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Sample records for absorbing aerosol properties

  1. Synergy of Satellite-Surface Observations for Studying the Properties of Absorbing Aerosols in Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2010-01-01

    Through interaction with clouds and alteration of the Earth's radiation budget, atmospheric aerosols significantly influence our weather and climate. Monsoon rainfalls, for example, sustain the livelihood of more than half of the world's population. Thus, understanding the mechanism that drives the water cycle and freshwater distribution is high-lighted as one of the major near-term goals in NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Strategy. Every cloud droplet/ice-crystal that serves as an essential element in portraying water cycle and distributing freshwater contains atmospheric aerosols at its core. In addition, the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol properties is complex due to their dynamic nature. In fact, the predictability of the tropical climate system is much reduced during the boreal spring, which is associated with the peak season of biomass burning activities and regional/long-range transport of dust aerosols. Therefore, to accurately assess the impact of absorbing aerosols on regional-to-global climate requires not only modeling efforts but also continuous observations from satellites, aircraft, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites the Earth Observing System - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, we have gradually developed and refined the SMART (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) and COMMIT (Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile observatories, a suite of surface remote sensing and in-situ instruments that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement the satellite observations. In this talk, we will present SMART-COMMIT which has played key roles, serving as network or supersite

  2. Sensitivity of Scattering and Backscattering Coefficients to Microphysical and Chemical Properties: Weakly Absorbing Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Pekour, M. S.; Berg, L. K.; Shilling, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Mei, F.; Jefferson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Scattering and backscattering coefficients of atmospheric aerosol are crucial parameters for numerous climate-relevant applications, including studies related to the Earth's radiation budget. Due to their strong connection to aerosol chemical and microphysical characteristics, in situ measurements have been commonly used for evaluating optical properties routines in global and regional scale models. However, these in situ measurements, including size distribution and chemical composition data, can be subject to uncertainties. Techniques for obtaining these data depend on particle size (submicron versus supermicron) and relative humidity range (dry versus wet conditions). In this study, we examine how the data uncertainties can impact the level of agreement between the calculated and measured optical properties (commonly known as optical closure). Moreover, we put forth a novel technique for inferring in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosols from simultaneously measured size distributions (with mobility and aerodynamic sizes), and two optical properties, namely the scattering coefficient and hemispheric backscatter fraction, measured by integrating nephelometer. We demonstrate the performance of our technique, which permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10-micron particles, using both a sensitivity study with synthetically generated inputs with random noise and a six-week case study with real measurements. These measurements cover a wide range of coastal summertime conditions observed during the recent Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP, http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/) and include periods with a wide range of aerosol loading and relative humidity. Finally, we discuss how in situ data and retrievals of aerosol characteristics can be applied for model evaluation.

  3. Light-absorbing Aerosol Properties in the Kathmandu Valley during SusKat-ABC Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Yoon, S.; Kim, J.; Cho, C.; Jung, J.

    2013-12-01

    Light-absorbing aerosols, such as black carbon (BC), are major contributors to the atmospheric heating and the reduction of solar radiation reaching at the earth's surface. In this study, we investigate light-absorption and scattering properties of aerosols (i.e., BC mass concentration, aerosol solar-absorption/scattering efficiency) in the Kathmandu valley during Sustainable atmosphere for the Kathmandu valley (SusKat)-ABC campaign, from December 2012 to February 2013. Kathmandu City is among the most polluted cities in the world. However, there are only few past studies that provide basic understanding of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, which is not sufficient for designing effective mitigation measures (e.g., technological, financial, regulatory, legal and political measures, planning strategies). A distinct diurnal variation of BC mass concentration with two high peaks observed during wintertime dry monsoon period. BC mass concentration was found to be maximum around 09:00 and 20:00 local standard time (LST). Increased cars and cooking activities including substantial burning of wood and other biomass in the morning and in the evening contributed to high BC concentration. Low BC concentrations during the daytime can be explain by reduced vehicular movement and cooking activities. Also, the developmements of the boundary layer height and mountain-valley winds in the Kathmandu Valley paly a crucial role in the temproal variation of BC mass concentrations. Detailed radiative effects of light-absorbing aerosols will be presented.

  4. Modeling the Absorbing Aerosol Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce; Zhang, Sophia

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to model the absorbing aerosol index and improve the biomass carbon inventories by optimizing the difference between TOMS aerosol index (AI) and modeled AI with an inverse model. Two absorbing aerosol types are considered, including biomass carbon and mineral dust. A priori biomass carbon source was generated by Liousse et al [1996]. Mineral dust emission is parameterized according to surface wind and soil moisture using the method developed by Ginoux [2000]. In this initial study, the coupled CCM1 and GRANTOUR model was used to determine the aerosol spatial and temporal distribution. With modeled aerosol concentrations and optical properties, we calculate the radiance at the top of the atmosphere at 340 nm and 380 nm with a radiative transfer model. The contrast of radiance at these two wavelengths will be used to calculate AI. Then we compare the modeled AI with TOMS AI. This paper reports our initial modeling for AI and its comparison with TOMS Nimbus 7 AI. For our follow-on project we will model the global AI with aerosol spatial and temporal distribution recomputed from the IMPACT model and DAO GEOS-1 meteorology fields. Then we will build an inverse model, which applies a Bayesian inverse technique to optimize the agreement of between model and observational data. The inverse model will tune the biomass burning source strength to reduce the difference between modelled AI and TOMS AI. Further simulations with a posteriori biomass carbon sources from the inverse model will be carried out. Results will be compared to available observations such as surface concentration and aerosol optical depth.

  5. Absorbing aerosols at high relative humidity: closure between hygroscopic growth and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. M.; Bar-Or, R. Z.; Bluvshtein, N.; Abo-Riziq, A.; Kostinski, A.; Borrmann, S.; Koren, I.; Rudich, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The extinction coefficient and growth factor of humidified aerosols, at 80% and 90% RH, and at 532 nm and 355 nm wavelengths were measured for size-selected particles for ammonium sulfate, IHSS Pahokee peat (a lightly absorbing humic-like substance proxy), nigrosine (a black dye to model highly absorbing substances), and a mixture of AS and nigrosine. The ratio of the humidified extinction coefficients to the dry (fRHext(%RH, Dry)) was explored. The measured fRHext(%RH, Dry) was compared to theoretical calculations based on Mie theory, using the measured growth factors and assuming homogeneous mixing. The expected complex refractive indices (RIs) using the volume weighted mixing rule were compared to the RIs derived from the extinction measurements. Moreover, the differences between assuming a core-shell structure or a homogeneous mixing of the substances is examined. The laboratory results were used as a basis to model the change in the total extinction, the single scattering albedo (ω), and the asymmetry parameter (g) in the twilight zone of clouds at 355 nm and 532 nm. We found slightly linear to no dependency of fRH(%RH, Dry) with size for absorbing substances in contrast to the decreasing exponential behavior with size for purely scattering substances. However, no discernable difference could be made between the two wavelengths used. Less than 5% differences were found between the real parts of the complex refractive indices derived and those calculated using the volume weighted mixing rule, and the imaginary parts had up to a 20% difference. Moreover, for substances with growth factor less than 1.15 there was, in average, less than 5% difference between the extinction efficiencies calculated using a core-shell model and assuming homogeneous mixing for size parameters less than 2.5. For x>2.5 the differences were greater causing and overestimation of the extinction efficiency (Qext) values if homogenous mixing was assume instead of a core-shell structure. The

  6. Applications of UV Scattering and Absorbing Aerosol Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M.; Beirle, S.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosols cause a substantial amount of radiative forcing, but quantifying this amount is difficult: determining aerosol concentrations in the atmosphere and, especially, characterizing their (optical) properties, has proved to be quite a challenge. A good way to monitor aerosol characteristics on a global scale is to perform satellite remote sensing. Most satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms are based on fitting of aerosol-induced changes in earth reflectance, which are usually subtle and have a smooth wavelength dependence. In such algorithms certain aerosol models are assumed, where optical parameters such as single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter and size parameter (or Angstrom exponent) are defined. Another, semi-quantitative technique for detecting aerosols is the calculation of UV Aerosol Indices (UVAI). The Absorbing and Scattering Aerosol Indices detect "UV-absorbing" aerosols (most notably mineral dust, black and brown carbon particles) and "scattering" aerosols (sulfate and secondary organic aerosol particles), respectively. UVAI are essentially a measure of the contrast between two wavelengths in the UV range. The advantages of UVAI are: they can be determined in the presence of clouds, they are rather insensitive to surface type, and they are very sensitive to aerosols. The Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) has been in use for over a decade, and the Scattering Aerosol Index (SAI) was recently introduced by our group. Whereas the AAI is mainly used to detect desert dust and biomass burning plumes, the SAI can be used to study regions with high concentrations of non-absorbing aerosols, either anthropogenic (e.g. sulfate aerosols in eastern China) or biogenic (e.g. secondary organic aerosols formed from VOCs emitted by plants). Here we will present our recent UVAI results from SCIAMACHY: we will discuss the seasonal trend of SAI, and correlate our UVAI data with other datasets such as trace gases (HCHO, NO2, CO) and fire counts from the (A

  7. Absorbing and scattering aerosols over the source region of biomass burning emissions: Implications in the assessment of optical and radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Atinderpal; Srivastava, Rohit; Rastogi, Neeraj; Singh, Darshan

    2016-02-01

    The current study focuses on the assessment of model simulated optical and radiative properties of aerosols incorporating the measured chemical composition of aerosol samples collected at Patiala during October, 2011-February, 2012. Monthly average mass concentration of PM2.5, elemental carbon (EC), primary organic carbon (POC), water-soluble (WS) and insoluble (INS) aerosols ranged from 120 to 192, 6.2 to 7.2, 20 to 39, 59 to 111 and 35 to 90 μg m-3, respectively. Mass concentration of different components of aerosols was further used for the assessment of optical properties derived from Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) model simulations. Microtops based measured aerosol optical depth (AOD500) ranged from 0.47 to 0.62 showing maximum value during November and December, and minimum during February. Ångström exponent (α380-870) remained high (>0.90) throughout the study period except in February (0.74), suggesting predominance of fine mode particles over the study region. The observed ratio of scattering to absorbing aerosols was incorporated in OPAC model simulations and single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm) so obtained ranged between 0.80 and 0.92 with relatively low values during the period of extensive biomass burning. In the present study, SBDART based estimated values of aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) at the surface (SRF) and top of the atmosphere (TOA) ranged from -31 to -66 Wm-2 and -2 to -18 W m-2 respectively. The atmospheric ARF, ranged between + 18 and + 58 Wm-2 resulting in the atmospheric heating rate between 0.5 and 1.6 K day-1. These results signify the role of scattering and absorbing aerosols in affecting the magnitude of aerosol forcing.

  8. Seasonal variations in the light-absorbing properties of water-soluble and insoluble organic aerosols in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jin Young; Jin, Hyoun Cher; Lee, Ji Yi; Lee, Se Pyo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral properties of light-absorbing organic aerosol extractions were investigated using 24-h average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) measurements from October 2012 to September 2013 in Seoul, Korea. The light-absorption spectra of water and methanol extracts exhibited strong evidence of brown carbon with Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE; fitted between 300 and 700 nm) ranges of 5.84-9.17 and 4.08-5.75, with averages of 7.23 ± 1.58 and 5.05 ± 0.67, respectively. The light absorption of both extracts at 365 nm (Abs365), which is typically used as a proxy for brown carbon (BrC), displayed strong seasonal variations and was well correlated with both water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC; r = 0.81) and organic carbon (OC; r = 0.85), indicating that both primary and secondary organics were sources of BrC in this region. Normalizing the Abs365 of water and methanol extracts to the mass of WSOC and OC yielded average solution mass absorption efficiency (MAE365) of 0.28-1.18 and 0.44-1.45 m2 g-1 C, respectively. MAE365 in Korea were in the same range or slightly lower than those in China, however, despite the same ranges, the seasonal variations were different, suggesting that the sources of light absorbers could be different. Combining the AAE, Abs365, and MAE365 of both extracts and a detailed chemical speciation of filter extracts identified the compounds responsible for the temporal variations of BrC in Korea. During summer, secondary organic aerosol (SOA), photochemically generated from anthropogenic emissions, was the major source; however, during winter, long range transported organics or transported BrC seem to be a source of BrC in Korea, a downwind site of China, where severe smog and BrC were observed during this season. Biomass burning was also an important source; however, unlike in previous studies, where it was identified as a major source during winter, here, it contributed during the whole year. Although many of its properties, sources, and potential

  9. Photochemical aging of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol material.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Moussa, Samar G; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-04-11

    Dark reactions of methylglyoxal with NH4(+) in aqueous aerosols yield light-absorbing and surface-active products that can influence the physical properties of the particles. Little is known about how the product mixture and its optical properties will change due to photolysis as well as oxidative aging by O3 and OH in the atmosphere. Here, we report the results of kinetics and product studies of the photochemical aging of aerosols formed by atomizing aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal and ammonium sulfate. Experiments were performed using aerosol flow tube reactors coupled with an aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometer (Aerosol-CIMS) for monitoring gas- and particle-phase compositions. Particles were also impacted onto quartz windows in order to assess changes in their UV-visible absorption upon oxidation. Photooxidation of the aerosols leads to the formation of small, volatile organic acids including formic acid, acetic acid, and glyoxylic acid. The atmospheric lifetime of these species during the daytime is predicted to be on the order of minutes, with photolysis being an important mechanism of degradation. The lifetime with respect to O3 oxidation was observed to be on the order of hours. O3 oxidation also leads to a net increase in light absorption by the particles due to the formation of additional carbonyl compounds. Our results are consistent with field observations of high brown carbon absorption in the early morning. PMID:23506538

  10. Properties of light-absorbing aerosols in the Nagoya urban area, Japan, in August 2011 and January 2012: Contributions of brown carbon and lensing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kawana, Kaori; Mochida, Michihiro; Ikemori, Fumikazu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    The optical properties of aerosols at 405 and 781 nm were measured in an urban site in Nagoya, Japan, in August 2011 and in January 2012 using a photoacoustic spectrometer. Comparison of the absorption coefficient at 781 nm of aerosols that did and did not pass through a thermo-denuder showed that an increase in black carbon (BC) light absorption due to the coating of non-refractory materials (i.e., the lensing effect) was small (on average, 10%) in August and negligible in January. The effective density distributions for the particles that did and did not pass through the thermo-denuder, which were measured simultaneously in August, suggested that the majority of BC particles sampled had a minimal coating. The small lensing effect observed can be explained partly by assuming that a large portion of non-refractory materials was mixed externally with BC. The contribution of direct light absorption by organic matter (OM) that vaporized at temperatures below 300°C to the total light absorption at 405 nm was negligible in August, but those by OM that vaporized below 300 and 400°C averaged 11 and 17%, respectively, in January. The larger contribution of light-absorbing OM in January is likely due to the greater contribution of OM originating from the burning of biomass, including biofuel and agricultural residue, in Japan, northern China, or Siberia, during the winter.

  11. Interaction of absorbing aerosols with high relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M.; Bluvshtein, N.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-12-01

    One of the major uncertainties in the understanding of Earth's climate system is the interaction between solar radiation and aerosols in the atmosphere. This interaction is dependent on the physical and chemical properties of the aerosols and on the wavelength of the incident light. Aerosols exposed to high humidity areas will change their chemical, physical, and optical properties. To model hydrated aerosols, atmospheric chemistry models use the volume weighted mixing rule to predict the complex refractive index (RI) of aerosols when they interact with high relative humidity areas, and, in general, assume homogeneous mixing. The validity of these assumptions is explored. The extinction coefficient and growth factor of humidified aerosols, at 80% and 90% RH, and at 532 nm and 355 nm wavelengths was measured for size-selected aerosols of ammonium sulfate, peat (a lightly absorbing humic-like substance proxy), nigrosine (a black dye to model highly absorbing substances), and a mixture of AS and nigrosine. The ratio of the humidified extinction coefficients to the dry (fRHext(%RH,Dry)) is explored. The measured fRHext(%RH,Dry) is compared to theoretical calculations based on Mie theory, and using the measured growth factors and assuming homogeneous mixing the expected RIs using the volume weighted mixing rule are compared to the RIs derived from the extinction measurements. Moreover, the differences between assuming a core-shell structure or a homogeneous mixing of the substances is examined. We found slightly linear to no dependency of fRH(%RH,Dry) with size for absorbing substances in contrast to the decreasing exponential behavior with size for purely scattering substances, but no discernable difference could be made between the two wavelengths used. Less than 5% differences were found between the real parts of the complex refractive indices derived and those calculated using the volume weighted mixing rule, and the imaginary parts had up to a 20% difference

  12. Source apportionment of absorbing aerosols in the central Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishya, Aditya; Singh, Prayagraj; Rastogi, Shantanu; Babu, S. Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) depicts high spatial and temporal heterogeneity in their radiative properties. Despite the fact that significant advancement in terms of characterizing aerosols radiative and physiochemical properties in the IGP have been made, information regarding the organic content towards total absorbing aerosol budget is lacking. In the present study we have analyzed two years of aerosol spectral light absorption measurements from the central-IGP, Gorakhpur (26.75°N, 83.38°E, 85m amsl), in order to study their seasonal behavior and to quantify their magnitude in terms of absorbing aerosols loading and source speciation. Remote sensing data in the form of 'Cloud corrected Fire Count' from MODIS Terra and 'Absorption Aerosol Index' from OMI satellites platform have been used to identify absorbing aerosol source regions. Spectral absorption analysis reveals a four-fold enhancement in absorption in the winter (W) and the post-monsoon (PoM) seasons at UV wavelengths as compared to 880 nm on account of increased biomass aerosol contribution to total absorbing aerosol load. Despite having higher fire events and absorption aerosol index, both indicating high biomass burning activities, in the pre-monsoon (PM) season, aerosols from the biomass sources contribute ~ 27% during the W and the PoM seasons as against ~17% in the PM season to the total absorbing aerosol content. This is due to near stagnant wind conditions and shallow height of air masses travelling to the central IGP in the W and the PoM seasons.

  13. The assessment of climatology of absorbing aerosol field with integration of aerosol-climate model, and ground-based and satellite remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G.; Wang, C.; Mahowald, N. M.; Rigby, M. L.; Martins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols play important roles in the Earth’s radiation budget and atmospheric circulation by absorbing sunlight and heating the atmosphere while cooling the surface. The strength of such effects depends on microphysical processes in the lifecycle of absorbing aerosols and their emissions to the atmosphere. Even though the knowledge of aerosol controlling processes and the techniques measuring aerosol properties have been greatly advanced, there are still significant gaps between model results and measurement data. The goal of this study is to minimize the model-observation discrepancy and to assess global 3-D absorbing aerosol fields. To achieve this goal, we investigate the errors related to aerosol models and measurements, and optimize the emissions of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols (BC) used in the models. In this study we first derive the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and absorbing aerosol optical depth (AAOD) of anthropogenic aerosols using the 3-D interactive aerosol-climate model [Kim et al., 2008] developed based on NCAR CAM3, running in an aerosol-transport-model (ATM) driven by NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data (2001~2003). Aerosol transformation in the atmosphere is fully considered in this model. We also derived the AOD and AAOD of dust aerosols based on the climatology from the Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) driven by the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data [Mahowald et al., 1997; Kistler et al., 2001]. In addition, the climatology (10-year mean) of the CAM3 sea salt model (Mahowald et al., 2006) is used to calculate the AOD of sea salt aerosols. An inverse modeling technique (Kalman filtering) is used to optimize the emissions of BC aerosols by minimizing the model-observation discrepancy of AAOD, and the emissions of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) aerosols and SO2 by minimizing the model-observation discrepancy of AOD. Initial estimates of carbonaceous aerosol emission due to fossil fuel are taken from the MIT EPPA model and Bond

  14. Extending "Deep Blue" Aerosol Retrieval Coverage to Cases of Absorbing Aerosols Above Clouds: Sensitivity Analysis and First Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Shinozuka, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cases of absorbing aerosols above clouds (AACs), such as smoke or mineral dust, are omitted from most routinely processed space-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) data products, including those from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). This study presents a sensitivity analysis and preliminary algorithm to retrieve above-cloud AOD and liquid cloud optical depth (COD) for AAC cases from MODIS or similar sensors, for incorporation into a future version of the "Deep Blue" AOD data product. Detailed retrieval simulations suggest that these sensors should be able to determine AAC AOD with a typical level of uncertainty approximately 25-50 percent (with lower uncertainties for more strongly absorbing aerosol types) and COD with an uncertainty approximately10-20 percent, if an appropriate aerosol optical model is known beforehand. Errors are larger, particularly if the aerosols are only weakly absorbing, if the aerosol optical properties are not known, and the appropriate model to use must also be retrieved. Actual retrieval errors are also compared to uncertainty envelopes obtained through the optimal estimation (OE) technique; OE-based uncertainties are found to be generally reasonable for COD but larger than actual retrieval errors for AOD, due in part to difficulties in quantifying the degree of spectral correlation of forward model error. The algorithm is also applied to two MODIS scenes (one smoke and one dust) for which near-coincident NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun photometer (AATS) data were available to use as a ground truth AOD data source, and found to be in good agreement, demonstrating the validity of the technique with real observations.

  15. Extending "Deep Blue" aerosol retrieval coverage to cases of absorbing aerosols above clouds: Sensitivity analysis and first case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Shinozuka, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Cases of absorbing aerosols above clouds (AACs), such as smoke or mineral dust, are omitted from most routinely processed space-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) data products, including those from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). This study presents a sensitivity analysis and preliminary algorithm to retrieve above-cloud AOD and liquid cloud optical depth (COD) for AAC cases from MODIS or similar sensors, for incorporation into a future version of the "Deep Blue" AOD data product. Detailed retrieval simulations suggest that these sensors should be able to determine AAC AOD with a typical level of uncertainty ˜25-50% (with lower uncertainties for more strongly absorbing aerosol types) and COD with an uncertainty ˜10-20%, if an appropriate aerosol optical model is known beforehand. Errors are larger, particularly if the aerosols are only weakly absorbing, if the aerosol optical properties are not known, and the appropriate model to use must also be retrieved. Actual retrieval errors are also compared to uncertainty envelopes obtained through the optimal estimation (OE) technique; OE-based uncertainties are found to be generally reasonable for COD but larger than actual retrieval errors for AOD, due in part to difficulties in quantifying the degree of spectral correlation of forward model error. The algorithm is also applied to two MODIS scenes (one smoke and one dust) for which near-coincident NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun photometer (AATS) data were available to use as a ground truth AOD data source, and found to be in good agreement, demonstrating the validity of the technique with real observations.

  16. Ocean mediation of tropospheric response to reflecting and absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Xie, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative forcing by reflecting (e.g., sulfate, SO4) and absorbing (e.g., black carbon, BC) aerosols is distinct: the former cools the planet by reducing solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere and the surface, without largely affecting the atmospheric column, while the latter heats the atmosphere directly. Despite the fundamental difference in forcing, here we show that the structure of the tropospheric response is remarkably similar between the two types of aerosols, featuring a deep vertical structure of temperature change (of opposite sign) at the Northern Hemisphere (NH) mid-latitudes. The deep temperature structure is anchored by the slow response of the ocean, as a large meridional sea surface temperature (SST) gradient drives an anomalous inter-hemispheric Hadley circulation in the tropics and induces atmospheric eddy adjustments at the NH mid-latitudes. The tropospheric warming in response to projected future decline in reflecting aerosols poses additional threats to the stability of mountain glaciers in the NH. Additionally, robust tropospheric response is unique to aerosol forcing and absent in the CO2 response, which can be exploited for climate change attribution.

  17. A ten-year global record of absorbing aerosols above clouds from OMI's near-UV observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torrres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction continues to be one of the leading uncertain components of climate models, primarily due to the lack of an adequate knowledge of the complex microphysical and radiative processes associated with the aerosolcloud system. The situations when aerosols and clouds are found in the same atmospheric column, for instance, when light-absorbing aerosols such as biomass burning generated carbonaceous particles or wind-blown dust overlay low-level cloud decks, are commonly found over several regional of the world. Contrary to the cloud-free scenario over dark surface, for which aerosols are known to produce a net cooling effect (negative radiative forcing) on climate, the overlapping situation of absorbing aerosols over cloud can potentially exert a significant level of atmospheric absorption and produces a positive radiative forcing at top-of-atmosphere. The magnitude of direct radiative effects of aerosols above cloud depends directly on the aerosol loading, microphysical-optical properties of the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud deck, and geometric cloud fraction. We help in addressing this problem by introducing a novel product of optical depth of absorbing aerosols above clouds retrieved from near-UV observations made by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board NASA's Aura platform. The presence of absorbing aerosols above cloud reduces the upwelling radiation reflected by cloud and produces a strong `color ratio' effect in the near-UV region, which can be unambiguously detected in the OMI measurements. Physically based on this effect, the OMACA algorithm retrieves the optical depths of aerosols and clouds simultaneously under a prescribed state of atmosphere. The algorithm architecture and results from a ten-year global record including global climatology of frequency of occurrence and above-cloud aerosol optical depth, and a discussion on related future field campaigns are presented.

  18. Effect of aerosol concentration and absorbing aerosol on the radiation fog life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalick, Z.; Kühn, T.; Korhonen, H.; Kokkola, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Analogous to cloud formation, the formation and life cycle of fogs is largely influenced by aerosol particles. The objective of this work is to analyze how changes in aerosol properties affect the fog life cycle, with special emphasis on how droplet concentrations change with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and on the effect that absorbing black carbon (BC) particles have on fog dissipation. For our simulation case study, we chose a typical fall time radiation fog at mid-latitudes (45° north) in fairly highly polluted conditions. Our results show that CCN concentrations have a strong influence on the fog lifetime. This is because the immediate effect of CCN on cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) is enhanced through two positive feedback loops: (1) Higher CDNC leads to more radiative cooling at the fog top, which leads to even stronger activation and (2) if CDNC is higher, the average droplet size is smaller, which slows down droplet removal through sedimentation. The effect that radiation fogs have on solar surface irradiation is large - the daily mean can change by 50% if CCN concentrations are doubled or halved (considering a reference CCN mixing ratio of 800 #/mg). With the same changes in CCN, the total fog lifetime increases 160 min or decreases 65 min, respectively. Although BC has a noticeable effect on fog height and dissipation time, its relative effect compared to CCN is small, even if BC concentrations are high. The fog formation is very sensitive to initial meteorological conditions which may be altered considerably if fog was present the previous day. This effect was neglected here, and future simulations, which span several days, may thus be a valuable extension of this study.

  19. Interpretation of FRESCO cloud retrievals in case of absorbing aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Tilstra, L. G.; de Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.

    2012-10-01

    Cloud and aerosol information is needed in trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements. The Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band (FRESCO) cloud algorithm employs reflectance spectra of the O2 A band around 760 nm to derive cloud pressure and effective cloud fraction. In general, clouds contribute more to the O2 A band reflectance than aerosols. Therefore, the FRESCO algorithm does not correct for aerosol effects in the retrievals and attributes the retrieved cloud information entirely to the presence of clouds, and not to aerosols. For events with high aerosol loading, aerosols may have a dominant effect, especially for almost cloud free scenes. We have analysed FRESCO cloud data and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument on the Metop-A satellite for events with typical absorbing aerosol types, such as volcanic ash, desert dust and smoke. We find that the FRESCO effective cloud fractions are correlated with the AAI data for these absorbing aerosol events and that the FRESCO cloud pressure contains information on aerosol layer pressure. For cloud free scenes, the derived FRESCO cloud pressure is close to the aerosol layer pressure, especially for optically thick aerosol layers. For cloudy scenes, if the strongly absorbing aerosols are located above the clouds, then the retrieved FRESCO cloud pressure may represent the height of the aerosol layer rather than the height of the clouds. Combining FRESCO and AAI data, an estimate for the aerosol layer pressure can be given.

  20. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  1. Toward Creating A Global Retrospective Climatology of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Robert J.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are thought to cause a significant direct and indirect climate forcing, but the magnitude of this forcing remains highly uncertain because of poor knowledge of global aerosol characteristics and their temporal changes. The standard long-term global product, the one-channel Advanced Very-High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aerosol optical thickness over the ocean, relies on a single predefined aerosol model and can be inaccurate in many cases. Furthermore, it provides no information on aerosol column number density, thus making it impossible to estimate the indirect aerosol effect on climate. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data can be used to detect absorbing aerosols over land, but are insensitive to aerosols located below one kilometer. It is thus clear that innovative approaches must be employed in order to extract a more quantitative and accurate aerosol climatology from available satellite and other measurements, thus enabling more reliable estimates of the direct and indirect aerosol forcings. The Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP) was established in 1998 as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). Its main objective is to analyze satellite radiance measurements and field observations to infer the global distribution of aerosols, their properties, and their seasonal and interannual variations. The overall goal is to develop advanced global aerosol climatologies for the period of satellite data and to make the aerosol climatologies broadly available through the GACP web site.

  2. In situ UV-VIS-NIR absorbing properties of atmospheric aerosol particles: estimates of the imaginary refractive index and comparison with columnar values.

    PubMed

    Mogo, S; Cachorro, V E; de Frutos, A M

    2012-11-30

    In this work, a novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction of in situ collected samples. Samples of atmospheric particulate matter were collected in El Arenosillo, southern Spain, on polycarbonate filters during summer 2004 as part of an aerosol characterization campaign. These samples were analyzed for the volumetric absorption coefficient in the 320-800 nm spectral region and an estimation of the effective imaginary refractive index was made. The values of the imaginary part of the complex refractive index ranged between 0.0009-0.0215 at 800 nm and 0.0015-0.0114 at 320 nm. Little dependence on the wavelength was observed. Several intense and long lasting desert outbreaks were registered during the campaign and the complex refractive index almost doubles its value during these dust events. Finally, we present a comparison of data obtained in situ with columnar data obtained from the AERONET network. A correlation factor of 0.64 was obtained between both data, which gives an idea of how accurately the in situ ground data represent the total column. PMID:22964016

  3. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  4. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics - Part 1: Surface tension depression and light-absorbing products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Shapiro, E. L.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2009-07-01

    We show that methylglyoxal forms light-absorbing secondary organic material in aqueous ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosol particles. The light-absorbing products form on the order of minutes, and solution composition continues to change over several days. The results suggest an aldol condensation pathway involving the participation of the ammonium ion. Aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal, with and without inorganic salts, exhibit surface tension depression. Methylglyoxal uptake could potentially change the optical properties, climate effects, and heterogeneous chemistry of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  5. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  6. Extending MODIS Deep Blue Aerosol Retrieval Coverage to Cases of Absorbing Aerosols Above Clouds: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Schmid, B.

    2015-01-01

    Absorbing smoke or mineral dust aerosols above clouds (AAC) are a frequent occurrence in certain regions and seasons. Operational aerosol retrievals from sensors like MODIS omit AAC because they are designed to work only over cloud-free scenes. However, AAC can in principle be quantified by these sensors in some situations (e.g. Jethva et al., 2013; Meyer et al., 2013). We present a summary of some analyses of the potential of MODIS-like instruments for this purpose, along with two case studies using airborne observations from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS; http://geo.arc.nasa.gov/sgg/AATS-website/) as a validation data source for a preliminary AAC algorithm applied to MODIS measurements. AAC retrievals will eventually be added to the MODIS Deep Blue (Hsu et al., 2013) processing chain.

  7. Satellite Retrieval of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, G.; Robles Gonzalez, C.; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Decae, R.

    SATELLITE RETRIEVAL of AEROSOL PROPERTIES G. de Leeuw, C. Robles Gonzalez, J. Kusmierczyk-Michulec and R. Decae TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory, The Hague, The Netherlands; deleeuw@fel.tno.nl Methods to retrieve aerosol properties over land and over sea were explored. The dual view offered by the ATSR-2 aboard ERS-2 was used by Veefkind et al., 1998. The retrieved AOD (aerosol optical depth) values compare favourably with collocated sun photometer measurements, with an accuracy of 0.06 +/- 0.05 in AOD. An algorithm developed for GOME on ERS-2 takes advantage of the low surface reflection in the UV (Veefkind et al., 2000). AOD values retrieved from ATSR-2 and GOME data over western Europe are consistent. The results were used to produce a map of mean AOD values over Europe for one month (Robles-Gonzalez et al., 2000). The ATSR-2 is al- gorithm is now extended with other aerosol types with the aim to apply it over the In- dian Ocean. A new algorithm is being developed for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to be launched in 2003 on the NASA EOS-AURA satellite. It is expected that, based on the different scattering and absorption properties of various aerosol types, five major aerosol classes can be distinguished. The experience with the retrieval of aerosol properties by using several wavelength bands is used to develop an algorithm for Sciamachy to retrieve aerosol properties both over land and over the ocean which takes advantage of the wavelengths from the UV to the IR. The variation of the AOD with wavelength is described by the Angstrom parameter. The AOD and the Angstrom parameter together yield information on the aerosol size distribution, integrated over the column. Analysis of sunphotometer data indicates a relation between the Angstrom parameter and the mass ratio of certain aerosols (black carbon, organic carbon and sea salt) to the total particulate matter. This relation has been further explored and was applied to satellite data over land to

  8. Light-absorbing secondary organic material formed by glyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, E. L.; Szprengiel, J.; Sareen, N.; Jen, C. N.; Giordano, M. R.; McNeill, V. F.

    2009-01-01

    Light-absorbing and high-molecular-weight secondary organic products were observed to result from the reaction of glyoxal in mildly acidic (pH=4) aqueous inorganic salt solutions mimicking aqueous tropospheric aerosol particles. High-molecular-weight (500-600 amu) products were observed when ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) or sodium chloride (NaCl) was present in the aqueous phase. The products formed in the (NH4)2SO4 solutions absorb light at UV and visible wavelengths. Substantial absorption at 300-400 nm develops within two hours, and absorption between 400-600 nm develops within days. Pendant drop tensiometry measurements show that the products are not surface-active. The experimental results along with ab initio predictions of the UV/Vis absorption of potential products suggest that an aldol condensation mechanism is active in the glyoxal-(NH4)2SO4system, resulting in the formation of pi-conjugated products. If similar products are formed in atmospheric aerosol particles, they could change the optical properties of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  9. Impacts of Snow Darkening by Absorbing Aerosols on Eurasian Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lau, William K M.; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Koster, Randal D.

    2016-01-01

    The deposition of absorbing aerosols on snow surfaces reduces snow-albedo and allows snowpack to absorb more sunlight. This so-called snow darkening effect (SDE) accelerates snow melting and leads to surface warming in spring. To examine the impact of SDE on weather and climate during late spring and early summer, two sets of NASA GEOS-5 model simulations with and without SDE are conducted. Results show that SDE-induced surface heating is particularly pronounced in Eurasian regions where significant depositions of dust transported from the North African deserts, and black carbon from biomass burning from Asia and Europe occur. In these regions, the surface heating due to SDE increases surface skin temperature by 3-6 degrees Kelvin near the snowline in spring. Surface energy budget analysis indicates that SDE-induced excess heating is associated with a large increase in surface evaporation, subsequently leading to a significant reduction in soil moisture, and increased risks of drought and heat waves in late spring to early summer. Overall, we find that rainfall deficit combined with SDE-induced dry soil in spring provide favorable condition for summertime heat waves over large regions of Eurasia. Increased frequency of summer heat waves with SDE and the region of maximum increase in heat-wave frequency are found along the snow line, providing evidence that early snowmelt by SDE may increase the risks of extreme summer heat wave. Our results suggest that climate models that do not include SDE may significantly underestimate the effect of global warming over extra-tropical continental regions.

  10. Interpretation of FRESCO cloud retrievals in case of absorbing aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Tilstra, L. G.; Stammes, P.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud and aerosol information is needed in trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements. The Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band (FRESCO) cloud algorithm employs reflectance spectra of the O2 A band around 760 nm to derive cloud pressure and effective cloud fraction. In general, clouds contribute more to the O2 A band reflectance than aerosols. Therefore, the FRESCO algorithm does not correct for aerosol effects in the retrievals and attributes the retrieved cloud information entirely to the presence of clouds, and not to aerosols. For events with high aerosol loading, aerosols may have a dominant effect, especially for almost cloud-free scenes. We have analysed FRESCO cloud data and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument on the Metop-A satellite for events with typical absorbing aerosol types, such as volcanic ash, desert dust and smoke. We find that the FRESCO effective cloud fractions are correlated with the AAI data for these absorbing aerosol events and that the FRESCO cloud pressures contain information on aerosol layer pressure. For cloud-free scenes, the derived FRESCO cloud pressures are close to those of the aerosol layer for optically thick aerosols. For cloudy scenes, if the strongly absorbing aerosols are located above the clouds, then the retrieved FRESCO cloud pressures may represent the height of the aerosol layer rather than the height of the clouds. Combining FRESCO cloud data and AAI, an estimate for the aerosol layer pressure can be given, which can be beneficial for aviation safety and operations in case of e.g. volcanic ash plumes.

  11. Light-absorbing aldol condensation products in acidic aerosols: Spectra, kinetics, and contribution to the absorption index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, Barbara; Esteve, William

    The radiative properties of aerosols that are transparent to light in the near-UV and visible, such as sulfate aerosols, can be dramatically modified when mixed with absorbing material such as soot. In a previous work we had shown that the aldol condensation of carbonyl compounds produces light-absorbing compounds in sulfuric acid solutions. In this work we report the spectroscopic and kinetic parameters necessary to estimate the effects of these reactions on the absorption index of sulfuric acid aerosols in the atmosphere. The absorption spectra obtained from the reactions of six different carbonyl compounds (acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal, 2-butanone, and trifluoroacetone) and their mixtures were compared over 190-1100 nm. The results indicated that most carbonyl compounds should be able to undergo aldol condensation. The products are oligomers absorbing light in the 300-500 nm region where few other compounds absorb, making them important for the radiative properties of aerosols. Kinetic experiments in 96-75 wt% H 2SO 4 solutions and between 273 and 314 K gave an activation energy for the rate constant of formation of the aldol products of acetaldehyde of -(70±15) kJ mol -1 in 96 wt% solution and showed that the effect of acid concentration was exponential. A complete expression for this rate constant is proposed where the absolute value in 96 wt% H 2SO 4 and at 298 K is scaled to the Henry's law coefficient for acetaldehyde and the absorption cross-section for the aldol products assumed in this work. The absorption index of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols after a 2-year residence time was estimated to 2×10 -4, optically equivalent to a content of 0.5% of soot and potentially significant for the radiative forcing of these aerosols and for satellite observations in channels where the aldol products absorb.

  12. Observations of Light-Absorbing Carbonaceous Aerosols in East and South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.; Kim, S.; Choi, W.

    2013-05-01

    Light-absorbing aerosols, such as black carbon (BC), brown carbon and mineral dust, typically constitute a small fraction of ambient particle mass but can contribute to solar radiative forcing through absorption of solar radiation and heating of the absorbing aerosol layer. Besides the direct radiative effect, the heating can evaporate clouds and change the atmospheric dynamics. In this study, we investigate the optical and radiative properties of light-absorbing aerosols from ground-based and aircraft measurements in East and South Asia within the framework of UNEP Atmospheric Brown Cloud-Asia (ABC-Asia) project and Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley (SusKat) campaign (December 2012 ~ February 2013). BC mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients measurements and radiative forcing calculations were performed at four sites: Gosan (Korea), Anmyeon (Korea), Hanimaadhoo (Maldives) and Pyramid (Nepal). No significant seasonal variations of aerosol properties, except for summer due to wet scavenging by rainfall, were observed in East Asia, whereas dramatic changes of light-absorbing aerosol properties were observed in South Asia between dry and wet monsoon periods. Although BC mass concentration in East Asia is generally higher than that observed in South Asia, BC mass concentration at Hanimaadhoo during winter dry monsoon is similar to that of East Asia. The observed solar absorption efficiency (absorption coefficient/extinction coefficient) at 550 nm at Gosan and Anmyeon is higher than that in Hanimaadhoo due to large portions of BC emission from fossil fuel combustion. Interestingly, solar absorption efficiency at Pyramid is 0.14, which is two times great than that in Hanimaadhoo and is about 40% higher than that in East Asia, though BC mass concentration at Pyramid is the lowest among four sites. Throughout the unmanned aerial vehicle experiment in Jeju, Korea during August-September 2008, long-range transport of aerosols from

  13. Modeling the Relationships Between Aerosol Properties and the Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols may affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing visible and infrared energy, They may also affect climate indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes, and by altering abundances of radiatively important gases through heterogeneous chemistry. Researchers understand which aerosol properties control the direct effect of aerosols on the radiation budget. Unfortunately, despite an abundance of data on certain types of aerosols, much work remains to be done to determine the values of these properties. For instance we have little idea about the global distribution, seasonal variation, or interannual variability of the aerosol optical depth. Also we do not know the visible light absorption properties of tropical aerosols which may contain much debris from slash and burn agriculture. A positive correlation between aerosol concentrations and albedos of marine stratus clouds is observed, and the causative microphysics is understood. However, models suggest that it is difficult to produce new particles in the marine boundary layer. Some modelers have suggested that the particles in the marine boundary layer may originate in the free troposphere and be transported into the boundary layer. Others argue that the aerosols are created in the marine boundary layer. There are no data linking aerosol concentration and cirrus cloud albedo, and models suggest cirrus properties may not be very sensitive to aerosol abundance. There is clear evidence of a radiatively significant change in the global lower stratospheric ozone abundance during the past few decades. These changes are caused by heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of particles. The rates of these reactions depend upon the chemical composition of the particles. Although rapid advances in understanding heterogeneous chemistry have been made, much remains to be done.

  14. Assessment of capabilities of multiangle imaging photo-polarimetry for atmospheric correction in presence of absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Seidel, F. C.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color is a critical tool for assessing the productivity of marine ecosystems and monitoring changes resulting from climatic or environmental influences. Yet water-leaving radiance comprises less than 10% of the signal measured from space, making correction for absorption and scattering by the intervening atmosphere imperative. Traditional ocean color retrieval algorithms utilize a standard set of aerosol models and the assumption of negligible water-leaving radiance in the near-infrared. Modern improvements have been developed to handle absorbing aerosols such as urban particulates in coastal areas and transported desert dust over the open ocean, where ocean fertilization can impact biological productivity at the base of the marine food chain. Even so, imperfect knowledge of the absorbing aerosol optical properties or their height distribution results in well-documented sources of error. In the UV, the problem of UV-enhanced absorption and nonsphericity of certain aerosol types are amplified due to the increased Rayleigh and aerosol optical depth, especially at off-nadir view angles. Multi-angle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool to better understand and retrieve the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of the work to be described is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on water leaving radiance measurement uncertainty by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard

  15. CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Properties Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol properties. Characterizing this zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects as well as for improving satellite measurements of aerosol properties. We present a statistical analysis of a global dataset of CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) Lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone extends as far as 15 km away from clouds and it is ubiquitous over all oceans. The use of only high confidence level cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD) data confirms the findings. However, the results underline the need for caution to avoid biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  16. Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S E

    2012-05-30

    Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

  17. Optical properties of aerosol contaminated cloud derived from MODIS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Linlu; Rozanov, Vladimir; Lelli, Luca; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    The presence of absorbing aerosols above/within cloud can reduce the amount of up-welling radiation in visible (VIS) and short-wave infrared and darken the spectral reflectance when compared with a spectrum of a clean cloud observed by satellite instruments (Jethva et al., 2013). Cloud properties retrieval for aerosol contaminated cases is a great challenge. Even small additional injection of aerosol particles into clouds in the cleanest regions of Earth's atmosphere will cause significant effect on those clouds and on climate forcing (Koren et al., 2014; Rosenfeld et al., 2014) because the micro-physical cloud process are non-linear with respect to the aerosol loading. The current cloud products like Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ignoring the aerosol effect for the retrieval, which may cause significant error in the satellite-derived cloud properties. In this paper, a new cloud properties retrieval method, considering aerosol effect, based on the weighting-function (WF) method, is presented. The retrieval results shows that the WF retrieved cloud properties (e.g COT) agrees quite well with MODIS COT product for relative clear atmosphere (AOT ≤ 0.4) while there is a large difference for large aerosol loading. The MODIS COT product is underestimated for at least 2 - 3 times for AOT>0.4, and this underestimation increases with the increase of AOT.

  18. Atmospheric correction of SeaWiFS ocean color imagery in the presence of absorbing aerosols off the Indian coast using a neuro-variational method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajard, J.; Moulin, C.; Thiria, S.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the atmospheric correction accuracy between the standard sea-viewing wide field-of-view sensor (SeaWiFS) algorithm and the NeuroVaria algorithm for the ocean off the Indian coast in March 1999. NeuroVaria is a general method developed to retrieve aerosol optical properties and water-leaving reflectances for all types of aerosols, including absorbing ones. It has been applied to SeaWiFS images of March 1999, during an episode of transport of absorbing aerosols coming from pollutant sources in India. Water-leaving reflectances and aerosol optical thickness estimated by the two methods were extracted along a transect across the aerosol plume for three days. The comparison showed that NeuroVaria allows the retrieval of oceanic properties in the presence of absorbing aerosols with a better spatial and temporal stability than the standard SeaWiFS algorithm. NeuroVaria was then applied to the available SeaWiFS images over a two-week period. NeuroVaria algorithm retrieves ocean products for a larger number of pixels than the standard one and eliminates most of the discontinuities and artifacts associated with the standard algorithm in presence of absorbing aerosols.

  19. Chemical Properties of Combustion Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of pyrogenic and anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. ...

  20. The effect of absorbing aerosols on Indian monsoon circulation and rainfall: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Pandithurai, G.

    2015-10-01

    Aerosol, an uncertain component of the climate system, has attracted wide attention among the researchers due to its role in hydrological cycle and radiation budget in a changing climate. According to IPCC 5th assessment report, current understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction is low to moderate, as a result they are not well represented in the climate models, and in turn are recognized as major uncertainties in the future climate projections. In South Asian monsoon regions, the aerosol forcing response to water cycle is even more complicated. Substantial amount of transported dust from Middle East countries and adjacent deserts get accumulated over Indian subcontinent (mainly North India and Indo Gangetic Plains; IGP) and further coated with black carbon (BC) produced from local emission, which make the atmospheric physics and chemistry of the aerosol more complex over the region. Here we review earlier studies and recapitulate our current understanding of absorbing aerosols on Indian monsoon circulation and rainfall from observational evidences and variety of numerical model simulations. This review begins with current understanding of the absorbing aerosols and interactions with Indian summer monsoon, followed by discussion on various working hypotheses, observational and modeling perspective, local and remote impacts. The key open questions and suggestions for future research priorities are delineated to improve the current understanding about the relationship between absorbing aerosols and Indian summer monsoon.

  1. Simultaneous retrieval of effective refractive index and density from size distribution and light scattering data: weakly absorbing aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Pekour, M.; Berg, L. K.; Shilling, J.; Flynn, C.; Mei, F.; Jefferson, A.

    2014-05-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define "weakly absorbing" as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 μm. The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE ~ 3%) and reasonable (RMSE ~ 28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49 ± 0.02) and effective density (1.68 ± 0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10

  2. In situ Measurements of Absorbing Aerosols from Urban Sources, in Maritime Environments and during Biomass Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, C.; Manvendra, D.; Chylek, P.; Arnott, P.

    2006-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols have important but still ill quantified effects on climate, visibility, cloud processes, and air quality. The compilation of aerosol scattering and absorption databases from reliable measurements is essential to reduce uncertainties in these inter-linked research areas. The atmospheric radiative balance for example, is modeled using the aerosol single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering to scattering plus absorption, SSA) as a fundamental input parameter in climate models. Sulfate aerosols with SSA values close to 1 scatter solar radiation resulting in a negative radiative forcing. However aerosol SSA values less than 1 are common when combustion processes are contributing to the aerosol sources. Absorbing aerosols directly heat the atmosphere and reduce the solar radiation at the surface. Currently, the net global anthropogenic aerosol direct radiative forcing is estimated to be around -0.5W m-2 with uncertainty of about 80% largely due to lack of understanding of SSA of sulfate-organic-soot aerosols. We present a rapidly expanding data set of direct in situ aerosol absorption and scattering measurements performed since June 2005 by photoacoustic instrument (at 781 and 870 nm), with integrated a total scattering sensor, during numerous field campaigns. Data have been collected over a wide range of aerosol sources, local environments and anthropogenic activities. Airborne measurements were performed in marine stratus off shore of the California coast and in cumulus clouds and clear air in the Houston, TX area; ground-based measurements have been performed in many locations in Mexico City; while laboratory measurements have been collected during a controlled combustion experiment of many different biomass fuels. The large dynamic range of aerosol types and conditions from these different field campaigns will be integrated to help quantify the SSA values, their variability, and their implications on the radiative forcing of climate.

  3. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    depth gradient, with AOD(500 nm) extremes from 0.1 to 1.1. On the Pacific transit from Honolulu to Hachijo AOD(500 nm) averaged 0.2, including increases to 0.4 after several storms, suggesting the strong impact of wind-generated seasalt. The AOD maximum, found in the Sea of Japan, was influenced by dust and anthropogenic sources. (4) In Beijing, single scattering albedo retrieved from AERONET sun-sky radiometry yielded midvisible SSA=0.88 with strong wavelength dependence, suggesting a significant black carbon component. SSA retrieved during dust episodes was approx. 0.90 and variable but wavelength neutral reflecting the presence of urban haze with the dust. Downwind at Anmyon Island SSA was considerably higher, approx. 0.94, but wavelength neutral for dust episodes and spectrally dependent during non dust periods. (5) Satellite retrievals show major aerosol features moving from Asia over the Pacific; however, determining seasonal-average aerosol effects is hampered by sampling frequency and large-scale cloud systems that obscure key parts of aerosol patterns. Preliminary calculations using, satellite-retrieved AOD fields and initial ACE-Asia aerosol properties (including sulfates, soot, and dust) yield clear-sky aerosol radiative effects in the seasonal-average ACE-Asia plume exceeding those of manmade greenhouse gases. Quantifying all-sky direct aerosol radiative effects is complicated by the need to define the height of absorbing aerosols with respect to cloud decks.

  4. The spatial-temporal variations in optical properties of atmosphere aerosols over China and its application in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Cheng, T.

    2013-12-01

    The atmospheric and climate response to the aerosol forcing are assessed by climate models regionally and globally under the past, present and future conditions. However, large uncertainties exist because of incomplete knowledge concerning the distribution and the physical and chemical properties of aerosols as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Reduction in these uncertainties requires long-term monitoring of detailed properties of different aerosol types. China is one of the heavily polluted areas with high concentration of aerosols in the world. The complex source, composition of China aerosol led to the worse accuracy of aerosol radiative forcing assessment in the world, which urgently calls for improvements on the understanding of China regional aerosol properties. The spatial-temporal properties of aerosol types over China are studied using the radiance measurements and inversions data at 4 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations. Five aerosol classes were identified including a coarse-size dominated aerosol type (presumably dust) and four fine-sized dominated aerosol types ranging from non-absorbing to highly absorbing fine aerosols. The mean optical properties of different aerosol types in China and their seasonal variations were also investigated. Based on the cluster analysis, the improved ground-based aerosol model is applied to the MODIS dark target inversion algorithm. Validation with MODIS official product and CE318 is also included.

  5. Aerosol properties over south india during different seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprasad, P.; Babu, C. A.; Jayakrishnan, P. R.

    Aerosols play an important role in the radiation balance and cloud properties, thereby affect the entire climatology of the earth-atmosphere system. Besides natural sources like dust, seasalt and natural sulphates, anthropogenic activities also inject aerosols like soot and industrial sulphates. Of these sea-salt and sulphates scatter the solar radiation. Soot is an absorbing aerosol while soil dust and organic matters are partly absorbing aerosols. Wind and rainfall are major factors affecting the transportation and deposition of the aerosols. India is a country blessed with plenty of monsoon rains. Winter (December to February), summer (March to May), monsoon (June to September) and post monsoon (October to November) are the four seasons over the region. Aerosol properties vary according to the season. Natural aerosols blown from the deserts have a major role in the aerosol optical depth over India. Of this, dust from Arabian desert that is carried by the winds are most important. The aerosol optical depth of south India is entirely different from that of north India. Maximum aerosol concentration is found over Gangetic plane in most of the seasons, whereas entire south India shows less aerosol optical depth. In the present study the aerosol properties of south India is analysed in general. Particular analysis is carried out for the four regions in the east and west coasts around Chennai, Kolkotha, Mumbai and Cochin. Chennai and Kolkotha are situated in the east coast whereas Cochin and Mumbai are in the west coast. These are industrial cities in India. Chennai region does not get monsoon rainfall since it is situated in the leeward side of Western ghats. But in the post monsoon season Chennai gets good amount of rainfall. Other three regions get good amount of rainfall during monsoon season. The study uses Terra MODIS, TOMS, NCEP/NCAR and TRMM data. Aerosol properties are analysed using Terra MODIS and Nimbus TOMS data. The variations of the aerosol optical

  6. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  7. Measurement-based estimates of direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2015-07-01

    The elevated layers of absorbing smoke aerosols from western African (e.g., Gabon and Congo) biomass burning activities have been frequently observed above low-level stratocumulus clouds off the African coast, which presents an excellent natural laboratory for studying the effects of aerosols above clouds (AAC) on regional energy balance in tropical and subtropical environments. Using spatially and temporally collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data sets, the top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol direct shortwave radiative effects (ARE) of absorbing aerosols above low-level water clouds in the southeast Atlantic Ocean was examined in this study. The regional averaged instantaneous ARE has been estimated to be 36.7 ± 20.5 Wm-2 (regional mean ± standard deviation) along with a mean positive OMI Aerosol Index at 1.3 in August 2006 based on multisensors measurements. The highest magnitude of instantaneous ARE can even reach 138.2 Wm-2. We assess that the 660 nm cloud optical depth (COD) values of 8-12 is the critical value above (below) which aerosol absorption (scattering) effect dominates and further produces positive (negative) ARE values. The results further show that ARE values are more sensitive to aerosols above lower COD values than cases for higher COD values. This is among the first studies to provide quantitative estimates of shortwave ARE due to AAC events from an observational perspective.

  8. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the

  9. A case study of modeled aerosol optical properties during the SAFARI 2000 campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Box, M. A.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, Jens

    2007-08-01

    We present modeled aerosol optical properties (single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter and lidar ratio) in two layers with different aerosol loadings and particle sizes, observed during the SAFARI 2000 campaign. The optical properties were calculated from aerosol size distributions retrieved from aerosol layer optical thickness spectra, measured using the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-14), and the refractive index based on the available information on aerosol chemical composition. The study focuses on differences between the results of two models for the mixture of absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol components: a layered sphere with absorbing core and non-absorbing shell, and an effective medium model. In addition, comparisons of modeled optical properties with the measurements are discussed. Because of the large difference between the single scattering albedo values (~ 0.1 at mid-visible wavelengths) obtained from different measurement methods for the case with high amount of biomass burning particles, radiative transfer calculations were carried out to estimate the radiative effect of the implied difference in aerosol absorption. For that purpose, the volume fraction of black carbon was varied to obtain a range of single scattering albedo values (0.81 – 0.91 at λ = 0.50 μm). The difference in absorption resulted in a significant difference in the instantaneous radiative forcing at the surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA), and can result in a change of the sign of the aerosol forcing at TOA from negative to positive.

  10. Surface-active and Light-absorbing Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, V. F.; Sareen, N.; Schwier, A. N.; Shapiro, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    We have observed the formation of light-absorbing, high-molecular-weight, and surface-active organics from methylgyloxal interacting with ammonium salts in aqueous aerosol mimics. Mixtures of methylglyoxal and glyoxal also form light-absorbing products and exhibit surface tension depression with a Langmuir-like dependence on initial methylglyoxal concentration. We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a volatilization flow tube inlet (Aerosol-CIMS) to characterize the product species. The results are consistent with aldol condensation products, carbon-nitrogen species, sulfur-containing compounds, and oligomeric species up to 759 amu. These observations have potentially significant implications for our understanding of the effects of SOA on climate, since a) SOA are typically treated as non-absorbing in climate models, and b) surface tension depression in aqueous aerosols by SOA material may result in increased cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. Furthermore, surface film formation could affect aerosol heterogeneous chemistry. We will also discuss aerosol flow tube O3 oxidation experiments designed to determine the atmospheric lifetimes of the observed product compounds.

  11. Amplification of ENSO effects on Indian summer monsoon by absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sang, Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present observational evidence, based on satellite aerosol measurements and MERRA reanalysis data for the period 1979-2011, indicating that absorbing aerosols can have strong influence on seasonal-to-interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, including amplification of ENSO effects. We find a significant correlation between ENSO (El Nino Southern Oscillation) and aerosol loading in April-May, with La Nina (El Nino) conditions favoring increased (decreased) aerosol accumulation over northern India, with maximum aerosol optical depth over the Arabian Sea and Northwestern India, indicative of strong concentration of dust aerosols transported from West Asia and Middle East deserts. Composite analyses based on a normalized aerosol index (NAI) show that high concentration of aerosol over northern India in April-May is associated with increased moisture transport, enhanced dynamically induced warming of the upper troposphere over the Tibetan Plateau, and enhanced rainfall over northern India and the Himalayan foothills during May-June, followed by a subsequent suppressed monsoon rainfall over all India, consistent with the elevated heat pump (EHP) hypothesis (Lau et al. in Clim Dyn 26:855-864, 2006. doi: 10.1007/s00382-006-0114-z). Further analyses from sub-sampling of ENSO years, with normal (<1-σ), and abnormal (>1-σ) NAI over northern India respectively show that the EHP may lead to an amplification of the Indian summer monsoon response to ENSO forcing, particularly with respect to the increased rainfall over the Himalayan foothills, and the warming of the upper troposphere over the Tibetan Plateau. Our results suggest that absorbing aerosol, particular desert dusts can strongly modulate ENSO influence, and possibly play important roles as a feedback agent in climate change in Asian monsoon regions.

  12. Signatures of semi-direct radiative forcing by absorbing aerosols in satellite observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, E. M.; Hosseinpour, F.; Colarco, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-direct radiative forcing of climate occurs when interactions between aerosols and radiative fluxes in the atmosphere yield a dynamical response in clouds. Semi-direct forcing is typically thought to be a positive radiative forcing whereby soot and biomass burning aerosols absorb sunlight and burn-off clouds. However, a negative semi-direct forcing is suspected in at least two regimes, the summertime Southeast Atlantic Ocean and the wintertime North Indian Ocean, where the heating profile by aerosol absorption by solar radiation is elevated above the elevation of the low clouds. Here we use a combination of satellite data and a model simulation to further characterize the signature of semi-direct radiative forcing in these two locations and elsewhere on the globe. We apply CERES albedos, Calipso profiles of aerosol extinction and cloud-top altitude, and a simulation with the Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model with meteorology constrained by MERRA and an assimilation of MODIS AOT (MERRAero). to quantify the vertical heating profile by aerosols under clear and cloudy skies. We seek to determine: (1) where aerosol heating by soot and biomass burning aerosol is occurring; (2) where vertically in the column the heating is occurring relative to the observed level of low cloud development; and (3) whether the variations of albedo with aerosol forcing suggest a positive, negative, or inconclusive semi-direct radiative forcing.

  13. Study of Aerosol Chemical Composition Based on Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Austin; Aryal, Rudra

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the variation of aerosol absorption optical properties obtained from the CIMEL Sun-Photometer measurements over three years (2012-2014) at three AERONET sites GSFC; MD Science_Center and Tudor Hill, Bermuda. These sites were chosen based on the availability of data and locations that can receive different types of aerosols from land and ocean. These absorption properties, mainly the aerosol absorption angstrom exponent, were analyzed to examine the corresponding aerosol chemical composition. We observed that the retrieved absorption angstrom exponents over the two sites, GSFC and MD Science Center, are near 1 (the theoretical value for black carbon) and with low single scattering albedo values during summer seasons indicating presence of black carbon. Strong variability of aerosol absorption properties were observed over Tudor Hill and will be analyzed based on the air mass embedded from ocean side and land side. We will also present the seasonal variability of these properties based on long-range air mass sources at these three sites. Brent Holben, NASA GSFC, AERONET, Jon Rodriguez.

  14. Optical Properties of Black and Brown Carbon Aerosols from Laboratory Combustion of Wildland Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.; Molzan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol light absorption in the solar spectral region (300 nm - 2300 nm) of the atmosphere is key for the direct aerosol radiative forcing, which is determined by aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), asymmetry parameter, and by the albedo of the underlying surface. SSA is of key importance for the sign and quantity of aerosol direct radiative forcing; that is, does the aerosol make the earth look darker (heating) or whiter (cooling)? In addition, these optical properties are needed for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth and properties. During wildland fires, aerosol optical absorption is largely determined by black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) emissions. BC is strongly absorbing throughout the solar spectrum, while BrC absorption strongly increases toward shorter wavelength and can be neglected in the red and infrared. Optical properties of BrC emitted from wildland fires are poorly understood and need to be studied as function of fuel type and moisture content and combustion conditions. While much more is known about BC optical properties, knowledge for the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region is still lacking and critically needed for satellite remote sensing (e.g., TOMS, OMI) and for modeling of tropospheric photochemistry. Here, a project to better characterize biomass burning aerosol optical properties is described. It utilizes a laboratory biomass combustion chamber to generate aerosols through combustion of different wildland fuels of global and regional importance. Combustion aerosol optics is characterized with an integrating nephelometer to measure aerosol light scattering and a photoacoustic instrument to measure aerosol light absorption. These measurements will yield optical properties that are needed to improve qualitative and quantitative understanding of aerosol radiative forcing and satellite retrievals for absorbing carbonaceous aerosols from combustion of wildland fuels.

  15. The Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on the Fraction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veroustraete, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol pollution attracts a growing interest from atmospheric scientists with regard to their impact on health, the global climate and vegetation stress. A hypothesis, less investigated, is whether atmospheric aerosol interactions in the solar radiation field affect the amount of radiation absorbed by vegetation canopies and hence terrestrial vegetation productivity. Typically, aerosols affect vegetation canopy radiation absorption efficiency by altering the physical characteristics of solar radiation incoming on for example a forest canopy. It has been illustrated, that increasing mixing ratio's of atmospheric particulate matter lead to a higher fraction of diffuse sunlight as opposed to direct sunlight. It can be demonstrated, based on the application of atmospheric (MODTRAN) and leaf/canopy radiative transfer (LIBERTY/SPRINT) models, that radiation absorption efficiency in the PAR band of Picea like forests increases with increasing levels of diffuse radiation. It can be documented - on a theoretical basis - as well, that increasing aerosol loads in the atmosphere, induce and increased canopy PAR absorption efficiency. In this paper it is suggested, that atmospheric aerosols have to be taken into account when estimating vegetation gross primary productivity (GPP). The results suggest that Northern hemisphere vegetation CO2 uptake magnitude may increase with increasing atmospheric aerosol loads. Many climate impact scenario's related to vegetation productivity estimates, do not take this phenomenon into account. Boldly speaking, the results suggest a larger sink function for terrestrial vegetation than generally accepted. Keywords: Aerosols, vegetation, fAPAR, CO2 uptake, diffuse radiation.

  16. Improving satellite retrieved aerosol microphysical properties using GOCART data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Kahn, R.; Chin, M.; Garay, M. J.; Chen, L.; Liu, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The Multi-Angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite can provide more reliable Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD, τ) and more particle information, such as constraints on particle size (Angström exponent or ANG, α), particle shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA, ω), than many other satellite instruments. However, MISR's ability to retrieve aerosol properties is weakened at low AOD levels. When aerosol-type information content is low, many candidate aerosol mixtures can match the observed radiances. We propose an algorithm to improve MISR aerosol retrievals by constraining MISR mixtures' ANG and absorbing AOD (AAOD) with Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model-simulated aerosol properties. To demonstrate this approach, we calculated MISR aerosol optical properties over the contiguous US from 2006 to 2009. Sensitivities associated with the thresholds of MISR-GOCART differences were analyzed according to the agreement between our results (AOD, ANG, and AAOD) and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) observations. Overall, our AOD has a good agreement with AERONET because the MISR AOD retrieval is not sensitive to different mixtures under many retrieval conditions. The correlation coefficient (r) between our ANG and AERONET improves to 0.45 from 0.29 for the MISR Version 22 standard product and 0.43 for GOCART when all data points are included. However, when only cases having AOD > 0.2, the MISR product itself has r ~ 0.40, and when only AOD > 0.2 and the best-fitting mixture are considered, r ~ 0.49. So as expected, the ANG improvement occurs primarily when the model constraint is applied in cases where the particle type information content of the MISR radiances is low. Regression analysis for AAOD shows that MISR Version 22 and GOCART misestimate AERONET by a ratio (mean retrieved AAOD to mean AERONET AAOD) of 0.5; our method improves this ratio to 0.74. Large discrepancies are found through an inter

  17. Organic Aerosols from SÃO Paulo and its Relationship with Aerosol Absorption and Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Brito, J. F.; Rizzo, L. V.

    2012-12-01

    The megacity of São Paulo with its 19 million people and 7 million cars is a challenge from the point of view of air pollution. High levels of organic aerosols, PM10, black carbon and ozone and the peculiar situation of the large scale use of ethanol fuel makes it a special case. Little is known about the impact of ethanol on air quality and human health and the increase of ethanol as vehicle fuel is rising worldwide An experiment was designed to physico-chemical properties of aerosols in São Paulo, as well as their optical properties. Aerosol size distribution in the size range of 1nm to 10 micrometers is being measured with a Helsinki University SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer), an NAIS (Neutral ion Spectrometer) and a GRIMM OPC (Optical Particle Counter). Optical properties are being measured with a TSI Nephelometer and a Thermo MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). A CIMEL sunphotometer from the AERONET network measure the aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. The ACSM was operated for 3 months continuosly during teh wintertime of 2012. The measured total particle concentration typically varies between 10,000 and 30,000 cm-3 being the lowest late in the night and highest around noon and frequently exceeding 50,000 cm-3. Clear diurnal patterns in aerosol optical properties were observed. Scattering and absorption coefficients typically range between 20 and 100 Mm-1 at 450 nm, and between 10 to 40 Mm-1 at 637 nm, respectively, both of them peaking at 7:00 local time, the morning rush hour. The corresponding single scattering albedo varies between 0.50 and 0.85, indicating a significant contribution of primary absorbing particles to the aerosol population. During the first month a total of seven new particle formation events were observed with growth rates ranging from 9 to 25

  18. Absorbing Aerosols Above Cloud: Detection, Quantitative Retrieval, and Radiative Forcing from Satellite-based Passive Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jethva, H.; Torres, O.; Remer, L. A.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    Light absorbing particles such as carbonaceous aerosols generated from biomass burning activities and windblown dust particles can exert a net warming effect on climate; the strength of which depends on the absorption capacity of the particles and brightness of the underlying reflecting background. When advected over low-level bright clouds, these aerosols absorb the cloud reflected radiation from ultra-violet (UV) to shortwave-IR (SWIR) and makes cloud scene darker-a phenomenon commonly known as "cloud darkening". The apparent "darkening" effect can be seen by eyes in satellite images as well as quantitatively in the spectral reflectance measurements made by space borne sensors over regions where light absorbing carbonaceous and dust aerosols overlay low-level cloud decks. Theoretical radiative transfer simulations support the observational evidence, and further reveal that the strength of the cloud darkening and its spectral signature (or color ratio) between measurements at two wavelengths are a bi-function of aerosol and cloud optical thickness (AOT and COT); both are measures of the total amount of light extinction caused by aerosols and cloud, respectively. Here, we developed a retrieval technique, named as the "color ratio method" that uses the satellite measurements at two channels, one at shorter wavelength in the visible and one at longer wavelength in the shortwave-IR for the simultaneous retrieval of AOT and COT. The present technique requires assumptions on the aerosol single-scattering albedo and aerosol-cloud separation which are supplemented by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and space borne CALIOP lidar measurements. The retrieval technique has been tested making use of the near-UV and visible reflectance observations made by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for distinct above-cloud smoke and dust aerosol events observed seasonally over the southeast and tropical Atlantic Ocean

  19. Measuring Aerosol Optical Properties with the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veefkind, J. P.; Torres, O.; Syniuk, A.; Decae, R.; deLeeuw, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is the Dutch-Finnish contribution to the NASA EOS-Aura mission scheduled for launch in January 2004. OM1 is an imaging spectrometer that will measure the back-scattered Solar radiance between 270 an 500 nm. With its relatively high spatial resolution (13x24 sq km at nadir) and daily global coverage. OM1 will make a major contribution to our understanding of atmospheric chemistry and to climate research. OM1 will provide data continuity with the TOMS instruments. One of the pleasant surprises of the TOMS data record was its information on aerosol properties. First, only the absorbing aerosol index, which is sensitive to elevated lay- ers of aerosols such as desert dust and smoke aerosols, was derived. Recently these methods were further improved to yield aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over land and ocean for 19 years of TOMS data (1979-1992,1997-2002), making it one of the longest and most valuable time series for aerosols presently available. Such long time series are essential to quantify the effect of aerosols on the Earth& climate. The OM1 instrument is better suited to measure aerosols than the TOMS instruments because of the smaller footprint, and better spectral coverage. The better capabilities of OMI will enable us to provide an improved aerosol product, but the knowledge will also be used for further analysis of the aerosol record from TOMS. The OM1 aerosol product that is currently being developed for OM1 combines the TOMS experience and the multi-spectral techniques that are used in the visible and near infrared. The challenge for this new product is to provide aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo from the near ultraviolet to the visible (330-500 nm) over land and ocean. In this presentation the methods for deriving the OM1 aerosol product will be presented. Part of these methods developed for OM1 can already be applied to TOMS data and results of such analysis will be shown.

  20. Global Analysis of Aerosol Properties Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waquet, F.; Peers, F.; Ducos, F.; Goloub, P.; Platnick, S. E.; Riedi, J.; Tanre, D.; Thieuleux, F.

    2013-01-01

    The seasonal and spatial varability of Aerosol Above Cloud (AAC) properties are derived from passive satellite data for the year 2008. A significant amount of aerosols are transported above liquid water clouds on the global scale. For particles in the fine mode (i.e., radius smaller than 0.3 m), including both clear sky and AAC retrievals increases the global mean aerosol optical thickness by 25(+/- 6%). The two main regions with man-made AAC are the tropical Southeast Atlantic, for biomass burning aerosols, and the North Pacific, mainly for pollutants. Man-made AAC are also detected over the Arctic during the spring. Mineral dust particles are detected above clouds within the so-called dust belt region (5-40 N). AAC may cause a warming effect and bias the retrieval of the cloud properties. This study will then help to better quantify the impacts of aerosols on clouds and climate.

  1. Properties of aerosol processed by ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Adler, G.; Moise, T.; Erlick-Haspel, C.

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that highly porous aerosol (HPA) can form in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere when ice particles encounter sub-saturation leading to ice sublimation similar to freeze drying. This process can occur at the lower layers of cirrus clouds (few km), at anvils of high convective clouds and thunderstorms, in clouds forming in atmospheric gravitational waves, in contrails and in high convective clouds injecting to the stratosphere. A new experimental system that simulates freeze drying of proxies for atmospheric aerosol at atmospheric pressure was constructed and various proxies for atmospheric soluble aerosol were studied. The properties of resulting HPA were characterized by various methods. It was found that the resulting aerosol have larger sizes (extent depends on substance and mixing), lower density (largevoid fraction), lower optical extinction and higher CCN activity and IN activity. Implication of HPA's unique properties and their atmospheric consequences to aerosol processing in ice clouds and to cloud cycles will be discussed.

  2. Heterogeneous Photochemistry and Optical Properties of Mineral Dust Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassian, Vicki

    2012-02-01

    It is now widely recognized that heterogeneous reactions of mineral dust aerosol with trace atmospheric gases impact the chemical balance of the atmosphere and the physicochemical properties of these particles. Field studies using single particle analysis, have now shown that the chemistry is mineralogy specific and follows the trends expected from laboratory studies. These laboratory studies, which were initiated over a decade ago, have focused on the nighttime chemistry of mineral dust aerosol which is really only ``half'' the story. This talk will focus on two aspects of solar light interaction with mineral dust aerosol. First, the heterogeneous photochemistry of adsorbed chromophores (e.g. nitrate ion) and light absorbing components of mineral dust (iron oxides and titanium dioxide) is discussed. These heterogeneous photochemical reactions are poorly understood and laboratory studies to better quantify these reactions in order to determine the impact on the chemical balance of the atmosphere are needed, as will be discussed. Second, the optical properties of mineral dust aerosol measured by extinction infrared spectroscopy and visible light scattering show that shape effects are extremely important for mineral dust aerosol.

  3. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  4. Simultaneous retrieval of effective refractive index and density from size distribution and light-scattering data: weakly absorbing aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Pekour, M.; Berg, L. K.; Shilling, J.; Flynn, C.; Mei, F.; Jefferson, A.

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define "weakly absorbing" as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 μm. The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from mobility and aerodynamic particle size spectrometers commonly referred to as a scanning mobility particle sizer and an aerodynamic particle sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE ~ 3%) and reasonable (RMSE ~ 28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49 ± 0.02) and effective density (1.68 ± 0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the

  5. Effects of Absorbing Aerosols on Accelerated Melting of Snowpack in the Tibetan-Himalayas Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2011-01-01

    The impacts of absorbing aerosol on melting of snowpack in the Hindu-Kush-Tibetan-Himalayas (HKTH) region are studied using NASA satellite and GEOS-5 GCM. Results from GCM experiments shows that a 8-10% in the rate of melting of snowpack over the western Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau can be attributed to the aerosol elevated-heat-pump (EHP) feedback effect (Lau et al. 2008), initiated by the absorption of solar radiation by absorbing aerosols accumulated over the Indo-Gangetic Plain and Himalayas foothills. On the other hand, deposition of black carbon on snow surface was estimated to give rise to a reduction in snow surface albedo of 2 - 5%, and an increased annual runoff of 9-24%. From case studies using satellite observations and re-analysis data, we find consistent signals of possible impacts of dust and black carbon aerosol in blackening snow surface, in accelerating spring melting of snowpack in the HKHT, and consequentially in influencing shifts in long-term Asian summer monsoon rainfall pattern.

  6. Scattered-field FDTD and PSTD algorithms with CPML absorbing boundary conditions for light scattering by aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Videen, Gorden; Fu, Qiang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2013-12-01

    As fundamental parameters for polarized-radiative-transfer calculations, the single-scattering phase matrix of irregularly shaped aerosol particles must be accurately modeled. In this study, a scattered-field finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model and a scattered-field pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) model are developed for light scattering by arbitrarily shaped dielectric aerosols. The convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used to truncate the computational domain. It is found that the PSTD method is generally more accurate than the FDTD in calculation of the single-scattering properties given similar spatial cell sizes. Since the PSTD can use a coarser grid for large particles, it can lower the memory requirement in the calculation. However, the Fourier transformations in the PSTD need significantly more CPU time than simple subtractions in the FDTD, and the fast Fourier transform requires a power of 2 elements in calculations, thus using the PSTD could not significantly reduce the CPU time required in the numerical modeling. Furthermore, because the scattered-field FDTD/PSTD equations include incident-wave source terms, the FDTD/PSTD model allows for the inclusion of an arbitrarily incident wave source, including a plane parallel wave or a Gaussian beam like those emitted by lasers usually used in laboratory particle characterizations, etc. The scattered-field FDTD and PSTD light-scattering models can be used to calculate single-scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped aerosol particles over broad size and wavelength ranges.

  7. Remote sensing of aerosol properties during CARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Pekour, Mikhail; Flynn, Connor; Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram T.

    2011-11-01

    One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small (~0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 μm) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

  8. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Properties during CARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram Thomas

    2011-10-01

    One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small ({approx}0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 um) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

  9. Spectral Absorption Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Bond, T. C.; Quinn, P. K.; Sierau, B.

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the solar spectral absorption optical depth of atmospheric aerosols for specific case studies during several field programs (three cases have been reported previously; two are new results). We combined airborne measurements of the solar net radiant flux density and the aerosol optical depth with a detailed radiative transfer model for all but one of the cases. The field programs (SAFARI 2000, ACE Asia, PRIDE, TARFOX, INTEX-A) contained aerosols representing the major absorbing aerosol types: pollution, biomass burning, desert dust and mixtures. In all cases the spectral absorption optical depth decreases with wavelength and can be approximated with a power-law wavelength dependence (Absorption Angstrom Exponent or AAE). We compare our results with other recent spectral absorption measurements and attempt to briefly summarize the state of knowledge of aerosol absorption spectra in the atmosphere. We discuss the limitations in using the AAE for calculating the solar absorption. We also discuss the resulting spectral single scattering albedo for these cases.

  10. Vegetation fires, absorbing aerosols and smoke plume characteristics in diverse biomass burning regions of Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Vadrevu, Krishna; Lasko, Kristofer; Giglio, Louis; Justice, Chris

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we explored the relationships between the satellite-retrieved fire counts (FC), fire radiative power (FRP) and aerosol indices using multi-satellite datasets at a daily time-step covering ten different biomass burning regions in Asia. We first assessed the variations in MODIS-retrieved aerosol optical depths (AOD’s) in agriculture, forests, plantation and peat land burning regions and then used MODIS FC and FRP (hereafter FC/FRP) to explain the variations in AOD characteristics. Results suggest that tropical broadleaf forests in Laos burn more intensively than the other vegetation fires. FC/FRP-AOD correlations in different agricultural residue burning regions did not exceed 20% whereas in forest regions they reached 40%. To specifically account for absorbing aerosols, we used Ozone Monitoring Instrument-derived aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) and UV aerosol index (UVAI). Results suggest relatively high AAOD and UVAI values in forest fires compared with peat and agriculture fires. Further, FC/FRP could explain a maximum of 29% and 53% of AAOD variations, whereas FC/FRP could explain at most 33% and 51% of the variation in agricultural and forest biomass burning regions, respectively. Relatively, UVAI was found to be a better indicator than AOD and AAOD in both agriculture and forest biomass burning plumes. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations data showed vertically elevated aerosol profiles greater than 3.2-5.3 km altitude in the forest fire plumes compared to 2.2-3.9 km and less than 1 km in agriculture and peat-land fires, respectively. We infer the need to assimilate smoke plume height information for effective characterization of pollutants from different sources.

  11. A study of remotely sensed aerosol properties from ground-based sun and sky scanning radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, David M.

    Aerosol particles impact human health by degrading air quality and affect climate by heating or cooling the atmosphere. The Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) of Northern India, one of the most populous regions in the world, produces and is impacted by a variety of aerosols including pollution, smoke, dust, and mixtures of them. The NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) mesoscale distribution of Sun and sky-pointing instruments in India was established to measure aerosol characteristics at sites across the IGP and around Kanpur, India, a large urban and industrial center in the IGP, during the 2008 pre-monsoon (April-June). This study focused on detecting spatial and temporal variability of aerosols, validating satellite retrievals, and classifying the dominant aerosol mixing states and origins. The Kanpur region typically experiences high aerosol loading due to pollution and smoke during the winter and high aerosol loading due to the addition of dust to the pollution and smoke mixture during the pre-monsoon. Aerosol emissions in Kanpur likely contribute up to 20% of the aerosol loading during the pre-monsoon over the IGP. Aerosol absorption also increases significantly downwind of Kanpur indicating the possibility of the black carbon emissions from aerosol sources such as coal-fired power plants and brick kilns. Aerosol retrievals from satellite show a high bias when compared to the mesoscale distributed instruments around Kanpur during the pre-monsoon with few high quality retrievals due to imperfect aerosol type and land surface characteristic assumptions. Aerosol type classification using the aerosol absorption, size, and shape properties can identify dominant aerosol mixing states of absorbing dust and black carbon particles. Using 19 long-term AERONET sites near various aerosol source regions (Dust, Mixed, Urban/Industrial, and Biomass Burning), aerosol absorption property statistics are expanded upon and show significant differences when compared to previous work

  12. North Atlantic Aerosol Radiative Effects Based on Satellite Measurements and Aerosol Intensive Properties from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.

    2000-01-01

    We estimate the impact of North Atlantic aerosols on the net shortwave flux at the tropopause by combining maps of satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) with model aerosol properties. We exclude African dust, primarily by restricting latitudes to 25-60 N. Aerosol properties were determined via column closure analyses in two recent experiments, TARFOX and ACE 2. The analyses use in situ measurements of aerosol composition and air- and ship-borne sunphotometer measurements of AOD spectra. The resulting aerosol model yields computed flux sensitivities (dFlux/dAOD) that agree with measurements by airborne flux radiometers in TARFOX. It has a midvisible single-scattering albedo of 0.9, which is in the range obtained from in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption in both TARFOX and ACE 2. Combining seasonal maps of AVHRR-derived midvisible AOD with the aerosol model yields maps of 24-hour average net radiative flux changes at the tropopause. For cloud-free conditions, results range from -9 W/sq m near the eastern US coastline in the summer to -1 W/sq m in the mid-Atlantic during winter; the regional annual average is -3.5 W/sq m. Using a non- absorbing aerosol model increases these values by about 30%. We estimate the effect of clouds using ISCCP cloud-fraction maps. Because ISCCP midlatitude North Atlantic cloud fractions are relatively large, they greatly reduce the computed aerosol-induced flux changes. For example, the regional annual average decreases from -3.5 W/sq m to -0.8 W/sq m. We compare results to previous model calculations for a variety of aerosol types.

  13. Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Kahn, Ralph A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Yu, Hongbin; Rind, David; Feingold, Graham; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Streets, David G.; DeCola, Phillip; Halthore, Rangasayi

    2009-01-01

    This report critically reviews current knowledge about global distributions and properties of atmospheric aerosols, as they relate to aerosol impacts on climate. It assesses possible next steps aimed at substantially reducing uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing estimates. Current measurement techniques and modeling approaches are summarized, providing context. As a part of the Synthesis and Assessment Product in the Climate Change Science Program, this assessment builds upon recent related assessments, including the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4, 2007) and other Climate Change Science Program reports. The objectives of this report are (1) to promote a consensus about the knowledge base for climate change decision support, and (2) to provide a synthesis and integration of the current knowledge of the climate-relevant impacts of anthropogenic aerosols for policy makers, policy analysts, and general public, both within and outside the U.S government and worldwide.

  14. Radio-absorbing properties of nickel-containing schungite powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyn'kov, L. M.; Borbot'ko, T. V.; Krishtopova, E. A.

    2009-05-01

    A nickel-containing shungite powder has been synthesized by means of chemical reduction from aqueous solutions. The chemical composition and radio-absorbing properties of this powder have been studied.

  15. Influences of external vs. core-shell mixing on aerosol optical properties at various relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties of external and core-shell mixtures of aerosol species present in the atmosphere are calculated in this study for different relative humidities. Core-shell Mie calculations are performed using the values of radii, refractive indices and densities of aerosol species that act as core and shell, and the core-shell radius ratio. The single scattering albedo (SSA) is higher when the absorbing species (black carbon, BC) is the core, while for a sulfate core SSA does not vary significantly as the BC in the shell dominates the absorption. Absorption gets enhanced in core-shell mixing of absorbing and scattering aerosols when compared to their external mixture. Thus, SSA is significantly lower for a core-shell mixture than their external mixture. SSA is more sensitive to core-shell ratio than mode radius when BC is the core. The extinction coefficient, SSA and asymmetry parameter are higher for external mixing when compared to BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell), and water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) mixtures in the relative humidity range of 0 to 90%. Spectral SSA exhibits the behaviour of the species which acts as a shell in core-shell mixing. The asymmetry parameter for an external mixture of water soluble aerosol and BC is higher than BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell) mixing and increases as function of relative humidity. The asymmetry parameter for the water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) is independent of relative humidity as BC is hydrophobic. The asymmetry parameter of the core-shell mixture decreases when BC aerosols are involved in mixing, as the asymmetry parameter of BC is lower. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) of core-shell mixtures increases at a higher rate when the relative humidity exceeds 70% in continental clean and urban aerosol models, whereas AOD remains the same when the relative humidity exceeds 50% in maritime aerosol models. The SSA for continental aerosols varies for core-shell mixing of water soluble

  16. Aerosol property retrieval from geostationary observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Yves

    The Meteosat satellites play an important role for the generation of consistent long time series of aerosol properties. This importance relies on (i) the long duration of past (Meteosat First Generation, MFG) starting in 1982, present (Meteosat Second Generation, MSG) and future (Meteosat Third Generation, MTG) missions and (ii) their frequent cycle of acquisition that can be used to document the anisotropy of the surface and therefore the lower boundary condition for aerosol retrieval over land surfaces. Hence, a similar approach is used for the processing of each Meteosat generation based on a joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol properties using an Optimal Estimation approach. Daily accumulation of the frequent Meteosat observations is used to discriminate the radiative effects that result from the surface anisotropy, from those caused by the aerosol scattering. The inverted forward model explicitly accounts for the surface anisotropy and the multiple scattering for the coupled surface-atmosphere system. Pinty et al. (2000) pioneered with the development of an original method to characterise simultaneously surface anisotropy and atmospheric scattering properties for the processing of MFG. Although these observations are limited to one single large VIS band poorly characterised, the main advantage of MFG relies in the duration of the archive (1982 - 2006), knowing that prior to 2000 space observations were very scarce. Despite these radiometric limitations, it is possible to detect major aerosol events like dust storms, fire plumes or pollution events, even over land surfaces. SEVIRI, on-board MSG, offers additional capabilities with its three solar channels and 15 min repeat cycle. AOD retrieval is much more accurate than with MFG and it is possible to discriminate among various aerosol classes. The additional FCI solar channels on-board MTG will offer improved capabilities with respect to MSG/SEVIRI for the retrieval of aerosol concentration and

  17. Ground-based Network and Supersite Measurements for Studying Aerosol Properties and Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations contain large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite datasets. The development and deployment of AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sunphotometer network and SMART-COMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile supersite are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To characterize the regional natural and anthropogenic aerosols, AERONET is an internationally federated network of unique sunphotometry that contains more than 250 permanent sites worldwide. Since 1993, there are more than 480 million aerosol optical depth observations and about 15 sites have continuous records longer than 10 years for annual/seasonal trend analyses. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instrument into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over eight years, SMART-COMMIT have gradually refine( and been proven vital for field deployment. In this paper, we will demonstrate the

  18. Associative study of Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) and precipitation in India during monsoon season (2005 to 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Shivali; Mehta, Manu; Singh, Ankit

    2016-05-01

    Based on their interaction with solar radiations, aerosols may be categorized as absorbing or scattering in nature. The absorbing aerosols are coarser and influence precipitation mainly due to microphysical effect (participating in the formation of Cloud Condensation Nuclei) and radiative forcing (by absorbing electromagnetic radiations). The prominent absorbing aerosols found in India are Black Carbon, soil dust, sand and mineral dust. Their size, distribution, and characteristics vary spatially and temporally. This paper aims at showing the spatio-temporal variation of Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) and precipitation over the four most polluted zones of Indian sub-continent (Indo-Gangetic plains 1, Indo-Gangetic plains 2, Central and Southern India) for monsoon season (June, July, August, September) during the last decade (2005 to 2014). Zonal averages AAI have been found to be exhibiting an increasing trend, hence region-wise correlations have been computed between AAI and precipitation during monsoon. Daily Absorption Aerosol Index (AAI) obtained from Aura OMI Aerosol Global Gridded Data Product-OMAEROe (V003) and monthly precipitation from TRMM 3B42-V7 gridded data have been used.

  19. A Long-term Record of Saharan Dust Aerosol Properties from TOMS Observations: Optical Depth and Single Scattering Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, P. K.; Herman, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction between the strong Rayleigh scattering in the near UV spectral region (330-380 nm) and the processes of aerosol absorption and scattering, produce a clear spectral signal in the upwelling radiance at the top of the atmosphere. This interaction is the basis of the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) aerosol retrieval technique that can be used for their characterization and to differentiate non-absorbing sulfates from strongly UV-absorbing aerosols such as mineral dust. For absorbing aerosols, the characterization is in terms of the optical depth and single scattering albedo with assumptions about the aerosol plume height. The results for non-absorbing aerosols are not dependent on plume height. Although iron compounds represent only between 5% to 8% of desert dust aerosol mass, hematite (Fe2O3) accounts for most of the near UV absorption. Because of the large ultraviolet absorption characteristic of hematite, the near UV method of aerosol sensing is especially suited for the detection and characterization of desert dust aerosols. Using the combined record of near UV measurements by the Nimbus7 (1978-1992) and Earth Probe (1996-present) TOMS instruments, a global longterm climatology of near UV optical depth and single scattering albedo has been produced. The multi-year long record of mineral aerosol properties over the area of influence of the Saharan desert, will be discussed.

  20. Optical properties of aerosols over the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, C.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Smolik, J.; Zdimal, V.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Colbeck, I.

    Measurements of aerosol optical properties, size distribution and chemical composition were conducted at Finokalia, a remote coastal site on the Greek island of Crete (35°19'N, 25°40'E) during July 2000 and January 2001. During the summer campaign the total scattering coefficient, σ, (at a wavelength of 550 nm) ranged from 13 to 120 Mm -1 (mean=44.2 Mm -1, standard deviation=17.5) whilst during the winter it ranged from 7.22 to 37.8 Mm -1 (mean=18.42 Mm -1, standard deviation=6.61). A distinct diurnal variation in scattering coefficients was observed, with minima occurring during the early morning and maxima in the late afternoon during the summer and late evening during the winter. The mean value of the Ångström exponent was 1.47 during the summer and 1.28 during the winter, suggesting a larger fraction of smaller particles at the site during the summer. This was confirmed by continuous measurements of the aerosol size distribution. An analysis of the single scattering albedo suggests that there is a more absorbing fraction in the particle composition in the summer than during the winter. An investigation of air mass origins on aerosol optical properties indicated that those from Turkey and Central/Eastern Europe were highly polluted with a corresponding impact on aerosol optical properties. A linear relationship was obtained between the total scattering coefficient and both the non-sea-salt sulphate concentrations and the fine aerosol fraction.

  1. Polarity and oxidation level of visible absorbers in model organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifkha Kameel, F.; Lee, S. H.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Colussi, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    How to parametrize the absorptivity of organic aerosols in atmospheric radiative models remains uncertain. Here we report that the λ = 400 nm absorbers in model aerosol mixtures elute as weakly polar species in reversed-phase chromatography. Typical among them, the m/z = 269 (C12H13O7-, O/C = 0.58) isomers detected by mass spectrometry possess Cdbnd O groups linked by Cdbnd C bridges. More polar species, such as the m/z = 289 (C11H13O9-, O/C = 0.82) polyacids, are instead colorless. On this basis we argue that visible absorptivity, which develops from extended conjugation among chromophores, may not increase monotonically with oxidation level.

  2. Comparison of modeled optical properties of Saharan mineral dust aerosols with SAMUM lidar and photometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Wiegner, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosols are, for example, relevant for the radiative transfer in Earth's atmosphere. An important source of information on this aerosol type is provided by remote sensing using lidar systems and sun/sky photometers. We investigate the sensitivity of lidar and photometer observations to the microphysical aerosol properties in a numerical study. Knowledge of this sensitivity is required for the development of microphysical retrieval algorithms. Until recently, such retrieval algorithms were applied only to lidar or photometer observations. Quite different sensitivities for lidar and photometer are found in our study, suggesting that synergistic effects can be expected from combining the observations from both techniques. Furthermore, we compare the modeled aerosol properties to observations of Saharan mineral dust aerosols performed during the SAMUM field campaign. We determined aerosol ensembles that are consistent with the lidar as well as the photometer observations, confirming the feasibility of combining the observations from both techniques. The consistent aerosol ensembles are based on the desert mixture from the OPAC aerosol dataset, and were improved by considering mixing of absorbing and non-absorbing irregularly shaped particles.

  3. Aerosol Characterization and New Instrumentation for Better Understanding Snow Radiative Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    Snow albedo is determined by snowpack thickness and grain size, but also affected by contamination with light-absorbing, microscopic (e.g., mineral dust, combustion aerosols, bio-aerosols) and macroscopic (e.g., microalgae, plant debris, sand, organisms) compounds. Most currently available instruments for measuring snow albedo utilize the natural, downward flux of solar radiation and the reflected upward flux. This reliance on solar radiation (and, thus, large zenith angles and clear-sky conditions) leads to severe constraints, preventing characterization of detailed diurnal snow albedo cycles. Here, we describe instrumentation and methodologies to address these limitations with the development and deployment of new snow radiation sensors for measuring surface spectral and in-snow radiative properties. This novel instrumentation will be tested at the CRREL/UCSB Eastern Sierra (CUES) Snow Study Site at Mammoth Mountain, which is extensively instrumented for characterizing snow properties including snow albedo and surface morphology. However, it has been lacking instrumentation for the characterization of aerosols that can be deposited on the snow surface through dry and wet deposition. Currently, we are installing aerosol instrumentation at the CUES site, which are also described. This includes instruments for the multi-wavelength measurement of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients and for the characterization of aerosol size distribution. Knowledge of aerosol concentration and physical and optical properties will allow for the study of aerosol deposition and modification of snow albedo and for establishing an aerosol climatology for the CUES site.

  4. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can c...

  5. Investigation of the seasonal variations of aerosol physicochemical properties and their impact on cloud condensation nuclei number concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Timothy S.

    Aerosols are among the most complex yet widely studied components of the atmosphere not only due to the seasonal variability of their physical and chemical properties but also their effects on climate change. The three main aerosol types that are known to affect the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere are: mineral dust, anthropogenic pollution, and biomass burning aerosols. In order to understand how these aerosols affect the atmosphere, this dissertation addresses the following three scientific questions through a combination of surface and satellite observations: SQ1: What are the seasonal and regional variations of aerosol physico-chemical properties at four selected Asian sites? SQ2: How do these aerosol properties change during transpacific and intra-continental long range transport? SQ3: What are the impacts of aerosol properties on marine boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei number concentration? This dissertation uses an innovative approach to classify aerosol properties by region and season to address SQ1. This is useful because this method provides an additional dimension when investigating the physico-chemical properties of aerosols by linking a regional and seasonal dependence to both the aerosol direct and indirect effects. This method involves isolating the aerosol physico-chemical properties into four separate regions using AERONET retrieved Angstrom exponent (AEAOD) and single scattering co-albedo (o oabs) to denote aerosol size and absorptive properties. The aerosols events are then clustered by season. The method is first applied to four AERONET sites representing single mode aerosol dominant regions: weakly absorbing pollution (NASA Goddard), strongly absorbing pollution (Mexico City), mineral dust (Solar Village), and biomass burning smoke (Alta Floresta). The method is then applied to four Asian sites that represent complicated aerosol components. There are strong regional and seasonal influences of the four aerosol types over the

  6. Microwave-absorbing properties of Co-filled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Haiyan; Zhu Hong Guo Hongfan; Yu Liufang

    2008-10-02

    Co-filled carbon nanotubes composites were synthesized via using a simple and efficient wet chemistry solution method. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Microwave-absorbing properties were investigated by measuring complex permittivity and complex permeability of the absorber in a frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The reflection loss (R.L.), matching frequency (f{sub m}) and matching thickness (d{sub m}) were calculated using the theory of the absorbing wall. The electromagnetic properties and microwave-absorbing characteristics effects of the modified carbon nanotubes by the encapsulation of metal Co were investigated. A matching thickness is found corresponding to a matching frequency. The maximum reflection loss is about -39.32 dB and the bandwidth corresponding to the reflection loss below -10 dB is 3.47 GHz. With increasing thickness, the maximum reflection loss shifts to lower frequency.

  7. Influence of shape on the optical properties of hematite aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veghte, Daniel P.; Moore, Justin E.; Jensen, Lasse; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2015-07-01

    Mineral dust particles are the second highest emitted aerosol type by mass. Due to changes in particle size, composition, and shape that are caused by physical processes and reactive chemistry, optical properties vary during transport, contributing uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing. Hematite is the major absorbing species of mineral dust. In this study, we analyzed the extinction cross sections of nigrosin and hematite particles using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy (CRD-AES) and have measured particle shape and size distributions using transmission electron microscopy. Nigrosin was also used in this study as a spherical standard for absorbing particles. The size-selected nigrosin particles have a narrow size distribution, with extinction cross sections that are described by Mie theory. In contrast, the size distribution of size-selected hematite particles is more polydisperse. The extinction cross sections were modeled using Mie theory and the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The DDA was used to model more complex shapes that account for the surface roughness and particle geometry. Of the four models used, Mie theory was the simplest to implement, but had significant error with a 26.1% difference from the CRD-AES results. By increasing the complexity of the models using the DDA, we determined that spheroids had a 14.7% difference, roughened spheres a 12.8% difference, and roughened spheroids a 11.2% difference from the experimental results. Using additional parameters that account for particle shape is necessary to model the optical properties of hematite particles and leads to improved extinction cross sections for modeling aerosol optical properties.

  8. Estimating the Direct Radiative Effect of Absorbing Aerosols Overlying Marine Boundary Layer Clouds in the Southeast Atlantic Using MODIS and CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2013-01-01

    Absorbing aerosols such as smoke strongly absorb solar radiation, particularly at ultraviolet and visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) wavelengths, and their presence above clouds can have considerable implications. It has been previously shown that they have a positive (i.e., warming) direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) when overlying bright clouds. Additionally, they can cause biased passive instrument satellite retrievals in techniques that rely on VIS/NIR wavelengths for inferring the cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (re) of underlying clouds, which can in turn yield biased above-cloud DARE estimates. Here we investigate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical property retrieval biases due to overlying absorbing aerosols observed by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and examine the impact of these biases on above-cloud DARE estimates. The investigation focuses on a region in the southeast Atlantic Ocean during August and September (2006-2011), where smoke from biomass burning in southern Africa overlies persistent marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds. Adjusting for above-cloud aerosol attenuation yields increases in the regional mean liquid COT (averaged over all ocean-only liquid clouds) by roughly 6%; mean re increases by roughly 2.6%, almost exclusively due to the COT adjustment in the non-orthogonal retrieval space. It is found that these two biases lead to an underestimate of DARE. For liquid cloud Aqua MODIS pixels with CALIOP-observed above-cloud smoke, the regional mean above-cloud radiative forcing efficiency (DARE per unit aerosol optical depth (AOD)) at time of observation (near local noon for Aqua overpass) increases from 50.9Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup-1) to 65.1Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup -1) when using bias-adjusted instead of nonadjusted MODIS cloud retrievals.

  9. Sources of light-absorbing aerosol in arctic snow and their seasonal variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegg, Dean A.; Warren, Stephen G.; Grenfell, Thomas C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Clarke, Antony D.

    2010-11-01

    Two data sets consisting of measurements of light absorbing aerosols (LAA) in arctic snow together with suites of other corresponding chemical constituents are presented; the first from Siberia, Greenland and near the North Pole obtained in 2008, and the second from the Canadian arctic obtained in 2009. A preliminary differentiation of the LAA into black carbon (BC) and non-BC LAA is done. Source attribution of the light absorbing aerosols was done using a positive matrix factorization (PMF) model. Four sources were found for each data set (crop and grass burning, boreal biomass burning, pollution and marine). For both data sets, the crops and grass biomass burning was the main source of both LAA species, suggesting the non-BC LAA was brown carbon. Depth profiles at most of the sites allowed assessment of the seasonal variation in the source strengths. The biomass burning sources dominated in the spring but pollution played a more significant (though rarely dominant) role in the fall, winter and, for Greenland, summer. The PMF analysis is consistent with trajectory analysis and satellite fire maps.

  10. A study on the temporal and spatial variability of absorbing aerosols using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2009-05-01

    Absorbing aerosols, especially mineral dust and black carbon, play key roles in climate change by absorbing solar radiation, heating the atmosphere, and contributing to global warming. In this paper, we first examine the consistency of the Aerosol Index (AI) product as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) instruments and then analyze these AI data sets to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of UV absorbing aerosols. In contrast to the trend in aerosol optical depth found in the advanced very high-resolution radiometer data, no obvious long-term trend in absorbing aerosols is observed from the time series of AI records. The comparison between the mean annual cycle in the two data sets shows that the cycles agree very well both globally and regionally, indicating a consistency between the AI products from TOMS and OMI. Varimax rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of detrended, deseasonalized AI data proves to be successful in isolating major dust and biomass burning source regions, as well as dust transport. Finally, we find that large, individual events, such as the Kuwait oil fire and Australian smoke plum, are isolated in individual higher-order principal components.

  11. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    Cairo is one of the largest megacities in the World and the particle load of its atmosphere is known to be particularly important. In this work we aim at assessing the temporal variability of the aerosol's characteristics and the magnitude of its impacts on the transfer of solar radiation. For this we use the level 2 quality assured products obtained by inversion of the instantaneous AERONET sunphotometer measurements performed in Cairo during the Cairo Aerosol CHaracterization Experiment (CACHE), which lasted from the end of October 2004 to the end of March 2006. The analysis of the temporal variation of the aerosol's optical depth (AOD) and spectral dependence suggests that the aerosol is generally a mixture of at least 3 main components differing in composition and size. This is confirmed by the detailed analysis of the monthly-averaged size distributions and associated optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter). The components of the aerosol are found to be 1) a highly absorbing background aerosol produced by daily activities (traffic, industry), 2) an additional, 'pollution' component produced by the burning of agricultural wastes in the Nile delta, and 3) a coarse desert dust component. In July, an enhancement of the accumulation mode is observed due to the atmospheric stability favoring its building up and possibly to secondary aerosols being produced by active photochemistry. More generally, the time variability of the aerosol's characteristics is due to the combined effects of meteorological factors and seasonal production processes. Because of the large values of the AOD achieved during the desert dust and biomass burning episodes, the instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at both the top (TOA) and bottom (BOA) of the atmosphere is maximal during these events. For instance, during the desert dust storm of April 8, 2005 RF BOA, RF TOA, and the corresponding atmospheric heating rate peaked at - 161.7 W/m 2, - 65.8 W/m 2

  12. Multiwavelength In-situ Aerosol Absorption, Scattering, and Hygroscopic Properties During the TEXAQS 2006 Field Campaign: Aerosol Classification and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierau, B.; Covert, D. S.; Coffman, D. J.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    In-situ, three wavelength-measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption of the regional aerosol near the coast of Texas, i.e. Houston and the Houston ship channel, as well as the Gulf of Mexico were carried out onboard the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the 2006 TEXAQS/GoMACCS field campaign in July through September 2006. Aerosol scattering, hemispheric backscattering and absorption-coefficients were measured for particles with diameters dp<10μm and dp<1μm using multiwavelength integrating nephelometers and filter-based absorption photometers (PSAPs) at 60% RH (nephelometers). Light scattering was measured as a function of RH at two additional humidities, (ca. 25%, and 85% RH). Together with the 60% RH data, this enabled determination of the hygroscopic growth curve of scattering. The extensive and intensive optical properties were used to characterize the aerosol in the Houston, TX area and the Coastal Gulf of Mexico region and to provide information critical to understanding the climatic and air quality impacts of those aerosols. Analysis focuses on how these properties change during the chemical processing of sources within the project area and how they are affected by changes in atmospheric relative humidity that accompany transport, diurnal cycles and vertical mixing. The results are relevant to radiation transfer, visibility, air quality, and interpretation of remote sensing data from lidar and satellite. The results will be presented based on a regional classification of the sampled air masses to identify distinct aerosol populations and sources and to show the temporal and spatial variability of the measured parameters. Special emphasize will be given to the physico-chemical properties of aerosols measured during extensive Saharan dust periods encountered during the cruise and several air pollution episodes and industrial plumes. Scattering hygroscopic growth will be analyzed along with the chemical composition of the aerosol and its

  13. The physical properties of black carbon and other light-absorbing material emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Yokelson, R. J.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fortner, E.; Onasch, T. B.; Akagi, S. K.; Taylor, J.; Coe, H.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol emitted from fires absorbs light, leading to visibility degradation as well as regional and global climate impacts. Fires also emit a wide range of trace gases and particulates that can interact with emitted BC and alter its optical properties and atmospheric lifetime. Non-BC particulate species emitted by fires can also scatter and absorb light, leading to additional effects on visibility. Recent work has shown that certain organic species can absorb light strongly at shorter wavelengths, giving it a brown or yellow color. This material has been classified as brown carbon, though it is not yet well defined. Land managers must find a balance between the negative impacts of prescribed fire emissions on visibility and air quality and the need to prevent future catastrophic wildfire as well as manage ecosystems for habitat restoration or other purposes. This decision process requires accurate assessments of the visibility impacts of fire emissions, including BC and brown carbon, which in turn depend on their optical properties. We present recent laboratory and aircraft measurements of black carbon and aerosol optical properties emitted from biomass burning. All measurement campaigns included a single particle soot photometer (SP2) instrument capable of providing size-resolved measurements of BC mass and number distributions and mixing state, which are needed to separate the BC and brown carbon contributions to total light absorption. The laboratory experiments also included a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer that provided accurate measurements of aerosol light absorption. The laboratory systems also characterized emissions after they had been treated with a thermal denuder to remove semi-volatile coatings, allowing an assessment of the role of non-BC coatings on bulk aerosol optical properties. Emissions were also aged in an environmental smog chamber to examine the role of secondary aerosol production on aerosol optical properties.

  14. Remote sensing of soot carbon - Part 1: Distinguishing different absorbing aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a method of using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) size distributions and complex refractive indices to retrieve the relative proportion of carbonaceous aerosols and free iron minerals (hematite and goethite). We assume that soot carbon has a spectrally flat refractive index and enhanced imaginary indices at the 440 nm wavelength are caused by brown carbon or hematite. Carbonaceous aerosols can be separated from dust in imaginary refractive index space because 95 % of biomass burning aerosols have imaginary indices greater than 0.0042 at the 675-1020 nm wavelengths, and 95 % of dust has imaginary refractive indices of less than 0.0042 at those wavelengths. However, mixtures of these two types of particles can not be unambiguously partitioned on the basis of optical properties alone, so we also separate these particles by size. Regional and seasonal results are consistent with expectations. Monthly climatologies of fine mode soot carbon are less than 1.0 % by volume for West Africa and the Middle East, but the southern African and South American biomass burning sites have peak values of 3.0 and 1.7 %. Monthly averaged fine mode brown carbon volume fractions have a peak value of 5.8 % for West Africa, 2.1 % for the Middle East, 3.7 % for southern Africa, and 5.7 % for South America. Monthly climatologies of free iron volume fractions show little seasonal variability, and range from about 1.1 to 1.7 % for coarse mode aerosols in all four study regions. Finally, our sensitivity study indicates that the soot carbon retrieval is not sensitive to the component refractive indices or densities assumed for carbonaceous and free iron aerosols, and the retrieval differs by only 15.4 % when these parameters are altered from our chosen baseline values. The total uncertainty of retrieving soot carbon mass is ˜ 50 % (when uncertainty in the AERONET product and mixing state is included in the analysis).

  15. Measurements of Semi-volatile Aerosol and Its Effect on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2013-12-01

    Semi-volatile compounds, including particle-bound water, comprise a large part of aerosol mass and have a significant influence on aerosol lifecycle and its optical properties. Understanding the properties of semi-volatile compounds, especially those pertaining to gas/aerosol partitioning, is of critical importance for our ability to predict concentrations and properties of ambient aerosol. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of temperature and relative humidity on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder and a variable residence time constant temperature thermodenuder in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. It was found that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. The variable residence time thermodenuder data suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s, in contrast to other ambient observations. Preliminary analysis show that approximately 50% and 90% of total aerosol mass evaporated at temperatures of 100 C and 180C, respectively. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology. During course of this study, T50 (temperatures at which 50% aerosol mass evaporates) varied from 60 C to more than 120 C.

  16. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  17. Properties of Carbonaceous Aerosols during CARDEX 2012: an Instrument Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.; Praveen, P. S.; Arnold, I. J.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Schauer, J. J.; Gustafsson, O.; Ramanathan, V.

    2012-12-01

    Quantification of black carbon (BC) aerosol in the atmosphere is becoming increasingly important due to its role in radiative forcing. As advances in measurement techniques continue, BC measurements can be performed using a variety of instruments, employing optical, thermal, and photoacoustic methods. However, the relationship between data obtained with these methods is dependent on multiple properties of the ambient air sampled (e.g., aerosol composition, wavelength-dependence of light- and mass-absorbing efficiencies) and on the instruments and their data analysis algorithms (e.g., scattering correction factors for aethalometer data). Previous studies have utilized theoretical corrections to estimate BC concentrations and their corresponding radiative properties, but with limited confidence. In this study, we present comparisons of in-situ and filter-based measurements of aerosol light absorption, black carbon (BC) concentration, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) from the 2012 CARDEX (Clouds, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, and Dynamics EXperiment) campaign based on the island of Hanimaadhoo in the Republic of Maldives. The instruments used for this comparison study include two photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS, λ = 870 and 405 nm), a 7-wavelength aethalometer (λ = 370, 430, 470, 520, 590, 700, and 880 nm), and independent 12- and 24-hour integrated filter samples, analyzed for EC - OC using the NIOSH thermal evolution protocol. During the dry monsoon season (December to April), anthropogenic aerosols from India and Southeast Asia are characteristically transported to the Maldives at surface level. Data shown here were collected between February and April of 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory-Hanimaadhoo (MCOH). Using correction factors adopted from Corrigan et al., (2006), we show reasonable agreement between absorption coefficients obtained with the aethalometer and the photoacoustic spectrometer and between BC mass concentrations obtained with

  18. Optical Properties and Climate Impacts of Tropospheric Aerosols that Undergo Long-Range Transport to the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P.; Bates, T.; Coffman, D.; Schulz, K.; Shank, L.; Jefferson, A.; Ogren, J.; Burkhart, J.; Shaw, G.

    2009-04-01

    Tropospheric aerosol particles undergo long range transport from the mid-latitudes to the Arctic each winter and spring. Once in the Arctic, aerosols may impact regional climate in several ways. Aerosols can affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and altering cloud properties. In addition, absorbing aerosol that is deposited onto ice and snow can lower the surface albedo and enhance the ice-albedo feedback mechanism. Measurements of aerosol properties relevant to climate forcing (chemical composition, light scattering, and light absorption) have been made by NOAA at Barrow, AK for over a decade. Measurements of aerosol chemical composition have been made over the same time period at the three more southern Alaskan sites of Poker Flat, Denali National Park, and Homer. In addition, in March and April of 2008, aerosol measurements were made during a NOAA research cruise (ICEALOT) to the Greenland, Norwegian and Barents Seas. Onboard the ship, measurements were made of aerosol optical and cloud nucleating properties. Results from the long-term measurements and ICEALOT will be presented in order to describe trends and climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles transported to the Arctic.

  19. Vertical Profile of Aerosol Properties at Pico Mountain, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Dzepina, K.; Hueber, J.; China, S.; Sharma, N.

    2013-12-01

    Pico Mountain (2325m asl) is a dormant volcano in the archipelago of the Azores1500 km west of Lisbon, Portugal in the North Atlantic. It differs from typical mountain ranges such as the Alps or the Rockies, which are large and present a complex orography. Pico Mountain has a simple cone-like structure with only one main peak and is thousands of kilometers away from any other significant mountain range. In summer months, it is typical for air masses to move around the mountain rather than traveling up its face. This implies that often the peak of the mountain lies above the marine boundary layer in the free troposphere, while the lower part of the mountain is affected by marine clouds and marine air-masses. An atmospheric monitoring station, the Pico Mountain Observatory was established in 2001 in the summit caldera of the volcano at 2225m above sea level. The observatory is far from large populations or pollution sources, which makes the station ideal to study atmospheric gases and aerosols transported over long-ranges in the free troposphere. The station is reachable only by foot following a steep and strenuous hiking trail. In the summer of 2013 we began to collect vertical profiles of aerosol by carrying an instrumented backpack up to the summit of the mountain, with the goal of studying the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols from the marine boundary layer to the free troposphere. The backpack was carried from the base of trail at 1200m asl. The backpack was equipped with the following instruments: 1. Nephelometer to measure light scattering from aerosol 2. 2-size optical particle counter (300-500 nm) 3. Portable micro-aethalometer to measure absorbing aerosols 4. SEM/TEM sampler to collect particles for off-line electron microscopy analysis 5. Battery powered data logger to measure relative humidity, temperature and pressure 6. GPS tracking device We provide a preliminary analysis of data collected in 2013 to gain insight on the vertical distribution

  20. Identification and characterization of aging products in the glyoxal/ammonium sulfate system - implications for light-absorbing material in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, C. J.; Jakob, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-02-01

    In this study we report the identification of bicyclic imidazoles in aqueous aerosol mimics using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. 2,2´-Biimidazole was identified to be a major contributor to the 280 nm absorbance band observed in mixtures of glyoxal and ammonium sulfate, despite the fact that its production rate is two orders of magnitude lower than the previously reported production rates of imidazole or imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde. The molar absorptivity of 2,2´-biimidazole was determined to be (36 690±998) M-1 cm-1. This demonstrates the necessity of molecular product identification at trace levels to enable a better understanding of relevant absorbing species. Additionally the formation of lower polarity products including formamides of imidazoles is proposed. The role of imidazoles and other light-absorbing species in the formation of SOA and optical properties of SOA is discussed and potentially interesting fields for future investigations are outlined.

  1. Identification and characterization of aging products in the glyoxal/ammonium sulfate system - implications for light-absorbing material in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, C. J.; Jakob, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-07-01

    In this study we report the identification of bicyclic imidazoles in aqueous aerosol mimics using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. 2,2'-Biimidazole was identified to be a major contributor to the 280 nm absorbance band observed in mixtures of glyoxal and ammonium sulfate, despite the fact that its production rate is two orders of magnitude lower than the previously reported production rates of imidazole or imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde. The molar absorptivity of 2,2'-biimidazole was determined to be (36 690 ± 998) M-1 cm-1. This demonstrates the necessity of molecular product identification at trace levels to enable a better understanding of relevant absorbing species. Additionally, the formation of lower polarity products including formamides of imidazoles is proposed. The role of imidazoles and other light-absorbing species in the formation of SOA and optical properties of SOA is discussed and potentially interesting fields for future investigations are outlined.

  2. Sensitivity of Multiangle Imaging to the Optical and Microphysical Properties of Biomass Burning Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David; Yau, Kevin; Seinfeld, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of biomass burning (BB) carbonaceous particles in the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Standard Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm is assessed, and algorithm refinements are suggested, based on a theoretical sensitivity analysis and comparisons with near-coincident AERONET measurements at representative BB sites. Over the natural ranges of BB aerosol microphysical and optical properties observed in past field campaigns, patterns of retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), particle size, and single scattering albedo (SSA) are evaluated. On the basis of the theoretical analysis, assuming total column AOD of 0.2, over a dark, uniform surface, MISR can distinguish two to three groups in each of size and SSA, except when the assumed atmospheric particles are significantly absorbing (mid-visible SSA approx.0.84), or of medium sizes (mean radius approx.0.13 pin); sensitivity to absorbing, medium-large size particles increases considerably when the assumed column AOD is raised to 0.5. MISR Research Aerosol Retrievals confirm the theoretical results, based on coincident AERONET inversions under BB-dominated conditions. When BB is externally mixed with dust in the atmosphere, dust optical model and surface reflection uncertainties, along with spatial variability, contribute to differences between the Research Retrievals and AERONET. These results suggest specific refinements to the MISR Standard Aerosol Algorithm complement of component particles and mixtures. They also highlight the importance for satellite aerosol retrievals of surface reflectance characterization, with accuracies that can be difficult to achieve with coupled surface-aerosol algorithms in some higher AOD situations.

  3. REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.; MCGRAW, R.; BENKOVITZ, C.M.; WRIGHT, D.L.

    2001-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

  4. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Healy, R. M.; Riemer, N.; West, M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C.-H.; Wenger, J. C.; Evans, G. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particles was 0.02-0.08 and 0.72-0.93, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  5. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol -Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inmore » two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.« less

  6. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  7. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can be present not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase 1,2. Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols1,2,3, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments4, and field measurements5 suggest that liquid- liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ ammonium sulfate (AS) particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core- shell and partially engulfed. A core- shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles since the aqueous inorganic-rich phase will be totally enclosed by a probably highly viscous organic coating with low diffusivity for reactants and water. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. In this first experiment, the behavior of single droplets of carminic acid (CA)/ AS/ H2O mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. We also intend to determine the occurrence of LLPS in accumulation- sized particles and the change in their absorption using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer. If LLPS alters the absorptive properties of the suggested model aerosols significantly, absorption measurements of accumulation mode

  8. Tensile properties of palladium-silver alloys with absorbed hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. J.; Otterson, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The alloys 90Pd-10Ag, 80Pd-20Ag, 70Pd-30Ag, 60Pd-40Ag, and 50Pd-50Ag containing absorbed hydrogen were tested in tension. The results show the tensile properties to be independent of the phase transition. Also, hydrogen in the lattice does not necessarily cause embrittlement or poor elongation. The changes in the tensile properties appear dependent on the electron to atom site ratio.

  9. Impacts of absorbing aerosols on interannual and intraseasonal variability of the South Asian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K. M.; Kim, K. M.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol-monsoon interactions on the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the South Asian monsoon are investigated from observations and modeling. On interannual time scales, we found from observations, and confirm with coupled ocean-atmosphere climate modeling, that absorbing aerosols (mainly desert dust and BC), can significantly amplifying the ENSO impact on the Indian monsoon, through precipitation and circulation feedback induced by the EHP effect. On intraseasonal time scales, modeling studies with the high-resolution WRF regional climate model demonstrated that EHP combined with the semi-direct and microphysics effects, associated with enhanced desert dust transported from the Middle East deserts across the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, may alter the moisture transport pathways, suppress the development of monsoon depression over northeastern India, resulting in development of intense convective cells, and extreme heavy rain along the Himalayan foothills in central and northwestern India. The implications of these feedback processes on climate change in the South Asian monsoon region will be discussed.

  10. Vertical Profiles of Light-Absorbing Aerosol: A Combination of In-situ and AERONET Observations during NASA DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Corr, C.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Hudgins, C.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols plays a vital role in utilizing spaceborne, column-integrated satellite observations. The properties and distribution of light-absorbing aerosol are particularly uncertain despite significant air quality and climate ramifications. Advanced retrieval algorithms are able to derive complex aerosol properties (e.g., wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo) from remote-sensing measurements, but quantitative relationships to surface conditions remain a challenge. Highly systematic atmospheric profiling during four unique deployments for the NASA DISCOVER-AQ project (Baltimore, MD, 2011; San Joaquin Valley, CA, 2013; Houston, TX, 2013; Denver, CO, 2014) allow statistical assessment of spatial, temporal, and source-related variability for light-absorbing aerosol properties in these distinct regions. In-situ sampling in conjunction with a dense network of AERONET sensors also allows evaluation of the sensitivity, limitations, and advantages of remote-sensing data products over a wide range of conditions. In-situ aerosol and gas-phase observations were made during DISCOVER-AQ aboard the NASA P-3B aircraft. Aerosol absorption coefficients were measured by a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). Approximately 200 profiles for each of the four deployments were obtained, from the surface (25-300m altitude) to 5 km, and are used to calculate absorption aerosol optical depths (AAODs). These are quantitatively compared to AAOD derived from AERONET Level 1.5 retrievals to 1) explore discrepancies between measurements, 2) quantify the fraction of AAOD that exists directly at the surface and is often missed by airborne sampling, and 3) evaluate the potential for deriving ground-level black carbon (BC) concentrations for air quality prediction. Aerosol size distributions are used to assess absorption contributions from mineral dust, both at the surface and aloft. SP2 (Single Particle Soot

  11. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  12. Scattering Properties of Heterogeneous Mineral Particles with Absorbing Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the results of numerically exact computer modeling of scattering and absorption properties of randomly oriented poly-disperse heterogeneous particles obtained by placing microscopic absorbing grains randomly on the surfaces of much larger spherical mineral hosts or by imbedding them randomly inside the hosts. These computations are paralleled by those for heterogeneous particles obtained by fully encapsulating fractal-like absorbing clusters in the mineral hosts. All computations are performed using the superposition T-matrix method. In the case of randomly distributed inclusions, the results are compared with the outcome of Lorenz-Mie computations for an external mixture of the mineral hosts and absorbing grains. We conclude that internal aggregation can affect strongly both the integral radiometric and differential scattering characteristics of the heterogeneous particle mixtures.

  13. Aeronet-based Microphysical and Optical Properties of Smoke-dominated Aerosol near Source Regions and Transported over Oceans, and Implications for Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad families of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA 0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA 0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savanna at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA 0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysicaloptical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  14. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can exist not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase (1,2). Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols (1,2,3), secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments (4), and field measurements (5) suggest that liquid-liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ inorganic particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core-shell and partially engulfed. A core-shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles in particular for organic phases containing absorbing molecules, e.g. brown carbon. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. Our ternary model system consist of ammonium sulfate (AS)/ Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)/ and water (H2O). Carminic acid (CA) was added as a proxy for an absorbing organic compound to the system. The behavior of single droplets of above ternary mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same ternary mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. In addition, Mie-code modeling is used to predict the absorption efficiency of the same ternary system and the result will be compared with the data obtained from EDB experiment. We also intend to determine the occurrence of

  15. Aerosol and CCN properties at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica: seasonality, new particle formation events and properties around precipitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; De Backer, Hugo; Herenz, Paul; Wex, Heike; Gossart, Alexandra; Souverijns, Niels; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, several complementary ground-based instruments for measuring the aerosol composition of the Antarctic atmosphere have been operated at the Belgian Antarctic research station Princess Elisabeth, in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (71.95° S, 23.35° E, 1390 m asl.). In addition, three ground-based remote sensing instruments for cloud and precipitation observations have been installed for continuous operation, including a ceilometer (cloud base height, type, vertical extent), a 24 Ghz micro-rain radar (vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (cloud base temperature). The station is inhabited from November to end of February and operates under remote control during the other months. In this contribution, the general aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties will be described with a special focus on new particle formation events and around precipitation events. New particle formation events are important for the atmospheric aerosol budget and they also show that aerosols are not only transported to Antarctica but are also produced there, also inland. Aerosols are essential for cloud formation and therefore also for precipitation, which is the only source for mass gain of the Antarctic ice sheet. Measured aerosol properties comprise size distribution, total number, total mass concentration, mass concentration of light-absorbing aerosol and absorption coefficient and total scattering coefficient. In addition, a CCN counter has been operated during austral summers 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16. The baseline total number concentration N-total was around some hundreds of particles/cm3. During new particle formation events N-total increased to some thousands of particles/cm3. Simultaneous measurements of N-total, size distribution and CCN number revealed that mostly the number of particles smaller than 100 nm increased and that the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei increased only very

  16. Microwave absorbance properties of zirconium–manganese substituted cobalt nanoferrite as electromagnetic (EM) wave absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Kishwar Rehman, Sarish

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Good candidates for EM materials with low reflectivity. • Good candidates for broad bandwidth at microwave frequency. • Microwave absorbing bandwidth was modulated simply by manipulating the Zr–Mn. • Higher the Zr–Mn content, the higher absorption rates for the electromagnetic radiation. • The predicted reflection loss shows that this can be used for thin ferrite absorber. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline Zr–Mn (x) substituted Co ferrite having chemical formula CoFe{sub 2−2x}Zr{sub x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.1–0.4) was prepared by co-precipitation technique. Combining properties such as structural, electrical, magnetic and reflection loss characteristics. Crystal structure and surface morphology of the calcined samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). By using two point probe homemade resistivity apparatus to find resistivity of the sample. Electromagnetic (EM) properties are measured through RF impedance/materials analyzer over 1 MHz–3 GHz. The room-temperature dielectric measurements show dispersion behavior with increasing frequency from 100 Hz to 3 MHz. Magnetic properties confirmed relatively strong dependence of saturation magnetization on Zr–Mn composition. Curie temperature is also found to decrease linearly with addition of Zr–Mn. Furthermore, comprehensive analysis of microwave reflection loss (RL) is carried out as a function of substitution, frequency, and thickness. Composition accompanying maximum microwave absorption is suggested.

  17. Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Properties of Amorphous Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tingkai; Hou, Cuilin; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhu, Ruoxing; She, Shengfei; Wang, Jungao; Li, Tiehu; Liu, Zhifu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) with diameters in the range of 7–50 nm were used as absorber materials for electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic wave absorbing composite films were prepared by a dip-coating method using a uniform mixture of rare earth lanthanum nitrate doped ACNTs and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The microstructures of ACNTs and ACNT/PVC composites were characterized using transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, and their electromagnetic wave absorbing properties were measured using a vector-network analyzer. The experimental results indicated that the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ACNTs are superior to multi-walled CNTs, and greatly improved by doping 6 wt% lanthanum nitrate. The reflection loss (R) value of a lanthanum nitrate doped ACNT/PVC composite was −25.02 dB at 14.44 GHz, and the frequency bandwidth corresponding to the reflector loss at −10 dB was up to 5.8 GHz within the frequency range of 2–18 GHz. PMID:25007783

  18. Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption Properties from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jethva, H.; Ahn, Chang-Woo

    2012-01-01

    The Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE) is a parameter commonly used to characterize the wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD). It is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses multi-spectral measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measurement can be explained, using an approximations of Beer's Law (BL), as the upwelling reflectance at the cloud top attenuated by the absorption effects of the overlying aerosol layer. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud-top in an aerosol-free atmospheric column is mainly a function of cloud optical depth (COD). In the proposed method of AAE derivation, the first step is determining COD which is retrieved using a previously developed color-ratio based approach. In the second step, corrections for molecular scattering effects are applied to both the observed ad the calculated cloud reflectance terms, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by an inversion of the BL approximation. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results making use of OMI multi-spectral measurements in the UV-Vis. will be presented.

  19. Modelling lidar-relevant optical properties of complex mineral dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Wiegner, Matthias; Groß, Silke; Freudenthaler, Volker; Toledano, Carlos; Tesche, Matthias; Kandler, Konrad

    2011-09-01

    We model lidar-relevant optical properties of mineral dust aerosols and compare the modelling results with optical properties derived from lidar measurements during the SAMUM field campaigns. The Discrete Dipole Approximation is used for optical modelling of single particles. For modelling of ensemble properties, the desert aerosol type of the OPAC aerosol dataset is extended by mixtures of absorbing and non-absorbing irregularly shaped mineral dust particles. Absorbing and non-absorbing particles are mixed to mimic the natural mineralogical inhomogeneity of dust particles. A sensitivity study reveals that the mineralogical inhomogeneity is critical for the lidar ratio at short wavelengths; it has to be considered for agreement with the observed wavelength dependence of the lidar ratio. The amount of particles with low aspect ratios (about 1.4 and lower) affects the lidar ratio at any lidar wavelength; their amount has to be low for agreement with SAMUM observations. Irregularly shaped dust particles with typical refractive indices, in general, have higher linear depolarization ratios than corresponding spheroids, and improve the agreement with the observations.

  20. Properties of a laser cavity containing an absorbing ring.

    PubMed

    Hasnaoui, Abdelkrim; Ait-Ameur, Kamel

    2010-07-20

    This paper considers the transverse optical properties of an absorbing ring when it is lighted by a symmetrical Laguerre-Gauss beam TEM(p0). It is demonstrated that the insertion of an opaque ring having adequate size inside a diaphragmed laser cavity is able to improve greatly (rate of about 100%) the discrimination between the TEM(00) and the TEM(10) modes, while keeping the diffraction losses unchanged or even decreased. PMID:20648186

  1. Aerosol Properties over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: A Mesoscale Perspective from the TIGERZ Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Tripathi, Sachchida; Eck, Thomas F.; Newcomb, W. Wayne; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, Russell R.; Thompson, Anne M.; Mattoo, Shana; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Singh, Remesh P.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    High aerosol loading over the northern Indian subcontinent can result in poor air quality leading to human health consequences and climate perturbations. The international 2008 TIGERZ experiment intensive operational period (IOP) was conducted in the Indo \\Gangetic Plain (IGP) around the industrial city of Kanpur (26.51degN, 80.23deg E), India, during the premonsoon (April-June). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometers performed frequent measurements of aerosol properties at temporary sites distributed within an area covering 50 sq km around Kanpur to characterize pollution and dust in a region where complex aerosol mixtures and semi \\bright surface effects complicate satellite retrieval algorithms. TIGERZ IOP Sun photometers quantified aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases up to 0.10 within and downwind of the city, with urban emissions accounting for 10 C20% of the IGP aerosol loading on deployment days. TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged volume size distribution and single scattering albedo retrievals indicated spatially homogeneous, uniformly sized, spectrally absorbing pollution and dust particles. Aerosol absorption and size relationships were used to categorize black carbon and dust as dominant absorbers and to identify a third category in which both black carbon and dust dominate absorption.Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD retrievals with the lowest quality assurance (QA > or = 0) flags were biased high with respect to TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged measurements. MODIS AOD retrievals with QA 0 had moderate correlation (R(sup 2) = 0.52-69) with the Kanpur AERONET site, whereas retrievals with QA > 0 were limited in number. Mesoscale \\distributed Sun photometers quantified temporal and spatial variability of aerosol properties, and these results were used to validate satellite retrievals.

  2. Cloud droplet nucleation and its connection to aerosol properties

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1996-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols influence the earth`s radiation balance and climate directly, by scattering shortwave (solar) radiation in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentrations of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effects are thought to be significant in the context of changes in the earth radiation budget over the industrial period, exerting a radiative forcing that is of comparable magnitude to that of increased concentrations of greenhouse gases over this period but opposite in sign. However the magnitudes of both the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite uncertain. Much of the uncertainty of the indirect effect arises from incomplete ability to describe changes in cloud properties arising from anthropogenic aerosols. This paper examines recent studies pertaining to the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on loading and properties of aerosols affecting their cloud nucleating properties and indicative of substantial anthropogenic influence on aerosol and cloud properties over the North Atlantic.

  3. The single scattering properties of the aerosol particles as aggregated spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Gu, X.; Cheng, T.; Xie, D.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.; Guo, J.

    2012-08-01

    The light scattering and absorption properties of anthropogenic aerosol particles such as soot aggregates are complicated in the temporal and spatial distribution, which introduce uncertainty of radiative forcing on global climate change. In order to study the single scattering properties of anthorpogenic aerosol particles, the structures of these aerosols such as soot paticles and soot-containing mixtures with the sulfate or organic matter, are simulated using the parallel diffusion limited aggregation algorithm (DLA) based on the transmission electron microscope images (TEM). Then, the single scattering properties of randomly oriented aerosols, such as scattering matrix, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP), are computed using the superposition T-matrix method. The comparisons of the single scattering properties of these specific types of clusters with different morphological and chemical factors such as fractal parameters, aspect ratio, monomer radius, mixture mode and refractive index, indicate that these different impact factors can respectively generate the significant influences on the single scattering properties of these aerosols. The results show that aspect ratio of circumscribed shape has relatively small effect on single scattering properties, for both differences of SSA and AP are less than 0.1. However, mixture modes of soot clusters with larger sulfate particles have remarkably important effects on the scattering and absorption properties of aggregated spheres, and SSA of those soot-containing mixtures are increased in proportion to the ratio of larger weakly absorbing attachments. Therefore, these complex aerosols come from man made pollution cannot be neglected in the aerosol retrievals. The study of the single scattering properties on these kinds of aggregated spheres is important and helpful in remote sensing observations and atmospheric radiation balance computations.

  4. Light scattering and absorption properties of aerosol particles in the urban environment of Granada, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    Surface measurements of optical and physical aerosol properties were made at an urban site, Granada (Spain) (37.18°N, 3.58°W, 680 m a.s.l), during winter 2005-2006. Measurements included the aerosol scattering, σsca, and backscattering coefficients, σbsca, at three wavelengths (450, 550 and 700 nm) measured at low relative humidity (RH<50%) by an integrating nephelometer, the absorption coefficient at 670 nm, σabs, measured with a multi-angle absorption photometer, and aerosol size distribution in the 0.5-20 μm aerodynamic diameter range registered by an aerodynamic aerosol sizer (APS-3321, TSI). The hourly average of σsca (550 nm) ranged from 2 to 424 M m -1 with an average value of 84±62 M m -1 (±S.D.). The Angstrom exponent presented an average value of 1.8±0.3, suggesting a large fraction of fine particles at the site, an observation confirmed by aerosol size distribution measurements. The hourly average of σabs (670 nm) ranged from 1.7 to 120.5 M m -1 with an average value of 28±20 M m -1. The results indicate that the aerosol absorption coefficient in Granada was relatively large. The largest σsca value was associated with air masses that passed over heavily polluted European areas and local stagnation conditions. High absorbing aerosol level was obtained during dust transport from North Africa probably due to the presence of hematite. Based on the measured scattering and absorption coefficients, a very low average value of the single scattering albedo of 0.66±0.11 at 670 nm was calculated, suggesting that urban aerosols in this region contain a large fraction of absorbing material. A clear diurnal pattern was observed in scattering and absorption coefficients and particle concentrations with two local maxima occurring in early morning and late evening. This behavior can be explained in terms of local conditions that control the particle sources associated with traffic and upward mixing of the aerosol during the daytime development of a

  5. A new approach for retrieving the UV-vis optical properties of ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important part in the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. To quantify the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions, researchers must obtain a detailed understanding of the spectrally dependent intensive and extensive optical properties of different aerosol types. Our new approach retrieves the optical coefficients and the single-scattering albedo of the total aerosol population over 300 to 650 nm wavelength, using extinction measurements from a broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer at 315 to 345 nm and 390 to 420 nm, extinction and absorption measurements at 404 nm from a photoacoustic cell coupled to a cavity ring-down spectrometer, and scattering measurements from a three-wavelength integrating nephelometer. By combining these measurements with aerosol size distribution data, we retrieved the time- and wavelength-dependent effective complex refractive index of the aerosols. Retrieval simulations and laboratory measurements of brown carbon proxies showed low absolute errors and good agreement with expected and reported values. Finally, we implemented this new broadband method to achieve continuous spectral- and time-dependent monitoring of ambient aerosol population, including, for the first time, extinction measurements using cavity-enhanced spectrometry in the 315 to 345 nm UV range, in which significant light absorption may occur.

  6. Dual-aureole and sun spectrometer system for airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Paul; Ruhtz, Thomas; Preusker, Rene; Fischer, Jürgen

    2007-12-10

    We have designed an airborne spectrometer system for the simultaneous measurement of the direct sun irradiance and the aureole radiance in two different solid angles. The high-resolution spectral radiation measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties. Combined measurements in two solid angles provide better information about the aerosol type without additional and elaborate measuring geometries. It is even possible to discriminate between absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol types. Furthermore, they allow to apply additional calibration methods and simplify the detection of contaminated data (e.g., by thin cirrus clouds). For the characterization of the detected aerosol type a new index is introduced that is the slope of the aerosol phase function in the forward scattering region. The instrumentation is a flexible modular setup, which has already been successfully applied in airborne and ground-based field campaigns. We describe the setup as well as the calibration of the instrument. In addition, example vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties--including the aureole measurements--are shown and discussed. PMID:18071387

  7. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with

  8. Study of atmospheric scattering and absorbing aerosols at 550nm over nearby western Indian tropical sites of Thar Desert effected region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, B. M.; Saxenna, Abhishek; Panwar, Chhagan

    2016-05-01

    The first time experimental results based on spaced satellite observations of different kinds of aerosols properties have been described over two different contrast environmental conditions locations in western tropical Indian region specifically first at Jaisalmer (26.90°N, 69.90°E, 220 m above mean sea level (amsl)) located in central Thar dessert vicinity of western Indian site over Indian Thar Desert region and another at Udaipur (24.6° N, 73.7° E, 560 m amsl) site concerning to semi-urban and semi arid place of hilly areas. The daily values of aerosols optical depth absorption at 500nm (AOD abs 500nm), aerosols optical depth extinction at 500nm (AOD ext 500nm) along with aerosols optical depth at 500nmon (AOD 500nm) of eleven year period from Jan., 2004 to Dec., 2014 are basis of primary database of the present investigation. From the synthesis if the above database and the basis of rigorous statistical approach, following some of interesting facts are noted (i) larger annual monthly AOD variation of 0.93 is noted over JSM when compared to observed annual monthly change in AOD cycle, over UDP, of only 0.50 clearly indicating the more impact of desert influence activities about more than double times over JSM than UDP (ii) The higher abundance of absorbing aerosols occurrences about two time higher are seen in JSM in comparison to UDP. It indicates the clear evidence of strong optical absorption properties of useful solar mid visible wavelength at 550nm as the results of presence of more availability of dust aerosols as mineral natural type in pre-monsoon to post-monsoon over JSM which is also more predominant over JSM than the UDP region located far away from desert activity regime (iii) The greater sharing of extinction solar radiation effect on aerosols are more effective in pre-monsoon in UDP in reference to over JSM, where as in case of UDP, the aerosols effect through the scattering mechanism gradually reduce from monsoon to winter months as compared

  9. Studying Taklamakan aerosol properties with lidar (STAPL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Paul; Mueller, Detlef; Shin, Dong-Ho; Zhang, Xiao Xiao; Feng, Guanglong; McKendry, Ian; Strawbridge, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    By now, the global impacts of atmospheric dust have been well-established. Nevertheless, relevant properties such as size distribution, depolarization ratio, and even single-scattering albedo have been shown to vary substantially between dust producing regions and are also strongly dependant on the conditions under which the dust is emitted. Even greater variations have been documented during the process of long-range transport. With continued improvement of detection technologies, research focus is increasingly turning to refinement of our knowledge of these properties of dust in order to better account for the presence of dust in models and data analysis. The purpose of this study is to use a combination of lidar data and models to directly observe the changing properties of dust layers as they are transported from their origin in the Taklamakan Desert of western China. With the co-operation of the Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, a portable micropulse lidar system was installed at Aksu National Field on the northern edge of the Tarim Basin in late April 2013, during the Spring dust storm season. Over six days, data were collected on the optical properties of dust emissions passing over this location. The measurements of this lidar have shown the dust over Aksu on these days to have a significantly higher depolarization ratio than has been previously reported for the region. Model results show this dust was then transported across the region at least as far as Korea and Japan. Models from the Naval Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) show that during transport the dust layers became intermixed with sulfate emissions from industrial sources in China as well as smoke from wildfires burning in south-east Asia and Siberia. The multi-wavelength raman-elastic lidar located in Gwangju South Korea was used to observe the vertical structure of the layers as well as optical properties such as colour ratio, depolarization ratio and extinction

  10. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  11. Aerosol optical properties in the ABL over arctic sea ice from airborne aerosol lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Neuber, Roland; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Dethloff, Klaus; Herber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Between 2009 and 2013 aerosols, sea ice properties and meteorological variables were measured during several airborne campaigns covering a wide range of the western Arctic Ocean. The campaigns were carried out with the aircraft Polar 5 of the German Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) during spring and summer periods. Optical properties of accumulation mode aerosol and clouds were measured with the nadir looking AMALi aerosol lidar covering the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 3000m, while dropsondes provided coincident vertical profiles of meteorological quantities. Based on these data we discuss the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter in and above the atmospheric boundary layer and its dependence on relative humidity, dynamics and underlying sea ice properties. We analyze vertical profiles of lidar and coincident dropsonde measurements from various locations in the European and Canadian Arctic from spring and summer campaigns. Sea ice cover is derived from modis satellite and aircraft onboard camera images. The aerosol load in the arctic atmospheric boundary layer shows a high variability. Various meteorological parameters and in particular boundary layer properties are discussed with their respective influence on aerosol features. To investigate the effect of the frequency and size of open water patches on aerosol properties, we relate the profiles to the sea ice properties influencing the atmosphere in the upwind region.

  12. The Truth about Stratospheric Aerosols: Key Results from SPARC`s Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Peter, T.

    2005-12-01

    Given the critical role it plays in ozone chemistry, the Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (ASAP) has been carried out by the WCRP project on Stratospheric Process and their Role in Climate (SPARC). The objective of this report was to present a systematic analysis of the state of knowledge of stratospheric aerosols including their precursors. It includes an examination of precursor concentrations and trends, measurements of stratospheric aerosol properties, trends in those properties, and modeling their formation, transport, and distribution in both background and volcanic conditions. The assessment found that the dominant nonvolcanic stratospheric aerosol precursor gases are OCS, SO2, and tropospheric aerosol. Therefore, though SO2, human-related activities play a significant role in the observed background stratospheric aerosol. There is general agreement between measured OCS and modeling of its transformation to sulfate aerosol, and observed aerosols. However, there is a significant dearth of SO2 measurements, and the role of tropospheric SO2 in the stratospheric aerosol budget - while significant - remains a matter of some guesswork. The assessment also found that there is basic agreement between the various data sets and models particularly during periods of elevated loading. However, at background levels significant differences were found that indicate that substantial questions remain regarding the nature of stratospheric aerosol during these periods particularly in the lower stratosphere. For instance, during periods of very low aerosol loading significant differences exist between systems for key parameters including aerosol surface area density and extinction. At the same time, comparisons of models and satellite observations of aerosol extinction found good agreement at visible wavelengths above 20-25 km altitude region but are less satisfactory for infrared wavelengths. While there are some model short-comings relative to observations in

  13. Electronic properties of perovskite absorbers for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Marina; Giustino, Feliciano

    2015-03-01

    Metal halide perovskite absorbers have captured the attention of the photovoltaics research community in the past 3 years, reaching efficiencies over 19%. Despite this unprecedented progress, the remarkable physical properties of these materials are not yet fully understood. In this work we show an exhaustive computational study of CH3NH3PbI3 within density functional theory and the GW approximation. We show the effect of semicore states and spin-orbit coupling on the quasiparticle band gap of CH3NH3PbI3 and describe a straightforward ``self-consistent scissor'' method to correct the underestimated dielectric screening in the G0W0 approach. Finally, we model the interplay between the structural and electronic properties of lead-iodide perovskites and propose novel lead-iodide peroskite absorbers with different cations at the center of the cuboctahedral cavity facilitating the tunning of the fundamental band gap. This work was supported by the ERC (EU FP7 / ERC 239578), UK EPSRC (EP/J009857/1) and the Leverhulme Trust (RL-2012-001).

  14. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  15. 1 Mixing state and absorbing properties of black carbon during Arctic haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanatta, Marco; Gysel, Martin; Eleftheriadis, Kosas; Laj, Paolo; Hans-Werner, Jacobi

    2016-04-01

    concentration from SP2, a mass absorption cross section of 6.0 m2 g-1 was found at a wavelength of 880 nm. Concerning mixing, rBC cores with a dimeter between 170 nm and 280 nm were found to be covered by a layer of non-absorbing material having a median thickness of 50 nm. From Mie calculation, such mixing would lead to an enhancement of absorption of 46% compared to a bare BC core. The aforementioned absorption enhancement would lead to a net decrease of single scattering albedo of the total aerosol of less than 1%. The reliability of Mie approach was confirmed by agreement with observations, while MAC values commonly used in radiative forcing models might lead to discrepancies up to 80%. Our work provides all the major optical properties of total aerosol and BC to minimize the uncertainty of radiative estimations based on a priori assumptions.

  16. Single scattering properties of semi-embedded soot morphologies with intersecting and non-intersecting surfaces of absorbing spheres and non-absorbing host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao; Xu, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The optical properties of light absorbing soot aerosols generally change through interactions with weakly absorbing particles, resulting in complex mixing states, and have been highlighted as a major uncertainty in assessing their radiative forcing and climatic impact. The single scattering properties of soot aggregates partially embedded in the host sulfate particle (semi-embedded soot-containing mixtures) are investigated for two kinds of morphologies with intersecting and non-intersecting surfaces. The surfaces cannot be overlapped in the non-intersecting surface morphology, while the intersecting surface morphology is unconstrained. Based on the modified diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) algorithm, the models with non-intersecting surfaces are simulated and applied for the single scattering calculations of semi-embedded soot-containing mixtures using the superposition T-matrix (STM) method. For comparison, the models with intersecting surfaces are simulated with the same morphological parameters, but some soot monomers are intersected by the host sphere. Due to the limitation of current STM method, the optical properties of these models with intersecting surfaces are calculated using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method. The soot volume fractions outside sulfate host (Fs,out) are introduced and applied to characterize the mixing states of the soot-containing aerosols. These simulations show that the absorption cross-sections of those internally, deeply, half and slightly embedded mixed soot particles (Fs,out = 0.0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8) are ~105%, ~65%, ~43% and ~14% larger than the semi-external mixtures (Fs,out = 1.0), respectively. The results also indicate that the differences of extinction cross-sections, single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASY) between simulations with intersecting and non-intersecting surfaces are small (<1%) for semi-embedded soot-containing mixtures with the same morphological parameters. Within the range of

  17. Evolution of Biomass Burning Aerosol Optical Properties in the Near Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Arnott, W. P.; Chand, D.; Fortner, E.; Freedman, A.; Kleinman, L. I.; Onasch, T. B.; Shilling, J. E.; Springston, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) events are known to produce chemically rich environments that can impact the evolution of primary aerosols and influence secondary aerosols production rates. With their increasing in frequency, BB events are expected to exert an ever-increasing impact on climate due to aerosol radiative forcing processes. One area that is still poorly understood is the evolution of these smoke aerosols in the near field. Recent literature suggests that BB aerosols undergo a rapid evolution near their source that is then followed by a slower aging phase. During the summer of 2013, the Department of Energy-sponsored an aircraft field campaign called the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) that specifically targeted the evolution of smoke aerosols in the near field (< 2 hours). Results examining the evolution of BB optical and microphysical properties will be presented. To probe these properties, the BBOP field campaign deployed a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to probe the mixing state of refractory black carbon (rBC) and a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) to investigate the composition of both non-refractory and rBC-containing particles. Aerosol optical properties were measured in situ using a 355 nm Photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS), a 532 nm photo thermal interferometer (PTI), a 630 nm cavity Attenuation Phase Shifted (CAPS) spectrometer, a 3-λ nephelometer, and a 3-λ PSAP. The BBOP study represented the maiden aircraft deployment for the SP-AMS, the 355 nm PAS and 532 nm PTI. Discussion will be on the near-field evolution of particle mixing state and morphology, chemical composition, and microphysical processes that determine aerosol size distributions and single scattering albedo (SSA) of light absorbing aerosols. In the cases studied, increases in the coating thickness of refractive black carbon (rBC) particles, organic aerosol/rBC ratio, scattering/CO ratio, and aerosol size distributions have been observed. Results will be

  18. Aerosol Optical Properties in Southeast Asia From AERONET Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Boonjawat, J.; Le, H. V.; Schafer, J. S.; Reid, J. S.; Dubovik, O.; Smirnov, A.

    2003-12-01

    There is little published data available on measured optical properties of aerosols in the Southeast Asian region. The AERONET project and collaborators commenced monitoring of aerosol optical properties in February 2003 at four sites in Thailand and two sites in Viet Nam to measure the primarily anthropogenic aerosols generated by biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion/ industrial emissions. Automatic sun/sky radiometers at each site measured spectral aerosol optical depth in 7 wavelengths from 340 to 1020 nm and combined with directional radiances in the almucantar, retrievals were made of spectral single scattering albedo and aerosol size distributions. Angstrom exponents, size distributions and spectral single scattering albedo of primarily biomass burning aerosols at rural sites are compared to measurements made at AERONET sites in other major biomass burning regions in tropical southern Africa, South America, and in boreal forest regions. Additionally, the aerosol single scattering albedo and size distributions measured in Bangkok, Thailand are compared with those measured at other urban sites globally. The influences of aerosols originating from other regions outside of Southeast Asia are analyzed using trajectory analyses. Specifically, cases of aerosol transport and mixing from Southern China and from India are presented.

  19. Retrieval of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties from SCIAMACHY limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörner, S.; Kühl, S.; Pukite, J.; Penning de Vries, M.; Hörmann, C.; von Savigny, C.; Wagner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Balloon-borne and aircraft measurements of stratospheric aerosol properties have been supplemented by satellite measurements since 1975 (Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement program). Ever since, the technological possibilities of satellite measurements increased steadily. Nowadays the large number of satellites provides global data sets of trace gases, clouds and aerosols. Stratospheric aerosol properties are usually determined from observations in occultation or limb geometry. Stratospheric aerosol has an important influence on the global radiation budget (e.g. after strong volcanic eruptions) and stratospheric ozone chemistry (e.g. the chlorine activation inside the polar vortex). Since the launch of SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT in 2002 measurements in limb geometry for the UV/VIS/NIR spectral range with a vertical resolution of 3.3 km at the tangent point are available. By using these measurements, profile information of stratospheric trace gases (e.g. NO2, BrO or OClO) can be retrieved. From the broad band spectral dependence of the SCIAMACHY limb measurements, also information on stratospheric aerosol properties can be derived. Pioneering studies (e.g. von Savigny et al., 2005) showed that signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and also stratospheric aerosols can be retrieved from color indices (including the near IR spectral range). In our study we make use of the color index method and additionally investigate the effects of aerosols on the whole UV/VIS/NIR spectral range. Aerosol properties are estimated by comparisons of the measured values with radiative transfer simulations. We investigate different atmospheric phenomena, e.g. volcanic eruptions (e.g. Kasatochi, 2008) or large biomass burning events (e.g. Australia, 2009). We also have a look at the spatio-temporal variation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds in the polar regions and stratospheric aerosol properties on a global scale.

  20. Trends in the aerosol load properties over south eastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orza, J. A. G.; Perrone, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The long-term (2003-2013) variations in columnar aerosol properties at Lecce, a site representative of the central Mediterranean, have been analysed for trend assessment. The study focuses on aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 340, 440, 500 and 1020 nm and Ångström exponent (AE) for the pair 440-870 nm, retrieved from a sun photometer operating within the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). A non-parametric trend analysis of the monthly mean, median and upper and lower tails (90th and 10th percentiles) suggests that the aerosol load has decreased during the study period, while the mean particle size remained unchanged. The characteristic advections reaching the study site were found by clustering analysis of back trajectories at 500, 1500 and 3000 m. Despite the strong influence they have on aerosol load and particle size, neither of the trends in advection routes could explain the tendencies found in the columnar aerosol properties. However, trends in aerosol data by advection type allow understanding the overall trends. Aerosol properties under flows with high residence time over continental Europe present differences according to the specific residing area. More specifically, no trend is found when flows arrive from Ukraine and the Balkans, while under advections from north-western/central Europe there are downward trends in the background levels and a reduction of the fine fraction. Negative trends are also found under flows with high residence time over the Mediterranean and northern Africa, again with differences according to the residing area.

  1. Sunphotometer network for monitoring aerosol properties in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Pereira, Alfredo; Vermote, E.; Reagan, J. A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Tanre, D.; Slutsker, I.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite platforms have provided a methodology for regional and global remote sensing of aerosols. New systems will significantly improve that capability during the EOS era; however, the voluminous 20 year record of satellite data has produced only regional snapshots of aerosol loading and have not yielded a data base of the optical properties of those aerosols which are fundamental to our understanding of their influence on climate change. The prospect of fully understanding the properties of the aerosols with respect to climate change is small without validation and augmentation by ancillary ground based observations. Sun photometry was demonstrated to be an effective tool for ground based measurements of aerosol optical properties from fire emissions. Newer technology has expanded routine sun photometer measurements to spectral observations of solar aureole and almucantar allowing retrievals of size distribution, scattering phase function, and refractive index. A series of such observations were made in Brazil's Amazon basin from a network of six simultaneously recording instruments deployed in Sep. 1992. The instruments were located in areas removed from local aerosol sources such that sites are representative of regional aerosol conditions. The overall network was designed to cover the counter clockwise tropospheric circulation of the Amazon Basin. Spectral measurements of sun, aureole and sky data for retrieval of aerosol optical thickness, particle size distribution, and scattering phase function as well as measurements of precipitable water were made during noncloudy conditions.

  2. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: an AQMEII-2 perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model in...

  3. Radiative properties of the background aerosol: absorption component of extinction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A D; Charlson, R J

    1985-07-19

    The light-scattering and light-absorption coefficients of the global background aerosol define its single-scatter albedo. Continuous, simultaneous measurements of these optical coefficients were made on a daily basis for the remote marine mid-troposphere; such measurements are essential for assessment of the effects of aerosol on atmospheric radiative transfer. Measurements of light-absorption coefficients made at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii were higher than expected, and the single-scatter albedo was lower than the value often used in radiative transfer models. Soot appears to be the most likely primary absorber, and hemispheric dispersal of this combustion-derived material is suggested. PMID:17759145

  4. Source Attribution of Light-absorbing Aerosols in Arctic Snow (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegg, D.; Warren, S. G.; Grenfell, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Larson, T. V.; Clarke, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    Light-absorbing aerosols (LAA) deposited on the arctic snow pack, in particular black carbon (BC), contribute appreciably to the arctic radiation budget and their reduction has been suggested as a means to attenuate warming in the arctic. Effective prediction and mitigation of Arctic snow LAA requires that the sources of the LAA be elucidated. To this end, receptor modeling in the form of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) has been exercised on a data set of chemical concentrations in snow of various species (including inorganic and organic acids, carbohydrates and selected other organics as well as LAA) derived from an extensive set of snow samples from locations in Russia (including Siberia), Canada, Greenland, the Arctic Ocean and Svalbard. The data were obtained in three distinct periods: spring of 2007, spring of 2008, and spring of 2009. Data from each period were analyzed separately (note that the Svalbard data were analyzed only recently and were not included in the published 2007 analysis). Aerosol light absorption was determined spectrophotometrically at multiple wavelengths on filters through which melted snow was filtered. Based on the Angstrom exponent of the light absorption, partitioning of the absorption between BC and other LAA species was estimated. Statistics of the LAA concentrations for the Arctic as a whole and the geographic distribution of BC and other LAA species are presented. PMF analysis of the filtrate and filters from the 2007 data set from western Siberia, the Canadian lower arctic and Greenland revealed four factors or sources: two distinct biomass burning sources, a pollution source and a marine source. The first three of these were responsible for essentially all of the black carbon, with the two biomass sources together accounting for > 90% of the black carbon. Geographically, the biomass sources were dominant for all regions except the Arctic Ocean near the North Pole. For the 2008 and 2009 data sets, from eastern Siberia and

  5. Multiple Types of Light Absorbing Carbon Aerosol in East Asian Outflow: Variatons in Morphology and Internal Structure as Characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. R.; Alexander, D. T.; Crozier, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    The importance of light absorbing carbon (LAC) aerosols to climate forcing is well established, but such aerosols are typically treated in climate models as uniform in optical properties. When examined by electron microscopy, however, LAC aerosols from regions with significant anthropogenic pollution show a wide variety of morphologies and internal structures. Electron energy loss spectral analysis to date on brown carbon and black carbon, albeit limited, suggests a linkage between internal structure and fundamental optical properties. Some of these LAC varieties can be easily defined as distinct “types” and other varieties show a continuum of variation within which general “types” can be defined. The data discussed here are from a research flight of the NCAR C-130 aircraft flown in April 2001 above the Yellow Sea during the ACE-Asia project. Perhaps the most common LAC type is “soot”, branched and chainlike aggregates of carbonaceous spherules. The spherule size in East Asian soot particles is 20-60 nm in many cases, but soot with large spherules (100 nm or larger) are also present. Spherule size is a “source effect” and not something altered during transport and aging. Some laboratory studies have suggested that as soot ages, the aggregates become more compact, but in these aerosols both compact and open soot particles coexist and compact soot is known to be the initial LAC product under some combustion conditions. In cases where the spherule size of the compact soot is different from that of open-structured soot, clearly the compact soot is not an aged form of the latter. Variability of ordering of the graphene sheets that make up the spherules is also a source effect. The more ordered soot particles consist of graphene sheets that curve concentrically, onion-like, around the spherule center, probably indicative of a high degree of carbonization that accompanies high temperature combustion. There is a range of ordering from highly ordered down to

  6. Formation of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing light-absorbing compounds accelerated by evaporation of water from secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Lee, Paula B.; Updyke, Katelyn M.; Bones, David L.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2012-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of d-limonene were subjected to dissolution, evaporation, and re-dissolution in the presence and absence of ammonium sulfate (AS). Evaporation with AS at pH 4-9 produced chromophores that were stable with respect to hydrolysis and had a distinctive absorption band at 500 nm. Evaporation accelerated the rate of chromophore formation by at least three orders of magnitude compared to the reaction in aqueous solution, which produced similar compounds. Absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) mass spectrometry experiments suggested that the molar fraction of the chromophores was small (<2%), and that they contained nitrogen atoms. Although the colored products represented only a small fraction of SOA, their large extinction coefficients (>105 L mol-1 cm-1 at 500 nm) increased the effective mass absorption coefficient of the residual organics in excess of 103 cm2 g-1 - a dramatic effect on the optical properties from minor constituents. Evaporation of SOA extracts in the absence of AS resulted in the production of colored compounds only when the SOA extract was acidified to pH ˜ 2 with sulfuric acid. These chromophores were produced by acid-catalyzed aldol condensation, followed by a conversion into organosulfates. The presence of organosulfates was confirmed by high resolution mass spectrometry experiments. Results of this study suggest that evaporation of cloud or fog droplets containing dissolved organics leads to significant modification of the molecular composition and serves as a potentially important source of light-absorbing compounds.

  7. Formation of Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing Compounds Accelerated by Evaporation of Water from Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Lee, Paula B.; Updyke, Katelyn M.; Bones, David L.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2012-01-14

    Aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of dlimonene were subjected to dissolution, evaporation, and re-dissolution in the presence and absence of ammonium sulfate (AS). Evaporation with AS at pH 4-9 produced chromophores that were stable with respect to hydrolysis and had a distinctive absorption band at 500 nm. Evaporation accelerated the rate of chromophore formation by at least three orders of magnitude compared to the reaction in aqueous solution, which produced similar compounds. Absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) mass spectrometry experiments suggested that the molar fraction of the chromophores was small (< 2%), and that they contained nitrogen atoms. Although the colored products represented only a small fraction of SOA, their large extinction coefficients (>10{sup 5} L mol{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at 500 nm) increased the effective mass absorption coefficient of the residual organics in excess of 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2} g{sup -1} - a dramatic effect on the optical properties from minor constituents. Evaporation of SOA extracts in the absence of AS resulted in the production of colored compounds only when the SOA extract was acidified to pH {approx} 2 with sulfuric acid. These chromophores were produced by acid-catalyzed aldol condensation, followed by a conversion into organosulfates. The presence of organosulfates was confirmed by high resolution mass spectrometry experiments. Results of this study suggest that evaporation of cloud or fog droplets containing dissolved organics leads to significant modification of the molecular composition and serves as a potentially important source of light-absorbing compounds.

  8. Optical and Structural Properties of Aerosols Emitted from Open Biomass Burning (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Lewis, K.; Gyawali, M.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M. K.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Arnott, W. P.

    2010-12-01

    Open biomass burning including wildland fires and agricultural burning emits substantial quantities of carbonaceous aerosols into the atmosphere. Fuel, soil, and atmospheric conditions largely determine the combustion phase. High temperature flaming combustion emits black aerosols, generally consisting of fractal-like chain aggregates that have a high black carbon content and therefore strongly absorb visible light. Low temperature, smoldering combustion, on the other hand, emits fairly white aerosols, often consisting of near-spherical particles that have high organic carbon content. While this organic carbon is traditionally considered to cause negligent absorption of visible light, more recent studies have shown that organic carbon from biomass burning often contains brown carbon. Brown carbon is a component of organic carbon, optically defined by its increasing light absorption toward shorter wavelengths. The physical characteristics of biomass combustion aerosol particles are determined by a combination of their morphology, monomer size, and shape, all of which can be determined from electron microscopy and image analysis. Here, we review optical and structural properties of aerosols emitted from open biomass burning with a focus on relevance for radiative forcing and climate change and satellite remote sensing. This review is followed by a discussion of measurements and modeling of brown carbon optical properties, of associated metrics such as the Ångström absorption coefficient, and of future research needs.

  9. The optical, physical and chemical properties of the products of glyoxal uptake on ammonium sulfate seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainic, M.; Riziq, A. A.; Lavi, A.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-07-01

    The heterogeneous reaction between gas phase glyoxal and ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols, a proxy for inorganic atmospheric aerosol, was studied in terms of the dependence of the optical, physical and chemical properties of the product aerosols on initial particle size and ambient RH. The reactions were studied under different relative humidity (RH) conditions, varying from dry conditions (~20 % RH) and up to 90 % RH, covering conditions prevalent in many atmospheric environments. At λ = 355 nm, the reacted aerosols demonstrate a substantial growth in optical extinction cross section, as well as in mobility diameter under a broad range of RH values (35-90 %). The ratio of the product aerosol to seed aerosol geometric cross section reached up to ~3.5, and the optical extinction cross-section up to ~250. The reactions show a trend of increasing physical and optical growth with decreasing seed aerosol size, from 100nm to 300 nm, as well as with decreasing RH values from 90 % to ~40 %. Optically inactive aerosols, at the limit of the Mie range (100 nm diameter) become optically active as they grow due to the reaction. AMS analyses of the reaction of 300 nm AS at RH values of 50 %, 75 % and 90 % show that the main products of the reaction are glyoxal oligomers, formed by acetal formation in the presence of AS. In addition, imidazole formation, which is a minor channel, is observed for all reactions, yielding a product which absorbs at λ = 290 nm, with possible implications on the radiative properties of the product aerosols. The ratio of absorbing substances (C-N compounds, including imidazoles) increases with increasing RH value. A core/shell model used for the investigation of the optical properties of the reaction products of AS 300nm with gas phase glyoxal, shows that the refractive index (RI) of the reaction products are in the range between 1.57-1.71 for the real part and between 0-0.02 for the imaginary part of the RI at 355 nm. The observed increase in the

  10. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  11. Aerosol physical properties in the stratosphere (APPS) radiometer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Woodin, E. A.; Anderson, T. J.; Magee, R. J.; Karthas, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The measurement concepts and radiometer design developed to obtain earth-limb spectral radiance measurements for the Aerosol Physical Properties in the Stratosphere (APPS) measurement program are presented. The measurements made by a radiometer of this design can be inverted to yield vertical profiles of Rayleigh scatterers, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, aerosol extinction, and aerosol physical properties, including a Junge size-distribution parameter, and a real and imaginary index of refraction. The radiometer design provides the capacity for remote sensing of stratospheric constituents from space on platforms such as the space shuttle and satellites, and therefore provides for global measurements on a daily basis.

  12. Examining the Impact of Overlying Aerosols on the Retrieval of Cloud Optical Properties from Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coddington, O. M.; Pilewskie, P.; Redemann, J.; Platnick, S.; Russell, P. B.; Schmidt, K. S.; Gore, W. J.; Livingston, J.; Wind, G.; Vukicevic, T.

    2010-01-01

    Haywood et al. (2004) show that an aerosol layer above a cloud can cause a bias in the retrieved cloud optical thickness and effective radius. Monitoring for this potential bias is difficult because space ]based passive remote sensing cannot unambiguously detect or characterize aerosol above cloud. We show that cloud retrievals from aircraft measurements above cloud and below an overlying aerosol layer are a means to test this bias. The data were collected during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX-A) study based out of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, United States, above extensive, marine stratus cloud banks affected by industrial outflow. Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) irradiance measurements taken along a lower level flight leg above cloud and below aerosol were unaffected by the overlying aerosol. Along upper level flight legs, the irradiance reflected from cloud top was transmitted through an aerosol layer. We compare SSFR cloud retrievals from below ]aerosol legs to satellite retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) in order to detect an aerosol ]induced bias. In regions of small variation in cloud properties, we find that SSFR and MODIS-retrieved cloud optical thickness compares within the uncertainty range for each instrument while SSFR effective radius tend to be smaller than MODIS values (by 1-2 microns) and at the low end of MODIS uncertainty estimates. In regions of large variation in cloud properties, differences in SSFR and MODIS ]retrieved cloud optical thickness and effective radius can reach values of 10 and 10 microns, respectively. We include aerosols in forward modeling to test the sensitivity of SSFR cloud retrievals to overlying aerosol layers. We find an overlying absorbing aerosol layer biases SSFR cloud retrievals to smaller effective radii and optical thickness while nonabsorbing aerosols had no impact.

  13. Aerosol Physiochemistry in Clean and Polluted Regions: Influences on Optical Properties and CCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A.; Kapustin, V.; Howell, S.; Shinozuka, Y.; McNaughton, C.; Zhou, J.; Decarlo, P.; Jimenez, J.; Roberts, G.

    2007-12-01

    Long range transport of aerosol from urban regions and anthropogenic sources is recognized to influence the radiative properties of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei, CCN, over large portions of the planet. The nature of these influences is determined by the size distributions, concentration and composition of the aerosol and their magnitude relative to natural sources. We have participated in diverse major field studies over the past decade designed to measure and isolate key properties that can be used to characterize various source regions and to provide aerosol parameters to effectively model both "direct" and "indirect" radiative effects. More recently these have expanded to include scales that can assess transformation in both gas and aerosol components as they evolve downwind or get lofted into the free troposphere. These experiments have revealed the importance of primary emissions and secondary emissions and the state of mixing of the aerosol both near the source and after aging downwind. The physiochemical processes that influence aerosol composition, growth, evolution, optical properties and cloud processes differ markedly with size. In this talk we focus on direct radiative effects that depend on sizes that dominate aerosol surface area or mass and on cloud related effects more sensitive to smaller sizes that dominate aerosol number and CCN. Key players of both anthropogenic and natural origin are black carbon (BC), sulfate, nitrate and organic carbon. These frequently evolve into internal mixtures and/or interact with similar natural aerosol such as dust and sea- salt. Hence, the size resolved state-of-mixing of these components determine their influences and also impact the strategies that might be used to mitigate any effects. Recent data highlight the significance of BC to both direct and indirect effects and reveal its multiple roles expressed through its optical properties, its evolution, its relation to light absorbing OC (brown carbon) and

  14. Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds: The Software Package OPAC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, M.; Koepke, P.; Schult, I.

    1998-05-01

    The software package OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) is described. It easily provides optical properties in the solar and terrestrial spectral range of atmospheric particulate matter. Microphysical and optical properties of six water clouds, three ice clouds, and 10 aerosol components, which are considered as typical cases, are stored as ASCII files. The optical properties are the extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients, the single scattering albedo, the asymmetry parameter, and the phase function. They are calculated on the basis of the microphysical data (size distribution and spectral refractive index) under the assumption of spherical particles in case of aerosols and cloud droplets and assuming hexagonal columns in case of cirrus clouds. Data are given for up to 61 wavelengths between 0.25 and 40 m and up to eight values of the relative humidity. The software package also allows calculation of derived optical properties like mass extinction coefficients and Ångström coefficients.Real aerosol in the atmosphere always is a mixture of different components. Thus, in OPAC it is made possible to get optical properties of any mixtures of the basic components and to calculate optical depths on the base of exponential aerosol height profiles. Typical mixtures of aerosol components as well as typical height profiles are proposed as default values, but mixtures and profiles for the description of individual cases may also be achieved simply.

  15. Satellite remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties over Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Saponaro, Giulia; Virtanen, Timo; Rodriguez, Edith; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Atlaskina, Ksenia; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides the spatial distribution of aerosol and cloud properties over a wide area. In our studies large data sets are used for statistical studies on aerosol and cloud interaction in an area over Fennoscandia, the Baltic Sea and adjacent regions over the European mainland. This area spans several regimes with different influences on aerosol cloud interaction such as a the transition from relative clean air over Fennoscandia to more anthropogenically polluted air further south, and the influence maritime air over the Baltic and oceanic air advected from the North Atlantic. Anthropogenic pollution occurs in several parts of the study area, and in particular near densely populated areas and megacities, but also in industrialized areas and areas with dense traffic. The aerosol in such areas is quite different from that produced over the boreal forest and has different effects on air quality and climate. Studies have been made on the effects of aerosols on air quality and on the radiation balance in China. The aim of the study is to study the effect of these different regimes on aerosol-cloud interaction using a large aerosol and cloud data set retrieved with the (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometer (A)ATSR Dual View algorithm (ADV) further developed at Finnish Meteorological Institute and aerosol and cloud data provided by MODIS. Retrieval algorithms for aerosol and clouds have been developed for the (A)ATSR, consisting of a series of instruments of which we use the second and third one: ATSR-2 which flew on the ERS-2 satellite (1995-2003) and AATSR which flew on the ENVISAT satellite (2002-2012) (both from the European Space Agency, ESA). The ADV algorithm provides aerosol data on a global scale with a default resolution of 10x10km2 (L2) and an aggregate product on 1x1 degree (L3). Optional, a 1x1 km2 retrieval products is available over smaller areas for specific studies. Since for the retrieval of AOD no prior knowledge is needed on

  16. An aerosol climatology for a rapidly growing arid region (southern Arizona): Major aerosol species and remotely sensed aerosol properties

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Wonaschütz, Anna; Jarjour, Elias G.; Hashimoto, Bryce I.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Betterton, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a comprehensive characterization of atmospheric aerosol particle properties in relation to meteorological and back trajectory data in the southern Arizona region, which includes two of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States (Phoenix and Tucson). Multiple data sets (MODIS, AERONET, OMI/TOMS, MISR, GOCART, ground-based aerosol measurements) are used to examine monthly trends in aerosol composition, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and aerosol size. Fine soil, sulfate, and organics dominate PM2.5 mass in the region. Dust strongly influences the region between March and July owing to the dry and hot meteorological conditions and back trajectory patterns. Because monsoon precipitation begins typically in July, dust levels decrease, while AOD, sulfate, and organic aerosol reach their maximum levels because of summertime photochemistry and monsoon moisture. Evidence points to biogenic volatile organic compounds being a significant source of secondary organic aerosol in this region. Biomass burning also is shown to be a major contributor to the carbonaceous aerosol budget in the region, leading to enhanced organic and elemental carbon levels aloft at a sky-island site north of Tucson (Mt. Lemmon). Phoenix exhibits different monthly trends for aerosol components in comparison with the other sites owing to the strong influence of fossil carbon and anthropogenic dust. Trend analyses between 1988 and 2009 indicate that the strongest statistically significant trends are reductions in sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon, and increases in fine soil during the spring (March–May) at select sites. These results can be explained by population growth, land-use changes, and improved source controls. PMID:24707452

  17. The relationship of boundary layer clouds in the tropical southeast Atlantic to absorbing aerosols, meteorology and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, P.; Adebiyi, A. A.; Ramajiguru, L.

    2015-12-01

    Ascension Island, a remote island located in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean within the trade-wind region oat 8S, 14.5W, experiences the outflow of biomass-burning aerosols from continental Africa, over 2000 km away, from July through November, peaking in August and September. The shortwave-absorbing free-tropospheric aerosols, located in a region of high solar irradiance, provide a climate warming that is poorly represented in global aerosol climate models. The low clouds can respond to the smoke layer in myriad possible ways that are not yet well-documented. The shortwave-warming can stabilize the free-troposphere, enhancing the low cloud fraction. The deepening boundary layer and subsiding smoke layer also increase the likelihood of aerosol-cloud microphysical interactions. Interest in this climate regime is supporting an observational strategy of a year-long DOE ARM Mobile Facility deployment to Ascension (Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds, or LASIC), and an NSF aircraft campaign (ObservatioNs of Fireʼs Impact on the southeast atlantic REgion, or ONFIRE) based on Sao Tome Island. These campaigns will be integrated with NASA, UK and African activities sharing similar goals based further south in Namibia. Initial analysis is distinguishing meteorology from aerosol impacts on the boundary layer cloud fields. The forward trajectories of emissions from over 24,000 fire sources on continental Africa show that a free-tropospheric jet can advect aerosols to above Ascension island in just one-two days. The fast transport time encourages retention of signatures of the fire sources, in particular the radiatively-crucial single-scattering albedo value. Thereafter, a deep land-based anticyclonic high recirculates over one-third of these trajectories back to the African continent, explaining the widespread extent of the aerosol layer. The free-tropospheric jet also reduces the mean atmospheric subsidence independently of shortwave absorption by the aerosols

  18. Physical properties of the stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    A comparison of the equilibrium vapor pressure over nitric acid solutions with observed water and nitric acid partial pressures in the stratosphere implies that nitric acid cannot be present as an aerosol particle in the lower stratosphere. A similar comparison for sulfuric acid solutions indicates that sulfuric acid aerosol particles are 75% H2SO4 by weight in water, in good agreement with direct observations. The freezing curve of H2SO4 solutions requires that the H2SO4 aerosol particles be solid or supercooled. The equilibrium vapor pressure of H2SO4 in the stratosphere is of the order of 20 picotorr. At stratospheric temperatures, ammonium sulfate is in a ferroelectric phase. As a result, polar molecules may form a surface coating on these aerosols, which may be a fertile ground for further chemical reaction.

  19. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) operated onboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the SAFARI-2000 field campaign. The CPL provided high spatial resolution measurements of aerosol optical properties at both 1064 nm and 532 nm. We present here results of planetary boundary layer (PBL) aerosol optical depth analysis and profiles of aerosol extinction. Variation of optical depth and extinction are examined as a function of regional location. The wide-scale aerosol mapping obtained by the CPL is a unique data set that will aid in future studies of aerosol transport. Comparisons between the airborne CPL and ground-based MicroPulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net) sites are shown to have good agreement.

  20. Aerosol optical properties of the free troposphere: Tropospheric backscatter climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, James M.

    1994-12-01

    A unique ensemble of aerosol sensors (backscattersondes, nephelometers and particle counters) has been assembled during the course of this research to obtain new measurements relating to the optical properties of aerosols in the atmosphere, especially in the free troposphere. A knowledge of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio has been greatly enhanced as a result of this project and the inference of representative values along with the range of variation is now possible. Agreement between the optical model results and actual measurements appears to be quite satisfactory. An initial climatology of aerosol backscatter in the free troposphere has been developed and is in general agreement with results and inferences from global remote sensing instruments. However, the data from remote sensors may indicate a larger influence of volcanic aerosols on the upper troposphere than actually exists. Further work with high resolution soundings is needed to fully resolve this issue.

  1. Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Cozic, J.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments

  2. The analysis of in situ and retrieved aerosol properties measured during three airborne field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, Chelsea A.

    Aerosols can directly influence climate, visibility, and photochemistry by scattering and absorbing solar radiation. Aerosol chemical and physical properties determine how efficiently a particle scatters and/or absorbs incoming short-wave solar radiation. Because many types of aerosol can act as nuclei for cloud droplets (CCN) and a smaller population of airborne particles facilitate ice crystal formation (IN), aerosols can also alter cloud-radiation interactions which have subsequent impacts on climate. Thus aerosol properties determine the magnitude and sign of both the direct and indirect impacts of aerosols on radiation-dependent Earth System processes. This dissertation will fill some gaps in our understanding of the role of aerosol properties on aerosol absorption and cloud formation. Specifically, the impact of aerosol oxidation on aerosol spectral (350nm < lambda< 500nm) absorption was examined for two biomass burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-S aircraft during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission in Spring and Summer 2008. Spectral aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved using actinic flux measured aboard the NASA DC-8 was used to calculate the aerosol absorption Angstrom exponents (AAE) for a 6-day-old plume on April 17 th and a 3-hour old plume on June 29th. Higher AAE values for the April 17th plume (6.78+/-0.38) indicate absorption by aerosol was enhanced in the ultraviolet relative to the visible portion of the short-wave spectrum in the older plume compared to the fresher plume (AAE= 3.34 0.11). These differences were largely attributed to the greater oxidation of the organic aerosol in the April 17th plume which can arise either from the aging of primary organic aerosol or the formation of spectrally-absorbing secondary organic aerosol. The validity of the actinic flux retrievals used above were also evaluated in this work by the comparison of SSA retrieved using

  3. Optical Properties of Moderately-Absorbing Organic and Mixed Organic/Inorganic Particles at Very High Humidities

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tami C; Rood, Mark J; Brem, Benjamin T; Mena-Gonzalez, Francisco C; Chen, Yanju

    2012-04-16

    Relative humidity (RH) affects the water content of an aerosol, altering its ability to scatter and absorb light, which is important for aerosol effects on climate and visibility. This project involves in situ measurement and modeling of aerosol optical properties including absorption, scattering and extinction at three visible wavelengths (467, 530, 660 nm), for organic carbon (OC) generated by pyrolysis of biomass, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and their mixtures at controlled RH conditions. Novel components of this project include investigation of: (1) Changes in all three of these optical properties at scanned RH conditions; (2) Optical properties at RH values up to 95%, which are usually extrapolated instead of measured; and (3) Examination of aerosols generated by the pyrolysis of wood, which is representative of primary atmospheric organic carbon, and its mixture with inorganic aerosol. Scattering and extinction values were used to determine light absorption by difference and single scattering albedo values. Extensive instrumentation development and benchmarking with independently measured and modeled values were used to obtain and evaluate these new results. The single scattering albedo value for a dry absorbing polystyrene microsphere benchmark agreed within 0.02 (absolute value) with independently published results at 530 nm. Light absorption by a nigrosin (sample light-absorbing) benchmark increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Closure modeling with Mie theory was able to reproduce this increase with the linear volume average (LVA) refractive index mixing rule for this water soluble compound. Absorption by biomass OC aerosol increased by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.7 and 2.3 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at 467 nm and 530 nm, but there was no detectable absorption at 660 nm. Additionally, the spectral dependence of absorption by OC that was observed with filter measurements was confirmed qualitatively

  4. Aerosol Properties From Multi-angle Satellite Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R. A.; Martonchik, J. V.; Diner, D. J.; Chen, W. A.; Gaitley, B. J.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Liu, Y.; Team, T.

    2005-12-01

    Based on pre-launch simulations, we expected that data from the multi-angle, multi-spectral MISR instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite would contain, in addition to aerosol optical depth (AOT), information about particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA). Such information would add a great deal to the global aerosol picture that satellites provide, allowing more meaningful assessments of aerosol direct radiative impact, source attribution, material fluxes, and possibly indirect effects of aerosols on clouds. But particle micro-physical property retrievals are much more difficult to validate than AOT, since there are significant uncertainties in aerosol size, and especially shape and SSA, retrieved from surface-based sun photometers, whereas instrumented aircraft must fly complex patterns to adequately sample all aerosol layers in the entire column seen simultaneously by MISR. Our multi-faceted validation effort, which makes use of ground-based AERONET sun photometers as well as coincident satellite and intensive field observations, has allowed us to quantify MISR data sensitivity to these aerosol micro-physical properties over dark water, and in a few situations, over land. In broad terms, over dark water MISR can distinguish three-to-five aerosol size bins between about 0.1 and 2.5 microns effective diameter, spherical vs. non-spherical particle shapes, plates from grains from spheroids at least in some cases, and two-to-four SSA groupings between 0.75 and 1.0. MISR can also identify several aerosol modes within the column, provided each contributes more than about 20% to the total column mid-visible AOT. These sensitivities diminish for column AOT below about 0.15, and for brighter underlying surfaces. This talk will summarize the current status of the MISR Standard Aerosol Product, the latest MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval validation study results, and our plans for completing aerosol micro-physical property formal validation for the MISR

  5. Climatology and Characteristics of Aerosol Optical Properties in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Lauren; Ogren, John; Backman, John; Asmi, Eija; Andrews, Elisabeth; Jefferson, Anne; Bergin, Michael; Tunved, Peter; Sharma, Sangeeta; Starkweather, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Within the Arctic, climate forcers like atmospheric aerosols are important contributors to the observed warming and environmental changes in the region. Quantifying the forcing by aerosols in the Arctic is especially difficult, given short aerosol lifetimes, annual variability in illumination and surface albedo, stratified atmospheric conditions, complex feedbacks, and long-range aerosol transport. However, in-situ surface measurements of Arctic aerosol optical properties can be used to constrain variability of light scattering and absorption, identify potential particle sources, and help evaluate the resulting forcing. Data from six WMO Global Atmosphere Watch stations are presented: Alert, Canada (ALT); Barrow, Alaska (BRW); Pallas, Finland (PAL); Summit, Greenland (SUM); Tiksi, Russia (TIK); and Zeppelin Mountain, Norway (ZEP). These sites contribute to the International Arctic System for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA), which facilitates Arctic-wide data collection and analysis. Climatologies of aerosol optical properties from each station show differences in magnitude and variability of observed parameters. For example, most stations (ALT, BRW, SUM, TIK, ZEP) experience maximum scattering in winter/spring, while PAL exhibits maximum scattering in the summer. The observed range in scattering across these sites is large (almost an order of magnitude) - SUM has the lowest annual median scattering at 0.82 Mm-1 while BRW has the highest at 6.9 Mm-1. A closer look at systematic variability between optical properties at each station, as well as site back trajectories, suggest differences in aerosol processes, sources and transport. The development of consistent climatologies and additional analyses like the ones presented here can help provide a better understanding of trans-Arctic aerosol variability, which can be an asset for improving aerosol models in this unique and remote region.

  6. Impacts of Aminium Sulfates on Atmospheric Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, C.; Zhang, R.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence our environment significantly by interacting with the solar radiation and modifying cloud formation processes. Amines are emitted into the atmosphere from various anthropogenic and biogenic sources. Recent studies have shown that atmospheric amines can enter the particle-phase as salts like aminium sulfates by reacting with aerosol constituents including sulfuric acid and ammonium salts. However, little knowledge is available about the properties of these aminium salts and their impacts on aerosol properties. We have conducted laboratory experiments to measure the hygroscopicity, thermostability, and density of five representative alkylaminium sulfates, using an integrated aerosol analytical system including a tandem differential mobility analyzer and an aerosol particle mass analyzer. When exposed to increasing RH, alkylaminium sulfate aerosols show monotonic growth in size without a well-defined deliquescence point. Aerosols of mixed ammonium-alkylaminium sulfates have deliquescence points lower than that of ammonium sulfate. The measurements of thermostability reveal that dimethylaminium sulfate is the most stable species upon heating. Trimethyl- and triethyl-aminium sulfates volatilize similarly to ammonium sulfate, but exhibit lower volatility than monomethyl- and diethyl-aminium sulfates. The density of alkylaminium sulfates ranges from 1.2 to 1.5 g cm-3, and can be predicted from an empirical model on the basis of the mole ratio of alkyl carbons to total sulfate. Our results suggest that the properties of aerosols may be considerably altered by the incorporation of atmospheric amines through heterogeneous reactions. In particular, these processes may lead to an enhanced water uptake at low RH and considerably change the contribution of aerosols to climate forcing.

  7. Aerosol optical properties and mixing state of black carbon in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Haobo; Liu, Li; Fan, Shaojia; Li, Fei; Yin, Yan; Cai, Mingfu; Chan, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols contribute the largest uncertainty to the total radiative forcing estimate, and black carbon (BC) that absorbs solar radiation plays an important role in the Earth's energy budget. This study analysed the aerosol optical properties from 22 February to 18 March 2014 at the China Meteorological Administration Atmospheric Watch Network (CAWNET) station in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. The representative values of dry-state particle scattering coefficient (σsp), hemispheric backscattering coefficient (σhbsp), absorption coefficient (σabsp), extinction coefficient (σep), hemispheric backscattering fraction (HBF), single scattering albedo (SSA), as well as scattering Ångström exponent (α) were presented. A comparison between a polluted day and a clean day shows that the aerosol optical properties depend on particle number size distribution, weather conditions and evolution of the mixing layer. To investigate the mixing state of BC at the surface, an optical closure study of HBF between measurements and calculations based on a modified Mie model was employed for dry particles. The result shows that the mixing state of BC might be between the external mixture and the core-shell mixture. The average retrieved ratio of the externally mixed BC to the total BC mass concentration (rext-BC) was 0.58 ± 0.12, and the diurnal pattern of rext-BC can be found. Furthermore, considering that non-light-absorbing particles measured by a Volatility-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (V-TDMA) exist independently with core-shell and homogenously internally mixed BC particles, the calculated optical properties were just slightly different from those based on the assumption that BC exist in each particle. This would help understand the influence of the BC mixing state on aerosol optical properties and radiation budget in the PRD.

  8. The Effects of an Absorbing Smoke Layer on MODIS Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Optical Property Retrievals and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Clouds, aerosols, and their interactions are widely considered to be key uncertainty components in our current understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and radiation budget. The work presented here is focused on the quasi-permanent marine boundary layer . (MBL) clouds off the southern Atlantic coast of Africa and the effects on MODIS cloud optical property retrievals (MOD06) of an overlying absorbing smoke layer. During much of August and September, a persistent smoke layer resides over this region, produced from extensive biomass burning throughout the southern African savanna. The resulting absorption, which increases with decreasing wavelength, potentially introduces biases into the MODIS cloud optical property retrievals of the underlying MBL clouds. This effect is more pronounced in the cloud optical thickness retrievals, which over ocean are derived from the wavelength channel centered near 0.86 micron (effective particle size retrievals are derived from the longer-wavelength near-IR channels at 1.6, 2.1, and 3.7 microns). Here, the spatial distributions of the scalar statistics of both the cloud and aerosol layers are first determined from the CALIOP 5 km layer products. Next, the MOD06 look-up tables (LUTs) are adjusted by inserting an absorbing smoke layer of varying optical thickness over the cloud. Retrievals are subsequently performed for a subset of MODIS pixels collocated with the CALIOP ground track, using smoke optical thickness from the CALIOP 5km aerosol layer product to select the appropriate LUT. The resulting differences in cloud optical property retrievals due to the inclusion of the smoke layer in the LUTs will be examined. In addition, the direct radiative forcing of this smoke layer will be investigated from the perspective of the cloud optical property retrieval differences.

  9. Remote Sensing of Spectral Aerosol Properties: A Classroom Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Pinker, Rachel T.

    2006-01-01

    Bridging the gap between current research and the classroom is a major challenge to today s instructor, especially in the sciences where progress happens quickly. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland teamed up in designing a graduate class project intended to provide a hands-on introduction to the physical basis for the retrieval of aerosol properties from state-of-the-art MODIS observations. Students learned to recognize spectral signatures of atmospheric aerosols and to perform spectral inversions. They became acquainted with the operational MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm over oceans, and methods for its evaluation, including comparisons with groundbased AERONET sun-photometer data.

  10. Large differences in aerosol optical properties over the north-west Atlantic Ocean during the TCAP field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, D.; Berg, L. K.; Comstock, J. M.; Fast, J. D.; Flynn, C. J.; Hubbe, J. M.; Kassianov, E.; Mei, F.; Pekour, M. S.; Schmid, B.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Berkowitz, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing is an important parameter in the Earth's radiation budget and can be an important driver of atmospheric circulation and the hydrological cycle. Accurate estimation of aerosol radiative forcing requires measurement of both the extensive and intensive optical properties of aerosols. While the intensive optical properties are independent of aerosol mass or number, they are critical inputs when calculating radiative forcing with applications to climate research, satellite remote sensing and model validations. The key aerosol intensive properties that need to be evaluated include single scattering albedo (SSA), the angstrom exponent, the asymmetry parameter, the radiative forcing efficiency, and the hygroscopic scattering factor. We report here on values of these variables over the Cape Cod and nearby northwest Atlantic Ocean during the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). The average SSA shows a distinct profile having higher SSA values below the top of well-mixed residual layer (RL) and lower SSA above it. Aerosol in the free troposphere (FT) were found to have less spectral dependence in their optical properties, lower back scatter fraction and higher hygroscopic growth relative to aerosols found in the RL. Analysis of individual particle composition suggests that that ratio of aged to fresh aerosol numbers in the FT is 70% higher compared to aerosols measured in the RL, and that smoke from biomass burning contributed ~10% to this number. Single particle analysis also reveals that the fraction and variability of coated black carbon (BC) aerosol is higher in the FT relative to that measured in the residual layer. The daily radiative forcing efficiency of these aerosols in the FT is factor 2 higher than below RL. Seven years (2007-2013) of CALIPSO satellite observations show that the mean altitude of the top of smoke layers (~3.3 km) consistent with these in situ observations from TCAP. Overall, the long term CALIPSO observations characterizes

  11. Retrieval of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties from SCIAMACHY limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerner, S.; Kühl, S.; Pukite, J.; Penning de Vries, M. J.; Hoermann, C.; von Savigny, C.; Deutschmann, T.; Wagner, T.

    2012-12-01

    Since the start of the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement program in 1975 satellites have been improving our understanding of the global distribution of trace gases, clouds and aerosols. Observations in occultation and limb geometry provide profile information on stratospheric aerosol, which have an important influence on the global radiation budget (e.g., after strong volcanic eruptions) and the stratospheric ozone chemistry (e.g., the chlorine activation inside the polar vortex). The Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) on ENVISAT performed measurements in limb geometry for almost ten years between 2002 and 2012. Its vertical resolution of about 3.3 km at the tangent point and the broad spectral range (UV/VIS/NIR) allow to retrieve profile information of stratospheric trace gases (e.g., O3, NO2, BrO or OClO) and stratospheric aerosol properties. Pioneering studies (e.g., Savigny et al., 2005) showed that in particular from color indices (including the near IR spectral range) signatures of stratospheric aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can be retrieved. In our study we investigate the sensitivity of SCIAMACHY's broad spectral range to aerosol particle properties by comparing measured spectra with simulated results from the 3D full spherical Monte Carlo Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Model McArtim. In particular, we focus on the absorption properties in the UV spectral range, the extinction coefficient and the Angström exponent. The final aim of our study is to use SCIAMACHY limb measurements for the profile retrieval of optical parameters (e.g., absorption and phase function) from which microphysical properties (e.g., mean aerosol particle diameter) of the stratospheric aerosol particles can be deduced.

  12. Light-absorption properties of aerosols observed in East and South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Yoon, S.; Lee, H.

    2011-12-01

    We compared light-absorption properties of aerosols observed in East and South Asia from black carbon (BC) mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients measurements at four sites: Korea Climate Observatory-Gosan (KCO-G), Korea Climate Observatory-Anmyeon (KCO-A), Maldives Climate Observatory-Hanimaadhoo (MCO-H) and Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid (NCO-P). No significant seasonal variations of BC mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, except for summer due to wet scavenging by rainfall, were observed in East Asia, whereas dramatic changes of light-absorbing aerosol properties were observed in South Asia between dry and wet monsoon periods. Although BC mass concentration in East Asia is generally higher than that observed in South Asia, BC mass concentration at MCO-H during winter dry monsoon is similar to that of East Asia. The observed solar absorption efficiency (absorption coefficient/extinction coefficient) at 550 nm at KCO-G and KCO-A is higher than that in MCO-H due to large portions of BC emission from fossil fuel combustion. Interestingly, solar absorption efficiency at NCO-P is 0.14, which is two times great than that in MCO-H and is about 40% higher than that in East Asia, though BC mass concentration at NCO-P is the lowest among four sites. Consistently, the highest elemental carbon to sulfate ratio is found at NCO-P.

  13. The thermal infrared radiance properties of dust aerosol over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zengzhou; Pan, Delu; Tu, Qianguang; Gong, Fang; Chen, Jianyu

    2015-10-01

    Asian dust storms, which can long-range transport to ocean, often occur on spring. The present of Asian dust aerosols over ocean makes some difficult for other studies, such as cloud detection, and also take some advantage for ocean, such as take nutrition into the ocean by dry or wet deposition. Therefore, it is important to study the dust aerosol and retrieve the properties of dust from satellite observations that is mainly from the thermal infrared radiance. In this paper, the thermal infrared radiance properties of dust aerosol over ocean are analyzed from MODIS and MTSAT2 observations and Streamer model simulations. By analyzing some line samples and a series of dust aerosol region, it shows that the dust aerosol brightness temperature at 12μm (BT12) is always greater than BT11 and BT8.5, and BT8.5 is general greater than BT11. The brightness temperature different between 11μm and 12μm (BTD11-12) increases with the dust intensity. And the BTD11-12 will become positive when the atmospheric relative humidity is greater than 70%. The BTD11-12 increases gradually with the surface temperature while the effect on BTD11-12 of dust layer temperature is not evident. Those are caused by the transmission of the dust aerosol is different at the two thermal infrared channels. During daytime, dust infrared brightness temperature at mid-infrared bands should reduce the visual radiance, which takes about 25K or less. In general, BT3.7 is greater than BT11 for dust aerosol. Those results are helpful to monitor or retrieve dust aerosol physical properties over ocean from satellite.

  14. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume concentrations of steady-state secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were measured in several hydrocarbon/NOx irradiation experiments. These measurements were used to estimate the thermal behavior of the particles that may be formed in the atmosphere. These laborator...

  15. MAPTIP experiment, marine aerosol properties and thermal imager performance

    SciTech Connect

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Leeuw, G. de; Jensen, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    During the fall of 1993, a field experimental study on Marine Aerosol Properties and Thermal Imager Performance (MAPTIP) was conducted in the Dutch coastal waters. The objectives of the MAPTIP trial were: (1) to improve and validate vertical marine aerosol models by providing an extensive set of aerosol and meteorological measurements, within a coastal environment, at different altitudes and for a range of meteorological conditions; (2) to make aerosol and meteorological observations in the first 10 m above the ocean surface with a view to extending existing aerosol models to incorporate near-surface effects; (3) to assess marine boundary layer effects on thermal imaging systems. Aerosol and meteorological instruments, as well as thermal imagers and calibrated targets, were used at several platforms and locations. Measurements have been made of atmospheric turbulence and refractivity effects at wavelengths in the IR and visible, to assess the marine boundary layer effects on the degradation of thermal images. Calibrated targets at different altitudes were observed to the maximum observable range under a wide variety of conditions in both the 3--5 and 8--12 gm bands, These data will be used for the development and validation of IRST models and IR ship signature models with the view of determining the effects of marine-generated aerosols, turbulence and meteorological profiles on their performance.

  16. Evidence of a Weakly Absorbing Intermediate Mode of Aerosols in AERONET Data from Saharan and Sahelian Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianelli, Scott M.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Carlson, Barbara E.; Hameed, Sultan

    2013-01-01

    Accurate retrievals of aerosol size distribution are necessary to estimate aerosols' impact on climate and human health. The inversions of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) usually retrieve bimodal distributions. However, when the inversion is applied to Saharan and Sahelian dust, an additional mode of intermediate size between the coarse and fine modes is sometimes seen. This mode explains peculiarities in the behavior of the Angstrom exponent, along with the fine mode fraction retrieved using the spectral deconvolution algorithm, observed in a March 2006 dust storm. For this study, 15 AERONET sites in northern Africa and on the Atlantic are examined to determine the frequency and properties of the intermediate mode. The mode is observed most frequently at Ilorin in Nigeria. It is also observed at Capo Verde and multiple sites located within the Sahel but much less frequently at sites in the northern Sahara and the Canary Islands. The presence of the intermediate mode coincides with increases in Angstrom exponent, fine mode fraction, single-scattering albedo, and to a lesser extent percent sphericity. The Angstrom exponent decreases with increasing optical depth at most sites when the intermediate mode is present, but the fine mode fraction does not. Single-scattering albedo does not steadily decrease with fine mode fraction when the intermediate mode is present, as it does in typical mixtures of dust and biomass-burning aerosols. Continued investigation is needed to further define the intermediate mode's properties, determine why it differs from most Saharan dust, and identify its climate and health effects.

  17. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived from Sea WiFS-Inferred Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties inferred from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) radiance measurements are used to compute the aerosol shortwave radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength of 865-nm is taken from the SeaWIFS archive. It is found that the nominal optical thickness over oceans ranges from 0.1 to 0.2. Using a maritime aerosol model and the radiances measured at the various SeaWiFS channels, the Angstrom exponent is determined to be 0.2174, the single-scattering albedo to be 0.995, and the asymmetry factor to be 0.786. The radiative transfer model has eight bands in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions and three bands in the near infrared. It includes the absorption due to aerosols, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and the scattering due to aerosols and gases (Rayleigh scattering). The radiative forcing is computed over global oceans for four months (January, April, July, and October, 1998) to represent four seasons. It is found that the aerosol radiative forcing is large and changes significantly with seasons near the continents with large-scale forest fires and desert dust. Averaged over oceans and the four months, the aerosol radiative forcing is approximately 7 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere. This large radiative forcing is expected to have a significant cooling effect on the Earth's climate as implied from simulations of a number of general circulation models.

  18. Measurement of Optical Properties of Organic and Mixed Organic/ Inorganic Laboratory Aerosols at Relative Humidities between 8 and 95%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brem, B.; Mena, F. C.; Chen, Y.; Bond, T. C.; Rood, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Relative humidity (RH) affects the liquid water content of an aerosol, altering its scattering and absorption of visible light, which is important for aerosol effects on visibility and climate. Particle light extinction, light scattering and light absorption coefficient values are reported here for laboratory-generated inorganic and organic carbon (OC) aerosols at RH values between 8% and 95%. Light scattering was measured with a nephelometer, light extinction was measured with an extinction cell and light absorption was determined based on the difference between those two values at three visible wavelengths (467 nm, 530 nm and 660 nm). The instrumentation was benchmarked with non-absorbing ammonium sulfate, absorbing polystyrene microspheres (PSMs) and absorbing nigrosin aerosol under controlled RH conditions. Agreement between dry measured scattering and extinction coefficients for ammonium sulfate was achieved within 3%. Optical closure with modeled scattering values based on measured ammonium sulfate particle size distributions was achieved within 7%. Measured single scattering albedo for dry absorbing PSMs agreed within 0.02 with the literature value. Light absorption by nigrosin increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Light absorption of OC aerosol that was generated from wood pyrolysis demonstrated enhancements of 2.2 +/- 0.7 and 2.7 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at the wavelengths of 467 and 530 nm, but no absorption was detected at 660 nm. A spectral dependence of light absorption by OC was observed with absorption increasing from 530 nm towards the 467 nm wavelength, consistent with previously reported ex situ measurements of filter extracts. Current work focuses on the measurement of optical properties as a function of RH for OC wood pyrolysis aerosol mixed with ammonium sulfate. Additionally optical closure is evaluated between measured and modeled results.

  19. Optical and radiative-transfer properties of mixed atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degheidy, A. R.; Sallah, M.; Elgarayhi, A.; Shaaban, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    The optical and radiative-transfer properties of mixed atmospheric aerosols have been investigated. The aerosol medium is considered as a plane-parallel anisotropic scattering medium with diffusive reflecting boundaries and containing an internal radiation source. The basic components are defined by their complex refractive index, a lognormal size distribution and humidity dependence in hygroscopic particles. The aerosol particles are assumed to be spherical, so the scattering parameters in the form of single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, scattering, absorption, extinction efficiencies and linear anisotropic coefficient are calculated using the Mie theory. The calculations have been performed for individual aerosol particles, internal and external mixing media. Radiation transfer problem through the considered aerosol medium has been solved in terms of the solution of the corresponding source-free problem with simple boundary conditions. For the solution of the source-free problem, the Variational Pomraning-Eddington technique has been employed. The variation of the radiative-transfer properties (partial radiative fluxes at the medium boundaries) have been calculated and represented graphically for the different aerosols with their different mixing states. A comparison of the obtained results versus available published data has been performed and a very good agreement was observed.

  20. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  1. Investigation of aerosol optical properties for remote sensing through DRAGON (distributed regional aerosol gridded observation networks) campaign in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Park, Jin-Soo; Hong, You-Deok; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere, including dust and pollutants, scatters/absorbs solar radiation and change the microphysics of clouds, thus influencing the Earth's energy budget, climate, air quality, visibility, agriculture and water circulation. Pollutants have also been reported to threaten the human health. The present research collaborated with the U.S. NASA and the U.S. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is to study the aerosol characteristics in East Asia and improve the long-distance transportation monitoring technology by analyzing the observations of aerosol characteristics in East Asia during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March 2012-May 2012). The sun photometers that measure the aerosol optical characteristics were placed evenly throughout the Korean Peninsula and concentrated in Seoul and the metropolitan area. Observation data are obtained from the DRAGON campaign and the first year (2012) observation data (aerosol optical depth and aerosol spatial distribution) are analyzed. Sun photometer observations, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), are utilized to validate satellite observations from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Additional analysis is performed associated with the Northeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula in particular, to determine the spatial distribution of the aerosol.

  2. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived From SeaWIFS - Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Mong-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To understand climatic implications of aerosols over global oceans, the aerosol optical properties retrieved from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) are analyzed, and the effects of the aerosols on the Earth's radiation budgets (aerosol radiative forcing, ARF) are computed using a radiative transfer model. It is found that the distribution of the SeaWiFS-retrieved aerosol optical thickness is distinctively zonal. The maximum in the equatorial region coincides with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the maximum in the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes coincides with the region of prevailing westerlies. The minimum aerosol optical thickness is found in the subtropical high pressure regions, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. These zonal patterns clearly demonstrate the influence of atmospheric circulation on the oceanic aerosol distribution. Over global oceans, aerosols reduce the annual mean net downward solar flux by 5.4 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and by 6.1 W m-2 at the surface. The largest ARF is found in the tropical Atlantic, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, the coastal regions of Southeast and East Asia, and the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes. During the period of the Indonesian big fires (September-December 1997), the cooling due to aerosols is greater than 15 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and greater than 30 W m(exp -1) at the surface in the vicinity of the maritime continents. The atmosphere receives extra solar radiation by greater than 15 W m(exp -1) over a large area. These large changes in radiative fluxes are expected to have enhanced the atmospheric stability, weakened the atmospheric circulation, and augmented the drought condition during that period. It would be very instructive to simulate the regional climatic. The model-calculated clear sky solar flux at the top of the atmosphere is compared with that derived from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). The net downward solar flux of

  3. A Measurement-Based Climatology of Aerosol Radiative Properties and Direct Radiative Forcing in the Southeastern U.S.-Initial Results from a Regionally-Representative Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Robertson, L.; Taubman, B.; Brewbaker, A.; Sheridan, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    The southeastern U.S.(SEUS), home to large emission sources of biogenic VOCs, is one of only a few regions where surface temperatures did not increase from 1901-2005. Recent studies (Goldstein et al., 2008) show that negative top-of-atmosphere (TOA) aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is consistent with a warm-season regional cooling effect dominated by secondary organic aerosols resulting from BVOC oxidation in the presence of anthropogenic NOx and SO2. Established in 2009, the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research Facility (AppalAIR) at Appalachian State University is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and NASA AERONET aerosol monitoring sites in the SEUS. Equipped with a comprehensive list of aerosol optical, microphysical, and newly-added chemical measurements, this regionally representative, high elevation site (1100 m asl) removed from local pollution sources allows us to significantly advance the state of the science by better quantifying regional aerosol DRF, the relative contributions of source types and source regions to DRF, seasonal and diurnal DRF variability, and an estimate of the anthropogenic contribution to DRF. Seasonal statistics of measured aerosol optical and microphysical properties, aerosol optical depth, and aerosol DRF will be presented. The optical property statistics are placed in the context of those measured at the other three U.S.-based NOAA-ESRL aerosol monitoring sites. Winter months are characterized by smaller, more absorbing particles, low aerosol loading, and negligible DRF. Summer months are characterized by lower aerosol concentrations of primarily scattering particles, high aerosol loading, and a significant negative DRF. Aerosols measured at AppalAIR were smaller in size than those measured at the other U.S. NOAA-ESRL sites for all seasons and seasonal variability of aerosol light scattering was largest. Air mass back-trajectories were used to classify aerosols by source type and region for each season in

  4. Aerosol Properties and Radiative Forcing over Kanpur during Severe Aerosol Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Sinha, P. R.; Vinoj, V.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Tripathi, S. N.; Misra, Amit; Sharma, M.; Singh, R. P.

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols over India exhibit large spatio-temporal fluctuation driven by the local monsoon system, emission rates and seasonally-changed air masses. The northern part of India is well-known for its high aerosol loading throughout the year due to anthropogenic emissions, dust influence and biomass burning. On certain circumstances and, under favorable weather conditions, the aerosol load can be severe, causing significant health concerns and climate implications. The present work analyzes the aerosol episode (AE) days and examines the modification in aerosol properties and radiative forcing during the period 2001-2010 based on Kanpur-AERONET sun photometer data. As AEs are considered the days having daily-mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) above the decadal mean + 1 STD (standard deviation); the threshold value is defined at 0.928. The results identify 277 out of 2095 days (13.2%) of AEs over Kanpur, which are most frequently observed during post-monsoon (78 cases, 18.6%) and monsoon (76, 14.7%) seasons due to biomass-burning episodes and dust influence, respectively. On the other hand, the AEs in winter and pre-monsoon are lower in both absolute and percentage values (65, 12.5% and 58, 9.1%, respectively). The modification in aerosol properties on the AE days is strongly related to season. Thus, in post-monsoon and winter the AEs are associated with enhanced presence of fine-mode aerosols and Black Carbon from anthropogenic pollution and any kind of burning, while in pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons they are mostly associated with transported dust. Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) calculated using SBDART shows much more surface (~-69 to -97 Wm-2) and Top of Atmosphere cooling (-20 to -30 Wm-2) as well as atmospheric heating (~43 to 71 Wm-2) during the AE days compared to seasonal means. These forcing values are mainly controlled by the higher AODs and the modified aerosol characteristics (Angstrom α, SSA) during the AE days in each season and may cause

  5. Global dust infrared aerosol properties retrieved using hyperspectral sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelle, Virginie; Chédin, alain; Pondrom, Marc; Pierangelo, Clémence; Armante, Raymond; Crevoisier, Cyril; Crépeau, Laurent; Scott, Noëlle

    2015-04-01

    Observations from infrared hyperspectral sounders, here IASI and AIRS, are interpreted in terms of dust aerosol properties (AOD and mean altitude). The method is based on a "Look-Up-Table" (LUT) approach, where all radiative transfer computation is performed once for all and "off-line", for a large selection of atmospheric situations, of observing conditions, of surface characteristics (in particular the surface emissivity and temperature), and different aerosol refractive index models. The inversion scheme follows two main steps: first, determination of the observed atmospheric thermodynamic situation, second, simultaneous retrieval of the 10µm coarse-mode AOD and of the mean altitude. The method is here applied over sea and over land, at daily scale daytime and nighttime, and at the satellite pixel resolution (12 km at nadir). The geographical study area studied includes the northern tropics from west Atlantic to the Arabian peninsula and Indian ocean, and the Mediterranean basin, all of them characterized by strong, regular dust events. A special focus is given to the hourly variation of aerosol properties within a day. In this context, both IASI overpasses are processed, providing two measurements at 9:30AM and 9:30PM (equator local time) each day. First results obtained from AIRS observations, made at 1:30 AM and PM, open the way to the analysis of the aerosol diurnal cycle. For the AOD, comparisons are made with AERONET ground-based data , when available, in order to 1) evaluate our results, and 2) show the importance of a better knowledge of the aerosol diurnal cycle, especially close to the sources. Mean aerosol layer altitude obtained from IASI is compared at local scale with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP/CALIPSO) aerosol altitude.

  6. Calibration of a Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry and Nephelometry Setup for Measuring Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon-Bernal, I. D.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols have a great impact on climate and global warming which is not yet fully understood. We want to have a better understanding how of how the optical properties of biomass burning aerosols, coming from cooking and forest wildfires, interact with light and affect the Earths radiation budget and its impact on climate. Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometry and integrating Nephelometry was used to determine the extinction of scattering and absorbing polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres of 390 nm and 404nm respectfully and a soot sample of 400 nm. The extinction coefficients obtained for the scattering 404 nm PSL spheres, 390 nm absorbing PSL spheres and the soot sample were: 1.337E-05 m-1, 9.569E-05 m-1, and 2.200E-05 m-1 respectively. The Single Scattering Albedo was also obtained for the lab standards, which were 0.7077 for the scattering PSL spheres and 0.0643 for the absorbing PSL spheres. Samples for the flaming stage and smoldering stage were observed under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to study how their morphology varies from one stage to the other. We determined the soot sample can attenuate light but less than what our PSL spheres are capable of after comparing extinction cross-sections. Error correlations need to be determined for the 400 nm soot particles and be applied to our data. Lastly, different morphologies were observed for the two burning stages analyzed under the SEM.

  7. Application of aerosol optical properties to estimate aerosol type from ground-based remote sensing observation at urban area of northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Huizheng; Zhao, Hujia; Wu, Yunfei; Xia, Xiangao; Zhu, Jun; Dubovik, Oleg; Estelles, Victor; Ma, Yanjun; Wang, Yangfeng; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yaqiang; Zhang, Xiaoye; Shi, Guangyu

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties were derived from ground-based sunphotometer observations between 2009-2013 at three urban sites of Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun in northeastern China. The annual means for extinction aerosol optical depths (EAOD) at 500 nm were 0.57±0.38, 0.52±0.35, and 0.41±0.31 at Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun, respectively. The corresponding annual means for the extinction Angstrom exponents (EAE) computed for the wavelengths of 440 and 870 nm were 0.86±0.32, 0.86±0.34 and 0.91±0.35, respectively, indicating that urban area of Northeast China were affected by both coarse and fine particles. Hygroscopic growth in summer and incursions of dust aerosols in spring were evidently revealed from the analysis of the relationship between EAE and δEAE (the EAE difference, δEAE=EAE(440,670)-EAE(670,870)). The annual mean absorption aerosol optical depths (AAOD440 nm) values at Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun were 0.15±0.11, 0.10±0.07, 0.08±0.04, respectively. The annual mean absorption Angstrom exponents (AAE440-870 nm) values were 0.86±0.24, 1.19±0.39, 1.33±0.36 at Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun, respectively. When the AAEs were close to unity at Anshan, the absorption aerosol particles evidently consisted of black carbon from coal combustion and motor vehicles. Larger AAEs at Fushun were indicative of absorbing aerosols mainly from biomass burning and mineral dust. The AAE at Shenyang was<1 which may be consistent with black carbon particles with absorbing or non-absorbing coatings. Analysis of the relationship between the AAEs and extinction Angstrom exponents showed that the aerosol populations at these three sites could be classified as "mixed-small particles" including anthropogenic particles and secondary organic aerosol with highly variable sphericity fractions.

  8. Comparative analysis of hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosols at ZOTTO Siberian background station during summer and winter campaigns of 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryshkevich, T. I.; Mironov, G. N.; Mironova, S. Yu.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Chi, X.; Andreae, M. O.; Mikhailov, E. F.

    2015-09-01

    The results of measurements of hygroscopic properties and chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples collected from June 10 to 20 and December 15 to 25, 2011, at the ZOTTO background stations (60.8° N, 89.35° E) in Central Siberia are presented. The sorption properties of aerosols are studied with the help of a differential analyzer of absorbed water mass in the relative humidity range of 5 to 99%. It has been found that the hygroscopic growth factor of aerosol particles collected during the winter campaign is on average 45% higher than that of the aerosol collected in the summer campaign, which leads to a 40% decrease in the critical supersaturation threshold of cloud activation of particles. The measurement data are analyzed and parameterized using a new approach that takes into account the concentration effects in the particle—water vapor system at low humidities. Based on the chemical analysis, the content of water-soluble substances in the winter sample is 2.5 times higher than in the summer sample. Here, the amount of sulfates and nitrates increases 20 and 88 times, respectively. A trajectory analysis of air mass motion shows that the increased content of inorganic ions in aerosols for the winter sample is caused by long-range transport of pollutants from industrial areas of Siberia. This difference in the chemical composition is the main source of the observed difference in hygroscopic and condensation properties of the aerosol particles.

  9. What is the real role of iron oxides in the optical properties of dust aerosols?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. L.; Wu, G. J.; Zhang, C. L.; Xu, T. L.; Zhou, Q. Q.

    2015-11-01

    Iron oxide compounds constitute an important component of mineral dust aerosols. Several previous studies have shown that these minerals are strong absorbers at visible wavelengths and thus that they play a critical role in the overall climate perturbation caused by dust aerosols. When compiling a database of complex refractive indices of possible mineral species of iron oxides to study their optical properties, we found that uniformly continuous optical constants for a single type of iron oxide in the wavelength range between 0.2 and 50 μm are very scarce, and that the use of hematite to represent all molecular or mineral iron-oxides types is a popular hypothesis. However, the crucial problem is that three continuous data sets for complex refractive indices of hematite are employed in climate models, but there are significant differences between them. Thus, the real role of iron oxides in the optical properties of dust aerosols becomes a key scientific question, and we address this problem by considering different refractive indices, size distributions and more logical weight fractions and mixing states of hematite. Based on the microscopic observations, a semi-external mixture that employs an external mixture between Fe aggregates and other minerals and partly internal mixing between iron oxides and aluminosilicate particles is advised as the optimal approximation. The simulations demonstrate that hematite with a spectral refractive index from Longtin et al. (1988) shows approximately equal absorbing capacity to the mineral illite over the whole wavelength region from 0.55 to 2.5 μm, and only enhances the optical absorption of aerosol mixture at λ < 0.55 μm. Using the data set from Querry (1985) may overestimate the optical absorption of hematite at both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. More laboratory measurements of the refractive index of iron oxides, especially for hematite and goethite in the visible spectrum, should therefore be taken into account

  10. Atmospheric Aging and Its Impacts on Physical Properties of Soot Aerosols: Results from the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Khalizov, A. F.; Zheng, J.; Reed, C. C.; Collins, D. R.; Olaguer, E. P.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impact the Earth energy balance directly by scattering solar radiation back to space and indirectly by changing the albedo, frequency, and lifetime of clouds. Carbon soot (or black carbon) produced from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning represents a major component of primary aerosols. Because of high absorption cross-sections over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. In areas identified as aerosol hotspots, which include many megacities, solar heating by soot-containing aerosols is roughly comparable to heating due to greenhouse gases. In addition, light absorbing soot aerosols may reduce photolysis rates at the surface level, producing a noticeable impact on photochemistry. Enhanced light absorption and scattering by soot can stabilize the atmosphere, retarding vertical transport and exacerbating accumulation of gaseous and particulate matter (PM) pollutants within the planetary boundary layer. Less surface heating and atmospheric stabilization may decrease formation of clouds, and warming in the atmosphere can evaporate existing cloud droplets by lowering relative humidity. Furthermore, soot-containing aerosols represent a major type of PM that has adverse effects on human health. When first emitted, soot particles are low-density aggregates of loosely connected primary spherules. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically hydrophobic, but may become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) during atmospheric aging by acquiring hydrophilic coatings. Hygroscopic soot particles, being efficient CCN, can exert indirect forcing on climate. In this talk, results will be presented on measurements of soot properties during the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign. Ambient aerosols and fresh soot particles injected into a captured air chamber were monitored to

  11. Retrieval of aerosol optical properties over land using PMAp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Munro, Rosemary; Lang, Ruediger; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy

    2015-04-01

    The retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an important task for industry and climate forecasting. An ideal instrument should include observations with moderate spectral and high spatial resolutions for a wide range of wavelengths (from the UV to the TIR), measurements of the polarization state at different wavelengths and measurements of the same scene for different observation geometries. As such an ideal instrument is currently unavailable the usage of different instruments on one satellite platform is an alternative choice. Since February 2014, the Polar Multi sensor Aerosol product (PMAp) is delivered as operational GOME product to our customers. The algorithms retrieve aerosol optical properties over ocean (AOD, volcanic ash, aerosol type) using a multi-sensor approach (GOME, AVHRR, IASI). The next releases of PMAp will provide an extended set of aerosol and cloud properties which include AOD over land and an improved volcanic ash retrieval combining AVHRR and IASI. This presentation gives an overview on the existing product and the prototypes in development. The major focus is the discussion of the AOD retrieval over land implemented in the upcoming PMAp2 release. In addition, the results of our current validation studies (e.g. comparisons to AERONET, other satellite platforms and model data) are shown.

  12. Indirect estimation of absorption properties for fine aerosol particles using AATSR observations: a case study of wildfires in Russia in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Kolmonen, P.; Virtanen, T. H.; Sogacheva, L.; Sundstrom, A.-M.; de Leeuw, G.

    2015-08-01

    The Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board the ENVISAT satellite is used to study aerosol properties. The retrieval of aerosol properties from satellite data is based on the optimized fit of simulated and measured reflectances at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The simulations are made using a radiative transfer model with a variety of representative aerosol properties. The retrieval process utilizes a combination of four aerosol components, each of which is defined by their (lognormal) size distribution and a complex refractive index: a weakly and a strongly absorbing fine-mode component, coarse mode sea salt aerosol and coarse mode desert dust aerosol). These components are externally mixed to provide the aerosol model which in turn is used to calculate the aerosol optical depth (AOD). In the AATSR aerosol retrieval algorithm, the mixing of these components is decided by minimizing the error function given by the sum of the differences between measured and calculated path radiances at 3-4 wavelengths, where the path radiances are varied by varying the aerosol component mixing ratios. The continuous variation of the fine-mode components allows for the continuous variation of the fine-mode aerosol absorption. Assuming that the correct aerosol model (i.e. the correct mixing fractions of the four components) is selected during the retrieval process, also other aerosol properties could be computed such as the single scattering albedo (SSA). Implications of this assumption regarding the ratio of the weakly/strongly absorbing fine-mode fraction are investigated in this paper by evaluating the validity of the SSA thus obtained. The SSA is indirectly estimated for aerosol plumes with moderate-to-high AOD resulting from wildfires in Russia in the summer of 2010. Together with the AOD, the SSA provides the aerosol absorbing optical depth (AAOD). The results are compared with AERONET data, i.e. AOD level 2.0 and SSA and AAOD inversion products. The RMSE

  13. Absorption Properties of Mediterranean Aerosols Obtained from Multi-year Ground-based and Satellite Remote Sensing Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallet, M.; Dubovik, O.; Nabat, P.; Dulac, F.; Kahn, R.; Sciare, J.; Paronis, D.; Leon, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol absorption properties are of high importance to assess aerosol impact on regional climate. This study presents an analysis of aerosol absorption products obtained over the Mediterranean Basin or land stations in the region from multi-year ground-based AERONET and satellite observations with a focus on the Absorbing Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and their spectral dependence. The AAOD and Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) data set is composed of daily averaged AERONET level 2 data from a total of 22 Mediterranean stations having long time series, mainly under the influence of urban-industrial aerosols and/or soil dust. This data set covers the 17 yr period 1996-2012 with most data being from 2003-2011 (approximately 89 percent of level-2 AAOD data). Since AERONET level-2 absorption products require a high aerosol load (AOD at 440 nm greater than 0.4), which is most often related to the presence of desert dust, we also consider level-1.5 SSA data, despite their higher uncertainty, and filter out data with an Angstrom exponent less than 1.0 in order to study absorption by carbonaceous aerosols. The SSA data set includes both AERONET level-2 and satellite level-3 products. Satellite-derived SSA data considered are monthly level 3 products mapped at the regional scale for the spring and summer seasons that exhibit the largest aerosol loads. The satellite SSA dataset includes the following products: (i) Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) over 2000-2011, (ii) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) near-UV algorithm over 2004-2010, and (iii) MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep-Blue algorithm over 2005-2011, derived only over land in dusty conditions. Sun-photometer observations show that values of AAOD at 440 nm vary between 0.024 +/- 0.01 (resp. 0.040 +/- 0.01) and 0.050 +/- 0.01 (0.055 +/- 0.01) for urban (dusty) sites. Analysis shows that the Mediterranean urban-industrial aerosols appear "moderately

  14. Tunable dielectric properties and excellent microwave absorbing properties of elliptical Fe3O4 nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Guoxiu; Liu, Yun; Cui, Tingting; Li, Yana; Zhao, Yanting; Guan, Jianguo

    2016-02-01

    Elliptical Fe3O4 nanorings (NRs) with continuously tunable axes that range from 40 nm to 145 nm in length were prepared through a precursor-directed synthetic route to determine the electromagnetic responses generated at 2-18 GHz. The tunability of the dielectric properties of Fe3O4 NRs depends on the long axis rather than on the specific surface area, internal stress, and grain size. Elliptical Fe3O4 NRs exhibit the excellent microwave absorbing properties due to the unique ring-like configuration, which significantly enhances permittivity, multiple scattering, oscillation resonance absorption, microantenna radiation, and interference. These findings indicate that ring-like nanostructures are promising for devising effective microwave absorbers.

  15. Effects of Absorbing Aerosols on Accelerated Melting of Snowpack in the Hindu-Kush-Himalayas-Tibetan Plateau Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.; Kyu-Myong, Kim; Yasunari, Teppei; Gautam, Ritesh; Hsu, Christina

    2011-01-01

    The impacts of absorbing aerosol on melting of snowpack in the Hindu-Kush-Himalayas-Tibetan Plateau (HKHT) region are studied using in-situ, satellite observations, and GEOS-5 GCM. Based on atmospheric black carbon measurements from the Pyramid observation ( 5 km elevation) in Mt. Everest, we estimate that deposition of black carbon on snow surface will give rise to a reduction in snow surface albedo of 2- 5 %, and an increased annual runoff of 12-34% for a typical Tibetan glacier. Examination of satellite reflectivity and re-analysis data reveals signals of possible impacts of dust and black carbon in darkening the snow surface, and accelerating spring melting of snowpack in the HKHT, following a build-up of absorbing aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Results from GCM experiments show that 8-10% increase in the rate of melting of snowpack over the western Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau can be attributed to the elevated-heat-pump (EHP) feedback effect, initiated from the absorption of solar radiation by dust and black carbon accumulated to great height ( 5 km) over the Indo-Gangetic Plain and Himalayas foothills in the pre-monsoon season (April-May). The accelerated melting of the snowpack is enabled by an EHP-induced atmosphere-land-snowpack positive feedback involving a) orographic forcing of the monsoon flow by the complex terrain, and thermal forcing of the HKHT region, leading to increased moisture, cloudiness and rainfall over the Himalayas foothills and northern India, b) warming of the upper troposphere over the Tibetan Plateau, and c) an snow albedo-temperature feedback initiated by a transfer of latent and sensible heat from a warmer atmosphere over the HKHT to the underlying snow surface. Results from ongoing modeling work to assess the relative roles of EHP vs. snow-darkening effects on accelerated melting of snowpack in HKHT region will also be discussed.

  16. Impact of absorbing aerosol deposition on snow albedo reduction over the southern Tibetan plateau based on satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Liang; Liou, K. N.; He, Cenlin; Liang, Hsin-Chien; Wang, Tai-Chi; Li, Qinbin; Liu, Zhenxin; Yue, Qing

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the snow albedo variation in spring over the southern Tibetan Plateau induced by the deposition of light-absorbing aerosols using remote sensing data from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra satellite during 2001-2012. We have selected pixels with 100 % snow cover for the entire period in March and April to avoid albedo contamination by other types of land surfaces. A model simulation using GEOS-Chem shows that aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a good indicator for black carbon and dust deposition on snow over the southern Tibetan Plateau. The monthly means of satellite-retrieved land surface temperature (LST) and AOD over 100 % snow-covered pixels during the 12 years are used in multiple linear regression analysis to derive the empirical relationship between snow albedo and these variables. Along with the LST effect, AOD is shown to be an important factor contributing to snow albedo reduction. We illustrate through statistical analysis that a 1-K increase in LST and a 0.1 increase in AOD indicate decreases in snow albedo by 0.75 and 2.1 % in the southern Tibetan Plateau, corresponding to local shortwave radiative forcing of 1.5 and 4.2 W m-2, respectively.

  17. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  18. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    A great deal of attention has been paid to brown carbon aerosol in the troposphere because it can both scatter and absorb solar radiation, thus affecting the Earth's climate. However, knowledge of the optical and chemical properties of brown carbon aerosol is still limited. In this study, we have investigated different aspects of the optical properties of brown carbon aerosol that have not been previously explored. These properties include extinction spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region and light scattering at two different visible wavelengths, 532 and 402 nm. A proxy for atmospheric brown carbon aerosol was formed from the aqueous reaction of ammonium sulfate with methylglyoxal. The different optical properties were measured as a function of reaction time for a period of up to 19 days. UV/vis absorption experiments of bulk solutions showed that the optical absorption of aqueous brown carbon solution significantly increases as a function of reaction time in the spectral range from 200 to 700 nm. The analysis of the light scattering data, however, showed no significant differences between ammonium sulfate and brown carbon aerosol particles in the measured scattering phase functions, linear polarization profiles, or the derived real parts of the refractive indices at either 532 or 402 nm, even for the longest reaction times with greatest visible extinction. The light scattering experiments are relatively insensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index, and it was only possible to place an upper limit of k ≤ 0.01 on the imaginary index values. These results suggest that after the reaction with methylglyoxal the single scattering albedo of ammonium sulfate aerosol is significantly reduced but that the light scattering properties including the scattering asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the relative amount of forward-to-backward scattering, remain essentially unchanged from that of unprocessed ammonium sulfate. The optical extinction properties

  19. Background Maritime Aerosol: Their Optical Thickness and Scattering Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of human induced change in the aerosol concentration and properties, or the aerosol response to climate change (e.g. droughts producing fires or dust) should be measured relative to a "background aerosol". How to define this background aerosol, so that it is both measurable and useful? Here we use 10 stations located in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans to answer this question. Using a data set of the spectral optical thickness measured by the Aerosol Robotic network (AERONET), extending 1-3 years, we find the background conditions for these stations. The oceanic background aerosol is the result of ocean emission and spray, and some residual long lived continental aerosol. Its source is very broadly spread and is expected to vary little in time. Pollution or dust sources are from specific locations, emitted and transported to the measuring site in specific combination of meteorological conditions. Therefore they are expected to vary with time. It follows that the background aerosol can be identified as the median for conditions with small variations. To define the background we compute the median of N consequent measurements. We use N=50 that in average cloudy conditions corresponds to 2-3 days of measurements and N=100 (4-5 days). Most high polluted or dusty conditions correspond to data sequences with high standard deviation (greater than 0.02 in optical thickness) and are excluded. From the remaining N point running medians with low standard deviations we derive again the median. This excludes those rare cases of pollution or dust that is stable during the N measurements. The results show that the background aerosol over the Pacific Ocean is characterize by optical thickness of 0.055 at 500 nm and Angstrom exponent of 0.74. Over the Atlantic Ocean the values are 0.070 and 1.1 respectively, with little influence of the assumed value of N (50 or 100). The derivation of the background uses 20,000 and 5000 medians respectively that passed the

  20. Measurement of wavelength-dependent extinction to distinguish between absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portscht, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of spectral transmission factors in smoky optical transmission paths reveal a difference between wavelength exponents of the extinction cross section of high absorption capacity and those of low absorption capacity. A theoretical explanation of this behavior is presented. In certain cases, it is possible to obtain data on the absorption index of aerosol particles in the optical path by measuring the spectral decadic extinction coefficient at, at least, two wavelengths. In this manner it is possible, for instance, to distinguish smoke containing soot from water vapor.

  1. Properties of Stratospheric Aerosol Estimated from HALOE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kwang-Mog; Park, Jae H.; Massie, Steven T.; Choi, Wookap

    2001-01-01

    Extinction coefficients for stratospheric aerosols at 8 HALOE (HALogen Occultation Experiment) wavelengths are determined by comparing transmittances data for two adjacent solar occultation measurements, where one limb path is loaded with aerosols but the other path is free of aerosols. These extinction coefficients are used to infer the aerosol properties such as composition and size distribution parameters. Mie theory has been used to calculate the extinction coefficients, and a nonlinear least square method is applied to determine the aerosol properties. Sixteen cases are selected for the retrieval in southern hemisphere at latitudes from 21 to 48 deg S for the period of 29 Mar - 31 May 1992. Retrieved size width ranges from 1.1 to 1.5 and radius ranges from 0.25 to 0.45 micrometers. These size parameters are within the ranges of in situ measurements at Laramie, Wyoming. Retrieved weight percent of H2SO4 is larger than the equilibrium value by about 5 to approximately 10 weight percent, similar to the results for northern hemisphere at latitudes 20 to 55 deg N for the period from Nov 1991 to Feb. 1992.

  2. Optical Properties of Fine/Coarse Mode Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Siniuk, A.; Pinker, R. T.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Chatenet, B.; Li, Z.; Singh, R.; Tripathi, S. N.; Dubovik, O.; Giles, D. M.; Martins, J.; Reid, J. S.; O'Neill, N. T.; Smirnov, A.

    2009-12-01

    Several regions of the earth exhibit seasonal mixtures of fine and coarse mode sized aerosol types, which are challenging to characterize from satellite remote sensing. Over land the coarse mode size aerosols (radius >1 micron) originate primarily from arid regions, which generate airborne soil dust, and the dominant fine mode sources are gases and particulates from urban/industrial emissions and from biomass burning. AERONET sun-sky radiometer almucantar retrievals from several years are analyzed for the urban sites of Beijing, China and Kanpur, India (in the Ganges floodplain) where seasonal coarse mode dust particles mix with fine mode pollution aerosol, predominately in the spring. As increasingly more absorbing fine mode pollutants are added to the dust aerosol at both sites, the single scattering albedo (SSA) of the mixtures at 675 nm through 1020 nm decrease as the fine mode fraction of AOD increases, while the 440 nm SSA is relatively constant. Additionally we compare multi-year data from Ilorin, Nigeria where desert dust from the Sahara and Sahel mix with fine mode biomass-burning aerosols. The volume size distribution retrievals from this site often shows tri-modality (third mode centered at 0.6 micron radius), which suggests a different particle source than found for most other arid region AERONET sites, which typically have bi-modal distributions. Comparison of mid-visible single scattering albedo obtained from in situ aircraft measurements during DABEX to multi-year means from the Ilorin site AERONET retrievals show close agreement (within 0.03 or less) over a wide range of Angstrom exponent (0.3 to 1.5). Observed differences in the spectral SSA as a function of fine mode fraction of the optical depth between all three sites are discussed and occur due to differences in absorption for both modes and also due to fine mode particle size dynamics.

  3. Composition and physical properties of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer and the North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B; Neely, Ryan R; Martinsson, Bengt G; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A M

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies revealed layers of enhanced aerosol scattering in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Asia (Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)) and North America (North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer (NATAL)). We use a sectional aerosol model (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA)) coupled with the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) to explore the composition and optical properties of these aerosol layers. The observed aerosol extinction enhancement is reproduced by CESM1/CARMA. Both model and observations indicate a strong gradient of the sulfur-to-carbon ratio from Europe to the Asia on constant pressure surfaces. We found that the ATAL is mostly composed of sulfates, surface-emitted organics, and secondary organics; the NATAL is mostly composed of sulfates and secondary organics. The model also suggests that emission increases in Asia between 2000 and 2010 led to an increase of aerosol optical depth of the ATAL by 0.002 on average which is consistent with observations. Key Points The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer is composed of sulfate, primary organics, and secondary organics The North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer is mostly composed of sulfate and secondary organics Aerosol Optical Depth of Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer increases by 0.002 from 2000 to 2010 PMID:26709320

  4. Effect of Dust and Anthropogenic Aerosols on Columnar Aerosol Optical Properties over Darjeeling (2200 m asl), Eastern Himalayas, India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Adak, Anandamay; Singh, Ajay K.; Devara, Panuganti C. S.; Raha, Sibaji

    2012-01-01

    Background The loading of atmospheric particulate matter (aerosol) in the eastern Himalaya is mainly regulated by the locally generated anthropogenic aerosols from the biomass burning and by the aerosols transported from the distance sources. These different types of aerosol loading not only affect the aerosol chemistry but also produce consequent signature on the radiative properties of aerosol. Methodology/Principal Findings An extensive study has been made to study the seasonal variations in aerosol components of fine and coarse mode aerosols and black carbon along with the simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth on clear sky days over Darjeeling, a high altitude station (2200 masl) at eastern Himalayas during the year 2008. We observed a heavy loading of fine mode dust component (Ca2+) during pre-monsoon (Apr – May) which was higher by 162% than its annual mean whereas during winter (Dec – Feb), the loading of anthropogenic aerosol components mainly from biomass burning (fine mode SO42− and black carbon) were higher (76% for black carbon and 96% for fine mode SO42−) from their annual means. These high increases in dust aerosols during pre-monsoon and anthropogenic aerosols during winter enhanced the aerosol optical depth by 25 and 40%, respectively. We observed that for every 1% increase in anthropogenic aerosols, AOD increased by 0.55% during winter whereas for every 1% increase in dust aerosols, AOD increased by 0.46% during pre-monsoon. Conclusion/Significance The natural dust transport process (during pre-monsoon) plays as important a role in the radiation effects as the anthropogenic biomass burning (during winter) and their differential effects (rate of increase of the AOD with that of the aerosol concentration) are also very similar. This should be taken into account in proper modeling of the atmospheric environment over eastern Himalayas. PMID:22792264

  5. In situ aerosol optics in Reno, NV, USA during and after the summer 2008 California wildfires and the influence of absorbing and non-absorbing organic coatings on spectral light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Lewis, K.; Moosmüller, H.

    2009-10-01

    Hundreds of wildfires in Northern California were sparked by lightning during the summer of 2008, resulting in downwind smoke for the months of June and July. Comparisons are reported for aerosol optics measurements in Reno, Nevada made during the very smoky month of July and the relatively clean month of August. Photoacoustic instruments equipped with integrating nephelometers were used to measure aerosol light scattering and absorption coefficients at wavelengths of 405 nm and 870 nm, revealing a strong variation of aerosol light absorption with wavelength. Insight on fuels burned is gleaned from comparison of Ångström exponents of absorption (AEA) versus single scattering albedo (SSA) of the ambient measurements with laboratory biomass smoke measurements for many fuels. Measurements during the month of August, which were largely unaffected by fire smoke, exhibit surprisingly low AEA for aerosol light absorption when the SSA is highest, again likely as a consequence of the underappreciated wavelength dependence of aerosol light absorption by particles coated with non-absorbing organic and inorganic matter. Coated sphere calculations were used to show that AEA as large as 1.6 are possible for wood smoke even with non-absorbing organic coatings on black carbon cores, suggesting care be exercised when diagnosing AEA.

  6. Influence of coal based thermal power plants on aerosol optical properties in the Indo-Gangetic basin - article no. L05805

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, A.K.; Singh, R.P.; Kafatos, M.

    2006-03-07

    The Indo-Gangetic basin is characterized by dense fog, haze and smog during the winter season. Here, we show one to one correspondence during the winter season of aerosol optical properties with the location of thermal power plants which are single small spatial entities compared to the big cities. Our results indicate that power plants are the key point source of air pollutants. The detailed analysis of aerosol parameters deduced from the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) level 3 remote sensing data show the existence of absorbing and non-absorbing aerosols emitted from these plants. Analysis of higher resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level 2 aerosol optical depth over thermal power plants supports the findings.

  7. A perspective on SOA generated in aerosol water from glyoxal and methylglyoxal and its impacts on climate-relevant aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, glyoxal and methylglyoxal have emerged to be potentially important SOA precursors with significant implications for climate-related aerosol properties. Here we will discuss how the chemistry of these and similar organic compounds in aerosol water can affect the aerosol optical and cloud formation properties. Aqueous-phase SOA production from glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a potential source of strongly light-absorbing organics, or "brown carbon". We characterized the kinetics of brown carbon formation from these precursors in mixtures of ammonium sulfate and water using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. This mechanism has been incorporated into a photochemical box model with coupled gas phase-aqueous aerosol chemistry. Methylglyoxal and related compounds also may impact an aerosol's ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus. We recently showed via pendant drop tensiometry and aerosol chamber studies that uptake of methylglyoxal from the gas phase driven by aqueous-phase oligomerization chemistry is a potentially significant, previously unidentified source of surface-active organic material in aerosols. Results from pendant drop tensiometry showed significantly depressed surface tension in methylglyoxal-ammonium sulfate solutions. We further found that ammonium sulfate particles exposed to gas-phase methylglyoxal in a 3.5 m3 aerosol reaction chamber activate into cloud droplets at sizes up to 15% lower at a given supersaturation than do pure ammonium sulfate particles. The observed enhancement exceeds that predicted based on Henry's Law and our measurements of surface tension depression in bulk solutions, suggesting that surface adsorption of methylglyoxal plays a role in determining CCN activity. Methylglyoxal and similar gas-phase surfactants may be an important and overlooked source of enhanced CCN activity in the atmosphere. To characterize the SOA products formed in these solutions, an Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) was used

  8. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Properties under Thin Cirrus from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, Nai-Yung Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew Mark.

    2014-01-01

    Retrieval of aerosol optical properties using shortwave bands from passive satellite sensors, such as MODIS, is typically limited to cloud-free areas. However, if the clouds are thin enough (i.e. thin cirrus) such that the satellite-observed reflectance contains signals under the cirrus layer, and if the optical properties of this cirrus layer are known, the TOA reflectance can be corrected for the cirrus layer to be used for retrieving aerosol optical properties. To this end, we first correct the TOA reflectances in the aerosol bands (0.47, 0.55, 0.65, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.12 micron for ocean algorithm and 0.412, 0.47, and 0.65 micron for deep blue algorithm) for the effects of thin cirrus using 1.38 micron reflectance and conversion factors that convert cirrus reflectance in 1.38 micron band to those in aerosol bands. It was found that the conversion factors can be calculated by using relationships between reflectances in 1.38 micron band and minimum reflectances in the aerosol bands (Gao et al., 2002). Refer to the example in the figure. Then, the cirrus-corrected reflectance can be calculated by subtracting the cirrus reflectance from the TOA reflectance in the optically thin case. A sensitivity study suggested that cloudy-sky TOA reflectances can be calculated with small errors in the form of simple linear addition of cirrus-only reflectances and clear-sky reflectances. In this study, we correct the cirrus signals up to TOA reflectance at 1.38 micron of 0.05 where the simple linear addition is valid without extensive radiative transfer simulations. When each scene passes the set of tests shown in the flowchart, the scene is corrected for cirrus contamination and passed into aerosol retrieval algorithms.

  9. The optical, physical and chemical properties of the products of glyoxal uptake on ammonium sulfate seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainic, M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Lavi, A.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-09-01

    The heterogeneous reaction between gas phase glyoxal and ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols, a proxy for inorganic atmospheric aerosol, was studied in terms of the dependence of the optical, physical and chemical properties of the product aerosols on initial particle size and ambient relative humidity (RH). Our experiments imitate an atmospheric scenario of a dry particle hydration at ambient RH conditions in the presence of glyoxal gas followed by efflorescence due to decrease of the ambient RH. The reactions were studied under different RH conditions, starting from dry conditions (~20% RH) and up to 90% RH, covering conditions prevalent in many atmospheric environments, and followed by consequent drying of the reacted particles before their analysis by the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), cavity ring down (CRD) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) systems. At λ = 355 nm, the reacted aerosols demonstrate a substantial growth in optical extinction cross section, as well as in mobility diameter under a broad range of RH values (35-90%). The ratio of the product aerosol to seed aerosol geometric cross section reached up to ~3.5, and the optical extinction cross-section up to ~250. The reactions show a trend of increasing physical and optical growth with decreasing seed aerosol size, from 100 nm to 300 nm, as well as with decreasing RH values from 90% to ~40%. Optically inactive aerosols, at the limit of the Mie range (100 nm diameter) become optically active as they grow due to the reaction. AMS analyses of the reaction of 300 nm AS at RH values of 50%, 75% and 90% show that the main products of the reaction are glyoxal oligomers, formed by acetal formation in the presence of AS. In addition, imidazole formation, which is a minor channel, is observed for all reactions, yielding a product which absorbs at λ = 290 nm, with possible implications on the radiative properties of the product aerosols. The ratio of absorbing substances (C-N compounds, including

  10. Determination of the broadband optical properties of biomass burning aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-04-01

    The direct and semi-direct effects of atmospheric aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are still the two of the largest uncertainties in our understanding of anthropogenic radiative forcing. In this study we developed a new approach for determining high sensitivity broadband UV-Vis spectrum (300-650 nm) of extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo and the complex refractive index for continuous, spectral and time dependent, monitoring of polydisperse aerosols population. This new approach was applied in a study of biomass burning aerosol. Extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients (αext, αsca, αabs, respectively) were continually monitored using photoacoustic spectrometer coupled to a cavity ring down spectrometer (PA-CRD-AS) at 404 nm, a dual-channel Broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer (BBCES) at 315-345 nm and 390-420 nm and a three channel integrating nephelometer (IN) centered at 457, 525 and 637 nm. During the biomass burning event, the measured aerosol number concentration increased by more than an order of magnitude relative to other week nights and the mode of the aerosols size distribution increased from 40-50 nm to 110nm diameter. αext and αsca increased by a factor of about 5.5 and 4.5, respectively. The αabs increased by a factor over 20, indicating a significant change in the aerosol overall chemical composition. The imaginary part of the complex RI at 404nm increased from its background level at about 0.02 to a peak of about 0.08 and the SSA decreased from 0.9 to about 0.6. Significant change of the absorption spectral dependence indicates formation of visible-light absorbing compounds. The mass absorption cross section of the water soluble organic aerosol (MACWSOA) reached up to about 12% of the corresponding value for black carbon (BC) at 450 nm and up to 30% at 300 nm. These results demonstrate the importance of biomass burning in understanding global and regional radiative forcing.

  11. Sources, composition and absorption Ångström exponent of light-absorbing organic components in aerosol extracts from the Los Angeles Basin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Surratt, Jason D; Weber, Rodney J

    2013-04-16

    We investigate the sources, chemical composition, and spectral properties of light-absorbing organic aerosol extracts (i.e., brown carbon, or BrC) in the Los Angeles (LA) Basin during the CalNex-2010 field campaign. Light absorption of PM2.5 water-soluble components at 365 nm (Abs365), used as a proxy for water-soluble BrC, was well correlated with water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) (r(2) = 0.55-0.65), indicating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from anthropogenic emissions was the major source of water-soluble BrC in this region. Normalizing Abs365 to WSOC mass yielded an average solution mass absorption efficiency (MAE365) of 0.71 m(2) g(-1) C. Detailed chemical speciation of filter extracts identified eight nitro-aromatic compounds that were correlated with Abs365. These compounds accounted for ∼4% of the overall water-soluble BrC absorption. Methanol-extracted BrC in LA was approximately 3 and 21 times higher than water-soluble BrC at 365 and 532 nm, respectively, and had a MAE365 of 1.58 m(2) g(-1) C (Abs365 normalized to organic carbon mass). The water-insoluble BrC was strongly correlated with ambient elemental carbon concentration, suggesting similar sources. Absorption Ångström exponent (Å(a)) (fitted between 300 and 600 nm wavelengths) was 3.2 (±1.2) for the PILS water-soluble BrC measurement, compared to 4.8 (±0.5) and 7.6 (±0.5) for methanol- and water-soluble BrC from filter extracts, respectively. These results show that fine particle BrC was prevalent in the LA basin during CalNex, yet many of its properties and potential impacts remain unknown. PMID:23506531

  12. Extensive aerosol optical properties and aerosol mass related measurements during TRAMP/TexAQS 2006 - Implications for PM compliance and planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Monica E.; Atkinson, Dean B.; Ziemba, Luke; Griffin, Robert; Hiranuma, Naruki; Brooks, Sarah; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James; Perna, Ryan; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Luke, Winston; Kelley, Paul

    2010-10-01

    Extensive aerosol optical properties, particle size distributions, and Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer measurements collected during TRAMP/TexAQS 2006 were examined in light of collocated meteorological and chemical measurements. Much of the evident variability in the observed aerosol-related air quality is due to changing synoptic meteorological situations that direct emissions from various sources to the TRAMP site near the center of the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) metropolitan area. In this study, five distinct long-term periods have been identified. During each of these periods, observed aerosol properties have implications that are of interest to environmental quality management agencies. During three of the periods, long range transport (LRT), both intra-continental and intercontinental, appears to have played an important role in producing the observed aerosol. During late August 2006, southerly winds brought super-micron Saharan dust and sea salt to the HGB area, adding mass to fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) measurements, but apparently not affecting secondary particle growth or gas-phase air pollution. A second type of LRT was associated with northerly winds in early September 2006 and with increased ozone and sub-micron particulate matter in the HGB area. Later in the study, LRT of emissions from wildfires appeared to increase the abundance of absorbing aerosols (and carbon monoxide and other chemical tracers) in the HGB area. However, the greatest impacts on Houston PM 2.5 air quality are caused by periods with low-wind-speed sea breeze circulation or winds that directly transport pollutants from major industrial areas, i.e., the Houston Ship Channel, into the city center.

  13. Retrieving aerosol microphysical properties by Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for different aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Valenzuela, A.; Lyamani, H.; Chaikovsky, A.; Wandinger, U.; Ansmann, A.; Dubovik, O.; Grudo, J. O.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2014-04-01

    LIRIC (Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code) is applied to combined lidar and Sun photometer data from Granada station corresponding to different case studies. The main aim of this analysis is to evaluate the stability of LIRIC output volume concentration profiles for different aerosol types, loadings, and vertical distributions of the atmospheric aerosols. For this purpose, in a first part, three case studies corresponding to different atmospheric situations are analyzed to study the influence of the user-defined input parameters in LIRIC when varied in a reasonable range. Results evidence the capabilities of LIRIC to retrieve vertical profiles of microphysical properties during daytime by the combination of the lidar and the Sun photometer systems in an automatic and self-consistent way. However, spurious values may be obtained in the lidar incomplete overlap region depending on the structure of the aerosol layers. In a second part, the use of a second Sun photometer located in Cerro Poyos, in the same atmospheric column as Granada but at higher altitude, allowed us to obtain LIRIC retrievals from two different altitudes with independent Sun photometer measurements in order to check the self-consistency and robustness of the method. Retrievals at both levels are compared, providing a very good agreement (differences below 5 µm3/cm3) in those cases with the same aerosol type in the whole atmospheric column. However, some assumptions such as the height independency of parameters (sphericity, size distribution, or refractive index, among others) need to be carefully reviewed for those cases with the presence of aerosol layers corresponding to different types of atmospheric aerosols.

  14. Estimate of the Impact of Absorbing Aerosol Over Cloud on the MODIS Retrievals of Cloud Optical Thickness and Effective Radius Using Two Independent Retrievals of Liquid Water Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Eric M.; Harshvardhan; Platnick, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Two independent satellite retrievals of cloud liquid water path (LWP) from the NASA Aqua satellite are used to diagnose the impact of absorbing biomass burning aerosol overlaying boundary-layer marine water clouds on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) retrievals of cloud optical thickness (tau) and cloud droplet effective radius (r(sub e)). In the MODIS retrieval over oceans, cloud reflectance in the 0.86-micrometer and 2.13-micrometer bands is used to simultaneously retrieve tau and r(sub e). A low bias in the MODIS tau retrieval may result from reductions in the 0.86-micrometer reflectance, which is only very weakly absorbed by clouds, owing to absorption by aerosols in cases where biomass burning aerosols occur above water clouds. MODIS LWP, derived from the product of the retrieved tau and r(sub e), is compared with LWP ocean retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E), determined from cloud microwave emission that is transparent to aerosols. For the coastal Atlantic southern African region investigated in this study, a systematic difference between AMSR-E and MODIS LWP retrievals is found for stratocumulus clouds over three biomass burning months in 2005 and 2006 that is consistent with above-cloud absorbing aerosols. Biomass burning aerosol is detected using the ultraviolet aerosol index from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite. The LWP difference (AMSR-E minus MODIS) increases both with increasing tau and increasing OMI aerosol index. During the biomass burning season the mean LWP difference is 14 g per square meters, which is within the 15-20 g per square meter range of estimated uncertainties in instantaneous LWP retrievals. For samples with only low amounts of overlaying smoke (OMI AI less than or equal to 1) the difference is 9.4, suggesting that the impact of smoke aerosols on the mean MODIS LWP is 5.6 g per square meter. Only for scenes with OMI aerosol index greater than 2 does the

  15. Estimation of aerosol optical properties considering hygroscopicity and light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yi; Kim, Yong Pyo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the influences of water solubility and light absorption on the optical properties of organic aerosols were investigated. A size-resolved model for calculating optical properties was developed by combining thermodynamic hygroscopic growth and aerosol dynamics models. The internal mixtures based on the homogeneous and core-shell mixing were compared. The results showed that the radiative forcing (RF) of Water Soluble Organic Carbon (WSOC) aerosol can be estimated to range from -0.07 to -0.49 W/m2 for core-shell mixing and from -0.09 to -0.47 W/m2 for homogeneous mixing under the simulation conditions (RH = 60%). The light absorption properties of WSOC showed the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of WSOC can be estimated 0.43-0.5 m2/g, which accounts for 5-10% of the MAE of elemental carbon (EC). The effect on MAE of increasing the imaginary refractive index of WSOC was also calculated, and it was found that increasing the imaginary refractive index by 0.001i enhanced WSOC aerosol absorption by approximately 0.02 m2/g. Finally, the sensitivity test results revealed that changes in the fine mode fraction (FMF) and in the geometric mean diameter of the accumulation mode play important roles in estimating RF during hygroscopic growth.

  16. Effects of crop residue burning on aerosol properties, plume characteristics, and long-range transport over northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kumar, S.; Sharma, D.; Singh, R. P.; Kharol, S. K.; Sharma, M.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, S.; Singh, Atinderpal; Singh, D.

    2014-05-01

    Aerosol emissions from biomass burning are of specific interest over the globe due to their strong radiative impacts and climate implications. The present study examines the impact of paddy crop residue burning over northern India during the postmonsoon (October-November) season of 2012 on modification of aerosol properties, as well as the long-range transport of smoke plumes, altitude characteristics, and affected areas via the synergy of ground-based measurements and satellite observations. During this period, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images show a thick smoke/hazy aerosol layer below 2-2.5 km in the atmosphere covering nearly the whole Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). The air mass trajectories originating from the biomass-burning source region over Punjab at 500 m reveal a potential aerosol transport pathway along the Ganges valley from west to east, resulting in a strong aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradient. Sometimes, depending upon the wind direction and meteorological conditions, the plumes also influence central India, the Arabian Sea, and the Bay of Bengal, thus contributing to Asian pollution outflow. The increased number of fire counts (Terra and Aqua MODIS data) is associated with severe aerosol-laden atmospheres (AOD500 nm > 1.0) over six IGP locations, high values of Ångström exponent (>1.2), high particulate mass 2.5 (PM2.5) concentrations (>100-150 µgm-3), and enhanced Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index gradient (~2.5) and NO2 concentrations (~6 × 1015 mol/cm2), indicating the dominance of smoke aerosols from agricultural crop residue burning. The aerosol size distribution is shifted toward the fine-mode fraction, also exhibiting an increase in the radius of fine aerosols due to coagulation processes in a highly turbid environment. The spectral variation of the single-scattering albedo reveals enhanced dominance of moderately absorbing aerosols, while the aerosol properties, modification, and mixing atmospheric

  17. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  18. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  19. The optical properties of using graphene as a saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keschl, Nathan; Schibli, Thomas; Lee, Chien-Chung; Xie, Wanyan

    2012-10-01

    Graphene, a single-atom layer of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice, has been on the forefront of research since it's discovery in 2005 [1]. Although it has many applications, my research is specialized in the field of utilizing the graphene as a saturable absorber for mode-locking lasers. Currently, the most common method to mode-lock a laser is by using a Semi-conductor Saturable Absorber Mirror (SESAM). Graphene is a substitute for SESAMs with pulse generation as low as 260 fs [2]. However, graphene will begin to ``burn'' as the laser approaches the intensity it needs to mode-lock. We have experimented with various methods of protecting the graphene from burning so it can be used at higher intensity domains.[4pt] [1] A. K. Geim, K. S. Novoselov, ``The rise of graphene.'' Nat Mater. 2007/03//print[0pt] [2] G. Acosta, J.S. Bunch, C.C. Lee, T.R. Schibli, ``Ultra-Short Optical Pulse Generation with Single-Layer Graphene.'' Journal of Nonlinear Optical Physics and Materials, Volume 19, Issue 04, pp. 767-771. 00/2010.

  20. Aerosol properties in Titan's upper atmosphere from UVIS airglow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Koskinen, Tommi; Royer, Emilie; Rannou, Pascal; West, Robert A.

    2015-11-01

    Multiple Cassini observations reveal that the abundant aerosol particles in Titan's atmosphere are formed at high altitudes, particularly in the thermosphere [1]. They subsequently fall towards the lower atmosphere, and in their path, their size, shape, and population change in reflection to the variable atmospheric conditions.Although multiple observations can help us retrieve information for the aerosol properties in the lower atmosphere [2], we have limited knowledge for their properties in the altitude range between their formation region in the thermosphere, and the upper region of the main haze layer. UVIS is one of a few instruments that can probe this part of the atmosphere and allow for the retrieval of the aerosol properties.Here we analyze observations of atmospheric airglow that demonstrate the signature of N2 emissions and light scattering from aerosol particles, at different altitudes above 500 km [3]. We fit these observations with a combined model of N2 airglow [4] and atmospheric scattering by gases and aerosols that allows us to separate the pure scattering component and retrieve the aerosol size (distribution) and density. We particularly focus on observations from the T32 flyby that probed high southern latitudes in 2007 and combine good altitude resolution with high signal to noise ratio. We combine these with observations at different phase angles and observing geometry conditions (nadir vs. limb) in order to set better constraints on the aerosol properties.Our preliminary results demonstrate an increase in the average particle size with decreasing altitude in the atmosphere, from about 10 nm at 800 km to ~50 nm at 500 km, and an extinction profile at 185 nm wavelength, similar to the profile derive from UVIS occultation measurements at lower latitudes [5].[1] Lavvas et al. 2013. PNAS, doi/10.1073/pnas.1217059110, and references therein.[2] Tomasko et al. 2008, PSS, 56, p.669; Bellucci et al. 2009, Icarus 201, p.198[3] Ajello et al. 2008, GRL

  1. Enhanced Surface Warming and Accelerated Snow Melt in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau Induced by Absorbing Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2010-01-01

    Numerical experiments with the NASA finite-volume general circulation model show that heating of the atmosphere by dust and black carbon can lead to widespread enhanced warming over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and accelerated snow melt in the western TP and Himalayas. During the boreal spring, a thick aerosol layer, composed mainly of dust transported from adjacent deserts and black carbon from local emissions, builds up over the Indo-Gangetic Plain, against the foothills of the Himalaya and the TP. The aerosol layer, which extends from the surface to high elevation (approx.5 km), heats the mid-troposphere by absorbing solar radiation. The heating produces an atmospheric dynamical feedback the so-called elevated-heat-pump (EHP) effect, which increases moisture, cloudiness, and deep convection over northern India, as well as enhancing the rate of snow melt in the Himalayas and TP. The accelerated melting of snow is mostly confined to the western TP, first slowly in early April and then rapidly from early to mid-May. The snow cover remains reduced from mid-May through early June. The accelerated snow melt is accompanied by similar phases of enhanced warming of the atmosphere-land system of the TP, with the atmospheric warming leading the surface warming by several days. Surface energy balance analysis shows that the short-wave and long-wave surface radiative fluxes strongly offset each other, and are largely regulated by the changes in cloudiness and moisture over the TP. The slow melting phase in April is initiated by an effective transfer of sensible heat from a warmer atmosphere to land. The rapid melting phase in May is due to an evaporation-snow-land feedback coupled to an increase in atmospheric moisture over the TP induced by the EHP effect.

  2. Aerosols physical properties at Hada Al Sham, western Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Alghamdi, M. A.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Hussein, T.; Aaltonen, V.; Abdelmaksoud, A. S.; Al-Jeelani, H.; Almazroui, M.; Almehmadi, F. M.; Al Zawad, F. M.; Hakala, J.; Khoder, M.; Neitola, K.; Petäjä, T.; Shabbaj, I. I.; Hämeri, K.

    2016-06-01

    This is the first time to clearly derive the comprehensive physical properties of aerosols at a rural background area in Saudi Arabia. Aerosol measurements station was established at a rural background area in the Western Saudi Arabia to study the aerosol properties. This study gives overview of the aerosol physical properties (PM10, PM2.5, black carbon and total number concentration) over the measurement period from November 2012 to February 2015. The average PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were 95 ± 78 μg m-3 (mean ± STD, at ambient conditions) and 33 ± 68 μg m-3 (at ambient conditions), respectively. As expected PM10 concentration was dominated by coarse mode particles (PM10-PM2.5), most probably desert dust. Especially from February to June the coarse mode concentrations were high because of dust storm season. Aerosol mass concentrations had clear diurnal cycle. Lower values were observed around noon. This behavior is caused by wind direction and speed, during night time very calm easterly winds are dominating whereas during daytime the stronger westerly winds are dominating (sea breeze). During the day time the boundary layer is evolving, causing enhanced mixing and dilution leading to lower concentration. PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were comparable to values measured at close by city of Jeddah. Black carbon concentration was about 2% and 6% of PM10 and PM2.5 mass, respectively. Total number concentration was dominated by frequent new particle formation and particle growth events. The typical diurnal cycle in particle total number concentration was clearly different from PM10 and PM2.5.

  3. Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Yan, Fang; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C; Feng, Yan; Dubey, Manvendra K; Liu, Shang; Pinto, Joseph P; Carmichael, Gregory R

    2015-04-21

    Organic aerosols (OAs) in the atmosphere affect Earth's energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called "brown carbon" (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OAs are not represented or are poorly represented in current climate and chemical transport models. In this study, we provide a method to constrain the BrC absorptivity at the emission inventory level using recent laboratory and field observations. We review available measurements of the light-absorbing primary OA (POA), and quantify the wavelength-dependent imaginary refractive indices (kOA, the fundamental optical parameter determining the particle's absorptivity) and their uncertainties for the bulk POA emitted from biomass/biofuel, lignite, propane, and oil combustion sources. In particular, we parametrize the kOA of biomass/biofuel combustion sources as a function of the black carbon (BC)-to-OA ratio, indicating that the absorptive properties of POA depend strongly on burning conditions. The derived fuel-type-based kOA profiles are incorporated into a global carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory, and the integrated kOA values of sectoral and total POA emissions are presented. Results of a simple radiative transfer model show that the POA absorptivity warms the atmosphere significantly and leads to ∼27% reduction in the amount of the net global average POA cooling compared to results from the nonabsorbing assumption. PMID:25811601

  4. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  5. Are remote-sensing retrieved aerosol radiative properties a suitable proxy for cloud condensation nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions arguably remain the single greatest uncertainty among anthropogenic perturbations of the climate system. The large uncertainties associated with their representation in global aerosol climate models have emphasised the need for observational studies. In-situ measurements provide a detailed description of aerosol and cloud microphysical properties, providing strong observational constraints on aerosol cloud interactions. However, their spatio-temporal sampling is sparse so that "observational" estimates of global aerosol cloud interactions generally rely on co-located satellite retrievals of aerosol radiative properties and cloud properties. In this study I will critically evaluate the suitability of remote-sensing retrieved aerosol radiative properties, such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol index (AI) and aerosol fine mode optical depth, as proxy for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). This analysis based on the fully self-consistent calculation of aerosol radiative properties and CCN in the aerosol climate model ECHAM-HAM. Correlating simulated aerosol radiative properties with CCN at a range of supersaturations (sampling different sizes/composition of the aerosol spectrum) highlights limitations in the suitability of AOD and AI as proxy for CCN. These discrepancies arise from a range of factors, including the limited representativeness of column-integrated aerosol radiative properties for surface or cloud-base CCN as well as the effects of humidity growth of aerosols, affecting AOD/AI but not CCN. Simulated correlations show a strong regional variability, with significant implications for "observational" estimates of aerosol cloud interactions from remote-sensing as well as in-situ data.

  6. A COMPARISON OF CMAQ-BASED AEROSOL PROPERTIES WITH IMPROVE, MODIS, AND AERONET DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare select aerosol Properties derived from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model-simulated aerosol mass concentrations with routine data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) satellite-borne Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer...

  7. Long-term Observation of Aerosol Optical Properties at the SORPES station in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yicheng; Ding, Aijun; Virkkula, Aki; Wang, Jiaping; Chi, Xuguang; Qi, Ximeng; Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Longfei; Xie, Yuning

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence the earth's radiation budget by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and contribute substantial uncertainty in the estimation of climate forcing. Thorough and comprehensive measurements on different parameters including absorption and scattering coefficient, wavelength dependence and angular dependence along with their daily and seasonal variation help to understand the influence of aerosol on radiation. 2-years continuous measurement of aerosol optical properties has been conducted from June 2013 to May 2015 at the Station for Observing Regional Process of Earth System (SORPES) station, which is a regional background station located in downwind direction of Yangtze River Delta (YRD) urban agglomeration in China. A 7-wavelenths aethalometer and a 3-wavelenths nephelometer were used to measure absorption and scattering coefficient, and also other parameters like single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption angstrom Exponent (AAE), scattering angstrom exponent (SAE) and back-scattering refraction. In addtion, simultaneous measurements on chemical composition and particle size distribution were performed so as to investigate the dependencies of aerosol optical properties on chemical composition and size distribution. To get further insight on the influencing factors, Lagrangian particle dispersion modeling (LPDM) was employed for source identification in this study. The averages of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and SSA are 26.0±18.7 Mm-1, 426±327 Mm-1 , 0.936±0.3 at 520nm respectively for whole period. SAE between 450 and 635nm is 1.299±0.34 and have strong negative correlation with particle Surface Mean Diameter (SMD). AAE between 370 and 950nm is 1.043±0.15 for whole period but growth to more than 1.6 in all identified Biomass Burning (BB) events.

  8. Vertical Profiles of Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Condensation Nuclei, Optical Aerosol, Aerosol Optical Properties, and Aerosol Volatility Measured from Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, T.; Snider, J. R.; Vali, G.

    1998-01-01

    Under the support of this grant a balloon-borne gondola containing a variety of aerosol instruments was developed and flown from Laramie, Wyoming, (41 deg N, 105 deg W) and from Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S, 170 deg E). The gondola includes instruments to measure the concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), optically detectable aerosol (OA.) (r greater than or equal to 0.15 - 2.0 microns), and optical scattering properties using a nephelometer (lambda = 530 microns). All instruments sampled from a common inlet which was heated to 40 C on ascent and to 160 C on descent. Flights with the CN counter, OA counter, and nephelometer began in July 1994. The CCN counter was added in November 1994, and the engineering problems were solved by June 1995. Since then the flights have included all four instruments, and were completed in January 1998. Altogether there were 20 flights from Laramie, approximately 5 per year, and 2 from Lauder. Of these there were one or more engineering problems on 6 of the flights from Laramie, hence the data are somewhat limited on those 6 flights, while a complete data set was obtained from the other 14 flights. Good CCN data are available from 12 of the Laramie flights. The two flights from Lauder in January 1998 were successful for all measurements. The results from these flights, and the development of the balloon-bome CCN counter have formed the basis for five conference presentations. The heated and unheated CN and OA measurements have been used to estimate the mass fraction of the aerosol volatile, while comparisons of the nephelometer measurements were used to estimate the light scattering, associated with the volatile aerosol. These estimates were calculated for 0.5 km averages of the ascent and descent data between 2.5 km and the tropopause, near 11.5 km.

  9. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program May 2003 Intensive Operations Period Examining Aerosol Properties and Radiative Influences: Preface to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Feingold, Graham; Ghan, Steven; Ogren, John; Schmid, Beat; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Sheridan, Pat

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate by scattering and absorbing radiation in clear air (direct effects) and by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, modifying the microphysical properties of clouds, influencing radiation and precipitation development (indirect effects). Much of present uncertainty in forcing of climate change is due to uncertainty in the relations between aerosol microphysical and optical properties and their radiative influences (direct effects) and between microphysical properties and their ability to serve as cloud condensation nuclei at given supersaturations (indirect effects). This paper introduces a special section that reports on a field campaign conducted at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in North Central Oklahoma in May, 2003, examining these relations using in situ airborne measurements and surface-, airborne-, and space-based remote sensing.

  10. A model study on the absorbed dose of radiation following respiratory intake of 238U3O8 aerosols.

    PubMed

    Canepa, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols of depleted uranium oxides, formed upon high-energy impact of shells on hard targets during military operations, are able to disperse, reach the alveolar region of the lungs and be absorbed and distributed throughout various parts of the body. The absorbed particles are subjected to clearance in the upper respiratory tract, distribution to other body districts, dissolution and excretion. While the soluble forms of uranium are known to deliver a small dose of radiation to the body due to their homogeneous distribution and the low specific activity of (238)U, ceramic particles exhibit a low dissolution rate and irradiate a limited volume of tissue for a long time with alpha particles with an energy of 4.267 MeV. The extent of the irradiated tissues depends on the radius of the particles and the total intake of uranium oxides. For the measured intake of U3O8 of a war veteran (15.51 μg) the number of particles ranges from 5.56×10(4) to 6.95×10(6) for sizes of 0.4-2.0 μm. Modelling the distribution of the particles between two compartments of the body, the averaged dose absorbed in 20 y by tissues surrounding the particles and within the range of the alpha particles varies from 6.8 mGy to 0.85 Gy for lungs and 8.1 mGy to 1.0 Gy for the lymph nodes, respectively. Correspondingly, due to the clearance and redistribution, the mass irradiated by 2.0-μm particles falls in 20 y from 6.06 mg to 0.94 μg in the lungs and grows from 0 to 1.0 mg in the lymph nodes. The estimated rate of formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water in the lungs and lymph nodes is 5.17×10(4) d(-1) per cell after 1 y. PMID:24578528

  11. Rural continental aerosol properties and processes observed during the Hohenpeissenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (HAZE2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.; Römpp, A.; Moortgat, G.; Franze, T.; Schauer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.

    2007-06-01

    Detailed investigations of the chemical and microphysical properties of rural continental aerosols were performed during the HAZE2002 experiment, which was conducted in May 2002 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg (DWD) in Southern Germany. The online measurement data and techniques included: size-resolved chemical composition of submicron particles by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS); total particle number concentrations and size distributions over the diameter range of 3 nm to 9 μm (CPC, SMPS, OPC); monoterpenes determined by gas chromatography- ion trap mass spectrometry; OH and H2SO4 determined by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Filter sampling and offline analytical techniques were used to determine: fine particle mass (PM2.5), organic, elemental and total carbon in PM2.5 (OC2.5, EC2.5, TC2.5), and selected organic compounds (dicarboxylic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, proteins). Overall, the non-refractory components of submicron particles detected by aerosol mass spectrometry (PM1, 6.6±5.4 μg m-3, arithmetic mean and standard deviation) accounted for ~62% of PM2.5 determined by filter gravimetry (10.6±4.7 μg m-3). The relative proportions of non-refractory submicron particle components were: 11% ammonium, 19% nitrate, 20% sulfate, and 50% organics (OM1). In spite of strongly changing meteorological conditions and absolute concentration levels of particulate matter (3-13 μg m-3 PM1), OM1 was closely correlated with PM1 (r2=0.9) indicating a near-constant ratio of non-refractory organics and inorganics. In contrast, the ratio of nitrate to sulfate was highly dependent on temperature (14-32°C) and relative humidity (20-100%), which could be explained by thermodynamic model calculations of NH3/HNO3/NH4NO3 gas-particle partitioning. From the combination of optical and other sizing techniques (OPC, AMS, SMPS), an average refractive index of 1.40-1.45 was inferred for the measured rural aerosol

  12. Evaluation of aerosol properties simulated by the high resolution global coupled chemistry-aerosol-microphysics model C-IFS-GLOMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Flemming, Johannes; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Engelen, Richard; Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Benduhn, Francois; Hewson, Will; Woodhouse, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The EU Framework Programme GEMS and MACC consortium projects co-ordinated by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have developed an operational global forecasting and reanalysis system (Composition-IFS) for atmospheric composition including greenhouse gases, reactive gases and aerosol. The current operational C-IFS system uses a mass-based aerosol model coupled to data assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth measured by satellite (MODIS) to predict global aerosol properties. During MACC, the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics scheme was added to the system, providing information on aerosol size and number for improved representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting also for simulated global variations in size distribution and internally-mixed particle composition. The IFS-GLOMAP system has recently been upgraded to couple with the sulphur cycle simulated in the online TM5 tropospheric chemistry module for global reactive gases. This C-IFS-GLOMAP system is also being upgraded to use a new "nitrate-extended" version of GLOMAP which realistically treats the size-resolved gas-particle partitioning of semi volatile gases ammonia and nitric acid. In this poster we described C-IFS-GLOMAP and present an evaluation of the global sulphate aerosol distribution simulated in this coupled aerosol-chemistry C-IFS-GLOMAP, comparing to surface observations in Europe, North America and the North Atlantic and contrasting to the fixed timescale sulphate production scheme developed in GEMS. We show that the coupling to the TM5 sulphur chemistry improves the seasonal cycle of sulphate aerosol, for example addressing a persistent wintertime sulphate high bias in northern Europe. The improved skill in simulated sulphate aerosol seasonal cycle is a pre-requisite to realistically characterise nitrate aerosol since biases in sulphate affect the amount of free ammonia available to form ammonium nitrate.

  13. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Mills, Michael J.; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M.; Neely, Ryan R.

    2015-06-01

    A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size-resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1-CARMA is approximately ˜2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial-temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground-based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ˜32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data.

  14. Studing Taklamakan aerosol properties with Lidar (STAPL)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By now, the global impacts of atmospheric dust have been well-established. Nevertheless, relevant properties such as size distribution, depolarization ratio, and even single-scattering albedo have been shown to vary substantially between dust producing regions and are also strongly dependent on the ...

  15. A Campaign Study of Sea Spray Aerosol Properties in the Bay of Aarhus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quynh; Rasmussen, Berit; Kristensen, Kasper; Sloth Nielsen, Lærke; Bilde, Merete

    2016-04-01

    The oceans of the world are a dominant source of atmospheric aerosol. Together with mineral dust, sea spray aerosols (SSA) constitute the largest mass flux of particulate matter in the atmosphere (Andreae and Rosenfeld, 2008). Due to their effects on the global radiative budget - both directly as scatterers and absorbers of solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), SSA are considered an important component of the climate system. The sea-surface microlayer (SML) is an ultra-thin boundary layer between the ocean and the atmosphere. The high concentration of surface-active organic compounds in the SML, compared to that of the underlying water column, creates rigid film-like layer over the surface of the ocean. The SML is believed to play an important role in the formation and composition of SSA. However, current knowledge on the SML and its impacts on SSA remain limited. To characterize the SML of natural seawater and examine its impacts on aerosol properties, a field campaign was conducted in the bay of Aarhus, Denmark, during spring 2015. Bulk seawater was collected 1-2 times every week along with selective sampling of the SML. Characterization of the sea water and SML included a wide range of measurements, including surface tension, water activity, dissolved organic matter, and chemical composition analysis by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-Q-TOFMS). SSA was generated from sampled sea water by diffusion of air bubbles through a 10L seawater sample situated in a sea spray tank. Particle number concentration and CCN measurements were conducted along with measurements of the organic share in the aerosol phase as indicated by volatility measurements. To investigate the effect of the SML, spiking of the seawater samples with additional SML was performed and measurements repeated for comparison. Preliminary results show that the SML samples

  16. Aerosol Climate Interactions in Climate System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehl, J. T.

    2002-12-01

    Aerosols are widely recognized as an important process in Earth's climate system. Observations over the past decade have improved our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosols. Recently, field observations have highlighted the pervasiveness of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere. These aerosols are of particular interest, since they alter the vertical distribution of shortwave radiative heating between the surface and atmosphere. Given this increased knowledge of aerosols from various field programs, interest is focusing on how to integrate this understanding into global climate models. These types of models provide the best tool available to comprehensively study the potential effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system. Results from climate system model simulations that include aerosol effects will be presented to illustrate key aerosol climate interactions. These simulations employ idealized and realistic distributions of absorbing aerosols. The idealized aerosol simulations provide insight into the role of aerosol shortwave absorption on the global hydrologic cycle. The realistic aerosol distributions provide insight into the local response of aerosol forcing in the Indian subcontinent region. Emphasis from these simulations will be on the hydrologic cycle, since water availability is of emerging global environmental concern. This presentation will also consider what more is needed to significantly improve our ability to model aerosol processes in climate system models. Uncertainty in aerosol climate interactions remains a major source of uncertainty in our ability to project future climate change. Focus will be on interactions between aerosols and various physical, chemical and biogeochemical aspects of the Earth system.

  17. Properties of Lyman-alpha Absorbers at High-Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroux, C.

    2001-09-01

    In recent years, an extremely successful method to observationally study early stages of galaxy formation has been provided by the study of quasar absorbers. Quasar absorption lines are systems intercepting our line-of-sight to a given quasar and thus produce a feature in the quasar spectrum. Damped Lyman-α systems (hereafter DLAs) have N (H I) > 2 × 1020 atoms cm-2, and were originally thought to be the precursors of present day disk galaxies but there is evidence that they may be dominated by gas-rich proto-dwarf galaxies representing the basic building blocks of hierarchical growth of structure. Since their detection is independent of their size, shape, and covering factor, they provide a unbiased method with which to study early galaxies. DLAs are a subset of Lyman-limit Systems (hereafter LLS) which have hydrogen column densities N (H I) > 1.6 × 1017 atoms cm-2. At z < 1, they are probably associated with galactic halos. Finally, the Lyman-α forest is composed of many small column density systems ranging from N (H I) =1012 to 1.6 × 1017 atoms cm-2. This thesis presents a sample of 66 bright z ⪆ 4 quasars observed with the 4 m Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory telescope and the 4.2 m William Hershel telescope. The first part of the study concentrates on the quasars themselves via the fitting of quasar continua and the measurement of continuum depression parameters characterising the mean absorption across the Lyman-α forest. The quasar spectra are then analysed to investigate the absorption systems they contain. This led to the discovery of 26 new DLAs, 34 LLS and many associated metal lines which enables the analysis of the evolution of the column density distribution, f(N,z), and the total mass in high-column density neutral hydrogen quasar absorbers. The observed number of LLS per unit redshift is used to constrain f(N,z) below the DLA limit in the range N(HI) = 1.6 × 1017 to 2× 1020 atoms cm-2. The joint analysis shows unambiguously that f

  18. Aerosol optical properties at a coastal site in Hong Kong, South China: temporal features, size dependencies and source analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiaping; Ding, Aijun; Virkkula, Aki; Lee, Shuncheng; Shen, Yicheng; Chi, Xuguang; Xu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Hong Kong is a typical coastal city adjacent to the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in southern China, which is one of the regions suffering from severe air pollution. Atmospheric aerosols can affect the earth's radiative balance by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. Black Carbon (BC) aerosol is a particularly emphasized component due to its strong light absorption. Aerosol transported from different source areas consists of distinct size distributions, leading to different optical properties. As the byproducts of the incomplete oxidation, BC and CO both have relatively long life time, their relationship is a good indicator for distinguishing different pollutant sources. In this study, temporal variations of aerosol optical properties and concentrations of BC and CO at a coastal background station in Hong Kong were investigated. Transport characteristics and origins of aerosol were elucidated by analyzing backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modeling (LPDM) results, together with related parameters including the relationships between optical properties and particle size, BC-CO correlations, ship location data and meteorological variables. From February 2012 to September 2013 and March 2014 to February 2015, continuous in-situ measurements of light scattering and absorption coefficients, particle size distribution and concentrations of BC and CO were conducted at Hok Tsui (HT), a coastal background station on the southeast tip of Hong Kong Island (22.22°N, 114.25°E, 60 m above the sea level) with few local anthropogenic activities. Affected by the Asian monsoon, this region is dominated by continental outflow in winter and by marine inflow from the South China Sea in summer, which is an ideal station for identifying the transport characteristics of aerosol and their effects on optical properties from different anthropogenic emission sources. 7-day backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modeling was performed for source identification. Three

  19. Rural continental aerosol properties and processes observed during the Hohenpeissenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (HAZE2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.; Römpp, A.; Moortgat, G.; Franze, T.; Schauer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.

    2008-02-01

    Detailed investigations of the chemical and microphysical properties of rural continental aerosols were performed during the HAZE2002 experiment, which was conducted in May 2002 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg (DWD) in Southern Germany. Online measurements included: Size-resolved chemical composition of submicron particles; total particle number concentrations and size distributions over the diameter range of 3 nm to 9 μm; gas-phase concentration of monoterpenes, CO, O3, OH, and H2SO4. Filter sampling and offline analytical techniques were used to determine: Fine particle mass (PM2.5), organic, elemental and total carbon in PM2.5 (OC2.5, EC2.5, TC2.5), and selected organic compounds (dicarboxylic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, proteins). Overall, the non-refractory components of submicron particles detected by aerosol mass spectrometry (PM1, 6.6±5.4 μg m-3, arithmetic mean and standard deviation) accounted for ~62% of PM2.5 determined by filter gravimetry (10.6±4.7 μg m-3). The relative proportions of non-refractory submicron particle components were: (23±39)% ammonium nitrate, (27±23)% ammonium sulfate, and (50±40)% organics (OM1). OM1 was closely correlated with PM1 (r2=0.9) indicating a near-constant ratio of non-refractory organics and inorganics. The average ratio of OM1 to OC2.5 was 2.1±1.4, indicating a high proportion of heteroelements in the organic fraction of the sampled rural aerosol. This is consistent with the high ratio of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) over hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inferred from the AMS results (4:1), and also with the high abundance of proteins (~3%) indicating a high proportion of primary biological material (~30%) in PM2.5. This finding was confirmed by low abundance of PAHs (<1 ng m-3) and EC (<1 μg m-3) in PM2.5 and detection of several secondary organic aerosol compounds (dicarboxylic acids) and their precursors (monoterpenes). New particle formation was observed almost

  20. Optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Measurements of aerosol properties in Kishinev, Moldova are being carried out within the framework of the international AERONET program managed by NASA/GSFC since 1999. Direct solar and sky diffuse radiances are measured by using of sunphotometer Cimel-318. Aerosol optical properties are retrieved from measured radiances by using of smart computational procedures developed by the AERONET's team. The instrument is situated at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station giving the opportunity to make simultaneous spectral (win sunphotometer) and broadband (with the set of sensors from radiometric complex) solar radiation. Detailed description of the station and investigations in progress can be found at the http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E; 205 m a.s.l). Summary of aerosol optical and microphysical properties retrieved from direct solar and diffuse sky radiance observations at Moldova site from September 1999 to June 2009 are presented below. Number of measurements (total): 1695 Number of measurements (for ?o, n, k): 223 Range of aerosol optical depth (AOD) @440 nm: 0.03 < ?(440) < 2.30, < ?(440)>=0.25 Range of Ångström parameter < α440_870 >: 0.14 < α < 2.28 Asymmetry factor (440/670/870/1020): 0.70/0.63/0.59/0.58 ±0.04 Refraction (n) and absorption (k) indices@440 nm: 1.41 ± 0.06; 0.009 ± 0.005 Single scattering albedo < ?o >(440/670/870/1020): 0.93/0.92/0.90/0.89 ±0.04 Parameters of volume particle size distribution function: (fine mode) volume median radius r v,f , μm: 0.17 ± 0.06 particle volume concentration Cv,f, μm3/μm2: 0.04 ± 0.03 (coarse mode) volume median radius rv,c , μm: 3.08 ± 0.64 particle volume concentration Cv,c, μm3/μm2: 0.03 ± 0.03 Climatic norms of AOD@500 nm and Ångström parameter < α440_870 > at the site of observation are equal to 0.21 ± 0.06 and 1.45 ± 0.14, respectively. The aerosol type in Moldova may be considered as 'urban

  1. Water absorbance and thermal properties of sulfated wheat gluten films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten films of varying thicknesses formed at 30C to 70C were treated with cold sulfuric acid to produce sulfated gluten films. Chemical, thermal, thermal stability, and water uptake properties were characterized for neat and sulfated films. The sulfated gluten films were able ...

  2. Microwave absorption properties of double-layer absorber based on carbonyl iron/barium hexaferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaohu; Fan, Huiqing; Cheng, Yankui

    2016-05-01

    The microwave absorption properties of BaCo0.4Zn1.6Fe16O27 ferrite and carbonyl iron powder with single-layer and double-layer composite absorbers were investigated based on the electromagnetic transmission line theory in the frequency range from 1 to 14 GHz. XRD was used to characterize the structure of prepared absorbing particles. SEM was used to examine the micromorphology of the particles and composites. The complex permittivity and permeability of composites were measured by using a vector network analyzer. The reflection loss of the single-layer and double-layer absorbers with different thicknesses and orders was investigated. The results show that double-layer absorbers have better microwave absorption properties than single-layer absorbers. The microwave absorption properties of the double-layer structure are influenced by the coupling interactions between the matching and absorption layers. As the pure ferrite used as matching layer and the composite of BF-5CI used as absorption, the minimum RL of absorber can achieve to -55.4 dB and the bandwidth of RL <-10 dB ranged from 5.6 to 10.8 GHz when the thicknesses of matching layer and absorption layer were 0.9 and 1.4 mm, respectively.

  3. Derivation of optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols by monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiangtao; Crozier, Peter A; Ercius, Peter; Anderson, James R

    2014-06-01

    Monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is employed to determine the optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols from the infrared to the ultraviolet region of the spectrum. It is essential to determine their optical properties to understand their accurate contribution to radiative forcing for climate change. The influence of surface and interface plasmon effects on the accuracy of dielectric data determined from EELS is discussed. Our measurements show that the standard thin film formulation of Kramers-Kronig analysis can be employed to make accurate determination of the dielectric function for carbonaceous particles down to about 40 nm in size. The complex refractive indices of graphitic and amorphous carbon spherules found in the atmosphere were determined over the wavelength range 200-1,200 nm. The graphitic carbon was strongly absorbing black carbon, whereas the amorphous carbon shows a more weakly absorbing brown carbon profile. The EELS approach provides an important tool for exploring the variation in optical properties of atmospheric carbon. PMID:24735494

  4. Calibration method for a photoacoustic system for real time source apportionment of light absorbing carbonaceous aerosol based on size distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, Noemi; Ajtai, Tibor; Pinter, Mate; Orvos, Peter I.; Szabo, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we introduce a calibration method with which sources of light absorbing carbonaceous particulate matter (LAC) can be apportioned in real time based on multi wavelength optical absorption measurements with a photoacoustic system. The method is primary applicable in wintry urban conditions when LAC is dominated by traffic and biomass burning. The proposed method was successfully tested in a field campaign in the city center of Szeged, Hungary during winter time where the dominance of traffic and wood burning aerosol has been experimentally demonstrated earlier. With the help of the proposed calibration method a relationship between the measured Aerosol Angström Exponent (AAE) and the number size distribution can be deduced. Once the calibration curve is determined, the relative strength of the two pollution sources can be deduced in real time as long as the light absorbing fraction of PM is exclusively related to traffic and wood burning. This assumption is indirectly confirmed in the presented measurement campaign by the fact that the measured size distribution is composed of two unimodal size distributions identified to correspond to traffic and wood burning aerosols. The proposed method offers the possibility of replacing laborious chemical analysis with simple in-situ measurement of aerosol size distribution data.

  5. The influence of meteoric smoke particles on stratospheric aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Graham; Brooke, James; Dhomse, Sandip; Plane, John; Feng, Wuhu; Neely, Ryan; Bardeen, Chuck; Bellouin, Nicolas; Dalvi, Mohit; Johnson, Colin; Abraham, Luke

    2016-04-01

    The ablation of metors in the thermosphere and mesosphere introduces a signficant source of particulate matter into the polar upper stratosphere. These meteoric smoke particles (MSP) initially form at nanometre sizes but in the stratosphere have grown to larger sizes (tens of nanometres) following coagulation. The presence of these smoke particles may represent a significant mechanism for the nucleation of polar stratospheric clouds and are also known to influence the properties of the stratospheric aerosol or Junge layer. In this presentation we present findings from experiments to investigate the influence of the MSP on the Junge layer, carried out with the UM-UKCA composition-climate model. The UM-UKCA model is a high-top (up to 80km) version of the general circulation model with well-resolved stratospheric dynamics, includes the aerosol microphysics module GLOMAP and has interactive sulphur chemistry suitable for the stratosphere and troposphere (Dhomse et al., 2014). We have recently added to UM-UKCA a source of meteoric smoke particles, based on prescribing the variation of the smoke particles from previous simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). In UM-UKCA, the MSP particles are transported within the GLOMAP aerosol framework, alongside interactive stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. For the experiments presented here, we have activated the interaction between the MSP and the stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The MSP provide an important sink term for the gas phase sulphuric acid simulated in the model, with subsequent effects on the formation, growth and temporal evolution of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol particles. By comparing simulations with and without the MSP-sulphur interactions we quantify the influence of the meteoric smoke on the properties of volcanically-quiescent Junge layer. We also investigate the extent to which the MSP may modulate the effects from SO2 injected into the stratosphere from volcanic

  6. Radiative Properties of Smoke and Aerosol Over Land Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    This talk discusses smoke and aerosol's radiative properties with particular attention to distinguishing the measurement over clear sky from clouds over land, sea, snow, etc. surfaces, using MODIS Airborne Simulator data from (Brazil, arctic sea ice and tundra and southern Africa, west Africa, and other ecosystems. This talk also discusses the surface bidirectional reflectance using Cloud Absorption Radiometer, BRDF measurements of Saudi Arabian desert, Persian Gulf, cerrado and rain forests in Brazil, sea ice, tundra, Atlantic Ocean, Great Dismal Swamp, Kuwait oil fire smoke. Recent upgrades to instrument (new TOMS UVA channels at 340 and 380 planned use in Africa (SAFARI 2000) and possibly for MEIDEX will also be discussed. This talk also plans to discuss the spectral variation of surface reflectance over land and the sensitivity of off-nadir view angles to correlation between visible near-infrared reflectance for use in remote sensing of aerosol over land.

  7. Interpretation of Aerosol Optical and Morphological Properties during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study in Sacramento, June 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkowski, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Sharma, N.; Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.; Gyawali, M. S.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Sacramento Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) utilized two ground sites T0 and T1 along with an aircraft platform to characterize carbonaceous aerosol chemical and physical properties and their evolution. The T0 site was chosen within the Sacramento metropolitan area for measuring primary and secondary aerosols generated in the city. The T1 site was chosen East of Sacramento on the Sierra foothill to study the evolution and processing of the Sacramento aerosol plume and to assess the characteristics of the background air. To reach T1, the Sacramento aerosols traveled often over the Blodgett Forest resulting in significant aging due coagulation, condensation, and photochemical processes. The ground sites were chosen for this unique and reoccurring transport pattern of the aerosols. The campaign took place in June 2010. Six Integrated Photoacoustic/Nephelometer Spectrometers (IPNSs) were installed at the sites to simultaneously record aerosol light scattering and absorption data. The optical properties of the aerosols were measured at 355nm (ultraviolet), 375nm (ultraviolet), 405nm (blue), 532nm (green), and 781nm (red). In conjugation with the IPNSs, aerosol filters for electron microscopy analysis were collected at each site; these were examined using a field emission scanning electron microscope to study the aerosol morphology. The origins of the air masses did vary daily, but a few general trends emerged. The processing of the IPNS data with a wavelet denoising technique greatly enhanced the signal to noise ratio of the measurements enabling a better understanding of the aerosol optical properties for various airmasses with different characteristics. Typically signals at both sites were lower than expected, however the processed signals from T0 clearly showed a daily rise and dilution of the Sacramento plume. Using the processed signals from both sites the transportation of the Sacramento plume was detectable. The IPNS data were

  8. Hygroscopic, Morphological, and Chemical Properties of Agricultural Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Cheek, L.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Littleton, R.

    2007-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust is a significant source of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. In the Texas Panhandle, daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots are routinely observed in conjunction with increased cattle activity in the late afternoons and early evenings. We conducted a field study to characterize size-selected agricultural aerosols with respect to hygroscopic, morphological, and chemical properties and to attempt to identify any correlations between these properties. To explore the hygroscopic nature of agricultural particles, we have collected size-resolved aerosol samples using a cascade impactor system at a cattle feedlot in the Texas Panhandle and have used the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) to determine the water uptake by individual particles in those samples as a function of relative humidity. To characterize the size distribution of agricultural aerosols as a function of time, A GRIMM aerosol spectrometer and Sequential Mobility Particle Sizer and Counter (SMPS) measurements were simultaneously performed in an overall size range of 11 nm to 20 µm diameters at a cattle feedlot. Complementary determination of the elemental composition of individual particles was performed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). In addition to the EDS analysis, an ammonia scrubber was used to collect ammonia and ammonium in the gas and particulate phases, respectively. The concentration of these species was quantified offline via UV spectrophotometry at 640 nanometers. The results of this study will provide important particulate emission data from a feedyard, needed to improve our understanding of the role of agricultural particulates in local and regional air quality.

  9. Ice Nucleation Properties of Amospherically Aged Biomass Burning Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polen, M.; Lawlis, E.; Sullivan, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning can sometimes emit surprisingly active ice nucleating particles, though these emissions are not at all consistent between biomass fuel sources and burns. Soot from biomass combustion has been attributed to some but not all of the ice nucleating potential of biomass burning aerosol (BBA), while fossil fuel combustion soot emits very weak ice nucleants. The causes of the sometimes significant but variable ice nucleating ability of BBA are still largely unknown. BBA experiences significant atmospheric aging as the plume evolves and mixes with background air, yet almost no reports exploring the effects of atmospheric aging on the freezing properties of BBA have been made. We have performed some of the first experiments to determine the effects of simulated atmospheric aging on these ice nucleation properties, using a chamber reactor. The fresh and aged BBA was collected for subsequent droplet freezing array analysis using an impinger sampler to collect aerosol in water, and by deposition onto substrates in a MOUDI sampler. Droplets containing the chamber particles were then suspended in oil on a cold plate for freezing temperature spectrum measurement. Aging of Sawgrass flaming-phase combustion BBA by exposure to hydroxyl radicals (from H2O2 photolysis) enhanced the ice nucleation ability, observed by a shift to warmer droplet freezing temperatures by ~2-3°C. The changes in the aerosol's chemical composition during aging were observed using a laser ablation single-particle mass spectrometer and a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer. We will report our observations of the effects of other types of simulated aging (including photochemistry under high and low NOx conditions, dark ozonolysis, and nitric acid exposure) on Sawgrass and BBA from other grass and palm fuels.

  10. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can comprise tens of thousands of organic compounds, refractory brown and black carbon, heavy metals, cations, anions, salts, and other inorganic phases. Aerosol organic matter normally contains semivolatile material th...

  11. Light Absorption Properties of Brown Carbon from Fresh and Aged Biomass Burning Aerosols Characterized in a Smog Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, R.; Chuang, W.; Hennigan, C.; McMeeking, G. R.; Coe, H.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Black carbon is an important particulate phase light absorber in the atmosphere. Recent studies have shown that some organic matter also absorb visible light, especially at short wavelengths. These organic compounds are referred to as "brown carbon". Biomass burning is a major contributor to brown carbon in atmospheric particulate matter; however, its optical properties are poorly characterized. We have conducted smog chamber experiments to investigate light absorption properties of brown carbon in primary and aged biomass burning emissions, namely the imaginary refractive index. The aging was performed in a smog chamber, where dilute emissions were exposed to UV lights to initiate photo-oxidation, which often produced substantial secondary organic aerosol. The experiments took place at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and at the US Fire Science Laboratory in Missoula, MT as part of the Fire Lab at Missoula field campaign (FLAME 2009). The CMU experiments simulated household wood burning (oak), and the FLAME experiments simulated wildland fires with fuels including gallberry, lodgepole pine, black spruce and ponderosa pine. Absorption coefficients were measured using an Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) at 7 different wavelengths ranging between 370 nm and 950 nm. The black carbon size distributions were measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2, DMT), and total aerosol size distributions were measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, TSI). The absorption coefficients of both the fresh and aged aerosol were significantly larger, and had stronger wavelength dependence than what would be expected for black carbon alone, and for a black carbon core with a non-absorbing shell. This indicates that biomass burning organic aerosol should be classified as brown carbon. A (black carbon) core - (brown carbon) shell absorption model based on Mie theory was optimized to determine the shell imaginary refractive index which produces model outputs that

  12. Analysis of Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties on the Coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango peninsula) during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohno, S.; Hoeller, R.; Ito, K.; Onishi, Y.; Ma, C. J.; Kasahara, M.; Cahill, T. A.; Cliff, S.

    2001-12-01

    During springtime the Japanese archipelago is periodically influenced by haze events originating from the Asian continent. The sources of these materials include both anthropogenic and natural aerosol, including the well-known yellow sand (Kosa) events, which can be recognized at places as far as Hawaii and the west coast of the United States. But there is also strong evidenced, which we want to support in this study, that these Kosa events are accompanied by strongly absorbing material as well as sulfates and organics. The springtime of 2001 was characterized by several strong dust events, which happened to be during the international ACE-Asia campaign. We participated in the ACE observation network by setting up a monitoring station during the period March 19 to April 6, 2001 for the measurement of aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties as well as observations of sky radiation. The measurement site is located on the coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango Peninsula, Kyoto Prefecture). Tango was chosen as an observation site, since it is relatively unpolluted and can therefore serve as a background site for studies of the direct impact of the mainland Asian outflow on the western Pacific area. The purpose of this work is to perform local and column closure experiments on aerosol properties, and to distinguish the anthropogenic part of the aerosol from the natural one. For this purpose, backward air-mass trajectories are calculated to identify potential sources of the observed aerosol. For measurements of aerosol mass-size distributions we used 12-stage low-pressure impactors, which were subsequently analyzed for elemental and ionic concentrations by PIXE, and Ion-chromatography, respectively. In addition, to get both the necessary time- and size-resolution, a DRUM sampler was operated with continuous collection and analysis for mass and optical transmission from 320 nm to 850 nm. Analysis is scheduled by synchrotron-XRF to < 0.1 ng/m3 for trace elemental

  13. Chemical and physicochemial properties of submicron aerosol agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Scripsick, R.C.; Ehrman, S.; Friedlander, S.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The formation of nanometer-sized aerosol particles in a premixed methane flame from both solid-phase aerosol precursors and gas-phase precursors was investigated. Techniques were developed to determine the distribution of the individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size by using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). To determine the distribution of chemical species both from particle to particle and within the particles on a nanometer scale, we used the analytical electron microscopy techniques of energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The observed distribution of individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size was linked to the material properties of the solid-phase precursors. For aerosol formed from gas-phase precursors by gas-to-particle conversion, the distribution of species on a manometer scale was found to correspond to the equilibrium phase distribution expected from equilibrium for the system at the flame temperatures.

  14. Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, and phase function calculations to assumptions on physical and chemical properties of aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    In coupled chemistry-meteorology simulations, the calculation of aerosol optical properties is an important task for the inclusion of the aerosol effects on the atmospheric radiative budget. However, the calculation of these properties from an aerosol profile is not uniquely defi...

  15. Composition and physical properties of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer and the North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B.; Neely, Ryan R.; Martinsson, Bengt G.; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies revealed layers of enhanced aerosol scattering in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Asia (Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)) and North America (North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer (NATAL)). We use a sectional aerosol model (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA)) coupled with the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) to explore the composition and optical properties of these aerosol layers. The observed aerosol extinction enhancement is reproduced by CESM1/CARMA. Both model and observations indicate a strong gradient of the sulfur-to-carbon ratio from Europe to the Asia on constant pressure surfaces. We found that the ATAL is mostly composed of sulfates, surface-emitted organics, and secondary organics; the NATAL is mostly composed of sulfates and secondary organics. The model also suggests that emission increases in Asia between 2000 and 2010 led to an increase of aerosol optical depth of the ATAL by 0.002 on average which is consistent with observations.

  16. Electromagnetic and absorbing property of CIPs/resin composite using the 3D forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Liang, Zichang; Wang, Xiaobing; Yuan, Liming; Li, Xinghao

    2016-08-01

    The absorbing composite filled with the flaky carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) were prepared using a three-dimensional (3D) forming process, in which the forming powder was fabricated using a milling process. The surface morphology was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy, the static magnetic property was evaluated on a vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were done to analyze the particle crystal grain structure. The complex permittivity and permeability were measured using a vector network analyzer in the frequency range of 4-18 GHz. With the variable thickness was set, the reflection loss (RL) was simulated to analyze the absorbing property of the composite. The results showed that the forming powder was uniformly dispersed in the absorber, and the saturation magnetization and the grain structure of the CIPs in the forming powder nearly did not change in the milling process. With the same volume content CIPs added, the average permittivity and the imaginary permeability of the samples added the powder was smaller than the directly mixing sample due to the aggregation effect. The RL results showed that the absorbing composites using the 3D forming process with thickness 6 or 8 mm had an better absorbing property (minimum RL -13.58 and -21.85 dB) in 4-18 GHz.

  17. Upper-atmosphere Aerosols: Properties and Natural Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The middle atmosphere is rich in its variety of particulate matter, which ranges from meteorite debris, to sulfate aerosols, to polar stratospheric ice clouds. Volcanic eruptions strongly perturb the stratospheric sulfate (Junge) layer. High-altitude 'noctilucent' ice clouds condense at the summer mesopause. The properties of these particles, including their composition, sizes, and geographical distribution, are discussed, and their global effects, including chemical, radiative, and climatic roles, are reviewed. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are composed of water and nitric acid in the form of micron-sized ice crystals. These particles catalyze reactions of chlorine compounds that 'activate' otherwise inert chlorine reservoirs, leading to severe ozone depletions in the southern polar stratosphere during austral spring. PSCs also modify the composition of the polar stratosphere through complex physiocochemical processes, including dehydration and denitrification, and the conversion of reactive nitrogen oxides into nitric acid. If water vapor and nitric acid concentrations are enhanced by high-altitude aircraft activity, the frequency, geographical range, and duration of PSCs might increase accordingly, thus enhancing the destruction of the ozone layer (which would be naturally limited in geographical extent by the same factors that confine the ozone hole to high latitudes in winter). The stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer reflects solar radiation and increases the planetary albedo, thereby cooling the surface and possibly altering the climate. Major volcanic eruptions, which increase the sulfate aerosol burden by a factor of 100 or more, may cause significant global climate anomalies. Sulfate aerosols might also be capable of activating stratospheric chlorine reservoirs on a global scale (unlike PCSs, which represent a localized polar winter phenomenon), although existing evidence suggests relatively minor perturbations in chlorine chemistry. Nevertheless, if

  18. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (<0.01), except for cargo ship and smoke plumes, which increased CR by 0.02 and 0.07, respectively, owing to their high organic mass fraction. Organic hygroscopicity had larger effects on droplet concentrations for cases with higher aerosol concentrations near the critical diameter (namely, polluted cases with a modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  19. Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol from cis-3-Hexenol and cis-3-Hexenyl Acetate: Effect of Chemical Composition, Humidity, and Phase.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Rebecca M; Bateman, Adam P; Jain, Shashank; Li, Yong Jie; Martin, Scot; Petrucci, Giuseppe A

    2016-05-17

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in Earth's radiative balance directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly, by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Atmospheric aerosol is dominated by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a class of BVOCs that contribute to SOA, yet their role in the Earth's radiative budget is poorly understood. In this work we measured the scattering efficiency (at 450, 525, and 635 nm), absorption efficiency (between 190 and 900 nm), particle phase, bulk chemical properties (O:C, H:C), and molecular-level composition of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of two GLVs: cis-3-hexenol (HXL) and cis-3-hexenyl acetate (CHA). Both HXL and CHA produced SOA that was weakly absorbing, yet CHA-SOA was a more efficient absorber than HXL-SOA. The scatter efficiency of SOA from both systems was wavelength-dependent, with the stronger dependence exhibited by HXL-SOA, likely due to differences in particle size. HXL-SOA formed under both dry (10% RH) and wet (70% RH) conditions had the same bulk chemical properties (O:C), yet significantly different optical properties, which was attributed to differences in molecular-level composition. We have found that SOA derived from green leaf volatiles has the potential to affect the Earth's radiative budget, and also that bulk chemical properties can be insufficient to predict SOA optical properties. PMID:27074496

  20. The design, fabrication and properties of B4C/Al neutron absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuli; Wang, Wenxian; Gao, Zhanping; Wang, Baodong

    2013-06-01

    Neutron absorber is used for the criticality safety during the storage or transportation of spent nuclear fuel. In this work, the metal matrix composite with good mechanical property and thermal neutron absorbing ability was investigated based on B4C/Al neutron radiation shielding material. The composition ratio for B4C/Al composite was firstly designed and the dependence of the neutron transmission on the thickness of the material was calculated. By vacuum hot-pressing technique at a low temperature, the neutron absorbers with high concentration of B4C were fabricated. Furthermore, the corresponding microstructure, physical, mechanical and corrosion properties as well as fracture surface were analyzed, proving that the developed composites can shield the neutron radiation as effectively as cadmium materials.

  1. Enhanced microwave absorbing properties and heat resistance of carbonyl iron by electroless plating Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyu; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhou, Wancheng; Luo, Fa

    2015-11-01

    Co coated carbonyl iron particles (Co (CI)) are fabricated through electroless plating method, and the electromagnetic microwave absorbing properties are investigated in the frequencies during 8.2-12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of CI particles after electroless plating Co is higher than that of raw CI particles due to improvment of the polarization process. Furthermore, according to the XRD and TG results, the Co layer can enhance the heat resistance of CI particles. The bandwidth below -10 dB can reach 3.9 GHz for the Co(CI) absorbent. The results indicate that the electroless plating Co not only enhances the absorbing properties but also improves the heat resistance of CI.

  2. Smart absorbing property of composites with MWCNTs and carbonyl iron as the filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-10-01

    A smart absorbing composite was prepared by mixing silicone rubber, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and flaky carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) in a two-roll mixer. The complex permittivity and permeability of composites with variable compression strain was measured by the transmission method and dc electric conductivity was measured by the standard four-point contact method, then the reflection loss (RL) could be calculated to evaluate the microwave absorbing ability. The results showed that the applied compression strain made the complex permittivity decrease but not obviously due to the broken original conductive network. The enforcement of the strain on the complex permeability was attributed to the orientation of flaky CIPs. With the compressing strain applied on the composites with thickness 1 mm or 1.5 mm, the RL value decreased (minimum -13.2 dB and -25.1 dB) and the absorbing band (RL<-10 dB) was widened (5.2-10.6 GHz and 4.0-8.4 GHz). While as the composite thickness decreased caused by the compression strain, the RL value still decreased (minimum -12.4 dB and -18.6 dB) and the absorbing band was also broadened (6.5-10.7 GHz and 4.4-10.0 GHz). Thus the smart absorbing property was effective on preparing absorbers with wide absorption band and high absorption ratio.

  3. Microphysical, chemical and optical aerosol properties in the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikas, Ülle; Reinart, Aivo; Pugatshova, Anna; Tamm, Eduard; Ulevicius, Vidmantas

    2008-11-01

    The microphysical structure, chemical composition and prehistory of aerosol are related to the aerosol optical properties and radiative effect in the UV spectral range. The aim of this work is the statistical mapping of typical aerosol scenarios and adjustment of regional aerosol parameters. The investigation is based on the in situ measurements in Preila (55.55° N, 21.00° E), Lithuania, and the AERONET data from the Gustav Dalen Tower (58 N, 17 E), Sweden. Clustering of multiple characteristics enabled to distinguish three aerosol types for clear-sky periods: 1) clean maritime-continental aerosol; 2) moderately polluted maritime-continental aerosol; 3) polluted continental aerosol. Differences between these types are due to significant differences in aerosol number and volume concentration, effective radius of volume distribution, content of SO 4- ions and Black Carbon, as well as different vertical profiles of atmospheric relative humidity. The UV extinction, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the Ångstrom coefficient α increased with the increasing pollution. The value α = 1.96 was observed in the polluted continental aerosol that has passed over central and eastern Europe and southern Russia. Reduction of the clear-sky UV index against the aerosol-free atmosphere was of 4.5%, 27% and 41% for the aerosol types 1, 2 and 3, respectively.

  4. Electromagnetic and microwave-absorbing properties of magnetic nickel ferrite nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weimo; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Rui; Ren, Jiawen; Lu, Guanzhong; Wang, Yanqin

    2011-07-01

    The electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties of nickel ferrite nanocrystals were investigated for the first time. There were two frequencies corresponding to the maximum reflection loss in a wide thickness range from 3.0 to 5.0 mm, which may be bought by the nanosize effect and the good crystallization of the nanocrystals. PMID:21633731

  5. An Intensive Study of Aerosol Optical Properties in the Outflow of the Manaus Urban Plume, in Central Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Cirino, G. G.; Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Barbosa, H. M.; Carbone, S.; Holanda, B. A.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Tota, J.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, one year of ground-based observations of aerosol optical properties from a site impacted by urban emissions in Central Amazon of Brazil are assessed as part of results from GoAmazon2014/5 experiment. The aerosol absorption (σa) and scattering (σs) coefficients, as well as single scattering albedo (SSA) are analyzed to aid in characterizing Manaus' urban aerosol at GoAmazon T2 site. There is a distinct diurnal variation for (σa) it was mainly attributed to the severe emission of particulate pollutants and black carbon during the morning and evening traffic rush hours. The decrease of (σa) nearly at noon (12:00-14:00 LT) was a result of strong atmospheric mixing and dilution due to the elevated height of atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL). After sunset (18:00 LT), the formation of stable nocturnal PBL even in atmospheric inversion led to a low atmospheric diffusion ability to aerosols and thus relatively high (σa) and (σs) throughout the night. Indeed, it was observed a strong dependence on local wind confirmed by simulated back trajectories in all two seasons. Overall, the wind dependence results provide valuable information about the locations of aerosol pollution sources and suggest that the air pollution in dry season is a regional problem but in the wet season it is mainly affected by local urban emissions. We have also seen an interesting difference in variability of (σs) and (σa) during 8:00-13:00 LT in wet season. A clear decrease was observed for (σa), while a smooth increase during 11:00-13:00 LT was presented for (σs). This is possibly a consequence of secondary aerosol production. (σa) is controlled to a large degree by primary aerosols such as black carbon that are emitted directly from pollution sources like vehicles, while (σs) is related to secondary aerosols such as sulfate and nitrate that contribute the most to light scattering. SSA was relatively low around 7:00-08:00 LT, which reflected that (σa) increased more

  6. High spectral resolution lidar to measure optical scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols. I - Theory and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, S. T.; Tracy, D. H.; Eloranta, E. W.; Roesler, F. L.; Weinman, J. A.; Trauger, J. T.; Sroga, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A high spectral resolution lidar technique to measure optical scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols is described. Light backscattered by the atmosphere from a narrowband optically pumped oscillator-amplifier dye laser is separated into its Doppler broadened molecular and elastically scattered aerosol components by a two-channel Fabry-Perot polyetalon interferometer. Aerosol optical properties, such as the backscatter ratio, optical depth, extinction cross section, scattering cross section, and the backscatter phase function, are derived from the two-channel measurements.

  7. New algorithm to derive the microphysical properties of the aerosols from lidar measurements using OPAC aerosol classification schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Labzovskii, Lev; Toanca, Florica

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to retrieve the aerosol complex refractive index and effective radius from multiwavelength lidar data, using an integrated model-measurement approach. In the model, aerosols are assumed to be a non-spherical ensemble of internally mixed components, with variable proportions. OPAC classification schemes and basic components are used to calculate the microphysical properties, which are then fed into the T-matrix calculation code to generate the corresponding optical parameters. Aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratios, extinction and backscatter Angstrom coefficients, and linear particle depolarization ratios) are computed at the altitude of the aerosol layers determined from lidar measurements, and iteratively compared to the values obtained by simulation for a certain aerosol type, for which the critical component's proportion in the overall mixture is varied. Microphysical inversion based on the Truncated Singular Value Decomposition (TSVD) algorithm is performed for selected cases of spherical aerosols, and comparative results of the two methods are shown. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, Data inversion, Optical parameters, Complex Refractive Index Acknowledgments: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project numbers 38/2012 - CAPESA and 55/2013 - CARESSE, and by the European Community's FP7-INFRASTRUCTURES-2010-1 under grant no. 262254 - ACTRIS and by the European Community's FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN under grant no. 289923 - ITARS

  8. Summer-winter differences in the relationships among background southeastern U.S. aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Relationships among aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties are useful for evaluating regional climate models, developing satellite-based aerosol retrievals, and understanding aerosol sources and processes. Since aerosol loading and optical properties vary primarily on seasonal scales in the southeastern U.S., it is important that such studies be carried out over multiple seasons but few (if any) such multi-season studies have been conducted in the region. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1080m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were also made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. Some of the major findings will be presented. Higher values of lower tropospheric aerosol light scattering coefficient at 550nm (a proxy for aerosol loading) are associated with higher single-scattering albedo (SSA) and lower hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) during both summer and winter. Absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) is typically well under 1 during summer and near 1.3-1.4 during winter. Lowest summer AAE values coincide with large, highly-reflective particles and higher aerosol light scattering coefficient but summer AAE is only weakly anti-correlated with organic and sulfate mass concentrations. Winter AAE is consistent with a mixture of elemental carbon and light-absorbing organic carbon, possibly influenced by regional residential wood-burning during winter. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to sulfate and organic aerosol mass fractions during both summer and winter

  9. Study on the characteristics of magneto-sensitive electromagnetic wave-absorbing properties of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Yang, Pingan; Fu, Jie; Liu, Shuzhi; Qi, Song

    2016-08-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) materials are a class of materials whose mechanical and electrical properties can be reversible controlled by the magnetic field. In this study, we pioneered research on the effect of a uniform magnetic field with different strengths and directions on the microwave-absorbing properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs), in which the ferromagnetic particles are flower-like carbonyl iron powders (CIPs) prepared by an in situ reduction method. The electromagnetic (EM) absorbing properties of the composites have been analyzed by vector network analysis with the coaxial reflection/transmission technique. Under the magnetic field, the columnar or chainlike structures were formed, which allows EM waves to penetrate. Meanwhile, stronger Debye dipolar relaxation and attenuation constant have been obtained when changing the direction of the applied magnetic field. Compared with untreated MREs, not only have the minimum reflection loss (RL) and the effective absorption bandwidth (below ‑20 dB) greatly increased, the frequencies of the absorbing peaks shift about 15%. This suggests that MREs are a magnetic-field-sensitive electromagnetic wave-absorbing material and have great potential in applications such as in anti-radar camouflage, due to the fact that radar can continuously conduct detection at many electromagnetic frequencies, while the MR materials can adjust the microwave-absorption peak according to the radar frequency.

  10. Aerosol and cloud properties using (A)ATSR: retrieval algorithm and application for aerosol-cloud interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; De Leeuw, Gerrit; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo H.; Saponaro, Giulia; Kokhanovsky, Alexander

    Aerosols and clouds play an important role in radiative transfer and are key elements of the water and energy cycles. The interactions between aerosol particles and cloud drops are critical to identifying the earth radiation budget. Accurate evaluation of the effects of aerosols and clouds on climate requires global information on aerosol properties which can only be provided using satellite remote sensing. Among the satellite instruments used for aerosol and cloud retrieval is the (Advanced) Along-Track Scanning Radiometer ((A)ATSR) on board the European Space Agency (ESA) satellite ENVISAT (1997-2012). (A)ATSR measures top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) radiances at 7 wavelengths in the spectral range from the visible to the thermal infrared. It has two views, one at nadir and the other one at 55o forward view; conical scan covers a swath of 512 km. The (A)ATSR resolution is 1 km at nadir. The aerosol retrieval algorithm (dual-view over land and single-view over ocean) was constructed for ATSR-2 data (e.g. Veefkind et al. 1998). The most recent version of ADV (AATSR Dual View) is described in Kolmonen et al. (2013). The (A)ATSR dual-view allows retrieval without prior information about land surface reflectance. A semi-analytical cloud retrieval algorithm using backscattered radiation in 0.4-2.4 μm spectral region has been implemented to ADV for the determination of the optical thickness, the liquid water path, and the effective size of droplets from spectral measurements of the intensity of light reflected from water clouds with large optical thickness. In AacDV ((A)ATSR aerosol and cloud Dual View) aerosol and cloud retrievals are combined. Cloud retrieval starts when cloud tests for aerosol retrieval show the presence of clouds. The algorithm was early introduced in Kokhanovsky et al. (2003). It works well for thick clouds. In addition to cloud properties, cloud top height is estimated using information from both nadir and forward views. AacDV has been successfully

  11. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects (supplement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A digest of technical papers is presented. Topics include aerosol size distribution from spectral attenuation with scattering measurements; comparison of extinction and backscattering coefficients for measured and analytic stratospheric aerosol size distributions; using hybrid methods to solve problems in radiative transfer and in multiple scattering; blue moon phenomena; absorption refractive index of aerosols in the Denver pollution cloud; a two dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption; the variation of the aerosol volume to light scattering coefficient; spectrophone in situ measurements of the absorption of visible light by aerosols; a reassessment of the Krakatoa volcanic turbidity, and multiple scattering in the sky radiance.

  12. Validation of Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties over Northeast Asia for Five Years from GOSAT TANSO-Cloud and Aerosol Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Lee, S.; KIM, M.; Choi, M.; Go, S.; Lim, H.; Goo, T. Y.; Nakajima, T.; Kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    An aerosol retrieval algorithm was developed from Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI) onboard the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), size distribution of aerosol, and aerosol type in 0.1 degree grid resolution by look-up tables, which is used in retrieving optical properties of aerosol using inversion products from Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometer observation. To improve the accuracy of aerosol algorithm, first, this algorithm considered the annually estimated radiometric degradation factor of TANSO-CAI suggested by Kuze et al. (2014). Second, surface reflectance was determined by two methods: one using the clear sky composite method from CAI measurements and the other the database from MODerate resolution Imaging Sensor (MODIS) surface reflectance data. At a given pixel, the surface reflectance is selected by using normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) depending on season (Hsu et al., 2013). In this study, the retrieved AODs were compared with those of AERONET and MODIS dataset for different season over five years. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and CAI show reasonable agreement with correlation coefficients of 0.65 ~ 0.97 and regression slopes between 0.7 and 1.2 for the whole period, depending on season and sites. Moreover, those between MODIS and CAI for the same period show agreements with correlation coefficients of 0.7 ~ 0.9 and regression slopes between 0.7 and 1.0, depending on season and regions. The results show reasonably good correlation, however, the largest error source in aerosol retrieval has been surface reflectance of TANSO-CAI due to its 3-days revisit orbit characteristics.

  13. Impact of annealing on electrical properties of Cu2ZnSnSe4 absorber layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Thomas Paul; Redinger, Alex; Rey, Germain; Schwarz, Torsten; Spies, Maria; Cojocura-Mirédin, Oana; Choi, P.-P.; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Reported growth processes for kesterite absorber layers generally rely on a sequential process including a final high temperature annealing step. However, the impact and details for this annealing process vary among literature reports and little is known on its impact on electrical properties of the absorber. We used kesterite absorber layers prepared by a high temperature co-evaporation process to explicitly study the impact of two different annealing processes. From electrical characterization it is found that the annealing process incorporates a detrimental deep defect distribution. On the other hand, the doping density could be reduced leading to a better collection and a higher short circuit current density. The activation energy of the doping acceptor was studied with admittance spectroscopy and showed Meyer-Neldel behaviour. This indicates that the entropy significantly contributes to the activation energy.

  14. Weekly periodicities of aerosol properties observed at an urban location in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Multi-year (~ 7 years) observations of aerosol optical and microphysical properties were conducted at a tropical urban location in Bangalore, India. As a consequence of rapid urbanization, Bangalore presents high local atmospheric emissions, which makes it an interesting site to study the effect of anthropogenic activities on aerosol properties. It has been found that both column (aerosol optical depth, AOD) and ground-level measurements (black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol mass) exhibit a weekly cycle with low aerosol concentrations on weekends. In comparison to the weekdays, the weekend reductions of aerosol optical depth, black carbon and composite aerosol mass concentrations were ~ 15%, 25% and 24%, respectively. The magnitude of weekend reduction of black carbon is as much as ~ 1 μg m - 3 . The similarity in the weekly cycle between the column and surface measurements suggests that the aerosol column loading at this location is governed by local anthropogenic emissions. The strongest weekly cycle in composite aerosol mass concentration was observed in the super micron mass range (> 1 μm). The weekly cycle of composite aerosol mass in the sub micron mass range (< 1 μm) was weak in comparison to the super micron aerosol mass.

  15. Weekly periodicities of aerosol properties observed at an urban location in India

    SciTech Connect

    Satheesh, S K; Vinoj, V; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Multi-year (~7 years) observations of aerosol optical and microphysical properties were conducted at a tropical urban location in Bangalore, India. As a consequence of rapid urbanization, Bangalore presents high local atmospheric emissions, which makes it an interesting site to study the effect of anthropogenic activities on aerosol properties. It has been found that both column (aerosol optical depth, AOD) and ground-level measurements (black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol mass) exhibit a weekly cycle with low aerosol concentrations on weekends. In comparison to the weekdays, the weekend reductions of aerosol optical depth, black carbon and composite aerosol mass concentrations were ~15%, 25% and 24%, respectively. The magnitude of weekend reduction of black carbon is as much as ~1 μg m-3. The similarity in the weekly cycle between the column and surface measurements suggests that the aerosol column loading at this location is governed by local anthropogenic emissions. The strongest weekly cycle in composite aerosol mass concentration was observed in the super micron mass range (>1 μm). The weekly cycle of composite aerosol mass in the sub micron mass range (<1 μm) was weak in comparison to the super micron aerosol mass.

  16. The JHU-SDSS Metal Absorption Line Catalog: Redshift Evolution and Properties of Mg II Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtun; Ménard, Brice

    2013-06-01

    We present a generic and fully automatic method aimed at detecting absorption lines in the spectra of astronomical objects. The algorithm estimates the source continuum flux using a dimensionality reduction technique and nonnegative matrix factorization, and then detects and identifies metal absorption lines. We apply it to a sample of ~105 quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and compile a sample of ~40,000 Mg II- and Fe II-absorber systems, spanning the redshift range 0.4 < z < 2.3. The corresponding catalog is publicly available. We study the statistical properties of these absorber systems and find that the rest equivalent width distribution of strong Mg II absorbers follows an exponential distribution at all redshifts, confirming previous studies. Combining our results with recent near-infrared observations of Mg II absorbers, we introduce a new parameterization that fully describes the incidence rate of these systems up to z ~ 5. We find the redshift evolution of strong Mg II absorbers to be remarkably similar to the cosmic star formation history over 0.4 < z < 5.5 (the entire redshift range covered by observations), suggesting a physical link between these two quantities.

  17. THE JHU-SDSS METAL ABSORPTION LINE CATALOG: REDSHIFT EVOLUTION AND PROPERTIES OF Mg II ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtun; Menard, Brice

    2013-06-20

    We present a generic and fully automatic method aimed at detecting absorption lines in the spectra of astronomical objects. The algorithm estimates the source continuum flux using a dimensionality reduction technique and nonnegative matrix factorization, and then detects and identifies metal absorption lines. We apply it to a sample of {approx}10{sup 5} quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and compile a sample of {approx}40,000 Mg II- and Fe II-absorber systems, spanning the redshift range 0.4 < z < 2.3. The corresponding catalog is publicly available. We study the statistical properties of these absorber systems and find that the rest equivalent width distribution of strong Mg II absorbers follows an exponential distribution at all redshifts, confirming previous studies. Combining our results with recent near-infrared observations of Mg II absorbers, we introduce a new parameterization that fully describes the incidence rate of these systems up to z {approx} 5. We find the redshift evolution of strong Mg II absorbers to be remarkably similar to the cosmic star formation history over 0.4 < z < 5.5 (the entire redshift range covered by observations), suggesting a physical link between these two quantities.

  18. Relationship Between Absorber Layer Properties and Device Operation Modes For High Efficiency Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Ram; Kokenyesi, Robert; Wager, John; Keszler, Douglas; CenterInverse Design Team

    2014-03-01

    A thin film solar cell (TFSC) can be differentiated into two distinct operation modes based on the transport mechanism. Current TFSCs predominantly exploit diffusion to extract photogenerated minority carriers. For efficient extraction, the absorber layer requires high carrier mobilities and long minority carrier lifetimes. Materials exhibiting a strong optical absorption onset near the fundamental band gap allows reduction of the absorber layer thickness to significantly less than 1 μm. In such a TFSC, a strong intrinsic electric field drives minority carrier extraction, resulting in drift-based transport. The basic device configuration utilized in this simulation study is a heterojunction TFSC with a p-type absorber layer. The diffusion/drift device operation modes are simulated by varying the thickness and carrier concentration of the absorber layer, and device performance between the two modes is compared. In addition, the relationship between device operation mode and transport properties, including carrier mobility and minority carrier lifetime are explored. Finally, candidate absorber materials that enable the advantages of a drift-based TFSC developed within the Center for Inverse Design are presented. School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

  19. Aerosol properties from 4STAR observations: A sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Flynn, C.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, A.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-spectral direct-beam observations of atmospheric aerosol and gas constituents have been taken successfully at a number of sites around the world by the airborne 14-Channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). The recently developed airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is the next generation of AATS-14 with ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared spectral coverage, increased number of channels (more than 1500 pixels) and the sky-scanning ability of the ground-based AERONET sun/sky photometers. While it is generally agreed that more measurements in terms of independent wavelengths and scattering angles would offer enhanced aerosol retrievals, the potential afforded by improved observational capabilities of the 4STAR has not yet been fully characterized. This paper will attempt to place the importance of improved spectrally- and angularly-resolved 4STAR observations within the context of the well-known AERONET intensive-property retrieval. In particular, we have developed model data sets comparable to the 4STAR measurements of direct sun and sky radiances and evaluated the impact on the retrieval from subsampling in wavelength and scattering angle.

  20. Aerosol optical and radiative properties during summer and winter seasons over Lahore and Karachi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan; Trautmann, Thomas; Blaschke, Thomas; Majid, Hussain

    2012-04-01

    The study of aerosol optical and radiative properties presented here focuses on a geographic region in which there exist significant gaps in our knowledge. These properties have been analyzed through the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) over the two megacities of Lahore and Karachi for summer (April-June) and winter (December-February) of 2010-11. During the study period the monthly mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm over Lahore ranged from 0.57 ± 0.18 to 0.76 ± 0.38, and the monthly mean Ångström exponent () ranged from 0.39 ± 0.17 to 1.22 ± 0.13. Likewise, over Karachi the monthly mean AOD ranged from 0.33 ± 0.11 to 0.63 ± 0.28 and the values varied between 0.29 ± 0.08 to 0.95 ± 0.22. The average AOD values in summer and winter are 0.66 ± 0.30, 0.50 ± 0.18 and 0.67 ± 0.40, 0.34 ± 0.12 in Lahore and Karachi respectively. The relationship between the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) and the Extinction Ångström Exponent (EAE) provided an indication of the relative proportions of urban-industrial and mineral dust aerosols over the two sites. The volume size distributions were higher over Lahore than over Karachi during both seasons. The single scattering albedo (SSA) ranged from 0.83 ± 0.02 (440 nm) to 0.91 ± 0.05 (1020 nm) over Lahore and from 0.88 ± 0.02 (440 nm) to 0.97 ± 0.01 (1020 nm) over Karachi. The lower SSA values over Lahore suggest that absorbing aerosols are more dominant over Lahore than over Karachi. The average aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) values in summer at the surface and the top of atmosphere (TOA) are -101.6 ± 8.2, -63.3 ± 9.5 and -19 ± 4.35, -20 ± 3.1 over Lahore and Karachi respectively. Likewise, the average ARF values in winter at the surface and TOA are -90.3 ± 21.03, -57 ± 6.35 and -26 ± 7, -16 ± 2.3 over Lahore and Karachi respectively. The averaged aerosol ARF values over Lahore and Karachi for the entire period covered by the observations were -22.5 ± 5.9 W m-2 and

  1. Retrieval of aerosol microstructure and radiative properties for moderate turbidity under conditions of Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, Tatiana B.; Bedareva, Tatiana V.; Sviridenkov, Mikhail A.

    2013-05-01

    This study focuses on the results of testing an algorithm for retrieval of aerosol optical and microphysical characteristics in the total atmospheric column from ground-based measurements of direct and diffuse solar radiation. Clear-sky photometric measurements carried out under moderate aerosol loading of the atmosphere in summer for 2003-2009 at Tomsk station of AERONET network were used. The retrieved aerosol optical and microphysical parameters are compared with AERONET data, an empirical model of the vertical profiles of aerosol optical characteristics over Western Siberia, well-known OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds) model and model recommended by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) (continental aerosol). In the visible spectral range, the mean value of single scattering albedo is 0.9-0.92, in good agreement with other data. It is shown, however, that asymmetry factor of aerosol scattering phase function disagrees with the WMO and OPAC values. A short description of the inversion strategy is also presented.

  2. Effect of biopolishing and UV absorber treatment on the UV protection properties of cotton knitted fabrics.

    PubMed

    Kan, C W; Au, C H

    2014-01-30

    Cotton knitted fabrics were manufactured with gauge number 20 G by circular knitting machine with conventional ring spun yarn and torque-free ring spun yarn. Torque-free ring spinning is a new spinning technology that produces yarns with low twist and balanced torque. This study examined whether the impact of biopolishing and UV absorber treatment on UV protection properties on cotton knitted fabric made of torque-free ring spun yarn is different. Biopolishing agent and UV absorber were used to treat the cotton knitted fabrics after scouring and bleaching. The UV protection properties were measured in terms of UV protection factor (UPF) and UV ray transmittance. Experimental results revealed that knitted fabric made from torque-free ring spun has better UPF than knitted fabric made from conventional ring spun yarn in untreated and biopolished states. However, knitted fabric made from conventional ring spun yarn has better UPF than knitted fabric made from torque-free ring spun after UV absorber treatment and combined UV absorber and biopolishing treatment. PMID:24299797

  3. Preparation and microwave absorbing properties of carbon/cobalt ferromagnetic composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangchang; Qiao, Xiaojing; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Shuman; Ren, Qingguo

    2013-02-01

    Carbon/cobalt ferromagnetic light composites with high performance of microwave absorbing properties were prepared by hydrothermal method using starch and hollow cobalt ferrites. It was concluded that after carbonization the spinel structure ferrites changed to Co3Fe7 alloys and the temperature of graphitization was significantly decreased for the catalytic of CoFe2O4/Co3Fe7. The increase of carbon content, and exist of CoFe2O4/Co3Fe7 heightened the microwave absorbing properties. Electromagnetic parameters were tested with 40% of the titled materials and 60% of paraffin wax composites by using HP8722ES vector network analyzer. The reflection was also simulated through transmission line theory. The microwave absorbers exhibited a maximum reflection loss -43 dB and the electromagnetic wave absorption less than -10 dB was found to exceed 3.0 GHz between 11.6 GHz and 15 GHz for an absorber thickness of 2 mm. PMID:23646517

  4. Effect of Ni content on microwave absorbing properties of MnAl powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-zhong; Lin, Pei-hao; Huang, Wei-chao; Pan, Shun-kang; Liu, Ye; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-01

    MnAlNi powder was prepared by the process of vacuum levitation melting and high-energy ball milling, The morphology and phase structure of the powder were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope(SEM), X-ray diffraction(XRD) and the effect of the Ni content on microwave absorbing properties of MnAl powder was investigated by an vector network analyzer. The addition of Ni, which improved the microwave absorbing properties of MnAl powder but not changed the composition of Al8Mn5 alloy. The minimum reflectivity of (Al8Mn5)0.95Ni0.05 powder with a coating thickness (d) of 1.8 mm was about -40.8 dB and has better bandwidth effect, the absorbing mechanism of AlMnNi powders on the electromagnetic was related to the electromagnetic loss within the absorbing coatings and the effect of coating thickness on the interference loss of electromagnetic wave.

  5. Light Absorption Properties and Radiative Effects of Primary Organic Aerosol Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic aerosols (OA) in the atmosphere affect Earth’s energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called “brown carbon” (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OA are not or poorly represented in current climate m...

  6. Optical, Physical and Chemical Properties of Tar Balls Observed During the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, Jenny L.; Malm, W. C.; Laskin, Alexander; Day, D. E.; Lee, Tae-bum; Wang, Chong M.; Carrico, C. E.; Carrillo, John R.; Cowin, James P.; Collett, J. G.; Iedema, Martin J.

    2005-11-09

    The Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study of summer 2002 (YACS) occurred during an active fire season in the western U. S., and provided an opportunity to investigate many unresolved issues related to the radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols. Single particle analysis was performed on field collected aerosol samples using an array of electron microscopy techniques. Amorphous carbon spheres, or “tar balls”, were present in samples collected during episodes of high particle light scattering coefficients that occurred during the peak of a smoke/haze event. The highest concentrations of light-absorbing carbon from a dual-wavelength aethalometer (λ = 370 and 880 nm) occurred during periods when the particles were predominantly tar balls, indicating they do absorb light in the UV and near-IR range of the solar spectrum. Closure experiments of mass concentrations and light scattering coefficients during periods dominated by tar balls did not require any distinct assumptions of organic carbon molecular weight correction factors, density, or refractive index compared to periods dominated by other types of organic carbon aerosols. Measurements of the hygroscopic behavior of tar balls using an environmental SEM indicate that tar balls do not exhibit deliquescence, but do uptake some water at high (~83 %) relative humidity. The ability of tar balls to efficiently scatter and absorb light, and to absorb water has important implications for their role in regional haze and climate fence.

  7. Background Southeast United States Aerosol Optical Properties and Their Dependence Upon Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlyszyn, C.; West, M.; Sherman, J. P.; Link, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol effects on SE U.S. radiation budget are highly-seasonal. Aerosol loading is much higher in summer, due largely to high levels of biogenic secondary organic aerosol and sulfates. Aerosol loading is lowest in winter. Aerosol optical properties relevant to radiative forcing have been measured continuously at the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research facility (AppalAIR) since the summer of 2009. AppalAIR is the only site in the eastern US to house co-located NOAA ESRL and NASA AeroNET instrumentation and is located in the mountains of Boone, NC. Lower tropospheric sub-micron (PM1) light scattering and absorption coefficients measured over seven summers and six winters are presented here, in addition to PM1 organic and sulfate aerosol mass concentrations measured during summers 2012-2013 as well as winter 2013. The objective is to determine the influence of aerosol sources and meteorology along the air mass back-trajectories on aerosol loading and composition. PM1 aerosol mass was dominated by organic aerosol and sulfate during the periods measured. Aerosol light scattering and organic aerosol concentrations were positively correlated during summer with temperature and solar flux along the parcel back-trajectory and negatively-correlated with rainfall along the back-trajectory. Wet deposition was a major factor in the difference between the upper and lower scattering coefficient quartiles for both summer and winter. Summer PM1 light scattering coefficient declined by approximately 30-40% since 2009, with smaller decreases during winter months. Long-term studies of aerosol optical properties from the regionally-representative AppalAIR site are necessary to determine the relationships between changing SE U.S. air quality and aerosol effects on regional climate and weather.

  8. Stratospheric aerosol properties and their effects on infrared radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a stratospheric aerosol model and infers its effects on terrestrial radiation. Composition of the aerosol is assumed to be concentrated sulfuric acid. An appropriate size distribution has been determined from available size distribution measurements of other investigators. Aerosols composed of concentrated sulfuric acid emit energy in the atmospheric window region of the infrared spectrum, 8-13 microns. Laboratory measurements of optical constant data obtained at room temperature are presented for 75 and 90% aqueous sulfuric acid. Calculations of an aerosol extinction coefficient are then performed by using the above data. Effects of changes in aerosol phase and temperature are discussed but not resolved.

  9. Multiwavelength In-situ Aerosol Absorption, Scattering, and Hygroscopic Properties During the TEXAQS 2006 Field Campaign: Aerosol Classification and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierau, B.; Covert, D. S.; Coffman, D. J.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2007-12-01

    In-situ, three wavelength-measurements of optical properties of the aerosol near the coast of Texas, i.e. in the region of Houston and the Houston ship channel, as well as in the Gulf of Mexico were carried out onboard the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the 2006 TEXAQS/GoMACCS field campaign in July through September 2006. Aerosol scattering, hemispheric backscattering and absorption-coefficients were measured for particles with diameters dp<10μm and dp<1μm using integrating nephelometers and filter-based absorption photometers (PSAPs) at 60% RH (nephelometers). Submicrometric light scattering coefficient was measured at two additional humidities, ca. 25%, and 85% RH. Together with the 60% RH data, this enabled determination of the effect of aerosol hygroscopic growth on light scattering and an empirical light scattering growth factor. The results are relevant to radiation transfer, visibility, air quality, and interpretation of remote sensing data from lidar and satellite. The extensive and intensive optical properties along with meteorological analysis are used to characterize the aerosol in the Houston, TX region and the Coastal Gulf of Mexico and to provide information critical to understanding the climatic and air quality impacts of those aerosols. Further analysis focuses on the changes that these properties undergo during chemical processing of emissions within the project area and how they are affected by changes in atmospheric relative humidity that accompany transport, diurnal cycles and vertical mixing. The results are classified by source region and flow regime of the sampled air masses to identify distinct aerosol populations. Special emphasis is given to the physico-chemical properties of aerosols measured during two periods when Saharan dust was encountered during the cruise as well as to several air pollution episodes and plumes from industrial complexes. The combination of hygroscopic growth, light scattering and absorption

  10. Determination of nocturnal aerosol properties from a combination of lunar photometer and lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Donghui; Li, Zhengqiang; Lv, Yang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Kaitao; Xu, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Aerosol plays a key role in the assessment of global climate change and environmental health, while observation is one of important way to deepen the understanding of aerosol properties. In this study, the newly instrument - lunar photometer is used to measure moonlight and nocturnal column aerosol optical depth (AOD, τ) is retrieved. The AOD algorithm is test and verified with sun photometer both in high and low aerosol loading. Ångström exponent (α) and fine/coarse mode AOD (τf, τc) 1 is derived from spectral AOD. The column aerosol properties (τ, α, τf, τc) inferred from the lunar photometer is analyzed based on two month measurement in Beijing. Micro-pulse lidar has advantages in retrieval of aerosol vertical distribution, especially in night. However, the typical solution of lidar equation needs lidar ratio(ratio of aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient) assumed in advance(Fernald method), or constrained by AOD2. Yet lidar ratio is varied with aerosol type and not easy to fixed, and AOD is used of daylight measurement, which is not authentic when aerosol loading is different from day and night. In this paper, the nocturnal AOD measurement from lunar photometer combined with mie scattering lidar observations to inverse aerosol extinction coefficient(σ) profile in Beijing is discussed.

  11. Aerosol optical properties in the southeastern United States in summer - Part 2: Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth to relative humidity and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Markovic, M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    Aircraft observations of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties were made between May and September 2013. Regionally representative aggregate vertical profiles of median and interdecile ranges of the measured parameters were constructed from 37 individual aircraft profiles made in the afternoon when a well-mixed boundary layer with typical fair-weather cumulus was present (Wagner et al., 2015). We use these 0-4 km aggregate profiles and a simple model to calculate the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) to changes in dry aerosol mass, relative humidity, mixed layer height, the central diameter and width of the particle size distribution, hygroscopicity, and dry and wet refractive index, while holding the other parameters constant. The calculated sensitivity is a result of both the intrinsic sensitivity and the observed range of variation of these parameters. These observationally based sensitivity studies indicate that the relationship between AOD and dry aerosol mass in these conditions in the southeastern US can be highly variable and is especially sensitive to relative humidity (RH). For example, calculated AOD ranged from 0.137 to 0.305 as the RH was varied between the 10th and 90th percentile profiles with dry aerosol mass held constant. Calculated AOD was somewhat less sensitive to aerosol hygroscopicity, mean size, and geometric standard deviation, σg. However, some chemistry-climate models prescribe values of σg substantially larger than we or others observe, leading to potential high biases in model-calculated AOD of ~ 25 %. Finally, AOD was least sensitive to observed variations in dry and wet aerosol refractive index and to changes in the height of the well-mixed surface layer. We expect these findings to be applicable to other moderately polluted and background continental airmasses in which an accumulation mode between 0.1-0.5 μm diameter dominates aerosol extinction.

  12. Aerosol optical properties in the southeastern United States in summer - Part 2: Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth to relative humidity and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Wagner, Nicholas L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gordon, Timothy D.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Lack, Daniel A.; Liao, Jin; Markovic, Milos Z.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Perring, Anne E.; Richardson, Matthews S.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Welti, Andre; Ziemba, Luke D.; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2016-04-01

    Aircraft observations of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties were made between May and September 2013 in the southeastern United States (US). Regionally representative aggregate vertical profiles of median and interdecile ranges of the measured parameters were constructed from 37 individual aircraft profiles made in the afternoon when a well-mixed boundary layer with typical fair-weather cumulus was present (Wagner et al., 2015). We use these 0-4 km aggregate profiles and a simple model to calculate the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) to changes in dry aerosol mass, relative humidity, mixed-layer height, the central diameter and width of the particle size distribution, hygroscopicity, and dry and wet refractive index, while holding the other parameters constant. The calculated sensitivity is a result of both the intrinsic sensitivity and the observed range of variation in these parameters. These observationally based sensitivity studies indicate that the relationship between AOD and dry aerosol mass in these conditions in the southeastern US can be highly variable and is especially sensitive to relative humidity (RH). For example, calculated AOD ranged from 0.137 to 0.305 as the RH was varied between the 10th and 90th percentile profiles with dry aerosol mass held constant. Calculated AOD was somewhat less sensitive to aerosol hygroscopicity, mean size, and geometric standard deviation, σg. However, some chemistry-climate models prescribe values of σg substantially larger than we or others observe, leading to potential high biases in model-calculated AOD of ˜ 25 %. Finally, AOD was least sensitive to observed variations in dry and wet aerosol refractive index and to changes in the height of the well-mixed surface layer. We expect these findings to be applicable to other moderately polluted and background continental air masses in which an accumulation mode between 0.1-0.5 µm diameter dominates aerosol extinction.

  13. Cloud Nucleating Properties of Aerosols During TexAQS - GoMACCS 2006: Influence of Aerosol Sources, Composition, and Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Coffman, D. J.; Covert, D. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Alllan, J. D.; Worsnop, D.

    2006-12-01

    TexAQS - GoMACCS 2006 was conducted from July to September 2006 in the Gulf of Mexico and Houston Ship Channel to investigate sources and processing of gas and particulate phase species and to determine their impact on regional air quality and climate. As part of the experiment, the NOAA R.V. Ronald H. Brown transited from Charleston, S.C. to the study region. The ship was equipped with a full compliment of gas and aerosol instruments. To determine the cloud nucleating properties of aerosols, measurements were made of the aerosol number size distribution, aerosol chemical composition, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration at five supersaturations. During the transit and over the course of the experiment, a wide range of aerosol sources and types was encountered. These included urban and industrial emissions from the S.E. U.S. as the ship left Charleston, a mixture of Saharan dust and marine aerosol during the transit around Florida and across the Gulf of Mexico, urban emissions from Houston, and emissions from the petrochemical industries, oil platforms, and marine vessels in the Gulf coast region. Highest activation ratios (ratio of CCN to total particle number concentration at 0.4 percent supersaturation) were measured in anthropogenic air masses when the aerosol was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate salts and in marine air masses with an aerosol composed of sulfate and sea salt. A strong gradient in activation ratio was measured as the ship moved from the Gulf of Mexico to the end of the Houston Ship Channel (values decreasing from about 0.8 to less than 0.1) and the aerosol changed from marine to industrial. The activation ratio under these different regimes in addition to downwind of marine vessels and oil platforms will be discussed in the context of the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition. The discussion of composition will include the organic mass fraction of the aerosol, the degree of oxidation of the organics, and the water

  14. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Cloud Properties During the MILAGRO Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knobelspiesse, K.; Cairns, B.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Stohl, A.

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of Direct Climate Forcing (DCF) due to aerosols in cloudy areas has historically been a difficult task, mainly because of a lack of appropriate measurements. Recently, passive remote sensing instruments have been developed that have the potential to retrieve both cloud and aerosol properties using polarimetric, multiple view angle, and multi spectral observations, and therefore determine DCF from aerosols above clouds. One such instrument is the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), an airborne prototype of a sensor on the NASA Glory satellite, which unfortunately failed to reach orbit during its launch in March of 2011. In the spring of 2006, the RSP was deployed on an aircraft based in Veracruz, Mexico, as part of the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field campaign. On 13 March, the RSP over flew an aerosol layer lofted above a low altitude marine stratocumulus cloud close to shore in the Gulf of Mexico. We investigate the feasibility of retrieving aerosol properties over clouds using these data. Our approach is to first determine cloud droplet size distribution using the angular location of the cloud bow and other features in the polarized reflectance. The selected cloud was then used in a multiple scattering radiative transfer model optimization to determine the aerosol optical properties and fine tune the cloud size distribution. In this scene, we were able to retrieve aerosol optical depth, the fine mode aerosol size distribution parameters and the cloud droplet size distribution parameters to a degree of accuracy required for climate modeling. This required assumptions about the aerosol vertical distribution and the optical properties of the coarse aerosol size mode. A sensitivity study was also performed to place this study in the context of future systematic scanning polarimeter observations, which found that the aerosol complex refractive index can also be observed accurately if the aerosol optical depth is

  15. Methacrylic resin having a high solar radiant energy absorbing property and process for producing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Kamada, K.; Nakai, Y.

    1981-10-20

    A methacrylic resin having a high solar radiant energy absorbing property wherein an organic compound (A) containing cupric ion and a compound (B) having at least one p-o-h bond in a molecule are contained into the methacrylic resin selected from poly(Methyl methacrylate) or methacrylic polymers containing at least 50% by weight of a methyl methacrylate unit. A process for producing said methacrylic resin is also disclosed.

  16. Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffet, Ryan Christopher

    Knowledge of aerosol physical, chemical, optical properties is essential for judging the effect that particulates have on human health, climate and visibility. The aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) is capable of measuring, in real-time, the size and chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols. This was exemplified by the recent deployments of the ATOFMS to Mexico City and Riverside. The ATOFMS provided rapid information about the major particle types present in the atmosphere. Industrial sources of particles, such as fine mode particles containing lead, zinc and chloride were detected in Mexico City. The rapid time response of the ATOFMS was also exploited to characterize a coarse particle concentrator used in human health effects studies. The ATOFMS showed the ability to detect changes in particle composition with a time resolution of 15 min during short 2 hour human exposure studies. As a major component of this work, an optical measurement has been added to the ATOFMS. The scattered light intensity was acquired for each sized and chemically analyzed particle. This scattering information together with the particle aerodynamic diameter, enabled the refractive index and density of the aerosol to be retrieved. This method was validated in the laboratory using different test particles such as oils, aqueous salt solutions and black carbon particles. It was found that the nozzle-type inlet does not evaporate aqueous salt particles as has been observed for aerodynamic lens inlets. These new optical and microphysical measurements were integrated into the ATOFMS for field deployment in Riverside and Mexico City. For both cities, the different mixing states were found to have unique refractive indexes and densities. A fraction of the strongly absorbing elemental carbon particles were observed to have a spherical morphology due to heavy mixing with secondary species. In addition to the quantitative refractive index and effective density measurements

  17. An investigation into particle shape effects on the light scattering properties of mineral dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meland, Brian Steven

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. The radiative balance of the Earth's atmosphere can be affected by mineral dust through both direct and indirect means. Mineral dust can directly scatter or absorb incoming visible solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial IR radiation. Dust particles can also serve as cloud condensation nuclei, thereby increasing albedo, or provide sites for heterogeneous reactions with trace gas species, which are indirect effects. Unfortunately, many of these processes are poorly understood due to incomplete knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the particles including dust concentration and global distribution, as well as aerosol composition, mixing state, and size and shape distributions. Much of the information about mineral dust aerosol loading and spatial distribution is obtained from remote sensing measurements which often rely on measuring the scattering or absorption of light from these particles and are thus subject to errors arising from an incomplete understanding of the scattering processes. The light scattering properties of several key mineral components of atmospheric dust have been measured at three different wavelengths in the visible. In addition, measurements of the scattering were performed for several authentic mineral dust aerosols, including Saharan sand, diatomaceous earth, Iowa loess soil, and palagonite. These samples include particles that are highly irregular in shape. Using known optical constants along with measured size distributions, simulations of the light scattering process were performed using both Mie and T-Matrix theories. Particle shapes were approximated as a distribution of spheroids for the T-Matrix calculations. It was found that the theoretical model simulations differed markedly from experimental measurements of the light scattering, particularly near the mid-range and near backscattering angles. In

  18. Aerosol particle properties in a South American megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulke, Ana; Torres-Brizuela, Marcela; Raga, Graciela; Baumgardner, Darrel; Cancelada, Marcela

    2015-04-01

    The subtropical city of Buenos Aires is located on the western shore of Río de la Plata, on the southeastern coast of Argentina. It is the second largest metropolitan area in South America, with a population density of around 14 thousand people per km2. When all 24 counties of the Great Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area are included it is the third-largest conurbation in Latin America, with a population of around fifteen million inhabitants. The generalized worldwide trend to concentrate human activities in urban regions that continue to expand in area, threatens the local and regional environment. Air pollution in the Buenos Aires airshed is due to local sources (mainly the mobile sources, followed by the electric power plants and some industries) and to distant sources (like biomass burning, dust, marine aerosols and occasionally volcanic ash) whose products arrive in the city area due to the regional transport patterns. Previous research suggests that ambient aerosol particle concentrations should be considered an air quality problem. A field campaign was conducted in Buenos Aires in 2011 in order to characterize some aerosol particles properties measured for the first time in the city. Measurements began in mid- April and continued until December. The field observations were done in a collaborative effort between the Universities of Mexico (UNAM) and Buenos Aires (UBA). A suite of instruments was installed on the roof of an UBA laboratory and classroom buildings (34.54° S, 58.44° W) at an altitude of approximately 30 m above sea level. The measurements included the number concentration of condensation nuclei (CN) larger than approximately 50 nm, the mass concentration of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH), the scattering (Bscat) and absorption (Babs) coefficients at 550 nm and the vertical profiles of backscattered light from aerosols at a wavelength of 910 nm using a ceilometer. In addition, a weather station recorded the meteorological

  19. Study of aerosol radiative properties under different relative humidity conditions in the thermal infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. P.; Yang, P.; Nasiri, S. L.; Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    In the aerosol transport process, the optical properties of aerosol particles can vary due to humidification or mixing with other kinds of aerosols. Previous studies have shown mixing dust with other types of aerosol tends to make the aerosol more spectrally absorptive, but the degree of impact of relative humidity (RH) along the transport path is not clear. To investigate this effect, we conduct a numerical study to estimate the radiative sensitivity of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Specifically, the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) database is used, which provides the optical properties (i.e., the extinction, scattering and absorption coefficient, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and phase function) of ten types of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Lookup tables (LUTs) of the bidirectional reflectivity, transmissivity and effective emissivity will be computed for the ten aerosol types for input to the high-spectral-resolution radiative transfer model (HRTM). Using these LUTs, the HTRM can calculate top-of-atmospheric brightness temperatures, which we can use to determine the degree of radiative sensitivity in the infrared spectral region. Furthermore, comparisons between simulations and MODIS observations will be presented.

  20. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  1. A comprehensive climatology of Arctic aerosol properties on the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, Jessie; de Boer, Gijs; Shupe, Matthew; McComiskey, Allison

    2016-04-01

    Evaluating aerosol properties has implications for the formation of Arctic clouds, resulting in impacts on cloud lifetime, precipitation processes, and radiative forcing. There are many remaining uncertainties and large discrepancies regarding modeled and observed Arctic aerosol properties, illustrating the need for more detailed observations to improve simulations of Arctic aerosol and more generally, projections of the components of the aerosol-driven processes that impact sea ice loss/gain. In particular, the sources and climatic effects of Arctic aerosol particles are severely understudied. Here, we present a comprehensive, long-term record of aerosol observations from the North Slope of Alaska baseline site at Barrow. These measurements include sub- and supermicron (up to 10 μm) total mass and number concentrations, sub- and supermicron soluble inorganic and organic ion concentrations, submicron metal concentrations, submicron particle size distributions, and sub- and supermicron absorption and scattering properties. Aerosol extinction and number concentration measurements extend back to 1976, while the remaining measurements were implemented since. Corroboration between the chemical, physical, and optical property measurements is evident during periods of overlapping observations, demonstrating the reliability of the measurements. During the Arctic Haze in the winter/spring, high concentrations of long-range transported submicron sea salt, mineral dust, industrial metals, pollution (non-sea salt sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), and biomass burning species are observed concurrent with higher concentrations of particles with sizes that span the submicron range, enhanced absorption and scattering coefficients, and largest Ångström exponents. The summer is characterized by high concentrations of small biogenic aerosols (< 100 nm) and low extinction coefficients. Fall is characterized by clean conditions, with supermicron sea salt representing the dominant aerosol

  2. Dependence of the spectral surface irradiance on aerosol properties and surface reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Kaufman, Y.; Podolak, M.; Ungar, S.

    1980-01-01

    A reduction in global surface irradiance occurs with increasing aerosol loadings when the aerosols are absorbing. For scattering aerosols, a reduction is pronounced for isotropic scattering (characteristic of small particles) but reduction is not as significant for scattering with a high anisotropy of a large forward peak (characteristic of large particles). This distinction between isotropic and anisotropic scattering becomes small or null over highly reflecting terrain; and for reflectivities higher than 0.5 and solar elevation angles close to the zenith, the global irradiance can be slightly higher for isotropic scattering than in the case of an anisotropy of a forward peak. Under such conditions, which can be encountered in reflective infrared bands over dense vegetation or over sandy deserts (close to noon, in low latitudes) the surface irradiance becomes nearly independent of the aerosol optical thickness.

  3. Appearance of strong absorbers and fluorophores in limonene-O3 secondary organic aerosol due to NH4+-mediated chemical aging over long time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, David L.; Henricksen, Dana K.; Mang, Stephen A.; Gonsior, Michael; Bateman, Adam P.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Cooper, William J.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated long-term chemical aging of model biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) prepared from the ozonolysis of terpenes. Techniques including electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, NMR, and three-dimensional fluorescence were used to probe the changes in chemical composition of SOA collected by impaction on substrates and also of aqueous extracts of SOA. The addition of ammonium ions or amino acids to limonene SOA reproducibly produced orange-colored species that strongly absorbed visible radiation and fluoresced at UV and visible wavelengths. Simultaneous addition of H2SO4 to the SOA aqueous extracts inhibited this color transformation. These observations suggest the existence of aging processes leading to heavily conjugated molecules containing organic nitrogen. The presence of nitrogen in the chromophores was confirmed by the dependence of the absorption and fluorescence spectra on the amino acids added. In contrast to the strong change in the absorption and fluorescence spectra, there was no significant change in the ESI-MS, FTIR, and NMR spectra, suggesting that the chromophores were minor species in the aged SOA. Aqueous extracts of aged limonene + NH4+ SOA were characterized by an effective base-e absorption coefficient of ˜3 L g-1 cm-1 at 500 nm. Assuming particulate matter concentrations typical of polluted rural air gives an upper limit of 0.2 M m-1 for the aerosol absorption coefficient due to the aged limonene oxidation products. Biogenic SOA can therefore become weakly absorbing if they undergo aging in the presence of NH4+-containing aerosol.

  4. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions. PMID:26257345

  5. An Analysis of AERONET Aerosol Absorption Properties and Classifications Representative of Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Smirnov, Alexander; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (tau) and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0) ) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption [i.e., omega (sub 0) and absorption Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub abs))] and size [i.e., extinction Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub ext)) and fine mode fraction of tau] relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to: (1) determine the average omega (sub 0) and alpha(sub abs) at each site (expanding upon previous work); (2) perform a sensitivity study on alpha(sub abs) by varying the spectral omega (sub 0); and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral omega (sub 0) averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < delta omega (sub 0) <= 0.02 decrease) than in previous work and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of alpha(sub abs) show significant overlap among aerosol type categories and at least 10% of the alpha(sub abs) retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral omega (sub 0) by +/- 0.03 induces significant alpha(sub abs) changes from the unperturbed value by at least approx. +/- 0.6 for Dust, approx. +/-0.2 for Mixed, and approx. +/-0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The omega (sub 0)440nm and alpha(sub ext) 440-870nm relationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  6. Quantitative retrieval of aerosol optical properties by means of ceilometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegner, Matthias; Gasteiger, Josef; Geiß, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years extended networks of ceilometers have been established by several national weather services. Based on improvements of the hardware performance of these single-wavelength backscatter lidars and their 24/7 availability they are increasingly used to monitor mixing layer heights and to derive profiles of the particle backscatter profile. As a consequence they are used for a wide range of applications including the dispersion of volcanic ash plumes, validation of chemistry transport models and air quality studies. In this context the development of automated schemes to detect aerosol layers and to identify the mixing layer are essential, in particular as the latter is often used as a proxy for air quality. Of equal importance is the calibration of ceilometer signals as a pre-requisite to derive quantitative optical properties. Recently, it has been emphasized that the majority of ceilometers are influenced by water vapor absorption as they operate in the spectral range of 905 - 910 nm. If this effect is ignored, errors of the aerosol backscatter coefficient can be as large as 50%, depending on the atmospheric water vapor content and the emitted wavelength spectrum. As a consequence, any other derived quantity, e.g. the extinction coefficient or mass concentration, would suffer from a significant uncertainty in addition to the inherent errors of the inversion of the lidar equation itself. This can be crucial when ceilometer derived profiles shall be used to validate transport models. In this presentation, the methodology proposed by Wiegner and Gasteiger (2015) to correct for water vapor absorption is introduced and discussed.

  7. Microwave absorbability of unidirectional SiC fiber composites as a function of the constituents’ properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Guangchao; Jiang, Jianjun; He, Yun; Bie, Shaowei

    2016-06-01

    The electromagnetic properties of unidirectional SiC fibre composites can be efficiently tailored by adjusting the properties of the composite’s constituents making these composites potential microwave absorbers. In this study, the microwave absorbing properties of unidirectional SiC fibre composites were investigated based on the electromagnetic properties of the constituents at frequencies ranging from 8 to 18 GHz. The composite was composed of two types of SiC fibres that individually exhibit relatively high and low electrical conductivity. The matrix together with the low-conductivity SiC fibres were characterized by effective permittivity and conductivity which provided a theoretical calculation of the microwave reflectivity. The theoretical calculation was based on formulas about anisotropic unidirectional composites and was compared to the results obtained from numerical simulations. There was good agreement in the results obtained from both methods. It was found that the intensity of microwave absorption of the composite was dependent primarily on the properties of the high-conductivity SiC fibres. The absorption band appeared to be dependent on the effective permittivity of the matrix and the low-conductivity SiC fibres and the conductivity of the high-conductivity SiC fibres.

  8. The Investigation of Property of Radiation and Absorbed of Infrared Lights of the Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Bo; Xiao, He-Lan; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2010-04-01

    The properties of absorption of infrared light for collagen, hemoglobin, bivine serum albumen (BSA) protein molecules with α- helix structure and water in the living systems as well as the infrared transmission spectra for person’s skins and finger hands of human body in the region of 400-4000 cm-1 (i.e., wavelengths of 2-20 μm) have been collected and determined by using a Nicolet Nexus 670 FT-IR Spectrometer, a Perkin Elmer GX FT-IR spectrometer, an OMA (optical multichannel analysis) and an infrared probe systems, respectively. The experimental results obtained show that the protein molecules and water can all absorb the infrared lights in the ranges of 600-1900 cm-1 and 2900-3900 cm-l, but their properties of absorption are somewhat different due to distinctions of their structure and conformation and molecular weight. We know from the transmission spectra of person’s finger hands and skin that the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm can not only transmit over the person’s skin and finger hands, but also be absorbed by the above proteins and water in the living systems. Thus, we can conclude from this study that the human beings and animals can absorb the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm.

  9. Absorption and scattering properties of organic carbon vs. sulfate dominant aerosols at Gosan climate observatory in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Lee, M.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Lee, G.; Lee, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonaceous and soluble ionic species of PM1.0 and PM10 were measured along with the absorption and scattering properties and aerosol number size distributions at Gosan climate observatory (GCO) from January to September 2008. The daily averaged equivalent black carbon (EBC) measured as aerosol absorption exhibited two types of spectral dependence with a distinct maximum (peak) at either 370 nm or 880 nm, by which two subsets were extracted and classified into the respective groups (370 nm and 880 nm). The 370 nm group was distinguished by high organic carbon (OC) concentrations relative to elemental carbon (EC) and sulfate, but sulfate was predominant for the 880 nm group. The PM1.0 OC of the 370 nm group was mainly composed of refractory and pyrolized components that correlated well with PM1.0 EC1, referred to as char EC, which suggests biofuel and biomass combustion as the source of these OC fractions, particularly during winter. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and the number size distributions implied that aerosols of the 370 nm group were externally mixed upon transport in fast-moving air masses that passed through the Beijing area in about one day. In contrast, the aerosols of the 880 nm group were characterized by high sulfate concentrations, and seemed to be internally mixed during slow transport over the Yellow Sea region over approximately two to four days. The absorption and scattering coefficients of the 880 nm group were noticeably higher compared to those of the 370 nm group. The average absorption ångström exponent (AAE) was estimated to be 1.29 and 1.0 for the 370 nm and 880 nm groups, respectively, in the range 370-950 nm. These results demonstrated that the optical properties of aerosols were intimately linked to chemical composition and mixing state, characteristics determined both by source and atmospheric aging processes. In OC dominant aerosols, absorption was enhanced in the UV region, which was possibly due to refractory and

  10. Absorption and scattering properties of organic carbon versus sulfate dominant aerosols at Gosan climate observatory in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Lee, M.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Lee, G.; Lee, Y. J.

    2014-08-01

    Carbonaceous and soluble ionic species of PM1.0 and PM10 were measured along with the absorption and scattering properties and aerosol number size distributions at Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO) from January to September 2008. The daily averaged equivalent black carbon (EBC) measured as aerosol absorption exhibited two types of spectral dependence with a distinct maximum (peak) at either 370 nm or 880 nm, by which two subsets were extracted and classified into the respective groups (370 and 880 nm). The 370 nm group was distinguished by high organic carbon (OC) concentrations relative to elemental carbon (EC) and sulfate, but sulfate was predominant for the 880 nm group. The PM1.0 OC of the 370 nm group was mainly composed of refractory and pyrolized components that correlated well with PM1.0 EC1, referred to as char EC, which suggests biofuel and biomass combustion as the source of these OC fractions, particularly during winter. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and the number size distributions implied that aerosols of the 370 nm group were externally mixed upon transport in fast-moving air masses that passed through the Beijing area in about one day. In contrast, the aerosols of the 880 nm group were characterized by high sulfate concentrations, and seemed to be internally mixed during slow transport over the Yellow Sea region over approximately 2 to 4 days. The absorption and scattering coefficients of the 880 nm group were noticeably higher compared to those of the 370 nm group. The average absorption ångström exponent (AAE) was estimated to be 1.29 and 1.0 for the 370 and 880 nm groups, respectively, in the range 370-950 nm. These results demonstrated that the optical properties of aerosols were intimately linked to chemical composition and mixing state, characteristics determined both by source and atmospheric aging processes. In OC dominant aerosols, absorption was enhanced in the UV region, which was possibly due to refractory and pyrolized

  11. Baseline Maritime Aerosol: Methodology to Derive the Optical Thickness and Scattering Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite Measurements of the global distribution of aerosol and their effect on climate should be viewed in respect to a baseline aerosol. In this concept, concentration of fine mode aerosol particles is elevated above the baseline by man-made activities (smoke or urban pollution), while coarse mode by natural processes (e.g. dust or sea-spray). Using 1-3 years of measurements in 10 stations of the Aerosol Robotic network (ACRONET we develop a methodology and derive the optical thickness and properties of this baseline aerosol for the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Defined as the median for periods of stable optical thickness (standard deviation < 0.02) during 2-6 days, the median baseline aerosol optical thickness over the Pacific Ocean is 0.052 at 500 am with Angstrom exponent of 0.77, and 0.071 and 1.1 respectively, over the Atlantic Ocean.

  12. Analysis of aerosol properties derived from sun photometer and lidar over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Xiuqing

    2016-05-01

    Duhuang site has been selected as China Radiation Calibration Site (CRCS) for Remote Sensing Satellite Sensors since 1996. With the economic development of Dunhuang city, the ambient of the radiation calibration field has changed in recent years. Taking into account the key role of aerosol in radiometric calibration, it is essential to investigate the aerosol optical properties over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site. In this paper, the CIMEL sun photometer (CE-318) and Mie-scattering Lidar are simultaneously used to measure aerosol optical properties in Dunhuang site. Data from aerosol-bands of sun photometer are used in a Langley method to determine spectral optical depths of aerosol. And Lidar is utilized to obtain information of vertical profile and integrated aerosol optical depths at different heights. The results showed that the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm wavelength during the in-situ measurement campaigns varied from 0.1 to 0.3 in Dunhuang site. And the observation results also indicated that high aerosol concentration layer mostly located at the height of about 2~4 km. These results implies that the aerosol concentration of atmosphere in Dunhuang was relatively small and suitable for in-flight calibration for remote sensing satellite sensors.

  13. Microwave absorbing properties of hollow microspheres plated with magnetic metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Tae; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2014-05-01

    Conductive and magnetic microspheres are fabricated through the electroless plating of Co, Co-10%Fe, Ni, and Ni-15%Fe films on hollow microspheres (cenospheres), and their high frequency electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties are investigated in the composite specimens. The electroless plating of the metal films is conducted using a two-step process of surface sensitizing and metal plating. For the microspheres coated with the Co and Co-10%Fe films, impedance matching is not satisfied at all frequencies due to the small values of magnetic loss and dielectric constant. For the Ni-plated microsphere composites, the dielectric constant is too high to satisfy the impedance matching, which results in a small value of microwave absorbance. For the Ni-15%Fe thin film composite with appropriate magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity, the impedance matching is satisfied in the GHz frequency and a lower value of reflection loss is predicted.

  14. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate in potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative Forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting, future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects. TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites, as illustrated in Figure 1. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux chances, or radiative forcing, from the satellite-measured radiances or 'etrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key Initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle and high latitudes.

  15. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, Robert A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate In potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols, Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects, TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux changes, or radiative forcing, from the satellite measured radiances or retrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent, ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle latitudes.

  16. Physico-chemical properties of aerosols in Sao Paulo, Brazil and mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Varanda Rizzo, Luciana; Luiza Godoy, Maria; Godoy, Jose Marcus

    2013-04-01

    Megacities emissions are increasingly becoming a global issue, where emissions from the transportation sector play an increasingly important role. Sao Paulo is a megacity with a population of about 18 million people, 7 million cars and large-scale industrial emissions. As a result of the vehicular and industrial emissions, the air quality in Sao Paulo is bellow WMO standards for aerosol particles and ozone. Many uncertainties are found on gas- and particulate matter vehicular emission factors and their following atmospheric processes, e.g. secondary organic aerosol formation. Due to the uniqueness of the vehicular fuel in Brazil, largely based on ethanol use, such characterization currently holds further uncertainties. To improve the understanding of the role of this unique emission characteristics, we are running a source apportionment study in Sao Paulo focused on the mechanisms of organic aerosol formation. One of the goals of this study is a quantitative aerosol source apportionment focused on vehicular emissions, including ethanol and gasohol (both fuels used by light-duty vehicles). This study comprises four sampling sites with continuous measurements for one year, where trace elements and organic aerosol are being measured for PM2.5 and PM10 along with real-time NOx, O3, PM10 and CO measurements. Aerosol optical properties and size distribution are being measured on a rotation basis between sampling stations. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to measure in real time VOCs and aerosol composition, respectively. Trace elements were measured using XRF and OC/EC analysis was determined with a Sunset OC/EC instrument. A TSI Nephelometer with 3 wavelengths measure light scattering and a MAAP measure black carbon. Results show aerosol number concentrations ranging between 10,000 and 35,000 cm-3, mostly concentrated in the nucleation and Aitken modes, with a peak in size at 80

  17. A closure study of aerosol optical properties at a regional background mountainous site in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Xiao, Hui; Yu, Xingna; Hao, Jian; Chen, Kui; Liu, Chao

    2016-04-15

    There is a large uncertainty in evaluating the radiative forcing from aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions due to the limited knowledge on aerosol properties. In-situ measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were carried out in 2012 at Mt. Huang (the Yellow Mountain), a continental background mountainous site in eastern China. An aerosol optical closure study was performed to verify the model outputs by using the measured aerosol optical properties, in which a spherical Mie model with assumptions of external and core-shell mixtures on the basis of a two-component optical aerosol model and high size-segregated element carbon (EC) ratio was applied. Although the spherical Mie model would underestimate the real scattering with increasing particle diameters, excellent agreement between the calculated and measured values was achieved with correlation coefficients above 0.98. Sensitivity experiments showed that the EC ratio had a negligible effect on the calculated scattering coefficient, but largely influenced the calculated absorption coefficient. The high size-segregated EC ratio averaged over the study period in the closure was enough to reconstruct the aerosol absorption coefficient in the Mie model, indicating EC size resolution was more important than time resolution in retrieving the absorption coefficient in the model. The uncertainties of calculated scattering and absorption coefficients due to the uncertainties of measurements and model assumptions yielded by a Monte Carlo simulation were ±6% and ±14% for external mixture and ±9% and ±31% for core-shell mixture, respectively. This study provided an insight into the inherent relationship between aerosol optical properties and physicochemical characteristics in eastern China, which could supplement the database of aerosol optical properties for background sites in eastern China and provide a method for regions with similar climate. PMID:26851881

  18. Comparison of Aerosol Properties within and above the ABL at the ARM Program's SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Monache, L.D.; Perry, K.D.; Cederwall, R.T.

    2002-02-26

    The goal of this study was to determine under what conditions, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth's surface are representative of the aerosol properties within the column of air above the surface. This project used data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site (Stokes and Schwartz 1994), which is one of the only locations in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements of atmospheric aerosol are made on a routine basis. All flight legs in the one-year period from March 2000 to March 2001 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) using an objective mixing height determination technique. The correlations between the aerosol properties measured at the surface and those measured within and above the ABL were then computed. The conclusion of this comparison is that the aerosol extensive properties (those that depend upon the amount of aerosol that is present in the atmosphere, i.e., either the number or mass concentrations), and intensive properties (those that do not depend upon the amount of aerosol present) measured at the surface are representative of values within the ABL, but not within the free atmosphere.

  19. Mount St. Helens related aerosol properties from solar extinction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Kleckner, E.W.; Stokes, G.M.

    1980-11-01

    The optical extinction due to the introduction of aerosols and aerosol-precursors into the troposphere and stratosphere during the major eruptive phase of Mount St. Helens, Washington, is quantified. The concentration is on the two-week period centered on the major eruption of 22 July 1980. (ACR)

  20. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical and Hygroscopic Properties at the Look Rock Site during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.; Corrigan, A. L.; Guzman, J. M.; Russell, L. M.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Li, X.; Surratt, J. D.; Hicks, W.; Bairai, S. T.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    One of the main goals of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) is to characterize the climate-relevant properties of aerosols over the southeastern United States at the interface of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions. As part of the SOAS campaign, the UCD cavity ringdown/photoacoustic spectrometer was deployed to make in-situ measurements of aerosol light extinction, absorption and sub-saturated hygroscopicity at the Look Rock site (LRK) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The site is influenced by substantial biogenic emissions with varying impacts from anthropogenic pollutants, allowing for direct examination of the optical and hygroscopic properties of anthropogenic-influenced biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA). During the experiment period, the average dry aerosol extinction (Bext), absorption (Babs) coefficients and single scattering albedo (SSA) at 532 nm were 30.3 × 16.5 Mm-1, 1.12 × 0.78 Mm-1 and 0.96 × 0.06. The Babs at 532 nm was well correlated (r2 = 0.79) with the refractory black carbon (rBC) number concentration determined by a single particle soot spectrometer (SP2). The absorption by black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC) and the absorption enhancement due to the 'lensing' effect were quantified by comparing the Babs of ambient and thermo-denuded aerosols at 405 nm and 532 nm. The optical sub-saturated hygroscopic growth factor was derived from extinction and particle size distribution measurements at dry and elevated relative humidity. In addition, to explore the extent to which ammonia mediated chemistry leads to BrC formation, as suggested in recent laboratory studies(1,2), we performed an NH3 perturbation experiment in-situ for 1 week during the study, in which ambient aerosols were exposed to approximately 100 ppb NH3 with a residence time of ~ 3hr. The broader implications of these observational data at LRK will be discussed in the context of the concurrent gas and aerosol chemical

  1. Global Aerosol Optical Models and Lookup Tables for the New MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Loraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Since 2000, MODIS has been deriving aerosol properties over land from MODIS observed spectral reflectance, by matching the observed reflectance with that simulated for selected aerosol optical models, aerosol loadings, wavelengths and geometrical conditions (that are contained in a lookup table or 'LUT'). Validation exercises have showed that MODIS tends to under-predict aerosol optical depth (tau) in cases of large tau (tau greater than 1.0), signaling errors in the assumed aerosol optical properties. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from the hundreds of global AERONET sunphotometer sites, we found that three spherical-derived models (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol), and one spheroid-derived model (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally described the range of observed global aerosol properties. The fine dominated models were separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (omega(sub 0)), ranging from non-absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to neutrally absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We determined the dominant model type in each region and season, to create a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid of assumed aerosol type. We used vector radiative transfer code to create a new LUT, simulating the four aerosol models, in four MODIS channels. Independent AERONET observations of spectral tau agree with the new models, indicating that the new models are suitable for use by the MODIS aerosol retrieval.

  2. Comparison of Aerosol Properties Within and Above the ABL at the ARM Program's SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Delle Monache, L

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine under what conditions, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth's surface are representative of aerosol properties within the column of air above the surface. This thesis will use data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) which is the only location in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements are made on a routine basis. All flight legs in the one-year period from March 2000-March 2001 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer using an objective mixing height determination technique. The correlations between the aerosol properties measured at the surface and the measured within and above the ABL were then computed. The conclusion of this comparison is that the aerosol extensive and intensive properties measured at the surface are representative of values within the ABL, but not within the free atmosphere.

  3. The XMM-Newton Bright Survey sample of absorbed quasars: X-ray and accretion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballo, L.; Severgnini, P.; Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Vignali, C.; Carrera, F. J.; Corral, A.; Mateos, S.

    2014-11-01

    Although absorbed quasars are extremely important for our understanding of the energetics of the Universe, the main physical parameters of their central engines are still poorly known. In this work, we present and study a complete sample of 14 quasars (QSOs) that are absorbed in the X-rays (column density NH > 4 × 1021 cm-2 and X-ray luminosity L 2-10 keV > 1044 ergs-1; XQSO2) belonging to the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey (XBS). From the analysis of their ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution, we can separate the nuclear emission from the host galaxy contribution, obtaining a measurement of the fundamental nuclear parameters, like the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the value of Eddington ratio, λ Edd. Comparing the properties of XQSO2s with those previously obtained for the X-ray unabsorbed QSOs in the XBS, we do not find any evidence that the two samples are drawn from different populations. In particular, the two samples span the same range in Eddington ratios, up to λ Edd ˜ 0.5; this implies that our XQSO2s populate the `forbidden region' in the so-called `effective Eddington limit paradigm'. A combination of low grain abundance, presence of stars inwards of the absorber, and/or anisotropy of the disc emission can explain this result.

  4. An AeroCom Initial Assessment - Optical Properties in Aerosol Component Modules of Global Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.; Textor, C.; Guibert, S.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Berglen, T.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, H.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Grini, A.; Hendricks, J.; Herzog, M.; Horrowitz, L.; Isaksen, I.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Kloster, S.; Koch, D.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Krol, M.; Lauer, A.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lesins, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, U.; Montanaro, V.; Myhre, G.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tie, X.

    2006-05-29

    The AeroCom exercise diagnoses multi-component aerosol modules in global modeling. In an initial assessment global fields for mass and for mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (aot) were compared among aerosol component modules of 21 different global models. There is general agreement among models for the annual global mean of component combined aot. At 0.12 to 0.14, simulated aot values are at the lower end of global averages suggested by remote sensing from ground (AERONET ca 0.14) and space (MODIS-MISR composite ca 0.16). More detailed comparisons, however, reveal that larger differences in regional distribution and significant differences in compositional mixture have remained. Of particular concern is the large model diversity for contributions by dust and carbon, because it leads to significant uncertainty in aerosol absorption (aab). Since not only aot but also aab influence the aerosol impact on the radiative energy-balance, aerosol (direct) forcing uncertainty in modeling is larger than differences in aot might suggest. New diagnostic approaches are proposed to trace model differences in terms of aerosol processing and transport: These include the prescription of common input (e.g. amount, size and injection of aerosol component emissions) and the use of observational capabilities from ground (e.g. measurements networks) and space (e.g. correlations between retrieved aerosol and cloud properties).

  5. Aerosol optical properties over the midcontinental United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Markham, Brian L.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Aro, Theo. O.

    1992-01-01

    Solar and sky radiation measurements were analyzed to obtain aerosol properties such as the optical thickness and the size distribution. The measurements were conducted as part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment during the second intensive field campaign (IFC) from June 25 to July 14, 1987, and the fifth IFC from July 25 to August 12, 1989, on the Konza Prairie near Manhattan, Kansas. Correlations with climatological and meteorological parameters show that during the period of observations in 1987, two types of air masses dominated the area: an air mass with low optical thickness and low temperature air associated with a northerly breeze, commonly referred to as the continental air, and an air mass with a higher optical thickness and higher temperature air associated with a southerly wind which we call 'Gulf air'. The size distributions show a predominance of the larger size particles in 'Gulf air'. Because of the presence of two contrasting air masses, correlations with parameters such as relative humidity, specific humidity, pressure, temperature, and North Star sky radiance reveal some interesting aspects. In 1989, clear distinctions between continental and Gulf air cannot be made; the reason for this will be discussed.

  6. Ground-based remote sensing of aerosol climatology in China: Aerosol optical properties, direct radiative effect and its parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, X.; Che, H.; Zhu, J.; Chen, H.; Cong, Z.; Deng, X.; Fan, X.; Fu, Y.; Goloub, P.; Jiang, H.; Liu, Q.; Mai, B.; Wang, P.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal variation of aerosol optical properties and aerosol direct radiative effects (ADRE) are studied based on high quality aerosol data at 21 sunphotometer stations with at least 4-months worth of measurements in China mainland and Hong Kong. A parameterization is proposed to describe the relationship of ADREs to aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD) and single scattering albedo at 550 nm (SSA). In the middle-east and south China, the maximum AOD is always observed in the burning season, indicating a significant contribution of biomass burning to AOD. Dust aerosols contribute to AOD significantly in spring and their influence decreases from the source regions to the downwind regions. The occurrence frequencies of background level AOD (AOD < 0.10) in the middle-east, south and northwest China are very limited (0.4%, 1.3% and 2.8%, respectively). However, it is 15.7% in north China. Atmosphere is pristine in the Tibetan Plateau where 92.0% of AODs are <0.10. Regional mean SSAs at 550 nm are 0.89-0.90, although SSAs show substantial site and season dependence. ADREs at the top and bottom of the atmosphere for solar zenith angle of 60 ± 5° are -16--37 W m-2 and -66--111 W m-2, respectively. ADRE efficiency shows slight regional dependence. AOD and SSA together account for more than 94 and 87% of ADRE variability at the bottom and top of the atmosphere. The overall picture of ADRE in China is that aerosols cool the climate system, reduce surface solar radiation and heat the atmosphere.

  7. Nanotribological properties of water films adsorbing atop, and absorbing below, graphene layers supported by metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zijian; Curtis, C. K.; Stine, R.; Sheehan, P.; Krim, J.

    The tribological properties of graphite, a common lubricant with known sensitivity to the presence of water, have been studied extensively at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. Although far less attention has been devoted to the tribological properties of graphene, it has been established that the tribological response to the presence of water is dissimilar from that of graphite. We report here a quartz crystal microbalance study of the nanotribological properties of water films adsorbed/absorbed on graphene layers prepared by either chemical decomposition on nickel(111) substrates or transfer of freestanding graphene layers to aluminum substrates. Sliding friction levels of the water films were also measured for metal surfaces in the absence of a graphene layer. We observe very high friction levels for water adsorbed atop graphene on Ni(111) and very low levels for water on aluminum. For the case of graphene/aluminum, the data indicate that the water is absorbing between the graphene layer and the aluminum. Dissipation levels moreover indicate the presence of an interstitial water increases sliding friction between the graphene and the aluminum substrate Work supported by NSF and NRL.

  8. Use of stratospheric aerosol properties as diagnostics of Antarctic vortex processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Poole, Lamont R.

    1993-01-01

    Physical properties of the stratospheric aerosol population are inferred from cloud-free SAGE II multiwavelength extinction measurements in the Antarctic during late summer (February/March) and spring (September/October, November). Seasonal changes in these properties are used to infer physical processes occurring in the Antarctic stratosphere over the course of the winter. The analysis suggests that the apparent springtime cleansing of the Antarctic stratosphere is the result of aerosol redistribution through subsidence of the polar vortex air mass and sedimentation of large polar stratospheric cloud particles. The analysis also suggests that vortex processes are responsible for a significant downward transport of aerosol through the tropopause.

  9. Model analysis of influences of aerosol mixing state upon its optical properties in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Xu, Liren

    2013-07-01

    The air quality model system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality) coupled with an aerosol optical/radiative module was applied to investigate the impact of different aerosol mixing states (i.e., externally mixed, half externally and half internally mixed, and internally mixed) on radiative forcing in East Asia. The simulation results show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) generally increased when the aerosol mixing state changed from externally mixed to internally mixed, while the single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased. Therefore, the scattering and absorption properties of aerosols can be significantly affected by the change of aerosol mixing states. Comparison of simulated and observed SSAs at five AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites suggests that SSA could be better estimated by considering aerosol particles to be internally mixed. Model analysis indicates that the impact of aerosol mixing state upon aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is complex. Generally, the cooling effect of aerosols over East Asia are enhanced in the northern part of East Asia (Northern China, Korean peninsula, and the surrounding area of Japan) and are reduced in the southern part of East Asia (Sichuan Basin and Southeast China) by internal mixing process, and the variation range can reach ±5 W m-2. The analysis shows that the internal mixing between inorganic salt and dust is likely the main reason that the cooling effect strengthens. Conversely, the internal mixture of anthropogenic aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon, could obviously weaken the cooling effect.

  10. Global volcanic aerosol properties derived from emissions, 1990-2014, using CESM1(WACCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Michael J.; Schmidt, Anja; Easter, Richard; Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Ghan, Steven J.; Neely, Ryan R.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Conley, Andrew; Bardeen, Charles G.; Gettelman, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Accurate representation of global stratospheric aerosols from volcanic and nonvolcanic sulfur emissions is key to understanding the cooling effects and ozone losses that may be linked to volcanic activity. Attribution of climate variability to volcanic activity is of particular interest in relation to the post-2000 slowing in the rate of global average temperature increases. We have compiled a database of volcanic SO2 emissions and plume altitudes for eruptions from 1990 to 2014 and developed a new prognostic capability for simulating stratospheric sulfate aerosols in the Community Earth System Model. We used these combined with other nonvolcanic emissions of sulfur sources to reconstruct global aerosol properties from 1990 to 2014. Our calculations show remarkable agreement with ground-based lidar observations of stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD) and with in situ measurements of stratospheric aerosol surface area density (SAD). These properties are key parameters in calculating the radiative and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols. Our SAOD calculations represent a clear improvement over available satellite-based analyses, which generally ignore aerosol extinction below 15 km, a region that can contain the vast majority of stratospheric aerosol extinction at middle and high latitudes. Our SAD calculations greatly improve on that provided for the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative, which misses about 60% of the SAD measured in situ on average during both volcanically active and volcanically quiescent periods.

  11. A study of aerosol properties over Lahore (Pakistan) by using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muhammad; Tariq, Salman; Mahmood, Khalid; Daud, Asim; Batool, Adila; Zia-ul-Haq

    2014-02-01

    It is well established that aerosols affect the climate in a variety of ways. In order to understand these effects, we require an insight into the properties of aerosols. In this paper we present a study of aerosol properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) over mega city of Lahore (Pakistan). The data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) have been used for the period December 2009 to October 2011. The seasonal average values of AOD, asymmetry parameter (ASY) and volume size distribution in coarse mode were observed to be highest in summer. On the other hand, the average values of Angstrom exponent (AE) and imaginary part of refractive index (RI) were found to be maximum in winter. The average value of real part of RI was found to be higher in spring than in all other seasons. The SSA exhibited an increasing trend with wavelength in the range 440 nm-1020 nm in spring, summer and fall indicating the dominance of coarse particles (usually dust). However, a decreasing trend was found in winter in the range 675 nm-1020 nm pointing towards the dominance of biomass and urban/industrial aerosols. As far as aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) is concerned, we have found that during the spring season ARF was lowest at the surface of Earth and highest at top of the atmosphere (TOA). This indicates that the atmosphere was warmer in spring than in all the remaining seasons.

  12. Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties ofBiomass Burn Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Lewis, K.; Desyaterik, Yury; Wang, Z.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Arnott, W.P.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, M.K.

    2008-01-29

    Aerosols generated from burning different plant fuels were characterized to determine relationships between chemical, optical and physical properties. Single scattering albedo ({omega}) and Angstrom absorption coefficients ({alpha}{sub ap}) were measured using a photoacoustic technique combined with a reciprocal nephelometer. Carbon-to-oxygen atomic ratios, sp{sup 2} hybridization, elemental composition and morphology of individual particles were measured using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion of X-rays (SEM/EDX). Particles were grouped into three categories based on sp2 hybridization and chemical composition. Measured {omega} (0.4-1.0 at 405 nm) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0-3.5) values displayed a fuel dependence. The category with sp{sup 2} hybridization >80% had values of {omega} (<0.5) and {alpha}{sub ap} ({approx}1.25) characteristic of light absorbing soot. Other categories with lower sp2 hybridization (20 to 60%) exhibited higher {omega} (>0.8) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0 to 3.5) values, indicating increased absorption spectral selectivity.

  13. Correlations between optical, chemical and physical properties of biomass burn aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, R. J.; Lewis, K.; Desyaterik, Y.; Wang, Z.; Tivanski, A. V.; Arnott, W. P.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2007-09-01

    Aerosols generated from burning different plant fuels were characterized to determine relationships between chemical, optical and physical properties. Single scattering albedo (ω) and Angstrom absorption coefficients (α ap) were measured using a photoacoustic technique combined with a reciprocal nephelometer. Carbon-to-oxygen atomic ratios, sp2 hybridization, elemental composition and morphology of individual particles were measured using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion of X-rays (SEM/EDX). Particles were grouped into three categories based on sp2 hybridization and chemical composition. Measured ω (0.4 - 1.0 at 405 nm) and α ap (1.0 - 3.5) values displayed a fuel dependence. The category with sp2 hybridization >80% had values of ω (<0.5) and α ap (~1.25) characteristic of light absorbing soot. Other categories with lower sp2 hybridization (20 to 60%) exhibited higher ω (>0.8) and α ap (1.0 to 3.5) values, indicating increased absorption spectral selectivity.

  14. Use of the NASA GEOS-5 SEAC4RS Meteorological and Aerosol Reanalysis for assessing simulated aerosol optical properties as a function of smoke age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Buchard, V.; Govindaraju, R.; Chen, G.; Hair, J. W.; Russell, P. B.; Shinozuka, Y.; Wagner, N.; Lack, D.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model, which includes an online aerosol module, provided chemical and weather forecasts during the SEAC4RS field campaign. For post-mission analysis, we have produced a high resolution (25 km) meteorological and aerosol reanalysis for the entire campaign period. In addition to the full meteorological observing system used for routine NWP, we assimilate 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from MODIS (both Aqua and Terra satellites), ground-based AERONET sun photometers, and the MISR instrument (over bright surfaces only). Daily biomass burning emissions of CO, CO2, SO2, and aerosols are derived from MODIS fire radiative power retrievals. We have also introduced novel smoke "age" tracers, which provide, for a given time, a snapshot histogram of the age of simulated smoke aerosol. Because GEOS-5 assimilates remotely sensed AOD data, it generally reproduces observed (column) AOD compared to, for example, the airborne 4-STAR instrument. Constraining AOD, however, does not imply a good representation of either the vertical profile or the aerosol microphysical properties (e.g., composition, absorption). We do find a reasonable vertical structure for aerosols is attained in the model, provided actual smoke injection heights are not much above the planetary boundary layer, as verified with observations from DIAL/HRSL aboard the DC8. The translation of the simulated aerosol microphysical properties to total column AOD, needed in the aerosol assimilation step, is based on prescribed mass extinction efficiencies that depend on wavelength, composition, and relative humidity. Here we also evaluate the performance of the simulated aerosol speciation by examining in situ retrievals of aerosol absorption/single scattering albedo and scattering growth factor (f(RH)) from the LARGE and AOP suite of instruments. Putting these comparisons in the context of smoke age as diagnosed by the model helps us to

  15. Analysis of the chemical and physical properties of combustion aerosols: Properties overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. Combustion aerosols can comprise tens of thousands of organic compounds and fragments, refractory carbon, metals, cations, anions, salts, and other inorganic phases and substituents [Hays et al., 2004]. Aerosol organic matter no...

  16. Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-11-01

    Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

  17. Climatology and Characteristics of In-situ Aerosol Optical Properties in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Ogren, J. A.; Sharma, S.; Asmi, E.; Bergin, M. H.; Jefferson, A.; Andrews, E.; Tunved, P.; Backman, J.; Starkweather, S.

    2015-12-01

    Within the Arctic, climate forcers like atmospheric aerosols are important contributors to the observed warming and environmental changes in the region. Quantifying the forcing by aerosols in the Arctic is especially difficult, given short aerosol lifetimes, annual variability in illumination and surface albedo, stratified atmospheric conditions, complex feedbacks, and long-range aerosol transport. However, in-situ surface measurements of Arctic aerosol optical properties can be used to constrain variability of light scattering and absorption, identify potential particle sources, and help evaluate the resulting forcing. Data from six WMO Global Atmosphere Watch stations are presented: Alert, Canada (ALT); Barrow, Alaska (BRW); Pallas, Finland (PAL); Summit, Greenland (SUM); Tiksi, Russia (TIK); and Zeppelin Mountain, Norway (ZEP). These sites contribute to the International Arctic System for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA), which facilitates Arctic-wide data collection and analysis. Climatologies of aerosol optical properties from each station show differences in magnitude and variability of observed parameters. For example, Figure 1 presents the annual cycle of aerosol light scattering at 550 nm at each site for 2012-2014, with most stations (ALT, BRW, TIK, ZEP) experiencing maximum scattering in winter/spring, while SUM and PAL exhibit minimum scattering in the winter. The observed range in scattering across these sites is large (almost an order of magnitude) - SUM has the lowest annual median scattering at 0.82 Mm-1 while BRW has the highest at 6.9 Mm-1. A closer look at systematic variability between optical properties at each station, as well as site back trajectories, suggest differences in aerosol processes, sources and transport. The development of consistent climatologies and additional analyses like the ones presented here can help provide a better understanding of trans-Arctic aerosol variability, which can be an asset for improving aerosol models in

  18. Global volcanic aerosol properties derived from emissions, 1990-2015, using CESM1(WACCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Michael; Schmidt, Anja; Easter, Richard; Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Douglas; Ghan, Steven; Neely, Ryan; Marsh, Daniel; Conley, Andrew; Bardeen, Charles; Gettelman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Accurate representation of global stratospheric aerosols from volcanic and non-volcanic sulfur emissions is key to understanding the cooling effects and ozone-losses that may be linked to volcanic activity. Attribution of climate variability to volcanic activity is of particular interest in relation to the post-2000 slowing in the rate of global average temperature increases. We have compiled a database of volcanic SO2 emissions and plume altitudes for eruptions from 1990 to 2015, and developed a new prognostic capability for simulating stratospheric sulfate aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We combined these with other non-volcanic emissions of sulfur sources to reconstruct global aerosol properties from 1990 to 2015. Our calculations show remarkable agreement with ground-based lidar observations of stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD), and with in situ measurements of stratospheric aerosol surface area density (SAD). These properties are key parameters in calculating the radiative and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols. Our SAOD calculations represent a clear improvement over available satellite-based analyses, which generally ignore aerosol extinction below 15 km, a region that can contain the vast majority of stratospheric aerosol extinction at mid- and high-latitudes. Our SAD calculations greatly improve on that provided for the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative, which misses about 60% of the SAD measured in situ on average during both volcanically active and volcanically quiescent periods. The stark differences in SAOD and SAD compared to other data sets will have significant effects on calculations of the radiative forcing of climate and global stratospheric chemistry over the period 2005-2015. In light of these results, the impact of volcanic aerosols in reducing the rate of global average temperature increases since the year 2000 should be revisited. We have made our calculated aerosol properties from January 1990 to

  19. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties Performed at CNR- IMAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, L.; Amodeo, A.; Cornacchia, C.; D'Amico, G.; Madonna, F.; Pandolfi, M.; Pappalardo, G.

    2005-12-01

    The lidar system for tropospheric aerosol study, located at CNR-IMAA in Tito Scalo, Potenza (40 °36'N, 15°44' E, 760 m above sea level), is a Raman/elastic lidar system operational since May 2000 in the framework of EARLINET (European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork), the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol study on continental scale. It provides independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles at 355 nm and aerosol backscatter profiles at 532 nm. Both the IMAA aerosol lidar system and the used algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol optical parameters have been successfully tested with different intercomparison exercises in the frame of the EARLINET quality assurance program. In the frame of EARLINET, regular measurements are performed three times per week, allowing to study the aerosol content typically present in the planetary boundary layer over Potenza. Particular attention is devoted to Saharan dust intrusions in Europe, and Saharan dust forecasts are distributed to all EARLINET stations. The large dataset of Saharan dust optical properties profiles collected at IMAA allowed to study the contribution of dust particles to the aerosol load typically present in our area as well as to investigate transformations of aerosol optical properties during the transport. Several intensive measurement campaigns have been performed at IMAA with this system to study optical properties of different types of aerosol, and how the transport and modification mechanisms and the water content affect these optical properties. In particular, direct transport of volcanic aerosol emitted in 2002 during the Etna eruptions was observed, and in summer 2004, aerosol layers related to forest fires smoke or pollution plume transported from Alaska, Canada and North America were observed at IMAA during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) field campaign. Moreover, this system has been used

  20. Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Profiles and Optical Properties during INDOEX 1999 Using Micro-Pulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.; Gordon, Howard R.; Johnson, James E.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-pulse lidar systems (MPL) were used to measure aerosol properties during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) 1999 field phase. Measurements were made from two platforms: the NOAA ship RN Ronald H. Brown, and the Kaashidhoo Climate Observatory (KCO) in the Maldives. Sunphotometers were used to provide aerosol optical depths (AOD) needed to calibrate the MPL. This study focuses on the height distribution and optical properties (at 523 nm) of aerosols observed during the campaign. The height of the highest aerosols (top height) was calculated and found to be below 4 km for most of the cruise. The marine boundary layer (MBL) top was calculated and found to be less than 1 km. MPL results were combined with air mass trajectories, radiosonde profiles of temperature and humidity, and aerosol concentration and optical measurements. Humidity varied from approximately 80% near the surface to 50% near the top height during the entire cruise. The average value and standard deviation of aerosol optical parameters were determined for characteristic air mass regimes. Marine aerosols in the absence of any continental influence were found to have an AOD of 0.05 +/- 0.03, an extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S-ratio) of 33 +/- 6 sr, and peak extinction values around 0.05/km (near the MBL top). The marine results are shown to be in agreement with previously measured and expected values. Polluted marine areas over the Indian Ocean, influenced by continental aerosols, had AOD values in excess of 0.2, S-ratios well above 40 sr, and peak extinction values approximately 0.20/km (near the MBL top). The polluted marine results are shown to be similar to previously published values for continental aerosols. Comparisons between MPL derived extinction near the ship (75 m) and extinction calculated at ship-level using scattering measured by a nephelometer and absorption using a PSAP were conducted. The comparisons indicated that the MPL algorithm (using a constant S-ratio throughout the

  1. Estimating absorbing black carbon and organic carbon optical properties from AERONET and MISR data over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Ramanathan, V.; Huang, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The radiative forcing due to carbonaceous aerosols is one of the largest source of uncertainties in global and regional climate change. Black carbon and organic carbon from biomass and fossil fuel are two major types of carbonaceous aerosols. In this study we use available ground based and satellite observations to infer the optical properties of black and organic carbon. NASA's AERONET and MISR data over East Asia provide the observational basis. We use the spectral variations in the observed aerosol extinction optical depth and absorption optical depth to categorize the optical properties including their mixing state with other aerosols such as dust and other inorganic aerosols. We create 8 different categories of aerosol mixtures: Dust, Biomass Burning, Fossil Fuel, Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Dust with Biomass Burning, Mixed Dust with Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Biomass Burning with Fossil Fuel, and Mixed Dust, Biomass Burning, with Fossil Fuel, over the following 6 regions of East Asia: Nepal, Gobi, North Industrial China, South Industrial China, Southeast Asia, and Korea/Japan. Our results are compared with independent surface observations over China using Aethalometers and Single Particle Soot Photometers.

  2. Inherent and Apparent Scattering Properties of Coated or Uncoated Spheres Embedded in an Absorbing Host Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, P.; Gao, B.-C.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Platnick, S.; Huang, H.-L.; Baum, B. A.; Hu, Y. X.; Winkler, D,; Tsay, S.-C.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The conventional Lorenz-Mie formalism is extended to the scattering process associated with a coated sphere embedded in an absorbing medium. It is shown that apparent and inherent scattering cross sections of a scattering particle, which are identical in the case of transparent host medium, are different if the host medium is absorptive. Here the inherent single-scattering properties are derived from the near-field information whereas the corresponding apparent counterparts are derived from the far-field asymptotic form of the scattered wave with scaling of host absorption that is assumed to be in an exponential form. The formality extinction and scattering efficiencies defined in the same manner as in the conventional sense can be unbounded. For a nonabsorptive particle embedded in an absorbing medium, the effect of host absorption on the phase matrix elements associated with polarization is significant. This effect, however, is largely reduced for strongly absorptive particles such as soot. For soot particles coated with water, the impurity can substantially reduce the single-scattering albedo of the particle if the size parameter is small. For water-coating soot and hollow ice spheres, it is shown that the phase matrix elements -P(sub 12)/P(sub 11) and P(sub 33)/P(sub 11) are unique if the shell is thin, as compared with the case for thick shell. Furthermore, the radiative transfer equation regarding a multidisperse particle system in an absorbing medium is discussed. It is illustrated that the conventional computation algorithms can be applied to solve the multiple scattering process if the scaled apparent single-scattering properties are applied.

  3. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  4. “Lidar Investigations of Aerosol, Cloud, and Boundary Layer Properties Over the ARM ACRF Sites”

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David

    2015-01-13

    Project goals; Characterize the aerosol and ice vertical distributions over the ARM NSA site, and in particular to discriminate between elevated aerosol layers and ice clouds in optically thin scattering layers; Characterize the water vapor and aerosol vertical distributions over the ARM Darwin site, how these distributions vary seasonally, and quantify the amount of water vapor and aerosol that is above the boundary layer; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds; and Use the high temporal Raman lidar data to continue to characterize the turbulence within the convective boundary layer and how the turbulence statistics (e.g., variance, skewness) is correlated with larger scale variables predicted by models.

  5. SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

  6. Improved aerosol radiative properties as a foundation for solar geoengineering risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Keith, D. W.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2016-07-01

    Side effects resulting from the deliberate injection of sulfate aerosols intended to partially offset climate change have motivated the investigation of alternatives, including solid aerosol materials. Sulfate aerosols warm the tropical tropopause layer, increasing the flux of water vapor into the stratosphere, accelerating ozone loss, and increasing radiative forcing. The high refractive index of some solid materials may lead to reduction in these risks. We present a new analysis of the scattering efficiency and absorption of a range of candidate solid aerosols. We utilize a comprehensive radiative transfer model driven by updated, physically consistent estimates of optical properties. We compute the potential increase in stratospheric water vapor and associated longwave radiative forcing. We find that the stratospheric heating calculated in this analysis indicates some materials to be substantially riskier than previous work. We also find that there are Earth-abundant materials that may reduce some principal known risks relative to sulfate aerosols.

  7. Optical Properties and Mixing State of Aerosols from Residential Wood Burning and Vehicle Emissions in Central and Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Cappa, C. D.; Collier, S.; Zhang, Q.; Williams, L. R.; Lee, A.; Abbatt, J.; Russell, L. M.; Liu, J.; Chen, C. L.; Betha, R.

    2015-12-01

    Light-absorbing materials such as black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) in atmospheric aerosols play important roles in regulating the earth's radiative budget and climate. However, the representations of BC and BrC in state-of-the-art climate models remain highly uncertain, in part due to the poor understanding of their microphysical and optical properties. Direct observations and characterizations of the mixing state and absorption enhancement of ambient aerosols could provide invaluable constraints for current model representations of aerosol radiative effects. Here, we will discuss results from measurements of aerosol light absorption and absorption enhancement (Eabs), using a thermodenuder-absorption method, made during two recent field studies in central and southern California. The winter study took place in Dec/Jan of 2014/2015 in Fresno, CA. This region is severely impacted by particulate matter from local and regional residential biomass burning. The summer study took place in July 2015 in Fontana, CA, a region ~80 km downwind of Los Angeles and strongly impacted by vehicular emissions, and thus provides a sharp contrast to the Fresno study. Eabs of BC particles due to the "lensing" effect from coatings to BC core and/or the presence of BrC will be quantified and compared between the two studies. Additionally, the chemical composition of bulk and the BC-containing particles are determined via a HR-ToF-AMS and a SP-AMS, respectively. Variations in the composition and mixing state of the ambient particles and how these affect the observed Eabs will be examined. The overall measurements suggest a relatively small role for lensing-induced absorption enhancements for ambient particles in these regions.

  8. Absorption and scattering properties of carbon nanohorn-based nanofluids for direct sunlight absorbers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the scattering and spectrally resolved absorption properties of nanofluids consisting in aqueous and glycol suspensions of single-wall carbon nanohorns. The characteristics of these nanofluids were evaluated in view of their use as sunlight absorber fluids in a solar device. The observed nanoparticle-induced differences in optical properties appeared promising, leading to a considerably higher sunlight absorption with respect to the pure base fluids. Scattered light was found to be not more than about 5% with respect to the total attenuation of light. Both these effects, together with the possible chemical functionalization of carbon nanohorns, make this new kind of nanofluids very interesting for increasing the overall efficiency of the sunlight exploiting device. PACS 78.40.Ri, 78.35.+c, 78.67.Bf, 88.40.fh, 88.40.fr, 81.05.U. PMID:21711795

  9. Some Technical Aspects of a CALIOP and MODIS Data Analysis that Examines Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties as a Function of Cloud Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    CALIOP shows stronger near-cloud changes in aerosol properties at higher cloud fractions. Cloud fraction variations explain a third of near-cloud changes in overall aerosol statistics. Cloud fraction and aerosol particle size distribution have a complex relationship.

  10. Aerosol optical properties at Lampedusa (Central Mediterranean) 1. Influence of transport and identification of different aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, G.; di Sarra, A.; Meloni, D.; Piacentino, S.; Chamard, P.

    2005-07-01

    Ångström exponent values. Particles originating from all sectors show a summer maximum in aerosol optical depth. The summer increase in optical depth for European aerosols is linked with an increment in the values of α that indicates an enhancement in the number of fine particles. The summer maximum of τ for African particles is associated with a weak reduction in theÅngström exponent, suggesting an increase in the total number of particles and a relatively more intense transport of large particles. The observations were classified according to the aerosol optical properties, and two main classes have been identified: desert dust and biomass burning/urban-industrial aerosols. Values of τ and α averaged over the whole observing period are 0.37 and 0.15 for desert dust, and 0.27 and 1.77 for urban-industrial/biomass burning aerosols. Lampedusa reveals a stronger influence of desert dust compared to other Mediterranean sites (mostly located on the coasts of Europe).

  11. Aerosol optical properties at Lampedusa (Central Mediterranean). 1. Influence of transport and identification of different aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, G.; di Sarra, A.; Meloni, D.; Piacentino, S.; Chamard, P.

    2006-03-01

    the meteorological patterns over the Mediterranean, the efficiency of the aerosol production mechanisms, and the variability of the particles' residence time produce a distinct seasonal cycle of aerosol optical depths and Ångström exponent values. Particles originating from all sectors show a summer maximum in aerosol optical depth. The summer increase in optical depth for European aerosols is linked with an increment in the values of α, that indicates an enhancement in the number of fine particles. The summer maximum of τ for African particles is associated with a weak reduction in the Ångström exponent, suggesting an increase in the total number of particles and a relatively more intense transport of large particles. The observations were classified according to the aerosol optical properties, and two main classes have been identified: desert dust and biomass burning/urban-industrial aerosols. Values of τ and α averaged over the whole observing period are 0.37 and 0.15 for desert dust, and 0.27 and 1.77 for urban-industrial/biomass burning aerosols.

  12. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing-based retrievals of aerosol composition require known or assumed relationships between aerosol optical properties and types. Most optically-based aerosol classification schemes apply some combination of the spectral dependence of aerosol light scattering and absorption-using the absorption and either scattering or extinction Angstrom exponents (AAE, SAE and EAE), along with single-scattering albedo (SSA). These schemes can differentiate between such aerosol types as dust, biomass burning, and urban/industrial but no such studies have been conducted in the SE U.S., where a large fraction of the background aerosol is a variable mixture of biogenic SOA, sulfates, and black carbon. In addition, AERONET retrievals of SSA are often highly uncertain due to low AOD in the region during most months. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Aerosol chemistry measured at AppalAIR is representative of the background SE U.S (Link et al. 2014) Dried aerosol light absorption and dried and humidified aerosol light scattering and hemispheric backscattering at 3 visible wavelengths and 2 particle size cuts (sub-1μm and sub-10μm) are measured continuously. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to the ratio of sulfate to organic aerosol(OA), as are SSA and AAE. SAE is a less sensitive indicator of fine-mode aerosol size than hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) and is more sensitive to fine-mode aerosol

  13. A satellite view of aerosols in the climate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Boucher, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are intricately linked to the climate system and to the hydrologic cycle. The net effect of aerosols is to cool the climate system by reflecting sunlight. Depending on their composition, aerosols can also absorb sunlight in the atmosphere, further cooling the surface but warming the atmosphere in the process. These effects of aerosols on the temperature profile, along with the role of aerosols as cloud condensation nuclei, impact the hydrologic cycle, through changes in cloud cover, cloud properties and precipitation. Unravelling these feedbacks is particularly difficult because aerosols take a multitude of shapes and forms, ranging from desert dust to urban pollution, and because aerosol concentrations vary strongly over time and space. To accurately study aerosol distribution and composition therefore requires continuous observations from satellites, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Increases in aerosol concentration and changes in their composition, driven by industrialization and an expanding population, may adversely affect the Earth's climate and water supply.

  14. Summary of the marine aerosol properties and thermal imager performance trial (MAPTIP). Professional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Leeuw, G. de; Eijik, A.M. van

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a 1993 field experiment entitled Marine Aerosol Properties and Thermal Imager Performance Trial (MAPTIP) conducted by NATO AC/243 Panel 04/RSG.8 and 04/RSG.5 in the Dutch coastal waters. Objectives were: to improve and validate vertical marine aerosol models by providing an extensive set of aerosol and meteorological measurements, within a coastal environment at different altitudes and for a range of meteorological conditions; make aerosol and meteorological observations in the first 10 m of the ocean surface with a view to extending existing aerosol models to incorporate near-surface effects; and to assess marine boundary layer effects on thermal Imaging systems. Aerosol and meteorological instruments, as well as thermal imagers and calibrated targets, were utilized. This network of instrumentation has provided a comprehensive database of aerosol size distribution profiles and relevant meteorological variables throughout the marine atmospheric boundary layer. Thermal imagery was included to provide ground truth for assessing the low-level propagation effects near the ocean surface. Measurements were made of atmospheric turbulence and refractivity effects in the IR and RF bands to assess the marine boundary layer effects on the degradation of thermal images. Calibrated targets at different altitudes were observed and these data will be used for development and validation of IRST models and IR ship signature models for determining the effects of marine-generated aerosols turbulence and meteorological profiles on their performance.

  15. Climatological Aspects of the Optical Properties of Fine/Coarse Mode Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Sinyuk, A.; Pinker, R. T.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Chatenet, B.; Li, Z.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S.N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Dubovik O.; O'Neill, N. T.; Smirnov, A.; Wang, P.; Xia, X.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol mixtures composed of coarse mode desert dust combined with fine mode combustion generated aerosols (from fossil fuel and biomass burning sources) were investigated at three locations that are in and/or downwind of major global aerosol emission source regions. Multiyear monitoring data at Aerosol Robotic Network sites in Beijing (central eastern China), Kanpur (Indo-Gangetic Plain, northern India), and Ilorin (Nigeria, Sudanian zone of West Africa) were utilized to study the climatological characteristics of aerosol optical properties. Multiyear climatological averages of spectral single scattering albedo (SSA) versus fine mode fraction (FMF) of aerosol optical depth at 675 nm at all three sites exhibited relatively linear trends up to 50% FMF. This suggests the possibility that external linear mixing of both fine and coarse mode components (weighted by FMF) dominates the SSA variation, where the SSA of each component remains relatively constant for this range of FMF only. However, it is likely that a combination of other factors is also involved in determining the dynamics of SSA as a function of FMF, such as fine mode particles adhering to coarse mode dust. The spectral variation of the climatological averaged aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) was nearly linear in logarithmic coordinates over the wavelength range of 440-870 nm for both the Kanpur and Ilorin sites. However, at two sites in China (Beijing and Xianghe), a distinct nonlinearity in spectral AAOD in logarithmic space was observed, suggesting the possibility of anomalously strong absorption in coarse mode aerosols increasing the 870 nm AAOD.

  16. Aerosol optical properties and types over the tropical urban region of Hyderabad, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Rani Sharma, Anu; Kvs, Badarinath; Kambezidis, H. D.

    India is densely populated, industrialized and in the recent years has witnessed an impressive economic development. Aerosols over and around India not only affect the Indian monsoon but also the global climate. The growing population coupled with revolution in industry has resulted in higher demands for energy and transport. With more and more urbanization the usage pattern of fossil and bio-fuels are leading to changes in aerosol properties, which may cause changes in precipitation and can decelerate the hydrological cycle. Over urban areas of India aerosol emissions from fossil fuels such as coal, petrol and diesel oil dominate. Further-more, the Indian subcontinent exhibits different land characteristics ranging from vegetated areas and forests to semiarid and arid environments and tall mountains. India experiences large seasonal climatic variations, which result in extreme temperatures, rainfall and relative humidity. These meteorological and climatic features introduce large variabilities in aerosol op-tical and physico-chemical characteristics at spatial and temporal scales. In the present study, seasonal variations in aerosol properties and types were analysed over tropical urban region of Hyderabad, India during October 2007-September 2008 using MICROTOPS II sun photometer measurements. Higher aerosol optical depth (AOD) values are observed in premonsoon, while the variability of the ˚ngstrüm exponent (α) seems to be more pronounced with higher values A in winter and premonsoon and lower in the monsoon periods. The AOD at 500 nm (AOD500 ) is very large over Hyderabad, varying from 0.46±0.17 in postmonsoon to 0.65±0.22 in premon-soon periods. A discrimination of the different aerosol types over Hyderabad is also attempted using values of AOD500 and α380-870. Such discrimination is rather difficult to interpret since a single aerosol type can partly be identified only under specific conditions (e.g. anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning or dust

  17. Aerosol chemical and optical properties over the Paris area within ESQUIF project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Vautard, R.; Chazette, P.; Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol chemical and optical properties are extensively investigated for the first time over the Paris Basin in July 2000 within the ESQUIF project. The measurement campaign offers an exceptional framework to evaluate the performances of the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE in simulating concentrations of gaseous and aerosol pollutants, as well as the aerosol-size distribution and composition in polluted urban environment against ground-based and airborne measurements. A detailed comparison of measured and simulated variables during the second half of July with particular focus on 19 and 31 pollution episodes reveals an overall good agreement for gas-species and aerosol components both at the ground level and along flight trajectories, and the absence of systematic biases in simulated meteorological variables such as wind speed, relative humidity and boundary layer height as computed by the MM5 model. A good consistency in ozone and NO concentrations demonstrates the ability of the model to reproduce fairly well the plume structure and location both on 19 and 31 July, despite an underestimation of the amplitude of ozone concentrations on 31 July. The spatial and vertical aerosol distributions are also examined by comparing simulated and observed lidar vertical profiles along flight trajectories on 31 July and confirmed the model capacity to simulate the plume characteristics. The comparison of observed and modeled aerosol components in the southwest suburb of Paris during the second half of July indicated that the aerosol composition is rather correctly reproduced, although the total aerosol mass is underestimated of about 20%. The simulated Parisian aerosol is dominated by primary particulate matter that accounts for anthropogenic and biogenic primary particles (40%) and inorganic aerosol fraction (40%) including nitrate (8%), sulfate (22%) and ammonium (10%). The secondary organic aerosols (SOA) represent 12% of the total aerosol mass, while the mineral dust

  18. Aerosol chemical and optical properties over the Paris area within ESQUIF project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Vautard, R.; Chazette, P.; Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.

    2006-08-01

    Aerosol chemical and optical properties are extensively investigated for the first time over the Paris Basin in July 2000 within the ESQUIF project. The measurement campaign offers an exceptional framework to evaluate the performances of the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE in simulating concentrations of gaseous and aerosol pollutants, as well as the aerosol-size distribution and composition in polluted urban environments against ground-based and airborne measurements. A detailed comparison of measured and simulated variables during the second half of July with particular focus on 19 and 31 pollution episodes reveals an overall good agreement for gas-species and aerosol components both at the ground level and along flight trajectories, and the absence of systematic biases in simulated meteorological variables such as wind speed, relative humidity and boundary layer height as computed by the MM5 model. A good consistency in ozone and NO concentrations demonstrates the ability of the model to reproduce the plume structure and location fairly well both on 19 and 31 July, despite an underestimation of the amplitude of ozone concentrations on 31 July. The spatial and vertical aerosol distributions are also examined by comparing simulated and observed lidar vertical profiles along flight trajectories on 31 July and confirm the model capacity to simulate the plume characteristics. The comparison of observed and modeled aerosol components in the southwest suburb of Paris during the second half of July indicates that the aerosol composition is rather correctly reproduced, although the total aerosol mass is underestimated by about 20%. The simulated Parisian aerosol is dominated by primary particulate matter that accounts for anthropogenic and biogenic primary particles (40%), and inorganic aerosol fraction (40%) including nitrate (8%), sulfate (22%) and ammonium (10%). The secondary organic aerosols (SOA) represent 12% of the total aerosol mass, while the mineral dust

  19. Hygroscopic Properties of Aircraft Engine Exhaust Aerosol Produced From Traditional and Alternative Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Chen, G.; Anderson, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Aircraft emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols constitute an important component of anthropogenic climate forcing, of which aerosol-cloud interactions remain poorly understood. It is currently thought that the ability of these aerosols to alter upper tropospheric cirrus cloud properties may produce radiative forcings many times larger than the impact of linear contrails alone and which may partially offset the impact of greenhouse gas emissions from aviation (Burkhardt and Karcher, Nature, 2011). Consequently, it is important to characterize the ability of these engine-emitted aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) to form clouds. While a number of studies in the literature have examined aerosol-cloud interactions for laboratory-generated soot or from aircraft engines burning traditional fuels, limited attention has been given to how switching to alternative jet fuels impacts the ability of engine-emitted aerosols to form clouds. The key to understanding these changes is the aerosol hygroscopicity. To address this need, the second NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX-II) was conducted in 2011 to examine the aerosol emissions from the NASA DC-8 under a variety of different engine power and fuel type conditions. Five fuel types were considered including traditional JP-8 fuel, synthetic Fischer-Tropsh (FT) fuel , sulfur-doped FT fuel (FTS) , hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuel, and a 50:50 blend of JP-8 with HRJ. Emissions were sampled from the DC-8 on the airport jetway at a distance of 145 meters downwind of the engine by a comprehensive suite of aerosol instrumentation that provided information on the aerosol concentration, size distribution, soot mass, and CCN activity. Concurrent measurements of carbon dioxide were used to account for plume dilution so that characteristic emissions indices could be determined. It is found that both engine power and fuel type significantly influence the hygroscopic properties of

  20. Ceilometer calibration for retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Kai, Kenji; Kawai, Kei; Nagai, Tomohiro; Sakai, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Batdorj, Dashdondog; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki

    2015-03-01

    Ceilometers are durable compact backscatter lidars widely used to detect cloud base height. They are also useful for measuring aerosols. We introduced a ceilometer (CL51) for observing dust in a source region in Mongolia. For retrieving aerosol profiles with a backscatter lidar, the molecular backscatter signal in the aerosol free heights or system constant of the lidar is required. Although the system constant of the ceilometer is calibrated by the manufacturer, it is not necessarily accurate enough for the aerosol retrieval. We determined a correction factor, which is defined as the ratio of true attenuated backscattering coefficient to the measured attenuated backscattering coefficient, for the CL51 ceilometer using a dual-wavelength Mie-scattering lidar in Tsukuba, Japan before moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, Mongolia. The correction factor determined by minimizing the difference between the ceilometer and lidar backscattering coefficients was approximately 1.2±0.1. Applying the correction to the CL51 signals, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) agreed well with the sky-radiometer AOD during the observation period (13-17 February 2013) in Tsukuba (9 ×10-3 of mean square error). After moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, however, the AOD observed with the CL51 (calibrated by the correction factor determined in Tsukuba) was approximately 60% of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun photometer AOD. The possible causes of the lower AOD results are as follows: (1) the limited height range of extinction integration (< 3 km); (2) change in the correction factor during the ceilometer transportation or with the window contamination in Mongolia. In both cases, on-site calibrations by dual-wavelength lidar are needed. As an alternative method, we showed that the backward inversion method was useful for retrieving extinction coefficients if the AOD was larger than 1.5. This retrieval method does not require the system constant and molecular backscatter signals

  1. Influence of air mass origin on aerosol properties at a remote Michigan forest site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanReken, T. M.; Mwaniki, G. R.; Wallace, H. W.; Pressley, S. N.; Erickson, M. H.; Jobson, B. T.; Lamb, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    The northern Great Lakes region of North America is a large, relatively pristine area. To date, there has only been limited study of the atmospheric aerosol in this region. During summer 2009, a detailed characterization of the atmospheric aerosol was conducted at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) as part of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX). Measurements included particle size distribution, water-soluble composition, and CCN activity. Aerosol properties were strongly dependent on the origin of the air masses reaching the site. For ∼60% of the study period, air was transported from sparsely populated regions to the northwest. During these times aerosol loadings were low, with mean number and volume concentrations of 1630 cm-3 and 1.91 μm3 cm-3, respectively. The aerosol during clean periods was dominated by organics, and exhibited low hygroscopicities (mean κ = 0.18 at s = 0.3%). When air was from more populated regions to the east and south (∼29% of the time), aerosol properties reflected a stronger anthropogenic influence, with 85% greater particle number concentrations, 2.5 times greater aerosol volume, six times more sulfate mass, and increased hygroscopicity (mean k = 0.24 at s = 0.3%). These trends are have the potential to influence forest-atmosphere interactions and should be targeted for future study.

  2. Aerosol Properties and Processes: A Path from Field and Laboratory Measurements to Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2007-07-01

    Aerosols exert a substantial influence on climate and climate change through a variety of complex mechanisms. Consequently there is a need to represent aerosol effects in global climate models, and models have begun to include representations of these effects. However, the treatment of aerosols in current global climate models is presently highly simplified, omitting many important processes and feedbacks. Consequently there is need for substantial improvement. Here we describe the U. S. Department of Energy strategy for improving the treatment of aerosol properties and processes in global climate models. The strategy begins with a foundation of field and laboratory measurements that provide the basis for modules of selected aerosol properties and processes. These modules are then integrated in regional aerosol models, which are evaluated by comparing with field measurements. Issues of scale are then addressed so that the modules can be applied to global aerosol models, which are evaluated by comparing with global satellite measurements. Finally, the validated set of modules are applied to global climate models for multi-century simulations. This strategy can be applied to successive generations of global climate models.

  3. Organic aggregate formation in aerosols and its impact on the physicochemical properties of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    Fatty acid salts and "humic" materials, found in abundance in atmospheric particles, are both anionic surfactants. Such materials are known to form organic aggregates or colloids in solution at very low aqueous concentrations. In a marine aerosol, micelle aggregates can form at a low fatty acid salt molality of ˜10 -3 m. In other types of atmospheric particles, such as biomass burning, biogenic, soil dust, and urban aerosols, "humic-like" materials exist in sufficient quantities to form micelle-like aggregates in solution. I show micelle formation limits the ability of surface-active organics in aerosols to reduce the surface tension of an atmospheric particle beyond about 10 dyne cm -1. A general phase diagram is presented for anionic surfactants to explain how surface-active organics can change the water uptake properties of atmospheric aerosols. Briefly such molecules can enhance and reduce water uptake by atmospheric aerosols at dry and humid conditions, respectively. This finding is consistent with a number of unexplained field and laboratory observations. Dry electron microscope images of atmospheric particles often indicate that organics may coat the surface of particles in the atmosphere. The surfactant phase diagram is used to trace the particle path back to ambient conditions in order to determine whether such coatings can exist on wet ambient aerosols. Finally, I qualitatively highlight how organic aggregate formation in aerosols may change the optical properties and chemical reactivity of atmospheric particles.

  4. Long term measurements of the estimated hygroscopic enhancement of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervo, Maxime; Sellegri, Karine; Pichon, Jean Marc; Roger, Jean Claude; Laj, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Water vapour has a major impact on aerosol optical properties, thus on the Radiative Forcing for aerosol-radiation interaction (RFari). However there is few studies measuring this impact over a large period. Optical properties of aerosols were measured at the GAW Puy de Dôme station (1465m) over a seven year period (2006-2012). The impact of hygroscopicity on aerosol optical properties was calculated over a two year period (2010-2011). The analysis of the spatial and temporal variability of the dry optical properties showed that while no long term trend was found, a clear seasonal and diurnal variation was observed on the extensive parameters (scattering, absorption). Scattering and absorption coefficients were highest during the warm season and daytime, in concordance with the seasonality and diurnal variation of the planetary boundary layer height reaching the site. Intensive parameters (single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, refractive index) did not show such a strong diurnal variability, but still indicated different values depending on the season. Both extensive and intensive optical parameters were sensitive to the air mass origin. A strong impact of hygroscopicity on aerosol optical properties was calculated, mainly on aerosol scattering, with a dependence on the aerosol type and the season. At 90% humidity, the scattering factor enhancement (fsca) was more than 4.4 for oceanic aerosol that have mixed with a pollution plume. Consequently, the aerosol radiative forcing was estimated to be 2.8 times higher at RH= 90% and 1.75 times higher at ambient RH when hygroscopic growth of the aerosol was considered. The hygroscopicity enhancement factor of the scattering coefficient was parameterized as a function of humidity and air mass type. To our knowledge, these results are one of the first presenting the impact of water vapour on the aerosol optical properties for a long period, and the first for a site at the border between the planetary boundary layer

  5. Chemical Composition and Cloud Condensation Nuclei Properties of Marine Aerosols during the 2005 Marine Stratus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Hudson, J.; Daum, P.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Alexander, L.; Jayne, J.; Hubbe, J.

    2006-12-01

    Marine aerosol chemical composition and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum were determined on board the DOE G1 aircraft during the Marine Stratus Experiment conducted over the coastal waters between Point Reyes National Seashore and Monterey Bay, California, in July 2005. Aerosol components, including sea-salt- (sodium, chloride, magnesium, methansulfonate) and terrestrial/pollution-derived (ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, organics, potassium, and calcium) were measured using the particle-into-liquid sampler-ion chromatography technique and an Aerodyne AMS at a time resolution of 4 min and 30 s, respectively, both covering the size range of ~0.08 to 1.5 micrometers. The CCN spectrum was determined at a 1-s time resolution covering a supersaturation range between 0.02% and 1%. The accumulation mode particle size- number distribution was measured using a passive cavity aerosol spectrometer probe; the cloud droplet size- number distribution was determined using a Cloud Aerosol Probe. During the campaign sulfate/organic aerosols were always present, sea-salt aerosols were observed on half of the flights, and no dust or biomass burning contribution was noted as calcium and potassium were always below their limits-of-detection. Based on CCN spectra and cloud droplet number concentrations, the typical supersaturation of the marine stratus clouds was ~0.06%, corresponding to a CCN critical diameter between 0.1 and 0.2 micrometer. This large critical diameter makes the aerosol chemical composition measured appropriate for investigating the CCN properties and marine stratus clouds. We note that while sea-salt aerosols and sulfate aerosols were most likely externally mixed, the ensemble exhibits similar CCN properties irrespective of the relative mass concentrations of these two types of aerosols, owing partly to the similar activation properties of NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 aerosols, and that sea-salt particles were larger but fewer, accounting for a small fraction of cloud

  6. Urban Aerosol Optical Properties Measurement by Elastic Counter-Look Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Boselli, A.; He, Y.; Sannino, A.; Song, C.; Spinelli, N.

    2016-06-01

    The new developed elastic lidar system utilizes two identical elastic lidars, in counter-look configuration, to measure aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficients without any hypotheses. Compared to elastic-Raman lidar and high spectral resolution lidar, the proposed counter-look elastic lidar can use low power eyesafe laser and all available wavelengths. With this prototype lidar system, urban aerosol optical properties and their spatial distribution have been directly measured, including backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and lidar ratio. The preliminary results show that the low cost and eye-safe counter-look configured elastic lidar system can be used to measure the aerosol optical properties distribution and give the hint of aerosol type.

  7. Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol from Residential Wood Burning in Fresno, CA: Results from 2013 NASA DISCOVER-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Zhang, Q.; Young, D. E.; Parworth, C.

    2015-12-01

    Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol were investigated at Fresno, CA from 13 January to 11 February, 2013 as part of the NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign. The light absorption spectra of water soluble organic aerosol in PM2.5 was measured using a UV/vis diode array detector (DAD) coupled with a particle into liquid sampler (PILS) that sampled downstream of a PM2.5 cyclone (URG). The PILS was also coupled with two ion chromatographs (IC) to measure inorganic and organic ionic species in PM2.5. In addition, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at the same site to measure size-resolved chemical composition of submicrometer aerosol (PM1) in real time during this study. Light absorption at 365 nm (Abs365), which is typically used as a proxy of water-soluble brown carbon (BrC), showed strong enhancement during night time and appeared to correlate well (r = 0.71) with biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) from residential wood burning for heating in the Fresno area. The tight correlations between Abs365 and biomass burning relevant tracers such as acetonitrile (r = 0.69), AMS-signature ions for phenolic compounds (r = 0.52-0.71), PAH (r = 0.74), and potassium (r = 0.67) further confirm that biomass burning contributed significantly to water soluble brown carbon during this study. The absorption angstrom exponent (Åa) values fitted between 300 and 700 nm wavelength were 3.3 ± 1.1, 2.0 ± 0.9 and 4.0 ± 0.8, respectively, in the morning, afternoon and nighttime, indicating that BrC is prevalent at night in Fresno during wintertime. However, there are also indications that small amount of BrC existed during the daytime as well, likely due to daytime wood burning and other sources such as the formation of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Finally, light absorption at 300 nm, 330 nm, and 390 nm were found to correlate tightly with BBOA, which indicate that biomass burning also emits

  8. Ultraviolet dust aerosol properties as observed by MARCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael J.; Todd Clancy, R.; Goguen, Jay D.; Malin, Michael C.; Cantor, Bruce A.

    2010-07-01

    Observations by the Mars Color Imager (MARCI) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) in two ultraviolet (UV, Bands 6 and 7; 258 nm, and 320 nm, respectively) and one visible (Band 1, 436 nm) channels of the 2007 planet encircling dust storm are combined with those made by the two Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) to better characterize the single scattering albedo (ω0) of martian dust aerosols. Exploiting the low contrast of the surface in the UV (and blue) as well as the reduced importance of surface reflectance under very dusty conditions, we utilize the sampling of photometric angles by the MARCI cross-track geometry to synthesize an analog of the classical Emergence Phase Function (EPF). This so-called "pseudo-EPF", used in conjunction with the "ground-truth" measurements provided by the MERs, is able to effectively isolate the effects of the dust ω0. The motivation for this approach is the elimination of a significant portion of the type of uncertainty involved in many previous radiative transfer analyses. Furthermore, we produce a self-consistent set of complex refractive indices (m=n+ik) through our use of an explicit microphysical representation of the aerosol scattering properties. Because of uncertainty in the exact size of the dust particles during the epoch of the observations, we consider two effective particle radii (reff) to cover the range anticipated from the literature: 1.6 and 1.8 μm. The resulting set of model-data comparisons, ω0, and m are presented along with an assessment of potential sources of error and uncertainty. Analysis of the Band 1 results is limited to ω0 as a "proof-of-concept" for our approach through a comparison to contemporaneous CRISM EPF results at 440 nm. The derived ω0 are: assuming reff=1.6μm-0.619-0.626,0.648, and 0.765, for Bands 6, 7, and 1, respectively; for reff=1.8μm-0.625-0.635,0.653,0.769, for the same band order. For either reff case, the total estimated error is 0.022, 0.019, and 0.010, again for

  9. Physical Properties of Weak MgII Absorbers at z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, R. S.; Charlton, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    Lynch et al. (ApJ submitted) surveyed 18 UVES/VLT quasar spectra, obtained from the ESO archive, to search for weak MgII λ λ doublets (defined to have Wr(2796) ≤ 0.3 Å ) in the redshift range 1.4 < z < 2.4, and found 9 such systems. The redshift path density dN/dz = 1.06 ± 0.12 is lower than that observed at z ˜ 1, suggesting that at z ˜ 2 we are studying weak absorbers before the peak epoch of their incidence. We present photoionization models of 9 systems at z ˜ 2 given by the Cloudy photoionization code (Ferland 2001). Similar models were discussed for 15 systems at z ˜ 1 in Rigby et al. (2001). They found that the systems are generally optically thin in neutral hydrogen and have near solar, or even supersolar metallicities. Many of the systems consist of two phases of gas, one that gives rise to low ionization MgII absorption, and one that gives rise to high ionization CIV absorption. Our results at z ˜ 2 are similar, with all of our systems likely exhibiting the same two-phase structure, and metallicities log Z⊙ ≥ -1.0. Although there are not as many weak MgII absorbers at z ˜ 2 than at z ˜ 1, their properties appear similar. This work was funded by the Nation Science Foundation grant NSF AST-07138 and by an NSF REU supplement.

  10. Aerosol Optical Properties in the Lower Troposphere During Summer Over New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman Radha, Radhakrishnan; Arya, Bhuwan Chandra; Misra, Sumith Kumar; Sharma, Chhemendra; Kumar, Arun; Shukla, Devesh Kumar; Jaswanth

    2016-06-01

    This work reports the variation in optical properties of aerosol in the boundary layer over the Delhi region during the summer season of the year 2014. The layering of aerosol particles in the shallow residual layer is observed in the night preceded by the hot days. The monitoring of this kind of layers in the lower troposphere is very important to study its long range transport.

  11. Beyond the Alphabet Soup: Molecular Properties of Aerosol Components Influence Optics. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Components within atmospheric aerosols exhibit almost every imaginable model of chemical bonding and physical diversity. The materials run the spectrum from crystalline to amorphous, covalent to ionic, and have varying viscosities, phase, and hygroscopicity. This seminar will focus on the molecular properties of materials that influence the optical behavior of aerosols. Special focus will be placed on the polarizability of materials, hygroscopic growth, and particle phase.

  12. Airborne in situ characterization of dry urban aerosol optical properties around complex topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targino, Admir Créso; Noone, Kevin J.

    2006-02-01

    In situ data from the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study—NARSTO were used to describe the aerosol optical properties in an urban area whose aerosol distribution is modified as the aerosols are advected over the surrounding topography. The data consist of measurements made with a nephelometer and absorption photometer onboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Pelican aircraft. The cases investigated in this study include vertical profiles flown over coastal sites as well as sites located along some important mountain ranges in southern California. The vertical distribution of the aerosol in the Los Angeles Basin showed a complex configuration, directly related with the local meteorological circulations and the surrounding topography. High spatial and temporal variability in air pollutant concentrations within a relatively small area was found, as indicated by the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficient data. The results suggest that in areas with such complex terrain, a high spatial resolution is required in order to adequately describe the aerosol optical quantities. Principal components analysis (PCA) has been applied to aerosol chemical samples in order to identify the major aerosol types in the Los Angeles Basin. The technique yielded four components that accounted for 78% of the variance in the data set. These were indicative of marine aerosols, urban aerosols, trace elements and secondary aerosol components of traffic emissions and agricultural activities. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer model has been employed to simulate the effects that different aerosol vertical profiles have on the attenuation of solar energy. The cases examined were selected using the results of the PCA and in situ data were used to describe the atmospheric optical properties in the model. These investigations comprise a number of sensitivity tests to evaluate the effects on the results of the location of the aerosol layers as well as

  13. Comparing the relationships between aerosol optical depth and cloud properties in observations and global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, Edward; Quaas, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols impact the climate both directly, through their interaction with radiation and indirectly, via their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying cloud properties. The influence of aerosols on cloud properties is highly uncertain. Many relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties have been observed using satellite data, but previous work has shown that some of these relationships are the product of the strong AOD-cloud fraction (CF) relationship. The confounding influence of local meteorology obscures the magnitude of any aerosol impact on CF, and so also the impact of aerosol on other cloud properties. For example, both AOD and CF are strongly influenced by relative humidity, which can generate a correlation between them. Previous studies have used reanalysis data to account for confounding meteorological variables. This requires knowledge of the relevant meteorological variables and is limited by the accuracy of the reanalysis data. Recent work has shown that by using the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) to mediate the AOD-CF relationship, the impact of relative humidity can be significantly reduced. This method removes the limitations imposed by the finite accuracy of reanalysis data. In this work we investigate the impact of the CDNC mediation on the AOD-CF relationship and on the relationship between AOD and other cloud properties in global atmospheric models. By comparing pre-industrial and present day runs, we investigate the success of the CDNC mediated AOD-CF relationship to predict the change in CF from the pre-industrial to the present day using only observations of the present day relationships between clouds and aerosol properties. This helps to determine whether the satellite-derived relationship provides a constraint on the aerosol indirect forcing due to changes in CF.

  14. The advanced characterization of aerosol properties from measurements of spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Benjamin; Toledano, Carlos; Dubovik, Oleg; Litvinov, Pavel; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Fuertes, David; Tanre, Didier; Goloub, Phillipe

    The main purpose of the work is to assess the potential of using spectral optical thickness measurement for characterizing aerosol properties. While the use of these measurements is limited to the characterization of aerosol loading in the atmosphere, several studies demonstrated that these observations could be used for deriving more detailed information about aerosol, such as size distribution (King et al. 1978) and for discriminating between the extinction of fine and coarse modes of aerosol (O’Neill 2003). In this study, we test the possibilities of using AERONET inversion (Dubovik and King 2000) for improving the interpretation of measurements of optical thickness. In addition, we study the potential of synergetic scenarios for inverting optical thickness using GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) algorithm (Dubovik et al., 2011). This algorithm uses new multi-pixel retrieval approach. According to this approach, the accuracy of aerosol retrieval can be improved if several sets of observations (e.g. observations of satellite over several pixels) are inverted together under additional a priori constraints on time and spatial variability of the retrieved parameters. The application of this approach appears to be promising for the present study. First, the retrieval stability can be improved by inverting more than a single set of spectral aerosol optical depth at once. Second, the set of spectral aerosol optical depth can be inverted together with the radiances observed in the same day. The preliminary results of using simulated data (for different scenarios and aerosol models), as well as, the applications to real data from several AERONET sites will be presented.

  15. Seasonal variation and difference of aerosol optical properties in columnar and surface atmospheres over Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tiantao; Xu, Chen; Duan, Junyan; Wang, Yifan; Leng, Chunpeng; Tao, Jun; Che, Huizheng; He, Qianshan; Wu, Yunfei; Zhang, Renjian; Li, Xiang; Chen, Jianmin; Kong, Lingdong; Yu, Xingna

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol optical properties in columnar and surface atmospheres were measured at an urban station of Shanghai from December 2010 to October 2012, and their seasonal variations and differences were examined. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 500 nm is on average about 0.72 over the entire campaign, relatively higher in spring and summer and lower in autumn and winter. Ångström wavelength exponent (Alfa) mainly distributes in 1.1-1.6 (72%) with an obvious uni-peak pattern, implying that fine particles are primary in the aerosol group. Aerosol single scattering albedo of columnar atmosphere (SSA) at 440 nm experiences a weak seasonal variation with an average of 0.91, indicating that aerosols are mainly composed of particles with relatively higher scattering efficiency. The aerosol volume size distribution shows one fine mode and another coarse mode, with peak radii of 0.15 μm and 3.0 μm, respectively. The volume of fine mode particles is minimum in spring and maximum in summer, while the volume of coarse mode particles is minimum in autumn and maximum in winter. The scattering coefficient (Sc) of aerosols in surface atmosphere is relatively higher in winter and spring, the absorptive coefficient (Ab) is higher in autumn and summer. The SSA of surface atmosphere (SSA-surf) at 532 nm varies weakly over time with a lower deviation, mostly scattering in the range of 0.8-0.95 (82%). Although the disconnection of aerosol properties between columnar and surface atmospheres exists, AOT and Alfa are correlated to some extent with PM2.5 and visibility. However, the difference of SSA and SSA-surf is remarkable about 0.1. Overall, fine particles are dominant in aerosols and contribute to AOT significantly in this city, and their difference between surface and columnar atmospheres is unignored.

  16. Detailed Characterization of aerosol properties from satellite Observations using GRASP algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, O.; Litvinov, P.; Lapyonok, T.; Ducos, F.; Huang, X.; Lopatin, A.; Fuertes, D.; Torres, B.

    2015-12-01

    GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) is rather sophisticated algorithm was developed recently by Dubovik et al. (2011, 2014) with objective of achieving more complete and accurate aerosols and surface retrieval. Specifically, GPASP searches in continuous space of solutions and doesn't utilize look-up-tables. It based on highly elaborated statistically optimized fitting. For example, it uses multi-pixel retrieval when statistically optimized inversion is implemented simultaneously for a group of satellite pixels. This allows using additional a priori information about limited variability of aerosol of surface properties in time and/or space. As a result, GRASP doesn't use any specific information about aerosol or surface type in the each observed pixel, and the results are essentially driven by observations. However GRASP retrieval takes longer computational time compare to most conventional algorithms that is the main practical challenge of employing GRASP for massive data processing. Nonetheless, in last two years, GRASP has been significantly optimized and adapted to operational needs. As a result of this optimization, GRASP has been accelerated to the level acceptable for processing large volumes of satellite observations. Recently GRASP has been applied to multi-years archives of PARASO/POLDER and ENVISAT/MERIS. Based, on the preliminary analysis GRASP results are very promising for comprehensive characterization of aerosol even for observations over bright surfaces and for monitoring very high aerosol loading events (with AOD 2 or 3). In addition, it was made the attempts to estimate such aerosol characteristics as aerosol height, air mass, radiative forcing, aerosol type, etc. The results and illustrations will be presented.

  17. Deep Blue Retrievals of Asian Aerosol Properties During ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Cee; King, Michael D.; Herman, Jay R.

    2006-01-01

    During the ACE-Asia field campaign, unprecedented amounts of aerosol property data in East Asia during springtime were collected from an array of aircraft, shipboard, and surface instruments. However, most of the observations were obtained in areas downwind of the source regions. In this paper, the newly developed satellite aerosol algorithm called "Deep Blue" was employed to characterize the properties of aerosols over source regions using radiance measurements from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Based upon the ngstr m exponent derived from the Deep Blue algorithm, it was demonstrated that this new algorithm is able to distinguish dust plumes from fine-mode pollution particles even in complex aerosol environments such as the one over Beijing. Furthermore, these results were validated by comparing them with observations from AERONET sites in China and Mongolia during spring 2001. These comparisons show that the values of satellite-retrieved aerosol optical thickness from Deep Blue are generally within 20%-30% of those measured by sunphotometers. The analyses also indicate that the roles of mineral dust and anthropogenic particles are comparable in contributing to the overall aerosol distributions during spring in northern China, while fine-mode particles are dominant over southern China. The spring season in East Asia consists of one of the most complex environments in terms of frequent cloudiness and wide ranges of aerosol loadings and types. This paper will discuss how the factors contributing to this complexity influence the resulting aerosol monthly averages from various satellite sensors and, thus, the synergy among satellite aerosol products.

  18. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, K.; Praveen, P. S.; Thomas, R. M.; Ramanathan, V.; Wilcox, E.; Bender, F. A.-M.

    2015-10-01

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood, as changes in atmospheric conditions due to aerosol may change the expected magnitude of indirect effects by altering cloud properties in unexpected ways. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season. In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements of atmospheric precipitable water vapor and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds were made, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol. Here we present evidence of a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP which becomes clear after the data are filtered to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region. We then use the aircraft and ground observatory measurements to explore the mechanisms behind the observed aerosol-LWP correlation. We determine that increased boundary-layer humidity lowering the cloud base is responsible for the observed increase in cloud liquid water. Large-scale analysis indicates that high pollution cases originate with a highly-polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the observatory from a northwesterly direction. This polluted mass exhibits higher temperatures and humidity than the clean case, the former of which may be attributable to heating due to aerosol absorption of solar radiation over the subcontinent. While high temperature conditions dispersed along with the high-aerosol

  19. SEAC4RS Aerosol Radiative Effects and Heating Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, S.; Schmidt, S.; Redemann, J.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; LeBlanc, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We will present (a) aerosol optical properties, (b) aerosol radiative forcing, (c) aerosol and gas absorption and heating rates, and (d) spectral surface albedo for cases from August 19th and 26th of the SEAC4RS mission. This analysis is based on irradiance data from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR), spectral aerosol optical depth from the Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR), and extinction profiles from the DIAL/High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). We derive spectrally resolved values of single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and surface albedo from the data, and determine profiles of absorption and heating rate segregated by absorber (aerosol and gas).

  20. Absorption-line survey of 32 QSOs at red wavelengths - properties of the Mg II absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzetta, K.M.; Wolfe, A.M.; Turnshek, D.A.

    1987-11-01

    The results of a survey of 32 QSOs for Mg II absorption at red wavelengths are presented, and the properties of the metal absorption systems are investigated. When interpreted in terms of ejection, the Mg II absorption systems are randomly distributed in velocity relative to the QSOs, although the systems may cluster on scales of a few thousand km/s. This is consistent with the absorption systems arising in intervening material not associated with the QSOs. The equivalent width distribution of the Mg II systems is well fitted by either an exponential or a power-law distribution, with the number density of the absorption systems increasing with decreasing rest equivalent width. There is marginally significant evidence for cosmological evolution of the number density of the Mg II absorbers, and no evidence for evolution of the Mg II equivalent width distribution with redshift. 42 references.

  1. Acoustic properties of multiple cavity resonance liner for absorbing higher-order duct modes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Di; Wang, Xiaoyu; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes analytical and experimental studies conducted to investigate the acoustic properties of axially non-uniform multiple cavity resonance liner for absorbing higher-order duct modes. A three-dimensional analytical model is proposed based upon transfer element method. The model is assessed by making a comparison with results of a liner performance experiment concerning higher-order modes propagation, and the agreement is good. According to the present results, it is found that the performance of multiple cavity resonance liner is related to the incident sound waves. Moreover, an analysis of the corresponding response of liner perforated panel-cavity system is performed, in which the features of resonance frequency and dissipation of the system under grazing or oblique incidence condition are revealed. The conclusions can be extended to typical non-locally reacting liners with single large back-cavity, and it would be beneficial for future non-locally reacting liner design to some extent. PMID:27586753

  2. Changes in the optical properties of benzo[a]pyrene-coated aerosols upon heterogeneous reactions with NO2 and NO3.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jessica W; Flores, J Michel; Lavi, Avi; Abo-Riziq, Ali; Rudich, Yinon

    2011-04-14

    Chemical reactions can alter the chemical, physical, and optical properties of aerosols. It has been postulated that nitration of aerosols can account for atmospheric absorbance over urban areas. To study this potentially important process, the change in optical properties of laboratory-generated benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)-coated aerosols following exposure to NO(2) and NO(3) was investigated at 355 nm and 532 nm by three aerosol analysis techniques. The extinction coefficient was determined at 355 nm and 532 nm from cavity ring-down aerosol spectroscopy (CRD-AS); the absorption coefficient was measured by photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) at 532 nm, while an on-line aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) supplied real-time quantitative information about the chemical composition of aerosols. In this study, 240 nm polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres were thinly coated with BaP to form 300 or 310 nm aerosols that were exposed to high concentrations of NO(2) and NO(3) and measured with CRD-AS, PAS, and the AMS. The extinction efficiencies (Q(ext)) changed after exposure to NO(2) and NO(3) at both wavelengths. Prior to reaction, Q(ext) for the 355 nm and 532 nm wavelengths were 4.36 ± 0.04 and 2.39 ± 0.05, respectively, and Q(ext) increased to 5.26 ± 0.04 and 2.79 ± 0.05 after exposure. The absorption cross-section at 532 nm, determined with PAS, reached σ(abs) = (0.039 ± 0.001) × 10(-8) cm(2), indicating that absorption increased with formation of nitro-BaP, the main reaction product detected by the AMS. The single-scattering albedo (SSA), a measure of particle scattering efficiency, decreased from 1 to 0.85 ± 0.03, showing that changes in the optical properties of BaP-covered aerosols due to nitration may have implications for regional radiation budget and, hence, climate. PMID:21373662

  3. The synthesis and microwave absorbing properties of MWCNTs and MWCNTs/ferromagnet composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi Gang; Qiao, Xiao Jing; Wan, Xiang; Ren, Qing Guo; Li, Wang Chang; Zhang, Shuai Zhong; Guo, Xiao Dang

    2016-02-01

    The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using camphor as carbon source and ferrocene as catalyst. The effect of different camphor/ferrocene ratio, calcination temperature and deposition substrates on the morphology and performance of the samples have been examined. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed the structure and growing mechanism of the MWCNTs in detail. The optimized MWCNTs have been obtained at 900 °C by 100:1 camphor/ferrocene ratio, whose IR extinction coefficient(αe) can reach 0.66 m2/g at 1400 cm-1, with the bandwidth between 594 and 3233 cm-1. The magnetic properties and microwave absorbing capability of Fe NPs/MWCNTs and MWCNTs/ferrite composites have been investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer and Vector network analyzer. With the addition of MWCNTs, the dielectric properties of the FeNPs/MWCNTs are enhanced in the L, S and C bands. The bandwidth (BW) below -10 dB of the 2 mm thickness ranges from 6.50 to 9.15 GHz, with the maximum RL reaching -23.78 dB at 7.8 GHz. And the peak reflection loss (RL) of the MWCNTs/ferrite can reach -18.17 dB at 3.55 GHz under 5 mm thickness, with dual-frequency absorption appearing in Ku bands at 4 and 5 mm thickness. The difference in lower frequency between the two composites suggests that MWCNTs/ferrite is expected to be an excellent tunable and broadband absorber.

  4. Studies of the chemical mixing state of sea spray aerosol and associated climate relevant properties (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Bertram, T. H.; Grassian, V. H.; Collins, D. B.; Ault, A. P.; Ruppel, M. J.; Axson, J. L.; Ryder, O. S.; Schill, S.

    2013-12-01

    The ocean plays a large but highly uncertain role in affecting clouds and climate, generating sea spray aerosols that can directly impact climate by scattering solar radiation and indirectly through nucleating clouds. A tremendous amount has been learned about these interactions over decades of marine studies, however the goal of establishing robust relationships between seawater composition and sea spray climate properties has remained elusive. Much of the impediment stems from difficulties associated with unraveling the impacts of nascent sea spray and background marine aerosols which have been shown to dominate field measurements. In an effort to advance our understanding of nascent sea spray properties, we have developed a new approach for studying this issue in a newly developed ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with breaking waves. After establishing extremely low background aerosol concentrations (< 1 per cc), studies have probed the size distribution and chemical mixing state of sea spray aerosols produced by breaking waves in natural seawater. The critical importance of using bubble size distributions representative of real breaking waves to generate sea spray aerosol (SSA) is discussed. Using a combination of techniques probing individual particle composition and morphology including aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), scanning tunnel x-ray microscopy (STXM), and electron microscopy, four major sea spray particle types are prevalent in all studies, consisting of sea salt, mixed sea salt and biogenic organic species, biogenic organic species, and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). Results from studies aimed at probing how changes in seawater composition due to biological activity impact sea spray aerosol composition and climate properties will be discussed.

  5. Retrieval of Aerosol Properties from Multi-Spectral Extinction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew A.

    1999-01-01

    The direct-beam spectral extinction of solar radiation contains information on atmospheric composition in a form that is essentially free from the data analysis complexities that often arise from multiple scattering. Ground based Multi-Filter Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measurements provide such information for the vertical atmospheric column path, while solar occultation measurements from a satellite platform provide horizontal slices through the atmosphere. We describe application of a Multi-Spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction (MACE) analysis technique used to analyze MFRSR data also to occultation measurements made by SAGE II. For analysis, we select the 1985 Nevado del Ruiz volcanic eruption period to retrieve atmospheric profiles of ozone and NO2, and changes in the stratospheric aerosol size and optical depth. The time evolution of volcanic aerosol serves as a passive tracer to study stratospheric dynamics, and changes in particle size put constraints on the sulfur chemistry modeling of volcanic aerosols. Paper presented at The '99 Kyoto Aerosol-Cloud Workshop, held Dec 1-3, 1999, Kyoto, Japan

  6. Preliminary results of aerosols' properties studied with EPF measurements from the SPICAM/UV instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willame, Y.; Vandaele, A.-C.; Depiesse, C.; Gillotay, D.; Kochenova, S.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosols on Mars have an important impact on the radiative transfer properties of its atmosphere. Today their spectral properties and therefore their interaction with UV radiation are only poorly known. Improving the radiative transfer modeling requires a better knowledge of their characteristics, in particular of their opacity, phase function and single scattering albedo. We will show that such information can be accessed by using EPF observations. The SPICAM instrument on board of the Mars-Express satellite is a 2 channel spectrometer. One channel operates in the ultraviolet (118-320 nm) and the second one in the infrared (1.0-1.7μm). SPICAM has been orbiting around the red planet since 2003 and has thus provided a large set of data. The instrument is capable of measuring under different geometries (nadir, limb, occultation) and one of them, called EPF (Emission Phase Function), is a practical tool to study aerosols' properties. We have developed a new retrieval algorithm for nadir measurements based on the radiative transfer model LIDORT. This new code performs simulations of spectra taking into account gas absorption, surface reflection and scattering by aerosols and gases. The retrieval method, based on the optimal estimation, allows us up to now to deduce the ozone column density, the aerosols' optical depth and the surface albedo (with fixed wavelength dependencies). We are developing our model further in order to better study the aerosols' characteristics using EPF observations, which consist in looking at the same point on the planet while the satellite moves along the orbit. As the attempt to study all the aerosols' properties simultaneously was not convincing, we will start with studying their opacity and its altitude distribution with the other characteristics fixed. We will present preliminary results of our study on aerosols' properties and their wavelength dependencies, using EPF data. The method will be illustrated by investigating SPICAM

  7. Preliminary results of aerosols' properties studied with EPF measurements from the SPICAM/UV instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willame, Yannick; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Depiesse, Cedric; Gillotay, Didier; Kochenova, Svetlana; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols on Mars have an important impact on the radiative transfer properties of its atmosphere. Today their spectral properties and therefore their interaction with UV radiation are only poorly known. Improving the radiative transfer modeling requires a better knowledge of their characteristics, in particular of their opacity, phase function and single scattering albedo. Part of such information can be accessed by using EPF observations. The SPICAM instrument on board of the Mars-Express satellite is a 2 channel spectrometer. One channel operates in the ultraviolet (118-320 nm) and the second one in the infrared (1.0-1.7μm). SPICAM has been orbiting around the red planet since 2003 and has thus provided a large set of data. The instrument is capable of measuring under different geometries (nadir, limb, occultation) and one of them, called EPF (Emission Phase Function), can be a tool to study aerosols' properties. We have developed a new retrieval algorithm for nadir measurements based on the radiative transfer model LIDORT. This new code performs simulations of spectra taking into account gas absorption, surface reflection and scattering by aerosols and gases. The retrieval method, based on the optimal estimation, allows us up to now to deduce the ozone column density, the aerosols' optical depth and the surface albedo (with fixed wavelength dependencies). We are developing our model further in order to better study the aerosols' characteristics using EPF observations, which consist in looking at the same point on the planet while the satellite moves along the orbit. As the attempt to study all the aerosols' properties simultaneously was not convincing, we started studying their opacity and the influence of its altitude distribution with the other characteristics fixed. We will present preliminary results of our study on aerosols' properties using EPF data from SPICAM.

  8. Evidence for Natural Variability in Marine Stratocumulus Cloud Properties Due to Cloud-Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Bruce; Sharon, Tarah; Jonsson, Haf; Minnis, Patrick; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, aircraft observations from the Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter are used to characterize the variability in drizzle, cloud, and aerosol properties associated with cloud rifts and the surrounding solid clouds observed off the coast of California. A flight made on 16 July 1999 provided measurements directly across an interface between solid and rift cloud conditions. Aircraft instrumentation allowed for measurements of aerosol, cloud droplet, and drizzle spectra. CCN concentrations were measured in addition to standard thermodynamic variables and the winds. A Forward Scatter Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) measured size distribution of cloud-sized droplets. A Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) was used to measure distributions of drizzle-sized droplets. Aerosol distributions were obtained from a Cloud Aerosol Scatterprobe (CAS). The CAS probe measured aerosols, cloud droplets and drizzle-sized drops; for this study. The CAS probe was used to measure aerosols in the size range of 0.5 micron - 1 micron. Smaller aerosols were characterized using an Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) sensor. The CPC was used to measure particles with diameters greater than 0.003 micron. By subtracting different count concentrations measured with the CPC, this probe was capable of identifying ultrafine particles those falling in the size range of 3 nanometers - 7 nanometers that are believed to be associated with new particle production.

  9. Efficacy and Immunogenicity of Single-Dose AdVAV Intranasal Anthrax Vaccine Compared to Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed in an Aerosolized Spore Rabbit Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vyjayanthi; Andersen, Bo H.; Shoemaker, Christine; Sivko, Gloria S.; Tordoff, Kevin P.; Stark, Gregory V.; Zhang, Jianfeng; Feng, Tsungwei; Duchars, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    AdVAV is a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5-vectored vaccine expressing the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA83) from Bacillus anthracis that is being developed for the prevention of disease caused by inhalation of aerosolized B. anthracis spores. A noninferiority study comparing the efficacy of AdVAV to the currently licensed Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed (AVA; BioThrax) was performed in New Zealand White rabbits using postchallenge survival as the study endpoint (20% noninferiority margin for survival). Three groups of 32 rabbits were vaccinated with a single intranasal dose of AdVAV (7.5 × 107, 1.5 × 109, or 3.5 × 1010 viral particles). Three additional groups of 32 animals received two doses of either intranasal AdVAV (3.5 × 1010 viral particles) or intramuscular AVA (diluted 1:16 or 1:64) 28 days apart. The placebo group of 16 rabbits received a single intranasal dose of AdVAV formulation buffer. All animals were challenged via the inhalation route with a targeted dose of 200 times the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of aerosolized B. anthracis Ames spores 70 days after the initial vaccination and were followed for 3 weeks. PA83 immunogenicity was evaluated by validated toxin neutralizing antibody and serum anti-PA83 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). All animals in the placebo cohort died from the challenge. Three of the four AdVAV dose cohorts tested, including two single-dose cohorts, achieved statistical noninferiority relative to the AVA comparator group, with survival rates between 97% and 100%. Vaccination with AdVAV also produced antibody titers with earlier onset and greater persistence than vaccination with AVA. PMID:25673303

  10. Efficacy and immunogenicity of single-dose AdVAV intranasal anthrax vaccine compared to anthrax vaccine absorbed in an aerosolized spore rabbit challenge model.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vyjayanthi; Andersen, Bo H; Shoemaker, Christine; Sivko, Gloria S; Tordoff, Kevin P; Stark, Gregory V; Zhang, Jianfeng; Feng, Tsungwei; Duchars, Matthew; Roberts, M Scot

    2015-04-01

    AdVAV is a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5-vectored vaccine expressing the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA83) from Bacillus anthracis that is being developed for the prevention of disease caused by inhalation of aerosolized B. anthracis spores. A noninferiority study comparing the efficacy of AdVAV to the currently licensed Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed (AVA; BioThrax) was performed in New Zealand White rabbits using postchallenge survival as the study endpoint (20% noninferiority margin for survival). Three groups of 32 rabbits were vaccinated with a single intranasal dose of AdVAV (7.5 × 10(7), 1.5 × 10(9), or 3.5 × 10(10) viral particles). Three additional groups of 32 animals received two doses of either intranasal AdVAV (3.5 × 10(10) viral particles) or intramuscular AVA (diluted 1:16 or 1:64) 28 days apart. The placebo group of 16 rabbits received a single intranasal dose of AdVAV formulation buffer. All animals were challenged via the inhalation route with a targeted dose of 200 times the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of aerosolized B. anthracis Ames spores 70 days after the initial vaccination and were followed for 3 weeks. PA83 immunogenicity was evaluated by validated toxin neutralizing antibody and serum anti-PA83 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). All animals in the placebo cohort died from the challenge. Three of the four AdVAV dose cohorts tested, including two single-dose cohorts, achieved statistical noninferiority relative to the AVA comparator group, with survival rates between 97% and 100%. Vaccination with AdVAV also produced antibody titers with earlier onset and greater persistence than vaccination with AVA. PMID:25673303

  11. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Kristina; Praveen, Puppala S.; Thomas, Rick M.; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Wilcox, Eric M.; Bender, Frida A.-M.

    2016-04-01

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric vertical structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season.In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements were made of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol from instrumentation at a ground observatory and on small unmanned aircraft. We present observations which indicate a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP only when considering cases with low atmospheric water vapor (PWV < 40 kg m-2), a criterion which acts to filter the data to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region.We then use the aircraft and ground-based measurements to explore possible mechanisms behind this observed aerosol-LWP correlation. The increase in cloud liquid water is found to coincide with a lowering of the cloud base, which is itself attributable to increased boundary layer humidity in polluted conditions. High pollution is found to correlate with both higher temperatures and higher humidity measured throughout the boundary layer. A large-scale analysis, using satellite observations and meteorological reanalysis, corroborates these covariations: high-pollution cases are shown to originate as a highly polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the observatory from a northwesterly

  12. A Study on the Optical Properties of Aerosols above the Forest by Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, J.

    2004-12-01

    Aerosol retrieval by remote sensing technique is one of the promising method in understanding the chemical and optical properties, column load, and spatial distribution of aerosols. However, though the current technique in use is quite successful about aerosols over ocean with small water-leaving radiances, quantitative retrieval of aerosols over land mass is not yet satisfactory. We try to develop a new method to make the aerosol retrieval over land more accurate than ever before. A sensitivity analysis of reflectance shows that wrong selection of spectral reflectance model results in quite a large difference in retrieved aerosol characteristics. Therefore, a well¡Csuited surface reflectance model is needed to be created. We conducted aerosol and radiation measurements coupled with in situ forest reflectance measurements in sync with satellite radiance measurements by EOS Terra and Aqua from the top of the atmosphere. The experimental site is located in a forest with an extensive and uniform area covered with deciduous trees commonly existing in Japan. The ground-based measurements include Andersen impactor samplings, radiometric measurements with OPC, a sunphotometer and a telephotometer. Forest reflectance was measured with a spectral radiometer covering visible and near infrared above the forest canopy level from a tower standing in the forest. Reflectance was measured directionally, and was found to show no major bi-directional dependency, assuring us that Lambert reflectance model is sufficient for calculation in this particular type of forest. The sampled spectral reflectances were averaged to be 0.0414 at 0.55 μ m. For satellite aerosol retrieval, visible and near infrared bands in MODIS sensors were employed. MODTRAN code was used in radiative transfer in the aerosol-laden atmosphere. Several different types of aerosol were examined, and a rural aerosol model with similar size distribution and composition to the aerosols, which are estimated from OPC

  13. Polarization of skylight in the O(2)A band: effects of aerosol properties.

    PubMed

    Boesche, Eyk; Stammes, Piet; Preusker, Réne; Bennartz, Ralf; Knap, Wouter; Fischer, Juergen

    2008-07-01

    Motivated by several observations of the degree of linear polarization of skylight in the oxygen A (O(2)A) band that do not yet have a quantitative explanation, we analyze the influence of aerosol altitude, microphysics, and optical thickness on the degree of linear polarization of the zenith skylight in the spectral region of the O(2)A band, between 755 to 775 nm. It is shown that the degree of linear polarization inside the O(2)A band is particularly sensitive to aerosol altitude. The sensitivity is strongest for aerosols within the troposphere and depends also on their microphysical properties and optical thickness. The polarization of the O(2)A band can be larger than the polarization of the continuum, which typically occurs for strongly polarizing aerosols in an elevated layer, or smaller, which typically occurs for depolarizing aerosols or cirrus clouds in an elevated layer. We show that in the case of a single aerosol layer in the atmosphere a determination of the aerosol layer altitude may be obtained. Furthermore, we show limitations of the aerosol layer altitude determination in case of multiple aerosol layers. To perform these simulations we developed a fast method for multiple scattering radiative transfer calculations in gaseous absorption bands including polarization. The method is a combination of doubling-adding and k-binning methods. We present an error estimation of this method by comparing with accurate line-by-line radiative transfer simulations. For the Motivated by several observations of the degree of linear polarization of skylight in the oxygen A (O(2)A) band that do not yet have a quantitative explanation, we analyze the influence of aerosol altitude, microphysics, and optical thickness on the degree of linear polarization of the zenith skylight in the spectral region of the O(2)A band, between 755 to 775 nm. It is shown that the degree of linear polarization inside the O(2)A band is particularly sensitive to aerosol altitude. The

  14. Chemical and hygroscopic properties of aerosol organics at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. Gannet; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Clegg, Simon L.; Samburova, Vera; Taylor, Nathan; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Zielinska, Barbara K.; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Chirokova, Galina; McCubbin, Ian B.; Dodson, Craig; Collins, Don

    2013-05-01

    A combined field and laboratory study was conducted to improve our understanding of the chemical and hygroscopic properties of organic compounds in aerosols sampled in the background continental atmosphere. PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 2.5 µm) aerosols were collected from 24 June to 28 July 2010 at Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL) in the Park Range of northwestern Colorado. New particle formation (NPF) was frequent at SPL during this campaign, and the samples were not influenced by regional dust storms. Filter samples were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), water soluble OC (WSOC), major inorganic ions, and detailed organic speciation. WSOC was isolated from inorganic ions using solid phase absorbents. Hygroscopic growth factors (GFs) and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of the WSOC were measured in the laboratory. Organic compounds compose the majority (average of 64% with a standard deviation (SD) of 9%) of the mass of measured species and WSOC accounted for an average of 89% (with a SD of 21%) of OC mass. Daily samples were composited according to back trajectories. On average, organic acids, sugars, and sugar alcohols accounted for 12.5 ± 6.2% (average ± SD) of WSOC. Based on the composition of these compounds and that of high molecular weight compounds identified using ultra high resolution mass spectrometry, the organic mass to OC ratio of the WSOC is estimated to be 2.04. The average hygroscopic GFs at RH = 80% (GF80) were 1.10 ± 0.03 for particles derived from isolated WSOC and 1.27 ± 0.03 for particles derived from the total water-soluble material (WSM). CCN activity followed a similar pattern. The critical diameters at a super-saturation of 0.35% were 0.072 ± 0.009 and 0.094 ± 0.006 µm for particles derived from WSM and isolated WSOC, respectively. These GF results compare favorably with estimates from thermodynamic models, which explicitly relate the water activity (RH) to concentration for

  15. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties observed in the ambient atmosphere during haze pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yisong; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao; Zhang, Ying; Li, Li; Lv, Yang; Qie, Lili; Xu, Hua

    Aerosol’s properties in the ambient atmosphere may differ significantly from sampling results due to containing of abundant water content. We performed sun-sky radiometer measurements in Beijing during 2011 and 2012 winter to obtain distribution of spectral and angular sky radiance. The measurements are then used to retrieve aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, including single scattering albedo, size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol component fractions identified as black carbon, brown carbon, mineral dust, ammonium sulfate-like components and water content inside particle matters. We found that during winter haze condition aerosol is dominated by fine particles with center radius of about 0.2 micron. Fine particles contribute about 93% to total aerosol extinction of solar light, and result in serious decrease of atmospheric visibility during haze condition. The percentage of light absorption of haze aerosol can up to about 10% among its total extinction, much higher than that of unpolluted conditions, that causes significant radiative cooling effects suppressing atmospheric convection and dispersion of pollutants. Moreover, the average water content occupies about one third of the ambient aerosol in volume which suggests the important effect of ambient humidity in the formation of haze pollution.

  16. A study of aerosol optical properties at the global GAW station Bukit Kototabang, Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhayati, N.; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2012-01-01

    There have been very few studies carried out in Indonesia on the atmospheric aerosol optical properties and their impact on the earth climate. This study utilized solar radiation and aerosol measurement results of Indonesian GAW station Bukit Kototabang in Sumatra. The radiation data of nine years were used as input to a radiation simulation code for retrieving optically equivalent parameters of aerosols, i.e., aerosol optical thickness (AOT), coarse particle to fine particle ratio ( γ-ratio), and soot fraction. Retrieval of aerosol properties shows that coarse particles dominated at the station due to high relative humidity (RH) reaching more than 80% throughout the year. AOT time series showed a distinct two peak structure with peaks in MJJ and NDJ periods. The second peak corresponds to the period of high RH suggesting it was formed by active particle growth with large RH near 90%. On the other hand the time series of hot spot number, though it is only for the year of 2004, suggests the first peak was strongly contributed by biomass burning aerosols. The γ-ratio took a value near 10 throughout the year except for November and December when it took a larger value. The soot fraction varies in close relation with the γ-ratio, i.e. low values when γ was large, as consistent with our proposal of active particle growth in the high relative periods.

  17. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  18. Aerosol Optical Properties of Smoke from the Las Conchas Wildfire, Los Alamos, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Flowers, B. A.; Aiken, A. C.; Klein, B. Z.; Mazzoleni, C.; Sharma, N.; China`, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Las Conchas wildfire in Northern New Mexico started on June, 26 2011 and spread rapidly, eventually burning an area of 634 km2 (245 mi2). Due to the close proximity to the fire, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was shut down and the town evacuated for several days. Immediately after LANL reopened (7/6/2011) the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division (EES-14) attained unique measurements of the smoke by sampling the ambient air. Three Integrated Photoacoustic/Nephelometer Spectrometers (DMT Inc.) were set up to measure aerosol light absorption and scattering coefficients. A University of Northwest Switzerland thermodenuder was used to remove compounds that are volatile at temperatures up to 200C. The aerosol's optical properties were measured before and after denuding the sample at 405nm (blue), 532nm (green), 781nm (red), and for non-denuded particles also at 375nm (ultraviolet). The aerosol size distributions were measured after the denuder with a Laser Aerosol Spectrometer (LAS, TSI Inc.) and black carbon was measured with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2, DMT Inc.). Additionally, ambient measurements of Total Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10) were collected continuously at the LANL air monitoring stations. These measurements are used in conjunction with numerical simulations to determine the bulk optical properties of the aerosol. Aerosols in wildfire smoke are composed of organic and black carbon (soot) particles that are formed during wood combustion and pyrolysis. The optical properties of the smoke particles are complex and lead to large uncertainties in assessing the global climate. During the measurement period, the Las Conchas fire provided very high particle concentrations (up to 200 μg/m3) that were exploited to investigate their optical properties. By heating the particles to temperatures ranging from 75 to 200C in the denuder, volatile organics were removed and the optical properties of the remaining particles were measured

  19. Retrieval of aerosol optical and micro-physical properties with 2D-MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Rich; Hair, Johnathan; Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Berg, Larry; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason; Hodges, Gary; Lantz, Kathy; Wagner, Thomas; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Recent retrievals of 2 dimensional (2D) Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2D-MAX-DOAS) have highlighted its importance in order to infer diurnal horizontal in-homogeneities around the measurement site. In this work, we expand the capabilities of 2D measurements in order to estimate simultaneously aerosol optical and micro-physical properties. Specifically, we present a retrieval method to obtain: (1) aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the boundary layer (BL) and free troposphere (FT) and (2) the effective complex refractive index and the effective radius of the aerosol column size distribution. The retrieval method to obtain AOT is based on an iterative comparison of measured normalized radiances, oxygen collision pair (O4), and absolute Raman Scattering Probability (RSP) with the forward model calculations derived with the radiative transfer model McArtim based on defined aerosol extinction profiles. Once the aerosol load is determined we use multiple scattering phase functions and single scattering albedo (SSA) obtained with Mie calculations which then constrain the RTM to forward model solar almucantar normalized radiances. The simulated almucantar normalized radiances are then compared to the measured normalized radiances. The best-fit, determined by minimizing the root mean square, retrieves the complex refractive index, and effective radius. We apply the retrieval approach described above to measurements carried out during the 2012 intensive operation period of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) held on Cape Cod, MA, USA. Results are presented for two ideal case studies with both large and small aerosol loading and similar air mass outflow from the northeast coast of the US over the West Atlantic Ocean. The aerosol optical properties are compared with several independent instruments, including the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) for highly resolved extinction profiles during the overpasses, and with the

  20. Mass absorption efficiency of light absorbing organic aerosols from source region of paddy-residue burning emissions in the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, B.; Rastogi, N.; Sarin, M. M.; Singh, A.; Singh, D.

    2016-01-01

    The mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of light absorbing water-soluble organics, representing a significant fraction of brown carbon (BrC), has been studied in fine mode aerosols (PM2.5) from a source region (Patiala: 30.2 °N, 76.3 °E) of biomass burning emissions (BBEs) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). The mass absorption coefficient of BrC at 365 nm (babs-365), assessed from absorption spectra of aqueous extracts, exhibits significant linear relationship with water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) for day (R2 = 0.37) and night time (R2 = 0.77) samples; and slope of regression lines provides a measure of MAE of BrC (daytime: ˜0.75 m2 g-1 and night time: 1.13 m2 g-1). A close similarity in the temporal variability of babs-365 (for BrC) and K+ in all samples suggests their common source from BBEs. The babs-365 of BrC follows a power law (babs-λ ≈ λ-α; where α = angstrom exponent) and averages around 5.2 ± 2.0 M m-1 (where M = 10-6). A significant decrease in the MAE of BrC from the source region (this study) to the downwind oceanic region (over Bay of Bengal, Srinivas and Sarin, 2013) could be attributed to relative increase in the contribution of non-absorbing WSOC and/or photo-bleaching of BrC during long-range atmospheric transport. The atmospheric radiative forcing due to BrC over the study site accounts for ˜40% of that from elemental carbon (EC).

  1. Evolution of biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon: airborne measurements of aerosol chemical composition, microphysical properties, mixing state and optical properties during SAMBBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Darbyshire, E.; Hodgson, A.; Liu, D.; O'Shea, S.; Bauguitte, S.; Szpek, K.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. On regional scales, the impacts are substantial, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated in the Cerrado. This led to significant differences in aerosol chemical composition, particularly in terms of the BC content, with BC being enhanced in the Cerrado

  2. Retrieval of Intensive Aerosol Properties from MFRSR observations: Partly Cloudy Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

    2010-09-30

    An approach for the obtaining column intensive aerosol properties, namely the single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP), from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) spectral observations under partly cloudy conditions is described. The approach involves the MFRSR-based aerosol retrieval for clear-sky periods and an interpolation of the retrieved column aerosol properties for cloudy periods. The observed weak diurnal variability of SSA and ASP at the surface and the close association of the surface intensive aerosol properties with their column counterparts form the basis of such interpolation. The approach is evaluated by calculating the corresponding clear-sky total, direct and diffuse fluxes at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870 nm) and compare them with the observed fluxes. The aerosol properties provided by this approach are applied for (i) an examination of the statistical relationship between spectral (visible spectral range) and broadband values of the total normalized cloud radiative forcing and (ii) an estimation of the fractional sky cover. Data collected during 13 days with single-layer cumulus clouds observed at U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during summer 2007 are applied to illustrate the performance and application of this approach.

  3. Retrieval of intensive aerosol properties from MFRSR observations: partly cloudy cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor; Long, Charles

    2010-10-01

    An approach for the obtaining column intensive aerosol properties, namely the single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP), from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) spectral observations under partly cloudy conditions is described. The approach involves the MFRSR-based aerosol retrieval for clear-sky periods and an interpolation of the retrieved column aerosol properties for cloudy periods. The observed weak diurnal variability of SSA and ASP at the surface and the close association of the surface intensive aerosol properties with their column counterparts form the basis of such interpolation. The approach is evaluated by calculating the corresponding clear-sky total, direct and diffuse fluxes at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870 nm) and compare them with the observed fluxes. The aerosol properties provided by this approach are applied for (i) an examination of the statistical relationship between spectral (visible range) and broadband values of the total normalized cloud radiative forcing and (ii) an estimation of the fractional sky cover. Data collected during 13 days with single-layer cumulus clouds observed at U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during summer 2007 are applied to illustrate the performance and application of this approach.

  4. Effects of Transport and Processing on Aerosol Chemical and Optical Properties Across the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P.; Bates, T.; Baynard, T.; Onasch, T.; Coffman, D.; Covert, D.; Worsnop, D.; Goldan, P.; Kuster, B.; Degouw, J.; Stohl, A.

    2005-12-01

    NEAQS-ITCT 2004 took place in July and August to study natural and anthropogenic emissions from North America including the processing of gas and particle phase species during transport over the North Atlantic and the resulting impact on air quality and climate. During the experiment, measurements were made onboard the NOAA RV Ronald H. Brown with a ship track that extended from the coast along Cape Cod, MA, Boston, MA and Portland, ME, east into the Gulf of Maine and out to Chebogue Point, Nova Scotia. Although measurements on the ship were not made in a true Lagrangian sense, they reveal information about the effects of transport and processing on aerosol chemical and optical properties. Photochemical age based on measured toluene to benzene ratios can be used in this region to indicate 'younger' versus 'older' aerosol. This approach, coupled with FLEXPART estimates of source contributions and age, reveals that continental aerosol becomes more acidic as it ages with transport over the Gulf of Maine. The increasing acidity is due to the conversion of SO2 to SO4= with no further significant input of NH3 in the well-capped marine boundary layer to neutralize the aerosol. In addition, as the aerosol ages, the organic mass fraction decreases while the organics that are present become more oxidized. These same chemical features were observed in aerosol transported from the Ohio River Valley and beyond. In contrast, recently formed aerosol from urban centers along the Eastern Seaboard are neutralized, have a higher organic content, and the organics are less oxidized. The impact of the observed range of aerosol acidity, organic mass fraction, and degree of oxidation of the organic matter on the f(RH) of the aerosol will be described. Here, f(RH) refers to the dependence of light extinction on relative humidity.

  5. Variability of Aerosol and its Impact on Cloud Properties Over Different Cities of Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan

    Interaction between aerosols and clouds is the subject of considerable scientific research, due to the importance of clouds in controlling climate. Aerosols vary in time in space and can lead to variations in cloud microphysics. This paper is a pilot study to examine the temporal and spatial variation of aerosol particles and their impact on different cloud optical properties in the territory of Pakistan using the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board NASA's Terra satellite data and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) data. We also use Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model for trajectory analysis to obtain origin of air masses in order to understand the spatial and temporal variability of aerosol concentrations. We validate data of MODIS and MISR by using linear correlation and regression analysis, which shows that there is an excellent agreement between data of these instruments. Seasonal study of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) shows that maximum value is found in monsoon season (June-August) over all study areas. We analyze the relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and some cloud parameters like water vapor (WV), cloud fraction (CF), cloud top temperature (CTT) and cloud top pressure (CTP). We construct the regional correlation maps and time series plots for aerosol and cloud parameters mandatory for the better understanding of aerosol-cloud interaction. Our analyses show that there is a strong positive correlation between AOD and water vapor in all cities. The correlation between AOD and CF is positive for the cities where the air masses are moist while the correlation is negative for cities where air masses are relatively dry and with lower aerosol abundance. It shows that these correlations depend on meteorological conditions. Similarly as AOD increases Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) is decreasing while Cloud Top Temperature (CTT) is increasing. Key Words: MODIS, MISR, HYSPLIT, AOD, CF, CTP

  6. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Mather, T. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Carboni, E.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol indirect radiative effects - the alteration of cloud properties by atmospheric aerosol - have a large, but relatively uncertain impact on the Earth's radiative balance. Quantification of volcanic aerosol indirect effects contributes to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. The impact of emissions from passively degassing volcanoes and minor volcanic explosions are particularly poorly constrained. We present systematic satellite measurements of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, 2000-2013 and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer 2002-2008). Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea, Yasur and Piton de la Fournaise are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that average upwind and downwind values can be estimated. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth (<0.1) and decreased cloud droplet effective radius (<8 μm) downwind of the volcanoes. Furthermore, Top of Atmosphere Short Wave flux from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) show downwind perturbations ranging from 10 to 45 Wm-2 within 400 km of degassing volcanoes. Comparison of these observations to cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing volcanoes demonstrates that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to those in the pre-industrial marine atmosphere.

  7. Aerosol Property Comparison Within and Above the ABL at the ARM Program SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Delle Monache, L

    2002-05-01

    This thesis determines what, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth surface are representative of those within the entire air column. Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site at the Southern Great Plains, the only location in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements are routinely made. Flight legs during the one-year period from March 2000 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by use of an objective mixing height determination technique. Correlations between aerosol properties measured at the surface and those within and above the ABL were computed. Aerosol extensive and intensive properties measured at the surface were found representative of values within the ABL, but not of within the free atmosphere.

  8. Observed changes in aerosol physical and optical properties before and after precipitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingmin; Dong, Yan; Dong, Zipeng; Du, Chuanli; Chen, Chuang

    2016-08-01

    Precipitation scavenging of aerosol particles is an important removal process in the atmosphere that can change aerosol physical and optical properties. This paper analyzes the changes in aerosol physical and optical properties before and after four rain events using in situ observations of mass concentration, number concentration, particle size distribution, scattering and absorption coefficients of aerosols in June and July 2013 at the Xianghe comprehensive atmospheric observation station in China. The results show the effect of rain scavenging is related to the rain intensity and duration, the wind speed and direction. During the rain events, the temporal variation of aerosol number concentration was consistent with the variation in mass concentration, but their size-resolved scavenging ratios were different. After the rain events, the increase in aerosol mass concentration began with an increase in particles with diameter <0.8 μm [measured using an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS)], and fine particles with diameter <0.1 μm [measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS)]. Rainfall was most efficient at removing particles with diameter ~0.6 μm and greater than 3.5 μm. The changes in peak values of the particle number distribution (measured using the SMPS) before and after the rain events reflect the strong scavenging effect on particles within the 100-120 nm size range. The variation patterns of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients before and after the rain events were similar, but their scavenging ratios differed, which may have been related to the aerosol particle size distribution and chemical composition.

  9. A study of regional aerosol radiative properties and effects on ultraviolet-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenny, B. N.; Schafer, J. S.; Deluisi, J. J.; Saxena, V. K.; Barnard, W. F.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Vergamini, A. J.

    1998-07-01

    A field experiment was conducted in western North Carolina to investigate the relationship between aerosol optical properties and atmospheric transmission. Two research measurement sites in close horizontal proximity but at different altitudes were established to measure the transmission of UV radiation through a slab of atmosphere. An identical set of radiation sensing instruments, including a broadband UV-B radiometer, a direct Sun pyrheliometer, a shadowband radiometer, and a spectral photometer, was placed at both sites, a mountaintop site (Mount Gibbes 35.78°N, 82.29°W, 2004 m elevation) and a valley site (Black Mountain, North Carolina 35.66°N, 82.38°N, 951 m elevation). Aerosol size distribution sampling equipment was located at the valley site. Broadband solar pseudo-optical depth and aerosol optical depths at 415 nm, 500 nm, and 673 nm were measured for the lowest 1-km layer of the troposphere. The measurements exhibited variation