Science.gov

Sample records for absorber-materials atomic numbers

  1. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  2. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  3. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  4. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  5. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-14

    forces on the order of (hbar)(k) (Omega), where Omega is the laser Rabi frequency. We have observed behavior compatible with bichromatic slowing and... Rabi frequency. We have observed behavior compatible with bichromatic slowing and cooling of some atoms in atomic beam. Results were presented at the

  6. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  7. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-01-01

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  8. The New Element Berkelium (Atomic Number 97)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Ghiorso, A.

    1950-04-26

    An isotope of the element with atomic number 97 has been discovered as a product of the helium-ion bombardment of americium. The name berkelium, symbol Bk, is proposed for element 97. The chemical separation of element 97 from the target material and other reaction products was made by combinations of precipitation and ion exchange adsorption methods making use of its anticipated (III) and (IV) oxidation states and its position as a member of the actinide transition series. The distinctive chemical properties made use of in its separation and the equally distinctive decay properties of the particular isotope constitute the principal evidence for the new element.

  9. Porphyrin Based Near Infrared-Absorbing Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiwen

    photosynthesis. Photosynthesis uses light from the sun to drive a series of chemical reactions. Most natural photosynthetic systems utilize chlorophylls to absorb light energy and carry out photochemical charge separation that stores energy in the form of chemical bonds. The sun produces a broad spectrum of light output that ranges from gamma rays to radio waves. The entire visible range of light (400-700 nm) and some wavelengths in the NIR (700-1000 nm), are highly active in driving photosynthesis. Although the most familiar chlorophyll-containing organisms, such as plants, algae and cyanobacteria, cannot use light longer than 700 nm, anoxygenic bacterium containing bacteriochlorophylls can use the NIR part of the solar spectrum. No organism is known to utilize light of wavelength longer than about 1000 nm for photosynthesis. NIR light has a very low-energy content in each photon, so that large numbers of these low-energy photons would have to be used to drive the chemical reactions of photosynthesis. This is thermodynamically possible but would require a fundamentally different molecular mechanism that is more akin to a heat engine than to photochemistry. Early work on developing light absorbing materials for OPVs was inspired by photosynthesis in which light is absorbed by chlorophyll. Structurally related to chlorophyll is the porphyrin family, which has accordingly drawn much interest as the potential light absorbing component in OPV applications. In this dissertation, the design and detail studies of several porphyrin-based NIR absorbing materials, including pi--extended perylenyl porphryins and pyrazole-containing carbaporphyrins, as well as porphyrin modified single-walled carbon nanotube hybrids, will be presented, dedicating efforts to develop novel and application-oriented materials for efficient utilization of sustainable solar energy.

  10. Boron-copper neutron absorbing material and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry

    1991-01-01

    A composite, copper clad neutron absorbing material is comprised of copper powder and boron powder enriched with boron 10. The boron 10 content can reach over 30 percent by volume, permitting a very high level of neutron absorption. The copper clad product is also capable of being reduced to a thickness of 0.05 to 0.06 inches and curved to a radius of 2 to 3 inches, and can resist temperatures of 900.degree. C. A method of preparing the material includes the steps of compacting a boron-copper powder mixture and placing it in a copper cladding, restraining the clad assembly in a steel frame while it is hot rolled at 900.degree. C. with cross rolling, and removing the steel frame and further rolling the clad assembly at 650.degree. C. An additional sheet of copper can be soldered onto the clad assembly so that the finished sheet can be cold formed into curved shapes.

  11. Diamond like carbon coatings: Categorization by atomic number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Dense diamond-like hydrocarbon films grown at the NASA Lewis Research Center by radio frequency self bias discharge and by direct ion beam deposition were studied. A new method for categorizing hydrocarbons based on their atomic number density and elemental composition was developed and applied to the diamond-like hydrocarbon films. It was shown that the diamond-like hydrocarbon films are an entirely new class of hydrocarbons with atomic number densities lying between those of single crystal diamond and adamantanes. In addition, a major review article on these new materials was completed in cooperation with NASA Lewis Research Center personnel.

  12. Effective atomic numbers and electron density of dosimetric material

    PubMed Central

    Kaginelli, S. B.; Rajeshwari, T.; Sharanabasappa; Kerur, B. R.; Kumar, Anil S.

    2009-01-01

    A novel method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of x-rays employing NaI (Tl) detector system and radioactive sources is described.in this paper. A rigid geometry arrangement and gating of the spectrometer at FWHM position and selection of absorber foils are all done following detailed investigation, to minimize the effect of small angle scattering and multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ, value. Firstly, for standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental foils such as Aluminum, Copper, Molybdenum, Tantalum and Lead are measured and then, this method is utilized for dosimetric interested material (sulfates). The experimental mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with the theoretical values to find good agreement between the theory and experiment within one to two per cent. The effective atomic numbers of the biological substitute material are calculated by sum rule and from the graph. The electron density of dosimetric material is calculated using the effective atomic number. The study has discussed in detail the attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of dosimetric material/biological substitutes. PMID:20098566

  13. Catalysis by clusters with precise numbers of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tyo, Eric C.; Vajda, Stefan

    2015-07-03

    Clusters that contain only a small number of atoms can exhibit unique and often unexpected properties. The clusters are of particular interest in catalysis because they can act as individual active sites, and minor changes in size and composition – such as the addition or removal of a single atom – can have a substantial influence on the activity and selectivity of a reaction. Here we review recent progress in the synthesis, characterization and catalysis of well-defined sub-nanometre clusters. We examine work on size-selected supported clusters in ultra-high vacuum environments and under realistic reaction conditions, and explore the use ofmore » computational methods to provide a mechanistic understanding of their catalytic properties. We also highlight the potential of size-selected clusters to provide insights into important catalytic processes and their use in the development of novel catalytic systems.« less

  14. Heaviest Nuclei: New Element with Atomic Number 117

    ScienceCinema

    Oganessian, Yuri

    2018-01-24

    One of the fundamental outcomes of the nuclear shell model is the prediction of the 'stability islands' in the domain of the hypothetical super heavy elements. The talk is devoted to the experimental verification of these predictions - the synthesis and study of both the decay and chemical properties of the super heavy elements. The discovery of a new chemical element with atomic number Z=117 is reported. The isotopes 293117 and 294117 were produced in fusion reactions between 48Ca and 249Bk. Decay chains involving 11 new nuclei were identified by means of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator. The measured decay properties show a strong rise of stability for heavier isotopes with Z =111, validating the concept of the long sought island of enhanced stability for heaviest nuclei.

  15. Wide band design on the scaled absorbing material filled with flaky CIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Gao, Wei; Wang, Xiaobing; Liang, Zichang; Liao, Yi

    2018-02-01

    The scaled target measurement is an important method to get the target characteristic. Radar absorbing materials are widely used in the low detectable target, considering the absorbing material frequency dispersion characteristics, it makes designing and manufacturing scaled radar absorbing materials on the scaled target very difficult. This paper proposed a wide band design method on the scaled absorbing material of the thin absorption coating with added carbonyl iron particles. According to the theoretical radar cross section (RCS) of the plate, the reflection loss determined by the permittivity and permeability was chosen as the main design factor. Then, the parameters of the scaled absorbing materials were designed using the effective medium theory, and the scaled absorbing material was constructed. Finally, the full-size coating plate and scaled coating plates (under three different scale factors) were simulated; the RCSs of the coating plates were numerically calculated and measured at 4 GHz and a scale factor of 2. The results showed that the compensated RCS of the scaled coating plate was close to that of the full-size coating plate, that is, the mean deviation was less than 0.5 dB, and the design method for the scaled material was very effective.

  16. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  17. Large atom number Bose-Einstein condensate machines

    SciTech Connect

    Streed, Erik W.; Chikkatur, Ananth P.; Gustavson, Todd L.

    2006-02-15

    We describe experimental setups for producing large Bose-Einstein condensates of {sup 23}Na and {sup 87}Rb. In both, a high-flux thermal atomic beam is decelerated by a Zeeman slower and is then captured and cooled in a magneto-optical trap. The atoms are then transferred into a cloverleaf-style Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap and cooled to quantum degeneracy with radio-frequency-induced forced evaporation. Typical condensates contain 20x10{sup 6} atoms. We discuss the similarities and differences between the techniques used for producing large {sup 87}Rb and {sup 23}Na condensates in the context of nearly identical setups.

  18. Effective atomic numbers of some tissue substitutes by different methods: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishwanath P; Badiger, N M

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers of some human organ tissue substitutes such as polyethylene terephthalate, red articulation wax, paraffin 1, paraffin 2, bolus, pitch, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, polyvinylchloride, and modeling clay have been calculated by four different methods like Auto-Zeff, direct, interpolation, and power law. It was found that the effective atomic numbers computed by Auto-Zeff, direct and interpolation methods were in good agreement for intermediate energy region (0.1 MeV < E < 5 MeV) where the Compton interaction dominates. A large difference in effective atomic numbers by direct method and Auto-Zeff was observed in photo-electric and pair-production regions. Effective atomic numbers computed by power law were found to be close to direct method in photo-electric absorption region. The Auto-Zeff, direct and interpolation methods were found to be in good agreement for computation of effective atomic numbers in intermediate energy region (100 keV < E < 10 MeV). The direct method was found to be appropriate method for computation of effective atomic numbers in photo-electric region (10 keV < E < 100 keV). The tissue equivalence of the tissue substitutes is possible to represent by any method for computation of effective atomic number mentioned in the present study. An accurate estimation of Rayleigh scattering is required to eliminate effect of molecular, chemical, or crystalline environment of the atom for estimation of gamma interaction parameters.

  19. Effective atomic numbers of some tissue substitutes by different methods: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Badiger, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers of some human organ tissue substitutes such as polyethylene terephthalate, red articulation wax, paraffin 1, paraffin 2, bolus, pitch, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, polyvinylchloride, and modeling clay have been calculated by four different methods like Auto-Zeff, direct, interpolation, and power law. It was found that the effective atomic numbers computed by Auto-Zeff, direct and interpolation methods were in good agreement for intermediate energy region (0.1 MeV < E < 5 MeV) where the Compton interaction dominates. A large difference in effective atomic numbers by direct method and Auto-Zeff was observed in photo-electric and pair-production regions. Effective atomic numbers computed by power law were found to be close to direct method in photo-electric absorption region. The Auto-Zeff, direct and interpolation methods were found to be in good agreement for computation of effective atomic numbers in intermediate energy region (100 keV < E < 10 MeV). The direct method was found to be appropriate method for computation of effective atomic numbers in photo-electric region (10 keV < E < 100 keV). The tissue equivalence of the tissue substitutes is possible to represent by any method for computation of effective atomic number mentioned in the present study. An accurate estimation of Rayleigh scattering is required to eliminate effect of molecular, chemical, or crystalline environment of the atom for estimation of gamma interaction parameters. PMID:24600169

  20. Development of Coatings for Radar Absorbing Materials at X-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Singh, Samarjit

    2018-03-01

    The present review gives a brief account on some of the technical features of radar absorbing materials (RAMs). The paper has been presented with a concentrated approach towards the material aspects for achieving enhanced radar absorption characteristics for its application as a promising candidate in stealth technology and electromagnetic interference (EMI) minimization problems. The effect of metal particles doping/dispersion in the ferrites and dielectrics has been discussed for obtaining tunable radar absorbing characteristics. A short theoretical overview on the development of absorber materials, implementation of genetic algorithm (GA) in multi-layering and frequency selective surfaces (FSSs) based multi-layer has also been presented for the development of radar absorbing coatings for achieving better absorption augmented with broadband features in order to counter the radar detection systems.

  1. The effect of grading the atomic number at resistive guide element interface on magnetic collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Alraddadi, R. A. B.; Woolsey, N. C.; Robinson, A. P. L.

    2016-07-15

    Using 3 dimensional numerical simulations, this paper shows that grading the atomic number and thus the resistivity at the interface between an embedded high atomic number guide element and a lower atomic number substrate enhances the growth of a resistive magnetic field. This can lead to a large integrated magnetic flux density, which is fundamental to confining higher energy fast electrons. This results in significant improvements in both magnetic collimation and fast-electron-temperature uniformity across the guiding. The graded interface target provides a method for resistive guiding that is tolerant to laser pointing.

  2. On-site monitoring of atomic density number for an all-optical atomic magnetometer based on atomic spin exchange relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng; Chen, Xiyuan; Ding, Ming; Shan, Guangcun; Hu, Zhaohui; Quan, Wei

    2016-07-25

    We present a method for monitoring the atomic density number on site based on atomic spin exchange relaxation. When the spin polarization P ≪ 1, the atomic density numbers could be estimated by measuring magnetic resonance linewidth in an applied DC magnetic field by using an all-optical atomic magnetometer. The density measurement results showed that the experimental results the theoretical predictions had a good consistency in the investigated temperature range from 413 K to 463 K, while, the experimental results were approximately 1.5 ∼ 2 times less than the theoretical predictions estimated from the saturated vapor pressure curve. These deviations were mainly induced by the radiative heat transfer efficiency, which inevitably leaded to a lower temperature in cell than the setting temperature.

  3. Trapped atom number in millimeter-scale magneto-optical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, Gregory W.; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Kitching, John

    2012-06-01

    For compact cold-atom instruments, it is desirable to trap a large number of atoms in a small volume to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. In MOTs with beam diameters of a centimeter or larger, the slowing force is roughly constant versus velocity and the trapped atom number scales as d^4. For millimeter-scale MOTs formed from pyramidal reflectors, a d^6 dependence has been observed [Pollack et al., Opt. Express 17, 14109 (2009)]. A d^6 scaling is expected for small MOTs, where the slowing force is proportional to the atom velocity. For a 1 mm diameter MOT, a d^6 scaling results in 10 atoms, and the difference between a d^4 and a d^6 dependence corresponds to a factor of 1000 in atom number and a factor of 30 in the signal-to-noise ratio. We have observed >10^4 atoms in 1 mm diameter MOTs, consistent with a d^4 dependence. We are currently performing measurements for sub-mm MOTs to determine where the d^4 to d^6 crossover occurs in our system. We are also exploring MOTs based on linear polarization, which can potentially produce stronger slowing forces due to stimulated emission [Emile et al., Europhys. Lett. 20, 687 (1992)]. It may be possible to trap more atoms in small volumes with this method, since high intensities can be easily achieved.

  4. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  5. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, T.W.

    1983-12-21

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  6. A Wide Band Absorbing Material Design Using Band-Pass Frequency Selective Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Xu, Qiang; Liu, Ting; Zheng, Dianliang; Zhou, Li

    2018-03-01

    Based on the high frequency advantage characteristics of the Fe based absorbing coating, a method for designing the structure of broadband absorbing structure by using frequency selective surface (FSS) is proposed. According to the transmission and reflection characteristic of the different size FSS structure, the frequency variation characteristic was simulated. Secondly, the genetic algorithm was used to optimize the high frequency broadband absorbing materials, including the single and double magnetic layer material. Finally, the absorbing characteristics in iron layer were analyzed as the band pass FSS structure was embedded, the results showed that the band-pass FSS had the influence on widening the absorbing frequency. As the FSS was set as the bottom layer, it was effective to achieve the good absorbing property in low frequency and the high frequency absorbing performance was not weakened, because the band-pass FSS led the low frequency absorption and the high frequency shielding effect. The results of this paper are of guiding significance for designing and manufacturing the broadband absorbing materials.

  7. Characterization and preparation of p(U-MMA-An) interpenetrating polymer network damping and absorbing material.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Qingshan; Zhuo, Yuguo; Hong, Wei; Lv, Wenfeng; Xing, Guangzhong

    2014-06-01

    P(U-MMA-ANI) interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) damping and absorbing material is successfully synthesized by PANI particles served as an absorbing agent with the microemulsion polymerization and P(U-MMA) foam IPN network structure for substrate materials with foaming way. P(U-MMA-ANI) IPN is characterized by the compression mechanical performance testing, TG-DSC, and DSC. The results verify that the P(U-MMA) IPN foam damping material has a good compressive strength and compaction cycle property, and the optimum content of PMMA was 40% (mass) with which the SEM graphs do not present the phase separation on the macro level between PMMA and PU, while the phase separation was observed on the micro level. The DTG curve indicates that because of the formation of P(U-MMA) IPN, the decomposition temperature of PMMA and the carbamate in PU increases, while that of the polyol segment in PU has almost no change. P(U-MMA-ANI) IPN foam damping and absorbing material is obtained by PANI particles served as absorbing agent in the form of filler, and PMMA in the form of micro area in substrate material. When the content of PANI was up to 2.0% (mass), the dissipation factor of composites increased, and with the increasing of frequency the dissipation factor increased in a straight line.

  8. Absorber Materials for Transition-Edge Sensor X-ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Bandler, Simon; Brekosky, Regis; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Fred; Sadleir, Jack; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; hide

    2007-01-01

    Arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) can provide high spatial and energy resolution necessary for x-ray astronomy. High quantum efficiency and uniformity of response can be achieved with a suitable absorber material, in which absorber x-ray stopping power, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity are relevant parameters. Here we compare these parameters for bismuth and gold. We have fabricated electroplated gold, electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, and evaporated gold/evaporated bismuth 8x8 absorber arrays and find that a correlation exists between the residual resistance ratio (RRR) and thin film microstructure. This finding indicates that we can tailor absorber material conductivity via microstructure alteration, so as to permit absorber thermalization on timescales suitable for high energy resolution x-ray microcalorimetry. We show that by incorporating absorbers possessing large grain size, including electroplated gold and electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, into our current Mo/Au TES, devices with tunable heat capacity and energy resolution of 2.3 eV (gold) and 2.1 eV (gold/bismuth) FWHM at 6 keV have been fabricated.

  9. Utilizing strongly absorbing materials for low-loss surface-wave nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Nicolai B.; Franz, Philipp; Heckmann, Jan; Pufahl, Karsten; Woggon, Ulrike

    2018-04-01

    Optical media endowed with large nonlinear susceptibilities are highly prized for their employment in frequency conversion and the generation of nonclassical states of light. Although the presence of an optical resonance can greatly increase the nonlinear response (e.g., in epsilon-near-zero materials), the non-negligible increase in linear absorption often precludes the application of such materials in nonlinear optics. Absorbing materials prepared as thin films, however, can support a low-loss surface wave: the long-range surface exciton polariton (LRSEP). Its propagation lifetime increases with greater intrinsic absorption and reduced film thickness, provided that the film is embedded in a transparent medium (symmetric cladding). We explore LRSEP propagation in a molybdenum film by way of a prism-coupling configuration. Our observations show that excitation of the LRSEP mode leads to a dramatic increase in the yield of second-harmonic generation. This implies that the LRSEP mode is an effective vehicle for utilizing the nonlinear response of absorbing materials.

  10. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM ELEMENTS HAVING AN ATOMIC NUMBER NOT LESS THAN 92

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, F.T.; Russell, D.S.

    1958-09-16

    other elements having atomic numbers nnt less than 92, It has been proposed in the past to so separate plutonium by solvent extraction iato an organic solvent using triglycoldichlcride as the organic solvent. The improvement lies in the discovery that triglycoldichloride performs far more efflciently as an extractant, wher certain second organie compounds are added to it. Mentioned as satisfactory additive compounds are benzaldehyde, saturated aliphatic aldehydes containtng at least twc carbon atoms, and certain polyhydric phenols.

  11. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bioactive glasses for photon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shantappa, Anil, E-mail: anilmalipatil@yahoo.co.in; Hanagodimath, S. M., E-mail: smhmath@rediffmail.com

    2015-08-28

    This work was carried out to study the nature of mass attenuation coefficient of bioactive glasses for gamma rays. Bioactive glasses are a group of synthetic silica-based bioactive materials with unique bone bonding properties. In the present study, we have calculated the effective atomic number, electron density for photon interaction of some selected bioactive glasses viz., SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O, SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-CaO and SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in the energy range 1 keV to 100 MeV. We have also computed the single valued effective atomic number by using XMuDat program. It is observed that variation in effective atomic number (Z{submore » PI,} {sub eff}) depends also upon the weight fractions of selected bioactive glasses and range of atomic numbers of the elements. The results shown here on effective atomic number, electron density will be more useful in the medical dosimetry for the calculation of absorbed dose and dose rate.« less

  12. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bioactive glasses for photon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work was carried out to study the nature of mass attenuation coefficient of bioactive glasses for gamma rays. Bioactive glasses are a group of synthetic silica-based bioactive materials with unique bone bonding properties. In the present study, we have calculated the effective atomic number, electron density for photon interaction of some selected bioactive glasses viz., SiO2-Na2O, SiO2-Na2O-CaO and SiO2-Na2O-P2O5 in the energy range 1 keV to 100 MeV. We have also computed the single valued effective atomic number by using XMuDat program. It is observed that variation in effective atomic number (ZPI, eff) depends also upon the weight fractions of selected bioactive glasses and range of atomic numbers of the elements. The results shown here on effective atomic number, electron density will be more useful in the medical dosimetry for the calculation of absorbed dose and dose rate.

  13. Atomic level characterization of cadmium selenide nanocrystal systems using atomic number contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, James R.

    This project involved the characterization of CdSe nanocrystals. Through the use of Atomic Number Contrast Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Z-STEM) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), atomic level structure and chemical information was obtained. Specifically, CdSe nanocrystals produced using a mixture of hexadecylamine (HDA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) were determined to be spherical compared to nanocrystals produced in TOPO only, which had elongated (101) facets. Additionally, the first Z-STEM images of CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals were obtained. From these images, the growth mechanism of the ZnS shell was determined and the existence of non-fluorescent ZnS particles was confirmed. Through collaboration with Quantum Dot Corp., core/shell nanocrystals with near unity quantum yield were developed. These core/shell nanocrystals included a US intermediate layer to improve shell coverage.

  14. Platinum clusters with precise numbers of atoms for preparative-scale catalysis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Takane; Akanuma, Yuki; Haruta, Naoki; Tsuchiya, Shogo; Ishihara, Kentaro; Okayasu, Takeshi; Chun, Wang-Jae; Takahashi, Masaki; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2017-09-25

    Subnanometer noble metal clusters have enormous potential, mainly for catalytic applications. Because a difference of only one atom may cause significant changes in their reactivity, a preparation method with atomic-level precision is essential. Although such a precision with enough scalability has been achieved by gas-phase synthesis, large-scale preparation is still at the frontier, hampering practical applications. We now show the atom-precise and fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters on a milligram scale from tiara-like platinum complexes with various ring numbers (n = 5-13). Low-temperature calcination of the complexes on a carbon support under hydrogen stream affords monodispersed platinum clusters, whose atomicity is equivalent to that of the precursor complex. One of the clusters (Pt 10 ) exhibits high catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of styrene compared to that of the other clusters. This method opens an avenue for the application of these clusters to preparative-scale catalysis.The catalytic activity of a noble metal nanocluster is tied to its atomicity. Here, the authors report an atom-precise, fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters from molecular ring precursors, and show that a variation of only one atom can dramatically change a cluster's reactivity.

  15. Nanoarchitectonics for Controlling the Number of Dopant Atoms in Solid Electrolyte Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Alpana; Unayama, Satomi; Tai, Seishiro; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Waser, Rainer; Aono, Masakazu; Valov, Ilia; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi

    2018-02-01

    Controlling movements of electrons and holes is the key task in developing today's highly sophisticated information society. As transistors reach their physical limits, the semiconductor industry is seeking the next alternative to sustain its economy and to unfold a new era of human civilization. In this context, a completely new information token, i.e., ions instead of electrons, is promising. The current trend in solid-state nanoionics for applications in energy storage, sensing, and brain-type information processing, requires the ability to control the properties of matter at the ultimate atomic scale. Here, a conceptually novel nanoarchitectonic strategy is proposed for controlling the number of dopant atoms in a solid electrolyte to obtain discrete electrical properties. Using α-Ag 2+ δ S nanodots with a finite number of nonstoichiometry excess dopants as a model system, a theory matched with experiments is presented that reveals the role of physical parameters, namely, the separation between electrochemical energy levels and the cohesive energy, underlying atomic-scale manipulation of dopants in nanodots. This strategy can be applied to different nanoscale materials as their properties strongly depend on the number of doping atoms/ions, and has the potential to create a new paradigm based on controlled single atom/ion transfer. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range.

    PubMed

    González, M; Crespo, M; Baselga, J; Pozuelo, J

    2016-05-19

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials.

  17. Knitted radar absorbing materials (RAM) based on nickel-cobalt magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teber, Ahmet; Unver, Ibrahim; Kavas, Huseyin; Aktas, Bekir; Bansal, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    There has been a long-standing interest in the development of flexible, lightweight, thin, and reconfigurable radar absorbing materials (RAM) for military applications such as camouflaging ground-based hardware against airborne radar observation. The use of polymeric Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fabrics as a host matrix for magnetic metal nano-particles (either at the yarn-stage or after weaving the fabric) for shielding and absorbing applications has been described in the literature. In our experimental investigation, the relative concentrations of Nickel and Cobalt as well as the coating time are varied with a view to optimizing the microwave absorption characteristics of the resulting PAN-based composite material in the radar-frequency bands (X, Ku, and K). It is found that the PAN samples with the shortest coating time have the best return losses (under -20 dB return loss over a moderate bandwidth).

  18. Light absorbing material (soot) in rainwater and in aerosol particles in the Maldives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granat, L.; EngströM, J. E.; Praveen, S.; Rodhe, H.

    2010-08-01

    Simultaneous measurements of soot (absorbing material at 528 nm) and inorganic ions in aerosol and precipitation at the Maldives Climate Observatory Hanimaadhoo during the period May 2005 to February 2007 have made it possible to calculate the washout ratio (WR) of these components as a measure of how efficiently they are scavenged by precipitation. On the basis of air trajectories the data have been separated into days with polluted air arriving from the Indian subcontinent in a northeasterly sector during winter and clean monsoon days with southerly flow from the Indian Ocean. The average soot concentration was a factor of 10 higher in the former situations. Despite considerable scatter for individual days, a systematic pattern emerged when the WR for the different components were compared with each other. During the monsoon season the WR for soot was similar to that of sulfate and other fine mode aerosol components, indicating that soot containing particles in these situations were efficient as cloud condensation nuclei. The origin of the light absorbing material during the monsoon season is unclear. During the polluted winter days, on the other hand, the WR for soot was three times smaller than that of sulfate. This indicates that, even after a travel time of several days, the soot containing particles from India have retained much of their hydrophobic property. The low WR and the infrequent rain during this season probably contribute to extending the atmospheric lifetime of soot well beyond several days. Surprisingly high concentrations of non-sea-salt calcium were measured during the monsoon season, substantially higher than during the winter season. The origin of these high values could be long-range transport from the Australian or African continents. Another possibility might be exopolymer gels derived from the ocean surface microlayer.

  19. Cheminoes: A Didactic Game to Learn Chemical Relationships between Valence, Atomic Number, and Symbol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Luis F.; Hincapié, Gina; Alzate, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cheminoes is a didactic game that enables the meaningful learning of some relations between concepts such as chemical element, valence, atomic number, and chemical symbol for the first 36 chemical elements of the periodic system. Among the students who have played the game, their opinions of the activity were positive, considering the game to be a…

  20. PREPARATION OF OXALATES OF METALS OF ATOMIC NUMBER GREATER THAN 88

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the preparation of oxalates of metals of atomic number greater than 88. A solid peroxide of the heavy metal is contacted with an aqueous oxalic acid solution ai a temperature of about 50 C for a period of time sufficient to form the insoluble metal oxalate which is subsequentiy recovered as a pures crystalline compound.

  1. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  2. Calculated gadolinium atomic electron energy levels and Auger electron emission probability as a function of atomic number Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevsky, G. V.; Tolkach, V. I.; Shani, Gad; Rozin, Semion

    2002-06-01

    Auger electron interaction with matter is gaining importance in particular in medical application of radiation. The production probability and energy spectrum is therefore of great importance. A good source of Auger electrons is the 157Gd(n,γ) 158Gd reaction. The present article describes calculations of electron levels in Gd atoms and provides missing data of outer electron energy levels. The energy of these electron levels missing in published tables, was found to be in the 23-24 and 6-7 eV energy ranges respectively. The probability of Auger emission was calculated as an interaction of wave function of the initial and final electron states. The wave functions were calculated using the Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation with relativistic correction. The equations were solved using a spherical symmetry potential. The error for inner shell level is less than 10%, it is increased to the order of 10-15% for the outer shells. The width of the Auger process changes from 0.1 to 1.2 eV for atomic number Z from 5 to 70. The fluorescence yield width changes five orders of magnitude in this range. Auger electron emission width from the K shell changes from 10 -2 to ˜1 eV with Z changing from 10 to 64, depending on the final state. For the L shell it changes from 0 to 0.25 when it Z changes from 20 to 64.

  3. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Crespo, M.; Baselga, J.; Pozuelo, J.

    2016-05-01

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials.Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Scheme of hydrogenated derivative of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (HDGEBA) and m-xylylenediamine; X-ray diffractograms of pristine CNT

  4. Measurements of the effective atomic numbers of minerals using bremsstrahlung produced by low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, S.; Williams, S.

    2017-12-01

    The accuracy of a method for measuring the effective atomic numbers of minerals using bremsstrahlung intensities has been investigated. The method is independent of detector-efficiency and maximum accelerating voltage. In order to test the method, experiments were performed which involved low-energy electrons incident on thick malachite, pyrite, and galena targets. The resultant thick-target bremsstrahlung was compared to bremsstrahlung produced using a standard target, and experimental effective atomic numbers were calculated using data from a previous study (in which the Z-dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung was studied). Comparisons of the results to theoretical values suggest that the method has potential for implementation in energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy systems.

  5. Resonance and intercombination lines in Mg-like ions of atomic numbers Z = 13 – 92

    SciTech Connect

    Santana, Juan A.; Trabert, Elmar

    2015-02-05

    While prominent lines of various Na-like ions have been measured with an accuracy of better than 100 ppm and corroborate equally accurate calculations, there have been remarkably large discrepancies between calculations for Mg-like ions of high atomic number. We present ab initio calculations using the multireference Moller-Plesset approach for Mg-like ions of atomic numbers Z = 13-92 and compare the results with other calculations of this isoelectronic sequence as well as with experimental data. Our results come very close to experiment (typically 100 ppm) over a wide range. Furthermore, data at high values of Z are sparse, which calls formore » further accurate measurements in this range where relativistic and QED effects are large.« less

  6. Effects of Ion Atomic Number on Single-Event Gate Rupture (SEGR) Susceptibility of Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Goldsman, Neil; Liu, Sandra; Titus, Jeffrey L.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony M.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Zafrani, Max; Sherman, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of heavy-ion interaction with the oxide, charge ionized in the epilayer, and charge ionized in the drain substrate, on the bias for SEGR failure in vertical power MOSFETs is experimentally investigated. The results indicate that both the charge ionized in the epilayer and the ion atomic number are important parameters of SEGR failure. Implications on SEGR hardness assurance are discussed.

  7. Potential application of a homogeneous and anisotropic slab as an angle insensitive absorbing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Chang; Liu, Xiaoning; Niu, Tiaoming; Wang, Jing; Mei, Zhonglei; Qin, Jiayong

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a flat and incident angle independence absorbing material is proposed and numerically verified in the optical spectrum. A homogeneous and anisotropic dielectric slab as a non-reflecting layer is first reviewed, and a feasible realization strategy of the slab is then given by using layered isotropic materials. When the loss components of the constitutive materials are not zero, the slab will work as an angle insensitive absorbing layer, and the absorption rate augments with increase of the losses. As the numerical verifications, the field distributions of a metallic cylinder and a triangular metallic object individually covered by the designed absorbing layer are demonstrated. The simulation results show that the designed absorbing layer can efficiently absorb the incident waves with the property of incident angle independence at the operation frequency. This homogeneous slab can be used in one and two dimensional situations for the realization of an invisibility cloak, a carpet cloak and even a skin cloak, if it is used to conformally cover target objects.

  8. Measurements of the light-absorbing material inside cloud droplets and its effect on cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Clarke, A. D.; Warren, Stephen G.; Radke, L. F.; Charleson, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    Most of the measurements of light-absorbing aerosol particles made previously have been in non-cloudy air and therefore provide no insight into aerosol effects on cloud properties. Here, researchers describe an experiment designed to measure light absorption exclusively due to substances inside cloud droplets, compare the results to related light absorption measurements, and evaluate possible effects on the albedo of clouds. The results of this study validate those of Twomey and Cocks and show that the measured levels of light-absorbing material are negligible for the radiative properties of realistic clouds. For the measured clouds, which appear to have been moderately polluted, the amount of elemental carbon (EC) present was insufficient to affect albedo. Much higher contaminant levels or much larger droplets than those measured would be necessary to significantly alter the radiative properties. The effect of the concentrations of EC actually measured on the albedo of snow, however, would be much more pronounced since, in contrast to clouds, snowpacks are usually optically semi-infinite and have large particle sizes.

  9. Hematite from Natural Iron Stones as Microwave Absorbing Material on X-Band Frequency Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuri, Mochamad

    2017-05-01

    This study has been investigated the effect of hematite as microwave absorbing materials (RAM) on X-Band frequency ranges. Hematite was succesfully processed by coprecipitation method and calcined at 500 °C for 5 hour. It was synthesized from natural iron stones from Tanah Laut, South Kalimantan, Indonesia. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraxtion (XRD), conductivity measurement, Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM), and Vector Network Analyzer (VNA). The result was shown that hematite has conductivity value on (2.5-3).10-7 S/cm and be included as dielectric materials. The hysterisis curve was shown that hematite was a super paramagnetic materials. The product was mixed on paint with procentage 10% of total weight and coated on steel grade AH36 with spray methods. Then, the maximum of reflection loss on x - band’s frequency range (8,2-12,4) GHz was -7 dB on frequency of 10.5 GHz. It mean that almost 50% electromagnetic energy was absorbed by hematite.

  10. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, Shivalinge; Krishnaveni, S.; Yashoda, T.; Umesh, T. K.; Gowda, Ramakrishna

    2004-09-01

    Photon mass attenuation coefficients of some thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) compounds, such as LiF, CaCO_3, CaSO_4, CaSO_4\\cdot2H_2O, SrSO_4, CdSO_4, BaSO_4, C_4H_6BaO_4 and 3CdSO_4\\cdot8H_2O were determined at 279.2, 320.07, 514.0, 661.6, 1115.5, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV in a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up using a high resolution, hyper pure germanium detector. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to compute the effective atomic number and the electron density of TLD compounds. The interpolation of total attenuation cross-sections of photons of energy E in elements of atomic number Z was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the data measured by the authors and reported earlier. The best-fit coefficients so obtained in the photon energy range of 279.2 to 320.07 keV, 514.0 to 661.6 keV and 1115.5 to 1332.5 keV by a piece-wise interpolation method were then used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in agreement with other available published values.

  11. Improved atom number with a dual color magneto—optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qiang; Luo, Xin-Yu; Gao, Kui-Yi; Wang, Xiao-Rui; Chen, Dong-Min; Wang, Ru-Quan

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel dual color magneto—optical trap (MOT), which uses two sets of overlapping laser beams to cool and trap 87Rb atoms. The volume of cold cloud in the dual color MOT is strongly dependent on the frequency difference of the laser beams and can be significantly larger than that in the normal MOT with single frequency MOT beams. Our experiment shows that the dual color MOT has the same loading rate as the normal MOT, but much longer loading time, leading to threefold increase in the number of trapped atoms. This indicates that the larger number is caused by reduced light induced loss. The dual color MOT is very useful in experiments where both high vacuum level and large atom number are required, such as single chamber quantum memory and Bose—Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments. Compared to the popular dark spontaneous-force optical trap (dark SPOT) technique, our approach is technically simpler and more suitable to low power laser systems.

  12. 2D Homologous Perovskites as Light-Absorbing Materials for Solar Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Duyen H; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2015-06-24

    We report on the fabrication and properties of the semiconducting 2D (CH3(CH2)3NH3)2(CH3NH3)(n-1)Pb(n)I(3n+1) (n = 1, 2, 3, and 4) perovskite thin films. The band gaps of the series decrease with increasing n values, from 2.24 eV (CH3(CH2)3NH3)2PbI4 (n = 1) to 1.52 eV CH3NH3PbI3 (n = ∞). The compounds exhibit strong light absorption in the visible region, accompanied by strong photoluminescence at room temperature, rendering them promising light absorbers for photovoltaic applications. Moreover, we find that thin films of the semi-2D perovskites display an ultrahigh surface coverage as a result of the unusual film self-assembly that orients the [Pb(n)I(3n+1)](-) layers perpendicular to the substrates. We have successfully implemented this 2D perovskite family in solid-state solar cells, and obtained an initial power conversion efficiency of 4.02%, featuring an open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 929 mV and a short-circuit current density (J(sc)) of 9.42 mA/cm(2) from the n = 3 compound. This result is even more encouraging considering that the device retains its performance after long exposure to a high-humidity environment. Overall, the homologous 2D halide perovskites define a promising class of stable and efficient light-absorbing materials for solid-state photovoltaics and other applications.

  13. Hybrid waste filler filled bio-polymer foam composites for sound absorbent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rus, Anika Zafiah M.; Azahari, M. Shafiq M.; Kormin, Shaharuddin; Soon, Leong Bong; Zaliran, M. Taufiq; Ahraz Sadrina M. F., L.

    2017-09-01

    Sound absorption materials are one of the major requirements in many industries with regards to the sound insulation developed should be efficient to reduce sound. This is also important to contribute in economically ways of producing sound absorbing materials which is cheaper and user friendly. Thus, in this research, the sound absorbent properties of bio-polymer foam filled with hybrid fillers of wood dust and waste tire rubber has been investigated. Waste cooking oil from crisp industries was converted into bio-monomer, filled with different proportion ratio of fillers and fabricated into bio-polymer foam composite. Two fabrication methods is applied which is the Close Mold Method (CMM) and Open Mold Method (OMM). A total of four bio-polymer foam composite samples were produce for each method used. The percentage of hybrid fillers; mixture of wood dust and waste tire rubber of 2.5 %, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10% weight to weight ration with bio-monomer. The sound absorption of the bio-polymer foam composites samples were tested by using the impedance tube test according to the ASTM E-1050 and Scanning Electron Microscope to determine the morphology and porosity of the samples. The sound absorption coefficient (α) at different frequency range revealed that the polymer foam of 10.0 % hybrid fillers shows highest α of 0.963. The highest hybrid filler loading contributing to smallest pore sizes but highest interconnected pores. This also revealed that when highly porous material is exposed to incident sound waves, the air molecules at the surface of the material and within the pores of the material are forced to vibrate and loses some of their original energy. This is concluded that the suitability of bio-polymer foam filled with hybrid fillers to be used in acoustic application of automotive components such as dashboards, door panels, cushion and etc.

  14. Lightweight and efficient microwave absorbing materials based on walnut shell-derived nano-porous carbon.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xu; Wang, Lixi; Zhu, Hongli; Guan, Yongkang; Zhang, Qitu

    2017-06-08

    Lightweight microwave absorbing materials have drawn tremendous attention. Herein, nano-porous biomass carbon materials have been prepared by carbonization with a subsequent potassium hydroxide activation of walnut shells and the microwave absorption properties have also been investigated. The obtained samples have large specific surface areas with numerous micropores and nanopores. The sample activated at 600 °C with a specific surface area of 736.2 m 2 g -1 exhibits the most enhanced microwave absorption performance. It has the maximum reflection loss of -42.4 dB at 8.88 GHz and the effective absorption bandwidth (reflection loss below -10 dB) is 1.76 GHz (from 8.08 GHz to 9.84 GHz), corresponding to a thickness of 2 mm. Additionally, the effective absorption bandwidth can reach 2.24 GHz (from 10.48 GHz to 12.72 GHz) when the absorber thickness is 1.5 mm. Three-dimensional porous architecture, interfacial polarization relaxation loss, and the dipolar relaxation loss make a great contribution to the excellent microwave absorption performance. In contrast, the non-activated sample with lower specific surface area (435.3 m 2 g -1 ) has poor microwave absorption performance due to a poor dielectric loss capacity. This comparison highlights the role of micropores and nanopores in improving the dielectric loss property of porous carbon materials. To sum up, porous biomass carbon has great potential to become lightweight microwave absorbers. Moreover, KOH is an efficient activation agent in the fabrication of carbonaceous materials.

  15. Determination of effective atomic number of biomedical samples using Gamma ray back-scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Inderjeet; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B. S.; Sabharwal, Arvind D.

    2018-05-01

    The study of effective atomic number of biomedical sample has been carried out by using a non-destructive multiple back-scattering technique. Also radiation characterization method is used to compare the tissue equivalent material as human tissue. Response function of 3″ × 3″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector is implemented on recorded pulse-height distribution to boost the counts under the photo-peak and help to reduce the uncertainty in the experimental result. Monte Carlo calculation for multiple back-scattered events supports the reported experimental work.

  16. Combustor exhaust-emissions and blowout-limits with diesel number 2 and jet A fuels utilizing air-atomizing and pressure atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental tests with diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels were conducted in a combustor segment to obtain comparative data on exhaust emissions and blowout limits. An air-atomizing nozzle was used to inject the fuels. Tests were also made with diesel number 2 fuel using a pressure-atomizing nozzle to determine the effectiveness of the air-atomizing nozzle in reducing exhaust emissions. Test conditions included fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.018, inlet-air total pressures and temperatures of 41 to 203 newtons per square centimeter and 477 to 811 K, respectively, and a reference velocity of 21.3 meters per second. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons were twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel. This was attributed to diesel number 2 having a higher concentration of aromatics and lower volatility than Jet A fuel. Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and blowout limits were approximately the same for the two fuels. The air-atomizing nozzle, as compared with the pressure-atomizing nozzle, reduced oxides-of-nitrogen by 20 percent, smoke number by 30 percent, carbon monoxide by 70 percent, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50 percent when used with diesel number 2 fuel.

  17. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  18. Electron density and effective atomic number (Zeff) determination through x-ray Moiré deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Talbot-Lau based Moiré deflectometry is a powerful density diagnostic capable of delivering refraction information and attenuation from a single image, through the accurate detection of X-ray phase-shift and intensity. The technique is able to accurately measure both the real part of the index of refraction δ (directly related to electron density) and the attenuation coefficient μ of an object placed in the x-ray beam. Since the atomic number Z (or Zeff for a composite sample) is proportional to these quantities, an elemental map of the effective atomic number can be obtained with the ratio of the phase and the absorption image. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest in various fields of HED research such as shocked materials and ICF experiments as Zeff is linked, by definition, to the x-ray absorption properties of a specific material. This work is supported by U.S. DoE/NNSA Grant No. 435 DENA0001835.

  19. Combustor exhaust-emissions and blowout-limits with diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels utilizing air-atomizing and pressure-atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of fuel properties on exhaust emissions and blowout limits of a high-pressure combustor segment is evaluated using a splash-groove air-atomizing fuel injector and a pressure-atomizing simplex fuel nozzle to burn both diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels. Exhaust emissions and blowout data are obtained and compared on the basis of the aromatic content and volatility of the two fuels. Exhaust smoke number and emission indices for oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbons are determined for comparison. As compared to the pressure-atomizing nozzle, the air-atomizing nozzle is found to reduce nitrogen oxides by 20%, smoke number by 30%, carbon monoxide by 70%, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50% when used with diesel number 2 fuel. The higher concentration of aromatics and lower volatility of diesel number 2 fuel as compared to Jet A fuel appears to have the most detrimental effect on exhaust emissions. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons are twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel.

  20. Mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of biological compounds for gamma ray interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Dhammajyot Kundlik; Pawar, Pravina P.; Selvam, T. Palani

    2017-09-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) for some enzymes, proteins, amino acids and fatty acids were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies, by performing transmission experiments using 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co and 22Na sources collimated to produce 0.52 cm diameter beams. A NaI (Tl) scintillation detector with energy resolution 8.2% at 663 keV was used for detection. The experimental values of (μ/ρ) were then used to determine the atomic cross section (σa), electronic cross section (σe), effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Neff). It was observed that (μ/ρ), σa and σe decrease initially and then tends to be almost constant at higher energies. Values of Zeff and Neff were observed roughly constant with energy. The deviations in experimental results of radiological parameters were believed to be affected by physical and chemical environments. Experimental results of radiological parameters were observed in good agreement with WinXCom values.

  1. Systematic measurements of opacity dependence on temperature, density, and atomic number at stellar interior conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Taisuke

    2017-10-01

    Model predictions for iron opacity are notably different from measurements performed at matter conditions similar to the boundary between the solar radiation and convection zones. The calculated iron opacities have narrower spectral lines, weaker quasi-continuum at short wavelength, and deeper opacity windows than the measurements. If correct, these measurements help resolve a decade old problem in solar physics. A key question is therefore: What is responsible for the model-data discrepancy? The answer is complex because the experiments are challenging and opacity theories depend on multiple entangled physical processes such as the influence of completeness and accuracy of atomic states, line broadening, contributions from myriad transitions from excited states, and multi-photon absorption processes. To help determine the cause of this discrepancy, a systematic study of opacity variation with temperature, density, and atomic number is underway. Measurements of chromium, iron, and nickel opacities have been performed at two different temperatures and densities. The collection of measured opacities provides constraints on hypotheses to explain the discrepancy. We will discuss implications of measured opacities, experimental errors, and possible opacity model refinements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  2. Experimental demonstration of multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography for effective atomic number identification in cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Brian S.; Lee, Hin Y.; MacDonald, Thomas D.; Nelson, Roberts G.; Danagoulian, Areg

    2018-04-01

    The smuggling of special nuclear materials (SNMs) through international borders could enable nuclear terrorism and constitutes a significant threat to global security. This paper presents the experimental demonstration of a novel radiographic technique for quantitatively reconstructing the density and type of material present in commercial cargo containers, as a means of detecting such threats. Unlike traditional techniques which use sources of bremsstrahlung photons with a continuous distribution of energies, multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography utilizes monoenergetic photons from nuclear reactions, specifically the 4.4 and 15.1 MeV photons from the 11B(d,nγ)12C reaction. By exploiting the Z-dependence of the photon interaction cross sections at these two specific energies, it is possible to simultaneously determine the areal density and the effective atomic number as a function of location for a 2D projection of a scanned object. The additional information gleaned from using and detecting photons of specific energies for radiography substantially increases the resolving power between different materials. This paper presents results from the imaging of mock cargo materials ranging from Z ≈5 -92 , demonstrating accurate reconstruction of the effective atomic number and areal density of the materials over the full range. In particular, the system is capable of distinguishing pure materials with Z ≳ 70 , such as lead and uranium—a critical requirement of a system designed to detect SNM. This methodology could be used to screen commercial cargoes with high material specificity, to distinguish most benign materials from SNM, such as uranium and plutonium.

  3. Experimental evaluation of effective atomic number of composite materials using back-scattering of gamma photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Inderjeet; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B. S.; Sabharwal, Arvind D.

    2017-04-01

    A method has been presented for calculation of effective atomic number (Zeff) of composite materials, by using back-scattering of 662 keV gamma photons obtained from a 137Cs mono-energetic radioactive source. The present technique is a non-destructive approach, and is employed to evaluate Zeff of different composite materials, by interacting gamma photons with semi-infinite material in a back-scattering geometry, using a 3″ × 3″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The present work is undertaken to study the effect of target thickness on intensity distribution of gamma photons which are multiply back-scattered from targets (pure elements) and composites (mixtures of different elements). The intensity of multiply back-scattered events increases with increasing target thickness and finally saturates. The saturation thickness for multiply back-scattered events is used to assign a number (Zeff) for multi-element materials. Response function of the 3″ × 3″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector is applied on observed pulse-height distribution to include the contribution of partially absorbed photons. The reduced value of signal-to-noise ratio interprets the increase in multiply back-scattered data of a response corrected spectrum. Data obtained from Monte Carlo simulations and literature also support the present experimental results.

  4. Robust determination of effective atomic numbers for electron interactions with TLD-100 and TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. L.

    2011-04-01

    Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) are the most commonly implemented for clinical dosimetry. The small physical magnitude of TLDs makes them attractive for applications such as small field measurement, in vivo dosimetry and measurement of out-of-field doses to critical structures. The most broadly used TLD is TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) and, for applications requiring higher sensitivity to low-doses, TLD-100H (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) is frequently employed. The radiological properties of these TLDs are therefore of significant interest. For the first time, in this study effective atomic numbers for radiative, collisional and total electron interaction processes are calculated for TLD-100 and TLD-100H dosimeters over the energy range 1 keV-100 MeV. This is undertaken using a robust, energy-dependent method of calculation rather than typical power-law approximations. The influence of dopant concentrations and unwanted impurities is also investigated. The two TLDs exhibit similar effective atomic numbers, ranging from approximately 5.77-6.51. Differences arising from the different dopants are most pronounced in low-energy radiative effects. The TLDs have atomic numbers approximately 1.48-2.06 times that of water. The effective atomic number of TLD-100H is consistently higher than that of TLD-100 over a broad energy range, due to the greater influence of the higher- Z dopants on the electron interaction cross sections. Typical variation in dopant concentration does not significantly influence the effective atomic number. The influence on TLD-100H is comparatively more pronounced than that on TLD-100. Contrariwise, unwanted hydroxide impurities influence TLD-100 more than TLD-100H. The effective atomic number is a key parameter that influences the radiological properties and energy response of TLDs. Although many properties of these TLDs have been studied rigorously, as yet there has been no investigation of their effective atomic numbers for electron interactions. The

  5. Studies on mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önder, P.; Turşucu, A.; Demir, D.; Gürol, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mass attenuation coefficient, μm , effective atomic number, Zeff, and effective electron density, Nel, were determined experimentally and theoretically for some thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) compounds such as MgSO4, CdSO4, Al2O3, Mg2SiO4, ZnSO4, CaSO4, CaF2, NaSO4, Na4P2O7, Ca5F(PO4)3, SiO2, CaCO3 and BaSO4 at 8.04, 8.91, 13.37, 14.97, 17.44, 19.63, 22.10, 24.90, 30.82, 32.06, 35.40, 36.39, 37.26, 43.74, 44.48, 50.38, 51.70, 53.16, 80.99, 276.40, 302.85, 356.01, 383.85 and 661.66 keV photon energies by using an HPGe detector with a resolution of 182 eV at 5.9 keV. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using mixture rule. The calculated values were compared with the experimental values for all compounds. Good agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretical values within experimental uncertainties.

  6. Atomic Theory and Multiple Combining Proportions: The Search for Whole Number Ratios.

    PubMed

    Usselman, Melvyn C; Brown, Todd A

    2015-04-01

    John Dalton's atomic theory, with its postulate of compound formation through atom-to-atom combination, brought a new perspective to weight relationships in chemical reactions. A presumed one-to-one combination of atoms A and B to form a simple compound AB allowed Dalton to construct his first table of relative atomic weights from literature analyses of appropriate binary compounds. For such simple binary compounds, the atomic theory had little advantages over affinity theory as an explanation of fixed proportions by weight. For ternary compounds of the form AB2, however, atomic theory made quantitative predictions that were not deducible from affinity theory. Atomic theory required that the weight of B in the compound AB2 be exactly twice that in the compound AB. Dalton, Thomas Thomson and William Hyde Wollaston all published within a few years of each other experimental data that claimed to give the predicted results with the required accuracy. There are nonetheless several experimental barriers to obtaining the desired integral multiple proportions. In this paper I will discuss replication experiments which demonstrate that only Wollaston's results are experimentally reliable. It is likely that such replicability explains why Wollaston's experiments were so influential.

  7. An Estimation of the Number and Size of Atoms in a Printed Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Beth; Collett, Edward; Tabor-Morris, Anne; Croman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Elementary school students learn that atoms are very, very small. Students are also taught that atoms (and molecules) are the fundamental constituents of the material world. Numerical values of their size are often given, but, nevertheless, it is difficult to imagine their size relative to one's everyday surroundings. In order for students to…

  8. Iodine Vapor Staining for Atomic Number Contrast in Backscattered Electron and X-ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Boyde, Alan; Mccorkell, Fergus A; Taylor, Graham K; Bomphrey, Richard J; Doube, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Iodine imparts strong contrast to objects imaged with electrons and X-rays due to its high atomic number (53), and is widely used in liquid form as a microscopic stain and clinical contrast agent. We have developed a simple technique which exploits elemental iodine's sublimation-deposition state-change equilibrium to vapor stain specimens with iodine gas. Specimens are enclosed in a gas-tight container along with a small mass of solid I2. The bottle is left at ambient laboratory conditions while staining proceeds until empirically determined completion (typically days to weeks). We demonstrate the utility of iodine vapor staining by applying it to resin-embedded tissue blocks and whole locusts and imaging them with backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM) or X-ray microtomography (XMT). Contrast is comparable to that achieved with liquid staining but without the consequent tissue shrinkage, stain pooling, or uneven coverage artefacts associated with immersing the specimen in iodine solutions. Unmineralized tissue histology can be read in BSE SEM images with good discrimination between tissue components. Organs within the locust head are readily distinguished in XMT images with particularly useful contrast in the chitin exoskeleton, muscle and nerves. Here, we have used iodine vapor staining for two imaging modalities in frequent use in our laboratories and on the specimen types with which we work. It is likely to be equally convenient for a wide range of specimens, and for other modalities which generate contrast from electron- and photon-sample interactions, such as transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy. Microsc. Res. Tech. 77:1044–1051, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. Microscopy Research Technique published by Wiley Periodocals, Inc. PMID:25219801

  9. Analysis of SnS2 hyperdoped with V proposed as efficient absorber material.

    PubMed

    Seminovski, Yohanna; Palacios, Pablo; Wahnón, Perla

    2014-10-01

    Intermediate-band materials can improve the photovoltaic efficiency of solar cells through the absorption of two subband-gap photons that allow extra electron-hole pair formations. Previous theoretical and experimental findings support the proposal that the layered SnS2 compound, with a band-gap of around 2 eV, is a candidate for an intermediate-band material when it is doped with a specific transition-metal. In this work we characterize vanadium doped SnS2 using density functional theory at the dilution level experimentally found and including a dispersion correction combined with the site-occupancy-disorder method. In order to analyze the electronic characteristics that depend on geometry, two SnS2 polytypes partially substituted with vanadium in symmetry-adapted non-equivalent configurations were studied. In addition the magnetic configurations of vanadium in a SnS2 2H-polytype and its comparison with a 4H-polytype were also characterized. We demonstrate that a narrow intermediate-band is formed, when these dopant atoms are located in different layers. Our theoretical predictions confirm the recent experimental findings in which a paramagnetic intermediate-band material in a SnS2 2H-polytype with 10% vanadium concentration is obtained.

  10. Effective Atomic Number, Mass Attenuation Coefficient Parameterization, and Implications for High-Energy X-Ray Cargo Inspection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.

    The most widely used technology for the non-intrusive active inspection of cargo containers and trucks is x-ray radiography at high energies (4-9 MeV). Technologies such as dual-energy imaging, spectroscopy, and statistical waveform analysis can be used to estimate the effective atomic number (Zeff) of the cargo from the x-ray transmission data, because the mass attenuation coefficient depends on energy as well as atomic number Z. The estimated effective atomic number, Zeff, of the cargo then leads to improved detection capability of contraband and threats, including special nuclear materials (SNM) and shielding. In this context, the exact meaning of effective atomic number (for mixtures and compounds) is generally not well-defined. Physics-based parameterizations of the mass attenuation coefficient have been given in the past, but usually for a limited low-energy range. Definitions of Zeff have been based, in part, on such parameterizations. Here, we give an improved parameterization at low energies (20-1000 keV) which leads to a well-defined Zeff. We then extend this parameterization up to energies relevant for cargo inspection (10 MeV), and examine what happens to the Zeff definition at these higher energies.

  11. Study of earth abundant tco and absorber materials for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Tejas

    In order to make photovoltaic power generation a sustainable venture, it is necessary to use cost-effective materials in the manufacture of solar cells. In this regard, AZO (Aluminum doped Zinc Oxide) and CZTS (Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide) have been studied for their application in thin film solar cells. While AZO is a transparent conducting oxide, CZTS is a photovoltaic absorber. Both AZO and CZTS consist of earth abundant elements and are non-toxic in nature. Highly transparent and conductive AZO thin films were grown using RF sputtering. The influence of deposition parameters such as working pressure, RF power, substrate temperature and flow rate on the film characteristics was investigated. The as-grown films had a high degree of preferred orientation along the (002) direction which enhanced at lower working pressures, higher RF powers and lower substrate temperatures. Williamson-Hall analysis on the films revealed that as the working pressure was increased, the nature of stress and strain gradually changed from being compressive to tensile. The fall in optical transmission of the films was a consequence of free carrier absorption resulting from enhanced carrier density due to incorporation of Al atoms or oxygen vacancies. The optical and electrical properties of the films were described well by the Burstein-Moss effect. CZTS absorber layers were grown using ultrasonic spray pyrolysis at a deposition temperature of 350 C and subsequently annealed in a sulfurization furnace. Measurements from XRD and Raman spectra confirmed the presence of pure single phase Cu2ZnSnS4. Texture analysis of as-deposited and annealed CZTS films indicated that the (112) plane which is characteristic of the kesterite phase was preferred. The grain size increased from 50 nm to 100 nm on conducting post-deposition annealing. CZTS films with stoichiometric composition yielded a band gap of 1.5 eV, which is optimal for solar energy conversion. The variation of tin in the film changed its

  12. Fraction number of trapped atoms and velocity distribution function in sub-recoil laser cooling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. A.; Krylova, D. D.

    1996-02-01

    The analytical investigation of Bloch equations is used to describe the main features of the 1D velocity selective coherent population trapping cooling scheme. For the initial stage of cooling the fraction of cooled atoms is derived in the case of a Gaussian initial velocity distribution. At very long times of interaction the fraction of cooled atoms and the velocity distribution function are described by simple analytical formulae and do not depend on the initial distribution. These results are in good agreement with those of Bardou, Bouchaud, Emile, Aspect and Cohen-Tannoudji based on statistical analysis in terms of Levy flights and with Monte-Carlo simulations of the process.

  13. Combustor exhaust emissions with air-atomizing splash-groove fuel injectors burning Jet A and Diesel number 2 fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Air-atomizing, splash-groove injectors were shown to improve primary-zone fuel spreading and reduce combustor exhaust emissions for Jet A and diesel number 2 fuels. With Jet A fuel large-orifice, splash-groove injectors the oxides-of-nitrogen emission index was reduced, but emissions of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, or smoke were unaffected. Small-orifice, splash-groove injectors did not reduce oxides of nitrogen, but reduced the smoke number and carbon monoxide and unburned-hydrocarbon emission indices. With diesel number 2 fuel, the small-orifice, splash-groove injectors reduced oxides of nitrogen by 19 percent, smoke number by 28 percent, carbon monoxide by 75 percent, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50 percent. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons were twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel. Combustor blowout limits were similar for diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels.

  14. A Novel, Real-Valued Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Radar Absorbing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, John Michael

    2004-01-01

    A novel, real-valued Genetic Algorithm (GA) was designed and implemented to minimize the reflectivity and/or transmissivity of an arbitrary number of homogeneous, lossy dielectric or magnetic layers of arbitrary thickness positioned at either the center of an infinitely long rectangular waveguide, or adjacent to the perfectly conducting backplate of a semi-infinite, shorted-out rectangular waveguide. Evolutionary processes extract the optimal physioelectric constants falling within specified constraints which minimize reflection and/or transmission over the frequency band of interest. This GA extracted the unphysical dielectric and magnetic constants of three layers of fictitious material placed adjacent to the conducting backplate of a shorted-out waveguide such that the reflectivity of the configuration was 55 dB or less over the entire X-band. Examples of the optimization of realistic multi-layer absorbers are also presented. Although typical Genetic Algorithms require populations of many thousands in order to function properly and obtain correct results, verified correct results were obtained for all test cases using this GA with a population of only four.

  15. Determination of the number density of excited and ground Zn atoms during rf magnetron sputtering of ZnO target

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Gangwar, R. K.; Stafford, L., E-mail: luc.stafford@umontreal.ca

    2015-07-15

    A combination of optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) and optical emission spectroscopy measurements was used to monitor the number density of Zn atoms in excited 4s4p ({sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable states as well as in ground 4s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) state in a 5 mTorr Ar radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering plasma used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. OAS measurements revealed an increase by about one order of magnitude of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms by varying the self-bias voltage on the ZnO target from −115 to −300 V. Over themore » whole range of experimental conditions investigated, the triplet-to-singlet metastable density ratio was 5 ± 1, which matches the statistical weight ratio of these states in Boltzmann equilibrium. Construction of a Boltzmann plot using all Zn I emission lines in the 200–500 nm revealed a constant excitation temperature of 0.33 ± 0.04 eV. In combination with measured populations of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms, this temperature was used to extrapolate the absolute number density of ground state Zn atoms. The results were found to be in excellent agreement with those obtained previously by actinometry on Zn atoms using Ar as the actinometer gas [L. Maaloul and L. Stafford, J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 31, 061306 (2013)]. This set of data was then correlated to spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of the deposition rate of Zn atoms on a Si substrate positioned at 12 cm away from the ZnO target. The deposition rate scaled linearly with the number density of Zn atoms. In sharp contrast with previous studies on RF magnetron sputtering of Cu targets, these findings indicate that metastable atoms play a negligible role on the plasma deposition dynamics of Zn-based coatings.« less

  16. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Garcia, Luis Isaac; Pérez Azorin, José Fernando; Almansa, Julio F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ({ρ\\text{e}} ) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for {ρ\\text{e}} and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating {ρ\\text{e}} and Z eff using dual-energy CT images.

  17. Monte Carlo Approach for Estimating Density and Atomic Number From Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Images of Carbonate Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Rodolfo A.; Prodanović, Maša.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2017-12-01

    We develop a new Monte Carlo-based inversion method for estimating electron density and effective atomic number from 3-D dual-energy computed tomography (CT) core scans. The method accounts for uncertainties in X-ray attenuation coefficients resulting from the polychromatic nature of X-ray beam sources of medical and industrial scanners, in addition to delivering uncertainty estimates of inversion products. Estimation of electron density and effective atomic number from CT core scans enables direct deterministic or statistical correlations with salient rock properties for improved petrophysical evaluation; this condition is specifically important in media such as vuggy carbonates where CT resolution better captures core heterogeneity that dominates fluid flow properties. Verification tests of the inversion method performed on a set of highly heterogeneous carbonate cores yield very good agreement with in situ borehole measurements of density and photoelectric factor.

  18. Effective atomic numbers in some food materials and medicines for γ -ray attenuation using ^{137}Cs γ -ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathy, J. S.; Anooja, J.; Krishnaveni, R. B.; Gangadathan, M. P.; Varier, K. M.

    2018-06-01

    A light-weight multichannel analyser (MCA)-based γ -ray spectrometer, developed earlier at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, has been used as part of the PG curriculum, to determine the effective atomic numbers for γ attenuation of ^{137}Cs γ -ray in different types of samples. The samples used are mixtures of graphite, aluminum and selenium powders in different proportions, commercial and home-made edible powders, fruit and vegetable juices as well as certain allopathic and ayurvedic medications. A narrow beam good geometry set-up has been used in the experiments. The measured attenuation coefficients have been used to extract effective atomic numbers in the samples. The results are consistent with XCOM values wherever available. The present results suggest that the γ attenuation technique can be used as an effective non-destructive method for finding adulteration of food materials.

  19. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge in some samarium compounds.

    PubMed

    Akman, F; Durak, R; Turhan, M F; Kaçal, M R

    2015-07-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some samarium compounds were determined using the experimental total mass attenuation coefficient values near the K edge in the X-ray energy range from 36.847 up to 57.142 keV. The measurements, in the region from 36.847 to 57.142 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the Kα2, Kα1, Kβ1 and Kβ2 X-rays from different secondary source targets excited by the 59.54 keV gamma-photons from an Am-241 annular source. This paper presents the first measurement of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some samarium compounds near the K edge. The results of the study showed that the measured values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated ones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of theoretical and experimental values of the number of metallic orbitals per atom in hypoelectronic and hyperelectronic metals

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus; Kamb, Barclay

    1985-01-01

    The statistical resonating-valence-bond theory of metals is applied in the purely theoretical calculation of the composition of the Ni-Cu alloy at the foot of the curve of saturation ferromagnetic moment, which marks the boundary between hypoelectronic and hyperelectronic metals and determines the value of the number of metallic orbitals per atom. The results, Ni44Cu56 and 0.722 metallic orbitals, agree with the observed values. This agreement provides strong support of the theory. PMID:16593633

  1. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  2. Radar Absorbing Material Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    layer will depend on the angle of the incidence of the incoming wave. However, for large and ε µ values, the direction of the refracted ray in the...1995. 3. Federation of American Scientist Official Website (www.fas.org), 22 June 2003. 4. Asoke Bhattacharyya, D.L. Sengupta, Radar Cross Section

  3. Growth of Cu2ZnSnS4(CZTS) by Pulsed Laser Deposition for Thin film Photovoltaic Absorber Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandur, Abhishek; White, Bruce

    2014-03-01

    CZTS (Cu2ZnSnS4) has become the subject of intense interest because it is an ideal candidate absorber material for thin-film solar cells with an optimal band gap (1.5 eV), high absorption coefficient (104 cm-1) and abundant elemental components. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) provides excellent control over film composition since thin films are deposited under high vacuum with excellent stoichiometry transfer from the target. CZTS thin films were deposited using PLD from a stoichiometrically close CZTS target (Cu2.6Zn1.1Sn0.7S3.44). The effects of laser energy fluence and substrate temperature and post-deposition sulfur annealing on the surface morphology, composition and optical absorption have been investigated. Optimal CZTS thin films exhibited a band gap of 1.54 eV with an absorption coefficient of 4x104cm-1. A solar cell utilizing PLD grown CZTS with the structure SLG/Mo/CZTS/CdS/ZnO/ITO showed a conversion efficiency of 5.85% with Voc = 376 mV, Jsc = 38.9 mA/cm2 and Fill Factor, FF = 0.40.

  4. Accuracies of the synthesized monochromatic CT numbers and effective atomic numbers obtained with a rapid kVp switching dual energy CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Christodoulou, Emmanuel G.; Larson, Sandra C.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was performed to investigate the accuracies of the synthesized monochromatic images and effective atomic number maps obtained with the new GE Discovery CT750 HD CT scanner. Methods: A Gammex-RMI model 467 tissue characterization phantom and the CT number linearity section of a Phantom Laboratory Catphan 600 phantom were scanned using the dual energy (DE) feature on the GE CT750 HD scanner. Synthesized monochromatic images at various energies between 40 and 120 keV and effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) maps were generated. Regions of interest were placed within these images/maps to measure the average monochromatic CT numbers andmore » average Z{sub eff} of the materials within these phantoms. The true Z{sub eff} values were either supplied by the phantom manufacturer or computed using Mayneord's equation. The linear attenuation coefficients for the true CT numbers were computed using the NIST XCOM program with the input of manufacturer supplied elemental compositions and densities. The effects of small variations in the assumed true densities of the materials were also investigated. Finally, the effect of body size on the accuracies of the synthesized monochromatic CT numbers was investigated using a custom lumbar section phantom with and without an external fat-mimicking ring. Results: Other than the Z{sub eff} of the simulated lung inserts in the tissue characterization phantom, which could not be measured by DECT, the Z{sub eff} values of all of the other materials in the tissue characterization and Catphan phantoms were accurate to 15%. The accuracies of the synthesized monochromatic CT numbers of the materials in both phantoms varied with energy and material. For the 40-120 keV range, RMS errors between the measured and true CT numbers in the Catphan are 8-25 HU when the true CT numbers were computed using the nominal plastic densities. These RMS errors improve to 3-12 HU for assumed true densities within the nominal density {+-}0.02 g

  5. Measuring air core characteristics of a pressure-swirl atomizer via a transparent acrylic nozzle at various Reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun J.; Oh, Sang Youp; Kim, Ho Y.

    2010-11-15

    Because of thermal fluid-property dependence, atomization stability (or flow regime) can change even at fixed operating conditions when subject to temperature change. Particularly at low temperatures, fuel's high viscosity can prevent a pressure-swirl (or simplex) atomizer from sustaining a centrifugal-driven air core within the fuel injector. During disruption of the air core inside an injector, spray characteristics outside the nozzle reflect a highly unstable, nonlinear mode where air core length, Sauter mean diameter (SMD), cone angle, and discharge coefficient variability. To better understand injector performance, these characteristics of the pressure-swirl atomizer were experimentally investigated and data were correlated to Reynoldsmore » numbers (Re). Using a transparent acrylic nozzle, the air core length, SMD, cone angle, and discharge coefficient are observed as a function of Re. The critical Reynolds numbers that distinguish the transition from unstable mode to transitional mode and eventually to a stable mode are reported. The working fluids are diesel and a kerosene-based fuel, referred to as bunker-A. (author)« less

  6. Tomography of atomic number and density of materials using dual-energy imaging and the Alvarez and Macovski attenuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paziresh, M.; Kingston, A. M.; Latham, S. J.; Fullagar, W. K.; Myers, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography and the Alvarez and Macovski [Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] transmitted intensity (AMTI) model were used in this study to estimate the maps of density (ρ) and atomic number (Z) of mineralogical samples. In this method, the attenuation coefficients are represented [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] in the form of the two most important interactions of X-rays with atoms that is, photoelectric absorption (PE) and Compton scattering (CS). This enables material discrimination as PE and CS are, respectively, dependent on the atomic number (Z) and density (ρ) of materials [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)]. Dual-energy imaging is able to identify sample materials even if the materials have similar attenuation coefficients at single-energy spectrum. We use the full model rather than applying one of several applied simplified forms [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976); Siddiqui et al., SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2004); Derzhi, U.S. patent application 13/527,660 (2012); Heismann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 2073-2079 (2003); Park and Kim, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 59, 2709 (2011); Abudurexiti et al., Radiol. Phys. Technol. 3, 127-135 (2010); and Kaewkhao et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 109, 1260-1265 (2008)]. This paper describes the tomographic reconstruction of ρ and Z maps of mineralogical samples using the AMTI model. The full model requires precise knowledge of the X-ray energy spectra and calibration of PE and CS constants and exponents of atomic number and energy that were estimated based on fits to simulations and calibration measurements. The estimated ρ and Z images of the samples used in this paper yield average relative errors of 2.62% and 1.19% and maximum relative errors of 2.64% and 7.85%, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the method accounts for the beam hardening effect in density (ρ) and

  7. Mid-Atomic-Number Cylindrical Wire Array Precursor Plasma Studies on Zebra

    DOE PAGES

    Stafford, A; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; ...

    2014-12-30

    The precursor plasmas from low wire number cylindrical wire arrays (CWAs) were previously shown to radiate at temperatures >300 eV for Ni-60 (94% Cu and 6% Ni) wires in experiments on the 1-MA Zebra generator. Continued research into precursor plasmas has studied additional midatomic-number materials including Cu and Alumel (95% Ni, 2% Al, 2% Mn, and 1% Si) to determine if the >300 eV temperatures are common for midatomic-number materials. Additionally, current scaling effects were observed by performing CWA precursor experiments at an increased current of 1.5 MA using a load current multiplier. Our results show an increase in amore » linear radiation yield of ~50% (16 versus 10 kJ/cm) for the experiments at increased current. However, plasma conditions inferred through the modeling of X-ray time-gated spectra are very similar for the precursor plasma in both current conditions.« less

  8. Accuracy of the raw-data-based effective atomic numbers and monochromatic CT numbers for contrast medium with a dual-energy CT technique.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Daisuke; Ozawa, Shuichi; Yokomachi, Kazushi; Tanaka, Sodai; Higaki, Toru; Fujioka, Chikako; Suzuki, Tatsuhiko; Tsuneda, Masato; Nakashima, Takeo; Ohno, Yoshimi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of raw-data-based effective atomic number (Z eff ) values and monochromatic CT numbers for contrast material of varying iodine concentrations, obtained using dual-energy CT. We used a tissue characterization phantom and varying concentrations of iodinated contrast medium. A comparison between the theoretical values of Z eff and that provided by the manufacturer was performed. The measured and theoretical monochromatic CT numbers at 40-130 keV were compared. The average difference between the Z eff values of lung (inhale) inserts in the tissue characterization phantom was 81.3% and the average Z eff difference was within 8.4%. The average difference between the Z eff values of the varying concentrations of iodinated contrast medium was within 11.2%. For the varying concentrations of iodinated contrast medium, the differences between the measured and theoretical monochromatic CT values increased with decreasing monochromatic energy. The Z eff and monochromatic CT numbers in the tissue characterization phantom were reasonably accurate. The accuracy of the raw-data-based Z eff values was higher than that of image-based Z eff values in the tissue-equivalent phantom. The accuracy of Z eff values in the contrast medium was in good agreement within the maximum SD found in the iodine concentration range of clinical dynamic CT imaging. Moreover, the optimum monochromatic energy for human tissue and iodinated contrast medium was found to be 70 keV. Advances in knowledge: The accuracy of the Z eff values and monochromatic CT numbers of the contrast medium created by raw-data-based, dual-energy CT could be sufficient in clinical conditions.

  9. Atomic Number Dependence of Hadron Production at Large Transverse Momentum in 300 GeV Proton--Nucleus Collisions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cronin, J. W.; Frisch, H. J.; Shochet, M. J.; Boymond, J. P.; Mermod, R.; Piroue, P. A.; Sumner, R. L.

    1974-07-15

    In an experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory we have compared the production of large transverse momentum hadrons from targets of W, Ti, and Be bombarded by 300 GeV protons. The hadron yields were measured at 90 degrees in the proton-nucleon c.m. system with a magnetic spectrometer equipped with 2 Cerenkov counters and a hadron calorimeter. The production cross-sections have a dependence on the atomic number A that grows with P{sub 1}, eventually leveling off proportional to A{sup 1.1}.

  10. Does the number of nitrogen atoms have an influence on the conducting properties of diphenylazines? A DFT insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moral, Mónica; Granadino-Roldán, José Manuel; Garzón, Andrés; García, Gregorio; Fernández-Gómez, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports on the variation of some structural and electronic properties related to the electron conductivity for the series of diphenylazines represented by the formula Ph sbnd (C 2+nN 4-nH n) sbnd Ph, n = 0 - 4. Properties such as planarity, aromaticity, HOMO → LUMO excitation energy, electron affinity, LUMO level energy, reorganization energy and electron coupling between neighboring molecules in the crystal were analyzed from a theoretical perspective as a function of the number of nitrogen atoms in the molecular structure. As a result, the planarity, aromaticity and electron affinity increase with the number of N atoms in the central ring while the HOMO → LUMO excitation energy and LUMO levels diminish. It is worth noting that up to n = 3, the frontier orbitals appear delocalized throughout the whole system while for n = 4 the localized character of the LUMO might explain the increase in the reorganization energy and thus the higher difficulty to delocalize the excess of negative charge. Electron coupling between neighboring molecules was also estimated on the basis of the energy splitting in dimer method and the reported crystal structures for some of the studied molecules. Accordingly, the highest | t12| value was obtained for Ph 2T N3 (0.06 eV) while Ph 2Tz should be the most advantageous candidate of the series in terms of electron injection.

  11. Magneto-structural correlations in dirhenium(iv) complexes possessing magnetic pathways with even or odd numbers of atoms.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders H; Julve, Miguel; Martínez-Lillo, José; Cano, Joan; Brechin, Euan K

    2017-09-12

    The employment of pyrazine (pyz), pyrimidine (pym) and s-triazine (triz) ligands in Re IV chemistry leads to the isolation of a family of complexes of general formula (NBu 4 ) 2 [(ReX 5 ) 2 (μ-L)] (L = pyz, X = Cl (1) or Br (2); L = pym, X = Br (3); L = triz, X = Br (4)). 1-4 are dinuclear compounds where two pentahalorhenium(iv) fragments are connected by bidentate pyz, pym and triz ligands. Variable-temperature magnetic measurements, in combination with detailed theoretical studies, uncover the underlying magneto-structural correlation whereby the nature of the exchange between the metal ions is dictated by the number of intervening atoms. That is, the spin-polarization mechanism present dictates that odd and even numbers of atoms favour ferromagnetic (F) and antiferromagnetic (AF) exchange interactions, respectively. Hence, while the pyz ligand in 1 and 2 mediates AF coupling, the pym and triz ligands in 3 and 4 promote F interactions.

  12. Prediction of microwave absorption properties of tetrapod-needle zinc oxide whisker radar absorbing material without prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Chen; Wang, Jie; Liu, Jiang-Fan; Song, Zhong-Guo; Xi, Xiao-Li

    2017-07-01

    The radar absorbing material (RAM) containing a tetrapod-needle zinc oxide whisker (T-ZnOw) has been proved to have good efficiency of microwave absorption. However, the available theoretical models, which are intended to predict the microwave absorbing properties of such an interesting composite, still cannot work well without some prior knowledge, like the measured effective electromagnetic parameters of the prepared T-ZnOw composite. Hence, we propose a novel predictive method here to calculate the reflectivity of T-ZnOw RAM without prior knowledge. In this method, the absorbing ability of this kind of material is divided into three main aspects: the unstructured background, the conductive network, and the nanostructured particle. Then, the attenuation properties of these three parts are represented, respectively, by three different approaches: the equivalent spherical particle and the static strong fluctuation theory, the equivalent circuit model obtained from the complex impedance spectra technology, and the combination of four different microscopic electromagnetic responses. The operational calculation scheme can be obtained by integrating these three absorption effects into the existing theoretical attenuation model. The reasonable agreement between the theoretical and experimental data of a T-ZnON/SiO2 composite in the range of 8-14 GHz shows that the proposed scheme can predict the microwave absorption properties of the T-ZnOw RAM. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of these three mechanisms indicates that, on the one hand, the background plays a dominant role in determining the real part of the effective permittivity of the T-ZnOw composite while the network and the particle are the decisive factors of its material loss; on the other hand, an zero-phase impedance, i.e., a pure resistance, with appropriate resonance characteristic might be a rational physical description of the attenuation property of the conductive network, but it is difficult to realize

  13. High fidelity simulation and analysis of liquid jet atomization in a gaseous crossflow at intermediate Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in numerical methods coupled with the substantial enhancements in computing power and the advent of high performance computing have presented first principle, high fidelity simulation as a viable tool in the prediction and analysis of spray atomization processes. The credibility and potential impact of such simulations, however, has been hampered by the relative absence of detailed validation against experimental evidence. The numerical stability and accuracy challenges arising from the need to simulate the high liquid-gas density ratio across the sharp interfaces encountered in these flows are key reasons for this. In this work we challenge this status quo by presenting a numerical model able to deal with these challenges, employing it in simulations of liquid jet in crossflow atomization and performing extensive validation of its results against a carefully executed experiment with detailed measurements in the atomization region. We then proceed to the detailed analysis of the flow physics. The computational model employs the coupled level set and volume of fluid approach to directly capture the spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-gas interface and the sharp-interface ghost fluid method to stably handle high liquid-air density ratio. Adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian droplet models are shown to be viable options for computational cost reduction. Moreover, high performance computing is leveraged to manage the computational cost. The experiment selected for validation eliminates the impact of inlet liquid and gas turbulence and focuses on the impact of the crossflow aerodynamic forces on the atomization physics. Validation is demonstrated by comparing column surface wavelengths, deformation, breakup locations, column trajectories and droplet sizes, velocities, and mass rates for a range of intermediate Weber numbers. Analysis of the physics is performed in terms of the instability and breakup characteristics and the features of downstream

  14. High fidelity simulation and analysis of liquid jet atomization in a gaseous crossflow at intermediate Weber numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoyi, E-mail: lixy2@utrc.utc.com; Soteriou, Marios C.

    Recent advances in numerical methods coupled with the substantial enhancements in computing power and the advent of high performance computing have presented first principle, high fidelity simulation as a viable tool in the prediction and analysis of spray atomization processes. The credibility and potential impact of such simulations, however, has been hampered by the relative absence of detailed validation against experimental evidence. The numerical stability and accuracy challenges arising from the need to simulate the high liquid-gas density ratio across the sharp interfaces encountered in these flows are key reasons for this. In this work we challenge this status quomore » by presenting a numerical model able to deal with these challenges, employing it in simulations of liquid jet in crossflow atomization and performing extensive validation of its results against a carefully executed experiment with detailed measurements in the atomization region. We then proceed to the detailed analysis of the flow physics. The computational model employs the coupled level set and volume of fluid approach to directly capture the spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-gas interface and the sharp-interface ghost fluid method to stably handle high liquid-air density ratio. Adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian droplet models are shown to be viable options for computational cost reduction. Moreover, high performance computing is leveraged to manage the computational cost. The experiment selected for validation eliminates the impact of inlet liquid and gas turbulence and focuses on the impact of the crossflow aerodynamic forces on the atomization physics. Validation is demonstrated by comparing column surface wavelengths, deformation, breakup locations, column trajectories and droplet sizes, velocities, and mass rates for a range of intermediate Weber numbers. Analysis of the physics is performed in terms of the instability and breakup characteristics and the features of

  15. Nickel Nanoparticle Encapsulated in Few-Layer Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Supported by Nitrogen-Doped Graphite Sheets as a High-Performance Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Material.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haoran; Yan, Feng; Li, Chunyan; Zhu, Chunling; Zhang, Xitian; Chen, Yujin

    2018-01-10

    Herein we develop a facile strategy for fabricating nickel particle encapsulated in few-layer nitrogen-doped graphene supported by graphite carbon sheets as a high-performance electromagnetic wave (EMW) absorbing material. The obtained material exhibits sheetlike morphology with a lateral length ranging from a hundred nanometers to 2 μm and a thickness of about 23 nm. Nickel nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 20 nm were encapsulated in about six layers of nitrogen-doped graphene. As applied for electromagnetic absorbing material, the heteronanostructures exhibit excellent electromagnetic wave absorption property, comparable to most EMW absorbing materials previously reported. Typically, the effective absorption bandwidth (the frequency region falls within the reflection loss below -10 dB) is up to 8.5 GHz at the thicknesses of 3.0 mm for the heteronanostructures with the optimized Ni content. Furthermore, two processes, carbonization at a high temperature and subsequent treatment in hot acid solution, were involved in the preparation of the heteronanostructures, and thus, mass production was achieved easily, facilitating their practical applications.

  16. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep, E-mail: sandeep0078monu@gmail.com; Singh, Sukhpal, E-mail: sukhpal-78@rediffmail.com

    2016-05-06

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μ{sub m}) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  17. Technical Note: exploring the limit for the conversion of energy-subtracted CT number to electron density for high-atomic-number materials.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masatoshi; Tsukihara, Masayoshi

    2014-07-01

    For accurate tissue inhomogeneity correction in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to an electron density (ΔHU-ρe conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρe over a wide ρe range. The purpose of this study is to address the limitations of the conversion method with respect to atomic number (Z) by elucidating the role of partial photon interactions in the ΔHU-ρe conversion process. The authors performed numerical analyses of the ΔHU-ρe conversion for 105 human body tissues, as listed in ICRU Report 46, and elementary substances with Z = 1-40. Total and partial attenuation coefficients for these materials were calculated using the XCOM photon cross section database. The effective x-ray energies used to calculate the attenuation were chosen to imitate a dual-source CT scanner operated at 80-140 kV/Sn under well-calibrated and poorly calibrated conditions. The accuracy of the resultant calibrated electron density,[Formula: see text], for the ICRU-46 body tissues fully satisfied the IPEM-81 tolerance levels in radiotherapy treatment planning. If a criterion of [Formula: see text]ρe - 1 is assumed to be within ± 2%, the predicted upper limit of Z applicable for the ΔHU-ρe conversion under the well-calibrated condition is Z = 27. In the case of the poorly calibrated condition, the upper limit of Z is approximately 16. The deviation from the ΔHU-ρe linearity for higher Z substances is mainly caused by the anomalous variation in the photoelectric-absorption component. Compensation among the three partial components of the photon interactions provides for sufficient linearity of the ΔHU-ρe conversion to be applicable for most human tissues even for poorly conditioned scans in which there exists a large variation of effective x-ray energies owing to beam-hardening effects arising from the mismatch between the sizes of the object and the

  18. Stability investigation of a high number density Pt1/Fe2O3 single-atom catalyst under different gas environments by HAADF-STEM.

    PubMed

    Duan, Sibin; Wang, Rongming; Liu, Jingyue

    2018-05-18

    Catalysis by supported single metal atoms has demonstrated tremendous potential for practical applications due to their unique catalytic properties. Unless they are strongly anchored to the support surfaces, supported single atoms, however, are thermodynamically unstable, which poses a major obstacle for broad applications of single-atom catalysts (SACs). In order to develop strategies to improve the stability of SACs, we need to understand the intrinsic nature of the sintering processes of supported single metal atoms, especially under various gas environments that are relevant to important catalytic reactions. We report on the synthesis of high number density Pt 1 /Fe 2 O 3 SACs using a facial strong adsorption method and the study of the mobility of these supported Pt single atoms at 250 °C under various gas environments that are relevant to CO oxidation, water-gas shift, and hydrogenation reactions. Under the oxidative gas environment, Fe 2 O 3 supported Pt single atoms are stable even at high temperatures. The presence of either CO or H 2 molecules in the gas environment, however, facilitates the movement of the Pt atoms. The strong interaction between CO and Pt weakens the binding between the Pt atoms and the support, facilitating the movement of the Pt single atoms. The dissociation of H 2 molecules on the Pt atoms and their subsequent interaction with the oxygen species of the support surfaces dislodge the surface oxygen anchored Pt atoms, resulting in the formation of Pt clusters. The addition of H 2 O molecules to the CO or H 2 significantly accelerates the sintering of the Fe 2 O 3 supported Pt single atoms. An anchoring-site determined sintering mechanism is further proposed, which is related to the metal-support interaction.

  19. Stability investigation of a high number density Pt1/Fe2O3 single-atom catalyst under different gas environments by HAADF-STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Sibin; Wang, Rongming; Liu, Jingyue

    2018-05-01

    Catalysis by supported single metal atoms has demonstrated tremendous potential for practical applications due to their unique catalytic properties. Unless they are strongly anchored to the support surfaces, supported single atoms, however, are thermodynamically unstable, which poses a major obstacle for broad applications of single-atom catalysts (SACs). In order to develop strategies to improve the stability of SACs, we need to understand the intrinsic nature of the sintering processes of supported single metal atoms, especially under various gas environments that are relevant to important catalytic reactions. We report on the synthesis of high number density Pt1/Fe2O3 SACs using a facial strong adsorption method and the study of the mobility of these supported Pt single atoms at 250 °C under various gas environments that are relevant to CO oxidation, water–gas shift, and hydrogenation reactions. Under the oxidative gas environment, Fe2O3 supported Pt single atoms are stable even at high temperatures. The presence of either CO or H2 molecules in the gas environment, however, facilitates the movement of the Pt atoms. The strong interaction between CO and Pt weakens the binding between the Pt atoms and the support, facilitating the movement of the Pt single atoms. The dissociation of H2 molecules on the Pt atoms and their subsequent interaction with the oxygen species of the support surfaces dislodge the surface oxygen anchored Pt atoms, resulting in the formation of Pt clusters. The addition of H2O molecules to the CO or H2 significantly accelerates the sintering of the Fe2O3 supported Pt single atoms. An anchoring-site determined sintering mechanism is further proposed, which is related to the metal–support interaction.

  20. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ < A > have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  1. Extracting atomic numbers and electron densities from a dual source dual energy CT scanner: experiments and a simulation model.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Granton, Patrick Vincent; van Rooijen, Bart; Beaulieu, Luc; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-09-01

    Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging can provide both the electron density ρ(e) and effective atomic number Z(eff), thus facilitating tissue type identification. This paper investigates the accuracy of a dual source DECT scanner by means of measurements and simulations. Previous simulation work suggested improved Monte Carlo dose calculation accuracy when compared to single energy CT for low energy photon brachytherapy, but lacked validation. As such, we aim to validate our DECT simulation model in this work. A cylindrical phantom containing tissue mimicking inserts was scanned with a second generation dual source scanner (SOMATOM Definition FLASH) to obtain Z(eff) and ρ(e). A model of the scanner was designed in ImaSim, a CT simulation program, and was used to simulate the experiment. Accuracy of measured Z(eff) (labelled Z) was found to vary from -10% to 10% from low to high Z tissue substitutes while the accuracy on ρ(e) from DECT was about 2.5%. Our simulation reproduced the experiments within ±5% for both Z and ρ(e). A clinical DECT scanner was able to extract Z and ρ(e) of tissue substitutes. Our simulation tool replicates the experiments within a reasonable accuracy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of Incidental Renal Mass With Dual-Energy CT: Diagnostic Accuracy of Effective Atomic Number Maps for Discriminating Nonenhancing Cysts From Enhancing Masses.

    PubMed

    Mileto, Achille; Allen, Brian C; Pietryga, Jason A; Farjat, Alfredo E; Zarzour, Jessica G; Bellini, Davide; Ebner, Lukas; Morgan, Desiree E

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of effective atomic number maps reconstructed from dual-energy contrast-enhanced data for discriminating between nonenhancing renal cysts and enhancing masses. Two hundred six patients (128 men, 78 women; mean age, 64 years) underwent a CT renal mass protocol (single-energy unenhanced and dual-energy contrast-enhanced nephrographic imaging) at two different hospitals. For each set of patients, two blinded, independent observers performed measurements on effective atomic number maps from contrast-enhanced dual-energy data. Renal mass assessment on unenhanced and nephrographic images, corroborated by imaging and medical records, was the reference standard. The diagnostic accuracy of effective atomic number maps was assessed with ROC analysis. Significant differences in mean effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) were observed between nonenhancing and enhancing masses (set A, 8.19 vs 9.59 Z eff ; set B, 8.05 vs 9.19 Z eff ; sets combined, 8.13 vs 9.37 Z eff ) (p < 0.0001). An effective atomic number value of 8.36 Z eff was the optimal threshold, rendering an AUC of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.89-0.94), sensitivity of 90.8% (158/174 [95% CI, 85.5-94.7%]), specificity of 85.2% (445/522 [95% CI, 81.9-88.2%]), and overall diagnostic accuracy of 86.6% (603/696 [95% CI, 83.9-89.1%]). Nonenhancing renal cysts, including hyperattenuating cysts, can be discriminated from enhancing masses on effective atomic number maps generated from dual-energy contrast-enhanced CT data. This technique may be of clinical usefulness when a CT protocol for comprehensive assessment of renal masses is not available.

  3. Evaluation of absorbent materials for use as ad hoc dry decontaminants during mass casualty incidents as part of the UK’s Initial Operational Response (IOR)

    PubMed Central

    Kassouf, Nick; Syed, Sara; Larner, Joanne; Amlôt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The UK’s Initial Operational Response (IOR) is a revised process for the medical management of mass casualties potentially contaminated with hazardous materials. A critical element of the IOR is the introduction of immediate, on-scene disrobing and decontamination of casualties to limit the adverse health effects of exposure. Ad hoc cleansing of the skin with dry absorbent materials has previously been identified as a potential means of facilitating emergency decontamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro oil and water absorbency of a range of materials commonly found in the domestic and clinical environments and to determine the effectiveness of a small, but representative selection of such materials in skin decontamination, using an established ex vivo model. Five contaminants were used in the study: methyl salicylate, parathion, diethyl malonate, phorate and potassium cyanide. In vitro measurements of water and oil absorbency did not correlate with ex vivo measurements of skin decontamination. When measured ex vivo, dry decontamination was consistently more effective than a standard wet decontamination method (“rinse-wipe-rinse”) for removing liquid contaminants. However, dry decontamination was ineffective against particulate contamination. Collectively, these data confirm that absorbent materials such as wound dressings and tissue paper provide an effective, generic capability for emergency removal of liquid contaminants from the skin surface, but that wet decontamination should be used for non-liquid contaminants. PMID:28152053

  4. High Atomic Number Contrast Media Offer Potential for Radiation Dose Reduction in Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Ann-Christin; Hupfer, Martin; Kolditz, Daniel; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Kalender, Willi A

    2016-04-01

    Spectral optimization of x-ray computed tomography (CT) has led to substantial radiation dose reduction in contrast-enhanced CT studies using standard iodinated contrast media. The purpose of this study was to analyze the potential for further dose reduction using high-atomic-number elements such as hafnium and tungsten. As in previous studies, spectra were determined for which the patient dose necessary to provide a given contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is minimized. We used 2 different quasi-anthropomorphic phantoms representing the liver cross-section of a normal adult and an obese adult patient with the lateral widths of 360 and 460 mm and anterior-posterior heights of 200 and 300 mm, respectively. We simulated and measured on 2 different scanners with x-ray spectra from 80 to 140 kV and from 70 to 150 kV, respectively. We determined the contrast for iodine-, hafnium-, and tungsten-based contrast media, the noise, and 3-dimensional dose distributions at all available tube voltages by measurements and by simulations. The dose-weighted CNR was determined as optimization parameter. Simulations and measurements were in good agreement regarding their dependence on energy for all parameters investigated. Hafnium provided the best performance for normal and for obese patient phantoms, indicating a dose reduction potential of 30% for normal and 50% for obese patients at 120 kV compared with iodine; this advantage increased further with higher kV values. Dose-weighted CNR values for tungsten were always slightly below the hafnium results. Iodine proved to be the superior choice at voltage values of 80 kV and below. Hafnium and tungsten both seem to be candidates for contrast-medium-enhanced CT of normal and obese adult patients with strongly reduced radiation dose at unimpaired image quality. Computed tomography examinations of obese patients will decrease in dose for higher kV values.

  5. On the atomic-number similarity of the binding energies of electrons in filled shells of elements of the periodic table

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, V. Ya.; Shpatakovskaya, G. V., E-mail: shpagalya@yandex.ru

    An expression for the binding energies of electrons in the ground state of an atom is derived on the basis of the Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization rule within the Thomas–Fermi model. The validity of this relation for all elements from neon to uranium is tested within a more perfect quantum-mechanical model with and without the inclusion of relativistic effects, as well as with experimental binding energies. As a result, the ordering of electronic levels in filled atomic shells is established, manifested in an approximate atomic-number similarity. It is proposed to use this scaling property to analytically estimate the binding energies of electronsmore » in an arbitrary atom.« less

  6. Application of ICP-OES to the determination of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin films used as absorber materials in solar cell devices.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Caballero, Raquel; Guillén, Cecilia; Gutiérrez, María Teresa; Rucandio, María Isabel

    2005-05-01

    CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 [CIGS; x=Ga/(In+Ga)] thin films are among of the best candidates as absorber materials for solar cell applications. The material quality and main properties of the polycrystalline absorber layer are critically influenced by deviations in the stoichiometry, particularly in the Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratio. In this work a simple, sensitive and accurate method has been developed for the quantitative determination of these thin films by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The proposed method involves an acid digestion of the samples to achieve the complete solubilization of CIGS, followed by the analytical determination by ICP-OES. A digestion procedure with 50% HNO3 alone or in the presence of 10% HCl was performed to dissolve those thin films deposited on glass or Mo-coated glass substrates, respectively. Two analytical lines were selected for each element (Cu 324.754 and 327.396 nm, Ga 294.364 and 417.206 nm, In 303.936 and 325.609 nm, Se 196.090 and 203.985 nm, and Mo 202.030 and 379.825 nm) and a study of spectral interferences was performed which showed them to be suitable, since they offered a high sensitivity and no significant inter-element interferences were detected. Detection limits for all elements at the selected lines were found to be appropriate for this kind of application, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 1.5% for all elements with the exception of Se (about 5%). The Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratios obtained from the application of this method to CIGS thin films were consistent with the study of the structural and morphological properties by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  7. SU-C-BRC-05: Monte Carlo Calculations to Establish a Simple Relation of Backscatter Dose Enhancement Around High-Z Dental Alloy to Its Atomic Number

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, S; Kushima, N; Katsura, K

    Purpose: To establish a simple relation of backscatter dose enhancement around a high-Z dental alloy in head and neck radiation therapy to its average atomic number based on Monte Carlo calculations. Methods: The PHITS Monte Carlo code was used to calculate dose enhancement, which is quantified by the backscatter dose factor (BSDF). The accuracy of the beam modeling with PHITS was verified by comparing with basic measured data namely PDDs and dose profiles. In the simulation, a high-Z alloy of 1 cm cube was embedded into a tough water phantom irradiated by a 6-MV (nominal) X-ray beam of 10 cmmore » × 10 cm field size of Novalis TX (Brainlab). The ten different materials of high-Z alloys (Al, Ti, Cu, Ag, Au-Pd-Ag, I, Ba, W, Au, Pb) were considered. The accuracy of calculated BSDF was verified by comparing with measured data by Gafchromic EBT3 films placed at from 0 to 10 mm away from a high-Z alloy (Au-Pd-Ag). We derived an approximate equation to determine the relation of BSDF and range of backscatter to average atomic number of high-Z alloy. Results: The calculated BSDF showed excellent agreement with measured one by Gafchromic EBT3 films at from 0 to 10 mm away from the high-Z alloy. We found the simple linear relation of BSDF and range of backscatter to average atomic number of dental alloys. The latter relation was proven by the fact that energy spectrum of backscatter electrons strongly depend on average atomic number. Conclusion: We found a simple relation of backscatter dose enhancement around high-Z alloys to its average atomic number based on Monte Carlo calculations. This work provides a simple and useful method to estimate backscatter dose enhancement from dental alloys and corresponding optimal thickness of dental spacer to prevent mucositis effectively.« less

  8. Tuning optical properties of magic number cluster (SiO2)4O2H4 by substitutional bonding with gold atoms.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiulong; Zhang, Peng; Ma, Liuxue; Zhang, Wenxian; Ning, Xijing; Zhao, Li; Zhuang, Jun

    2009-04-30

    By bonding gold atoms to the magic number cluster (SiO(2))(4)O(2)H(4), two groups of Au-adsorbed shell-like clusters Au(n)(SiO(2))(4)O(2)H(4-n) (n = 1-4) and Au(n)(SiO(2))(4)O(2) (n = 5-8) were obtained, and their spectral properties were studied. The ground-state structures of these clusters were optimized by density functional theory, and the results show that in despite of the different numbers and types of the adsorbed Au atoms, the cluster core (SiO(2))(4)O(2) of T(d) point-group symmetry keeps almost unchanged. The absorption spectra were obtained by time-dependent density functional theory. From one group to the other, an extension of absorption wavelength from the UV-visible to the NIR region was observed, and in each group the absorption strengths vary linearly with the number of Au atoms. These features indicate their advantages for exploring novel materials with easily controlled tunable optical properties. Furthermore, due to the weak electronic charge transfer between the Au atoms, the clusters containing Au(2) dimers, especially Au(8)(SiO(2))(4)O(2), absorb strongly NIR light at 900 approximately 1200 nm. Such strong absorption suggests potential applications of these shell-like clusters in tumor cells thermal therapy, like the gold-coated silica nanoshells with larger sizes.

  9. Preparation of Superparamagnetic Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 Particle by Coprecipitation-Sonochemical Method for Radar Absorbing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufiq, A.; Bahtiar, S.; Sunaryono; Hidayat, N.; Hidayat, A.; Mufti, N.; Diantoro, M.; Fuad, A.; Munasir; Rahmawati, R.; Adi, W. A.; Pratapa, S.; Darminto

    2017-05-01

    One of many applications of spinel ferrite nanoparticles is related to their performance as radar absorbing materials. In this work, we report developing synthesis method through combined coprecipitation-sonochemical routes in preparing Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle from iron sand in Indonesia as a vital raw material. The structure, size, morphology, and elements of the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle were investigated via X-Ray diffractometry and Transmission/Scanning Electron Microscopy (TEM/SEM) combining Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The magnetic properties of the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle were characterized by using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Furthermore, the reflection loss character of the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle was determined via Vector Network Analyzer (VNA). From the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the XRD data, it can be identified that the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 particle formed a spinel cubic structure in a single phase with the lattice parameter of approximately 8.401 Å. It is known from the TEM image that the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 particle had a size of about 9.7 nm and tended to agglomerate. Furthermore, the data analysis of the M(H) curve presented that the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle has a superparamagnetic behavior with the saturation magnetization of approximately 43 emu/g. Finally, the data analysis of the reflection loss as a function of frequency showed that the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle performs as a radar absorbing material with the absorption performance of approximately -11.0 dB at the frequency of 10.8 GHz

  10. Analytical dependence of effective atomic number on the elemental composition of matter and radiation energy in the range 10-1000 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eritenko, A. N.; Tsvetiansky, A. L.; Polev, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    In the present paper, a universal analytical dependence of effective atomic number on the composition of matter and radiation energy is proposed. This enables one to consider the case of a strong difference in the elemental composition with respect to their atomic numbers over a wide energy range. The contribution of photoelectric absorption and incoherent and coherent scattering during the interaction between radiation and matter is considered. For energy values over 40 keV, the contribution of coherent scattering does not exceed approximately 10% that can be neglected at a further consideration. The effective atomic numbers calculated on the basis of the proposed relationships are compared to the results of calculations based on other methods considered by different authors on the basis of experimental and tabulated data on mass and atomic attenuation coefficients. The examination is carried out for both single-element (e.g., 6C, 14Si, 28Cu, 56Ba, and 82Pb) and multi-element materials. Calculations are performed for W1-xCux alloys (x = 0.35; x = 0.4), PbO, ther moluminescent dosimetry compounds (56Ba, 48Cd, 41Sr, 20Ca, 12Mg, and 11Na), and SO4 in a wide energy range. A case with radiation energy between the K- and L1-absorption edges is considered for 82Pb, 74W, 56Ba, 48Cd, and 38Sr. This enables to substantially simplify the calculation of the atomic number and will be useful in technical and scientific fields related to the interaction between X-ray/gamma radiation and matter.

  11. The physical properties of black carbon and other light-absorbing material emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Yokelson, R. J.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fortner, E.; Onasch, T. B.; Akagi, S. K.; Taylor, J.; Coe, H.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol emitted from fires absorbs light, leading to visibility degradation as well as regional and global climate impacts. Fires also emit a wide range of trace gases and particulates that can interact with emitted BC and alter its optical properties and atmospheric lifetime. Non-BC particulate species emitted by fires can also scatter and absorb light, leading to additional effects on visibility. Recent work has shown that certain organic species can absorb light strongly at shorter wavelengths, giving it a brown or yellow color. This material has been classified as brown carbon, though it is not yet well defined. Land managers must find a balance between the negative impacts of prescribed fire emissions on visibility and air quality and the need to prevent future catastrophic wildfire as well as manage ecosystems for habitat restoration or other purposes. This decision process requires accurate assessments of the visibility impacts of fire emissions, including BC and brown carbon, which in turn depend on their optical properties. We present recent laboratory and aircraft measurements of black carbon and aerosol optical properties emitted from biomass burning. All measurement campaigns included a single particle soot photometer (SP2) instrument capable of providing size-resolved measurements of BC mass and number distributions and mixing state, which are needed to separate the BC and brown carbon contributions to total light absorption. The laboratory experiments also included a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer that provided accurate measurements of aerosol light absorption. The laboratory systems also characterized emissions after they had been treated with a thermal denuder to remove semi-volatile coatings, allowing an assessment of the role of non-BC coatings on bulk aerosol optical properties. Emissions were also aged in an environmental smog chamber to examine the role of secondary aerosol production on aerosol optical properties.

  12. A Method to Estimate the Atomic Number and Mass Thickness of Intervening Materials in Uranium and Plutonium Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streicher, Michael; Brown, Steven; Zhu, Yuefeng; Goodman, David; He, Zhong

    2016-10-01

    To accurately characterize shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) using passive gamma-ray spectroscopy measurement techniques, the effective atomic number and the thickness of shielding materials must be measured. Intervening materials between the source and detector may affect the estimated source isotopics (uranium enrichment and plutonium grade) for techniques which rely on raw count rates or photopeak ratios of gamma-ray lines separated in energy. Furthermore, knowledge of the surrounding materials can provide insight regarding the configuration of a device containing SNM. The described method was developed using spectra recorded using high energy resolution CdZnTe detectors, but can be expanded to any gamma-ray spectrometers with energy resolution of better than 1% FWHM at 662 keV. The effective atomic number, Z, and mass thickness of the intervening shielding material are identified by comparing the relative attenuation of different gamma-ray lines and estimating the proportion of Compton scattering interactions to photoelectric absorptions within the shield. While characteristic Kα x-rays can be used to identify shielding materials made of high Z elements, this method can be applied to all shielding materials. This algorithm has adequately estimated the effective atomic number for shields made of iron, aluminum, and polyethylene surrounding uranium samples using experimental data. The mass thicknesses of shielding materials have been estimated with a standard error of less than 1.3 g/cm2 for iron shields up to 2.5 cm thick. The effective atomic number was accurately estimated to 26 ± 5 for all iron thicknesses.

  13. Review of Radar Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Symposium, 1990. AP-S. Merging technologies for the 90’s. Digest 1990, 3, 1212. (30) Nortier, J. R., Van der Neut , C.A., Baker, D.E. Microwave Journal...1987, 219. (31) Kasevich, R. S.; Broderick, F., US Patent 5223849. 1993. (32) Van Der Plas, G., Barel, A., Schweicher, E. Antennas and Propagation

  14. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  15. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  16. Polarizabilities and van der Waals C{sub 6} coefficients of fullerenes from an atomistic electrodynamics model: Anomalous scaling with number of carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Saidi, Wissam A., E-mail: alsaidi@pitt.edu; Norman, Patrick

    2016-07-14

    The van der Waals C{sub 6} coefficients of fullerenes are shown to exhibit an anomalous dependence on the number of carbon atoms N such that C{sub 6} ∝ N{sup 2.2} as predicted using state-of-the-art quantum mechanical calculations based on fullerenes with small sizes, and N{sup 2.75} as predicted using a classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation of the fullerenes. We use an atomistic electrodynamics model where each carbon atom is described by a polarizable object to extend the quantum mechanical calculations to larger fullerenes. The parameters of this model are optimized to describe accurately the static and complex polarizabilities of the fullerenes bymore » fitting against accurate ab initio calculations. This model shows that C{sub 6} ∝ N{sup 2.8}, which is supportive of the classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation. Additionally, we show that the anomalous dependence of the polarizability on N is attributed to the electric charge term, while the dipole–dipole term scales almost linearly with the number of carbon atoms.« less

  17. Thermalization of X-rays in evaporated tin and bismuth films used as the absorbing materials in X-ray calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahle, C. K.; Kelley, R. L.; Moseley, S. H.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Juda, M.; McCammon, D.; Zhang, J.

    1993-11-01

    We have investigated the use of evaporated tin and bismuth films as the absorbing materials in X-ray calorimeters. When the films were deposited directly on monolithic silicon calorimeters, the output signal from both Sn and Bi devices was strongly dependent on the location of the absorption event relative to the ion-implanted thermistors, presumably indicating thermistor sensitivity to a non-thermal spectrum of phonons. With Sn films we also observed that a component of the thermalization proceeded slowly, relative to a complete thermalization reference. The thermalization function could be modified by trapping magnetic flux within the film. In order to distinguish thermalization effects in the films from the thermistor sensitivity to energetic phonons, we deposited Sn and Bi films on thin Si substrates which we then affixed to calorimeters using epoxy. With glued Sn films, we were able to attain as good as 13.6 eV resolution of 6 keV X-rays with no excess broadening of the line beyond the width of the baseline, while similarly made Bi devices showed excess broadening.

  18. Characterization and MCNP simulation of neutron energy spectrum shift after transmission through strong absorbing materials and its impact on tomography reconstructed image.

    PubMed

    Hachouf, N; Kharfi, F; Boucenna, A

    2012-10-01

    An ideal neutron radiograph, for quantification and 3D tomographic image reconstruction, should be a transmission image which exactly obeys to the exponential attenuation law of a monochromatic neutron beam. There are many reasons for which this assumption does not hold for high neutron absorbing materials. The main deviations from the ideal are due essentially to neutron beam hardening effect. The main challenges of this work are the characterization of neutron transmission through boron enriched steel materials and the observation of beam hardening. Then, in our work, the influence of beam hardening effect on neutron tomographic image, for samples based on these materials, is studied. MCNP and FBP simulation are performed to adjust linear attenuation coefficients data and to perform 2D tomographic image reconstruction with and without beam hardening corrections. A beam hardening correction procedure is developed and applied based on qualitative and quantitative analyses of the projections data. Results from original and corrected 2D reconstructed images obtained shows the efficiency of the proposed correction procedure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal conversion of an Fe₃O₄@metal-organic framework: a new method for an efficient Fe-Co/nanoporous carbon microwave absorbing material.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingmiao; Ji, Guangbin; Liu, Wei; Quan, Bin; Liang, Xiaohui; Shang, Chaomei; Cheng, Yan; Du, Youwei

    2015-08-14

    A novel FeCo nanoparticle embedded nanoporous carbon composite (Fe-Co/NPC) was synthesized via in situ carbonization of dehydro-ascorbic acid (DHAA) coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulated in a metal-organic framework (zeolitic imidazolate framework-67, ZIF-67). The molar ratio of Fe/Co significantly depends on the encapsulated content of Fe3O4 in ZIF-67. The composites filled with 50 wt% of the Fe-Co/NPC-2.0 samples in paraffin show a maximum reflection loss (RL) of -21.7 dB at a thickness of 1.2 mm; in addition, a broad absorption bandwidth for RL < -10 dB which covers from 12.2 to 18 GHz can be obtained, and its minimum reflection loss and bandwidth (RL values exceeding -10 dB) are far greater than those of commercial carbonyl iron powder under a very low thickness (1-1.5 mm). This study not only provides a good reference for future preparation of carbon-based lightweight microwave absorbing materials but also broadens the application of such kinds of metal-organic frameworks.

  20. Analysis by oxygen atom number density measurement of high-speed hydrophilic treatment of polyimide using atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, S.

    2015-03-30

    This paper describes the fundamental experimental data of the plasma surface modification of the polyimide using atmospheric pressure microwave plasma source. The experimental results were discussed from the point of view of the radical’s behavior, which significantly affects the modification mechanism. The purpose of the study is to examine how the value of the oxygen atom density will affect the hydrophilic treatment in the upstream region of the plasma where gas temperature is very high. The surface modification experiments were performed by setting the polyimide film sample in the downstream region of the plasma. The degree of the modification wasmore » measured by a water contact angle measurement. The water contact angle decreased less than 30 degrees within 1 second treatment time in the upstream region. Very high speed modification was observed. The reason of this high speed modification seems that the high density radical which contributes the surface modification exist in the upstream region of the plasma. This tendency is supposed to the measured relatively high electron density (~10{sup 15}cm{sup −3}) at the center of the plasma. We used the electric heating catalytic probe method for oxygen radical measurement. An absolute value of oxygen radical density was determined by catalytic probe measurement and the results show that ~10{sup 15}cm{sup −3} of the oxygen radical density in the upstream region and decreases toward downstream region. The experimental results of the relation of the oxygen radical density and hydrophilic modification of polyimide was discussed.« less

  1. Repetitively Coupled Chemical Reduction and Galvanic Exchange as a Synthesis Strategy for Expanding Applicable Number of Pt Atoms in Dendrimer-Encapsulated Pt Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cho, Taehoon; Yoon, Chang Won; Kim, Joohoon

    2018-06-13

    In this study, we report the controllable synthesis of dendrimer-encapsulated Pt nanoparticles (Pt DENs) utilizing repetitively coupled chemical reduction and galvanic exchange reactions. The synthesis strategy allows the expansion of the applicable number of Pt atoms encapsulated inside dendrimers to more than 1000 without being limited by the fixed number of complexation sites for Pt 2+ precursor ions in the dendrimers. The synthesis of Pt DENs is achieved in a short period of time (i.e., ∼10 min) simply by the coaddition of appropriate amounts of Cu 2+ and Pt 2+ precursors into aqueous dendrimer solution and subsequent addition of reducing agents such as BH 4 - , resulting in fast and selective complexation of Cu 2+ with the dendrimers and subsequent chemical reduction of the complexed Cu 2+ while uncomplexed Pt 2+ precursors remain oxidized. Interestingly, the chemical reduction of Cu 2+ , leading to the formation of Cu nanoparticles encapsulated inside the dendrimers, is coupled with the galvanic exchange of the Cu nanoparticles with the nearby Pt 2+ . This coupling repetitively proceeds until all of the added Pt 2+ ions form into Pt nanoparticles encapsulated inside the dendrimers. In contrast to the conventional method utilizing direct chemical reduction, this repetitively coupled chemical reduction and galvanic exchange enables a substantial increase in the applicable number of Pt atoms up to 1320 in Pt DENs while maintaining the unique features of DENs.

  2. Quantification of differences in the effective atomic numbers of healthy and cancerous tissues: A discussion in the context of diagnostics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. L.; Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3001

    Purpose: There are a range of genetic and nongenetic factors influencing the elemental composition of different human tissues. The elemental composition of cancerous tissues frequently differs from healthy tissue of the same organ, particularly in high-Z trace element concentrations. For this reason, one could suggest that this may be exploited in diagnostics and perhaps even influence dosimetry. Methods: In this work, for the first time, effective atomic numbers are computed for common cancerous and healthy tissues using a robust, energy-dependent approach between 10 keV and 100 MeV. These are then quantitatively compared within the context of diagnostics and dosimetry. Results:more » Differences between effective atomic numbers of healthy and diseased tissues are found to be typically less than 10%. Fibrotic tissues and calcifications of the breast exhibit substantial (tens to hundreds of percent) differences to healthy tissue. Expectedly, differences are most pronounced in the photoelectric regime and consequently most relevant for kV imaging/therapy and radionuclides with prominent low-energy peaks. Cancerous tissue of the testes and stomach have lower effective atomic numbers than corresponding healthy tissues, while diseased tissues of the other organ sites typically have higher values. Conclusions: As dose calculation approaches improve in accuracy, there may be an argument for the explicit inclusion of pathologies. This is more the case for breast, penile, prostate, nasopharyngeal, and stomach cancer, less so for testicular and kidney cancer. The calculated data suggest dual-energy computed tomography could potentially improve lesion identification in the aforementioned organs (with the exception of testicular cancer), with most import in breast imaging. Ultimately, however, the differences are very small. It is likely that the assumption of a generic 'tissue ramp' in planning will be sufficient for the foreseeable future, and that the Z differences do

  3. Comparison of Martian meteorites with earth composition: Study of effective atomic numbers in the energy range 1 keV-100 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ün, Adem, E-mail: ademun25@yahoo.com; Han, İbrahim, E-mail: ibrahimhan25@hotmail.com; Ün, Mümine, E-mail: mun@agri.edu.tr

    2016-04-18

    Effective atomic (Z{sub eff}) and electron numbers (N{sub eff}) for 24 Martian meteorites have been determined in the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV and also for sixteen significant energies of commonly used radioactive sources. The values of Z{sub eff} and N{sub eff} for all sample were obtained from the DirectZeff program. The obtained results for Martian meteorites have been compared with the results for Earth composition and similarities or differences also evaluated.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of BaFe12O19/Poly(aniline, pyrrole, ethylene terephthalate) Composites Coatings as Radar Absorbing Material (RAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasria, Nia; Ardhyananta, H.; Fajarin, R.; Widyastuti

    2017-07-01

    This research shows the processing and design of radar absorbing material (RAM) based on barium hexaferrite (BaM) and poly(aniline, pyrrole, ethylene terephthalate) (PAni,PPy,PET). BaM was prepared by sol gel method with Ni-Zn doping at mole fraction of 0. 4 to obtain soft magnetic material. BaM/(PAni,PPy) composites were synthesized by in-situ polymerization method at ˜0 °C. (BaM/PET) composite was prepared by melt compounding at 220°C. The composites were coated on A-grade AH36 steel using Dallenbach Layer, Salisbury Screen and Jaumann Layer methods with thickness of 2, 4, and 6 mm. The composites were evaluated using XRD, SEM, FTIR, VSM, LCM-meter and VNA. Results showed that doped BaM showed BaNixZnxFe12-2xO19 structure. BaM/(PAni,PPy,PET) composites possessed globular morphology with M-O and C-H bonds. BaNixZnxFe12-2xO19 exhibited the value of Ms and Hc, 56.6 emu/g and 60 Oe respectively. High electrical conductivity of 1.77744 × 10-5 S/cm was achieved of BaM/PAni composite. The maximum reflection loss (RL) was reached at - 48.720 dB and 8.1 GHz for BaM/PAni composite coating with 6 mm thickness at Jaumann Layer. These results indicated that BaM/PAni composite was a soft magnetic material with a high RL value that is suitable for RAM, which used in stealth technology on naval vessels.

  5. Cold Incineration of Chlorophenols in Aqueous Solution by Advanced Electrochemical Process Electro-Fenton. Effect of Number and Position of Chlorine Atoms on the Degradation Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oturan, Nihal; Panizza, Marco; Oturan, Mehmet A.

    2009-09-01

    This study reports the kinetics of the degradation of several chlorophenols (CPs), such as monochlorophenols (2-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol), dichlorophenols (2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,6- dichlorophenol), trichlorophenols (2,3,5- trichlorophenol and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol), 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, by the electro-Fenton process using a carbon felt cathode and a Pt anode. The effect of number and the position of the chlorine atoms in the aromatic ring on the oxidative degradation rate was evaluated and discussed. The oxidation reaction of all the CPs with hydroxyl radicals evidenced a pseudo-first-order kinetics and the rate constant decreased with increasing the number of chlorine atoms. The absolute rate constant of second-order reaction kinetics between CPs and •OH was determined by the competition kinetics method in the range of (3.56-7.75) × 109 M-1 s-1 and follows the same sequence of the apparent rate constants. The mineralization of several CPs and of a mixture of all CPs under study was monitored by the total organic carbon (TOC) removal and the chlorine release during mineralization was followed by ion chromatography. Our results demonstrated that more chlorinated phenols are more difficult to mineralize; however for all the tested CPs, almost quantitative release of chloride ions was obtained after 6 h of treatment.

  6. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some human tissues and dosimetric materials for mean energies of various radiation sources relevant to radiotherapy and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-09-01

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff, and electron densities, neff, are convenient parameters used to characterise the radiation response of a multi-element material in many technical and medical applications. Accurate values of these physical parameters provide essential data in medical physics. In the present study, the effective atomic numbers and electron densities have been calculated for some human tissues and dosimetric materials such as Adipose Tissue (ICRU-44), Bone Cortical (ICRU-44), Brain Grey/White Matter (ICRU-44), Breast Tissue (ICRU-44), Lung Tissue (ICRU-44), Soft Tissue (ICRU-44), LiF TLD-100H, TLD-100, Water, Borosilicate Glass, PAG (Gel Dosimeter), Fricke (Gel Dosimeter) and OSL (Aluminium Oxide) using mean photon energies, Em, of various radiation sources. The used radiation sources are Pd-103, Tc-99, Ra-226, I-131, Ir-192, Co-60, 30 kVp, 40 kVp, 50 kVp (Intrabeam, Carl Zeiss Meditec) and 6 MV (Mohan-6 MV) sources. The Em values were then used to calculate Zeff and neff of the tissues and dosimetric materials for various radiation sources. Different calculation methods for Zeff such as the direct method, the interpolation method and Auto-Zeff computer program were used and agreements and disagreements between the used methods have been presented and discussed. It has been observed that at higher Em values agreement is quite satisfactory (Dif.<5%) between the adopted methods.

  7. Effective atomic number and electron density of amino acids within the energy range of 0.122-1.330 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Chaitali V.; Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2016-08-01

    Photon attenuation coefficient calculation methods have been widely used to accurately study the properties of amino acids such as n-acetyl-L-tryptophan, n-acetyl-L-tyrosine, D-tryptophan, n-acetyl-L-glutamic acid, D-phenylalanine, and D-threonine. In this study, mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these amino acids for 0.122-, 0.356-, 0.511-, 0.662-, 0.884-, 1.170, 1.275-, 1.330-MeV photons are determined using the radio-nuclides Co57, Ba133, Cs137, Na22, Mn54, and Co60. NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system was used to detect gamma rays with a resolution of 8.2% at 0.662 MeV. The calculated attenuation coefficient values were then used to determine total atomic cross sections (σt), molar extinction coefficients (ε), electronic cross sections (σe), effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of the amino acids. Theoretical values were calculated based on the XCOM data. Theoretical and experimental values are found to be in a good agreement (error<5%). The variations of μm, σt, ε, σe, Zeff, and Neff with energy are shown graphically. The values of μm, σt, ε, σe are higher at lower energies, and they decrease sharply as energy increases; by contrast, Zeff and Neff were found to be almost constant.

  8. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  9. Investigation of the on-axis atom number density in the supersonic gas jet under high gas backing pressure by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guanglong; Xu, Yi; Cao, Yunjiu

    The supersonic gas jets from conical nozzles are simulated using 2D model. The on-axis atom number density in gas jet is investigated in detail by comparing the simulated densities with the idealized densities of straight streamline model in scaling laws. It is found that the density is generally lower than the idealized one and the deviation between them is mainly dependent on the opening angle of conical nozzle, the nozzle length and the gas backing pressure. The density deviation is then used to discuss the deviation of the equivalent diameter of a conical nozzle from the idealized d{sub eq} inmore » scaling laws. The investigation on the lateral expansion of gas jet indicates the lateral expansion could be responsible for the behavior of the density deviation. These results could be useful for the estimation of cluster size and the understanding of experimental results in laser-cluster interaction experiments.« less

  10. A simple formulation for deriving effective atomic numbers via electron density calibration from dual-energy CT data in the human body.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masatoshi; Sagara, Shota

    2017-06-01

    The main objective of this study is to propose a simple formulation (which we called DEEDZ) for deriving effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) via electron density (ρ e ) calibration from dual-energy (DE) CT data. We carried out numerical analysis of this DEEDZ method for a large variety of materials with known elemental compositions and mass densities using an available photon cross sections database. The new conversion approach was also applied to previously published experimental DECT data to validate its practical feasibility. We performed numerical analysis of the DEEDZ conversion method for tissue surrogates that have the same chemical compositions and mass densities as a commercial tissue-characterization phantom in order to determine the parameters necessary for the ρ e and Z eff calibrations in the DEEDZ conversion. These parameters were then applied to the human-body-equivalent tissues of ICRU Report 46 as objects of interest with unknown ρ e and Z eff . The attenuation coefficients of these materials were calculated using the XCOM photon cross sections database. We also applied the DEEDZ conversion to experimental DECT data available in the literature, which was measured for two commercial phantoms of different shapes and sizes using a dual-source CT scanner at 80 kV and 140 kV/Sn. The simulated Z eff 's were in excellent agreement with the reference values for almost all of the ICRU-46 human tissues over the Z eff range from 5.83 (gallstones-cholesterol) to 16.11 (bone mineral-hydroxyapatite). The relative deviations from the reference Z eff were within ± 0.3% for all materials, except for one outlier that presented a -3.1% deviation, namely, the thyroid. The reason for this discrepancy is that the thyroid contains a small amount of iodine, an element with a large atomic number (Z = 53). In the experimental case, we confirmed that the simple formulation with less fit parameters enable to calibrate Z eff as accurately as the existing calibration

  11. Parity oscillations and photon correlation functions in the Z2-U (1 ) Dicke model at a finite number of atoms or qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi-Xiang, Yu; Ye, Jinwu; Zhang, CunLin

    2016-08-01

    Four standard quantum optics models, that is, the Rabi, Dicke, Jaynes-Cummings, and Tavis-Cummings models, were proposed by physicists many decades ago. Despite their relative simple forms and many previous theoretical works, their physics at a finite N , especially inside the superradiant regime, remain unknown. In this work, by using the strong-coupling expansion and exact diagonalization (ED), we study the Z2-U(1 ) Dicke model with independent rotating-wave coupling g and counterrotating-wave coupling g' at a finite N . This model includes the four standard quantum optics models as its various special limits. We show that in the superradiant phase, the system's energy levels are grouped into doublets with even and odd parity. Any anisotropy β =g'/g ≠1 leads to the oscillation of parities in both the ground and excited doublets as the atom-photon coupling strength increases. The oscillations will be pushed to the infinite coupling strength in the isotropic Z2 limit β =1 . We find nearly perfect agreement between the strong-coupling expansion and the ED in the superradiant regime when β is not too small. We also compute the photon correlation functions, squeezing spectrum, and number correlation functions that can be measured by various standard optical techniques.

  12. Collisional, radiative and total electron interaction in compound semiconductor detectors and solid state nuclear track detectors: effective atomic number and electron density.

    PubMed

    Kurudirek, Murat; Kurudirek, Sinem V

    2015-05-01

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff and electron densities, Ne are widely used for characterization of interaction processes in radiation related studies. A variety of detectors are employed to detect different types of radiations i.e. photons and charged particles. In the present work, some compound semiconductor detectors (CSCD) and solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were investigated with respect to the partial as well as total electron interactions. Zeff and Ne of the given detectors were calculated for collisional, radiative and total electron interactions in the kinetic energy region 10keV-1GeV. Maximum values of Zeff and Ne were observed at higher kinetic energies of electrons. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne up to ≈20-25% were noticed for the detectors, GaN, ZnO, Amber and CR-39 for total electron interaction. Moreover, the obtained Zeff and Ne for electrons were compared to those obtained for photons in the entire energy region. Significant variations in Zeff were also noted not only for photons (up to ≈40% for GaN) but also between photons and electrons (up to ≈60% for CR-39) especially at lower energies. Except for the lower energies, Zeff and Ne keep more or less constant values for the given materials. The energy regions where Zeff and Ne keep constant clearly show the availability of using these parameters for characterization of the materials with respect to the radiation interaction processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Determining the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density of raw wood and binderless particleboards of Rhizophora spp. by using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marashdeh, Mohammad W.; Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F.; Abdel Munem, Eid M.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Ariffin, Alawiah; Al-Omari, Saleh

    Rhizophora spp. wood has the potential to serve as a solid water or tissue equivalent phantom for photon and electron beam dosimetry. In this study, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron density (Neff) of raw wood and binderless Rhizophora spp. particleboards in four different particle sizes were determined in the 10-60 keV energy region. The mass attenuation coefficients used in the calculations were obtained using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation code. The MCNP5 calculations of the attenuation parameters for the Rhizophora spp. samples were plotted graphically against photon energy and discussed in terms of their relative differences compared with those of water and breast tissue. Moreover, the validity of the MCNP5 code was examined by comparing the calculated attenuation parameters with the theoretical values obtained by the XCOM program based on the mixture rule. The results indicated that the MCNP5 process can be followed to determine the attenuation of gamma rays with several photon energies in other materials.

  14. Calculation of effective atomic number and electron density of essential biomolecules for electron, proton, alpha particle and multi-energetic photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Onaran, Tayfur

    2015-07-01

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some essential biomolecules have been calculated for total electron interaction, total proton interaction and total alpha particle interaction using an interpolation method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. Also, the spectrum weighted Zeff for multi-energetic photons has been calculated using Auto-Zeff program. Biomolecules consist of fatty acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and basic nucleotides of DNA and RNA. Variations of Zeff and Ne with kinetic energy of ionizing charged particles and effective photon energies of heterogeneous sources have been studied for the given materials. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne have been observed through the entire energy region for electron, proton and alpha particle interactions. Non-uniform variation has been observed for protons and alpha particles in low and intermediate energy regions, respectively. The maximum values of Zeff have found to be in higher energies for total electron interaction whereas maximum values have found to be in relatively low energies for total proton and total alpha particle interactions. When it comes to the multi-energetic photon sources, it has to be noted that the highest Zeff values were found at low energy region where photoelectric absorption is the pre-dominant interaction process. The lowest values of Zeff have been shown in biomolecules such as stearic acid, leucine, mannitol and thymine, which have highest H content in their groups. Variation in Ne seems to be more or less the same with the variation in Zeff for the given materials as expected.

  15. Emission- and fluorescence-spectroscopic investigation of a glow discharge plasma: absolute number density of radiative and nonradiative atoms in the negative glow.

    PubMed

    Takubo, Y; Sato, T; Asaoka, N; Kusaka, K; Akiyama, T; Muroo, K; Yamamoto, M

    2008-01-01

    The excited-state atom densities in the negative glow of a direct-current glow discharge are derived from the spectral-line intensity of radiative atoms and the resonance-fluorescence photon flux of nonradiative atoms. The discharge is operated in a helium-argon gas mixture (molar fraction ratio 91:9; total gas pressure 5 Torr) at a dc current of 0.7-1.2 mA. The observations are made in the region of the maximum luminance in the cathode region, where high-energy electrons accelerated in the cathode fall are injected into the negative glow. The emission intensities of the He I, He II, Ar I, and Ar II spectral lines are measured with a calibrated tungsten ribbon lamp as an absolute spectral-radiance standard. Fluorescence photons scattered by helium and argon atoms in the metastable state and argon atoms in the resonance state are detected by the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method with the Rayleigh scattering of nitrogen molecules as an absolute standard of scattering cross section. The laser absorption method is incorporated to confirm the result of the LIF measurement. Excitation energies of the measured spectral lines range from 11.6 (Ar I) to 75.6 eV (He II), where the excitation energy is measured from the ground state of the neutral atom on the assumption that, in the plasma of this study, both the neutral and the ionic lines are excited by electron impact in a single-step process from the ground state of the corresponding neutral atoms. Experimental evidence is shown for the validity of this assumption.

  16. A molecular dynamics study of the effect of thermal boundary conductance on thermal transport of ideal crystal of n-alkanes with different number of carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zeng, Yi; Khodadadi, J. M., E-mail: khodajm@auburn.edu

    2016-05-28

    Phase change materials such as n-alkanes that exhibit desirable characteristics such as high latent heat, chemical stability, and negligible supercooling are widely used in thermal energy storage applications. However, n-alkanes have the drawback of low thermal conductivity values. The low thermal conductivity of n-alkanes is linked to formation of randomly oriented nano-domains of molecules in their solid structure that is responsible for excessive phonon scattering at the grain boundaries. Thus, understanding the thermal boundary conductance at the grain boundaries can be crucial for improving the effectiveness of thermal storage systems. The concept of the ideal crystal is proposed in thismore » paper, which describes a simplified model such that all the nano-domains of long-chain n-alkanes are artificially aligned perfectly in one direction. In order to study thermal transport of the ideal crystal of long-chain n-alkanes, four (4) systems (C{sub 20}H{sub 42}, C{sub 24}H{sub 50}, C{sub 26}H{sub 54}, and C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) are investigated by the molecular dynamics simulations. Thermal boundary conductance between the layers of ideal crystals is determined using both non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. Both NEMD and EMD simulations exhibit no significant change in thermal conductance with the molecular length. However, the values obtained from the EMD simulations are less than the values from NEMD simulations with the ratio being nearly three (3) in most cases. This difference is due to the nature of EMD simulations where all the phonons are assumed to be in equilibrium at the interface. Thermal conductivity of the n-alkanes in three structures including liquid, solid, and ideal crystal is investigated utilizing NEMD simulations. Our results exhibit a very slight rise in thermal conductivity values as the number of carbon atoms of the chain increases. The key understanding is that thermal transport

  17. On the calculation of line strengths, oscillator strengths and lifetimes for very large principal quantum numbers in hydrogenic atoms and ions by the McLean-Watson formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    As a sequel to an earlier study (Hey 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 125701), we consider further the application of the line strength formula derived by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 L291) to transitions arising from states of very high principal quantum number in hydrogenic atoms and ions (Rydberg-Rydberg transitions, n > 1000). It is shown how apparent difficulties associated with the use of recurrence relations, derived (Hey 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641) by the ladder operator technique of Infeld and Hull (1951 Rev. Mod. Phys. 23 21), may be eliminated by a very simple numerical device, whereby this method may readily be applied up to n ≈ 10 000. Beyond this range, programming of the method may entail greater care and complexity. The use of the numerically efficient McLean-Watson formula for such cases is again illustrated by the determination of radiative lifetimes and comparison of present results with those from an asymptotic formula. The question of the influence on the results of the omission or inclusion of fine structure is considered by comparison with calculations based on the standard Condon-Shortley line strength formula. Interest in this work on the radial matrix elements for large n and n‧ is related to measurements of radio recombination lines from tenuous space plasmas, e.g. Stepkin et al (2007 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 374 852), Bell et al (2011 Astrophys. Space Sci. 333 377), to the calculation of electron impact broadening parameters for such spectra (Watson 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889) and comparison with other theoretical methods (Peach 2014 Adv. Space Res. in press), to the modelling of physical processes in H II regions (Roshi et al 2012 Astrophys. J. 749 49), and the evaluation bound-bound transitions from states of high n during primordial cosmological recombination (Grin and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 81 083005, Ali-Haïmoud and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 82 063521, Ali

  18. Backscatter dose effects for high atomic number materials being irradiated in the presence of a magnetic field: A Monte Carlo study for the MRI linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal

    Purpose: To quantify and explain the backscatter dose effects for clinically relevant high atomic number materials being irradiated in the presence of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field. Methods: Interface effects were investigated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. We used GPUMCD (v5.1) and GEANT4 (v10.1) for this purpose. GPUMCD is a commercial software written for the Elekta AB, MRI linac. Dose was scored using GPUMCD in cubic voxels of side 1 and 0.5 mm, in two different virtual phantoms of dimensions 20 × 20 × 20 cm and 5 × 5 × 13.3 cm, respectively. A photon beam was generatedmore » from a point 143.5 cm away from the isocenter with energy distribution sampled from a histogram representing the true Elekta, MRI linac photon spectrum. A slab of variable thickness and position containing either bone, aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, or one of the two different dental filling materials was inserted as an inhomogeneity in the 20 × 20 × 20 cm phantom. The 5 × 5 × 13.3 cm phantom was used as a clinical test case in order to explain the dose perturbation effects for a head and neck cancer patient. The back scatter dose factor (BSDF) was defined as the ratio of the doses at a given depth with and without the presence of the inhomogeneity. Backscattered electron fluence was calculated at the inhomogeneity interface using GEANT4. A 1.5 T magnetic field was applied perpendicular to the direction of the beam in both phantoms, identical to the geometry in the Elekta MRI linac. Results: With the application of a 1.5 T magnetic field, all the BSDF’s were reduced by 12%–47%, compared to the no magnetic field case. The corresponding backscattered electron fluence at the interface was also reduced by 45%–64%. The reduction in the BSDF at the interface, due to the application of the magnetic field, is manifested in a different manner for each material. In the case of bone, the dose drops at the interface contrary to the expected increase when no magnetic

  19. Finding concealed high atomic numbered materials hidden in cargo containers using dual-energy high-energy x-rays from a linear accelerator with the unique signature from photofission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, James E.; Bjorkholm, Paul

    2006-05-01

    The Dual Energy X-ray technique employs two X-ray projection images of an object with X-ray energy spectra at a low X-ray energy and a high X-ray energy. The two energies are both high enough to penetrate all cargoes. The endpoint energies for low and high will be approximately 5-6 MeV and 8-9.5 MeV respectively. These energies are chosen such that pair production is the dominant energy loss mechanism for the high energy mode. By defining the ratio of the transmitted X-ray photon R = T high/T low it can be shown that there is a difference in the ratio that will permit the detection of materials that are significantly higher in atomic number than the low to mid atomic numbered elements that normally appear in the stream of commerce. This difference can be used to assist in the automatic detection of high atomic numbered materials. These materials might be a WMD or dirty bomb. When coupled with detectors that can observe the delayed signature of photon induced fission a confirmation of a WMD may be made. The use of the delayed photons and neutrons from Photofission can confirm the presence of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). The energy required to induce fission in SNM by a photon is approximately 6 MeV with the maximum fission production rate from X-ray photons in the energy range of 12-15 MeV.

  20. Number series of atoms, interatomic bonds and interface bonds defining zinc-blende nanocrystals as function of size, shape and surface orientation: Analytic tools to interpret solid state spectroscopy data

    SciTech Connect

    König, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.koenig@unsw.edu.au

    2016-08-15

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) experience stress and charge transfer by embedding materials or ligands and impurity atoms. In return, the environment of NCs experiences a NC stress response which may lead to matrix deformation and propagated strain. Up to now, there is no universal gauge to evaluate the stress impact on NCs and their response as a function of NC size d{sub NC}. I deduce geometrical number series as analytical tools to obtain the number of NC atoms N{sub NC}(d{sub NC}[i]), bonds between NC atoms N{sub bnd}(d{sub NC}[i]) and interface bonds N{sub IF}(d{sub NC}[i]) for seven high symmetry zinc-blende (zb) NCsmore » with low-index faceting: {001} cubes, {111} octahedra, {110} dodecahedra, {001}-{111} pyramids, {111} tetrahedra, {111}-{001} quatrodecahedra and {001}-{111} quadrodecahedra. The fundamental insights into NC structures revealed here allow for major advancements in data interpretation and understanding of zb- and diamond-lattice based nanomaterials. The analytical number series can serve as a standard procedure for stress evaluation in solid state spectroscopy due to their deterministic nature, easy use and general applicability over a wide range of spectroscopy methods as well as NC sizes, forms and materials.« less

  1. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  2. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variationsmore » from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.« less

  3. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2018-01-16

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  4. Multiobjective Topology Optimization of Energy Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part I: layered foam liner . Mater Des 30(9):3405–3413 Sethian J, Wiegmann A (2000) Structural boundary design via...Army Research Laboratory Wildman RA, Weile DS (2007) Geometry reconstruction of conduct- ing cylinders using genetic programming. IEEE Trans Antennas

  5. Shock Tube Test for Energy Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-13

    rigid and lightweight foam material with a closed-cell structure, and a very high strength-to-weight ratio (7). It is commonly used as a sandwich...including application in helmet liners (8). Zorbium™ is the viscoelastic polyurethane foam used in military helmet suspension system pads (9). 8...viscoelastic polyurethane foam which shows strain rate dependent behavior when compressed. This is displayed by the significant difference in response

  6. New Solutions for Energy Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    One can also readily plot transverse stiffness versus axial compression , shown in Figure 8, by relating the axial compression force, N, to the...displacement of 1 μm was applied at the center-top of the beam at the same time as the beam ends were subjected to varying axial compressive ...Figure 8 for varying amounts of axial compression . The results indicate a very good agreement between the analytical and FEA models. The slight

  7. Use of cork as absorbent material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Lombardi, Ilaria; D'Alesio, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    Cork is a green and sustainable material. At the end of its useful life, it can be disposed of into the environment without causing any damage. It can be used to improve the acoustics inside environments, as a system for the reduction of reverberation time. Sound absorption systems consist of cork panels mounted at a distance onto a rigid wall. The thickness of the cork panels considered are 1.5 mm and 2.5 mm. While the distances considered from the rigid wall are 3 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm and 15 cm. The absorption coefficient of the samples was measured in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 2,000 Hz with an impedance tube (tube of Kundt). Furthermore, the problems relating to the realization of sound-absorption systems composed of cork panels are also discussed.

  8. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2018-01-16

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  9. Coherent single-atom superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junki; Yang, Daeho; Oh, Seung-hoon; An, Kyungwon

    2018-02-01

    Superradiance is a quantum phenomenon emerging in macroscopic systems whereby correlated single atoms cooperatively emit photons. Demonstration of controlled collective atom-field interactions has resulted from the ability to directly imprint correlations with an atomic ensemble. Here we report cavity-mediated coherent single-atom superradiance: Single atoms with predefined correlation traverse a high–quality factor cavity one by one, emitting photons cooperatively with the N atoms that have already gone through the cavity (N represents the number of atoms). Enhanced collective photoemission of N-squared dependence was observed even when the intracavity atom number was less than unity. The correlation among single atoms was achieved by nanometer-precision position control and phase-aligned state manipulation of atoms by using a nanohole-array aperture. Our results demonstrate a platform for phase-controlled atom-field interactions.

  10. Time-resolved study of the electron temperature and number density of argon metastable atoms in argon-based dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, E.; Laurent, M.; Durocher-Jean, A.; Laroche, G.; Gherardi, N.; Naudé, N.; Stafford, L.

    2018-01-01

    A combination of optical emission spectroscopy and collisional-radiative modelling is used to determine the time-resolved electron temperature (assuming Maxwellian electron energy distribution function) and number density of Ar 1s states in atmospheric pressure Ar-based dielectric barrier discharges in presence of either NH3 or ethyl lactate. In both cases, T e values were higher early in the discharge cycle (around 0.8 eV), decreased down to about 0.35 eV with the rise of the discharge current, and then remained fairly constant during discharge extinction. The opposite behaviour was observed for Ar 1s states, with cycle-averaged values in the 1017 m-3 range. Based on these findings, a link was established between the discharge ionization kinetics (and thus the electron temperature) and the number density of Ar 1s state.

  11. Atom Interferometer Modeling Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-08

    present, LiveAtom supports the alkali metals from Lithium to Cesium. LiveAtom will also show where atoms in the equilibrium state will sit if a trap is...Address: 7105 La Vista Pl . Niwot, CO 80503 Phone Number: 303-652-0725 The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors...0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing

  12. Atom-by-atom assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-05-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed.

  13. The Unimolecular Reactions of CF3CHF2 Studied by Chemical Activation: Assignment of Rate Constants and Threshold Energies to the 1,2-H Atom Transfer, 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF Elimination Reactions, and the Dependence of Threshold Energies on the Number of F-Atom Substituents in the Fluoroethane Molecules.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caleb A; Gillespie, Blanton R; Heard, George L; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2017-11-22

    The recombination of CF 3 and CHF 2 radicals in a room-temperature bath gas was used to prepare vibrationally excited CF 3 CHF 2 * molecules with 101 kcal mol -1 of vibrational energy. The subsequent 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions were observed as a function of bath gas pressure by following the CHF 3 , CF 3 (F)C: and C 2 F 4 product concentrations by gas chromatography using a mass spectrometer as the detector. The singlet CF 3 (F)C: concentration was measured by trapping the carbene with trans-2-butene. The experimental rate constants are 3.6 × 10 4 , 4.7 × 10 4 , and 1.1 × 10 4 s -1 for the 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions, respectively. These experimental rate constants were matched to statistical RRKM calculated rate constants to assign threshold energies (E 0 ) of 88 ± 2, 88 ± 2, and 87 ± 2 kcal mol -1 to the three reactions. Pentafluoroethane is the only fluoroethane that has a competitive H atom transfer decomposition reaction, and it is the only example with 1,1-HF elimination being more important than 1,2-HF elimination. The trend of increasing threshold energies for both 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF processes with the number of F atoms in the fluoroethane molecule is summarized and investigated with electronic-structure calculations. Examination of the intrinsic reaction coordinate associated with the 1,1-HF elimination reaction found an adduct between CF 3 (F)C: and HF in the exit channel with a dissociation energy of ∼5 kcal mol -1 . Hydrogen-bonded complexes between HF and the H atom migration transition state of CH 3 (F)C: and the F atom migration transition state of CF 3 (F)C: also were found by the calculations. The role that these carbene-HF complexes could play in 1,1-HF elimination reactions is discussed.

  14. Number-phase entropic squeezing and nonclassical properties of a three-level atom interacting with a two-mode field: intensity-dependent coupling, deformed Kerr medium, and detuning effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Javad; Tavassoly, Mohammad Kazem

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we follow our presented model in J. Opt. Soc. Am. B {\\bf 30}, 1109--1117 (2013), in which the interaction between a $\\Lambda$-type three-level atom and a quantized two-mode radiation field in a cavity in the presence of nonlinearities is studied. After giving a brief review on the procedure of obtaining the state vector of the atom-field system, some further interesting and important physical features (which are of particular interest in the quantum optics field of research) of the whole system state, i.e., the number-phase entropic uncertainty relation (based on the two-mode Pegg-Barnett formalism) and some of the nonclassicality signs consist of sub-Poissonian statistics, Cauchy-Schwartz inequality and two kinds of squeezing phenomenon are investigated. During our presentation, the effects of intensity-dependent coupling, deformed Kerr medium and the detuning parameters on the depth and domain of each of the mentioned nonclassical criteria of the considered quantum system are studied, in detail. It is shown that each of the mentioned nonclassicality aspects can be obtained by appropriately choosing the related parameters.

  15. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  16. Element Abundances in the Galactic Cosmic Rays with Atomic Number (Z) in the Interval 30 is less than or equal to Z is less than or equal to 40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbier, Louis; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E.; deNolfo, G.; Geier, S.; Israel, M. H.; Link, J. T.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mitchell, J.; Rauch, B. F.

    2004-01-01

    We present new results on the elemental abundances of galactic cosmic rays with atomic number, Z, greater than 30, and comparison of these observations with abundances expected from galactic propagation of various suggested models of the cosmic-ray source. We combine preliminary results from the 2003-04 flight of the Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (TIGER) cosmic-ray detector with previously reported results from the 2001-02 flight. This instrument flew over Antarctica for nearly 32 days at a mean atmospheric depth of 5.2 mb in December 2001 - January 2002. At the time of submission of this abstract, January 8, 2004, TIGER was again in the air over Antarctica having completed 22 days of an expected 30day flight at a mean atmospheric depth of about 4 nb, Data from the first flight demonstrated excellent resolution of individual elements, and we expect similar resolution from the second flight.

  17. Effective atomic number, energy loss and radiation damage studies in some materials commonly used in nuclear applications for heavy charged particles such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Commonly used nuclear physics materials such as water, concrete, Pb-glass, paraffin, freon and P 10 gases, some alloys such as brass, bronze, stainless-steel and some scintillators such as anthracene, stilbene and toluene have been investigated with respect to the heavy charged particle interaction as means of projected range and effective atomic number (Zeff) in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. Calculations were performed for heavy ions such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U. Also, the energy loss and radiation damage were studied using SRIM Monte Carlo code for anthracene for different heavy ions of 100 keV kinetic energy. It has been observed that the variation in Zeff becomes less when the atomic number of the ions increase. Glass-Pb, bronze, brass, stainless-steel and Freon gas were found to vary less than 10% in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. For total proton interaction, discrepancies up to 10% and 18% between two databases namely PSTAR and SRIM were noted in mass stopping power and Zeff of water, respectively. The range calculations resulted with a conclusion that the metal alloys and glass-Pb have lowest values of ranges confirming best shielding against energetic heavy ions whereas freon and P 10 gases have the highest values of ranges in the entire energy region. The simulation results showed that the energy loss (%) to target electrons decreases as the Z of the incident ion increases. Also, it was observed that the radiation damage first increases with Z of the ion and then keeps almost constant for ions with Z≥52.

  18. The New Element Americium (Atomic Number 95)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Seaborg, G.T.; James, R.A.; Morgan, L.O.

    1948-01-01

    Several isotopes of the new element 95 have been produced and their radiations characterized. The chemical properties of this tripositive element are similar to those of the typical tripositive lanthanide rare-earth elements. Element 95 is different from the latter in the degree and rate of formation of certain compounds of the complex ion type, which makes possible the separation of element 95 from the lanthanide rare-earths. The name americium (after the Americas) and the symbol Am are suggested for the element on the basis of its position as the sixth member of the actinide rare-earth series, analogous to europium, Eu, of the lanthanide series.

  19. Investigation of the effective atomic numbers of dosimetric materials for electrons, protons and alpha particles using a direct method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aksakal, Oğuz; Akkuş, Tuba

    2015-11-01

    A direct method has been used for the first time, to compute effective atomic numbers (Z eff) of water, air, human tissues, and some organic and inorganic compounds, for total electron proton and alpha particle interaction in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. The obtained values for Z eff were then compared to those obtained using an interpolation procedure. In general, good agreement has been observed for electrons, and the difference (%) in Z eff between the results of the direct and the interpolation method was found to be <10 % for all materials, in the energy range from 10 keV to 1 MeV. More specifically, results of the two methods were found to agree well (Dif. <10 %) for air, calcium fluoride, kapton polyimide film, paraffin wax and plastic scintillator in the entire energy region with respect to the total electron interaction. On the other hand, values for Z eff calculated using both methods for protons and alpha particles generally agree with each other in the high-energy region above 10 MeV.

  20. Superradiators created atom by atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  1. Atomic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Colm T.

    2018-04-01

    A knowledge of atomic theory should be an essential part of every physicist's and chemist's toolkit. This book provides an introduction to the basic ideas that govern our understanding of microscopic matter, and the essential features of atomic structure and spectra are presented in a direct and easily accessible manner. Semi-classical ideas are reviewed and an introduction to the quantum mechanics of one and two electron systems and their interaction with external electromagnetic fields is featured. Multielectron atoms are also introduced, and the key methods for calculating their properties reviewed.

  2. Effect of dietary fats with odd or even numbers of carbon atoms on metabolic response and muscle damage with exercise in Quarter Horse-type horses with type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy.

    PubMed

    Borgia, Lisa A; Valberg, Stephanie J; McCue, Molly E; Pagan, Joe D; Roe, Charles R

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate effects of fats with odd and even numbers of carbon atoms on muscle metabolism in exercising horses with polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). 8 horses with PSSM (6 females and 2 males; mean +/- SD age, 6.3 +/- 3.9 years). Isocaloric diets (grain, triheptanoin, corn oil, and high-fat, low-starch [HFLS] feed) were fed for 3 weeks each; horses performed daily treadmill exercise. Grain was fed to establish an exercise target, and HFLS feed was fed as a negative control diet. Daily plasma samples were obtained. For each diet, a 15-minute exercise test was performed, and gluteus medius muscle specimens and blood samples were obtained before and after exercise. Feeding triheptanoin, compared with the corn oil diet, resulted in exercise intolerance; higher plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and concentrations of C3:0- and C7:0-acylcarnitine and insulin; and lower concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and C16:0-, C18:1-, and C18:2-acylcarnitine, without changes in concentrations of plasma glucose or resting muscle substrates and metabolites. Feeding grain induced higher CK activity and insulin concentrations and lower NEFA concentrations than did corn oil or HFLS feed. Feeding grain induced higher glucose concentrations than did triheptanoin and corn oil. In muscle, feeding grain resulted in lower glucose-6-phosphate, higher citrate, and higher postexercise lactate concentrations than did the other diets. Triheptanoin had detrimental effects, reflecting decreased availability of NEFA, increased insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis, and potential inhibition of lipid oxidation. Long-chain fats are the best dietetic for PSSM.

  3. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  4. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  5. Single-particle characterization of atmospheric aerosols collected at Gosan, Korea, during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment field campaign using low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hong; Cheng, Fangqin; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-11-01

    A quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), namely low-Z (atomic number) particle EPMA, was used to characterize the chemical compositions of the individual aerosol particles collected at the Gosan supersite, Jeju Island, Korea, as a part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). On 4-10 April 2001 just before a severe dust storm arrived, seven sets of aerosol samples were obtained by a seven-stage May cascade impactor with a flow rate of 20 L/min. Overall 11,200 particles on stages 1-6 with cutoff diameters of 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, and 0.5 microm, respectively, were examined and classified based on their secondary electron images and X-ray spectra. In general, sea salt particles were the most frequently encountered, followed by mineral dust, organic carbon (OC)-like, (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, elemental carbon (EC)-like, Fe-rich, and K-rich particles. Sea salt and mineral dust particles had a higher relative abundance on stages 1-5, whereas OC-like, (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, Fe-rich, and K-rich particles were relatively abundant on stage 6. The analysis on relative number abundances of various particle types combined with 72-hr backward air mass trajectories indicated that a lot of reacted sea salt and reacted mineral dust (with airborne NOx and SO2 or their acidic products) and OC-like particles were carried by the air masses passing over the Yellow Sea (for sample "10 April") and many NH4HSO4/ (NH4)2SO4-containing particles were carried by the air masses passing over the Sea of Japan and Korea Strait (for samples "4-9 April"). It was concluded that the atmosphere over Jeju Island was influenced by anthropogenic SO2 and NOx, organic compounds, and secondary aerosols when Asian dust was absent.

  6. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  7. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  8. On the bosonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate ground state properties of atoms, in which substitute fermions - electrons by bosons, namely π --mesons. We perform some calculations in the frame of modified Hartree-Fock (HF) equation. The modification takes into account symmetry, instead of anti-symmetry of the pair identical bosons wave function. The modified HF approach thus enhances (doubles) the effect of self-action for the boson case. Therefore, we accordingly modify the HF equations by eliminating the self-action terms "by hand". The contribution of meson-meson and meson-nucleon non-Coulomb interaction is inessential at least for atoms with low and intermediate nuclear charge, which is our main subject. We found that the binding energy of pion negative ions A π - , pion atoms A π , and the number of extra bound pions ΔN π increases with the growth of nuclear charge Z. For e.g. Xe ΔN π = 4. As an example of a simple process with a pion atom, we consider photoionization that differs essentially from that for electron atoms. Namely, it is not monotonic decreasing from the threshold but has instead a prominent maximum above threshold. We study also elastic scattering of pions by pion atoms.

  9. Atom chip gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  10. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Kasevich, Mark

    2017-12-22

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  11. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Canmore » atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?« less

  12. Nondestructive characterization of municipal-solid-waste-contaminated surface soil by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Ghosh, Rita; Mitra, Ajoy K; Roy, Subinit; Sarkar, Manoranjan; Chowdhury, Subhajit; Bhowmik, Asit; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal; Maskey, Shila; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-11-01

    The long-term environmental impact of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfilling is still under investigation due to the lack of detailed characterization studies. A MSW landfill site, popularly known as Dhapa, in the eastern fringe of the metropolis of Kolkata, India, is the subject of present study. A vast area of Dhapa, adjoining the current core MSW dump site and evolving from the raw MSW dumping in the past, is presently used for the cultivation of vegetables. The inorganic chemical characteristics of the MSW-contaminated Dhapa surface soil (covering a 2-km stretch of the area) along with a natural composite (geogenic) soil sample (from a small countryside farm), for comparison, were investigated using two complementary nondestructive analytical techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) for bulk analysis and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA) for single-particle analysis. The bulk concentrations of K, Rb, and Zr remain almost unchanged in all the soil samples. The Dhapa soil is found to be polluted with heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, and Pb (highly elevated) and Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Sr (moderately elevated), compared to the natural countryside soil. These high bulk concentration levels of heavy metals were compared with the Ecological Soil Screening Levels for these elements (U.S. Environment Protection Agency) to assess the potential risk on the immediate biotic environment. Low-Z particle EPMA results showed that the aluminosilicate-containing particles were the most abundant, followed by SiO2, CaCO3-containing, and carbonaceous particles in the Dhapa samples, whereas in the countryside sample only aluminosilicate-containing and SiO2 particles were observed. The mineral particles encountered in the countryside sample are solely of geogenic origin, whereas those from the Dhapa samples seem to have evolved from a mixture of raw dumped MSW, urban dust, and other contributing factors such as wind

  13. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  14. United States History Simulations, 1925-1964: The Scopes Trial, Dropping the Atomic Bomb on Japan, United States versus Alger Hiss, Mississippi--Summer 1964. ETC Simulations Number Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostrop, Richard W.

    This booklet provides instructions for simulation and role play of historical events in U.S. history from 1925-1964. Included for student research and participation are: the Scopes trial in Tennessee involving supporters of the teaching of evolution in the schools and of creationism; the decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan ending World War…

  15. Atomic arias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  16. Hupa Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; And Others

    An introduction to the Hupa number system is provided in this workbook, one in a series of numerous materials developed to promote the use of the Hupa language. The book is written in English with Hupa terms used only for the names of numbers. The opening pages present the numbers from 1-10, giving the numeral, the Hupa word, the English word, and…

  17. PubChem atom environments.

    PubMed

    Hähnke, Volker D; Bolton, Evan E; Bryant, Stephen H

    2015-01-01

    Atom environments and fragments find wide-spread use in chemical information and cheminformatics. They are the basis of prediction models, an integral part in similarity searching, and employed in structure search techniques. Most of these methods were developed and evaluated on the relatively small sets of chemical structures available at the time. An analysis of fragment distributions representative of most known chemical structures was published in the 1970s using the Chemical Abstracts Service data system. More recently, advances in automated synthesis of chemicals allow millions of chemicals to be synthesized by a single organization. In addition, open chemical databases are readily available containing tens of millions of chemical structures from a multitude of data sources, including chemical vendors, patents, and the scientific literature, making it possible for scientists to readily access most known chemical structures. With this availability of information, one can now address interesting questions, such as: what chemical fragments are known today? How do these fragments compare to earlier studies? How unique are chemical fragments found in chemical structures? For our analysis, after hydrogen suppression, atoms were characterized by atomic number, formal charge, implicit hydrogen count, explicit degree (number of neighbors), valence (bond order sum), and aromaticity. Bonds were differentiated as single, double, triple or aromatic bonds. Atom environments were created in a circular manner focused on a central atom with radii from 0 (atom types) up to 3 (representative of ECFP_6 fragments). In total, combining atom types and atom environments that include up to three spheres of nearest neighbors, our investigation identified 28,462,319 unique fragments in the 46 million structures found in the PubChem Compound database as of January 2013. We could identify several factors inflating the number of environments involving transition metals, with many

  18. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  19. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  20. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  1. Understanding Atomic Structure: Is There a More Direct and Compelling Connection between Atomic Line Spectra and the Quantization of an Atom's Energy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The "atoms first" philosophy, adopted by a growing number of General Chemistry textbook authors, places greater emphasis on atomic structure as a key to a deeper understanding of the field of chemistry. A pivotal concept needed to understand the behavior of atoms is the restriction of an atom's energy to specific allowed values. However,…

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for I-131 (Iodine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope I-131 (Iodine, atomic number Z = 53, mass number A = 131).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for F-22 (Fluorine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope F-22 (Fluorine, atomic number Z = 9, mass number A = 22).

  4. Number-unconstrained quantum sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum sensing is commonly described as a constrained optimization problem: maximize the information gained about an unknown quantity using a limited number of particles. Important sensors including gravitational wave interferometers and some atomic sensors do not appear to fit this description, because there is no external constraint on particle number. Here, we develop the theory of particle-number-unconstrained quantum sensing, and describe how optimal particle numbers emerge from the competition of particle-environment and particle-particle interactions. We apply the theory to optical probing of an atomic medium modeled as a resonant, saturable absorber, and observe the emergence of well-defined finite optima without external constraints. The results contradict some expectations from number-constrained quantum sensing and show that probing with squeezed beams can give a large sensitivity advantage over classical strategies when each is optimized for particle number.

  5. Nanosecond and Picosecond Spectroscopy and Kinetics of Dynamic Absorbing Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-08

    pS i~n antenna ]"lti ’Ri" 4. Artit’r corctiption of ibactf.ria I rac’tirr (n’i htr owing chlracteristic tims’ of the carl c% entis in lite prinury...pliytin a. poor ovvrlap wt,4d overlai) Fi(; vRF ’ Ili, Franck ( tm~im di;tgram, loW mal stiapt’ channg’s Amo tc’nap and large shiape i’(langes goo(d

  6. 3D-Printing ‘Smarter’ Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-08-29

    Foams are, by nature, disordered materials studded with air pockets of varying sizes. Lack of control over the material’s architecture at the micrometer or nanometer scale can make it difficult to adjust the foam’s basic properties. But Eric Duoss and a team of Livermore researchers are using additive manufacturing to develop “smarter” silicone cushions. By architecting the structure at the micro scale, they are able to control macro-scale properties previously unachievable with foam materials.

  7. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.

  8. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  9. Number Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezin, Fatin

    2009-01-01

    It is instructive and interesting to find hidden numbers by using different positional numeration systems. Most of the present guessing techniques use the binary system expressed as less-than, greater-than or present-absent type information. This article describes how, by employing four cards having integers 1-64 written in different colours, one…

  10. Numbers Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathotia, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on work undertaken by schools as part of Qualifications and Curriculum Authority's (QCA's) "Engaging mathematics for all learners" project. The goal was to use in the classroom, materials and approaches from a Royal Institution (Ri) Year 10 master-class, "Number Sense", which was inspired by examples from…

  11. Ghost imaging with atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakimov, R. I.; Henson, B. M.; Shin, D. K.; Hodgman, S. S.; Dall, R. G.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging is a counter-intuitive phenomenon—first realized in quantum optics—that enables the image of a two-dimensional object (mask) to be reconstructed using the spatio-temporal properties of a beam of particles with which it never interacts. Typically, two beams of correlated photons are used: one passes through the mask to a single-pixel (bucket) detector while the spatial profile of the other is measured by a high-resolution (multi-pixel) detector. The second beam never interacts with the mask. Neither detector can reconstruct the mask independently, but temporal cross-correlation between the two beams can be used to recover a ‘ghost’ image. Here we report the realization of ghost imaging using massive particles instead of photons. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold, metastable helium atoms, which originate from s-wave scattering of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. We use higher-order Kapitza-Dirac scattering to generate a large number of correlated atom pairs, enabling the creation of a clear ghost image with submillimetre resolution. Future extensions of our technique could lead to the realization of ghost interference, and enable tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and Bell’s inequalities with atoms.

  12. International Journal of Quantum Chemistry. Quantum Chemistry Symposium Number 26: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Theory and Computational Methods Held in St. Augustine, Florida on 14-21 March 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Spectrum The vibrational IR spectra of formaldeh.de and its deuterated species have been measured by a number of groups and analyzed in several studies ... studies [23-28]. The order of the frontier (r) orbitals, a textbook example for simple group theory arguments, is determined by the high symmetry (Dy...simplexes will give a structure with octahedral symmetr\\ since the subgroup of the Coxeter group which leaves one component of a four -vector invariant

  13. Atomic Energy Basics, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This booklet is part of the "Understanding the Atom Series," though it is a later edition and not included in the original set of 51 booklets. A basic survey of the principles of nuclear energy and most important applications are provided. These major topics are examined: matter has molecules and atoms, the atom has electrons, the nucleus,…

  14. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The growth method of atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced in Finland by Suntola under the name of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). The method was originally used for deposition of thin films of sulphides (ZnS, CaS, SrS) activated with manganese or rare-earth ions. Such films were grown for applications in thin-film electroluminescence (TFEL) displays. The ALE mode of growth was also tested in the case of molecular beam epitaxy. Films grown by ALD are commonly polycrystalline or even amorphous. Thus, the name ALE has been replaced by ALD. In the 80s ALD was developed mostly in Finland and neighboring Baltic countries. Deposition of a range of different materials was demonstrated at that time, including II-VI semiconductors (e.g. CdTe, CdS) and III-V (e.g. GaAs, GaN), with possible applications in e.g. photovoltaics. The number of publications on ALD was slowly increasing, approaching about 100 each year. A real boom in interest came with the development of deposition methods of thin films of high-k dielectrics. This research was motivated by a high leakage current in field-effect transistors with SiO2-based gate dielectrics. In 2007 Intel introduced a new generation of integrated circuits (ICs) with thin films of HfO2 used as gate isolating layers. In these and subsequent ICs, films of HfO2 are deposited by the ALD method. This is due to their unique properties. The introduction of ALD to the electronics industry led to a booming interest in the ALD growth method, with the number of publications increasing rapidly to well above 1000 each year. A number of new applications were proposed, as reflected in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The included articles cover a wide range of possible applications—in microelectronics, transparent electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and spintronics. Research papers and reviews on the basics of ALD growth are also included, reflecting a growing interest in precursor chemistry and growth

  15. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  16. Experiments With Trapped Neutral Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-05

    number of condensate atoms in the trap [11]. (a) i solitons (b) £ 10 \\QT>J — \\^y Darks -WW . ’ VrV Ground state A(|>=0 <* -^ Mr...interacting condensates leading to soliton formation for a relative phase of Pi. (b) The relative phase of two split condensates was monitored for various

  17. Oxidation Numbers and Their Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews a method for determining oxidation numbers in covalent compounds and balancing mixed organic-inorganic or purely organic systems. Points out ambiguities presented when adjacent atoms have small or zero electronegativity differences. Presents other limitations that arise when using electronegativity values. (CW)

  18. Progress towards a cesium atomic fountain clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, William M.; Raithel, Georg A.; Rolston, Steven L.; Phillips, William D.; Ekstrom, Christopher R.

    1997-04-01

    We have been developing a fountain of laser--cooled cesium atoms for use as an atomic clock. Our design largely follows that of the fountain built at LPTF in Paris. In our fountain, chirp--slowed atoms are first collected in a Magneto--Optic Trap (MOT) and then cooled to a few μK in optical molasses. The cooled atoms are then launched vertically into a "moving molasses" by shifting the frequencies of the vertical cooling beams. The atoms then travel through a microwave cavity tuned to the 9.2 GHz cesium hyperfine frequency for a first Ramsey pulse. After roughly 0.5 seconds of free flight under the influence of gravity, the atoms fall back through the microwave cavity and into an optical state--detection region which detects the number of atoms making the F=3 arrow F=4 transition. The increased Ramsey interaction time improves the short--time precision as compared to traditional atomic beam experiments, while many systematic shifts which limit the accuracy of an atomic beam clock are reduced by the low atomic velocity and the retrace of the atomic trajectory through the microwave cavity. We will discuss the progress towards a working fountain being assembled in our laboratory.

  19. Stark effect on an excited hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Barratt, C.

    1983-07-01

    The method of degenerate perturbation theory is used to study the dipolar nature of an excited hydrogen atom in an external electric field. The dependence of the atoms perturbed energy levels on the principal and magnetic quantum numbers, n and m, is investigated, along with the perturbed wave functions.

  20. Quantum teleportation with atoms trapped in cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the quantum teleportation protocol with single atoms trapped in cavities. The scheme is based on the adiabatic passage and the polarization measurement. We show that it is possible to teleport the internal state of an atom trapped in a cavity to an atom trapped in another cavity with the success probability of 1/2 and the fidelity of 1. The scheme is resistant to a number of considerable imperfections such as the violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, weak atom-cavity coupling, spontaneous emission, and detection inefficiency.

  1. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading coldmore » atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.« less

  2. Preparation of Ultracold Atom Clouds at the Shot Noise Level.

    PubMed

    Gajdacz, M; Hilliard, A J; Kristensen, M A; Pedersen, P L; Klempt, C; Arlt, J J; Sherson, J F

    2016-08-12

    We prepare number stabilized ultracold atom clouds through the real-time analysis of nondestructive images and the application of feedback. In our experiments, the atom number N∼10^{6} is determined by high precision Faraday imaging with uncertainty ΔN below the shot noise level, i.e., ΔNatom number to a user-defined target, whereupon a second imaging series probes the number stabilized cloud. By this method, we show that the atom number in ultracold clouds can be prepared below the shot noise level.

  3. Atomic Particle Detection, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The instruments used to detect both particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerge from the nucleus are described. The counters reviewed include ionization chambers,…

  4. Atomic Fuel, Understanding the Atom Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is part of the "Understanding the Atom" series. Complete sets of the series are available free to teachers, schools, and public librarians who can make them available for reference or use by groups. Among the topics discussed are: What Atomic Fuel Is; The Odyssey of Uranium; Production of Uranium; Fabrication of Reactor…

  5. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder

    DOE PAGES

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; ...

    2015-12-10

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. Here in this paper, we propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approachmore » the Néel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust.« less

  6. Atomic-scale reversibility in sheared glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Meng; Wang, Minglei; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    Systems become irreversible on a macroscopic scale when they are sheared beyond the yield strain and begin flowing. Using computer simulations of oscillatory shear, we investigate atomic scale reversibility. We employ molecular dynamics simulations to cool binary Lennard-Jones liquids to zero temperature over a wide range of cooling rates. We then apply oscillatory quasistatic shear at constant pressure to the zero-temperature glasses and identify neighbor-switching atomic rearrangement events. We determine the critical strain γ*, beyond which atoms in the system do not return to their original positions upon reversing the strain. We show that for more slowly cooled glasses, the average potential energy is lower and the typical size of atomic rearrangements is smaller, which correlates with larger γ*. Finally, we connect atomic- and macro-scale reversibility by determining the number of and correlations between the atomic rearrangements that occur as the system reaches the yield strain.

  7. Compact atom interferometer using single laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiow, Sheng-wey; Yu, Nan

    2018-06-01

    A typical atom interferometer requires vastly different laser frequencies at different stages of operation, e.g., near resonant light for laser cooling and far detuned light for atom optics, such that multiple lasers are typically employed. The number of laser units constrains the achievable minimum size and power in practical devices for resource critical environments such as space. We demonstrate a compact atom interferometer accelerometer operated by a single diode laser. This is achieved by dynamically changing the laser output frequency in GHz range while maintaining spectroscopic reference to an atomic transition via a sideband generated by phase modulation. At the same time, a beam path sharing configuration is also demonstrated for a compact sensor head design, in which atom interferometer beams share the same path as that of the cooling beam. This beam path sharing also significantly simplifies three-axis atomic accelerometry in microgravity using single sensor head.

  8. Atomic clusters and atomic surfaces in icosahedral quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Quiquandon, Marianne; Portier, Richard; Gratias, Denis

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the basic tools commonly used to describe the atomic structures of quasicrystals with a specific focus on the icosahedral phases. After a brief recall of the main properties of quasiperiodic objects, two simple physical rules are discussed that lead one to eventually obtain a surprisingly small number of atomic structures as ideal quasiperiodic models for real quasicrystals. This is due to the fact that the atomic surfaces (ASs) used to describe all known icosahedral phases are located on high-symmetry special points in six-dimensional space. The first rule is maximizing the density using simple polyhedral ASs that leads to two possible sets of ASs according to the value of the six-dimensional lattice parameter A between 0.63 and 0.79 nm. The second rule is maximizing the number of complete orbits of high symmetry to construct as large as possible atomic clusters similar to those observed in complex intermetallic structures and approximant phases. The practical use of these two rules together is demonstrated on two typical examples of icosahedral phases, i-AlMnSi and i-CdRE (RE = Gd, Ho, Tm).

  9. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  10. Mechanical gate control for atom-by-atom cluster assembly with scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Yurtsever, Ayhan; Hirayama, Naoki; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo

    2014-07-11

    Nanoclusters supported on substrates are of great importance in physics and chemistry as well as in technical applications, such as single-electron transistors and nanocatalysts. The properties of nanoclusters differ significantly from those of either the constituent atoms or the bulk solid, and are highly sensitive to size and chemical composition. Here we propose a novel atom gating technique to assemble various atom clusters composed of a defined number of atoms at room temperature. The present gating operation is based on the transfer of single diffusing atoms among nanospaces governed by gates, which can be opened in response to the chemical interaction force with a scanning probe microscope tip. This method provides an alternative way to create pre-designed atom clusters with different chemical compositions and to evaluate their chemical stabilities, thus enabling investigation into the influence that a single dopant atom incorporated into the host clusters has on a given cluster stability.

  11. Light-induced atomic desorption in a compact system for ultracold atoms

    PubMed Central

    Torralbo-Campo, Lara; Bruce, Graham D.; Smirne, Giuseppe; Cassettari, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) of alkali atoms from the inner surface of a vacuum chamber has been employed in cold atom experiments for the purpose of modulating the alkali background vapour. This is beneficial because larger trapped atom samples can be loaded from vapour at higher pressure, after which the pressure is reduced to increase the lifetime of the sample. We present an analysis, based on the case of rubidium atoms adsorbed on pyrex, of various aspects of LIAD that are useful for this application. Firstly, we study the intensity dependence of LIAD by fitting the experimental data with a rate-equation model, from which we extract a correct prediction for the increase in trapped atom number. Following this, we quantify a figure of merit for the utility of LIAD in cold atom experiments and we show how it can be optimised for realistic experimental parameters. PMID:26458325

  12. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  13. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  14. High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L Bravo...ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L...Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) L Bravo, CB Ivey, D

  15. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  16. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  17. Self-regulated Gd atom trapping in open Fe nanocorrals

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, R. X.; Liu, Z.; Miao, B. F.

    2014-07-01

    Utilizing open Fe nanocorrals built by atom manipulation, we demonstrate self-regulated Gd atom trapping in open quantum corrals. The number of Gd atoms trapped is exactly determined by the diameter of the corral. The quantization can be understood as a self-regulating process, arising from the long-range interaction between Gd atoms and the open corral. We illustrate with arrays of open corrals that such atom trapping can suppress unwanted statistical fluctuations. Our approach opens a potential pathway for nanomaterial design and fabrication with atomic-level precision.

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for U-287 (Uranium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope U-287 (Uranium, atomic number Z = 92, mass number A = 287).

  19. Future population of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kenichi; Mine, Mariko; Shibata, Yoshisada

    2013-01-01

    The Nagasaki University Atomic Bomb Survivor Database, which was established in 1978 for elucidating the long-term health effects of the atomic bombing, has registered since 1970 about 120,000 atomic bomb survivors with a history of residence in Nagasaki city. Since the number of atomic bomb survivors has steadily been decreasing, prediction of future population is important for planning future epidemiologic studies, and we tried to predict the population of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki city from 2008 to 2030. In addition, we evaluated our estimated population comparing with the actual number from 2008 to 2011.

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ac-212 (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ac-212 (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89, mass number A = 212).

  1. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-09-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  2. Observing heliospheric neutral atoms at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Florinski, Vladimir; Zank, Gary

    2006-09-01

    Although in situ observations of distant heliospheric plasma by the Voyagers has proven to be extremely enlightening, such point observations need to be complemented with global measurements taken remotely to obtain a complete picture of the heliosphere and local interstellar environment. Neutral atoms, with their contempt for magnetic fields, provide useful probes of the plasma that generated them. However, there will be a number of ambiguities in neutral atom readings that require a deeper understanding of the plasma processes generating neutral atoms, as well as the loss mechanisms on their flight to the observation point. We introduce a procedure for generating all-sky maps of energetic H-atoms, calculated directly in our Monte-Carlo neutral atom code. Results obtained for a self-consistent axisymmetric MHD-Boltzmann calculation, as well as several non-selfconsistent 3D sky maps, will be presented.

  3. Magneto-optical trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D.; Sokolov, A.; Chebakov, K.

    2010-07-15

    Thulium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap using a strong transition at 410 nm with a small branching ratio. We trap up to 7x10{sup 4} atoms at a temperature of 0.8(2) mK after deceleration in a 40-cm-long Zeeman slower. Optical leaks from the cooling cycle influence the lifetime of atoms in the magneto-optical trap which varies between 0.3 and 1.5 s in our experiments. The lower limit for the leaking rate from the upper cooling level is measured to be 22(6) s{sup -1}. The repumping laser transferring the atomic population out of the F=3 hyperfine ground-state sublevel gives amore » 30% increase for the lifetime and the number of atoms in the trap.« less

  4. Ultra-cold 4He atom beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, N.; Wyatt, A. F. G.

    1994-02-01

    It has been shown that it is possible to create ultra-cold 4He atom beams, using a metal film heater covered with a superfluid helium film. The transient behaviour of the atom pulse can be improved significantly by shaping of the heater pulse. The leading edge of more energetic atoms can be suppressed nearly completely, leaving a core of mono-energetic atoms. The maximum number of atoms in the pulse is determined by the amount of helium in the superfluid film on the heater. This seriously limits the ranges of pulse width and energy over which this beam source can be operated. However, these can be increased significantly by using porous gold smoke heaters.

  5. NARROW Na AND K ABSORPTION LINES TOWARD T TAURI STARS: TRACING THE ATOMIC ENVELOPE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Simon, M. N.; Edwards, S.

    2015-11-20

    We present a detailed analysis of narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines toward nearly 40 T Tauri stars in Taurus with the goal of clarifying their origin. The Na i λ5889.95 line is detected toward all but one source, while the weaker K i λ7698.96 line is detected in about two-thirds of the sample. The similarity in their peak centroids and the significant positive correlation between their equivalent widths demonstrate that these transitions trace the same atomic gas. The absorption lines are present toward both disk and diskless young stellar objects, which excludes cold gas within themore » circumstellar disk as the absorbing material. A comparison of Na i and CO detections and peak centroids demonstrates that the atomic gas and molecular gas are not co-located, the atomic gas being more extended than the molecular gas. The width of the atomic lines corroborates this finding and points to atomic gas about an order of magnitude warmer than the molecular gas. The distribution of Na i radial velocities shows a clear spatial gradient along the length of the Taurus molecular cloud filaments. This suggests that absorption is associated with the Taurus molecular cloud. Assuming that the gradient is due to cloud rotation, the rotation of the atomic gas is consistent with differential galactic rotation, whereas the rotation of the molecular gas, although with the same rotation axis, is retrograde. Our analysis shows that narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines are useful tracers of the atomic envelope of molecular clouds. In line with recent findings from giant molecular clouds, our results demonstrate that the velocity fields of the atomic and molecular gas are misaligned. The angular momentum of a molecular cloud is not simply inherited from the rotating Galactic disk from which it formed but may be redistributed by cloud–cloud interactions.« less

  6. Advances in atomic physics

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics. PMID:26425356

  7. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  8. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  9. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  10. First-Order Quantum Phase Transition for Dicke Model Induced by Atom-Atom Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Liu, Ni; Liang, Jiu-Qing

    2017-05-01

    In this article, we use the spin coherent state transformation and the ground state variational method to theoretically calculate the ground function. In order to consider the influence of the atom-atom interaction on the extended Dicke model’s ground state properties, the mean photon number, the scaled atomic population and the average ground energy are displayed. Using the self-consistent field theory to solve the atom-atom interaction, we discover the system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from the normal phase to the superradiant phase, but a famous Dicke-type second-order quantum phase transition without the atom-atom interaction. Meanwhile, the atom-atom interaction makes the phase transition point shift to the lower atom-photon collective coupling strength. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11275118, 11404198, 91430109, 61505100, 51502189, and the Scientific and Technological Innovation Programs of Higher Education Institutions in Shanxi Province (STIP) under Grant No. 2014102, and the Launch of the Scientific Research of Shanxi University under Grant No. 011151801004, and the National Fundamental Fund of Personnel Training under Grant No. J1103210. The Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province under Grant No. 2015011008

  11. Defect-suppressed atomic crystals in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Rabl, P; Daley, A J; Fedichev, P O; Cirac, J I; Zoller, P

    2003-09-12

    We present a coherent filtering scheme which dramatically reduces the site occupation number defects for atoms in an optical lattice by transferring a chosen number of atoms to a different internal state via adiabatic passage. With the addition of superlattices it is possible to engineer states with a specific number of atoms per site (atomic crystals), which are required for quantum computation and the realization of models from condensed matter physics, including doping and spatial patterns. The same techniques can be used to measure two-body spatial correlation functions.

  12. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  13. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency In Rydberg Atomic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Li; Cong, Lu; Chen, Ai-Xi

    2018-03-01

    Due to possessing big principal quantum number, Rydberg atom has some unique properties, for example: its radiative lifetime is long, dipole moment is large, and interaction between atoms is strong and so on. These properties make one pay attention to Rydberg atoms. In this paper we investigate the effects of Rydberg dipole-dipole interactions on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) schemes and group velocity in three-level systems of ladder type, which provides theoretical foundation for exploring the linear and nonlinear characteristics of light in a Rydberg electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium.

  14. Atomic oxygen exposure of LDEF experiment trays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Atomic oxygen exposures were determined analytically for rows, longerons, and end bays of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The calculations are based on an analytical model that accounts for the effects of thermal molecular velocity, atmospheric temperature, number density, spacecraft velocity, incidence angle, and atmospheric rotation on atomic oxygen flux. Results incorporate variations in solar activity, geomagnetic index, and orbital parameters occurring over the 6-year flight of the spacecraft. To facilitate use of the data, both detailed tabulations and summary charts for atomic oxygen fluences are presented.

  15. Dynamics in atomic signaling games.

    PubMed

    Fox, Michael J; Touri, Behrouz; Shamma, Jeff S

    2015-07-07

    We study an atomic signaling game under stochastic evolutionary dynamics. There are a finite number of players who repeatedly update from a finite number of available languages/signaling strategies. Players imitate the most fit agents with high probability or mutate with low probability. We analyze the long-run distribution of states and show that, for sufficiently small mutation probability, its support is limited to efficient communication systems. We find that this behavior is insensitive to the particular choice of evolutionary dynamic, a property that is due to the game having a potential structure with a potential function corresponding to average fitness. Consequently, the model supports conclusions similar to those found in the literature on language competition. That is, we show that efficient languages eventually predominate the society while reproducing the empirical phenomenon of linguistic drift. The emergence of efficiency in the atomic case can be contrasted with results for non-atomic signaling games that establish the non-negligible possibility of convergence, under replicator dynamics, to states of unbounded efficiency loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Resonant Laser Manipulation of an Atomic Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    similar species such as alkali metals . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...resonant laser-atom interaction with other rarefied and collisional solvers for similar species such as alkali metals . Keywords: atomic beam, cesium...a target flow over length scales which push the limits of physical manufacture. The ability to create masks, beam blocks, controlling electric

  17. Evaluating excited state atomic polarizabilities of chromophores.

    PubMed

    Heid, Esther; Hunt, Patricia A; Schröder, Christian

    2018-03-28

    Ground and excited state dipoles and polarizabilities of the chromophores N-methyl-6-oxyquinolinium betaine (MQ) and coumarin 153 (C153) in solution have been evaluated using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). A method for determining the atomic polarizabilities has been developed; the molecular dipole has been decomposed into atomic charge transfer and polarizability terms, and variation in the presence of an electric field has been used to evaluate atomic polarizabilities. On excitation, MQ undergoes very site-specific changes in polarizability while C153 shows significantly less variation. We also conclude that MQ cannot be adequately described by standard atomic polarizabilities based on atomic number and hybridization state. Changes in the molecular polarizability of MQ (on excitation) are not representative of the local site-specific changes in atomic polarizability, thus the overall molecular polarizability ratio does not provide a good approximation for local atom-specific polarizability changes on excitation. Accurate excited state force fields are needed for computer simulation of solvation dynamics. The chromophores considered in this study are often used as molecular probes. The methods and data reported here can be used for the construction of polarizable ground and excited state force fields. Atomic and molecular polarizabilities (ground and excited states) have been evaluated over a range of functionals and basis sets. Different mechanisms for including solvation effects have been examined; using a polarizable continuum model, explicit solvation and via sampling of clusters extracted from a MD simulation. A range of different solvents have also been considered.

  18. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  19. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  20. Doping Scheme in Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada

    1997-01-01

    Due to the dramatic reduction in MOS size, there appear many unwanted effects. In these small devices, the number of dopant atoms in the channel is not macroscopic and electrons may suffer significantly different scattering from device to device since the spatial distribution of dopant atoms is no longer regarded as continuous. This prohibits integration, while it is impossible to control such dopant positions within atomic scale. A fundamental solution is to create electronics with simple but atomically precise structures, which could be fabricated with recent atom manipulation technology. All the constituent atoms are placed as planned, and then the device characteristics are deviation-free, which is mandatory for integration. Atomic chain electronics belongs to this category. Foreign atom chains or arrays form devices, and they are placed on the atomically flat substrate surface. We can design the band structure and the resultant Fermi energy of these structures by manipulating the lattice constant. Using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, it has been predicted that isolated Si chains and arrays are metallic, Mg chains are insulating, and Mg arrays have metallic and insulating phases [1]. The transport properties along a metallic chain have been studied, emphasizing the role of the contact to electrodes [2]. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along die chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome

  1. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  2. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  3. Atomic Power Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: What is Atomic Power?; What Does Safety Depend On?; Control of Radioactive Material During Operation; Accident Prevention; Containment in the Event of an Accident; Licensing and…

  4. Beyond the Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, John

    2011-08-01

    1. Introduction - the atom in the seventies; 2. The vacuum tube; 3. The new rays; 4. The new substances; 5. Disintegration; 6. A family tree; 7. Verifications and results; 8. The objective reality of molecules; 9. The new atom; Bibliography; Index.

  5. Superradiance for Atoms Trapped along a Photonic Crystal Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goban, A.; Hung, C.-L.; Hood, J. D.; Yu, S.-P.; Muniz, J. A.; Painter, O.; Kimble, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    We report observations of superradiance for atoms trapped in the near field of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). By fabricating the PCW with a band edge near the D1 transition of atomic cesium, strong interaction is achieved between trapped atoms and guided-mode photons. Following short-pulse excitation, we record the decay of guided-mode emission and find a superradiant emission rate scaling as Γ¯SR∝N ¯Γ1 D for average atom number 0.19 ≲N ¯≲2.6 atoms, where Γ1 D/Γ'=1.0 ±0.1 is the peak single-atom radiative decay rate into the PCW guided mode, and Γ' is the radiative decay rate into all the other channels. These advances provide new tools for investigations of photon-mediated atom-atom interactions in the many-body regime.

  6. Dopant atoms as quantum components in silicon nanoscale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaosong; Han, Weihua; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liuhong; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Wang; Yan, Wei; Yang, Fuhua

    2018-06-01

    Recent progress in nanoscale fabrication allows many fundamental studies of the few dopant atoms in various semiconductor nanostructures. Since the size of nanoscale devices has touched the limit of the nature, a single dopant atom may dominate the performance of the device. Besides, the quantum computing considered as a future choice beyond Moore's law also utilizes dopant atoms as functional units. Therefore, the dopant atoms will play a significant role in the future novel nanoscale devices. This review focuses on the study of few dopant atoms as quantum components in silicon nanoscale device. The control of the number of dopant atoms and unique quantum transport characteristics induced by dopant atoms are presented. It can be predicted that the development of nanoelectronics based on dopant atoms will pave the way for new possibilities in quantum electronics. Project supported by National Key R&D Program of China (No. 2016YFA0200503).

  7. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  8. Modeling of atomic systems for atomic clocks and quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Bindiya

    This dissertation reports the modeling of atomic systems for atomic clocks and quantum information. This work is motivated by the prospects of optical frequency standards with trapped ions and the quantum computation proposals with neutral atoms in optical lattices. Extensive calculations of the electric-dipole matrix elements in monovalent atoms are conducted using the relativistic all-order method. This approach is a linearized version of the coupled-cluster method, which sums infinite sets of many-body perturbation theory terms. All allowed transitions between the lowest ns, np1/2, np 3/2 states and a large number of excited states of alkali-metal atoms are evaluated using the all-order method. For Ca+ ion, additional allowed transitions between nd5/2, np 3/2, nf5/2, nf 7/2 states and a large number of excited states are evaluated. We combine D1 lines measurements by Miller et al. [18] with our all-order calculations to determine the values of the electric-dipole matrix elements for the 4pj - 3d j' transitions in K and for the 5pj - 4dj' transitions in Rb to high precision. The resulting electric-dipole matrix elements are used for the high-precision calculation of frequency-dependent polarizabilities of ground state of alkali atoms. Our values of static polarizabilities are found to be in excellent agreement with available experiments. Calculations were done for the wavelength in the range 300--1600 nm, with particular attention to wavelengths of common infrared lasers. We parameterize our results so that they can be extended accurately to arbitrary wavelengths above 800 nm. Our data can be used to predict the oscillation frequencies of optically-trapped atoms, and particularly the ratios of frequencies of different species held in the same trap. We identify wavelengths at which two different alkali atoms have the same oscillation frequency. We present results of all-order calculations of static and frequency-dependent polarizabilities of excited np1/2 and np3

  9. Materials selection for long life in low earth orbit - A critical evaluation of atomic oxygen testing with thermal atom systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Albyn, K.; Leger, L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of thermal atom test methods as a materials selection and screening technique for low-earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft is critically evaluated. The chemistry and physics of thermal atom environments are compared with the LEO environment. The relative reactivities of a number of materials determined in thermal atom environments are compared with those observed in LEO and in high-quality LEO simulations. Reaction efficiencies (cu cm/atom) measured in a new type of thermal atom apparatus are one-thousandth to one ten-thousandth those observed in LEO, and many materials showing nearly identical reactivities in LEO show relative reactivities differing by as much as a factor of eight in thermal atom systems. A simple phenomenological kinetic model for the reaction of oxygen atoms with organic materials can be used to explain the differences in reactivity in different environments. Certain speciic thermal atom test environments can be used as reliable materials screening tools.

  10. Number Sense on the Number Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Dawn Marie; Ketterlin Geller, Leanne; Basaraba, Deni

    2018-01-01

    A strong foundation in early number concepts is critical for students' future success in mathematics. Research suggests that visual representations, like a number line, support students' development of number sense by helping them create a mental representation of the order and magnitude of numbers. In addition, explicitly sequencing instruction…

  11. Epitaxy: Programmable Atom Equivalents Versus Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Gabrys, Paul A.

    The programmability of DNA makes it an attractive structure-directing ligand for the assembly of nanoparticle superlattices in a manner that mimics many aspects of atomic crystallization. However, the synthesis of multilayer single crystals of defined size remains a challenge. Though previous studies considered lattice mismatch as the major limiting factor for multilayer assembly, thin film growth depends on many interlinked variables. Here, a more comprehensive approach is taken to study fundamental elements, such as the growth temperature and the thermodynamics of interfacial energetics, to achieve epitaxial growth of nanoparticle thin films. Under optimized equilibrium conditions, single crystal, multilayer thin filmsmore » can be synthesized over 500 × 500 μm2 areas on lithographically patterned templates. Importantly, these superlattices follow the same patterns of crystal growth demonstrated in thin film atomic deposition, allowing for these processes to be understood in the context of well-studied atomic epitaxy, and potentially enabling a nanoscale model to study fundamental crystallization processes.« less

  12. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  13. Population Dynamics of Excited Atoms in Dissipative Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hong-Mei; Liu, Yu; Fang, Mao-Fa

    2016-10-01

    Population dynamics of excited atoms in dissipative cavities is investigated in this work. We present a method of controlling populations of excited atoms in dissipative cavities. For the initial state | e e> A B |00> a b , the repopulation of excited atoms can be obtained by using atom-cavity couplings and non-Markovian effects after the atomic excited energy decays to zero. For the initial state | g g> A B |11> a b , the two atoms can also be populated to the excited states from the initial ground states by using atom-cavity couplings and non-Markovian effects. And the stronger the atom-cavity coupling or the non-Markovian effect is, the larger the number of repopulation of excited atoms is. Particularly, when the atom-cavity coupling or the non-Markovian effect is very strong, the number of repopulation of excited atoms can be close to one in a short time and will tend to a steady value in a long time.

  14. Interplay of weak interactions in the atom-by-atom condensation of xenon within quantum boxes

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowska, Sylwia; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Kawai, Shigeki; Ivas, Toni; Nowakowski, Jan; Fatayer, Shadi; Wäckerlin, Christian; Nijs, Thomas; Meyer, Ernst; Björk, Jonas; Stöhr, Meike; Gade, Lutz H.; Jung, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Condensation processes are of key importance in nature and play a fundamental role in chemistry and physics. Owing to size effects at the nanoscale, it is conceptually desired to experimentally probe the dependence of condensate structure on the number of constituents one by one. Here we present an approach to study a condensation process atom-by-atom with the scanning tunnelling microscope, which provides a direct real-space access with atomic precision to the aggregates formed in atomically defined ‘quantum boxes’. Our analysis reveals the subtle interplay of competing directional and nondirectional interactions in the emergence of structure and provides unprecedented input for the structural comparison with quantum mechanical models. This approach focuses on—but is not limited to—the model case of xenon condensation and goes significantly beyond the well-established statistical size analysis of clusters in atomic or molecular beams by mass spectrometry. PMID:25608225

  15. Single-Atom Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Fu, Shaofang; Shi, Qiurong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-11-06

    Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the production of sustainable and renewable energy. However, the electrochemical performances of the various systems are limited, and there is an intensive search for highly efficient electrocatalysts by more rational control over the size, shape, composition, and structure. Of particular interest are the studies on single-atom catalysts (SACs), which have sparked new interests in electrocatalysis because of their high catalytic activity, stability, selectivity, and 100 % atom utilization. In this Review, we introduce innovative syntheses and characterization techniques for SACs, with a focus on their electrochemical applications in the oxygen reduction/evolution reaction, hydrogen evolution reaction, and hydrocarbon conversion reactions for fuel cells (electrooxidation of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid). The electrocatalytic performance is further considered at an atomic level and the underlying mechanisms are discussed. The ultimate goal is the tailoring of single atoms for electrochemical applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Atomic bomb health benefits.

    PubMed

    Luckey, T D

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment.

  17. The Atomic Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummo, Evelyn; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to provide students with opportunities to practice drawing atomic models and discover the logical pairings of whole families on the periodic table. Follows the format of a television game show. (DDR)

  18. Atomic Bomb Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Luckey, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment. PMID:19088902

  19. Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Adatom chains, precise structures artificially created on an atomically regulated surface, are the smallest possible candidates for future nanoelectronics. Since all the devices are created by combining adatom chains precisely prepared with atomic precision, device characteristics are predictable, and free from deviations due to accidental structural defects. In this atomic dimension, however, an analogy to the current semiconductor devices may not work. For example, Si structures are not always semiconducting. Adatom states do not always localize at the substrate surface when adatoms form chemical bonds to the substrate atoms. Transport properties are often determined for the entire system of the chain and electrodes, and not for chains only. These fundamental issues are discussed, which will be useful for future device considerations.

  20. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P.

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  1. Atomizing nozzle and method

    DOEpatents

    Ting, Jason; Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2000-03-16

    A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

  2. Navigation with Atom Interferometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-20

    cos(1[ 2 1)( ttP g g e    (1) where  2  is the zero detuning Rabi frequency,  is the atomic dipole moment, 22  g is the...generalized Rabi frequency and oL   is the detuning of the laser from the atomic transition. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution

  3. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  4. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  5. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  6. Atomic clocks for geodesy.

    PubMed

    Mehlstäubler, Tanja E; Grosche, Gesine; Lisdat, Christian; Schmidt, Piet O; Denker, Heiner

    2018-06-01

    We review experimental progress on optical atomic clocks and frequency transfer, and consider the prospects of using these technologies for geodetic measurements. Today, optical atomic frequency standards have reached relative frequency inaccuracies below 10 -17 , opening new fields of fundamental and applied research. The dependence of atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential makes atomic clocks ideal candidates for the search for deviations in the predictions of Einstein's general relativity, tests of modern unifying theories and the development of new gravity field sensors. In this review, we introduce the concepts of optical atomic clocks and present the status of international clock development and comparison. Besides further improvement in stability and accuracy of today's best clocks, a large effort is put into increasing the reliability and technological readiness for applications outside of specialized laboratories with compact, portable devices. With relative frequency uncertainties of 10 -18 , comparisons of optical frequency standards are foreseen to contribute together with satellite and terrestrial data to the precise determination of fundamental height reference systems in geodesy with a resolution at the cm-level. The long-term stability of atomic standards will deliver excellent long-term height references for geodetic measurements and for the modelling and understanding of our Earth.

  7. Atomic clocks for geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlstäubler, Tanja E.; Grosche, Gesine; Lisdat, Christian; Schmidt, Piet O.; Denker, Heiner

    2018-06-01

    We review experimental progress on optical atomic clocks and frequency transfer, and consider the prospects of using these technologies for geodetic measurements. Today, optical atomic frequency standards have reached relative frequency inaccuracies below 10‑17, opening new fields of fundamental and applied research. The dependence of atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential makes atomic clocks ideal candidates for the search for deviations in the predictions of Einstein’s general relativity, tests of modern unifying theories and the development of new gravity field sensors. In this review, we introduce the concepts of optical atomic clocks and present the status of international clock development and comparison. Besides further improvement in stability and accuracy of today’s best clocks, a large effort is put into increasing the reliability and technological readiness for applications outside of specialized laboratories with compact, portable devices. With relative frequency uncertainties of 10‑18, comparisons of optical frequency standards are foreseen to contribute together with satellite and terrestrial data to the precise determination of fundamental height reference systems in geodesy with a resolution at the cm-level. The long-term stability of atomic standards will deliver excellent long-term height references for geodetic measurements and for the modelling and understanding of our Earth.

  8. Molecules Without Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Anthony; Collins, Laura; Gomes, Kenjiro; Janko, Boldizsar

    We present a real-space representation of molecules which results in the normal bonding rules and electronic structure of chemistry without atom-centered coulomb potentials. Using a simple mapping, we can generate atomless molecules from the structure of real molecules. Additionally, molecules without atoms show similar covalent bonding energies and transfer of charge in ionic bonds as real molecules. The atomless molecules contain only the valence and conduction electronic structure of the real molecule. Using the framework of the Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory of Bader, we prove that the topological features of the valence charge distribution of molecules without atoms are identical to that of real molecules. In particular, the charge basins of atomless molecules show identical location and quantities of representative charge. We compare the accuracy, computational cost, and intuition gained from electronic structure calculations of molecules without atoms with the use of pseudopotentials to represent atomic cores in density functional theory. A. R. acknowledges support from a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  9. Atom Interferometry on Atom Chips - A Novel Approach Towards Precision Inertial Navigation System - PINS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Demonstration of an area-enclosing guided-atom interferometer for rotation sensing, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 173201 (2007). 4. Heralded Single- Magnon Quantum...excitations are quantized spin waves ( magnons ), such that transitions between its energy levels ( magnon number states) correspond to highly directional...polarization storage in the form of a single collective-spin excitation ( magnon ) that is shared between two spatially overlapped atomic ensembles

  10. Atom-atom inelastic collisions and three-body atomic recombination in weakly ionized argon plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, C. G.; Kunc, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A stationary collisional-radiative model including both inelastic electron-atom and atom-atom collisions is used to examine nonequilibrium weakly ionized argon plasmas with atomic densities 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 20th/cu cm, temperatures below 6000 K, and with different degrees of radiation trapping. It is shown that three-body atomic recombination becomes important at high particle densities. Comparison is made between the present approach and Thomson's theory for atomic recombination.

  11. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  12. Atomic spectrometry update - atomic mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, J.; Crain, J. S.; McMahon, A. W.

    The MS and XRF updates have been published together since their introduction in 1988. In the last few years, however, the two sections have been prepared independently of each other and it therefore seemed appropriate to publish the two sections separately. With effect from this issue, the MS Update will appear in the October issue of JAAS and the XRF Update in the November issue. The format used for the MS section is broadly similar to that used last year, with some additional sub-headings. This Update is intended to cover all atomic and stable isotopic MS techniques, but not thosemore » used in studies of fundamental nuclear physics and exotic nuclei far from stability. Also excluded are those reports in which MS is used as a tool in the study of molecular processes and of gaseous components. the review is based on critical selection of developments in instrumentation and methodology, notable for their innovation, originality or achievement of significant advances, and is not intended to be comprehensive in its coverage. Conference papers are only included if they contain enough information to show they meet these criteria, and our policy in general remains one of waiting for a development to appear in a full paper before inclusion in the review. a similar policy applies to foreign language papers unlikely to reach a wide audience. Routine applications of atomic MS are not included in this Update and the reader is referred to the Updates on Industrial Analysis: Metals, Chemicals and Advanced Materials (96/416), Environmental Analysis (96/1444) and Clinical and Biological Materials, Food and Beverages (96/2479). Also excluded are those applications, even if not routine, which use atomic spectroscopy as a tool for the study of a non-atomic property, for example, the use of stable isotope labeling of carbon or nitrogen in biomolecules in metabolic studies. There have been few general reviews on atomic MS of note in the period covered by this update. That of

  13. Atomic resolution holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2014-11-01

    Atomic resolution holography, such as X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH)[1] and photoelectron holography (PH), has the attention of researcher as an informative local structure analysis, because it provides three dimensional atomic images around specific elements within a range of a few nanometers. It can determine atomic arrangements around a specific element without any prior knowledge of structures. It is considered that the atomic resolution holographic is a third method of structural analysis at the atomic level after X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). As known by many researchers, XRD and XAFS are established methods that are widespread use in various fields. XRD and XAFS provide information on long-range translational periodicities and very local environments, respectively, whereas the atomic resolution holography gives 3D information on the local order and can visualize surrounding atoms with a large range of coordination shells. We call this feature "3D medium-range local structure observation".In addition to this feature, the atomic resolution holography is very sensitive to the displacement of atoms from their ideal positions, and one can obtain quantitative information about local lattice distortions by analyzing reconstructed atomic images[2] When dopants with different atomic radii from the matrix elements are present, the lattices around the dopants are distorted. However, using the conventional methods of structural analysis, one cannot determine the extent to which the local lattice distortions are preserved from the dopants. XFH is a good tool for solving this problem.Figure 1 shows a recent achievement on a relaxor ferroelectric of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) using XFH. The structural studies of relaxor ferroelectrics have been carried out by X-ray or neutron diffractions, which suggested rhombohedral distortions of their lattices. However, their true pictures have not been obtained, yet. The Nb Kα holograms showed

  14. First principles calculation of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Au-Pd atomic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, Mudra R., E-mail: mdave-phy@yahoo.co.in; Sharma, A. C.

    2015-06-24

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of free standing Au-Pd bimetallic atomic chain is studied using ab-initio method. It is found that electronic and magnetic properties of chains depend on position of atoms and number of atoms. Spin polarization factor for different atomic configuration of atomic chain is calculated predicting a half metallic behavior. It suggests a total spin polarised transport in these chains.

  15. Optical atomic phase reference and timing.

    PubMed

    Hollberg, L; Cornell, E H; Abdelrahmann, A

    2017-08-06

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10 -20 As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, Δ Φ / Φ total  ≤ 10 -20 , that could make an important impact in gravity wave science.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Squeezing on Momentum States for Atom Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Leonardo; Poli, Nicola; Vuletić, Vladan; Tino, Guglielmo M

    2018-01-19

    We propose and analyze a method that allows for the production of squeezed states of the atomic center-of-mass motion that can be injected into an atom interferometer. Our scheme employs dispersive probing in a ring resonator on a narrow transition in order to provide a collective measurement of the relative population of two momentum states. We show that this method is applicable to a Bragg diffraction-based strontium atom interferometer with large diffraction orders. This technique can be extended also to small diffraction orders and large atom numbers N by inducing atomic transparency at the frequency of the probe field, reaching an interferometer phase resolution scaling Δϕ∼N^{-3/4}. We show that for realistic parameters it is possible to obtain a 20 dB gain in interferometer phase estimation compared to the standard quantum limit. Our method is applicable to other atomic species where a narrow transition is available or can be synthesized.

  17. Promote Number Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurganus, Susan

    2004-01-01

    "Number sense" is "an intuition about numbers that is drawn from all varied meanings of number" (NCTM, 1989, p. 39). Students with number sense understand that numbers are representative of objects, magnitudes, relationships, and other attributes; that numbers can be operated on, compared, and used for communication. It is fundamental knowledge…

  18. All Square Chiliagonal Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A?iru, Muniru A.

    2016-01-01

    A square chiliagonal number is a number which is simultaneously a chiliagonal number and a perfect square (just as the well-known square triangular number is both triangular and square). In this work, we determine which of the chiliagonal numbers are perfect squares and provide the indices of the corresponding chiliagonal numbers and square…

  19. Single atoms in a MOT

    SciTech Connect

    Meschede, Dieter; Ueberholz, Bernd; Gomer, Victor

    1999-06-11

    We are experimenting with individual neutral cesium atoms stored in a magneto-optical trap. The atoms are detected by their resonance fluorescence, and fluorescence fluctuations contain signatures of the atomic internal and external degrees of freedom. This noninvasive probe provides a rich source of information about atomic dynamics at all relevant time scales.

  20. Accurate atom-mapping computation for biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Latendresse, Mario; Malerich, Jeremiah P; Travers, Mike; Karp, Peter D

    2012-11-26

    The complete atom mapping of a chemical reaction is a bijection of the reactant atoms to the product atoms that specifies the terminus of each reactant atom. Atom mapping of biochemical reactions is useful for many applications of systems biology, in particular for metabolic engineering where synthesizing new biochemical pathways has to take into account for the number of carbon atoms from a source compound that are conserved in the synthesis of a target compound. Rapid, accurate computation of the atom mapping(s) of a biochemical reaction remains elusive despite significant work on this topic. In particular, past researchers did not validate the accuracy of mapping algorithms. We introduce a new method for computing atom mappings called the minimum weighted edit-distance (MWED) metric. The metric is based on bond propensity to react and computes biochemically valid atom mappings for a large percentage of biochemical reactions. MWED models can be formulated efficiently as Mixed-Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). We have demonstrated this approach on 7501 reactions of the MetaCyc database for which 87% of the models could be solved in less than 10 s. For 2.1% of the reactions, we found multiple optimal atom mappings. We show that the error rate is 0.9% (22 reactions) by comparing these atom mappings to 2446 atom mappings of the manually curated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) RPAIR database. To our knowledge, our computational atom-mapping approach is the most accurate and among the fastest published to date. The atom-mapping data will be available in the MetaCyc database later in 2012; the atom-mapping software will be available within the Pathway Tools software later in 2012.

  1. Double photoionization of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoeft, Marco

    2003-10-01

    Double photoionization studies of atoms and molecules are new state-of-the-art studies providing a deeper knowledge of multi-electron excitations. This type of work advances the understanding of many-body problems. Double photoionization of atoms is of great interest to learn about electron-electron correlation and relaxation effects in atoms and molecules. In order to study double photoionization processes, a new electron-electron coincidence apparatus was built to carry out the measurements. I will present the apparatus I built as well as the results of the measurement of the triply-differential-cross-section (TDCS) for the predicted interference and Post-Collision-Interaction (PCI) effects in the Xenon N5O2,3 O2,3 Auger decay after 4d5/2 photoionization. Furthermore I present measurements for direct double photoionization of Helium at various photon energies.

  2. Handling of Atomic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Deetjen, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art NLTE model atmosphere codes have arrived at a high level of ``numerical'' sophistication and are an adequate tool to analyze the available high-quality spectra from the infrared to the X-ray wavelength range. The computational capacities allow the calculation which include all elements from hydrogen up to the iron group and the lack of reliable atomic data has become a crucial problem for further progress. We summarize briefly the available sources of atomic data and how these are implemented in the Tübingen Model Atmosphere Package (TMAP).

  3. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  4. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  5. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Silvia C.; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu’s), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu’s. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å. PMID:25295177

  6. Atomic cluster collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  7. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    Ricken, Joel and Heidloff, Andrew

    2018-05-07

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  8. STIR-Physics: Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-02

    STIR- Physics : Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials We worked on a tapered fiber in cold atomic cloud...reviewed journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: STIR- Physics : Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber...other than abstracts): Number of Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): Books Number of Manuscripts: 0.00Number of

  9. ATOMIC PHYSICS, AN AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM, VOLUME 2, SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DETERLINE, WILLIAM A.; KLAUS, DAVID J.

    THE AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS IN THIS TEXT WERE PREPARED FOR USE IN AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY, OFFERING SELF-TUTORING MATERIAL FOR LEARNING ATOMIC PHYSICS. THE TOPICS COVERED ARE (1) ISOTOPES AND MASS NUMBERS, (2) MEASURING ATOMIC MASS, (3) DISCOVERY OF THE NUCLEUS, (4) STRUCTURE OF THE NUCLEUS, (5) DISCOVERY OF THE NEUTRON, (6) NUCLEAR REACTIONS,…

  10. Quantum computation with cold bosonic atoms in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    García-Ripoll, Juan José; Cirac, Juan Ignacio

    2003-07-15

    We analyse an implementation of a quantum computer using bosonic atoms in an optical lattice. We show that, even though the number of atoms per site and the tunnelling rate between neighbouring sites is unknown, one may operate a universal set of gates by means of adiabatic passage.

  11. Project Physics Tests 5, Models of the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Test items relating to Project Physics Unit 5 are presented in this booklet. Included are 70 multiple-choice and 23 problem-and-essay questions. Concepts of atomic model are examined on aspects of relativistic corrections, electron emission, photoelectric effects, Compton effect, quantum theories, electrolysis experiments, atomic number and mass,…

  12. Numbers Defy the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ruma; Lann, Avital Lavie

    2015-01-01

    As the number of independent tosses of a fair coin grows, the rates of heads and tails tend to equality. This is misinterpreted by many students as being true also for the absolute numbers of the two outcomes, which, conversely, depart unboundedly from each other in the process. Eradicating that misconception, as by coin-tossing experiments,…

  13. Valence, Covalence, Hypervalence, Oxidation State, and Coordination Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    2005-01-01

    Valence as a numerical measure of an atom's combining power, expressed by the number of bonds it forms in a molecular formulation of the compound in question, was unable to cope with coordination compounds. The covalence of an atom is the nearest model equivalent, but is subject to ambiguity since it often depends on which bonding model is being…

  14. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  15. Energy from the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia L.

    This curriculum guide was written to supplement fifth and sixth grade science units on matter and energy. It was designed to provide more in-depth material on the atom. The first part, "Teacher Guide," contains background information, biographical sketches of persons in the history of nuclear energy, vocabulary, answer sheets, management sheets…

  16. Atomically resolved tissue integration.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Johan; Sundell, Gustav; Thuvander, Mattias; Andersson, Martin

    2014-08-13

    In the field of biomedical technology, a critical aspect is the ability to control and understand the integration of an implantable device in living tissue. Despite the technical advances in the development of biomaterials, the elaborate interplay encompassing materials science and biology on the atomic level is not very well understood. Within implantology, anchoring a biomaterial device into bone tissue is termed osseointegration. In the most accepted theory, osseointegration is defined as an interfacial bonding between implant and bone; however, there is lack of experimental evidence to confirm this. Here we show that atom probe tomography can be used to study the implant-tissue interaction, allowing for three-dimensional atomic mapping of the interface region. Interestingly, our analyses demonstrated that direct contact between Ca atoms and the implanted titanium oxide surface is formed without the presence of a protein interlayer, which means that a pure inorganic interface is created, hence giving experimental support to the current theory of osseointegration. We foresee that this result will be of importance in the development of future biomaterials as well as in the design of in vitro evaluation techniques.

  17. Bonds Between Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  18. Atoms in Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Paul A.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. A Basic Topics section discusses atomic structure, emphasizing states of matter at high temperature and spectroscopic analysis of light from the stars. A section…

  19. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Josh B.; Dick, Don D.; McDonnell, Stephen J.; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H. G.; Owen, William R.; Alexander, Justin D.; Jaeger, David L.; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J.; Wallace, Robert M.; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M.; Randall, John N.; Von Ehr, James

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure. PMID:26274555

  20. FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ming Feng

    2018-02-01

    FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

  1. Atomism, Pragmatism, Holism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John P.

    1986-01-01

    Examines three world views influencing curriculum development--atomism (underpinning competency-based education), pragmatism (promoting inquiry-based approaches), amd holism (associated with confluent or Waldorf education). Holism embodies the perennial philosophy and attempts to integrate cognitive, affective, and transpersonal dimensions,…

  2. Rutherford-Bohr atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, J. L.

    1981-03-01

    Bohr used to introduce his attempts to explain clearly the principles of the quantum theory of the atom with an historical sketch, beginning invariably with the nuclear model proposed by Rutherford. That was sound pedagogy but bad history. The Rutherford-Bohr atom stands in the middle of a line of work initiated by J.J. Thomson and concluded by the invention of quantum mechanics. Thompson's program derived its inspiration from the peculiar emphasis on models characteristic of British physics of the 19th century. Rutherford's atom was a late product of the goals and conceptions of Victorian science. Bohr's modifications, although ultimately fatal to Thomson's program, initially gave further impetus to it. In the early 1920s the most promising approach to an adequate theory of the atom appeared to be the literal and detailed elaboration of the classical mechanics of multiply periodic orbits. The approach succeeded, demonstrating in an unexpected way the force of an argument often advanced by Thomson: because a mechanical model is richer in implications than the considerations for which it was advanced, it can suggest new directions of research that may lead to important discoveries.

  3. Precisely detecting atomic position of atomic intensity images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaohe

    2015-03-01

    We proposed a quantitative method to detect atomic position in atomic intensity images from experiments such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and simulation such as phase field crystal modeling. The evaluation of detection accuracy proves the excellent performance of the method. This method provides a chance to precisely determine atomic interactions based on the detected atomic positions from the atomic intensity image, and hence to investigate the related physical, chemical and electrical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Atomic-scale phase composition through multivariate statistical analysis of atom probe tomography data.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Michael R; Smentkowski, Vincent S; Ulfig, Robert M; Oltman, Edward; Larson, David J; Kelly, Thomas F

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that multivariate statistical analysis techniques can be applied to atom probe tomography data to estimate the chemical composition of a sample at the full spatial resolution of the atom probe in three dimensions. Whereas the raw atom probe data provide the specific identity of an atom at a precise location, the multivariate results can be interpreted in terms of the probabilities that an atom representing a particular chemical phase is situated there. When aggregated to the size scale of a single atom (∼0.2 nm), atom probe spectral-image datasets are huge and extremely sparse. In fact, the average spectrum will have somewhat less than one total count per spectrum due to imperfect detection efficiency. These conditions, under which the variance in the data is completely dominated by counting noise, test the limits of multivariate analysis, and an extensive discussion of how to extract the chemical information is presented. Efficient numerical approaches to performing principal component analysis (PCA) on these datasets, which may number hundreds of millions of individual spectra, are put forward, and it is shown that PCA can be computed in a few seconds on a typical laptop computer.

  5. Hyperfine state entanglement of spinor BEC and scattering atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhibing; Bao, Chengguang; Zheng, Wei

    2018-05-01

    Condensate of spin-1 atoms frozen in a unique spatial mode may possess large internal degrees of freedom. The scattering amplitudes of polarized cold atoms scattered by the condensate are obtained with the method of fractional parentage coefficients that treats the spin degrees of freedom rigorously. Channels with scattering cross sections enhanced by the square of the atom number of the condensate are found. Entanglement between the condensate and the propagating atom can be established by scattering. Entanglement entropy is analytically obtained for arbitrary initial states. Our results also give a hint for the establishment of quantum thermal ensembles in the hyperfine space of spin states.

  6. Atomic layer deposition in nanostructured photovoltaics: tuning optical, electronic and surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Axel F.; Santra, Pralay K.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured materials offer key advantages for third-generation photovoltaics, such as the ability to achieve high optical absorption together with enhanced charge carrier collection using low cost components. However, the extensive interfacial areas in nanostructured photovoltaic devices can cause high recombination rates and a high density of surface electronic states. In this feature article, we provide a brief review of some nanostructured photovoltaic technologies including dye-sensitized, quantum dot sensitized and colloidal quantum dot solar cells. We then introduce the technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a vapor phase deposition method using a sequence of self-limiting surface reaction steps to grow thin, uniform and conformal films. We discuss how ALD has established itself as a promising tool for addressing different aspects of nanostructured photovoltaics. Examples include the use of ALD to synthesize absorber materials for both quantum dot and plasmonic solar cells, to grow barrier layers for dye and quantum dot sensitized solar cells, and to infiltrate coatings into colloidal quantum dot solar cell to improve charge carrier mobilities as well as stability. We also provide an example of monolayer surface modification in which adsorbed ligand molecules on quantum dots are used to tune the band structure of colloidal quantum dot solar cells for improved charge collection. Finally, we comment on the present challenges and future outlook of the use of ALD for nanostructured photovoltaics.

  7. Trapped atoms along nanophotonic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Brian; Kim, May; Chang, Tzu-Han; Hung, Chen-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Many-body systems subject to long-range interactions have remained a very challenging topic experimentally. Ultracold atoms trapped in extreme proximity to the surface of nanophotonic structures provides a dynamic system combining the strong atom-atom interactions mediated by guided mode photons with the exquisite control implemented with trapped atom systems. The hybrid system promises pair-wise tunability of long-range interactions between atomic pseudo spins, allowing studies of quantum magnetism extending far beyond nearest neighbor interactions. In this talk, we will discuss our current status developing high quality nanophotonic ring resonators, engineered on CMOS compatible optical chips with integrated nanostructures that, in combination with a side illuminating beam, can realize stable atom traps approximately 100nm above the surface. We will report on our progress towards loading arrays of cold atoms near the surface of these structures and studying atom-atom interaction mediated by photons with high cooperativity.

  8. HPAM: Hirshfeld Partitioned Atomic Multipoles

    PubMed Central

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2011-01-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank lmax on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from lmax = 0 (atomic charges) to lmax = 4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank lmax are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L ≤ lmax. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only (lmax = 0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. PMID:22140274

  9. Suppression and enhancement of decoherence in an atomic Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japha, Yonathan; Zhou, Shuyu; Keil, Mark; Folman, Ron; Henkel, Carsten; Vardi, Amichay

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the role of interatomic interactions when a Bose gas, in a double-well potential with a finite tunneling probability (a ‘Bose-Josephson junction’), is exposed to external noise. We examine the rate of decoherence of a system initially in its ground state with equal probability amplitudes in both sites. The noise may induce two kinds of effects: firstly, random shifts in the relative phase or number difference between the two wells and secondly, loss of atoms from the trap. The effects of induced phase fluctuations are mitigated by atom-atom interactions and tunneling, such that the dephasing rate may be suppressed by half its single-atom value. Random fluctuations may also be induced in the population difference between the wells, in which case atom-atom interactions considerably enhance the decoherence rate. A similar scenario is predicted for the case of atom loss, even if the loss rates from the two sites are equal. We find that if the initial state is number-squeezed due to interactions, then the loss process induces population fluctuations that reduce the coherence across the junction. We examine the parameters relevant for these effects in a typical atom chip device, using a simple model of the trapping potential, experimental data, and the theory of magnetic field fluctuations near metallic conductors. These results provide a framework for mapping the dynamical range of barriers engineered for specific applications and set the stage for more complex atom circuits (‘atomtronics’).

  10. Experiments with bosonic atoms for quantum gas assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Mark; Lin, Yiheng; Lester, Brian; Kaufman, Adam; Ball, Randall; Brossard, Ludovic; Isaev, Leonid; Thiele, Tobias; Lewis-Swan, Robert; Schymik, Kai-Niklas; Rey, Ana Maria; Regal, Cindy

    2017-04-01

    Quantum gas assembly is a promising platform for preparing and observing neutral atom systems on the single-atom level. We have developed a toolbox that includes ground-state laser cooling, high-fidelity loading techniques, addressable spin control, and dynamic spatial control and coupling of atoms. Already, this platform has enabled us to pursue a number of experiments studying entanglement and interference of pairs of bosonic atoms. We discuss our recent work in probabilistically entangling neutral atoms via interference, measurement, and post-selection as well as our future pursuits of interesting spin-motion dynamics of larger arrays of atoms. This work was supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, National Science Foundation Physics Frontier Centers, and the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowships program.

  11. Antimisting kerosene atomization and flammability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleeter, R.; Petersen, R. A.; Toaz, R. D.; Jakub, A.; Sarohia, V.

    1982-01-01

    Various parameters found to affect the flammability of antimisting kerosene (Jet A + polymer additive) are investigated. Digital image processing was integrated into a technique for measurement of fuel spray characteristics. This technique was developed to avoid many of the error sources inherent to other spray assessment techniques and was applied to the study of engine fuel nozzle atomization performance with Jet A and antimisting fuel. Aircraft accident fuel spill and ignition dynamics were modeled in a steady state simulator allowing flammability to be measured as a function of airspeed, fuel flow rate, fuel jet Reynolds number and polymer concentration. The digital imaging technique was employed to measure spray characteristics in this simulation and these results were related to flammability test results. Scaling relationships were investigated through correlation of experimental results with characteristic dimensions spanning more than two orders of magnitude.

  12. Parameterizing by the Number of Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellows, Michael R.; Gaspers, Serge; Rosamond, Frances A.

    The usefulness of parameterized algorithmics has often depended on what Niedermeier has called "the art of problem parameterization". In this paper we introduce and explore a novel but general form of parameterization: the number of numbers. Several classic numerical problems, such as Subset Sum, Partition, 3-Partition, Numerical 3-Dimensional Matching, and Numerical Matching with Target Sums, have multisets of integers as input. We initiate the study of parameterizing these problems by the number of distinct integers in the input. We rely on an FPT result for Integer Linear Programming Feasibility to show that all the above-mentioned problems are fixed-parameter tractable when parameterized in this way. In various applied settings, problem inputs often consist in part of multisets of integers or multisets of weighted objects (such as edges in a graph, or jobs to be scheduled). Such number-of-numbers parameterized problems often reduce to subproblems about transition systems of various kinds, parameterized by the size of the system description. We consider several core problems of this kind relevant to number-of-numbers parameterization. Our main hardness result considers the problem: given a non-deterministic Mealy machine M (a finite state automaton outputting a letter on each transition), an input word x, and a census requirement c for the output word specifying how many times each letter of the output alphabet should be written, decide whether there exists a computation of M reading x that outputs a word y that meets the requirement c. We show that this problem is hard for W[1]. If the question is whether there exists an input word x such that a computation of M on x outputs a word that meets c, the problem becomes fixed-parameter tractable.

  13. Coherent and incoherent dipole-dipole interactions between atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2016-05-01

    Results will be presented on the collective interaction between atoms due to the electric dipole-dipole coupling between states of different parity on two different atoms. A canonical example of this effect is when the electronic state of one atom has S-character and the state of another atom has P-character. The energy difference between the two states plays an important role in the interaction since the change in energy determines the wave number of a photon that would cause a transition between the states. If the atoms are much closer than the wave length of this photon, then the dipole-dipole interaction is in the near field and has a 1 /r3 dependence on atomic separation. If the atoms are farther apart than the wave length, then the interaction is in the far field and has a 1 / r dependence. When many atoms interact, collective effects can dominate the system with the character of the collective effect depending on whether the atomic separation leads to near field or far field coupling. As an example of the case where the atoms are in the far field, the line broadening of transitions and strong deviations from the Beer-Lambert law in a diffuse gas will be presented. As an example of near field collective behavior, the radiative properties of a Rydberg gas will be presented. Based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1404419-PHY in collaboration with R.T. Sutherland.

  14. On Atom-Bond Connectivity Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Xing, Rundan

    2011-02-01

    The atom-bond connectivity (ABC) index, introduced by Estrada et al. in 1998, displays an excellent correlation with the formation heat of alkanes. We give upper bounds for this graph invariant using the number of vertices, the number of edges, the Randíc connectivity indices, and the first Zagreb index. We determine the unique tree with the maximum ABC index among trees with given numbers of vertices and pendant vertices, and the n-vertex trees with the maximum, and the second, the third, and the fourth maximum ABC indices for n ≥ 6.

  15. Atomic Spectra Bibliography Databases at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains three online Bibliographic Databases (BD) [http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData/ASBib1/index.html]: -- Atomic Energy Levels and Spectra (AEL BD), Atomic Transition Probability (ATP BD), and Atomic Spectral Line Broadening (ALB BD). This year marks new releases of these BDs -- AEL BD v.2.0, ATP BD v.9.0, and ALB DB v.3.0. These releases incorporate significant improvements in the quantity and quality of bibliographic data since the previous versions published first in 2006. The total number of papers in the three DBs grew from 20,000 to 30,000. The data search is now made easier, and the returned content is enriched with direct links to online journal articles and universal Digital Object Identifiers. Statistics show a nearly constant flow of new publications on atomic spectroscopy, about 600 new papers published each year since 1968. New papers are inserted in our BDs every two weeks on average.

  16. Permutation-invariant distance between atomic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Grégoire; Maillet, Jean-Bernard; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    We present a permutation-invariant distance between atomic configurations, defined through a functional representation of atomic positions. This distance enables us to directly compare different atomic environments with an arbitrary number of particles, without going through a space of reduced dimensionality (i.e., fingerprints) as an intermediate step. Moreover, this distance is naturally invariant through permutations of atoms, avoiding the time consuming associated minimization required by other common criteria (like the root mean square distance). Finally, the invariance through global rotations is accounted for by a minimization procedure in the space of rotations solved by Monte Carlo simulated annealing. A formal framework is also introduced, showing that the distance we propose verifies the property of a metric on the space of atomic configurations. Two examples of applications are proposed. The first one consists in evaluating faithfulness of some fingerprints (or descriptors), i.e., their capacity to represent the structural information of a configuration. The second application concerns structural analysis, where our distance proves to be efficient in discriminating different local structures and even classifying their degree of similarity.

  17. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  18. Lasers, Cold Atoms and Atomic Clocks: Realizing the Second Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calonico, Davide

    2013-09-01

    The time is the physical quantity that mankind could measure with the best accuracy, thanks to the properties of the atomic physics, as the present definition of time is based on atomic energy transitions. This short review gives some basic information on the heart of the measurement of time in the contemporary world, i.e. the atomic clocks, and some trends related.

  19. Building Numbers from Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  20. Are Numbers Gendered?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkie, James E. B.; Bodenhausen, Galen V.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the possibility that nonsocial, highly generic concepts are gendered. Specifically, we investigated the gender connotations of Arabic numerals. Across several experiments, we show that the number 1 and other odd numbers are associated with masculinity, whereas the number 2 and other even numbers are associated with femininity, in ways…

  1. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  2. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  3. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  4. Atoms, Stars, and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1991-09-01

    1. Introducing stars and nebulae; 2. Stellar rainbows; 3. Atoms and molecules; 4. The climate in a stellar atmosphere; 5. Analysing the stars; 6. Dwarfs, giants, and supergiants; 7. What makes a star shine?; 8. The youth and middle age of a common star; 9. Wind, dust and pulsations; 10. A star's last hurray?; 11. The interstellar medium and gaseous nebulae; 12. Uncommon stars and their sometimes violent behaviour; 13. High energy astronomy.

  5. Atomic Josephson Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaurov, Vitaliy; Kuklov, Anatoly

    2006-03-01

    We show that atomic Josephson vortices [1] in a quasi-1D atomic junction can be controllably manipulated by imposing a tunneling bias current created by a difference of chemical potentials on the atomic BEC waveguides forming the junction. This effect, which has its origin in the Berry phase structure of a vortex, turns out to be very robust in the whole range of the parameters where such vortices can exist [2]. Acceleration of the vortex up to a certain threshold speed, determined by the strength of the Josephson coupling, results in the phase slip causing switching of the vorticity. This effect is directly related to the interconversion [1], when slow variation of the coupling can cause transformation of the vortex into the dark soliton and vice verse. We also propose that a Josephson vortex can be created by the phase imprinting technique and can be identified by a specific tangential feature in the interference picture produced by expanding clouds released from the waveguides [2]. [1] V. M. Kaurov , A. B. Kuklov, Phys. Rev. A 71, 11601(R) (2005). [2] V. M. Kaurov , A. B. Kuklov cond-mat/0508342

  6. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  7. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  8. Number Sense Made Simple Using Number Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Hui Fang Huang; Marinas, Carol; Furner, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights investigating intriguing number patterns utilising an emerging technology called the Square Tool. Mathematics teachers of grades K-12 will find the Square Tool useful in making connections and bridging the gap from the concrete to the abstract. Pattern recognition helps students discover various mathematical concepts. With…

  9. Rapid prototyping of versatile atom chips for atom interferometry applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, Brian; Squires, Matthew; Olson, Spencer; Kroese, Bethany; Imhof, Eric; Kohn, Rudolph; Stuhl, Benjamin; Schramm, Stacy; Stickney, James

    2016-05-01

    We present recent advances in the manipulation of ultracold atoms with ex-vacuo atom chips (i.e. atom chips that are not inside to the UHV chamber). Details will be presented of an experimental system that allows direct bonded copper (DBC) atom chips to be removed and replaced in minutes, requiring minimal re-optimization of parameters. This system has been used to create Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as magnetic waveguides with precisely tunable axial parameters, allowing double wells, pure harmonic confinement, and modified harmonic traps. We investigate the effects of higher order magnetic field contributions to the waveguide, and the implications for confined atom interferometry.

  10. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  11. Atomizer with liquid spray quenching

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Osborne, Matthew G.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    1998-04-14

    Method and apparatus for making metallic powder particles wherein a metallic melt is atomized by a rotating disk or other atomizer at an atomizing location in a manner to form molten droplets moving in a direction away from said atomizing location. The atomized droplets pass through a series of thin liquid quenching sheets disposed in succession about the atomizing location with each successive quenching sheet being at an increasing distance from the atomizing location. The atomized droplets are incrementally cooled and optionally passivated as they pass through the series of liquid quenching sheets without distorting the atomized droplets from their generally spherical shape. The atomized, cooled droplets can be received in a chamber having a collection wall disposed outwardly of the series of liquid quenching sheets. A liquid quenchant can be flowed proximate the chamber wall to carry the cooled atomized droplets to a collection chamber where atomized powder particles and the liquid quenchant are separated such that the liquid quenchant can be recycled.

  12. Atomizer with liquid spray quenching

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Osborne, M.G.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1998-04-14

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for making metallic powder particles wherein a metallic melt is atomized by a rotating disk or other atomizer at an atomizing location in a manner to form molten droplets moving in a direction away from said atomizing location. The atomized droplets pass through a series of thin liquid quenching sheets disposed in succession about the atomizing location with each successive quenching sheet being at an increasing distance from the atomizing location. The atomized droplets are incrementally cooled and optionally passivated as they pass through the series of liquid quenching sheets without distorting the atomized droplets from their generally spherical shape. The atomized, cooled droplets can be received in a chamber having a collection wall disposed outwardly of the series of liquid quenching sheets. A liquid quenchant can be flowed proximate the chamber wall to carry the cooled atomized droplets to a collection chamber where atomized powder particles and the liquid quenchant are separated such that the liquid quenchant can be recycled. 6 figs.

  13. The International Atomic Energy Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II inaugurated a new era in world history, the atomic age. After the war, the Soviet Union, eager to develop the same military capabilities as those demonstrated by the United States, soon rivaled the U.S. as an atomic and nuclear superpower. Faced by the possibility of…

  14. Lasers, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. Basic information for understanding the laser is provided including discussion of the electromagnetic spectrum, radio waves, light and the atom, coherent light, controlled…

  15. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  16. Atom counting in HAADF STEM using a statistical model-based approach: methodology, possibilities, and inherent limitations.

    PubMed

    De Backer, A; Martinez, G T; Rosenauer, A; Van Aert, S

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper, a statistical model-based method to count the number of atoms of monotype crystalline nanostructures from high resolution high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images is discussed in detail together with a thorough study on the possibilities and inherent limitations. In order to count the number of atoms, it is assumed that the total scattered intensity scales with the number of atoms per atom column. These intensities are quantitatively determined using model-based statistical parameter estimation theory. The distribution describing the probability that intensity values are generated by atomic columns containing a specific number of atoms is inferred on the basis of the experimental scattered intensities. Finally, the number of atoms per atom column is quantified using this estimated probability distribution. The number of atom columns available in the observed STEM image, the number of components in the estimated probability distribution, the width of the components of the probability distribution, and the typical shape of a criterion to assess the number of components in the probability distribution directly affect the accuracy and precision with which the number of atoms in a particular atom column can be estimated. It is shown that single atom sensitivity is feasible taking the latter aspects into consideration. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Equilibrium vortex lattices of a binary rotating atomic Bose–Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Biao; Wang, Lin-Xue; Chen, Guang-Ping

    We perform a detailed numerical study of the equilibrium ground-state structures of a binary rotating Bose–Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses. Our results show that the ground-state distribution and its related vortex configurations are complex events that differ markedly depending strongly on the strength of rotation frequency, as well as on the ratio of atomic masses. We also discuss the structures and radii of the clouds, the number and the size of the core region of the vortices, as a function of the rotation frequency, and of the ratio of atomic masses, and the analytical results agree well with ourmore » numerical simulations. This work may open an alternate way in the quantum control of the binary rotating quantum gases with unequal atomic masses. - Highlights: • A binary quantum gases with unequal atomic masses is considered. • Effects of the ratio of atomic masses and rotation frequency are discussed in full parameter space. • The detailed information about both the cloud and vortices are also discussed.« less

  18. Atomic structure of water/Au, Ag, Cu and Pt atomic junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-08

    Much progress has been made in understanding the transport properties of atomic-scale conductors. We prepared atomic-scale metal contacts of Cu, Ag, Au and Pt using a mechanically controllable break junction method at 10 K in a cryogenic vacuum. Water molecules were exposed to the metal atomic contacts and the effect of molecular adsorption was investigated by electronic conductance measurements. Statistical analysis of the electronic conductance showed that the water molecule(s) interacted with the surface of the inert Au contact and the reactive Cu ant Pt contacts, where molecular adsorption decreased the electronic conductance. A clear conductance signature of water adsorption was not apparent at the Ag contact. Detailed analysis of the conductance behaviour during a contact-stretching process indicated that metal atomic wires were formed for the Au and Pt contacts. The formation of an Au atomic wire consisting of low coordination number atoms leads to increased reactivity of the inert Au surface towards the adsorption of water.

  19. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  20. Uranium isotopes quantitatively determined by modified method of atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. H.

    1967-01-01

    Hollow-cathode discharge tubes determine the quantities of uranium isotopes in a sample by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dissociation of the uranium atoms allows a large number of ground state atoms to be produced, absorbing the incident radiation that is different for the two major isotopes.

  1. Introduction to the Contributions of A. Temkin and R. J. Drachman to Atomic Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Their work, as is the work of most atomic theorists, is concerned with solving the Schroedinger equation accurately for wave function in cases where there is no exact analytical solution. In particular, Temkin is associated with electron scattering from atoms and ions. When he started there already were a number of methods to study the scattering of electrons from atoms.

  2. Numbers and brains.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R

    2017-12-01

    The representation of discrete and continuous quantities appears to be ancient and pervasive in animal brains. Because numbers are the natural carriers of these representations, we may discover that in brains, it's numbers all the way down.

  3. AtomDB: Expanding an Accessible and Accurate Atomic Database for X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall

    Since its inception in 2001, the AtomDB has become the standard repository of accurate and accessible atomic data for the X-ray astrophysics community, including laboratory astrophysicists, observers, and modelers. Modern calculations of collisional excitation rates now exist - and are in AtomDB - for all abundant ions in a hot plasma. AtomDB has expanded beyond providing just a collisional model, and now also contains photoionization data from XSTAR as well as a charge exchange model, amongst others. However, building and maintaining an accurate and complete database that can fully exploit the diagnostic potential of high-resolution X-ray spectra requires further work. The Hitomi results, sadly limited as they were, demonstrated the urgent need for the best possible wavelength and rate data, not merely for the strongest lines but for the diagnostic features that may have 1% or less of the flux of the strong lines. In particular, incorporation of weak but powerfully diagnostic satellite lines will be crucial to understanding the spectra expected from upcoming deep observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton, as well as the XARM and Athena satellites. Beyond incorporating this new data, a number of groups, both experimental and theoretical, have begun to produce data with errors and/or sensitivity estimates. We plan to use this to create statistically meaningful spectral errors on collisional plasmas, providing practical uncertainties together with model spectra. We propose to continue to (1) engage the X-ray astrophysics community regarding their issues and needs, notably by a critical comparison with other related databases and tools, (2) enhance AtomDB to incorporate a large number of satellite lines as well as updated wavelengths with error estimates, (3) continue to update the AtomDB with the latest calculations and laboratory measurements, in particular velocity-dependent charge exchange rates, and (4) enhance existing tools, and create new ones as needed to

  4. Reform by the Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanford, Terry; White, Kathleen

    1991-01-01

    Although numbers such as average test scores or dropout rates can capture part of a school system's success or failure, school statistics seldom tell the whole story. School board members should realize that numbers might measure compliance or process, rather than improvement. Also, improvements in numbers might reflect changes in assessment…

  5. Discovery: Prime Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    Prime numbers are important as the building blocks for the set of all natural numbers, because prime factorisation is an important and useful property of all natural numbers. Students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c. 276-194 BC. Eratosthenes…

  6. The Numbered Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissner, Emily

    2000-01-01

    Describes the activity of numbering trees in which students number trees or find the numbered trees and observe other features according to class time. This activity aims to increase student tracking, mapping, and writing skills and integrate them with math skills. Suggests follow up activities that focus on reading, writing, and language skills.…

  7. Sum-Difference Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Yixun

    2010-01-01

    Starting with an interesting number game sometimes used by school teachers to demonstrate the factorization of integers, "sum-difference numbers" are defined. A positive integer n is a "sum-difference number" if there exist positive integers "x, y, w, z" such that n = xy = wz and x ? y = w + z. This paper characterizes all sum-difference numbers…

  8. The Remarkable Number "1"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, G. Donald

    2014-01-01

    In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God…

  9. Estimating Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  10. Doping of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid progress in atom manipulation technology, atomic chain electronics would not be a dream, where foreign atoms are placed on a substrate to form a chain, and its electronic properties are designed by controlling the lattice constant d. It has been shown theoretically that a Si atomic chain is metallic regardless of d and that a Mg atomic chain is semiconducting or insulating with a band gap modified with d. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along the chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome this dilemma, we may place a dopant atom beside the chain at every N lattice periods (N > 1). Because of the periodic arrangement of dopant atoms, we can avoid the unwanted Anderson localization. Moreover, since the dopant atoms do not constitute the chain, the overlap interaction between them is minimized, and the band structure modification can be made smallest. Some tight-binding results will be discussed to demonstrate the present idea.

  11. Chameleon induced atomic afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare

    2010-11-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  12. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  13. Generalizing Atoms in Constraint Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, C. David, Jr.; Frisch, Alan M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the generalization of atomic formulas, or atoms, that are augmented with constraints on or among their terms. The atoms may also be viewed as definite clauses whose antecedents express the constraints. Atoms are generalized relative to a body of background information about the constraints. This paper first examines generalization of atoms with only monadic constraints. The paper develops an algorithm for the generalization task and discusses algorithm complexity. It then extends the algorithm to apply to atoms with constraints of arbitrary arity. The paper also presents semantic properties of the generalizations computed by the algorithms, making the algorithms applicable to such problems as abduction, induction, and knowledge base verification. The paper emphasizes the application to induction and presents a pac-learning result for constrained atoms.

  14. Heat transport through atomic contacts.

    PubMed

    Mosso, Nico; Drechsler, Ute; Menges, Fabian; Nirmalraj, Peter; Karg, Siegfried; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2017-05-01

    Heat transport and dissipation at the nanoscale severely limit the scaling of high-performance electronic devices and circuits. Metallic atomic junctions serve as model systems to probe electrical and thermal transport down to the atomic level as well as quantum effects that occur in one-dimensional (1D) systems. Whereas charge transport in atomic junctions has been studied intensively in the past two decades, heat transport remains poorly characterized because it requires the combination of a high sensitivity to small heat fluxes and the formation of stable atomic contacts. Here we report heat-transfer measurements through atomic junctions and analyse the thermal conductance of single-atom gold contacts at room temperature. Simultaneous measurements of charge and heat transport reveal the proportionality of electrical and thermal conductance, quantized with the respective conductance quanta. This constitutes a verification of the Wiedemann-Franz law at the atomic scale.

  15. The adsorption of helium atoms on coronene cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzthaler, Thomas; Rasul, Bilal; Kuhn, Martin

    2016-08-14

    We report the first experimental study of the attachment of multiple foreign atoms to a cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The chosen PAH was coronene, C{sub 24}H{sub 12}, which was added to liquid helium nanodroplets and then subjected to electron bombardment. Using mass spectrometry, coronene cations decorated with helium atoms were clearly seen and the spectrum shows peaks with anomalously high intensities (“magic number” peaks), which represent ion-helium complexes with added stability. The data suggest the formation of a rigid helium layer consisting of 38 helium atoms that completely cover both faces of the coronene ion. Additional magic numbers canmore » be seen for the further addition of 3 and 6 helium atoms, which are thought to attach to the edge of the coronene. The observation of magic numbers for the addition of 38 and 44 helium atoms is in good agreement with a recent path integral Monte Carlo prediction for helium atoms on neutral coronene. An understanding of how atoms and molecules attach to PAH ions is important for a number of reasons including the potential role such complexes might play in the chemistry of the interstellar medium.« less

  16. Liquid atomization in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missoum, Azzedine

    An experimental investigation of the atomization of a round liquid jet by coaxial, costream injection into a supersonic, Mach 1.5 air flow is reported. Extensive flow visualization was conducted using schlieren/shadowgraph, flash photography, and short duration (ns) laser imaging. The finer details of the jet were revealed when viewed under high magnification with the help of a microscope. The liquid and air pressures were varied individually. Photographic evidence indicates the presence of three regions within the liquid jet: a primary region enclosed by the first shock cell where the primary breakup occurs, a secondary region in which the jet is totally broken because of its interaction with the supersonic wave structure, and a third, subsonic region further downstream. It was found that the breakup mechanism of liquid jets in supersonic airstreams is quite complex. The breakup seems to be initiated by the growth of the turbulent structure on the liquid surface and the subsequent detachment of the three-dimensional structure as fine droplets by the intense shear at the liquid-gas interface. This seems to confirm the boundary layer stripping mechanism. The liquid jet expands into a bubble like formation as it interacts with the first set of waves. Higher liquid injection pressures resulted in higher initial spray angles. The liquid jet displayed a geometry strongly dependent on the pressure distribution resulting from the wave structure present in the supersonic jet. Droplet size and velocity distributions were measured by the P/DPA (Phase/Doppler Particle Analyzer) system. The Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) was measured at several axial and radial locations at various liquid and air pressures. The SMD shows a decrease with increase in both the air-to-liquid mass flow ratio and the Weber number. The drop size decreased towards the outer edges of the jet. The results lead one to conclude that the coaxial, coflowing configuration is very attractive for atomizing

  17. Directed Atom-by-Atom Assembly of Dopants in Silicon.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Bethany M; Song, Jiaming; Sims, Hunter; Troparevsky, M Claudia; Humble, Travis S; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Snijders, Paul C; Lupini, Andrew R

    2018-05-17

    The ability to controllably position single atoms inside materials is key for the ultimate fabrication of devices with functionalities governed by atomic-scale properties. Single bismuth dopant atoms in silicon provide an ideal case study in view of proposals for single-dopant quantum bits. However, bismuth is the least soluble pnictogen in silicon, meaning that the dopant atoms tend to migrate out of position during sample growth. Here, we demonstrate epitaxial growth of thin silicon films doped with bismuth. We use atomic-resolution aberration-corrected imaging to view the as-grown dopant distribution and then to controllably position single dopants inside the film. Atomic-scale quantum-mechanical calculations corroborate the experimental findings. These results indicate that the scanning transmission electron microscope is of particular interest for assembling functional materials atom-by-atom because it offers both real-time monitoring and atom manipulation. We envision electron-beam manipulation of atoms inside materials as an achievable route to controllable assembly of structures of individual dopants.

  18. Are numbers gendered?

    PubMed

    Wilkie, James E B; Bodenhausen, Galen V

    2012-05-01

    We examined the possibility that nonsocial, highly generic concepts are gendered. Specifically, we investigated the gender connotations of Arabic numerals. Across several experiments, we show that the number 1 and other odd numbers are associated with masculinity, whereas the number 2 and other even numbers are associated with femininity, in ways that influence judgments of stimuli arbitrarily paired with numerical cues; specifically, babies' faces and foreign names were more likely to be judged as "male" when paired with odd versus even numbers. The power of logically irrelevant numerical stimuli to connote masculinity or femininity reflects the pervasiveness of gender as a social scaffolding for generating understandings of abstract concepts.

  19. Estimating large numbers.

    PubMed

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-07-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions predict a log-to-linear shift: People will either place numbers linearly or will place numbers according to a compressive logarithmic or power-shaped function (Barth & Paladino, ; Siegler & Opfer, ). While about half of people did estimate numbers linearly over this range, nearly all the remaining participants placed 1 million approximately halfway between 1 thousand and 1 billion, but placed numbers linearly across each half, as though they believed that the number words "thousand, million, billion, trillion" constitute a uniformly spaced count list. Participants in this group also tended to be optimistic in evaluations of largely ineffective political strategies, relative to linear number-line placers. The results indicate that the surface structure of number words can heavily influence processes for dealing with numbers in this range, and it can amplify the possibility that analogous surface regularities are partially responsible for parallel phenomena in children. In addition, these results have direct implications for lawmakers and scientists hoping to communicate effectively with the public. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. Enhancing optical nonreciprocity by an atomic ensemble in two coupled cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L. N.; Wang, Z. H.; Li, Yong

    2018-05-01

    We study the optical nonreciprocal propagation in an optical molecule of two coupled cavities with one of them interacting with a two-level atomic ensemble. The effect of increasing the number of atoms on the optical isolation ratio of the system is studied. We demonstrate that the significant nonlinearity supplied by the coupling of the atomic ensemble with the cavity leads to the realization of greatly-enhanced optical nonreciprocity compared with the case of single atom.

  1. Strategic Applications of Ultra-Cold Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    journals or in conference proceedings (N/A for none) 68.00Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Wolfgang Ketterle: New Frontiers with...Helmerson, V.S. Bagnato (American Institute of Physics, 2005) pp. 25-29. Wolfgang Ketterle: The Bose-Einstein Condensate- a Superfluid Gas of Coherent Atoms...Vuletic 0.10 No Wolfgang Ketterle 0.10 Yes David Pritchard 0.10 Yes Mara Prentiss 0.10 No 0.80FTE Equivalent: 8Total Number: Names of Under

  2. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-04-26

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale.

  3. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale. PMID:28443645

  4. Atom-by-atom assembly of defect-free one-dimensional cold atom arrays.

    PubMed

    Endres, Manuel; Bernien, Hannes; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-11-25

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a platform for the deterministic preparation of regular one-dimensional arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of more than 50 atoms in less than 400 milliseconds. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach may enable controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. A kilobyte rewritable atomic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalff, F. E.; Rebergen, M. P.; Fahrenfort, E.; Girovsky, J.; Toskovic, R.; Lado, J. L.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Otte, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of devices based on single dopants, such as the single-atom transistor, the single-spin magnetometer and the single-atom memory, has motivated the quest for strategies that permit the control of matter with atomic precision. Manipulation of individual atoms by low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy provides ways to store data in atoms, encoded either into their charge state, magnetization state or lattice position. A clear challenge now is the controlled integration of these individual functional atoms into extended, scalable atomic circuits. Here, we present a robust digital atomic-scale memory of up to 1 kilobyte (8,000 bits) using an array of individual surface vacancies in a chlorine-terminated Cu(100) surface. The memory can be read and rewritten automatically by means of atomic-scale markers and offers an areal density of 502 terabits per square inch, outperforming state-of-the-art hard disk drives by three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the chlorine vacancies are found to be stable at temperatures up to 77 K, offering the potential for expanding large-scale atomic assembly towards ambient conditions.

  6. Enhancing light-atom interactions via atomic bunching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-07-01

    There is a broad interest in enhancing the strength of light-atom interactions to the point where injecting a single photon induces a nonlinear material response. Here we show theoretically that sub-Doppler-cooled two-level atoms that are spatially organized by weak optical fields give rise to a nonlinear material response that is greatly enhanced beyond that attainable in a homogeneous gas. Specifically, in the regime where the intensity of the applied optical fields is much less than the off-resonance saturation intensity, we show that the third-order nonlinear susceptibility scales inversely with atomic temperature and, due to this scaling, can be two orders of magnitude larger than that of a homogeneous gas for typical experimental parameters. As a result, we predict that spatially bunched two-level atoms can exhibit single-photon nonlinearities. Our model is valid for all regimes of atomic bunching and simultaneously accounts for the backaction of the atoms on the optical fields. Our results agree with previous theoretical and experimental results for light-atom interactions that have considered only limited regimes of atomic bunching. For lattice beams tuned to the low-frequency side of the atomic transition, we find that the nonlinearity transitions from a self-focusing type to a self-defocusing type at a critical intensity. We also show that higher than third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities are significant in the regime where the dipole potential energy is on the order of the atomic thermal energy. We therefore find that it is crucial to retain high-order nonlinearities to accurately predict interactions of laser fields with spatially organized ultracold atoms. The model presented here is a foundation for modeling low-light-level nonlinear optical processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  7. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    We investigate non-destructive measurements of ultra-cold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. In particular, we pursue applications to dynamically controlled ultracold atoms. The dependence of the Faraday signal on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. In particular the destructivity per measurement is extremely low and we illustrate this by imaging the same cloud up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration. Adding dynamic changes to system parameters, we demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. The method can be implemented particularly easily in standard imaging systems by the insertion of an extra polarizing beam splitter. These results are steps towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  8. Atom Interferometry for Detection of Gravitational Waves: Progress and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy promises to provide a new window into the universe, collecting information about astrophysical systems and cosmology that is difficult or impossible to acquire by other methods. Detector designs based on atom interferometry offer a number of advantages over traditional approaches, including access to conventionally inaccessible frequency ranges and substantially reduced antenna baselines. Atomic physics techniques also make it possible to build a gravitational wave detector with a single linear baseline, potentially offering advantages in cost and design flexibility. In support of these proposals, recent progress in long baseline atom interferometry has enabled observation of matter wave interference with atomic wavepacket separations exceeding 10 cm and interferometer durations of more than 2 seconds. These results are obtained in a 10-meter drop tower incorporating large momentum transfer atom optics. This approach can provide ground-based proof-of-concept demonstrations of many of the technical requirements of both terrestrial and satellite gravitational wave detectors.

  9. Optical spectroscopy of atomic and molecular positronium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, A. P., Jr.

    2014-04-01

    Positronium (Ps) is a purely leptonic hydrogen-like atom formed from an electron and a positron. Since the interactions of electrons and positrons are thought to be almost entirely electromagnetic, precision measurements of the Ps energy levels should constitute a good test of QED theory. The ultimate precision is limited by the rapid annihilation of the various Ps states and the number of Ps atoms available. Much progress in making better Ps sources has been made since the 1950's when Ps was discovered and its principle characteristics measured in by the pioneering experiments of Martin Deutsch. The most notable milestones were the first reproducible schemes for making slow positrons and Ps in vacuum by Canter and his co-workers in the 1970's and the discovery of the enabling technology for accumulating slow positrons by Surko and co-workers in 1989. These techniques have made it possible to generate high density bursts of slow Ps atoms that has led to the production of di-positronium molecules, Ps2, and the observation of the Lyman-alpha-like transition in Ps2 at a wavelength of 251 nm predicted by Varga and co-workers. The possibilities for 1S-2S spectroscopy of triplet and singlet Ps with precisions relevant to the proton charge radius problem and efficient production of slow Rydberg Ps atoms useful for measuring Ps free fall are discussed.

  10. Atomic physics constraints on the X boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.; Nándori, István

    2018-04-01

    Recently, a peak in the light fermion pair spectrum at invariant q2≈(16.7MeV ) 2 has been observed in the bombardment of 7Li by protons. This peak has been interpreted in terms of a protophobic interaction of fermions with a gauge boson (X boson) of invariant mass ≈16.7 MeV which couples mainly to neutrons. High-precision atomic physics experiments aimed at observing the protophobic interaction need to separate the X boson effect from the nuclear-size effect, which is a problem because of the short range of the interaction (11.8 fm), which is commensurate with a "nuclear halo." Here we analyze the X boson in terms of its consequences for both electronic atoms as well as muonic hydrogen and deuterium. We find that the most promising atomic systems where the X boson has an appreciable effect, distinguishable from a finite-nuclear-size effect, are muonic atoms of low and intermediate nuclear charge numbers.

  11. Single-atom cavity QED and optomicromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallquist, M.; Hammerer, K.; Zoller, P.; Genes, C.; Ludwig, M.; Marquardt, F.; Treutlein, P.; Ye, J.; Kimble, H. J.

    2010-02-01

    In a recent publication [K. Hammerer, M. Wallquist, C. Genes, M. Ludwig, F. Marquardt, P. Treutlein, P. Zoller, J. Ye, and H. J. Kimble, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 063005 (2009)] we have shown the possibility to achieve strong coupling of the quantized motion of a micron-sized mechanical system to the motion of a single trapped atom. In the proposed setup the coherent coupling between a SiN membrane and a single atom is mediated by the field of a high finesse cavity and can be much larger than the relevant decoherence rates. This makes the well-developed tools of cavity quantum electrodynamics with single atoms available in the realm of cavity optomechanics. In this article we elaborate on this scheme and provide detailed derivations and technical comments. Moreover, we give numerical as well as analytical results for a number of possible applications for transfer of squeezed or Fock states from atom to membrane as well as entanglement generation, taking full account of dissipation. In the limit of strong-coupling the preparation and verification of nonclassical states of a mesoscopic mechanical system is within reach.

  12. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems.

    PubMed

    van Frank, S; Bonneau, M; Schmiedmayer, J; Hild, S; Gross, C; Cheneau, M; Bloch, I; Pichler, T; Negretti, A; Calarco, T; Montangero, S

    2016-10-11

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit - the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  13. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations. PMID:27725688

  14. Large momentum transfer atomic interferometric gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Robert; Dorr, Joshua; Nelson, Karl; Parker, Richard; Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger

    2017-04-01

    Atom interferometry holds out significant promise as the basis for compact, low cost, high performance inertial sensing. Some light pulse atom interferometers are based on an atomic beam-splitter in which the interferometer paths separate at the velocity imparted by a two-photon (Raman) recoil event, resulting in narrow path separation and a corresponding high aspect ratio between the length and width of the interferometer. In contrast, proposals for large momentum transfer (LMT) offer paths to larger separation between interferometer arms, and aspect ratios approaching 1. Here, we demonstrate an LMT gyroscope based on a combination of Bragg and Bloch atomic transitions adding up to a total of 8 photons of momentum transfer. We discuss prospects for scalability to larger photon numbers where angular random walk (ARW) can be better than navigation-grade. This research was developed with funding from DARPA. The views, opinions, and/or findings contained herein are those of the presenters and should not be interpreted as representing the official views or policies of the DoD or the US Government.

  15. Universal Number Library

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, G. Scott

    This floating-point arithmetic library contains a software implementation of Universal Numbers (unums) as described by John Gustafson [1]. The unum format is a superset of IEEE 754 floating point with several advantages. Computing with unums provides more accurate answers without rounding errors, underflow or overflow. In contrast to fixed-sized IEEE numbers, a variable number of bits can be used to encode unums. This all allows number with only a few significant digits or with a small dynamic range to be represented more compactly.

  16. High Reynolds Number Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required are discussed. The operational characteristics and design features of the National Transonic Facility are reviewed.

  17. The Belgian repository of fundamental atomic data and stellar spectra (BRASS). I. Cross-matching atomic databases of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverick, M.; Lobel, A.; Merle, T.; Royer, P.; Martayan, C.; David, M.; Hensberge, H.; Thienpont, E.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Fundamental atomic parameters, such as oscillator strengths, play a key role in modelling and understanding the chemical composition of stars in the Universe. Despite the significant work underway to produce these parameters for many astrophysically important ions, uncertainties in these parameters remain large and can propagate throughout the entire field of astronomy. Aims: The Belgian repository of fundamental atomic data and stellar spectra (BRASS) aims to provide the largest systematic and homogeneous quality assessment of atomic data to date in terms of wavelength, atomic and stellar parameter coverage. To prepare for it, we first compiled multiple literature occurrences of many individual atomic transitions, from several atomic databases of astrophysical interest, and assessed their agreement. In a second step synthetic spectra will be compared against extremely high-quality observed spectra, for a large number of BAFGK spectral type stars, in order to critically evaluate the atomic data of a large number of important stellar lines. Methods: Several atomic repositories were searched and their data retrieved and formatted in a consistent manner. Data entries from all repositories were cross-matched against our initial BRASS atomic line list to find multiple occurrences of the same transition. Where possible we used a new non-parametric cross-match depending only on electronic configurations and total angular momentum values. We also checked for duplicate entries of the same physical transition, within each retrieved repository, using the non-parametric cross-match. Results: We report on the number of cross-matched transitions for each repository and compare their fundamental atomic parameters. We find differences in log(gf) values of up to 2 dex or more. We also find and report that 2% of our line list and Vienna atomic line database retrievals are composed of duplicate transitions. Finally we provide a number of examples of atomic spectral lines

  18. Homogeneous Atomic Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Yan, Zhenjie; Patel, Parth B.; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Yefsah, Tarik; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the creation of homogeneous Fermi gases of ultracold atoms in a uniform potential. In the momentum distribution of a spin-polarized gas, we observe the emergence of the Fermi surface and the saturated occupation of one particle per momentum state: the striking consequence of Pauli blocking in momentum space for a degenerate gas. Cooling a spin-balanced Fermi gas at unitarity, we create homogeneous superfluids and observe spatially uniform pair condensates. For thermodynamic measurements, we introduce a hybrid potential that is harmonic in one dimension and uniform in the other two. The spatially resolved compressibility reveals the superfluid transition in a spin-balanced Fermi gas, saturation in a fully polarized Fermi gas, and strong attraction in the polaronic regime of a partially polarized Fermi gas.

  19. Atomic Basic Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  20. Atoms in astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Aspects of electromagnetic radiation and atomic physics needed for an understanding of astronomical applications are explored. Although intended primarily for teachers, this brochure is written so that it can be distributed to students if desired. The first section, Basic Topics, is suitable for a ninth-grade general science class; the style is simple and repetitive, and no mathematics or physics background is required. The second section, Intermediate and Advanced Topics, requires a knowledge of the material in the first section and assumes a generally higher level of achievement and motivation on the part of the student. These latter topics might fit well into junior-level physics, chemistry, or earth-science courses. Also included are a glossary, a list of references and teaching aids, class exercises, and a question and answer section.

  1. Correlation of materials properties with the atomic density concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis that the number of atoms per unit volume, accurately calculable for any substance of known real density and chemical composition, various characterizing parameters (energy levels of electrons interacting among atoms of the same or different kinds, atomic mass, bond intensity) were chosen for study. A multiple exponential equation was derived to express the relationship. Various properties were examined, and correlated with the various parameters. Some of the properties considered were: (1) heat of atomization, (2) boiling point, (3) melting point, (4) shear elastic modulus of cubic crystals, (5) thermal conductivity, and (6) refractive index for transparent substances. The solid elements and alkali halides were the materials studied. It is concluded that the number of different properties can quantitively be described by a common group of parameters for the solid elements, and a wide variety of compounds.

  2. Sensible and Crazy Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, James

    2017-01-01

    Using a game-based context and concentrating explicitly on language, students in the early years are able to make sense about place value amid the vagaries of the English language in naming numbers. This conceptual approach to understanding place value allows students to further develop number strategies beyond counting by ones.

  3. The Fibonacci Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onstad, Torgeir

    1991-01-01

    After a brief historical account of Leonardo Pisano Fibonacci, some basic results concerning the Fibonacci numbers are developed and proved, and entertaining examples are described. Connections are made between the Fibonacci numbers and the Golden Ratio, biological nature, and other combinatorics examples. (MDH)

  4. Hyperquarks and generation number

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, Alfons J.; Schmid, Michael L.

    2005-03-01

    In a model in which quarks and leptons are built up from two spin-(1/2) preons as fundamental entities, a new class of fermionic bound states (hyperquarks) arises. It turns out that these hyperquarks are necessary to fulfill the 't Hooft anomaly constraint, which then links the number of fermionic generations to the number of colors and hypercolors.

  5. First Graders' Number Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jonathan N.; Tabor, Pamela D.; Wright, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    As young children make sense of mathematics, they begin to see with new eyes. What once was uncertain may now be determined. Objects become countable; fingers become tools; and numbers become more than just names. Educators revel in such developments--which mark significant progress toward more sophisticated understanding of number--and work…

  6. Genetics by the Numbers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Genetics by the Numbers Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Genetics by the Numbers By Chelsea ... New Genetics NIH's National DNA Day This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  7. Avogadro's Number Ferromagnetically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Avogadro's number, usually denoted by N[subscript A], plays a fundamental role in both physics and chemistry. It defines the extremely useful concept of the mole, which is the base unit of the amount of matter in the international system of units. The fundamental character of this number can also be illustrated by its appearance in the definitions…

  8. A rational approach to heavy-atom derivative screening

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M. Gordon; Radaev, Sergei; Sun, Peter D., E-mail: psun@nih.gov

    2010-04-01

    In order to overcome the difficulties associated with the ‘classical’ heavy-atom derivatization procedure, an attempt has been made to develop a rational crystal-free heavy-atom-derivative screening method and a quick-soak derivatization procedure which allows heavy-atom compound identification. Despite the development in recent times of a range of techniques for phasing macromolecules, the conventional heavy-atom derivatization method still plays a significant role in protein structure determination. However, this method has become less popular in modern high-throughput oriented crystallography, mostly owing to its trial-and-error nature, which often results in lengthy empirical searches requiring large numbers of well diffracting crystals. In addition, the phasingmore » power of heavy-atom derivatives is often compromised by lack of isomorphism or even loss of diffraction. In order to overcome the difficulties associated with the ‘classical’ heavy-atom derivatization procedure, an attempt has been made to develop a rational crystal-free heavy-atom derivative-screening method and a quick-soak derivatization procedure which allows heavy-atom compound identification. The method includes three basic steps: (i) the selection of likely reactive compounds for a given protein and specific crystallization conditions based on pre-defined heavy-atom compound reactivity profiles, (ii) screening of the chosen heavy-atom compounds for their ability to form protein adducts using mass spectrometry and (iii) derivatization of crystals with selected heavy-metal compounds using the quick-soak method to maximize diffraction quality and minimize non-isomorphism. Overall, this system streamlines the process of heavy-atom compound identification and minimizes the problem of non-isomorphism in phasing.« less

  9. Optical Thin Film Thickness Measurement for the Single Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Courtney; Frisbie, Dustin; Singh, Jaideep; Spinlab Team

    2017-09-01

    The Single Atom Microscope Project proposes an efficient, selective, and sensitive method to measure the 1022Ne+24 He ->1225 Mg + n reaction. This rare nuclear reaction is a source of neutrons for heavy element development through the slow neutron capture process. This method embeds Magnesium atoms in a solid neon film. The Magnesium atoms exhibit a shifted fluorescence spectrum allowing for the detection of individual fluorescence photons against the excitation light background. Currently, Ytterbium is used in place of Magnesium-25 because it has been more thoroughly studied than Magnesium and we expect it to have a brighter signal. To identify the signal emitted from the Ytterbium atoms, we need to quantify the amount of signal and background per atom in the neon film. We need to know the film thickness to find the number of atoms in the film to determine the amount of light emitted per atom. In preparation for the neon film measurement, I constructed an experiment to advance the understanding of what is required to optically measure a thin film by using a cover glass slide in place of the thin film. This preliminary experiment has determined a measurement method for finding the thickness of a neon thin film on a sapphire substrate. This work is supported by Michigan State University, U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1654610, and U.S. NSF REU.

  10. Thermally induced secondary atomization of droplet in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saptarshi; Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermal effects that lead to instability and break up in acoustically levitated vaporizing fuel droplets. For selective liquids, atomization occurs at the droplet equator under external heating. Short wavelength [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability for diesel and bio-diesel droplets triggers this secondary atomization. Vapor pressure, latent heat, and specific heat govern the vaporization rate and temperature history, which affect the surface tension gradient and gas phase density, ultimately dictating the onset of KH instability. We develop a criterion based on Weber number to define a condition for the inception of secondary atomization.

  11. Atomization of Impinging Droplets on Superheated Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Preston; Crockett, Julie; Maynes, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Water droplets impinging smooth superheated surfaces may be characterized by dynamic vapor bubbles rising to the surface, popping, and causing a spray of tiny droplets to erupt from the droplet. This spray is called secondary atomization. Here, atomization is quantified experimentally for water droplets impinging superheated superhydrophobic surfaces. Smooth hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces with varying rib and post microstructuring were explored. Each surface was placed on an aluminum heating block, and impingement events were captured with a high speed camera at 3000 fps. For consistency among tests, all events were normalized by the maximum atomization found over a range of temperatures on a smooth hydrophobic surface. An estimate of the level of atomization during an impingement event was created by quantifying the volume of fluid present in the atomization spray. Droplet diameter and Weber number were held constant, and atomization was found for a range of temperatures through the lifetime of the impinging droplet. The Leidenfrost temperature was also determined and defined to be the lowest temperature at which atomization ceases to occur. Both atomization and Leidenfrost temperature increase with decreasing pitch (distance between microstructures).

  12. Impinging jets atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, E. A.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the characteristics of the spray produced by an impinging-jet injector is presented. Predictions of the spray droplet size and distribution are obtained through studying the formation and disintegration of the liquid sheet formed by the impact of two cylindrical jets of the same diameter and momentum. Two breakup regimes of the sheet are considered depending on Weber number, with transition occurring at Weber numbers between 500 and 2000. In the lower Weber number regime, the breakup is due to Taylor cardioidal waves, while at Weber number higher than 2000, the sheet disintegration is by the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability waves. Theoretical expressions to predict the sheet thickness and shape are derived for the low Weber number breakup regime. An existing mathematical analysis of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of radially moving liquid sheets is adopted in the predictions of resultant drop sizes by sheet breakup at Weber numbers greater than 2000. Comparisons of present theoretical results with experimental measurements and empirical correlations reported in the literature reveal favorable agreement.

  13. Atomic Processes for XUV Lasers: Alkali Atoms and Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiduk, David Paul

    The development of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) lasers is dependent upon knowledge of processes in highly excited atoms. Described here are spectroscopy experiments which have identified and characterized certain autoionizing energy levels in core-excited alkali atoms and ions. Such levels, termed quasi-metastable, have desirable characteristics as upper levels for efficient, powerful XUV lasers. Quasi -metastable levels are among the most intense emission lines in the XUV spectra of core-excited alkalis. Laser experiments utilizing these levels have proved to be useful in characterizing other core-excited levels. Three experiments to study quasi-metastable levels are reported. The first experiment is vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy on the Cs 109 nm transitions using high-resolution laser techniques. This experiment confirms the identification of transitions to a quasi-metastable level, estimates transition oscillator strengths, and estimates the hyperfine splitting of the quasi-metastable level. The second experiment, XUV emission spectroscopy of Ca II and Sr II in a microwave-heated plasma, identifies transitions from quasi-metastable levels in these ions, and provides confirming evidence of their radiative, rather than autoionizing, character. In the third experiment, core-excited Ca II ions are produced by inner-shell photoionization of Ca with soft x-rays from a laser-produced plasma. This preliminary experiment demonstrated a method of creating large numbers of these highly-excited ions for future spectroscopic experiments. Experimental and theoretical evidence suggests the CA II 3{ rm p}^5 3d4s ^4 {rm F}^circ_{3/2 } quasi-metastable level may be directly pumped via a dipole ionization process from the Ca I ground state. The direct process is permitted by J conservation, and occurs due to configuration mixing in the final state and possibly the initial state as well. The experiments identifying and characterizing quasi-metastable levels are

  14. Atomic masses 1993. The 1993 atomic mass evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audi, G.; Wapstra, A. H.

    1993-11-01

    The 1993 atomic mass evaluation by G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra is documented. The resulting data files containing recommended values of atomic masses, obtained by experiment of systematics, and related data such as reaction and separation energies are described. The data files can be obtained through online services from several nuclear data centers or on magnetic tape, free of charge.

  15. Numbers in Action.

    PubMed

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL.

  16. Name that compound: The numbers game for CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and Halons

    DOE Data Explorer

    Blasing, T. J.; Jones, Sonja

    2012-02-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contain Carbon and some combination of Fluorine and Chlorine atoms. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) contain Hydrogen, Fluorine, and Carbon (no chlorine). Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) contain Hydrogen, Chlorine, Fluorine, and Carbon atoms. Hydrobromofluorocarbons (HBFCs) contain Hydrogen, Bromine, Fluorine, and Carbon atoms. Perfluorocarbons contain Fluorine, Carbon, and Bromine atoms, and some contain Chlorine and/or Hydrogen atoms. These compounds are often designated by a combination of letters and numbers (e.g., CFC-11, HCFC-142b). In the latter example, the lower-case b refers to an isomer, which has no relationship to the chemical formula (C2H3F2Cl), but designates a particular structural arrangement of the atoms included. For example, HCFC-142b identifies the isomer in which all three hydrogen atoms are attached to the same carbon atom, and the structural formula is written as CH3CF2Cl. By contrast, HCFC-142 (without the b) refers to an arrangement in which one carbon atom is attached to two hydrogen atoms and one chlorine atom, while the other carbon atom is attached to the third hydrogen atom and two fluorine atoms. Hence, it has a different structural formula (CH2ClCHF2).

  17. Partial Coordination Numbers in Binary Metallic Glasses (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-07

    structural differences related to relative atom size and quench rate. The magnitude of chemical interactions between the atoms, eij, might also influence...vious calculations.[2] A statistical approach is used to develop the Zij equations from the product of four terms: (1) the number of reference sites...within experimental scatter. The development of equations for Zij from the ECP model uses a statistical view of topology, and the Zij values

  18. Theory of atomic spectral emission intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yngström, Sten

    1994-07-01

    The theoretical derivation of a new spectral line intensity formula for atomic radiative emission is presented. The theory is based on first principles of quantum physics, electrodynamics, and statistical physics. Quantum rules lead to revision of the conventional principle of local thermal equilibrium of matter and radiation. Study of electrodynamics suggests absence of spectral emission from fractions of the numbers of atoms and ions in a plasma due to radiative inhibition caused by electromagnetic force fields. Statistical probability methods are extended by the statement: A macroscopic physical system develops in the most probable of all conceivable ways consistent with the constraining conditions for the system. The crucial role of statistical physics in transforming quantum logic into common sense logic is stressed. The theory is strongly supported by experimental evidence.

  19. In numbers we trust?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Scientists go to great lengths to ensure that data are collected and analysed properly, so why, asks Eve Marder, do they apply different standards to data about the number of times research papers have been cited and viewed? PMID:24692454

  20. Quantum random number generator

    DOEpatents

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  1. The Numbers Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustick, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes a simple activity that explores and reveals the principles of significant figures and scientific notation using a 500 gram bag of unpopped popcorn. Students must devise a method for determining the number of kernels in the bag. (DDR)

  2. Zero: A "None" Number?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Glenda J.; Walshaw, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the challenges students face in making sense of zero as a number. A range of different student responses to a computation problem involving zero reveal students' different understandings of zero.

  3. Low Reynolds Number Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    numbers. At high altitudes aircraft gas turbine engine fan, compressor, and turbine blades with their small chords encounter Reynolds numhers...light man-carrying/man-powered aircraft , minl-RPVs at low altitude, and wind turbines . Since the airfoil section forms the basic element in the...Wind turbine blades also require high aerodynamic efficiency and all-weather capabilities. The need for efficient low Reynolds number airfoils which

  4. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  5. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  6. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  7. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  8. Thin film atomic hydrogen detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Thin film and bead thermistor atomic surface recombination hydrogen detectors were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Devices were constructed on a thin Mylar film substrate. Using suitable Wheatstone bridge techniques sensitivities of 80 microvolts/2x10 to the 13th power atoms/sec are attainable with response time constants on the order of 5 seconds.

  9. The Stair-Step Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a model of a generic atom that is used to represent the movement of electrons from lower to higher levels and vice-versa due to excitation and de-excitation of the atom. As the process of de-excitation takes place, photons represented by colored ping-pong balls are emitted, indicating the emission of light. (MDH)

  10. Fuel Injector With Shear Atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, George W.; Mills, Virgil L.; Smith, Durward B., II; Beacom, William F.

    1995-01-01

    Atomizer for injecting liquid fuel into combustion chamber uses impact and swirl to break incoming stream of fuel into small, more combustible droplets. Slanted holes direct flow of liquid fuel to stepped cylindrical wall. Impact on wall atomizes liquid. Air flowing past vanes entrains droplets of liquid in swirling flow. Fuel injected at pressure lower than customarily needed.

  11. Atomic Spectroscopic Databases at NIST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, J.; Kramida, A. E.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2006-01-01

    We describe recent work at NIST to develop and maintain databases for spectra, transition probabilities, and energy levels of atoms that are astrophysically important. Our programs to critically compile these data as well as to develop a new database to compare plasma calculations for atoms that are not in local thermodynamic equilibrium are also summarized.

  12. Crystallized and amorphous vortices in rotating atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Fei; Fan, Heng; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Vortex is a topological defect with a quantized winding number of the phase in superfluids and superconductors. Here, we investigate the crystallized (triangular, square, honeycomb) and amorphous vortices in rotating atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) by using the damped projected Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The amorphous vortices are the result of the considerable deviation induced by the interaction of atomic-molecular vortices. By changing the atom-molecule interaction from attractive to repulsive, the configuration of vortices can change from an overlapped atomic-molecular vortices to carbon-dioxide-type ones, then to atomic vortices with interstitial molecular vortices, and finally into independent separated ones. The Raman detuning can tune the ratio of the atomic vortex to the molecular vortex. We provide a phase diagram of vortices in rotating atomic-molecular BECs as a function of Raman detuning and the strength of atom-molecule interaction. PMID:24573303

  13. Hyperthermal atomic oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Wu, Dongchuan

    1990-01-01

    Characterization of the transport properties of oxygen through silver was continued. Specifically, experiments measuring the transport through Ag(111), Ag(110), Ag(100) single crystals and through Ag0.05 Zr alloy were completed. In addition, experiments using glow discharge excitation of oxygen to assist in the transport were completed. It was found that the permeability through the different orientations of single crystal Ag was the same, but significant differences existed in the diffusivity. The experimental ratio of diffusivities, however, was in reasonable agreement with theoretical estimates. Since the solubilities of orientations must be the same, this suggests some problems with the assumption K = DS. The glow discharge experiments show that there is a substantial increase in transport (factor of six) when the upstream pressure is dissociated to some fraction of atoms (which have a much higher sticking coefficient). These results indicate that there is a significant surface limitation because of dissociative adsorption of the molecules. Experiments with the Ag0.05 Zr alloy and its high-grain boundary and defect density show a permeability of greater than a factor of two over ordinary polycrystalline Ag, but it is unclear as to whether this is because of enhanced transport through these defects or whether the Zr and defects on the surface increased the sticking coefficient and therefore the transport.

  14. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom’s angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light’s OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light–matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069766

  15. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  16. [Projection of prisoner numbers].

    PubMed

    Metz, Rainer; Sohn, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The past and future development of occupancy rates in prisons is of crucial importance for the judicial administration of every country. Basic factors for planning the required penal facilities are seasonal fluctuations, minimum, maximum and average occupancy as well as the present situation and potential development of certain imprisonment categories. As the prisoner number of a country is determined by a complex set of interdependent conditions, it has turned out to be difficult to provide any theoretical explanations. The idea accepted in criminology for a long time that prisoner numbers are interdependent with criminal policy must be regarded as having failed. Statistical and time series analyses may help, however, to identify the factors having influenced the development of prisoner numbers in the past. The analyses presented here, first describe such influencing factors from a criminological perspective and then deal with their statistical identification and modelling. Using the development of prisoner numbers in Hesse as an example, it has been found that modelling methods in which the independent variables predict the dependent variable with a time lag are particularly helpful. A potential complication is, however, that for predicting the number of prisoners the different dynamics in German and foreign prisoners require the development of further models.

  17. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.N.

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in thismore » publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.« less

  18. Atom-atom entanglement by single-photon detection.

    PubMed

    Slodička, L; Hétet, G; Röck, N; Schindler, P; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R

    2013-02-22

    A scheme for entangling distant atoms is realized, as proposed in the seminal paper by [C. Cabrillo et al., Phys. Rev. A 59, 1025 (1999)]. The protocol is based on quantum interference and detection of a single photon scattered from two effectively one meter distant laser cooled and trapped atomic ions. The detection of a single photon heralds entanglement of two internal states of the trapped ions with high rate and with a fidelity limited mostly by atomic motion. Control of the entangled state phase is demonstrated by changing the path length of the single-photon interferometer.

  19. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; ...

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a highmore » speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  20. Earthquake number forecasts testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Yan Y.

    2017-10-01

    We study the distributions of earthquake numbers in two global earthquake catalogues: Global Centroid-Moment Tensor and Preliminary Determinations of Epicenters. The properties of these distributions are especially required to develop the number test for our forecasts of future seismic activity rate, tested by the Collaboratory for Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP). A common assumption, as used in the CSEP tests, is that the numbers are described by the Poisson distribution. It is clear, however, that the Poisson assumption for the earthquake number distribution is incorrect, especially for the catalogues with a lower magnitude threshold. In contrast to the one-parameter Poisson distribution so widely used to describe earthquake occurrences, the negative-binomial distribution (NBD) has two parameters. The second parameter can be used to characterize the clustering or overdispersion of a process. We also introduce and study a more complex three-parameter beta negative-binomial distribution. We investigate the dependence of parameters for both Poisson and NBD distributions on the catalogue magnitude threshold and on temporal subdivision of catalogue duration. First, we study whether the Poisson law can be statistically rejected for various catalogue subdivisions. We find that for most cases of interest, the Poisson distribution can be shown to be rejected statistically at a high significance level in favour of the NBD. Thereafter, we investigate whether these distributions fit the observed distributions of seismicity. For this purpose, we study upper statistical moments of earthquake numbers (skewness and kurtosis) and compare them to the theoretical values for both distributions. Empirical values for the skewness and the kurtosis increase for the smaller magnitude threshold and increase with even greater intensity for small temporal subdivision of catalogues. The Poisson distribution for large rate values approaches the Gaussian law, therefore its skewness

  1. In-situ control system for atomization

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1995-06-13

    Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray. 3 figs.

  2. In-situ control system for atomization

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    1995-06-13

    Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray.

  3. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.; Balsavich, John

    1991-01-01

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  5. Colour by Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetherell, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This is an edited extract from the keynote address given by Dr. Chris Wetherell at the 26th Biennial Conference of the Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers Inc. The author investigates the surprisingly rich structure that exists within a simple arrangement of numbers: the times tables.

  6. Preschoolers' Number Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moomaw, Sally; Carr, Victoria; Boat, Mary; Barnett, David

    2010-01-01

    A child's demonstration of his conceptual understanding of number bodes well for his future success in school mathematics. As youngsters' thinking becomes more logical, they apply one-to-one correspondence relationships to quantification. Yet, reliable assessment of young children's mathematical ability is difficult because of social and emotional…

  7. Guess the Number of . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Housen, Monica

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Monica Housen describes how she uses Guess the Number of . . . , a game that develops estimation skills and persistence to provide a fun, to provide a meaningful experience for her high school students. Each week she displays objects in a clear plastic container, like those for pretzels sold in bulk. Students enter a…

  8. Introducing Complex Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudgian, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    One of the difficulties in any teaching of mathematics is to bridge the divide between the abstract and the intuitive. Throughout school one encounters increasingly abstract notions, which are more and more difficult to relate to everyday experiences. This article examines a familiar approach to thinking about negative numbers, that is an…

  9. Playing the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Some say that the educators now have a gender-stratified system of higher education, with nearly 60 percent of all undergraduates being women and fewer men attending each year. The battle for gender equity for women in higher education has been a long and contentious one. In the decades since, increasing numbers of women have gone to college, to…

  10. "Better than Their Numbers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses College Summit, a nonprofit effort centered around the premise that there is a sizable number of students who are more capable of college academics than their test scores and grade point averages suggest. Its four-day summer sessions are focused not on ramping up students' academic performance but in mining students'…

  11. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    even 1¢, the standard credit card rates would dominate the cost of the item. Thus, a number of parties have proposed support for microtransactions ...Millicent [14].) Both NetBill and cryptographic postage indicia are motivated by the idea of supporting microtransactions . Some of the design decisions made...for those systems can only be understood by the microtransaction requirement. However, a detailed discussion of microtransactions is beyond the scope

  12. Dynamics of atom-atom correlations in the Fermi problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, Massimo; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Plastina, Francesco; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2012-10-01

    We present a detailed perturbative study of the dynamics of several types of atom-atom correlations in the famous Fermi problem. This is an archetypal model to study micro-causality in the quantum domain, where two atoms, one initially excited and the other prepared in its ground state, interact with the vacuum electromagnetic field. The excitation can be transferred to the second atom via a flying photon, and various kinds of quantum correlations between the two are generated during this process. Among these, prominent examples are given by entanglement, quantum discord and non-local correlations. The aim of this paper is to analyze the role of the light cone in the emergence of such correlations.

  13. Making Record-efficiency SnS Solar Cells by Thermal Evaporation and Atomic Layer Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Rafael; Steinmann, Vera; Yang, Chuanxi; Hartman, Katy; Chakraborty, Rupak; Poindexter, Jeremy R.; Castillo, Mariela Lizet; Gordon, Roy; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-01-01

    Tin sulfide (SnS) is a candidate absorber material for Earth-abundant, non-toxic solar cells. SnS offers easy phase control and rapid growth by congruent thermal evaporation, and it absorbs visible light strongly. However, for a long time the record power conversion efficiency of SnS solar cells remained below 2%. Recently we demonstrated new certified record efficiencies of 4.36% using SnS deposited by atomic layer deposition, and 3.88% using thermal evaporation. Here the fabrication procedure for these record solar cells is described, and the statistical distribution of the fabrication process is reported. The standard deviation of efficiency measured on a single substrate is typically over 0.5%. All steps including substrate selection and cleaning, Mo sputtering for the rear contact (cathode), SnS deposition, annealing, surface passivation, Zn(O,S) buffer layer selection and deposition, transparent conductor (anode) deposition, and metallization are described. On each substrate we fabricate 11 individual devices, each with active area 0.25 cm2. Further, a system for high throughput measurements of current-voltage curves under simulated solar light, and external quantum efficiency measurement with variable light bias is described. With this system we are able to measure full data sets on all 11 devices in an automated manner and in minimal time. These results illustrate the value of studying large sample sets, rather than focusing narrowly on the highest performing devices. Large data sets help us to distinguish and remedy individual loss mechanisms affecting our devices. PMID:26067454

  14. Entanglement of 3000 atoms by detecting one photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    Quantum-mechanically correlated (entangled) states of many particles are of interest in quantum information, quantum computing and quantum metrology. In particular, entangled states of many particles can be used to overcome limits on measurements performed with ensembles of independent atoms (standard quantum limit). Metrologically useful entangled states of large atomic ensembles (spin squeezed states) have been experimentally realized. These states display Gaussian spin distribution functions with a non-negative Wigner quasiprobability distribution function. We report the generation of entanglement in a large atomic ensemble via an interaction with a very weak laser pulse; remarkably, the detection of a single photon prepares several thousand atoms in an entangled state. We reconstruct a negative-valued Wigner function, and verify an entanglement depth (the minimum number of mutually entangled atoms) that comprises 90% of the atomic ensemble containing 3100 atoms. Further technical improvement should allow the generation of more complex Schrödinger cat states, and of states the overcome the standard quantum limit.

  15. Use of Atomic Oxygen for the Determination of Document Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Klubnik, Larisa M.

    2003-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which normally is found only the near Earth space environment, causes oxidation and erosion of polymers on spacecraft. The development of technology to prevent this degradation has required NASA to develop ground laboratory facilities that generate atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen has also been found to be able to oxidize most types of ink from a variety of types of pens. The use of atomic oxygen to identify alteration of documents has been investigated and is reported. Results of testing indicates that for many types of ink, pen, and paper, identification of document alteration of pen and ink numbers and evidence of alteration can be made visible by exposing the questionable writing to atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen provides discrimination because different inks may oxidize at different rates, the amount of time between delayed alteration may add to ink thickness at crossings, and the end of pen strokes tend to have much thicker ink deposits than the rest of the character. Examples and techniques of using atomic oxygen to identify document alteration indicate that the technology can, in many but not all cases, provide discrimination between original and altered documents.

  16. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, S.; Univ. of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai; ...

    2016-10-25

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop in this paper a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms,more » Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Finally, comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.« less

  17. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Nordlund, K; Djurabekova, F; Zhang, Y; Velisa, G; Wang, T S

    2016-10-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop here a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms, Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.

  18. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Zhang, Y.; Velisa, G.; Wang, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop here a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms, Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.

  19. Influence of spray nozzle shape upon atomization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniuga, Marius; Mihai, Ioan

    2016-12-01

    The atomization process is affected by a number of operating parameters (pressure, viscosity, temperature, etc.) [1-6] and the adopted constructive solution. In this article are compared parameters of atomized liquid jet with two nozzles that have different lifespan, one being new and the other one out. The last statement shows that the second nozzle was monitored as time of operation on the one hand and on the other hand, two dimensional nozzles have been analyzed using laser profilometry. To compare the experimental parameters was carried an experimental stand to change the period and pulse width in injecting liquid through two nozzles. Atomized liquid jets were photographed and filmed quickly. Images obtained were analyzed using a Matlab code that allowed to determine a number of parameters that characterize an atomized jet. Knowing the conditions and operating parameters of atomized jet, will establish a new wastewater nozzle block of parameter values that can be implemented in controller that provides dosing of the liquid injected. Experimental measurements to observe the myriad forms of atomized droplets to a wide range of operating conditions, realized using the electronic control module.

  20. Microcavities coupled to multilevel atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Sandra Isabelle; Evers, Jörg

    2011-11-01

    A three-level atom in the Λ configuration coupled to a microcavity is studied. The two transitions of the atom are assumed to couple to different counterpropagating mode pairs in the cavity. We analyze the dynamics both in the strong-coupling and the bad-cavity limits. We find that, compared to a two-level setup, the third atomic state and the additional control field modes crucially modify the system dynamics and enable more advanced control schemes. All results are explained using appropriate dressed-state and eigenmode representations. As potential applications, we discuss optical switching and turnstile operations and detection of particles close to the resonator surface.

  1. Studies of Highly Excited Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-02

    R 2 o i86 Chemical Physics Laboratory " i 0. R . Abrahamson i Vice President Physical Fciences Division ri" - c. -:OP...34 - men I IN RO U TI, .. . . . . . . . . . - .... .... o .. . . . o ......... - TI R SOPA T C LLIS OWZ.... ... . 6 ... ... oo ... .... ... .... . - A...by WA =W + 1ns- 0 (3a) and R = 1’np + ’(n-l)p (3b) .* 7_7. ’ P. z Atom 2 ’b y tom1 SA-846 1-30A FIGURE 2 GEOMETRY OF THE COLLISION OF TWO ATOMS Atom I

  2. NIST Databases on Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, J.; Wiese, W. L.; Martin, W. C.; Musgrove, A.; Fuhr, J. R.

    2002-11-01

    The NIST atomic and molecular spectroscopic databases now available on the World Wide Web through the NIST Physics Laboratory homepage include Atomic Spectra Database, Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms, Spectrum of Platinum Lamp for Ultraviolet Spectrograph Calibration, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Transition Probabilities, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Spectral Line Broadening, and Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database. The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) [1] offers evaluated data on energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities for atoms and atomic ions. Data are given for some 950 spectra and 70,000 energy levels. About 91,000 spectral lines are included, with transition probabilities for about half of these. Additional data resulting from our ongoing critical compilations will be included in successive new versions of ASD. We plan to include, for example, our recently published data for some 16,000 transitions covering most ions of the iron-group elements, as well as Cu, Kr, and Mo [2]. Our compilations benefit greatly from experimental and theoretical atomic-data research being carried out in the NIST Atomic Physics Division. A new compilation covering spectra of the rare gases in all stages of ionization, for example, revealed a need for improved data in the infrared. We have thus measured these needed data with our high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer [3]. An upcoming new database will give wavelengths and intensities for the stronger lines of all neutral and singly-ionized atoms, along with energy levels and transition probabilities for the persistent lines [4]. A critical compilation of the transition probabilities of Ba I and Ba II [5] has been completed and several other compilations of atomic transition probabilities are nearing completion. These include data for all spectra of Na, Mg, Al, and Si [6]. Newly compiled data for selected ions of Ne, Mg, Si and S, will form the basis for a new

  3. QED effects on individual atomic orbital energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozioł, Karol; Aucar, Gustavo A.

    2018-04-01

    Several issues, concerning QED corrections, that are important in precise atomic calculations are presented. The leading QED corrections, self-energy and vacuum polarization, to the orbital energy for selected atoms with 30 ≤ Z ≤ 118 have been calculated. The sum of QED and Breit contributions to the orbital energy is analyzed. It has been found that for ns subshells the Breit and QED contributions are of comparative size, but for np and nd subshells the Breit contribution takes a major part of the QED+Breit sum. It has also, been found that the Breit to leading QED contributions ratio for ns subshells is almost independent of Z. The Z-dependence of QED and Breit+QED contributions per subshell is shown. The fitting coefficients may be used to estimate QED effects on inner molecular orbitals. We present results of our calculations for QED contributions to orbital energy of valence ns-subshell for group 1 and 11 atoms and discuss about the reliability of these numbers by comparing them with experimental first ionization potential data.

  4. AtomPy: an open atomic-data curation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Manuel; Mendoza, Claudio; Boswell, Josiah S; Ajoku, Chukwuemeka

    2014-06-01

    We present a cloud-computing environment for atomic data curation, networking among atomic data providers and users, teaching-and-learning, and interfacing with spectral modeling software. The system is based on Google-Drive Sheets, Pandas (Python Data Analysis Library) DataFrames, and IPython Notebooks for open community-driven curation of atomic data for scientific and technological applications. The atomic model for each ionic species is contained in a multi-sheet Google-Drive workbook, where the atomic parameters from all known public sources are progressively stored. Metadata (provenance, community discussion, etc.) accompanying every entry in the database are stored through Notebooks. Education tools on the physics of atomic processes as well as their relevance to plasma and spectral modeling are based on IPython Notebooks that integrate written material, images, videos, and active computer-tool workflows. Data processing workflows and collaborative software developments are encouraged and managed through the GitHub social network. Relevant issues this platform intends to address are: (i) data quality by allowing open access to both data producers and users in order to attain completeness, accuracy, consistency, provenance and currentness; (ii) comparisons of different datasets to facilitate accuracy assessment; (iii) downloading to local data structures (i.e. Pandas DataFrames) for further manipulation and analysis by prospective users; and (iv) data preservation by avoiding the discard of outdated sets.

  5. Life with Four Billion Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Thomas

    2013-04-10

    Today it is commonplace to design and construct single silicon chips with billions of transistors. These are complex systems, difficult (but possible) to design, test, and fabricate. Remarkably, simple living systems can be assembled from a similar number of atoms, most of them in water molecules. In this talk I will present the current status of our attempts at full understanding and complexity reduction of one of the simplest living systems, the free-living bacterial species Mesoplasma florum. This 400 nm diameter cell thrives and replicates every 40 minutes with a genome of only 800 kilobases. Our recent experiments using transposonmore » gene knockouts identified 354 of 683 annotated genes as inessential in laboratory culture when inactivated individually. While a functional redesigned genome will certainly not remove all of those genes, this suggests that roughly half the genome can be removed in an intentional redesign. I will discuss our recent knockout results and methodology, and our future plans for Genome re-engineering using targeted knock-in/knock-out double recombination; whole cell metabolic models; comprehensive whole cell metabolite measurement techniques; creation of plug-and-play metabolic modules for the simplified organism; inherent and engineered biosafety control mechanisms. This redesign is part of a comprehensive plan to lay the foundations for a new discipline of engineering biology. Engineering biological systems requires a fundamentally different viewpoint from that taken by the science of biology. Key engineering principles of modularity, simplicity, separation of concerns, abstraction, flexibility, hierarchical design, isolation, and standardization are of critical importance. The essence of engineering is the ability to imagine, design, model, build, and characterize novel systems to achieve specific goals. Current tools and components for these tasks are primitive. Our approach is to create and distribute standard biological parts

  6. Quantum sized gold nanoclusters with atomic precision.

    PubMed

    Qian, Huifeng; Zhu, Manzhou; Wu, Zhikun; Jin, Rongchao

    2012-09-18

    properties of the nanocluster. Therefore, precise atomic control of nanoclusters is critically important: the nanometer precision typical of conventional nanoparticles is not sufficient. Atomically precise nanoclusters are represented by molecular formulas (e.g. Au(n)(SR)(m) for thiolate-protected ones, where n and m denote the respective number of gold atoms and ligands). Recently, major advances in the synthesis and structural characterization of molecular purity gold nanoclusters have made in-depth investigations of the size evolution of metal nanoclusters possible. Metal nanoclusters lie in the intermediate regime between localized atomic states and delocalized band structure in terms of electronic properties. We anticipate that future research on quantum-sized nanoclusters will stimulate broad scientific and technological interests in this special type of metal nanomaterial.

  7. Semiclassical approach to atomic decoherence by gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, D. A.; Varcoe, B. T. H.

    2018-01-01

    A new heuristic model of interaction of an atomic system with a gravitational wave (GW) is proposed. In it, the GW alters the local electromagnetic field of the atomic nucleus, as perceived by the electron, changing the state of the system. The spectral decomposition of the wave function is calculated, from which the energy is obtained. The results suggest a shift in the difference of the atomic energy levels, which will induce a small detuning to a resonant transition. The detuning increases with the quantum numbers of the levels, making the effect more prominent for Rydberg states. We performed calculations on the Rabi oscillations of atomic transitions, estimating how they would vary as a result of the proposed effect.

  8. Materials selection for long life in LEO: A critical evaluation of atomic oxygen testing with thermal atom systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Kuminecz, J.; Leger, L.; Nordine, P.

    1988-01-01

    The use of thermal atom test methods as a materials selection and screening technique for low-Earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft is critically evaluated. The chemistry and physics of thermal atom environments are compared with the LEO environment. The relative reactivities of a number of materials determined to be in thermal atom environments are compared to those observed in LEO and in high quality LEO simulations. Reaction efficiencies measured in a new type of thermal atom apparatus are one-hundredth to one-thousandth those observed in LEO, and many materials showing nearly identical reactivities in LEO show relative reactivities differing by as much as a factor of 8 in thermal atom systems. A simple phenomenological kinetic model for the reaction of oxygen atoms with organic materials can be used to explain the differences in reactivity in different environments. Certain specific thermal test environments can be used as reliable materials screening tools. Using thermal atom methods to predict material lifetime in LEO requires direct calibration of the method against LEO data or high quality simulation data for each material.

  9. The Remarkable Number "1"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. Donald

    2014-09-01

    In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God made the integers; all else is the work of man," has spawned a lively modern philosophical discussion, and this discussion begins by trying to get a philosophical handle on "1." This approach remains under heavy discussion, and is more-or-less unresolved (Frege in Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik (English: The foundations of arithmetic). Polhman, 1884). In this note, we consider the many facets of "one" in it many guises and applications. Nonetheless, "one" has multiple meanings, from the very practical to the abstract, from mathematics to science to basically everything. We examine here a mere slice of mathematical history with a focus on the most basic and applicable concept therein. It troubles many, particularly students, even today.

  10. 3D-Printing ‘Smarter’ Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2018-01-16

    Foams are, by nature, disordered materials studded with air pockets of varying sizes. Lack of control over the material’s architecture at the micrometer or nanometer scale can make it difficult to adjust the foam’s basic properties. But Eric Duoss and a team of Livermore researchers are using additive manufacturing to develop “smarter” silicone cushions. By architecting the structure at the micro scale, they are able to control macro-scale properties previously unachievable with foam materials.

  11. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lumin; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised ofmore » boron trioxide and sassolite (H 3BO 3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.« less

  12. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to Portland cement.

  13. Neutron Diffusion in a Space Lattice of Fissionable and Absorbing Materials

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Feynman, R. P.; Welton, T. A.

    1946-08-27

    Methods are developed for estimating the effect on a critical assembly of fabricating it as a lattice rather than in the more simply interpreted homogeneous manner. An idealized case is discussed supposing an infinite medium in which fission, elastic scattering and absorption can occur, neutrons of only one velocity present, and the neutron m.f.p. independent of position and equal to unity with the unit of length used.

  14. Prediction of the niche effect for single flat panels with or without attached sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Sgard, Franck; Atalla, Noureddine; Nélisse, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The sound transmission loss (STL) of a test sample measured in sound transmission facilities is affected by the opening in which it is located. This is called the niche effect. This paper uses a modal approach to study the STL of a rectangular plate with or without an attached porous material located inside a box-shaped niche. The porous material is modeled as a limp equivalent fluid. The proposed model is validated by comparison with finite element/boundary element computations. Using a condensation of the pressure fields in the niche, the niche effect is interpreted in terms of a modification of the modal blocked pressure fields acting on the panel induced by the front cavity and by a modification of the radiation efficiency of the panel modes due to the presence of the back cavity. The modal approach is then used to investigate the impact of (1) the presence of a porous material attached to the panel on the niche effect and (2) the niche effect on the assessment of the porous material insertion loss. A simplified model for the porous material based on a transfer matrix approach is also proposed to predict the STL of the system and its validity is discussed.

  15. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    DOE PAGES

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-05-11

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast-flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. Our purpose is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Thus, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flashmore » analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. Furthermore, the ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al 3Hf, radiation damage and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.« less

  16. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the costmore » of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.« less

  17. Fabrication of Organic Radar Absorbing Materials: A Report on the TIF Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    thickness, permittivity and permeability. The ability to measure the permittivity and permeability is an essential requirement for designing an optimised...absorber. And good optimisations codes are required in order to achieve the best possible absorber designs . In this report, the results from a...through measurement of their conductivity and permittivity at microwave frequencies. Methods were then developed for optimising the design of

  18. Development Radar Absorber Material using Rice Husk Carbon for Anechoic Chamber Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulpadrianto, Z.; Yohandri, Y.; Putra, A.

    2018-04-01

    The developments of radar technology in Indonesia are very strategic due to the vast territory and had a high-level cloud cover more than 55% of the time. The objective of this research is to develop radar technology facility in Indonesia using local natural resources. The target of this research is to present a low cost and satisfy quality of anechoic chambers. Anechoic chamber is a space designed to avoid reflection of EM waves from outside or from within the room. The reflection coefficient of the EM wave is influenced by the medium imposed by the EM wave. In laboratory experimental research has been done the development of material radar absorber using rice husk. The rice husk is activated using HCl and KOH by stirring using a magnetic stirrer for 1 Hours. The results of rice husk activation were measured using a Vector Network Analyzer by varying the thickness of the ingredients and the concentration of the activation agent. The VNA measurement is obtained reflection coefficient of -12dB and. -6.22dB for 1M HCL and KOH at thickness 10mm, respectively.

  19. Bottom-up approach for microstructure optimization of sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Perrot, Camille; Chevillotte, Fabien; Panneton, Raymond

    2008-08-01

    Results from a numerical study examining micro-/macrorelations linking local geometry parameters to sound absorption properties are presented. For a hexagonal structure of solid fibers, the porosity phi, the thermal characteristic length Lambda('), the static viscous permeability k(0), the tortuosity alpha(infinity), the viscous characteristic length Lambda, and the sound absorption coefficient are computed. Numerical solutions of the steady Stokes and electrical equations are employed to provide k(0), alpha(infinity), and Lambda. Hybrid estimates based on direct numerical evaluation of phi, Lambda('), k(0), alpha(infinity), Lambda, and the analytical model derived by Johnson, Allard, and Champoux are used to relate varying (i) throat size, (ii) pore size, and (iii) fibers' cross-section shapes to the sound absorption spectrum. The result of this paper tends to demonstrate the important effect of throat size in the sound absorption level, cell size in the sound absorption frequency selectivity, and fibers' cross-section shape in the porous material weight reduction. In a hexagonal porous structure with solid fibers, the sound absorption level will tend to be maximized with a 48+/-10 microm throat size corresponding to an intermediate resistivity, a 13+/-8 microm fiber radius associated with relatively small interfiber distances, and convex triangular cross-section shape fibers allowing weight reduction.

  20. Limitations of Cs3Bi2I9 as lead-free photovoltaic absorber materials.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Biplab; Wu, Bo; Mulmudi, Hemant Kumar; Guet, Claude; Weber, Klaus; Sum, Tze Chien; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G; Mathews, Nripan

    2018-01-17

    Lead (Pb) halide perovskites have attracted tremendous attention in recent years due to their rich optoelectronic properties, which have resulted in more than 22% power conversion efficient photovoltaics. Nevertheless, Pb-metal toxicity remains a huge hurdle for extensive applications of these compounds. Thus, alternative compounds with similar optoelectronic properties need to be developed. Bismuth possesses similar electronic structure as that of lead with the presence of ns2 electrons that exhibit rich structural variety as well as interesting optical and electronic properties. Herein, we critically assess Cs3Bi2I9 as a candidate for thin-film solar cell absorber. Despite a reasonable optical bandgap (~2eV) and absorption coefficient, the power conversion efficiency of the Cs3Bi2I9 mesoscopic solar cells was found to be severely lacking, limited by poor photocurrent density. The efficiency of the Cs3Bi2I9 solar cell can be slightly improved by changing the stoichiometry of the precursor solutions. We have investigated the possible reasons behind the poor performance of Cs3Bi2I9 by transient absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. Comparison between thin-films and single crystals highlights the presence of intrinsic defects in thin-films which act as nonradiative recombination centers.

  1. A theoretical and practical clarification on the calculation of reflection loss for microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Zhao, Kun; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Yue

    2018-01-01

    Reflection loss is usually calculated and reported as a function of the thickness of microwave absorption material. However, misleading results are often obtained since the principles imbedded in the popular methods contradict the fundamental facts that electromagnetic waves cannot be reflected in a uniform material except when there is an interface and that there are important differences between the concepts of characteristic impedance and input impedance. In this paper, these inconsistencies have been analyzed theoretically and corrections provided. The problems with the calculations indicate a gap between the background knowledge of material scientists and microwave engineers and for that reason a concise review of transmission line theory is provided along with the mathematical background needed for a deeper understanding of the theory of reflection loss. The expressions of gradient, divergence, Laplacian, and curl operators in a general orthogonal coordinate system have been presented including the concept of reciprocal vectors. Gauss's and Stokes's theorems have been related to Green's theorem in a novel way.

  2. Quantum storage of heralded polarization qubits in birefringent and anisotropically absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Christoph; Bussières, Félix; Afzelius, Mikael; Gisin, Nicolas

    2012-05-11

    Storage of quantum information encoded into heralded single photons is an essential constituent of long-distance quantum communication based on quantum repeaters and of optical quantum information processing. The storage of photonic polarization qubits is, however, difficult because many materials are birefringent and have polarization-dependent absorption. Here we present a simple scheme that eliminates these polarization effects, and we demonstrate it by storing heralded polarization qubits into a solid-state quantum memory. The quantum memory is implemented with a biaxial yttrium orthosilicate (Y2SiO5) crystal doped with rare-earth ions. Heralded single photons generated from a filtered spontaneous parametric down-conversion source are stored, and quantum state tomography of the retrieved polarization state reveals an average fidelity of 97.5±0.4%, which is significantly higher than what is achievable with a measure-and-prepare strategy.

  3. Learning atoms for materials discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Tang, Peizhe; Liu, Shenxiu; Pan, Jinbo; Yan, Qimin; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2018-06-26

    Exciting advances have been made in artificial intelligence (AI) during recent decades. Among them, applications of machine learning (ML) and deep learning techniques brought human-competitive performances in various tasks of fields, including image recognition, speech recognition, and natural language understanding. Even in Go, the ancient game of profound complexity, the AI player has already beat human world champions convincingly with and without learning from the human. In this work, we show that our unsupervised machines (Atom2Vec) can learn the basic properties of atoms by themselves from the extensive database of known compounds and materials. These learned properties are represented in terms of high-dimensional vectors, and clustering of atoms in vector space classifies them into meaningful groups consistent with human knowledge. We use the atom vectors as basic input units for neural networks and other ML models designed and trained to predict materials properties, which demonstrate significant accuracy. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  4. Contemporary Aspects of Atomic Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, R. G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The approach generally used in writing undergraduate textbooks on Atomic and Nuclear Physics presents this branch as historical in nature. Describes the concepts of astrophysics, plasma physics and spectroscopy as contemporary and intriguing for modern scientists. (PS)

  5. Coherent Radiation in Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Robert Tyler

    Over the last century, quantum mechanics has dramatically altered our understanding of light and matter. Impressively, exploring the relationship between the two continues to provide important insights into the physics of many-body systems. In this thesis, we add to this still growing field of study. Specifically, we discuss superradiant line-broadening and cooperative dipole-dipole interactions for cold atom clouds in the linear-optics regime. We then discuss how coherent radiation changes both the photon scattering properties and the excitation distribution of atomic arrays. After that, we explore the nature of superradiance in initially inverted clouds of multi-level atoms. Finally, we explore the physics of clouds with degenerate Zeeman ground states, and show that this creates quantum effects that fundamentally change the photon scattering of atomic ensembles.

  6. Atom beams split by gentle persuasion

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, R.

    1994-02-25

    Two different research teams have taken a big step toward atom interferometry. They have succeeded in splitting atomic beams by using atoms in spin states that neither absorb nor reemit laser light. By proper adjustment of experimental conditions, atoms are changed from one spin state to another, without passing through the intermediary excited state. The atoms in essence absorb momentum from the laser photons, without absorption or emission of photons. The change in momentum deflects atoms in the proper spin state.

  7. Laser Cooling of Neutral Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Assumptions and Scope ........oo......469....... II. Theory of the Resonance Radiation Force ........... 7 .’ Introduction o ..... - ... o7 General Explanation...areas. First, the initial velocity distribution for the atoms are needed. This information is developed in Ramsey’s book (Ref 12). Second, a general ...theory of the interaction of light with an atom is required. A general theory of resonance radiation pressure of light is developed from quantum

  8. Copper atomic-scale transistors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fangqing; Kavalenka, Maryna N; Röger, Moritz; Albrecht, Daniel; Hölscher, Hendrik; Leuthold, Jürgen; Schimmel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO 4 + H 2 SO 4 ) in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate). The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and -170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes ( U bias ) influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1 G 0 ( G 0 = 2e 2 /h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck's constant) or 2 G 0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors.

  9. Copper atomic-scale transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kavalenka, Maryna N; Röger, Moritz; Albrecht, Daniel; Hölscher, Hendrik; Leuthold, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO4 + H2SO4) in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate). The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and −170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes (U bias) influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1G 0 (G 0 = 2e2/h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck’s constant) or 2G 0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors. PMID:28382242

  10. A kilobyte rewritable atomic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalff, Floris; Rebergen, Marnix; Fahrenfort, Nora; Girovsky, Jan; Toskovic, Ranko; Lado, Jose; FernáNdez-Rossier, JoaquíN.; Otte, Sander

    The ability to manipulate individual atoms by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) opens op opportunities for storage of digital data on the atomic scale. Recent achievements in this direction include data storage based on bits encoded in the charge state, the magnetic state, or the local presence of single atoms or atomic assemblies. However, a key challenge at this stage is the extension of such technologies into large-scale rewritable bit arrays. We demonstrate a digital atomic-scale memory of up to 1 kilobyte (8000 bits) using an array of individual surface vacancies in a chlorine terminated Cu(100) surface. The chlorine vacancies are found to be stable at temperatures up to 77 K. The memory, crafted using scanning tunneling microscopy at low temperature, can be read and re-written automatically by means of atomic-scale markers, and offers an areal density of 502 Terabits per square inch, outperforming state-of-the-art hard disk drives by three orders of magnitude.

  11. Change of Energy of the Cubic Subnanocluster of Iron Under Influence of Interstitial and Substitutional Atoms.

    PubMed

    Nedolya, Anatoliy V; Bondarenko, Natalya V

    2016-12-01

    Energy change of an iron face-centred cubic subnanocluster was evaluated using molecular mechanics method depending on the position of a carbon interstitial atom and substitutional atoms of nickel. Calculations of all possible positions of impurity atoms show that the energy change of the system are discrete and at certain positions of the atoms are close to continuous.In terms of energy, when all impurity atoms are on the same edge of an atomic cluster, their positions are more advantageous. The presence of nickel atoms on the edge of a cubic cluster resulted in decrease of potential barrier for a carbon atom and decrease in energy in the whole cluster. A similar drift of a carbon atom from central octahedral interstitial site to the surface in the direction <011> occurred under the influence of surface factors.Such configuration corresponds to decreasing symmetry and increasing the number of possible energy states of a subnanocluster, and it corresponds to the condition of spontaneous crystallization process in an isolated system.Taking into account accidental positions of the nickel atom in the iron cluster, such behaviour of the carbon atom can explain the mechanism of growth of a new phase and formation of new clusters in the presence of other kind of atoms because of surface influence.

  12. Operation of the computer model for direct atomic oxygen exposure of Earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gruenbaum, P. E.; Gillis, J. R.; Hargraves, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    One of the primary causes of material degradation in low Earth orbit (LEO) is exposure to atomic oxygen. When atomic oxygen molecules collide with an orbiting spacecraft, the relative velocity is 7 to 8 km/sec and the collision energy is 4 to 5 eV per atom. Under these conditions, atomic oxygen may initiate a number of chemical and physical reactions with exposed materials. These reactions contribute to material degradation, surface erosion, and contamination. Interpretation of these effects on materials and the design of space hardware to withstand on-orbit conditions requires quantitative knowledge of the atomic oxygen exposure environment. Atomic oxygen flux is a function of orbit altitude, the orientation of the orbit plan to the Sun, solar and geomagnetic activity, and the angle between exposed surfaces and the spacecraft heading. We have developed a computer model to predict the atomic oxygen exposure of spacecraft in low Earth orbit. The application of this computer model is discussed.

  13. Generalized Pauli constraints in small atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Christian; Altunbulak, Murat; Knecht, Stefan; Lopes, Alexandre; Whitfield, James D.; Christandl, Matthias; Gross, David; Reiher, Markus

    2018-05-01

    The natural occupation numbers of fermionic systems are subject to nontrivial constraints, which include and extend the original Pauli principle. A recent mathematical breakthrough has clarified their mathematical structure and has opened up the possibility of a systematic analysis. Early investigations have found evidence that these constraints are exactly saturated in several physically relevant systems, e.g., in a certain electronic state of the beryllium atom. It has been suggested that, in such cases, the constraints, rather than the details of the Hamiltonian, dictate the system's qualitative behavior. Here, we revisit this question with state-of-the-art numerical methods for small atoms. We find that the constraints are, in fact, not exactly saturated, but that they lie much closer to the surface defined by the constraints than the geometry of the problem would suggest. While the results seem incompatible with the statement that the generalized Pauli constraints drive the behavior of these systems, they suggest that the qualitatively correct wave-function expansions can in some systems already be obtained on the basis of a limited number of Slater determinants, which is in line with numerical evidence from quantum chemistry.

  14. RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotopemore » as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic

  15. Chip-Scale Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, Svenja

    2010-03-01

    Atomic magnetometers have reached sensitivities rivaling those of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in some frequency ranges [1]. A major advancement in atomic magnetometry was made possible by implementing interrogation schemes that suppress spin-exchange collisions between the alkali atoms [2]. Good signal-to-noise can be achieved by operation at very high alkali densities. At the same time, it introduces the challenge to create uniform spin-polarization and monitor the atomic precession about the magnetic field in atomic vapors with large optical densities. Off-resonant detection of the polarization rotation rather than the absorption is essential to operate in this regime. By use of microfabrication methods, we are miniaturizing such atomic magnetometers. They consist of miniature vapor cells with volumes of a few cubic millimeters integrated with micro-optical components. We present the advancement in sensitivities of such devices over nearly four orders of magnitude [3]. This allows for small low-power room-temperature devices with sensitivities that get close to those of SQUIDs in the frequency range around 100 Hz. We outline the current performance of chip-scale atomic magnetometers and the major challenges. Apart from efficient pumping and probing at high optical densities, these include magnetic noise caused by several sensor components and environmental factors, noise on the light fields, as well as magnetic fields from current-carrying parts, such as heaters, lasers, and photodetectors.[4pt] [1] Allred et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 130801 (2002) [0pt] [2] Happer and Tam, Phys. Rev. A 16, 1877 (1977) [0pt] [3] Griffith et al., Appl. Phys. Lett 94, 023502 (2009)

  16. Motion of Cesium Atoms in the One-Dimensional Magneto-Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yimin; Chen, Xuzong; Wang, Qingji; Wang, Yiqiu

    1996-01-01

    The force to which Cs atoms are subjected in the one-dimensional magneto-optical trap (lD-MOT) is calculated, and properties of this force are discussed. Several methods to increase the number of Cs atoms in the lD-MOT are presented on the basis of the analysis of the capture and escape of Cs atoms in the ID-MOT.

  17. Soliton Dynamics of an Atomic Spinor Condensate on a Ring Lattice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-22

    REPORT Soliton dynamics of an atomic spinor condensate on a Ring Lattice 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We study the dynamics of...8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - Soliton dynamics of an atomic spinor condensate on a Ring Lattice Report Title ABSTRACT We study the dynamics...Report Number Soliton dynamics of an atomic spinor condensat Block 13: Supplementary Note © 2013 . Published in Physical Review A (accepted), Vol. Ed

  18. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  19. Coaxial twin-fluid atomization with pattern air gas streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei Ng, Chin; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Coaxial twin-fluid atomization has numerous industrial applications, most notably fuel injection and spray coating. In the coating process of pharmaceutical tablets, the coaxial atomizing air stream is accompanied by two diametrically opposed side jets that impinge on the liquid/gas coaxial jets at an angle to produce an elliptical shape of the spray's cross section. Our study focuses on the influence of these side jets on the break up process and on the droplet velocity and diameter distribution along the cross section. The ultimate goal is to predict the size distribution and volume flux per unit area in the spray. With this predictive model, an optimal atomizing air/pattern air ratio can be found to achieve the desired coating result. This model is also crucial in scaling up the laboratory setup to production level. We have performed experiments with different atomized liquids, such as water and glycerine-water mixtures, that allow us to establish the effect of liquid viscosity, through the Ohnesorge number, in the spray characteristics. The gas Reynolds number of our experiments ranges from 9000 to 18000 and the Weber number ranges from 400 to 1600. We will present the effect of pattern air in terms of the resulting droplets size, droplet number density and velocity at various distances downstream of the nozzle where the effect of pattern air is significant.

  20. Dynamical Evolution of Properties for Atom and Field in the Process of Two-Photon Absorption and Emission Between Atomic Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-ming; Xu, Xue-xiang

    2018-04-01

    Using dressed state method, we cleverly solve the dynamics of atom-field interaction in the process of two-photon absorption and emission between atomic levels. Here we suppose that the atom is initially in the ground state and the optical field is initially in Fock state, coherent state or thermal state, respectively. The properties of the atom, including the population in excited state and ground state, the atom inversion, and the properties for optical field, including the photon number distribution, the mean photon number, the second-order correlation function and the Wigner function, are discussed in detail. We derive their analytical expressions and then make numerical analysis for them. In contrast with Jaynes-Cummings model, some similar results, such as quantum Rabi oscillation, revival and collapse, are also exhibit in our considered model. Besides, some novel nonclassical states are generated.

  1. Neutral atom imaging at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, A.; Orsini, S.; Milillo, A.; Di Lellis, A. M.; De Angelis, E.

    2006-02-01

    The feasibility of neutral atom detection and imaging in the Hermean environment is discussed in this study. In particular, we consider those energetic neutral atoms (ENA) whose emission is directly related to solar wind entrance into Mercury's magnetosphere. In fact, this environment is characterised by a weak magnetic field; thus, cusp regions are extremely large if compared to the Earth's ones, and intense proton fluxes are expected there. Our study includes a model of H + distribution in space, energy and pitch angle, simulated by means of a single-particle, Monte-Carlo simulation. Among processes that could generate neutral atom emission, we focus our attention on charge-exchange and ion sputtering, which, in principle, are able to produce directional ENA fluxes. Simulated neutral atom images are investigated in the frame of the neutral particle analyser-ion spectrometer (NPA-IS) SERENA experiment, proposed to fly on board the ESA mission BepiColombo/MPO. The ELENA (emitted low-energy neutral atoms) unit, which is part of this experiment, will be able to detect such fluxes; instrumental details and predicted count rates are given.

  2. Biological atomism and cell theory.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Daniel J

    2010-09-01

    Biological atomism postulates that all life is composed of elementary and indivisible vital units. The activity of a living organism is thus conceived as the result of the activities and interactions of its elementary constituents, each of which individually already exhibits all the attributes proper to life. This paper surveys some of the key episodes in the history of biological atomism, and situates cell theory within this tradition. The atomistic foundations of cell theory are subsequently dissected and discussed, together with the theory's conceptual development and eventual consolidation. This paper then examines the major criticisms that have been waged against cell theory, and argues that these too can be interpreted through the prism of biological atomism as attempts to relocate the true biological atom away from the cell to a level of organization above or below it. Overall, biological atomism provides a useful perspective through which to examine the history and philosophy of cell theory, and it also opens up a new way of thinking about the epistemic decomposition of living organisms that significantly departs from the physicochemical reductionism of mechanistic biology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Atomic memory access hardware implementations

    DOEpatents

    Ahn, Jung Ho; Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J

    2015-02-17

    Atomic memory access requests are handled using a variety of systems and methods. According to one example method, a data-processing circuit having an address-request generator that issues requests to a common memory implements a method of processing the requests using a memory-access intervention circuit coupled between the generator and the common memory. The method identifies a current atomic-memory access request from a plurality of memory access requests. A data set is stored that corresponds to the current atomic-memory access request in a data storage circuit within the intervention circuit. It is determined whether the current atomic-memory access request corresponds to at least one previously-stored atomic-memory access request. In response to determining correspondence, the current request is implemented by retrieving data from the common memory. The data is modified in response to the current request and at least one other access request in the memory-access intervention circuit.

  4. Electrodeposition of Isolated Platinum Atoms and Clusters on Bismuth-Characterization and Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2017-12-06

    We describe a method for the electrodeposition of an isolated single Pt atom or small cluster, up to 9 atoms, on a bismuth ultramicroelectrode (UME). This deposition was immediately followed by electrochemical characterization via the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that occurs readily on the electrodeposited Pt but not on Bi. The observed voltammetric current plateau, even for a single atom, which behaves as an electrode, allows the estimation of deposit size. Pt was plated from solutions of femtomolar PtCl 6 2- , which allowed precise control of the arrival of ions and thus the plating rate on the Bi UME, to one ion every few seconds. This allowed the atom-by-atom fabrication of isolated platinum deposits, ranging from single atoms to 9-atom clusters. The limiting currents in voltammetry gave the size and number of atoms of the clusters. Given the stochasticity of the plating process, we show that the number of atoms plated over a given time (10 and 20 s) follows a Poisson distribution. Taking the potential at a certain current density as a measure of the relative rate of the HER, we found that the potential shifted positively as the size increased, with single atoms showing the largest overpotentials compared to bulk Pt.

  5. Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization studies of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixit, S. N.; Levin, D.; Mckoy, V.

    1987-01-01

    In resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), an atom absorbs several photons making a transition to a resonant intermediate state and subsequently ionizing out of it. With currently available tunable narrow-band lasers, the extreme sensitivity of REMPI to the specific arrangement of levels can be used to selectively probe minute amounts of a single species (atom) in a host of background material. Determination of the number density of atoms from the observed REMPI signal requires a knowledge of the multiphoton ionization cross sections. The REMPI of atomic oxygen was investigated through various excitation schemes that are feasible with available light sources. Using quantum defect theory (QDT) to estimate the various atomic parameters, the REMPI dynamics in atomic oxygen were studied incorporating the effects of saturation and a.c. Stark shifts. Results are presented for REMPI probabilities for excitation through various 2p(3) (4S sup o) np(3)P and 2p(3) (4S sup o) nf(3)F levels.

  6. Rydberg interaction induced enhanced excitation in thermal atomic vapor.

    PubMed

    Kara, Dushmanta; Bhowmick, Arup; Mohapatra, Ashok K

    2018-03-27

    We present the experimental demonstration of interaction induced enhancement in Rydberg excitation or Rydberg anti-blockade in thermal atomic vapor. We have used optical heterodyne detection technique to measure Rydberg population due to two-photon excitation to the Rydberg state. The anti-blockade peak which doesn't satisfy the two-photon resonant condition is observed along with the usual two-photon resonant peak which can't be explained using the model with non-interacting three-level atomic system. A model involving two interacting atoms is formulated for thermal atomic vapor using the dressed states of three-level atomic system to explain the experimental observations. A non-linear dependence of vapor density is observed for the anti-blockade peak which also increases with increase in principal quantum number of the Rydberg state. A good agreement is found between the experimental observations and the proposed interacting model. Our result implies possible applications towards quantum logic gates using Rydberg anti-blockade in thermal atomic vapor.

  7. Magnetism of a relaxed single atom vacancy in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunyi; Hu, Yonghong; Xue, Li; Sun, Tieyu; Wang, Yu

    2018-04-01

    It has been suggested in literature that defects in graphene (e.g. absorbed atoms and vacancies) may induce magnetizations due to unpaired electrons. The nature of magnetism, i.e. ferromagnetic or anti-ferromagnetic, is dependent on a number of structural factors including locations of magnetic moments and lattice symmetry. In the present work we investigated the influence of a relaxed single atom vacancy in garphnene on magnetization which were obtained under different pinning boundary conditions, aiming to achieve a better understanding of the magnetic behaviors of graphene. Through first principles calculations, we found that major spin polarizations occur on atoms that deviate slightly from their original lattice positions, and pinning boundaries could also affect the relaxed positions of atoms and determine which atom(s) would become the main source(s) of total spin polarizations and magnetic moments. When the pinning boundary condition is free, a special non-magnetic and semi-conductive structure may be obtained, suggesting that magnetization should more readily occur under pinning boundary conditions.

  8. Science and Emerging Technology of 2D Atomic Layered Materials and Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0067 Science & Emerging Technology of 2D Atomic Layered Materials and Devices Angel Rubio UNIVERSIDAD DEL PAIS VASCO - EUSKAL...Emerging Technology of 2D Atomic Layered Materials and Devices 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-15-1-0006 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...reporting documents for AOARD project 144088, “2D Materials and Devices Beyond Graphene Science & Emerging Technology of 2D Atomic Layered Materials and

  9. Heat conduction in double-walled carbon nanotubes with intertube additional carbon atoms.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liu; Feng, Yanhui; Tan, Peng; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-07-07

    Heat conduction of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with intertube additional carbon atoms was investigated for the first time using a molecular dynamics method. By analyzing the phonon vibrational density of states (VDOS), we revealed that the intertube additional atoms weak the heat conduction along the tube axis. Moreover, the phonon participation ratio (PR) demonstrates that the heat transfer in DWCNTs is dominated by low frequency modes. The added atoms cause the mode weight factor (MWF) of the outer tube to decrease and that of the inner tube to increase, which implies a lower thermal conductivity. The effects of temperature, tube length, and the number and distribution of added atoms were studied. Furthermore, an orthogonal array testing strategy was designed to identify the most important structural factor. It is indicated that the tendencies of thermal conductivity of DWCNTs with added atoms change with temperature and length are similar to bare ones. In addition, thermal conductivity decreases with the increasing number of added atoms, more evidently for atom addition concentrated at some cross-sections rather than uniform addition along the tube length. Simultaneously, the number of added atoms at each cross-section has a considerably more remarkable impact, compared to the tube length and the density of chosen cross-sections to add atoms.

  10. Number Theoretic Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, Z.

    Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Divisibility 2.1. Basics on Divisibility 2.2. The Greatest Common Divisor 2.3. The Euclidean Algorithm 2.4. The Diophantine Equation ax+by=c 3. Prime Numbers 3.1. The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic 3.2. There Are Infinitely Many Primes 3.3. The Density of Primes 3.4. Primes in Arithmetic Progressions 4. Continued Fractions 5. Modular Arithmetic 5.1. Congruences 5.2. Modular Inverses 5.3. The Chinese Remainder Theorem 5.4. The Structure of the Multiplicative Group (Z/NZ)^* 5.5. Primitive Roots 6. Quadratic Congruences 6.1. Euler's Criterion 6.2. The Legendre Symbol and Quadratic Reciprocity 7. Pell's Equation 7.1. The Group Law 7.2. Integer Solutions 7.3. Finding the Fundamental Solution 8. The Riemann Zeta Function 8.1 Analytic Continuation and Functinal Equation of ζ(s) 8.2 Connecting the Primes and the Zeros of ζ(s) 8.3 The Riemann Hypothesis References

  11. Parametric Cooling of Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Bharath, H. M.; Barrios, Maryrose; Chapman, Michael

    2017-04-01

    An oscillator is characterized by a restoring force which determines the natural frequency at which oscillations occur. The amplitude and phase-noise of these oscillations can be amplified or squeezed by modulating the magnitude of this force (e.g. the stiffness of the spring) at twice the natural frequency. This is parametric excitation; a long-studied phenomena in both the classical and quantum regimes. Parametric cooling, or the parametric squeezing of thermo-mechanical noise in oscillators has been studied in micro-mechanical oscillators and trapped ions. We study parametric cooling in ultracold atoms. This method shows a modest reduction of the variance of atomic momenta, and can be easily employed with pre-existing controls in many experiments. Parametric cooling is comparable to delta-kicked cooling, sharing similar limitations. We expect this cooling to find utility in microgravity experiments where the experiment duration is limited by atomic free expansion.

  12. Atomic scale study of nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldum, A.; Ciraci, S.; Batra, Inder P.; Fong, C. Y.

    1998-03-01

    Nanocontact and subsequent pulling off a sharp Ni(111) tip on a Cu(110) surface are investigated by using molecular dynamics method with embedded atom model. As the contact is formed, the sharp tip experiences multiple jump to contact in the attractive force range. The contact interface develops discontinuously mainly due to disorder-order transformations which lead to disappearance of a layer and hence abrupt changes in the normal force variation. Atom exchange occurs in the repulsive range. The connective neck is reduced also discontinuously by pulling off the tip. The novel atomic structure of the neck under the tensile force is analyzed. We also presented a comperative study for the contact by a Si(111) tip on Si(111)-(2x1) surface.

  13. Correlations between interacting Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Braun, Christoph; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2018-04-01

    This paper is a short introduction to Rydberg physics and quantum nonlinear optics using Rydberg atoms. It has been prepared as a compliment to a series of lectures delivered during the Latin American School of Physics "Marcos Moshinsky" 2017. We provide a short introduction to the properties of individual Rydberg atoms and discuss in detail how the interaction potential between Rydberg atom pairs is calculated. We then discuss how this interaction gives rise to the Rydberg blockade mechanism. With the aid of hallmark experiments in the field applications of the blockade for creating correlated quantum systems are discussed. Our aim is to give an overview of this exciting and rapidly evolving field. The interested reader is referred to original work and more comprehensive reviews and tutorials for further details on these subjects.

  14. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1997-07-08

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid. 3 figs.

  15. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid.

  16. Hot atoms in cosmic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rossler, K; Jung, H J; Nebeling, B

    1984-01-01

    High energy chemical reactions and atom molecule interactions might be important for cosmic chemistry with respect to the accelerated species in solar wind, cosmic rays, colliding gas and dust clouds and secondary knock-on particles in solids. "Hot" atoms with energies ranging from a few eV to some MeV can be generated via nuclear reactions and consequent recoil processes. The chemical fate of the radioactive atoms can be followed by radiochemical methods (radio GC or HPLC). Hot atom chemistry may serve for laboratory simulation of the reactions of energetic species with gaseous or solid interstellar matter. Due to the effective measurement of 10(8)-10(10) atoms only it covers a low to medium dose regime and may add to the studies of ion implantation which due to the optical methods applied are necessarily in the high dose regime. Experimental results are given for the systems: C/H2O (gas), C/H2O (solid, 77 K), N/CH4 (solid, 77K) and C/NH3 (solid, 77 K). Nuclear reactions used for the generation of 2 to 3 MeV atoms are: N(p,alpha) 11C, 16O(p,alpha pn) 11C and 12C(d,n) 13N with 8 to 45 MeV protons or deuterons from a cyclotron. Typical reactions products are: CO, CO2, CH4, CH2O, CH3OH, HCOOH, NH3, CH3NH2, cyanamide, formamidine, guanidine etc. Products of hot reactions in solids are more complex than in corresponding gaseous systems, which underlines the importance of solid state reactions for the build-up of precursors for biomolecules in space. As one of the major mechanisms for product formation, the simultaneous or fast consecutive reactions of a hot carbon with two target molecules (reaction complex) is discussed.

  17. The RPA Atomization Energy Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P; Csonka, Gábor I

    2010-01-12

    There is current interest in the random phase approximation (RPA), a "fifth-rung" density functional for the exchange-correlation energy. RPA has full exact exchange and constructs the correlation with the help of the unoccupied Kohn-Sham orbitals. In many cases (uniform electron gas, jellium surface, and free atom), the correction to RPA is a short-ranged effect that is captured by a local spin density approximation (LSDA) or a generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Nonempirical density functionals for the correction to RPA were constructed earlier at the LSDA and GGA levels (RPA+), but they are constructed here at the fully nonlocal level (RPA++), using the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) of Langreth, Lundqvist, and collaborators. While they make important and helpful corrections to RPA total and ionization energies of free atoms, they correct the RPA atomization energies of molecules by only about 1 kcal/mol. Thus, it is puzzling that RPA atomization energies are, on average, about 10 kcal/mol lower than those of accurate values from experiment. We find here that a hybrid of 50% Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA with 50% RPA+ yields atomization energies much more accurate than either one does alone. This suggests a solution to the puzzle: While the proper correction to RPA is short-ranged in some systems, its contribution to the correlation hole can spread out in a molecule with multiple atomic centers, canceling part of the spread of the exact exchange hole (more so than in RPA or RPA+), making the true exchange-correlation hole more localized than in RPA or RPA+. This effect is not captured even by the vdW-DF nonlocality, but it requires the different kind of full nonlocality present in a hybrid functional.

  18. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). 29.9205 Section 29.9205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE... number (farm serial number). The serial number assigned to an individual farm by the appropriate office...

  19. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). 29.9205 Section 29.9205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE... number (farm serial number). The serial number assigned to an individual farm by the appropriate office...

  20. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). 29.9205 Section 29.9205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE... number (farm serial number). The serial number assigned to an individual farm by the appropriate office...