solar thermal rocket. A review of these properties, their application and a new experimental methodology to measure them at high temperatures is presented. The direct application for the research is absorber cavity development for a Solar Thermal Upper Stage (STUS). High temperature measurements, greater than 1,000 Kelvin, are difficult to obtain for incident radiation upon a solid surface that forms an absorber cavity in a solar thermal engine. The basic material properties determine the amount of solar energy that is absorbed, transmitted or reflected and are dependent upon the material's temperature. This investigation developed a new approach to evaluate the material properties (i.e., reflectivity, absorptive) of the absorber wall and experimentally determined them for rhenium and niobium sample coupons. The secular reflectivity was measured both at room temperature and at temperatures near 1,000 Kelvin over a range of angles from 0 to 90 degrees. The same experimental measurements were used to calculate the total reflectivity of the sample by integrating the recorded intensities over a hemisphere. The test methodology used the incident solar energy as the heating source while directly measuring the reflected light (an integrated value over all visible wavelengths). Temperature dependence on total reflectivity was found to follow an inverse power function of the material's temperature.

  2. Oxygen absorbers in food preservation: a review.

    PubMed

    Cichello, Simon Angelo

    2015-04-01

    The preservation of packaged food against oxidative degradation is essential to establish and improve food shelf life, customer acceptability, and increase food security. Oxygen absorbers have an important role in the removal of dissolved oxygen, preserving the colour, texture and aroma of different food products, and importantly inhibition of food spoilage microbes. Active packaging technology in food preservation has improved over decades mostly due to the sealing of foods in oxygen impermeable package material and the quality of oxygen absorber. Ferrous iron oxides are the most reliable and commonly used oxygen absorbers within the food industry. Oxygen absorbers have been transformed from sachets of dried iron-powder to simple self-adhesive patches to accommodate any custom size, capacity and application. Oxygen concentration can be effectively lowered to 100 ppm, with applications spanning a wide range of food products and beverages across the world (i.e. bread, meat, fish, fruit, and cheese). Newer molecules that preserve packaged food materials from all forms of degradation are being developed, however oxygen absorbers remain a staple product for the preservation of food and pharmaceutical products to reduce food wastage in developed nations and increased food security in the developing & third world.

  3. Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

  4. A satellite mortality study to support space systems lifetime prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George; Salazar, Ronald; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Dubos, Gregory F.

    Estimating the operational lifetime of satellites and spacecraft is a complex process. Operational lifetime can differ from mission design lifetime for a variety of reasons. Unexpected mortality can occur due to human errors in design and fabrication, to human errors in launch and operations, to random anomalies of hardware and software or even satellite function degradation or technology change, leading to unrealized economic or mission return. This study focuses on data collection of public information using, for the first time, a large, publically available dataset, and preliminary analysis of satellite lifetimes, both operational lifetime and design lifetime. The objective of this study is the illustration of the relationship of design life to actual lifetime for some representative classes of satellites and spacecraft. First, a Weibull and Exponential lifetime analysis comparison is performed on the ratio of mission operating lifetime to design life, accounting for terminated and ongoing missions. Next a Kaplan-Meier survivor function, standard practice for clinical trials analysis, is estimated from operating lifetime. Bootstrap resampling is used to provide uncertainty estimates of selected survival probabilities. This study highlights the need for more detailed databases and engineering reliability models of satellite lifetime that include satellite systems and subsystems, operations procedures and environmental characteristics to support the design of complex, multi-generation, long-lived space systems in Earth orbit.

  5. A Satellite Mortality Study to Support Space Systems Lifetime Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, George; Salazar, Ronald; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Dubos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the operational lifetime of satellites and spacecraft is a complex process. Operational lifetime can differ from mission design lifetime for a variety of reasons. Unexpected mortality can occur due to human errors in design and fabrication, to human errors in launch and operations, to random anomalies of hardware and software or even satellite function degradation or technology change, leading to unrealized economic or mission return. This study focuses on data collection of public information using, for the first time, a large, publically available dataset, and preliminary analysis of satellite lifetimes, both operational lifetime and design lifetime. The objective of this study is the illustration of the relationship of design life to actual lifetime for some representative classes of satellites and spacecraft. First, a Weibull and Exponential lifetime analysis comparison is performed on the ratio of mission operating lifetime to design life, accounting for terminated and ongoing missions. Next a Kaplan-Meier survivor function, standard practice for clinical trials analysis, is estimated from operating lifetime. Bootstrap resampling is used to provide uncertainty estimates of selected survival probabilities. This study highlights the need for more detailed databases and engineering reliability models of satellite lifetime that include satellite systems and subsystems, operations procedures and environmental characteristics to support the design of complex, multi-generation, long-lived space systems in Earth orbit.

  6. Rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, Herbert J.; Clark, Philip M.; Gilcrest, James D.

    1978-06-20

    A rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed fuel elements. The enclosures are fixed at the lower ends thereof to a base. Pockets are formed between confronting walls of adjacent enclosures for receiving high absorption neutron absorbers, such as Boral, cadmium, borated stainless steel and the like for the closer spacing of spent fuel elements.

  7. Circular polarization sensitive absorbers based on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kunpeng; Wang, Min; Pu, Mingbo; Wu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Hui; Hu, Chenggang; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the polarization of a linearly polarized (LP) light would rotate after passing through a single layer graphene under the bias of a perpendicular magnetostatic field. Here we show that a corresponding phase shift could be expected for circularly polarized (CP) light, which can be engineered to design the circular polarization sensitive devices. We theoretically validate that an ultrathin graphene-based absorber with the thickness about λ/76 can be obtained, which shows efficient absorption >90% within incident angles of ±80°. The angle-independent phase shift produced by the graphene is responsible for the nearly omnidirectional absorber. Furthermore, a broadband absorber in frequencies ranging from 2.343 to 5.885 THz with absorption over 90% is designed by engineering the dispersion of graphene. PMID:27034257

  8. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  9. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  10. Lifetime monogamy and the evolution of eusociality

    PubMed Central

    Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2009-01-01

    All evidence currently available indicates that obligatory sterile eusocial castes only arose via the association of lifetime monogamous parents and offspring. This is consistent with Hamilton's rule (brs > roc), but implies that relatedness cancels out of the equation because average relatedness to siblings (rs) and offspring (ro) are both predictably 0.5. This equality implies that any infinitesimally small benefit of helping at the maternal nest (b), relative to the cost in personal reproduction (c) that persists throughout the lifespan of entire cohorts of helpers suffices to establish permanent eusociality, so that group benefits can increase gradually during, but mostly after the transition. The monogamy window can be conceptualized as a singularity comparable with the single zygote commitment of gametes in eukaryotes. The increase of colony size in ants, bees, wasps and termites is thus analogous to the evolution of multicellularity. Focusing on lifetime monogamy as a universal precondition for the evolution of obligate eusociality simplifies the theory and may help to resolve controversies about levels of selection and targets of adaptation. The monogamy window underlines that cooperative breeding and eusociality are different domains of social evolution, characterized by different sectors of parameter space for Hamilton's rule. PMID:19805427

  11. Atmospheric lifetime of SF5CF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Nakayama, T.; Matsumi, Y.; Solomon, S.; Gejo, T.; Shigemasa, E.; Wallington, T. J.

    2002-08-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption spectrum of SF5CF3 was measured over the range 106-200 nm. At 121.6 nm, σ(base e) = (7.8 +/- 0.6) × 10-18 cm2 molecule-1, in which quoted uncertainty includes two standard deviation from the least-square fit in the Beer-Lambert plot and our estimate of potential systematic errors associated with measurements of the reactant concentrations. The VUV spectrum and literature data for electron attachment and ion-molecule reactions were incorporated into a model of the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere. This information provides better constraints on the atmospheric lifetime and hence on the potential of this highly radiatively-active trace gas to influence the climate system. The atmospheric lifetime of SF5CF3 is dominated by dissociative electron attachment and is estimated to be approximately 950 years. Solar proton events could reduce this to a lower limit of 650 years.

  12. Heuristic Modeling for TRMM Lifetime Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, P. S.; Sharer, P. J.; DeFazio, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis time for computing the expected mission lifetimes of proposed frequently maneuvering, tightly altitude constrained, Earth orbiting spacecraft have been significantly reduced by means of a heuristic modeling method implemented in a commercial-off-the-shelf spreadsheet product (QuattroPro) running on a personal computer (PC). The method uses a look-up table to estimate the maneuver frequency per month as a function of the spacecraft ballistic coefficient and the solar flux index, then computes the associated fuel use by a simple engine model. Maneuver frequency data points are produced by means of a single 1-month run of traditional mission analysis software for each of the 12 to 25 data points required for the table. As the data point computations are required only a mission design start-up and on the occasion of significant mission redesigns, the dependence on time consuming traditional modeling methods is dramatically reduced. Results to date have agreed with traditional methods to within 1 to 1.5 percent. The spreadsheet approach is applicable to a wide variety of Earth orbiting spacecraft with tight altitude constraints. It will be particularly useful to such missions as the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission scheduled for launch in 1997, whose mission lifetime calculations are heavily dependent on frequently revised solar flux predictions.

  13. Lifetime of the Excited State In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Govindjee; Hammond, J. H.; Merkelo, H.

    1972-01-01

    Lifetime of the excited state (τ) of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) in photosynthetic bacteria, measured with a mode-locked argon laser (oscillating at 488 nm; mode locked at 56 MHz) as light source, ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 nsec. These τ values are reported with a precision of ±0.1 nsec. The value of τ at high exciting light intensity (I) was two to three times that at low intensity. For young cultures of green bacterium Chloropseudomonas ethylicum, τ ranged from 0.5 (low I) to 1.0 nsec (high I); for those of the purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, from 0.4 (low I) to 1.0 nsec (high I); and for those of the BChl b-containing Rhodopseudomonas viridis, from 1.0 (low I) to 2.5 nsec (high I). These data provide information regarding the efficiencies of the photochemical process in these bacteria. Quantum yield (ø) of BChl fluorescence, calculated from ø = τ/τ0 (where τ0 is the intrinsic lifetime of fluorescence), ranges from 2-6% at low intensities to 6-14% at high intensities. PMID:4624833

  14. Revisiting cosmological bounds on radiative neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Montanino, Daniele; Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2007-09-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments and direct bounds on absolute masses constrain neutrino mass differences to fall into the microwave energy range, for most of the allowed parameter space. As a consequence of these recent phenomenological advances, older constraints on radiative neutrino decays based on diffuse background radiations and assuming strongly hierarchical masses in the eV range are now outdated. We thus derive new bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board the Cosmic Background Explorer. The lower bound on the lifetime is between a fewx10{sup 19} s and {approx}5x10{sup 20} s, depending on the neutrino mass ordering and on the absolute mass scale. However, due to phase space limitations, the upper bound in terms of the effective magnetic moment mediating the decay is not better than {approx}10{sup -8} Bohr magnetons. We also comment about possible improvements of these limits, by means of recent diffuse infrared photon background data. We compare these bounds with preexisting limits coming from laboratory or astrophysical arguments. We emphasize the complementarity of our results with others available in the literature.

  15. Absorber topography dependence of phase edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, Aamod; Sczyrba, Martin; Connolly, Brid; Waller, Laura; Neureuther, Andy

    2015-10-01

    Mask topography contributes to phase at the wafer plane, even for OMOG binary masks currently in use at the 22nm node in deep UV (193nm) lithography. Here, numerical experiments with rigorous FDTD simulation are used to study the impact of mask 3D effects on aerial imaging, by varying the height of the absorber stack and its sidewall angle. Using a thin mask boundary layer model to fit to rigorous simulations it is seen that increasing the absorber thickness, and hence the phase through the middle of a feature (bulk phase) monotonically changes the wafer-plane phase. Absorber height also influences best focus, revealed by an up/down shift in the Bossung plot (linewidth vs. defocus). Bossung plot tilt, however, responsible for process window variability at the wafer, is insensitive to changes in the absorber height (and hence also the bulk phase). It is seen to depend instead on EM edge diffraction from the thick mask edge (edge phase), but stays constant for variations in mask thickness within a 10% range. Both bulk phase and edge phase are also independent of sidewall angle fluctuation, which is seen to linearly affect the CD at the wafer, but does not alter wafer phase or the defocus process window. Notably, as mask topography varies, the effect of edge phase can be replicated by a thin mask model with 8nm wide boundary layers, irrespective of absorber height or sidewall angle. The conclusions are validated with measurements on phase shifting masks having different topographic parameters, confirming the strong dependence of phase variations at the wafer on bulk phase of the mask absorber.

  16. Precise dispersion equations of absorbing filter glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichel, S.; Biertümpfel, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The refractive indices versus wavelength of optical transparent glasses are measured at a few wavelengths only. In order to calculate the refractive index at any wavelength, a so-called Sellmeier series is used as an approximation of the wavelength dependent refractive index. Such a Sellmeier representation assumes an absorbing free (= loss less) material. In optical transparent glasses this assumption is valid since the absorption of such transparent glasses is very low. However, optical filter glasses have often a rather high absorbance in certain regions of the spectrum. The exact description of the wavelength dependent function of the refractive index is essential for an optimized design for sophisticated optical applications. Digital cameras use an IR cut filter to ensure good color rendition and image quality. In order to reduce ghost images by reflections and to be nearly angle independent absorbing filter glass is used, e.g. blue glass BG60 from SCHOTT. Nowadays digital cameras improve their performance and so the IR cut filter needs to be improved and thus the accurate knowledge of the refractive index (dispersion) of the used glasses must be known. But absorbing filter glass is not loss less as needed for a Sellmeier representation. In addition it is very difficult to measure it in the absorption region of the filter glass. We have focused a lot of effort on measuring the refractive index at specific wavelength for absorbing filter glass - even in the absorption region. It will be described how to do such a measurement. In addition we estimate the use of a Sellmeier representation for filter glasses. It turns out that in most cases a Sellmeier representation can be used even for absorbing filter glasses. Finally Sellmeier coefficients for the approximation of the refractive index will be given for different filter glasses.

  17. Engineering reverse saturable absorbers for desired wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.; Scharf, Benjamin

    1986-06-01

    A variety of applications exist for reverse saturable absorbers (RSAs) in laser science (RSAs are substances whose excited-state absorption cross section is larger than their ground-state absorption cross section at a given wavelength and possess a number of other properties). We propose an approach to designing RSAs at a desired wavelength by construction of dimers of dye molecules which absorb near the wavelength of interest. The dimer ground-state absorption is to a state in which the excitation is spread over both monomeric units and the excited-state absorption commences from this state to the doubly excited electronic state in which both monomeric units are excited.

  18. Spin Particle in an Absorbing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amooshahi, M.

    2015-10-01

    The quantum dynamics of a localized spin Particle interacting with an absorbing environment is investigated. The quantum Langevin-Schrödinger equation for spin is obtained. The susceptibility function of the environment is calculated in terms of the coupling function of the spin and the environment. it is shown that the susceptibility function satisfies the Kramers-Kronig relations. Spontaneous emission and the shift frequency of the spin is obtained in terms of the imaginary part of the susceptibility function in frequency domain. Some transition probabilities between the spin states are calculated when the absorbing environment is in the thermal state.

  19. OSCEE fan exhaust bulk absorber treatment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Samanich, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    The acoustic suppression capability of bulk absorber material designed for use in the fan exhaust duct walls of the quiet clean short haul experiment engine (OCSEE UTW) was evaluated. The acoustic suppression to the original design for the engine fan duct which consisted of phased single degree-of-freedom wall treatment was tested with a splitter and also with the splitter removed. Peak suppression was about as predicted with the bulk absorber configuration, however, the broadband characteristics were not attained. Post test inspection revealed surface oil contamination on the bulk material which could have caused the loss in bandwidth suppression.

  20. Multi-Absorber Transition-Edge Sensors for X-Ray Astronomy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porst, J. P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing multi-absorber Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) for applications in x-ray astronomy. These position-sensitive devices consist of multiple x-ray absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to a single readout TES. Heat diffusion between the absorbers and the TES gives rise to a characteristic pulse shape corresponding to each absorber element and enables position discrimination. The development of these detectors is motivated by a desire to maximize focal plane arrays with the fewest number of readout channels. In this contribution we report on the first results from devices consisting of nine) 65 X 65 sq. microns Au x-ray absorbers) 5 microns thick. These are coupled to a single 35 X 35 sq. microns Mo/Au bilayer TES. These devices have demonstrated full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of 2.1 eV at 1.5 keV) 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV and 3.3 eV at 8 keV. This is coupled with position discrimination from pulse shape over the same energy range. We use a finite-element model to reproduce the measured pulse shapes and investigate the detector non-linearity with energy) which impacts on the devices position sensitivity and energy resolution.

  1. Direct observation of minority carrier lifetime improvement in InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice photodiodes via interfacial layer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Daniel; Qiao, Pengfei; Wasserman, Daniel; Lien Chuang, Shun

    2013-04-01

    We present improved performance in strain-balanced InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice photodetectors grown using InSb interfacial layers, measured using a cross-sectional electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique to obtain minority carrier diffusion characteristics. We detail a modified EBIC model that accounts for the long absorber regions in photodetectors and fit the experimental data. We find a significant increase in the minority hole lifetime (up to 157 ns) and increased minority electron lifetime due to the interfacial layers. Additionally, electrical characterization of the device temperature-dependent resistance-area product reveals that the interfacial treatment improves the device dark current at lower temperatures.

  2. S∧4 Reactor: Operating Lifetime and Estimates of Temperature and Burnup Reactivity Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The S∧4 reactor has a sectored, Mo-14%Re solid core for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion. The reactor is loaded with UN fuel, cooled with a He-Xe gas mixture at ~1200 K and operates at steady thermal power of 550 kW. Following a launch abort accident, the axial and radial BeO reflectors easily disassemble upon impact so that the bare reactor is subcriticial when submerged in wet sand or seawater and the core voids are filled with seawater. Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) additives have been shown to increase the UN fuel enrichment and significantly reduce the total mass of the reactor. This paper investigates the effects of SSA additions on the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients and the operational lifetime of the S∧4 reactor. SSAs slightly decrease the temperature reactivity feedback coefficient, but significantly increase the operating lifetime by decreasing the burnup reactivity coefficient. With no SSAs, fuel enrichment is only 58.5 wt% and the estimated operating lifetime is the shortest (7.6 years) with the highest temperature and burnup reactivity feedback coefficients (-0.2709 ¢/K and -1.3470 $/atom%). With europium-151 and gadolinium-155 additions, the enrichment (91.5 and 94 wt%) and operating lifetime (9.9 and 9.8 years) of the S∧4 reactor are the highest while the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients (-0.2382 and -0.2447 ¢/K -0.9073 and 0.8502 $/atom%) are the lowest.

  3. A Titanium Nitride Absorber for Controlling Optical Crosstalk in Horn-Coupled Aluminum LEKID Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarrick, H.; Flanigan, D.; Jones, G.; Johnson, B. R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bradford, K.; Bryan, S.; Cantor, R.; Che, G.; Day, P.; Doyle, S.; Leduc, H.; Limon, M.; Mauskopf, P.; Miller, A.; Mroczkowski, T.; Tucker, C.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the design and measured performance of a titanium nitride (TiN) mesh absorber we are developing for controlling optical crosstalk in horn-coupled lumped-element kinetic inductance detector (LEKID) arrays for millimeter wavelengths. This absorber was added to the fused silica anti-reflection coating attached to previously characterized, 20-element prototype arrays of LEKIDs fabricated from thin-film aluminum on silicon substrates. To test the TiN crosstalk absorber, we compared the measured response and noise properties of LEKID arrays with and without the TiN mesh. For this test, the LEKIDs were illuminated with an adjustable, incoherent electronic millimeter-wave source. Our measurements show that the optical crosstalk in the LEKID array with the TiN absorber is reduced by 66 % on average, so the approach is effective and a viable candidate for future kilo-pixel arrays.

  4. FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, J.J.

    1963-09-24

    A method is described whereby fuel tubes or pins are cut, loaded with fuel pellets and a heat transfer medium, sealed at each end with slotted fittings, and assembled into a rectangular tube bundle to form a fuel element. The tubes comprising the fuel element are laterally connected between their ends by clips and tabs to form a linear group of spaced parallel tubes, which receive their vertical support by resting on a grid. The advantages of this method are that it permits elimination of structural material (e.g., fuel-element cans) within the reactor core, and removal of at least one fuel pin from an element and replacement thereof so that a burnable poison may be utilized during the core lifetime. (AEC)

  5. Education and Lifetime Earnings in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tamborini, Christopher R.; Kim, ChangHwan; Sakamoto, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Differences in lifetime earnings by educational attainment have been of great research and policy interest. Although a large literature examines earnings differences by educational attainment, research on lifetime earnings—which refers to total accumulated earnings from entry into the labor market until retirement—remains limited because of the paucity of adequate data. Using data that match respondents in the Survey of Income and Program Participation to their longitudinal tax earnings as recorded by the Social Security Administration, we estimate the 50-year work career effects of education on lifetime earnings for men and women. By overcoming the purely synthetic cohort approach, our results provide a more realistic appraisal of actual patterns of lifetime earnings. Detailed estimates are provided for gross lifetime earnings by education; net lifetime earnings after controlling for covariates associated with the probability of obtaining a bachelor’s degree; and the net present 50-year lifetime value of education at age 20. In addition, we provide estimates that include individuals with zero earnings and disability. We also assess the adequacy of the purely synthetic cohort approach, which uses age differences in earnings observed in cross-sectional surveys to approximate lifetime earnings. Overall, our results confirm the persistent positive effects of higher education on earnings over different stages of the work career and over a lifetime, but also reveal notably smaller net effects on lifetime earnings compared with previously reported estimates. We discuss the implications of these and other findings. PMID:26100983

  6. Education and Lifetime Earnings in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, Christopher R; Kim, ChangHwan; Sakamoto, Arthur

    2015-08-01

    Differences in lifetime earnings by educational attainment have been of great research and policy interest. Although a large literature examines earnings differences by educational attainment, research on lifetime earnings--which refers to total accumulated earnings from entry into the labor market until retirement--remains limited because of the paucity of adequate data. Using data that match respondents in the Survey of Income and Program Participation to their longitudinal tax earnings as recorded by the Social Security Administration, we estimate the 50-year work career effects of education on lifetime earnings for men and women. By overcoming the purely synthetic cohort approach, our results provide a more realistic appraisal of actual patterns of lifetime earnings. Detailed estimates are provided for gross lifetime earnings by education; net lifetime earnings after controlling for covariates associated with the probability of obtaining a bachelor's degree; and the net present 50-year lifetime value of education at age 20. In addition, we provide estimates that include individuals with zero earnings and disability. We also assess the adequacy of the purely synthetic cohort approach, which uses age differences in earnings observed in cross-sectional surveys to approximate lifetime earnings. Overall, our results confirm the persistent positive effects of higher education on earnings over different stages of the work career and over a lifetime, but also reveal notably smaller net effects on lifetime earnings compared with previously reported estimates. We discuss the implications of these and other findings. PMID:26100983

  7. The Cooling of a Liquid Absorber using a Small Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Liggins, N.

    2005-08-24

    This report discusses the use of small cryogenic coolers for cooling the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) liquid cryogen absorbers. Since the absorber must be able contain liquid helium as well liquid hydrogen, the characteristics of the available 4.2 K coolers are used here. The issues associated with connecting two-stage coolers to liquid absorbers are discussed. The projected heat flows into an absorber and the cool-down of the absorbers using the cooler are presented. The warm-up of the absorber is discussed. Special hydrogen safety issues that may result from the use of a cooler on the absorbers are also discussed.

  8. Tunable metamaterial dual-band terahertz absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, C. Y.; Li, Z. Z.; Guo, Z. H.; Yue, J.; Luo, Q.; Yao, G.; Ji, J.; Rao, Y. K.; Li, R. K.; Li, D.; Wang, H. X.; Yao, J. Q.; Ling, F. R.

    2015-11-01

    We report a design of a temperature controlled tunable dual band terahertz absorber. The compact single unit cell consists of two nested closed square ring resonators and a layer metallic separated by a substrate strontium titanate (STO) dielectric layer. It is found that the absorber has two distinctive absorption peaks at frequencies 0.096 THz and 0.137 THz, whose peaks are attained 97% and 75%. Cooling the absorber from 400 K to 250 K causes about 25% and 27% shift compared to the resonance frequency of room temperature, when we cooling the temperature to 150 K, we could attained both the two tunabilities exceeding 53%. The frequency tunability is owing to the variation of the dielectric constant of the low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate. The mechanism of the dual band absorber is attributed to the overlapping of dual resonance frequencies, and could be demonstrated by the distributions of the electric field. The method opens up avenues for designing tunable terahertz devices in detection, imaging, and stealth technology.

  9. Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Lee, Myung W.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

  10. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  11. Optimization of ramified absorber networks doing desalination.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Martin S; Heiss, Gregor; Hübler, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    An iterated function system is used to generate fractal-like ramified graph networks of absorbers, which are optimized for desalination performance. The diffusion equation is solved for the boundary case of constant pressure difference at the absorbers and a constant ambient salt concentration far from the absorbers, while constraining both the total length of the network and the total area of the absorbers to be constant as functions of generation G. A linearized form of the solution was put in dimensionless form which depends only on a dimensionless membrane resistance, a dimensionless inverse svelteness ratio, and G. For each of the first nine generations G=2,…,10, the optimal graph shapes were obtained. Total water production rate increases parabolically as a function of generation, with a maximum at G=7. Total water production rate is shown to be approximately linearly related to the power consumed, for a fixed generation. Branching ratios which are optimal for desalination asymptote decreasingly to r=0.510 for large G, while branching angles which are optimal for desalination asymptote decreasingly to 1.17 radians. Asymmetric graphs were found to be less efficient for desalination than symmetric graphs. The geometry which is optimal for desalination does not depend strongly on the dimensionless parameters, but the optimal water production does. The optimal generation was found to increase with the inverse svelteness ratio.

  12. Estimating the radiation absorbed by a human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Natasha A.; Warland, Jon S.; Brown, Robert D.; Gillespie, Terry G.

    2008-07-01

    The complexities of the interactions between long- and short-wave radiation fluxes and the human body make it inherently difficult to estimate precisely the total radiation absorbed ( R) by a human in an outdoor environment. The purpose of this project was to assess and compare three methods to estimate the radiation absorbed by a human in an outdoor environment, and to compare the impact of applying various skin and clothing albedos ( α h ) on R. Field tests were conducted under both clear and overcast skies to evaluate the performance of applying a cylindrical radiation thermometer (CRT), net radiometer, and a theoretical estimation model to predict R. Three albedos were evaluated: light ( α h = 0.57), medium ( α h = 0.37), and dark ( α h = 0.21). During the sampling periods, the range of error between the methods used to estimate the radiation absorbed by a cylindrical body under clear and overcast skies ranged from 3 to 8%. Clothing and skin albedo had a substantial impact on R, with the mean change in R between the darkest and lightest albedos ranging from 115 to 157 W m - 2 over the sampling period. Radiation is one of the most important variables to consider in outdoor thermal comfort research, as R is often the largest contributor to the human energy balance equation. The methods outlined and assessed in this study can be conveniently applied to provide reliable estimates of the radiation absorbed by a human in an outdoor environment.

  13. Aldehyde-containing urea-absorbing polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Hsu, G. C.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A novel aldehyde containing polymer (ACP) is prepared by reaction of a polysaccharide with periodate to introduce aldehyde groups onto the C2 - C3 carbon atoms. By introduction of ether and ester groups onto the pendant primary hydroxyl solubility characteristics are modified. The ACP is utilized to absorb nitrogen bases such as urea in vitro or in vivo.

  14. Shock absorber protects motive components against overloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Shock absorber with an output shaft, hollow gear, and a pair of springs forming a resilient driving connection between shaft and gear, operates when abnormally high torques are applied. This simple durable frictional device is valuable in rotating mechanisms subject to sudden overloads.

  15. Elemental ZOO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helser, Terry L.

    2003-04-01

    This puzzle uses the symbols of 39 elements to spell the names of 25 animals found in zoos. Underlined spaces and the names of the elements serve as clues. To solve the puzzle, students must find the symbols that correspond to the elemental names and rearrange them into the animals' names.

  16. Finite quasiparticle lifetime in disordered superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Zemlicka, M.; Neilinger, P.; Trgala, M; Rehak, M; Manca, D.; Grajcar, M.; Szabo, P.; Samuely, P.; Gazi, S.; Hubner, U.; Vinokur, V. M.; Il'ichev, E.

    2015-12-08

    We investigate the complex conductivity of a highly disordered MoC superconducting film with k(F)l approximate to 1, where k(F) is the Fermi wave number and l is the mean free path, derived from experimental transmission characteristics of coplanar waveguide resonators in a wide temperature range below the superconducting transition temperature T-c. We find that the original Mattis-Bardeen model with a finite quasiparticle lifetime, tau, offers a perfect description of the experimentally observed complex conductivity. We show that iota is appreciably reduced by scattering effects. Characteristics of the scattering centers are independently found by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and agree with those determined from the complex conductivity.

  17. Plunger Lifetime Measurements in 102Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyva, G.; Spyrou, A.; Axiotis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Saha, B.; Liennemann, A.; Vlastou, R.; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; Rusu, C.; De Angelis, G.; Ur, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Balabanski, D. L.; Julin, R.

    2006-04-26

    Recently, an intense experimental effort has been devoted to the search of empirical proofs of critical-point symmetries in nuclear structure. These symmetries describe shape-phase transitions and provide parameter-free predictions (up to over-all scale factors) for excitation spectra and B(E2) values. This contribution reports on recent plunger-lifetime measurements ON 102Pd carried out at LNL, Legnaro, with the Cologne plunger apparatus coupled to the GASP spectrometer and using the 92Zr(13C,3n)102Pd reaction at 48 MeV. According to the results of our measurements, 102Pd is so far the best known paradigm of the E(5) critical-point symmetry.

  18. Lifetime of stringy de Sitter vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    In this note we perform a synopsis of the life-times from vacuum decay of several de Sitter vacuum constructions in string/M-theory which have a single dS minimum arising from lifting a pre-existing AdS extremum and no other local minima existent after lifting. For these vacua the decay proceeds via a Coleman-De Luccia instanton towards the universal Minkowski minimum at infinite volume. This can be calculated using the thin-wall approximation, provided the cosmological constant of the local dS minimum is tuned sufficiently small. We compare the estimates for the different model classes and find them all stable in the sense of exponentially long life times as long as they have a very small cosmological constant and a scale of supersymmetry breaking gsim TeV.

  19. Theoretical uncertainties in proton lifetime estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolešová, Helena; Malinský, Michal; Mede, Timon

    2016-06-01

    We recapitulate the primary sources of theoretical uncertainties in proton lifetime estimates in renormalizable, four-dimensional & non-supersymmetric grand unifications that represent the most conservative framework in which this question may be addressed at the perturbative level. We point out that many of these uncertainties are so severe and often even irreducible that there are only very few scenarios in which an NLO approach, as crucial as it is for a real testability of any specific model, is actually sensible. Among these, the most promising seems to be the minimal renormalizable SO(10) GUT whose high-energy gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken by the adjoint and the five-index antisymmetric irreducible representations.

  20. Predicting the Lifetimes of Nuclear Waste Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Fraser

    2014-03-01

    As for many aspects of the disposal of nuclear waste, the greatest challenge we have in the study of container materials is the prediction of the long-term performance over periods of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. Various methods have been used for predicting the lifetime of containers for the disposal of high-level waste or spent fuel in deep geological repositories. Both mechanical and corrosion-related failure mechanisms need to be considered, although until recently the interactions of mechanical and corrosion degradation modes have not been considered in detail. Failure from mechanical degradation modes has tended to be treated through suitable container design. In comparison, the inevitable loss of container integrity due to corrosion has been treated by developing specific corrosion models. The most important aspect, however, is to be able to justify the long-term predictions by demonstrating a mechanistic understanding of the various degradation modes.

  1. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optomechanics in a handheld form factor. We examined the characteristics of the optomechanics with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (from LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  2. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optical mount in a hand-held form factor. We examined the characteristics of the 3D printed optical system with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  3. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optomechanics in a handheld form factor. We examined the characteristics of the optomechanics with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (from LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  4. A metamaterial absorber for the terahertz regime: design, fabrication and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Landy, Nathan I; Bingham, Christopher M; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D; Padilla, Willie J

    2008-05-12

    We present a metamaterial that acts as a strongly resonant absorber at terahertz frequencies. Our design consists of a bilayer unit cell which allows for maximization of the absorption through independent tuning of the electrical permittivity and magnetic permeability. An experimental absorptivity of 70% at 1.3 terahertz is demonstrated. We utilize only a single unit cell in the propagation direction, thus achieving an absorption coefficient alpha = 2000 cm(-1). These metamaterials are promising candidates as absorbing elements for thermally based THz imaging, due to their relatively low volume, low density, and narrow band response. PMID:18545422

  5. A metamaterial absorber for the terahertz regime: design, fabrication and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Landy, Nathan I; Bingham, Christopher M; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D; Padilla, Willie J

    2008-05-12

    We present a metamaterial that acts as a strongly resonant absorber at terahertz frequencies. Our design consists of a bilayer unit cell which allows for maximization of the absorption through independent tuning of the electrical permittivity and magnetic permeability. An experimental absorptivity of 70% at 1.3 terahertz is demonstrated. We utilize only a single unit cell in the propagation direction, thus achieving an absorption coefficient alpha = 2000 cm(-1). These metamaterials are promising candidates as absorbing elements for thermally based THz imaging, due to their relatively low volume, low density, and narrow band response.

  6. Attenuation of a hydrogen-air detonation by acoustic absorbing covering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.; Ivanov, K. V.; Korobov, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    Using of sound-absorbing surfaces to weaken and decay of a detonation wave in hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated experimentally. Experiments were carried out in a cylindrical detonation tube open at one end. Initiation of the explosive mixture was carried out by a spark discharge, which is located at the closed end of the detonation tube. Acoustical sound absorbing foam element of a specific weight of 0.035 g/cm3 with open pores of 0.5 mm was used. The degree of attenuation of the intensity of the detonation wave front was determined.

  7. Propagation of detonation wave in hydrogen-air mixture in channels with sound-absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu.; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    The possibility of using sound-absorbing surfaces for attenuating the intensity of detonation waves propagating in hydrogen-air mixtures has been experimentally studied in a cylindrical detonation tube open at one end, with an explosive initiated by spark discharge at the closed end. Sound-absorbing elements were made of an acoustic-grade foamed rubber with density of 0.035 g/cm3 containing open pores with an average diameter of 0.5 mm. The degree of attenuation of the detonation wave front velocity was determined as dependent on the volume fraction of hydrogen in the gas mixture.

  8. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  9. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes.

    PubMed

    Amato, E; Lizio, D; Baldari, S

    2011-01-21

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as (90)Y and to (131)I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  10. Debuncher Microwave Absorber Tests of January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fullett, Ken

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the tests performed on the microwave absorbers placed in the Debuncher to replace the existing microwave cutoffs. The purpose of the microwave cutoffs is to reduce the transmission of microwave energy through the beam pipe. The old microwave cutoffs consisted of a stainless steel beam pipe of approximately 2.8 inches inside diameter into which a glass tube with an inside diameter of 1.835 inches was placed. The glass tube was coated with a thin coat of microwave absorbing material on its outside. Three of these cutoffs were installed in the Debuncher at locations D6Q5, D1Q7, and D4Q10 (see Figure 1). However, the glass tube was removed from the cutoff at D4Q10 leaving only the metal beam pipe. Please note that there was not an old style microwave cutoff installed at location D2Q09. It was felt that the glass tube cutoff was an aperture restriction in the Debuncher with its small (1.8 inch) inside diameter. It was decided that new cutoffs would be needed that would increase the aperture. The new microwave absorbers consist of a four inch stainless steel beam pipe into which eleven dielectric cores are inserted separated by aluminum spacers. The spacing allows adjustment of the frequency response of the absorber assembly. The inside diameter is 3 inches thus providing an increase of 1.2 inches over the old cutoffs. The new absorbers will be installed at four locations as shown in Figure 1.

  11. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Lizio, D.; Baldari, S.

    2011-01-01

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as 90Y and to 131I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  12. Magneto-rheological fluid shock absorber for suspension of an off-road motorcycle: a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, Everet O.; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2000-06-01

    This work presents a theoretical model for the damping force of a magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) shock absorber of an off-road motorcycle. The Bingham plastic model and a 3D electromagnetic finite-element analysis are employed to develop a theoretical model to estimate the damping force of a MRF shock absorber. The mode is based on the physical parameters of the device as well as the properties of the fluid, making a valuable tool in shock absorber design for a particular application. By comparing the theoretical and experimental results, it is demonstrated that the model accurately predicts the damping force.

  13. Potential use of a polycarbonate-urethane matrix reinforced with polyethylene fibers for shock-absorbing dental implants.

    PubMed

    Sheikhhassani, Ramtin; Anvari, Pasha; Taei, Simin; Sheikhhassani, Yasmin

    2015-09-01

    The absence of a shock-absorbing mechanism in commercial dental implants is a likely factor in the resulting bone loss and possible implant failure. The aim of the current study is to generate a shock-absorbing dental implant that resembles the periodontal ligament, which naturally absorbs occlusal overloading forces. To achieve this, a polycarbonate-urethane composite reinforced with polyethylene fibers will be constructed. Tests based on finite element analysis and mechanical testing are proposed to further examine this novel implant type.

  14. Neutron absorbers and methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, Donna P; Porter, Douglas L; Swank, W David; Erickson, Arnold W

    2014-12-02

    Methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber include combining a first material and a second material to form a compound, reducing the compound into a plurality of particles, mixing the plurality of particles with a third material, and pressing the mixture of the plurality of particles and the third material. One or more components of neutron absorbers may be formed by such methods. Neutron absorbers may include a composite material including an intermetallic compound comprising hafnium aluminide and a matrix material comprising pure aluminum.

  15. Light scattering by absorbing hexagonal ice crystals in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Xu, L

    1995-09-01

    An improved ray-optics theory for single scattering and polarization of hexagonal columns and plates randomly oriented in space has been developed by considering absorption and by using the Chebyshev solution for diffraction integrals. The vector-tracing method and statistics technique of random sampling are employed. The equivalent forms of Snell's law and Fresnel formulas for absorbing ice crystals are derived, and two equivalent optical constants, m' and m″, are obtained. Comparison is made of the computed results of our model and the Takano and Liou model for asymmetry factors, single-scattering albedos, and scattering phase matrix elements. Some characteristics of our model are discussed, and these analyses demonstrate that our ray-optics model is practical and much improved.

  16. Ultra-flexible polarization-insensitive multiband terahertz metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Fan, Wenhui

    2015-03-20

    A thin-flexible and polarization-insensitive multiband terahertz metamaterial absorber (MMA) has been investigated. Each unit cell of the MMA consists of two metallic structures, which include the top metal resonator ring and the bottom metal ground plane, separated by a thin-flexible dielectric spacer. Finite element simulation indicates that this MMA has three high absorption peaks in the terahertz region, with absorptivities of 89% at 0.72 THz, 98% at 1.4 THz, and 85% at 2.3 THz. However, because of its rotationally symmetric structure, this MMA is polarization-insensitive and can perform very well at a wide range of incident angles, namely, 30° for transverse electric waves and 40° for transverse magnetic waves. The thin-flexible device structure and good performance shows that this MMA is very promising to disguise objects and make them less detectable to radar in the terahertz region. PMID:25968524

  17. General Strategy for the Bioorthogonal Incorporation of Strongly Absorbing, Solvation-Sensitive Infrared Probes into Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A high-sensitivity metal-carbonyl-based IR probe is described that can be incorporated into proteins or other biomolecules in very high yield via Click chemistry. A two-step strategy is demonstrated. First, a methionine auxotroph is used to incorporate the unnatural amino acid azidohomoalanine at high levels. Second, a tricarbonyl (η5-cyclopentadienyl) rhenium(I) probe modified with an alkynyl linkage is coupled via the Click reaction. We demonstrate these steps using the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 as a model system. An overall incorporation level of 92% was obtained at residue 109, which is a surface-exposed residue. Incorporation of the probe into a surface site is shown not to perturb the stability or structure of the target protein. Metal carbonyls are known to be sensitive to solvation and protein electrostatics through vibrational lifetimes and frequency shifts. We report that the frequencies and lifetimes of this probe also depend on the isotopic composition of the solvent. Comparison of the lifetimes measured in H2O versus D2O provides a probe of solvent accessibility. The metal carbonyl probe reported here provides an easy and robust method to label very large proteins with an amino-acid-specific tag that is both environmentally sensitive and a very strong absorber. PMID:24749542

  18. Dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on mirror latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on the mirror latitude for ions mirroring off the geomagnetic equator was re-computed using the improved hydrogen distribution models. The Chamberlain model was used to define the spatial distribution of the neutral hydrogen environment through which the ring current ions traverse. The resultant dependence of the charge exchange lifetime on mirror latitude is best fitted by the approximation that contains the charge exchange lifetime for equatorial particles.

  19. Experimental evidence of an incomplete thermalization of the energy in an x-ray microcalorimeter with a TaAu absorber.

    PubMed

    Perinati, E; Barbera, M; Varisco, S; Silver, E; Beeman, J; Pigot, C

    2008-05-01

    We have conducted an experimental test at our XACT facility using an x-ray microcalorimeter with TaAu absorber and neutron transmutation doped germanium thermal sensor. The test was aimed at measuring the percentage of energy effectively thermalized after absorption of x-ray photons in superconducting tantalum. Moreover, in general, possible formation of long living quasiparticles implies that by using a superconducting absorber, a fraction of the deposited energy could not be thermalized on the useful time scale of the thermal sensor. To investigate this scenario, we exploited an absorber made of gold, where no energy trapping is expected, with a small piece of superconducting tantalum attached on top. We obtained evidence that the thermalization of photons absorbed in tantalum is delayed by energy trapping from quasiparticles. We compare the experimental results with numerical simulations and derive a value for the intrinsic lifetime of quasiparticles. PMID:18513077

  20. The role of buffer/kesterite interface recombination and minority carrier lifetime on kesterite thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courel, Maykel; Andrade-Arvizu, J. A.; Vigil-Galán, O.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents for the first time a theoretical study of the impact of kesterite/buffer interface recombination and kesterite minority carrier lifetime on both CZTS and CZTSe solar cells. It demonstrates that only an 11% efficiency can be reached in CZTS solar cells by improving absorber crystalline quality, pointing out the need for an improved CdS/CZTS interface. It further demonstrates that a CZTS solar cell efficiency enhancement of up to 18%, with an open-circuit voltage value of up to 918 mV, can be achieved depending on CZTS minority carrier lifetime and CdS/CZTS interface recombination speed values. Moreover, this paper shows that by improving CZTSe crystalline quality, a record efficiency value of 17% could be achieved without focusing on improving CdS/CZTSe interface quality. Consequently, CZTSe is presented as a better candidate for solar cell applications. Conditions under which CdS/kesterite interface recombination and trap-assisted tunneling recombination become dominant are provided. In particular, we find that CdS/CZTS interface recombination is the dominant transport mechanism for CZTS minority carrier lifetime values higher than 5 ns, while for CZTSe minority carrier lifetime values lower than 0.1 μs, CdS/CZTSe interface losses are negligible.

  1. Emission Lifetimes of a Fluorescent Dye under Shock Compression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-long; Bassett, Will P; Christensen, James M; Dlott, Dana D

    2015-11-01

    The emission lifetimes of rhodamine 6G (R6G) were measured under shock compression to 9.1 GPa, with the dual intents of better understanding molecular photophysics in extreme environments and assessing the usefulness of fluorescence lifetime microscopy to measure spatially dependent pressure distributions in shocked microstructured media. R6G was studied as free dye dissolved in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or dye encapsulated in silica microparticles suspended in PMMA. Thin layers of these materials in impedance-matched geometries were subjected to planar single-stage shocks created by laser-driven flyer plates. A synchronized femtosecond laser excited the dye at selected times relative to flyer plate arrival and the emission lifetimes were measured with a streak camera. Lifetimes decreased when shocks arrived. The lifetime decrease was attributed to a shock-induced enhancement of R6G nonradiative relaxation. At least part of the relaxation involved shock-enhanced intersystem crossing. For free dye in PMMA, the lifetime decrease during the shock was shown to be a linear function of shock pressure from 0 to 9 GPa, with a slope of -0.22 ns·GPa(-1). The linear relationship makes it simple to convert lifetimes into pressures. Lifetime measurements in shocked microenvironments may be better than emission intensity measurements, because lifetimes are sensitive to the surrounding environment, but insensitive to intensity variations associated with the motion and optical properties of a dynamically changing structure.

  2. Tropospheric hydroxyl concentrations and the lifetimes of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional fields of modeled tropospheric OH concentrations are used to calculate lifetimes against destruction by OH for many hydrogenated halocarbons, including the CFC alternatives. The OH fields were taken from a 3-D chemical transport model (Spivakovsky et al. 1989) that accurately simulates the global measurements of methyl chloroform (derived lifetime of 5.5 years). The lifetimes of various hydro-halocarbons are shown to be insensitive to possible spatial variations and seasonal cycles. It is possible to scale the HCFC lifetimes to that of methyl chloroform or methane by using the ratio of the rate coefficients for reaction with OH at an appropriate temperature, about 277 K.

  3. Emission Lifetimes of a Fluorescent Dye under Shock Compression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-long; Bassett, Will P; Christensen, James M; Dlott, Dana D

    2015-11-01

    The emission lifetimes of rhodamine 6G (R6G) were measured under shock compression to 9.1 GPa, with the dual intents of better understanding molecular photophysics in extreme environments and assessing the usefulness of fluorescence lifetime microscopy to measure spatially dependent pressure distributions in shocked microstructured media. R6G was studied as free dye dissolved in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or dye encapsulated in silica microparticles suspended in PMMA. Thin layers of these materials in impedance-matched geometries were subjected to planar single-stage shocks created by laser-driven flyer plates. A synchronized femtosecond laser excited the dye at selected times relative to flyer plate arrival and the emission lifetimes were measured with a streak camera. Lifetimes decreased when shocks arrived. The lifetime decrease was attributed to a shock-induced enhancement of R6G nonradiative relaxation. At least part of the relaxation involved shock-enhanced intersystem crossing. For free dye in PMMA, the lifetime decrease during the shock was shown to be a linear function of shock pressure from 0 to 9 GPa, with a slope of -0.22 ns·GPa(-1). The linear relationship makes it simple to convert lifetimes into pressures. Lifetime measurements in shocked microenvironments may be better than emission intensity measurements, because lifetimes are sensitive to the surrounding environment, but insensitive to intensity variations associated with the motion and optical properties of a dynamically changing structure. PMID:26469397

  4. Positron lifetime measurements in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, Devendra S.

    1991-01-01

    Positron lifetimes in the isotropic phases of chiral nematic liquid crystal formulations and their mixtures up to the racemic level were measured. The lifetime spectra for all liquid crystal systems were analyzed into three components. Although the individual spectra in the left- and right-handed components are identical, their racemic mixtures exhibit much larger orthopositronium lifetimes; these larger lifetimes indicate the presence of larger microvoids. This result is consistent with the reportedly higher thermodynamic stability and color play range in the racemic mixtures of chiral nematic liquid crystals.

  5. Spectral variation of fluorescence lifetime near single metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Webster, Linden; Segovia, Paulina; Zayats, Anatoly V.; Richards, David

    2016-02-01

    We explore the spectral dependence of fluorescence enhancement and the associated lifetime modification of fluorescent molecules coupled to single metal nanoparticles. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and single-particle dark-field spectroscopy are combined to correlate the dependence of fluorescence lifetime reduction on the spectral overlap between the fluorescence emission and the localised surface plasmon (LSP) spectra of individual gold nanoparticles. A maximum lifetime reduction is observed when the fluorescence and LSP resonances coincide, with good agreement provided by numerical simulations. The explicit comparison between experiment and simulation, that we obtain, offers an insight into the spectral engineering of LSP mediated fluorescence and may lead to optimized application in sensing and biomedicine.

  6. Excitation energies, polarizabilities, multipole transition rates, and lifetimes of ions along the francium isoelectronic sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.; Safronova, M. S.

    2007-10-15

    Relativistic many-body perturbation theory is applied to study properties of ions of the francium isoelectronic sequence. Specifically, energies of the 7s, 7p, 6d, and 5f states of Fr-like ions with nuclear charges Z=87-100 are calculated through third order; reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for 7s-7p, 7p-6d, and 6d-5f electric-dipole transitions; and 7s-6d, 7s-5f, and 5f{sub 5/2}-5f{sub 7/2} multipole matrix elements are evaluated to obtain the lifetimes of low-lying excited states. Moreover, for the ions Z=87-92 calculations are also carried out using the relativistic all-order single-double method, in which single and double excitations of Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders in perturbation theory. With the aid of the single-double wave functions, we obtain accurate values of energies, transition rates, oscillator strengths, and the lifetimes of these six ions. Ground state scalar polarizabilities in Fr I, Ra II, Ac III, and Th IV are calculated using relativistic third-order and all-order methods. Ground state scalar polarizabilities for other Fr-like ions are calculated using a relativistic second-order method. These calculations provide a theoretical benchmark for comparison with experiment and theory.

  7. Effects of DeOrbitSail as applied to Lifetime predictions of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afful, Andoh; Opperman, Ben; Steyn, Herman

    2016-07-01

    Orbit lifetime prediction is an important component of satellite mission design and post-launch space operations. Throughout its lifetime in space, a spacecraft is exposed to risk of collision with orbital debris or operational satellites. This risk is especially high within the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) region where the highest density of space debris is accumulated. This paper investigates orbital decay of some LEO micro-satellites and accelerating orbit decay by using a deorbitsail. The Semi-Analytical Liu Theory (SALT) and the Satellite Toolkit was employed to determine the mean elements and expressions for the time rates of change. Test cases of observed decayed satellites (Iridium-85 and Starshine-1) are used to evaluate the predicted theory. Results for the test cases indicated that the theory fitted observational data well within acceptable limits. Orbit decay progress of the SUNSAT micro-satellite was analysed using relevant orbital parameters derived from historic Two Line Element (TLE) sets and comparing with decay and lifetime prediction models. This paper also explored the deorbit date and time for a 1U CubeSat (ZACUBE-01). The use of solar sails as devices to speed up the deorbiting of LEO satellites is considered. In a drag sail mode, the deorbitsail technique significantly increases the effective cross-sectional area of a satellite, subsequently increasing atmospheric drag and accelerating orbit decay. The concept proposed in this study introduced a very useful technique of orbit decay as well as deorbiting of spacecraft.

  8. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  9. Recycling of trace elements required for humans in CELSS.

    PubMed

    Ashida, A

    1994-11-01

    Recycle of complete nourishment necessary for human should be constructed in CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems). Essential elements necessary for human support are categorized as major elements, semi-major elements and trace elements. Recently, trace elements have been identified from considerations of local diseases, food additive problems, pollution problems and adult diseases, consisting of Fe, Zn, Cu, Se, Co, F, Si, Mn, Cr, I, As, Mo, Ni, V, Sn, Li, Br, Cd, Pb, B. A review of the biogeochemical history of the earth's biosphere and the physiological nature of humans and plants explains some of the requirements. A possible route for intake of trace elements is considered that trace elements are dissolved in some chemical form in water, absorbed by plants through their roots and then transfered to human as foods. There may be a possibility that living things absorb some trace elements from atmosphere. Management and recycling of trace elements in CELSS is discussed.

  10. Design, fabrication, and characterization of lightweight and broadband microwave absorbing structure reinforced by two dimensional composite lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingji; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2012-07-01

    Microwave absorbing structures (MASs) reinforced by two dimensional (2D) composite lattice elements have been designed and fabricated. The density of these MASs is lower than 0.5 g/cm3. Experimental measurements show that the sandwich structure with glass fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) lattice core can serve as a broadband MAS with its reflectivity below -10 dB over the frequency range of 4-18 GHz. The low permittivity GFRC is indicated to be the proper material for both the structural element of the core and the transparent face sheet. Calculations by the periodic moment method (PMM) demonstrate that the 2D Kagome lattice performs better for microwave absorbing than the square one at relatively low frequencies. The volume fraction and cell size of the structural element are also revealed to be key factors for microwave absorbing performance.

  11. Source apportionment of light absorbing WSOC in South Asian outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Carme; Kirillova, Elena; Andersson, August; Kruså, Martin; Budhavant, Krishnakant; Tiwari, Suresh; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2013-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols (CA) formed over South Asia are of special concern for human health and regional climate impacts. Anthropogenic emissions forming CA are generally high throughout the region and particularly over the Indo-Gangetic Plain. The net effects of CA on radiative climate forcing are still uncertain. One of the components of CA is black carbon (BC), dominated by soot-like elemental carbon, a strong absorber of solar radiation. Another component is organic carbon (OC), traditionally considered as a light scattering particle. However, recent field studies have shown OC to absorb at lower wavelengths. Thus OC, in addition to BC, may also contribute to light absorption and have a positive direct radiative effect on climate. Light absorbing organic aerosol is usually termed brown carbon (BrC). A significant fraction of BrC is water-soluble, therefore its dissolution into clouds could result in absorbing droplets that affect the cloud absorption and thus contributing to the indirect aerosol climate effects. In this study, light absorption and δ13C + Δ14C isotopic measurements of WSOC were studied in fine aerosols (PM 2.5) at two sites during early pre-monsoon season. New Delhi, one of the most densely populated and industrialized urban megacities in South Asia, was chosen to represent a strong source and Maldives Climate Observatory at Hanimaadhoo (MCOH) was chosen as a regional receptor which in wintertime is located downwind of the Indian subcontinent. Sampling in Delhi was done from mid-February to mid-March 2011 and in MCOH during March 2012. WSOC concentrations were 12±4.5 and 0.71±0.30 μg m-3 in Delhi and MCOH respectively. Whereas in Delhi WSOC contributed 31±4% of total organic carbon, this contribution was slightly higher in MCOH (40±12%). Light absorption by WSOC exhibited strong wavelength (?) dependence. In Maldives, WSOC Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) was found to be 6.9±0.4 and Mass Absorption Efficiency (MAE) measured at 365 nm

  12. A sound absorbing metasurface with coupled resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfei; Wang, Wenqi; Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-08-01

    An impedance matched surface is able, in principle, to totally absorb the incident sound and yield no reflection, and this is desired in many acoustic applications. Here we demonstrate a design of impedance matched sound absorbing surface with a simple construction. By coupling different resonators and generating a hybrid resonance mode, we designed and fabricated a metasurface that is impedance-matched to airborne sound at tunable frequencies with subwavelength scale unit cells. With careful design of the coupled resonators, over 99% energy absorption at central frequency of 511 Hz with a 50% absorption bandwidth of 140 Hz is achieved experimentally. The proposed design can be easily fabricated, and is mechanically stable. The proposed metasurface can be used in many sound absorption applications such as loudspeaker design and architectural acoustics.

  13. Absorbing Software Testing into the Scrum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomikoski, Janne; Tervonen, Ilkka

    In this paper we study, how to absorb software testing into the Scrum method. We conducted the research as an action research during the years 2007-2008 with three iterations. The result showed that testing can and even should be absorbed to the Scrum method. The testing team was merged into the Scrum teams. The teams can now deliver better working software in a shorter time, because testing keeps track of the progress of the development. Also the team spirit is higher, because the Scrum team members are committed to the same goal. The biggest change from test manager’s point of view was the organized Product Owner Team. Test manager don’t have testing team anymore, and in the future all the testing tasks have to be assigned through the Product Backlog.

  14. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variations from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.

  15. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  16. Mechanically stretchable and tunable metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fuli; Feng, Shuqi; Qiu, Kepeng; Liu, Zijun; Fan, Yuancheng; Zhang, Weihong; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji

    2015-03-01

    In this letter, we present experimental demonstration of a mechanically stretchable and tunable metamaterial absorber composed of dielectric resonator stacked on a thin conductive rubber layer. A near unity absorption is observed due to strong local field confinement around magnetic Mie resonance of dielectric resonator. Furthermore, the interspacing between unit cells is modulated dynamically under uniaxial stress. Owing to the decreases of longitudinal coupling between neighboring unit cells, the resonant absorption peak is reversibly tuned by 410 MHz, as the stain varies up to 180% along H field direction. On the contrary, the resonant absorption state is nearly independent on strain variation when external stress is applied along E field direction, due to the weak transverse interplaying. The mechanically tunable metamaterial absorber featured by flexibility paves a way forwards for actual application.

  17. Imaging highly absorbing nanoparticles using photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Simon-Alexandre; Moradi, Hamid; Price, Alain; Murugkar, Sangeeta

    2015-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have tremendous potential in biomedicine. They can be used as absorbing labels inside living cells for the purpose of biomedical imaging, biosensing as well as for photothermal therapy. We demonstrate photothermal imaging of highly-absorbing particles using a pump-probe setup. The photothermal signal is recovered by heterodyne detection, where the excitation pump laser is at 532 nm and the probe laser is at 638 nm. The sample is moved by a scanning stage. Proof of concept images of red polystyrene microspheres and gold nanoparticles are obtained with this home-built multimodal microscope. The increase in temperature at the surface of the gold NPs, due to the pump laser beam, can be directly measured by means of this photothermal microscope and then compared with the results from theoretical predictions. This technique will be useful for characterization of nanoparticles of different shapes, sizes and materials that are used in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Disposable Diaper Absorbency: Improvements via Advanced Designs.

    PubMed

    Helmes, C Tucker; O'Connor, Robert; Sawyer, Larry; Young, Sharon

    2014-06-24

    Absorbency effectiveness in diapers has improved significantly in recent years with the advent of new ingredient combinations and advanced design features. With these features, many leading products maintain their dryness performance overnight. Considering the importance of holding liquid away from the skin, ongoing research in diaper construction focuses on strategies to increase the effectiveness to capture liquid and help avoid rewetting of infant skin. The layout and design of a disposable diaper allows for distribution of absorbency features where they can provide the optimal benefit. Clinical evidence indicates materials can keep moisture away from the skin in the diapered area, helping maintain proper skin hydration, minimizing irritation, and contributing to reduced rates of diaper rash.

  19. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  20. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Yong W.; Wiedermann, Arne H.; Ockert, Carl E.

    1985-01-01

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  1. Development and application of rotary shock absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kozo; Yamada, Toshihiro; Fukuyama, Katsura

    1995-12-31

    In recent years, rear suspension systems with a single shock absorber unit placed behind the engine, have been used primarily in the middle and large classes of motorcycles. Some features such as the longer rear wheel travel, progressive response characteristics and mass concentration at the center part of motorcycle are effective in improving maneuverability of the motorcycle. In the 1980s, the systems were introduced first in the off-road motorcycles and then in the on-road motorcycles. Performance of the systems are excellent, but there are demands for further improvement of suspension characteristics and space utility at the center part of motorcycle. For this purpose, the authors have developed a prototype of a rotary shock absorber and studied the applicability to modern motorcycles.

  2. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing

    PubMed Central

    Mattiucci, N.; Bloemer, M. J.; Aközbek, N.; D'Aguanno, G.

    2013-01-01

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others. PMID:24220284

  3. Disposable Diaper Absorbency: Improvements via Advanced Designs.

    PubMed

    Helmes, C Tucker; O'Connor, Robert; Sawyer, Larry; Young, Sharon

    2014-06-24

    Absorbency effectiveness in diapers has improved significantly in recent years with the advent of new ingredient combinations and advanced design features. With these features, many leading products maintain their dryness performance overnight. Considering the importance of holding liquid away from the skin, ongoing research in diaper construction focuses on strategies to increase the effectiveness to capture liquid and help avoid rewetting of infant skin. The layout and design of a disposable diaper allows for distribution of absorbency features where they can provide the optimal benefit. Clinical evidence indicates materials can keep moisture away from the skin in the diapered area, helping maintain proper skin hydration, minimizing irritation, and contributing to reduced rates of diaper rash. PMID:24961785

  4. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, N; Bloemer, M J; Aközbek, N; D'Aguanno, G

    2013-01-01

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others. PMID:24220284

  5. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, N; Bloemer, M J; Aközbek, N; D'Aguanno, G

    2013-11-13

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others.

  6. Pinhole Effects on Venus Superpressure Balloon Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffery L.; Yavrouian, Andre H.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for a series of experiments that addressed the effect of small pinhole defects on the potential lifetime of a Venus superpressure balloon. The experiments were performed on samples of a candidate balloon envelope material through which a single small hole of 80 to 300 microns in diameter was deliberately made in each one by puncturing with a metal pin. The material was mounted horizontally in a test apparatus and then a 2-3 mm thick layer of sulfuric acid was placed on top to mimic balloon wetting at Venus. Acid penetration and damage manifested itself as a darkening of the aluminum metal and adhesive layers around the hole in the balloon material. There were no test conditions under which the acid simply fell through the pinhole due to gravity because the surface tension forces always compensated at this size. Very little acid-damaged material was observed for the smallest 80 micron pinholes while gas flowed through the hole due to balloon-like pressurization: the black spot size was approximately 0.2 mm in diameter after 6 days with 86% sulfuric acid. The damage area grew more quickly in the absence of gas flowing out of an 80 micron hole, namely at a rate of 2 mm/day. It was concluded that the flow of escaping gas out of the hole provides a substantial reduction of the rate of acid penetration and damage. Larger diameter pinholes of approximately 300 micron diameter showed larger growth rates of 0.7 mm/day with gas flow and 1.7 mm/day without. The pinhole size did not change over the duration of these experiments because the material has an outer layer of fluoropolymer film that remained intact during the process and thereby held the hole size constant. None of the damage rates measured in these experiments pose a threat to the lifetime of the balloon over the projected course of a 30 day mission because the affected area is too small to cause a structural failure either through direct damage or increased solar heating and

  7. Conditioning of BWR Control - Elements Using the New MOSAIK 80T/SWR-SE Cask - Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Oldiges, O.; Blenski, H.-J.; Engelage, H.; Behrens, W.; Majunke, J.; Schwarz, W.; Hallfarth, Dr.

    2002-02-27

    During the operation of Boiling Water Reactors, Control - Elements are used to control the neutron flux inside the reactor vessel. After the end of the lifetime, the Control - Elements are usually stored in the fuel - elements - pool of the reactor. Up to now, in Germany no conditioning of Control - Elements has been done in a BWR under operation.

  8. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-06-17

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  9. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2016-07-12

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  10. Lightweight Energy Absorbers for Blast Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balles, Donald L.; Ingram, Thomas M.; Novak, Howard L.; Schricker, Albert F.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic-energy-absorbing liners made of aluminum foam have been developed to replace solid lead liners in blast containers on the aft skirt of the solid rocket booster of the space shuttle. The blast containers are used to safely trap the debris from small explosions that are initiated at liftoff to sever frangible nuts on hold-down studs that secure the spacecraft to a mobile launch platform until liftoff.

  11. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2016-07-12

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  12. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-28

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  13. A magneto-gravitational neutron trap for the measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, Daniel J.

    Neutron decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta-decay. The mean decay lifetime is a key input for predicting the abundance of light elements in the early universe. A precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, when combined with other neutron decay observables, can test for physics beyond the standard model in a way that is complimentary to, and potentially competitive with, results from high energy collider experiments. Many previous measurements of the neutron lifetime used ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in material bottles. In a material bottle experiment, UCN are loaded into the apparatus, stored for varying times, and the surviving UCN are emptied and counted. These measurements are in poor agreement with experiments that use neutron beams, and new experiments are needed to resolve the discrepancy and precisely determine the lifetime. Here we present an experiment that uses a bowl-shaped array of NdFeB magnets to confine neutrons without material wall interactions. The trap shape is designed to rapidly remove higher energy UCN that might slowly leak from the top of the trap, and can facilitate new techniques to count surviving UCN within the trap. We review the scientific motivation for a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, and present the commissioning of the trap. Data are presented using a vanadium activation technique to count UCN within the trap, providing an alternative method to emptying neutrons from the trap and into a counter. Potential systematic effects in the experiment are then discussed and estimated using analytical and numerical techniques. We also investigate solid nitrogen-15 as a source of UCN using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy. We conclude with a discussion of forthcoming research and development for UCN detection and UCN sources.

  14. Actuator lifetime predictions for Ni60Ti40 shape memory alloy plate actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert; Ottmers, Cade; Hewling, Brett; Lagoudas, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs), due to their ability to repeatedly recover substantial deformations under applied mechanical loading, have the potential to impact the aerospace, automotive, biomedical, and energy industries as weight and volume saving replacements for conventional actuators. While numerous applications of SMA actuators have been flight tested and can be found in industrial applications, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components, are not widely implemented and frequently one-off designs, and are generally overdesigned due to a lack of understanding of the effect of the loading path on the fatigue life and the lack of an accurate method of predicting actuator lifetimes. Previous efforts have been effective at predicting actuator lifetimes for isobaric dogbone test specimens. This study builds on previous work and investigates the actuation fatigue response of plate actuators with various stress concentrations through the use of digital image correlation and finite element simulations.

  15. Load limiting energy absorbing lightweight debris catcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the representative embodiment of the invention disclosed, a load limiting, energy absorbing net is arranged to overlay a normally-covered vent opening in the rear bulkhead of the space orbiter vehicle. Spatially-disposed flexible retainer straps are extended from the net and respectively secured to bulkhead brackets spaced around the vent opening. The intermediate portions of the straps are doubled over and stitched together in a pattern enabling the doubled-over portions to progressively separate at a predicable load designed to be well below the tensile capability of the straps as the stitches are successively torn apart by the forces imposed on the retainer members whenever the cover plate is explosively separated from the bulkhead and propelled into the net. By arranging these stitches to be successively torn away at a load below the strap strength in response to forces acting on the retainers that are less than the combined strength of the retainers, this tearing action serves as a predictable compact energy absorber for safely halting the cover plate as the retainers are extended as the net is deployed. The invention further includes a block of an energy-absorbing material positioned in the net for receiving loose debris produced by the explosive release of the cover plate.

  16. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOEpatents

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  17. An absorbed dose calorimeter for IMRT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duane, S.; Aldehaybes, M.; Bailey, M.; Lee, N. D.; Thomas, C. G.; Palmans, H.

    2012-10-01

    A new calorimeter for dosimetry in small and complex fields has been built. The device is intended for the direct determination of absorbed dose to water in moderately small fields and in composite fields such as IMRT treatments, and as a transfer instrument calibrated against existing absorbed dose standards in conventional reference conditions. The geometry, materials and mode of operation have been chosen to minimize detector perturbations when used in a water phantom, to give a reasonably isotropic response and to minimize the effects of heat transfer when the calorimeter is used in non-reference conditions in a water phantom. The size of the core is meant to meet the needs of measurement in IMRT treatments and is comparable to the size of the air cavity in a type NE2611 ionization chamber. The calorimeter may also be used for small field dosimetry. Initial measurements in reference conditions and in an IMRT head and neck plan, collapsed to gantry angle zero, have been made to estimate the thermal characteristics of the device, and to assess its performance in use. The standard deviation (estimated repeatability) of the reference absorbed dose measurements was 0.02 Gy (0.6%).

  18. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  19. Flow cytometric fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA binding fluorochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Crissman, Harry A.; Cui, H. H.; Steinkamp, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Most flow cytometry (FCM) applications monitor fluorescence intensity to quantitate the various cellular parameters; however, the fluorescence emission also contains information relative to the fluorescence lifetime. Recent developments in FCM (Pinsky et al., 1993; Steinkamp & Crissman, 1993; Steinkamp et al., 1993), provide for the measurement of fluorescence lifetime which is also commonly referred to as fluorescence decay, or the time interval in which a fluorochrome remains in the excited state. Many unbound fluorochromes have characteristic lifetime values that are determined by their molecular structure; however, when the probe becomes bound, the lifetime value is influenced by a number of factors that affect the probe interaction with a target molecule. Monitoring the changes in the lifetime of the probe yields information relating to the molecular conformation, the functional state or activity of the molecular target. In addition, the lifetime values can be used as signatures to resolve the emissions of multiple fluorochrome labels with overlapping emission spectra that cannot be resolved by conventional FCM methodology. Such strategies can increase the number of fluorochrome combinations used in a flow cytometer with a single excitation source. Our studies demonstrate various applications of lifetime measurements for the analysis of the binding of different fluorochromes to DNA in single cells. Data presented in this session will show the utility of lifetime measurements for monitoring changes in chromatin structure associated with cell cycle progression, cellular differentiation, or DNA damage, such as induced during apoptosis. Several studies show that dyes with specificity for nucleic acids display different lifetime values when bound to DNA or to dsRNA. The Phase Sensitive Flow Cytometer is a multiparameter instrument, capable of performing lifetime measurements in conjunction with all the conventional FCM measurements. Future modifications of this

  20. Multi-Level Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Two Composite Energy Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2015-01-01

    Two composite energy absorbers were developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program. A conical-shaped energy absorber, designated the conusoid, was evaluated that consisted of four layers of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric oriented at [+45 deg/-45 deg/-45 deg/+45 deg] with respect to the vertical, or crush, direction. A sinusoidal-shaped energy absorber, designated the sinusoid, was developed that consisted of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical direction and a closed-cell ELFOAM P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/cu ft) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorbers was to achieve average floor-level accelerations of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in both designs were assessed through dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the designs were finalized, subfloor beams of each configuration were fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorbers prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. The retrofitted airframe was crash tested under combined forward and vertical velocity conditions onto soil, which is characterized as a sand/clay mixture. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test-analysis results are presented for each energy absorber as comparisons of time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage under impact loading for each evaluation level.

  1. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, Isidoro E.

    1992-01-01

    An absorber wave guide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the wave guide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the wave guide.

  2. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.

    1992-05-12

    An absorber waveguide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the waveguide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the waveguide. 11 figs.

  3. Preparation of perlite-based carbon dioxide absorbent.

    PubMed

    He, H; Wu, L; Zhu, J; Yu, B

    1994-02-01

    A new highly efficient carbon dioxide absorbent consisting of sodium hydroxide, expanded perlite and acid-base indicator was prepared. The absorption efficiency, absorption capacity, flow resistance and color indication for the absorbent were tested and compared with some commercial products. The absorbent can reduce the carbon dioxide content in gases to 3.3 ppb (v/v) and absorbs not less than 35% of its weight of carbon dioxide. Besides its large capacity and sharp color indication, the absorbent has an outstanding advantage of small flow resistance in comparison with other commercial carbon dioxide absorbents. Applications in gas analysis and purification were also investigated.

  4. Complex absorbing potentials with Voronoi isosurfaces wrapping perfectly around molecules.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld, Thomas; Ehara, Masahiro

    2015-10-13

    Complex absorbing potentials (CAPs) are imaginary potentials that are added to a Hamiltonian to change the boundary conditions of the problem from scattering to square-integrable. In other words, with a CAP, standard bound-state methods can be used in problems involving unbound states such as identifying resonance states and predicting their energies and lifetimes. Although in wave packet dynamics, many CAP forms are used, in electronic structure theory, the so-called box-CAP is used almost exclusively, because of the ease of evaluating its integrals in a Gaussian basis set. However, the box-CAP does has certain disadvantages. First, it will, e.g., break the symmetry of Cnv molecules if n is odd and the main axis is placed along the z-axis by the "standard orientation" of the electronic structure code. Second, it provides a CAP starting at the smallest box around the entire molecular system. For larger molecules or clusters, which do not fill the space efficiently, that implies that much "dead space" within the molecule will be left, where there is neither a CAP nor a sufficient description with basis functions. Here, two new CAP forms are introduced and systematically explored: first, a Voronoi-CAP (that is, a CAP defined in each atom's Voronoi cell), and second, a smooth Voronoi-CAP (which is similar to the Voronoi-CAP; however, the noncontinuously differentiable behavior at the surfaces between the Voronoi cells is smoothed out). Both have isosurfaces that are similar to the cavities used in solvation modeling. An obvious disadvantage of these two CAPs is that the integrals cannot be obtained analytically, but must be computed numerically. However, Voronoi-CAPs share the advantage of having the same symmetry as the molecular system, and, more importantly, considerably facilitate the treatment of larger molecules with asymmetric side chains and of molecular clusters. PMID:26574253

  5. Molecular Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Maji, Dolonchampa; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely rely on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems, and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future. PMID:25961514

  6. Andrew shortens lifetime of Louisiana Barrier Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    Because the Isles Dernieres, a series of four barrier islands off the coast of Louisiana, have one of the most rapidly eroding shorelines in the world, geologists at the U.S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey have been monitoring erosion activity over the last several years, said Jeff Williams of the USGS in Reston, Va. Hurricane Andrew, which struck the state on August 26, caused severe erosional damage to these islands that has shortened their lifetimes.Before Andrew struck, geologists projected that Raccoon Island would disappear below sea level by the year 2001 and that Whiskey Island would disappear by 2016. Now, due to the severe erosion from Hurricane Andrew, the scientists claim that the islands may disappear before the turn of the century, and the other islands in the Dernieres chain are expected to follow suit within 2 decades. Raccoon, Whiskey, Trinity, and East islands make up the Isles Dernieres, which existed as one island, known as the Isle Derniere, before an 1856 hurricane and subsequent erosion.

  7. Feasibility study for long lifetime helium dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    A feasible concept for a launchable three year lifetime helium dewar was investigted. Current helium dewar designs were examined to see where the largest potential reductions in parasitic heat loads can be made. The study was also devoted to examining support concepts. The support concept chosen, a passive orbital disconnect strut (PODS), has an orbital support conductance that is lower by more than an order of magnitude over current tension band supports. This lower support conductance cuts the total dewar weight in half for the same three year life time requirements. Effort was also concentrated on efficient wire feed through designs and vapor cooling of the multilayer insulation, supports, wire feed throughs and plumbing penetrations. A single stage helium dewar vs. dual stage dewars with a guard cryogen of nitrogen or neon was examined. The single stage dewar concept was selected. Different support concepts were analyzed from which the PODS support concepts was chosen. A preliminary design of the dewar was thermally and structurally analyzed and laid out including system weights, thermal performance and performance sensitivities.

  8. The lifetime of evaporating dense sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, Alois; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    We study the processes by which a set of nearby liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a gas phase whose relative humidity (vapor concentration) is controlled at will. A dense spray of micron-sized water droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer and conveyed through a nozzle in a closed chamber whose vapor concentration has been pre-set to a controlled value. The resulting plume extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. When the spray plume is straight and laminar, droplets evaporate at its edge where the vapor is saturated, and diffuses through a boundary layer developing around the plume. We quantify the shape and length of the plume as a function of the injecting, vapor diffusion, thermodynamic and environment parameters. For higher injection Reynolds numbers, standard shear instabilities distort the plume into stretched lamellae, thus enhancing the diffusion of vapor from their boundary towards the diluting medium. These lamellae vanish in a finite time depending on the intensity of the stretching, and relative humidity of the environment, with a lifetime diverging close to the equilibrium limit, when the plume develops in an medium saturated in vapor. The dependences are described quantitatively.

  9. The Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health Newsletter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    The June 2010 LSAH newsletter introduced the change from the Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health research study to the new Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health program (An Overview of the New Occupational Surveillance Program for the Astronaut Corps). Instead of performing research-focused retrospective analyses of astronaut medical data compared to a JSC civil servant control population, the new program is focused on prevention of disease and prospective identification and mitigation of health risks in each astronaut due to individual exposure history and the unique occupational exposures experienced by the astronaut corps. The new LSAH program has 5 primary goals: (1) Provide a comprehensive medical exam for each LSAH participant; (2) Conduct occupational surveillance; (3) Improve communication, data accessibility, integrity and storage; (4) Support operational and healthcare analyses; and (5) Support NASA research objectives. This article will focus primarily on the first goal, the comprehensive medical exam. Future newsletters will outline in detail the plans and processes for addressing the remaining program goals.

  10. Emittance and lifetime measurement with damping wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. M.; Shaftan, T.; Cheng, W. X.; Guo, W.; Ilinsky, P.; Li, Y.; Podobedov, B.; Willeke, F.

    2016-03-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a new third-generation storage ring light source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The storage ring design calls for small horizontal emittance (<1 nm-rad) and diffraction-limited vertical emittance at 12 keV (8 pm-rad). Achieving low value of the beam size will enable novel user experiments with nm-range spatial and meV-energy resolution. The high-brightness NSLS-II lattice has been realized by implementing 30-cell double bend achromatic cells producing the horizontal emittance of 2 nm rad and then halving it further by using several Damping Wigglers (DWs). This paper is focused on characterization of the DW effects in the storage ring performance, namely, on reduction of the beam emittance, and corresponding changes in the energy spread and beam lifetime. The relevant beam parameters have been measured by the X-ray pinhole camera, beam position monitors, beam filling pattern monitor, and current transformers. In this paper, we compare the measured results of the beam performance with analytic estimates for the complement of the 3 DWs installed at the NSLS-II.

  11. Phonon-lifetimes in demixing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaasambuu, J.; Güthoff, F.; Petri, M.; Hradil, K.; Schober, H.; Ollivier, J.; Eckold, G.

    2012-06-01

    The dynamics of silver-alkali halide mixed single crystals (AgxNa1-xBr, x = 0.23, 0.35, 0.40 and 0.70) were studied by inelastic neutron scattering during the process of spinodal decomposition. Using the thermal three-axes spectrometer PUMA as well as the time-of-flight spectrometer IN5, the time evolution of phonons was observed in time-resolved, stroboscopic measurements. Complementary to the study of long wavelength acoustic phonons, as studied previously, we extended these investigations to Brillouin-zone boundary modes that are particularly sensitive to variations of the local structure. Starting from the homogeneous mixed phase the behaviour of these modes during demixing is observed in real-time. A simple dynamical model based on local structure variants helps to interpret the results. It is shown that the phonon lifetimes vary strongly during the phase separation and increase drastically during the coarsening process. Up to a critical size of precipitates of about 10 nm, zone-boundary modes are found to be strongly damped, while beyond the line widths are reduced to the experimental resolution. This finding leads to the conclusion that the typical mean free path of these modes is of the order of 10 nm, which corresponds to 20 unit cells.

  12. Highly ionised absorbers at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Jacqueline; Herbert-Fort, Stéphane

    2005-03-01

    We build a sample of O VI absorption systems in the redshift range 2.0 ≲ z ≲ 2.6 using high spectral resolution data of ten quasars from the VLT-UVES large programme. We investigate the existence of a metal-rich O VI population and define observational criteria for this class of absorbers under the assumption of photoionisation. The low temperatures of nearly half of all O VI absorbers, implied by their line widths, are too low for collisional ionisation to be a dominant process. We estimate the oxygen abundance under the assumption of photoionisation; a striking result is the bimodal distribution of [o/h] with median values close to 0.01 and 0.5 solar for the metal-poor and metal-rich populations, respectively. Using the line widths to fix the temperature or assuming a constant, low gas density does not drastically change the metallicities of the metal-rich population. We present the first estimate of the O VI column density distribution. Assuming a single power-law distribution, f(n) ∝ n-α, yields α ˜ 1.7 and a normalisation of f(n) =2.3× 10-13 at log n(O VI) ˜ 13.5, both with a ˜30% uncertainty. The value of α is similar to that found for C IV surveys, whereas the normalisation factor is about ten times higher. We use f(n) to derive the number density per unit z and cosmic density ωb(O VI), selecting a limited column density range not strongly affected by incompleteness or sample variance. Comparing our results with those obtained at z˜0.1 for a similar range of column densities implies some decline of dn/dz with z. The cosmic O VI density derived from f(n), ωb(O VI)≈ (3.5± 3.20.9) × 10-7, is 2.3 times higher than the value estimated using the observed O VI sample (of which the metal-rich population contributes ˜35%), easing the problem of missing metals at high z (˜ 1/4 of the produced metals) but not solving it. We find that the majori ty of the metal-rich absorbers are located within ˜ 450 km s-1 of strong Ly-α lines and show that

  13. Harnessing snap-through instability for shape-recoverable energy-absorbing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung; Shan, Sicong; Raney, Jordan; Wang, Pai; Candido, Francisco; Lewis, Jennifer; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Energy absorbing materials and structures are used in numerous areas for maintaining structural integrity, protection and comfort. To absorb/dissipate energy from shock/vibration, one generally relies on processes such as plastic deformation and damping as the case of metal foams and suspensions. Because plastic deformation and damping induce irreversible change in the energy-absorbing systems such as shape changes and degradation of damping elements by heat dissipation, it would be desirable to develop a new energy-absorption mechanism with reversibility. Furthermore, it would be desirable to implement energy-absorption mechanisms whose behavior is not affected by the rate of loading. Here, we report a shape-recoverable system that absorbs energy without degradation by harnessing multistability in elastic structures. Using numerical simulations, we investigate geometrical parameters that determine the onset of the snap-through and multi-stability. We subsequently manufacture structures with different geometrical parameters and sizes using a scalable direct-write 3D printing approach. We experimentally demonstrate reversible energy-absorption in these structures at strain rates over three orders of magnitudes, with reduced peak acceleration under impact by up to one order of magnitude compared with control samples. Our findings can open new opportunities for scalable design and manufacturing of energy-absorbing materials and structures.

  14. Moisture determination in composite materials using positron lifetime techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. R.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A technique was developed which has the potential of providing information on the moisture content as well as its depth in the specimen. This technique was based on the dependence of positron lifetime on the moisture content of the composite specimen. The positron lifetime technique of moisture determination and the results of the initial studies are described.

  15. Masses, lifetimes, and decays of B hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    L. Vacavant

    2003-10-31

    The latest results in B physics from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron are presented, including inclusive b lifetime measurement, exclusive lifetime measurement of the B{sub s}. Promising samples collected by CDF with its Secondary Vertex Trigger are shown as well.

  16. Do Love Styles Predict Lifetime Number of Sex Partners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hans, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between love styles and lifetime number of sexual partners was explored using survey data from 507 college students. Love styles significantly (p less than 0.001) contributed to the prediction of number of lifetime sex partners after controlling for demographic characteristics and attitudes toward sexually transmitted infections.…

  17. Experimental Investigation of Excited-State Lifetimes in Atomic Ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.J.; Budker, D.; Commins, E.D.; DeMille, D.; Freedman, S.J.; Nguyen, A.-T.; Shang, S.-Q.; Zolotorev, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-15

    Lifetimes of 21 excited states in atomic Yb were measured using time-resolved fluorescence detection following pulsed laser excitation. The lifetime of the 4f{sup 14}5d6s {sup 3}D{sub 1} state, which is of particular importance for a proposed study of parity nonconservation in atoms, was measured to be 380(30) ns.

  18. Associations between Number of Lifetime Partners and Other Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Roberta J.; Dinger, Mary K.; Vesely, Sara

    2001-01-01

    Examined associations between health behaviors and lifetime sexual partners. Data from the 1995 National College Health Risk Behavior Survey indicated that having two or more lifetime partners related to infrequent seatbelt use, driving after drinking, fighting, considering suicide, and using certain substances. Significant sex interactions…

  19. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  20. Laser induced lifetime degradation in p-type crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ametowobla, M.; Bilger, G.; Koehler, J. R.; Werner, J. H.

    2012-06-01

    Pulsed, green laser irradiation of uncoated p-type silicon leads to a significant reduction of the effective minority carrier lifetime. The reason for the lifetime drop lies in the introduction of recombination centres into the laser melted and recrystallized surface layer, leading to a low local minority carrier lifetime {tau} Almost-Equal-To 10 ns inside this surface layer. The laser treatment introduces the impurities oxygen, carbon and nitrogen into the silicon and further leads to an n-type doping of the surface layer. There are strong indications that these impurities are responsible for the observed n-type doping, as well as the lifetime reduction after irradiation. Both effects are removed by thermal annealing. An estimate shows that the low local lifetime does nevertheless not affect the performance of industrial or contacted selective solar cell emitter structures.

  1. Moisture dependence of positron lifetime in Kevlar-49

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Holt, William H.; Mock, Willis, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Because of filamentary character of Kevlar-49 aramid fibers, there is some concern about the moisture uptake and its effect on plastic composites reinforced with Kevlar-49 fibers. As part of continuing studies of positron lifetime in polymers, we have measured positron lifetime spectra in Kevlar-49 fibers as a function of their moisture content. The long lifetime component intensities are rather low, being only of the order of 2-3 percent. The measured values of long component lifetimes at various moisture levels in the specimens are as follows: 2072 +/- 173 ps (dry); 2013 +/- 193 ps (20.7 percent saturation); 1665 +/- 85 ps (25.7 percent saturation); 1745 +/- 257 ps (32.1 percent saturation); and 1772 +/- 217 ps (100 percent saturation). It is apparent that the long component lifetime at first decreases and then increases as the specimen moisture content increases. These results have been compared with those inferred from Epon-815 and Epon-815/K-49 composite data.

  2. Use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for latent fingerprints detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Chao, Zhi Xia; Seah, Leong K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke M.

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in frequency domain enables the mapping of the spatial distribution of fluorescence lifetimes of a specimen. FLIM can provide unique information about fluorophores and hence is widely used in biology and for medical diagnostics. In this paper, a theoretical analysis for the fluorescence lifetime determination of latent fingerprint samples is described, which is followed by the feasibility study of using FLIM in frequency domain for latent fingerprints detection. Experiments are carried out with fingerprint on green paper substrate and postcard substrate treated with certain fluorescent powder. The total phase lag and demodulation factor are calculated to determine the lifetimes pixel by pixel. The resulting fluorescence lifetime image of fingerprint revealed an improvement in the contrast, and was able to detect the latent fingerprint clearly.

  3. Development of Next Generation Lifetime PSP Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a lifetime PSP system that has recently been developed using pulsed light-emitting diode (LED) lamps and a new interline transfer CCD camera technology. This system alleviates noise sources associated with lifetime PSP systems that use either flash-lamp or laser excitation sources and intensified CCD cameras for detection. Calibration curves have been acquired for a variety of PSP formulations using this system, and a validation test was recently completed in the Subsonic Aerodynamic Research Laboratory (SARL) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). In this test, global surface pressure distributions were recovered using both a standard intensity-based method and the new lifetime system. Results from the lifetime system agree both qualitatively and quantitatively with those measured using the intensity-based method. Finally, an advanced lifetime imaging technique capable of measuring temperature and pressure simultaneously is introduced and initial results are presented.

  4. 17 C Lifetime Measurements with the TRIPLEX Plunger and GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Duane; Iwasaki, H.; Whitmore, K.; Morse, C.; Loelius, C.; Gade, A.; Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Langer, C.; Recchia, F.; Berryman, J.; Bader, V.; Stroberg, S. R.; Campbell, C.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A.; Wimmer, K.; Lemasson, A.; Parker, J.

    2013-10-01

    As nuclei approach the drip-line exotic features such as deformation and collectivity begin to manifest. Experimental observation of these features provide valuable inputs to test the validity of current theoretical models. Excited state lifetime measurements can be linked directly to the reduced transition probability allowing the inference of structure information. Recent lifetime measurements of the neutron rich 17C have been performed using the gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA and the newly designed TRIPLEX plunger at the NSCL. The TRIPLEX plunger allows multiple lifetimes, ranging from 1ps to 1ns, to be measured with a single setting. This provides a robust model independent methodology for determining excited state lifetimes through in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy. Initial results of the lifetime measurements and the data analysis will be presented.

  5. Laser induced lifetime degradation in p-type crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ametowobla, M.; Bilger, G.; Köhler, J. R.; Werner, J. H.

    2012-06-01

    Pulsed, green laser irradiation of uncoated p-type silicon leads to a significant reduction of the effective minority carrier lifetime. The reason for the lifetime drop lies in the introduction of recombination centres into the laser melted and recrystallized surface layer, leading to a low local minority carrier lifetime τ ≈ 10 ns inside this surface layer. The laser treatment introduces the impurities oxygen, carbon and nitrogen into the silicon and further leads to an n-type doping of the surface layer. There are strong indications that these impurities are responsible for the observed n-type doping, as well as the lifetime reduction after irradiation. Both effects are removed by thermal annealing. An estimate shows that the low local lifetime does nevertheless not affect the performance of industrial or contacted selective solar cell emitter structures.

  6. High Lifetime Solar Cell Processing and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    In order to maximize efficiency a solar cell must: (1) absorb as much light as possible in electron-hole production, (2) transport as large a fraction as possible of the electrons to the n-type terminal and holes to the p-type terminal without their first recombining, and (3) produce as high as possible terminal voltage. Step (1) is largely fixed by the spectrum of sunlight and the fundamental absorption characteristics of silicon, although some improvements are possible through texturizing induced light trapping and back surface reflectors. Steps (2) and (3) are, however, dependent on the recombination mechanisms of the cell. The recombination, on the contrary, is strongly influenced by cell processing and design. Some of the lessons during the development of point-contact-cell are discussed. Cell dependence on recombination, surface recombination, and contact recombination are discussed. Results show the overwhelming influence of contact recombination on the operation of the cell when the other sources of recombination are reduced by careful processing.

  7. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy Clay (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  8. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy C. (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  9. Lifetime-resolved photoacoustic (LPA) spectroscopy for monitoring oxygen change and photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Lee, Chang Heon; Kopelman, Raoul; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    The Methylene Blue loaded Polyacrylamide Nanoparticles (MB-PAA NPs) are used for oxygen sensing and Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a promising therapeutic modality employed for various tumors, with distinct advantages of delivery of biomedical agents and protection from other bio-molecules overcoming inherent limitations of molecular dyes. Lifetime-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy using quenched-phosphorescence method is applied with MB-PAA NPs so as to sense oxygen, while the same light source is used for PDT. The dye is excited by absorbing 650 nm wavelength light from a pump laser to reach triplet state. The probe laser at 810 nm wavelength is used to excite the first triplet state at certain delayed time to measure the dye lifetime which indicates oxygen concentration. The 9L cells (106 cells/ml) incubated with MB-PAA NP solution are used for monitoring oxygen level change during PDT in situ test. The oxygen level and PDT efficacy are confirmed with a commercial oximeter, and fluorescence microscope imaging and flow cytometry results. This technique with the MB-PAA NPs allowed us to demonstrate a potential non-invasive theragnostic operation, by monitoring oxygen depletion during PDT in situ, without the addition of secondary probes. Here, we demonstrate this theragnostic operation, in vitro, performing PDT while monitoring oxygen depletion. We also show the correlation between O2 depletion and cell death.

  10. Inorganic UV absorbers for the photostabilisation of wood-clearcoating systems: Comparison with organic UV absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloui, F.; Ahajji, A.; Irmouli, Y.; George, B.; Charrier, B.; Merlin, A.

    2007-02-01

    Inorganic UV absorbers which are widely used today were originally designed neither as a UV blocker in coatings applications, nor for wood protection. In recent years however, there has been extensive interest in these compounds, especially with regard to their properties as a UV blocker in coating applications. In this work, we carried out a comparative study to look into some inorganic and organic UV absorbers used in wood coating applications. The aim of this study is to determine the photostabilisation performances of each type of UV absorbers, to seek possible synergies and the influences of different wood species. We have also searched to find eventual correlation between these performances and the influence of UV absorbers on the film properties. Our study has compared the performances of the following UV absorbers: hombitec RM 300, hombitec RM 400 from the Sachtleben Company; transparent yellow and red iron oxides from Sayerlack as inorganic UV absorbers; organic UV absorbers Tinuvin 1130 and Tinuvin 5151 from Ciba Company. The study was carried out on three wood species: Abies grandis, tauari and European oak. The environmental constraints (in particular the limitation of the emission of volatile organic compounds VOCs) directed our choice towards aqueous formulations marketed by the Sayerlack Arch Coatings Company. The results obtained after 800 h of dry ageing showed that the Tinuvins and the hombitecs present better wood photostabilisations. On the other hand in wet ageing, with the hombitec, there are appearances of some cracks and an increase in the roughness of the surface. This phenomenon is absent when the Tinuvins are used. With regard to these results, the thermomechanical analyses relating to the follow-up of the change of the glass transition temperature ( Tg) of the various coating systems, show a different behaviour between the two types of absorbers. However, contrary to organic UV absorbers, inorganic ones tend to increase Tg during ageing

  11. Modeling the Effect of Polychromatic Light in Quantitative Absorbance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel; Cantrell, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory experiment is conducted to give the students practical experience with the principles of electronic absorbance spectroscopy. This straightforward approach creates a powerful tool for exploring many of the aspects of quantitative absorbance spectroscopy.

  12. Lifetime of the Excited State In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mar, T.; Govindjee; Singhal, G. S.; Merkelo, H.

    1972-01-01

    Using a mode-locked laser (λ, 632.8 nm), fluorescence decay of chlorophyll (Chl) a in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, and the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans was measured by the phase-shift method under conditions when photosynthesis was not operative (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea [DCMU] poisoning, or cooling to 77°K). In the presence of 10-5 M DCMU, the lifetime of Chl a fluorescence (τ) at room temperature is about 1.7 nsec in Chlorella, 1.0 nsec in Porphyridium, and 0.7 nsec in Anacystis. At 77°K, τ is 1.4 nsec (for fluorescence at about 685 nm, F-685) and 2.3 nsec (for F-730) in Chlorella, 0.9 nsec (F-685) and 1.2 nsec (F-730) in Porphyridium, and 0.8 nsec (F-685 and F-730) in Anacystis. From the above measurement, and the assumption that τ0 (the intrinsic fluorescence lifetime) for Chl a in all three algae is 15.2 nsec, we have calculated the rate constants of radiationless transition (that includes energy transfer to weakly fluorescent system I) processes competing with fluorescence at room temperature to be about 5 × 108 sec-1 in Chlorella, 9 × 108 sec-1 in Porphyridium, and 13 × 108 sec-1 in Anacystis. At 77°K, this rate constant for Chl a that fluoresces at 685 nm remains, in the first approximation, the same as at room temperature. From the τ data, the rate constant for the trapping of excitation energy is calculated to be about 1.2 × 109 sec-1 for Chlorella, 2 × 109 sec-1 for Porphyridium, and 2 × 109 sec-1 for Anacystis. The efficiency of trapping is calculated to be about 66% (Chlorella), 68% (Porphyridium), and 60% (Anacystis). (It is recognized that variations in the above values are to be expected if algae grown under different conditions are used for experimentation.) The maximum quantum yield of Chl a fluorescence for system II (λ, 632.8 nm), calculated from τ measurements, is about 10% in Chlorella, 6-7% in Porhyridium, and 5% in Anacystis under conditions when photosynthesis

  13. β-Cyclodextrin-based oil-absorbent microspheres: preparation and high oil absorbency.

    PubMed

    Song, Ci; Ding, Lei; Yao, Fei; Deng, Jianping; Yang, Wantai

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the preparation and evaluation of polymeric microspheres as a new class of oil-absorbent (POAMs). Based on our earlier oil-absorbents, the present microspheres contained β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) moieties as both cross-linking agent and porogen agent, and showed exciting high oil absorbency, fast oil absorption speed and good reusability. Such microspheres were prepared via suspension polymerization with octadecyl acrylate and butyl acrylate as co-monomers, β-CD derivative as cross-linking agent, 2,2'-azoisobutyronitrile as initiator and polyvinylalcohol as stabilizer. Oil absorbency of the POAMs was, for CCl(4), 83.4; CHCl(3), 75.1; xylene, 48.7; toluene, 42.8; gasoline, 30.0; kerosene 27.1; and diesel, 18.2 g/g (oil/POAMs). Saturation oil absorption reached within 3h in CCl(4). The POAMs exhibited high oil retention percentage (>90%), and can be reused for at least 10 times while keeping oil absorbency almost unchanged. PMID:23044125

  14. The lifetime of excess atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Berrien; Braswell, B. H.

    1994-03-01

    We explore the effects of a changing terrestrial biosphere on the atmospheric residence time of CO2 using three simple ocean carbon cycle models and a model of global terrestrial carbon cycling. We find differences in model behavior associated with the assumption of an active terrestrial biosphere (forest regrowth) and significant differences if we assume a donor-dependent flux from the atmosphere to the terrestrial component (e.g., a hypothetical terrestrial fertilization flux). To avoid numerical difficulties associated with treating the atmospheric CO2 decay (relaxation) curve as being well approximated by a weighted sum of exponential functions, we define the single half-life as the time it takes for a model atmosphere to relax from its present-day value half way to its equilibrium pCO2 value. This scenario-based approach also avoids the use of unit pulse (Dirac Delta) functions which can prove troublesome or unrealistic in the context of a terrestrial fertilization assumption. We also discuss some of the numerical problems associated with a conventional lifetime calculation which is based on an exponential model. We connect our analysis of the residence time of CO2 and the concept of single half-life to the residence time calculations which are based on using weighted sums of exponentials. We note that the single half-life concept focuses upon the early decline of CO2 under a cutoff/decay scenario. If one assumes a terrestrial biosphere with a fertilization flux, then our best estimate is that the single half-life for excess CO2 lies within the range of 19 to 49 years, with a reasonable average being 31 years. If we assume only regrowth, then the average value for the single half-life for excess CO2 increases to 72 years, and if we remove the terrestrial component completely, then it increases further to 92 years.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime to image epidermal ionic concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behne, Martin J.; Barry, Nicholas P.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of ionic concentrations in skin have traditionally been performed with an array of methods which either did not reveal detailed localization information, or only provided qualitative, not quantitative information. FLIM combines a number of advantages into a method ideally suited to visualize concentrations of ions such as H+ in intact, unperturbed epidermis and stratum corneum (SC). Fluorescence lifetime is dye concentration-independent, the method requires only low light intensities and is therefore not prone to photobleaching or phototoxic artifacts, and because multiphoton lasers of IR wavelength are used, light penetrates deep into intact tissue. The standard method to measure SC pH is the flat pH electrode, which provides reliable information only about surface pH changes, without further vertical or subcellular spatial resolution; i.e., specific microdomains such as the corneocyte interstices are not resolved, and the deeper SC is inaccessible without resorting to inherently disruptive stripping methods. Furthermore, the concept of a gradient of pH through the SC stems from such stripping experiments, but other confirmation for this concept is lacking. Our investigations into the SC pH distribution so far have revealed the crucial role of the Sodium/Hydrogen Antiporter NHE1 in generation of SC acidity, the colocalization of enzymatic lipid processing activity in the SC with acidic domains of the SC, and the timing and localization of emerging acidity in the SC of newborns. Together, these results have led to an improved understanding of the SC pH, its distribution, origin, and regulation. Future uses for this method include measurements of other ions important for epidermal processes, such as Ca2+, and a quantitative approach to topical drug penetration.

  16. Infrared trace element detection system

    DOEpatents

    Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.; Matthew, M.W.

    1988-11-15

    An infrared trace element detection system includes an optical cell into which the sample fluid to be examined is introduced and removed. Also introduced into the optical cell is a sample beam of infrared radiation in a first wavelength band which is significantly absorbed by the trace element and a second wavelength band which is not significantly absorbed by the trace element for passage through the optical cell through the sample fluid. The output intensities of the sample beam of radiation are selectively detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The intensities of a reference beam of the radiation are similarly detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The sensed output intensity of the sample beam in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other and similarly, the intensity of the reference beam of radiation in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other. The normalized sample beam intensity and normalized reference beam intensity are then compared to provide a signal from which the amount of trace element in the sample fluid can be determined. 11 figs.

  17. Infrared trace element detection system

    DOEpatents

    Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Matthew, Michael W.

    1988-01-01

    An infrared trace element detection system including an optical cell into which the sample fluid to be examined is introduced and removed. Also introduced into the optical cell is a sample beam of infrared radiation in a first wavelength band which is significantly absorbed by the trace element and a second wavelength band which is not significantly absorbed by the trace element for passage through the optical cell through the sample fluid. The output intensities of the sample beam of radiation are selectively detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The intensities of a reference beam of the radiation are similarly detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The sensed output intensity of the sample beam in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other and similarly, the intensity of the reference beam of radiation in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other. The normalized sample beam intensity and normalized reference beam intensity are then compared to provide a signal from which the amount of trace element in the sample fluid can be determined.

  18. Consideration of lifetime limitation for spent stages in GTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Adimurthy, V.

    altitude. It is interesting to understand the basic physics of the luni-solar perturbations. A few typical examples presented here illustrate this effect very clearly. It is interesting to note that in GTO orbits the interplay of drag and luni- solar gravity effects can give rise to situations where more drag get translated into more lifetime. Orbital evolution study of the third stage of GSLV-D1, which falls into the second category described above, provides us with a few interesting observations (Ref.2). The orbital lifetime can vary from around 7 months to well beyond 50 years depending on the launch time during the day of launch. A study with respect to few other days during the year to find the effect of sun and moon initial locations on orbital life is also included. For the present launch, the orbital life is around 600 days, which is well within the widely accepted criterion on the lifetime of any manmade space object. It is noted that the osculating perigee altitude decreases and apogee altitude increases when the object comes near the perigee due to oblate earth effects. The decrease in perigee is about 3.5 km and the increase in apogee is 160 km. Utilizing 175 Two Line Element (TLE) sets of the object available in the first 100 days of its life, the suitable ballistic coefficient is estimated and simulations up to re-entry are done. The re-entry is predicted between 7 Nov 2002 and 29 Dec 2002. A continuous monitoring with the available orbital data shows that the predictions continue to be within the above bounds. Ref.1. King-Hele, D.G., "Lifetime Predictions for Satellites in Low inclination Transfer Orbits", Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, Vol.35, pp.339-344, 1982 Ref.2. Priyankar Bandhopadhyay, Sharma, R.K., Adimurthy,V., " The Orbiting Third Stage of GSLV-D1 as Space Debris", VSSC/AERO/TR-001/2001, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Trivandrum, 2001

  19. Method for absorbing an ion from a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Huizhen; Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles R.

    2007-07-03

    A method for absorbing an ion from a fluid by using dispersing an organic acid into an anion surfactant solution, mixing in a divalent-metal containing compound and a trivalent-metal containing compound and calcining the resulting solid layered double hydroxide product to form an absorbent material and then contacting the absorbent material with an aqueous solution of cations or anions to be absorbed.

  20. Grover walks on a line with absorbing boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Wu, Nan; Kuklinski, Parker; Xu, Ping; Hu, Haixing; Song, Fangmin

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study Grover walks on a line with one and two absorbing boundaries. In particular, we present some results for the absorbing probabilities in both a semi-finite and finite line. Analytical expressions for these absorbing probabilities are presented by using the combinatorial approach. These results are perfectly matched with numerical simulations. We show that the behavior of Grover walks on a line with absorbing boundaries is strikingly different from that of classical walks and that of Hadamard walks.

  1. Characterizing metastable states beyond energies and lifetimes: Dyson orbitals and transition dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagau, Thomas-C.; Krylov, Anna I.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical description of electronic resonances is extended beyond calculations of energies and lifetimes. We present the formalism for calculating Dyson orbitals and transition dipole moments within the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster singles and doubles method for electron-attached states augmented by a complex absorbing potential (CAP-EOM-EA-CCSD). The capabilities of the new methodology are illustrated by calculations of Dyson orbitals of various transient anions. We also present calculations of transition dipole moments between transient and stable anionic states as well as between different transient states. Dyson orbitals characterize the differences between the initial neutral and final electron-attached states without invoking the mean-field approximation. By extending the molecular-orbital description to correlated many-electron wave functions, they deliver qualitative insights into the character of resonance states. Dyson orbitals and transition moments are also needed for calculating experimental observables such as spectra and cross sections. Physically meaningful results for those quantities are obtained only in the framework of non-Hermitian quantum mechanics, e.g., in the presence of a complex absorbing potential (CAP), when studying resonances. We investigate the dependence of Dyson orbitals and transition moments on the CAP strength and illustrate how Dyson orbitals help understand the properties of metastable species and how they are affected by replacing the usual scalar product by the so-called c-product.

  2. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  12. 14 CFR 29.475 - Tires and shock absorbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tires and shock absorbers. 29.475 Section... shock absorbers. Unless otherwise prescribed, for each specified landing condition, the tires must be assumed to be in their static position and the shock absorbers to be in their most critical position....

  13. 14 CFR 29.475 - Tires and shock absorbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tires and shock absorbers. 29.475 Section... shock absorbers. Unless otherwise prescribed, for each specified landing condition, the tires must be assumed to be in their static position and the shock absorbers to be in their most critical position....

  14. 21 CFR 878.4755 - Absorbable lung biopsy plug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable lung biopsy plug. 878.4755 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4755 Absorbable lung biopsy plug. (a) Identification. A preformed (polymerized) absorbable lung biopsy plug is intended to...

  15. About sound mufflers sound-absorbing panels aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, A. S.; Bulbovich, R. V.; Svirshchev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The article provides a formula for calculating the frequency of sound absorbed panel with a perforated wall. And although the sound absorbing structure is a set of resonators Helmholtz, not individual resonators should be considered in acoustic calculations, and all the perforated wall panel. The analysis, showing how the parameters affect the size and sound-absorbing structures in the absorption rate.

  16. Acoustical model of a Shoddy fibre absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, John Peter

    Shoddy fibres or "Shoddies" are a mixture of post-consumer and post-industrial fibres diverted from textile waste streams and recycled into their raw fibre form. They have found widespread use as a raw material for manufacturing sound absorbers that include, but are not limited to: automotive, architectural and home appliance applications. The purpose of this project is to develop a simple acoustic model to describe the acoustic behaviour of sound absorbers composed primarily of Shoddy fibres. The model requires knowledge of the material's bulk density only. To date, these materials have not been the focus of much published research and acoustical designers must rely on models that were developed for other materials or are overly complex. For modelling purposes, an equivalent fluid approach is chosen to balance complexity and accuracy. In deriving the proposed model, several popular equivalent fluid models are selected and the required input parameters for each model identified. The models are: the model of Delaney and Bazley, two models by Miki, the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Champoux and Allard and the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Lafarge. Characterization testing is carried out on sets of Shoddy absorbers produced using three different manufacturing methods. The measured properties are open porosity, tortuosity, airflow resistivity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the static thermal permeability. Empirical relationships between model parameters and bulk density are then derived and used to populate the selected models. This yields several 'simplified' models with bulk density as the only parameter. The most accurate model is then selected by comparing each model's prediction to the results of normal incidence sound absorption tests. The model of Johnson-Lafarge populated with the empirical relations is the most accurate model over the range of frequencies considered (approx. 300 Hz - 4000 Hz

  17. Characterization of the absorbance bleaching in AllnAs/AlGaInAs multiple-quantum wells for semiconductor saturable absorbers.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Alliman, Darrell L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Waldmueller, Ines

    2010-05-01

    Semiconductor saturable absorbers (SESAs) introduce loss into a solid-state laser cavity until the cavity field bleaches the absorber producing a high-energy pulse. Multiple quantum wells (MQWs) of AlGaInAs grown lattice-matched to InP have characteristics that make them attractive for SESAs. The band gap can be tuned around the target wavelength, 1064 nm, and the large conduction band offset relative to the AlInAs barrier material helps reduces the saturation fluence, and transparent substrate reduces nonsaturable losses. We have characterized the lifetime of the bleaching process, the modulation depth, the nonsaturable losses, and the saturation fluence associated with SESAs. We compare different growth conditions and structure designs. These parameters give insight into the quality of the epitaxy and effect structure design has on SESA performance in a laser cavity. AlGaInAs MQWs were grown by MOVPE using a Veeco D125 machine using methyl-substituted metal-organics and hydride sources at a growth temperature of 660 C at a pressure of 60 Torr. A single period of the basic SESA design consists of approximately 130 to 140 nm of AlInAs barrier followed by two AlGaInAs quantum wells separated by 10 nm AlInAs. This design places the QWs near the nodes of the 1064-nm laser cavity standing wave. Structures consisting of 10-, 20-, and 30-periods were grown and evaluated. The SESAs were measured at 1064 nm using an optical pump-probe technique. The absorbance bleaching lifetime varies from 160 to 300 nsec. The nonsaturable loss was as much as 50% for structures grown on n-type, sulfur-doped InP substrates, but was reduced to 16% when compensated, Fe-doped InP substrates were used. The modulation depth of the SESAs increased linearly from 9% to 30% with the number of periods. We are currently investigating how detuning the QW transition energy impacts the bleaching characteristics. We will discuss how each of these parameters impacts the laser performance.

  18. Dual-band near-infrared plasmonic perfect absorber assisted by strong coupling between bright-dark nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yudong; Ren, Guobin; Liu, Huaiqing; Gao, Yixiao; Zhu, Bofeng; Wu, Beilei; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a plasmonic structure with subwavelength air groove periodically etched on metallic surface is designed and numerically investigated by using Finite Element Method (FEM). The simulation results reveal that the transverse magnetic (TM) polarized incident wave can be perfectly absorbed by the air grooves due to the metallic ohmic loss of Fabry-Pérot resonance. More importantly, by introducing an additional nanoresonator to form a pair of bright-dark resonators, a dual-band plasmonic nearly-perfect absorber can be achieved and the original single absorption peak splits into two absorption peaks. Moreover, the resonance wavelengths correspond to the absorption peaks can be manipulated by varying the geometric parameters. Furthermore, the proposed absorber is found to have large angle tolerance. This dual-band and angle independent near-infrared plasmonic perfect absorber has potential applications in infrared technology and devices, such as imaging devices, thermal bolometers, solar cells and wavelength selective radiators.

  19. Fabrication of an Absorber-Coupled MKID Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, Samuel; Stevenson, Thomas; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Absorber-coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays were developed for submillimeter and far-infrared astronomy. These sensors comprise arrays of lambda/2 stepped microwave impedance resonators patterned on a 1.5-mm-thick silicon membrane, which is optimized for optical coupling. The detector elements are supported on a 380-mm-thick micro-machined silicon wafer. The resonators consist of parallel plate aluminum transmission lines coupled to low-impedance Nb microstrip traces of variable length, which set the resonant frequency of each resonator. This allows for multiplexed microwave readout and, consequently, good spatial discrimination between pixels in the array. The transmission lines simultaneously act to absorb optical power and employ an appropriate surface impedance and effective filling fraction. The fabrication techniques demonstrate high-fabrication yield of MKID arrays on large, single-crystal membranes and sub-micron front-to-back alignment of the micro strip circuit. An MKID is a detector that operates upon the principle that a superconducting material s kinetic inductance and surface resistance will change in response to being exposed to radiation with a power density sufficient to break its Cooper pairs. When integrated as part of a resonant circuit, the change in surface impedance will result in a shift in its resonance frequency and a decrease of its quality factor. In this approach, incident power creates quasiparticles inside a superconducting resonator, which is configured to match the impedance of free space in order to absorb the radiation being detected. For this reason MKIDs are attractive for use in large-format focal plane arrays, because they are easily multiplexed in the frequency domain and their fabrication is straightforward. The fabrication process can be summarized in seven steps: (1) Alignment marks are lithographically patterned and etched all the way through a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer, which consists of a

  20. Precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Guan, H.; Qian, Y.; Gao, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca. The measurement was performed using a high-efficiency quantum-state detection technique to monitor quantum jumps and a high-precision and highly synchronous measurement sequence for laser control. A feature in our measurement is the pumping rate of the 729-nm laser that was corrected in a real-time way. The 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime was obtained through the measurement of the spontaneous decay rate after incoherent shelving of the ion to the 3 d 3/2 2D state with a wait time. Systematic errors, such as collisions with background gases, heating effects, impurity components, the shelving and pumping rates, and state detection, were carefully analyzed and estimated. We determined an improved value of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime to be τ3 /2=1.195 (8 ) s. Furthermore, the 3 d 3/2 2D →4 s 1/2 2S quadrupole transition matrix element was measured to be Sk i=7.936 (26 ) e a02 , and the ratio between the lifetimes of 3 d 2D3 /2 and 3 d 2D5 /2 was determined to be 1.018(11). Our method can be universally applied to lifetime measurements of other single ions and atoms with a similar structure.