Science.gov

Sample records for absorbing black carbon

  1. Influence of carbon black and indium tin oxide absorber particles on laser transmission welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aden, Mirko; Mamuschkin, Viktor; Olowinsky, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    For laser transmission welding of polypropylene carbon black and indium tin oxide (ITO) are used as absorber particles. Additionally, the colorant titanium dioxide is mixed to the absorbing part, while the transparent part is kept in natural state. The absorption coefficients of ITO and carbon black particles are obtained, as well as the scattering properties of polypropylene loaded with titanium dioxide (TiO2). At similar concentrations the absorption coefficient of ITO is an order of magnitude smaller than that of carbon black. Simulations of radiation propagation show that the penetration depth of laser light is smaller for carbon black. Therefore, the density of the released heat is higher. Adding TiO2 changes the distribution of heat in case of ITO, whereas for carbon black the effect is negligible. Thermal simulations reveal the influence of the two absorbers and TiO2 on the heat affected zone. The results of the thermal simulations are compared to tensile test results.

  2. A black body absorber from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kohei; Ishii, Juntaro; Kishida, Hideo; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Futaba, Don N.; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Among all known materials, we found that a forest of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes behaves most similarly to a black body, a theoretical material that absorbs all incident light. A requirement for an object to behave as a black body is to perfectly absorb light of all wavelengths. This important feature has not been observed for real materials because materials intrinsically have specific absorption bands because of their structure and composition. We found a material that can absorb light almost perfectly across a very wide spectral range (0.2–200 μm). We attribute this black body behavior to stem from the sparseness and imperfect alignment of the vertical single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:19339498

  3. Black carbon and other light-absorbing impurities in the Andes of Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, P. M.; Cordero, R.; Warren, S. G.; Pankow, A.; Jorquera, J.; Schrempf, M.; Doherty, S. J.; Cabellero, M.; Carrasco, J. F.; Neshyba, S.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) and other light-absorbing impurities in snow absorb solar radiation and thus have the potential to accelerate glacial retreat and snowmelt. In Chile, glaciers and seasonal snow are important sources of water for irrigation and domestic uses. In July 2015 (Austral winter) we sampled snow in the western Andes in a north-south transect of Chile from 18 S to 34 S. Most of the sampled snow had fallen during a single synoptic event, during 11-13 July. The snow was melted and passed through 0.4 micrometer nuclepore filters. Preliminary estimates indicate that (1) the ratio of BC to dust in snow increases going south from Northern to Central Chile, and (2) in snow sampled during the two weeks following the snowstorm, the impurities were concentrated in the upper 5 cm of snow, indicating that the surface layer became polluted over time by dry deposition.

  4. 1 Mixing state and absorbing properties of black carbon during Arctic haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanatta, Marco; Gysel, Martin; Eleftheriadis, Kosas; Laj, Paolo; Hans-Werner, Jacobi

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic atmosphere is periodically affected by the Arctic haze occurring in spring. One of its particulate components is the black carbon (BC), which is considered to be an important contributor to climate change in the Arctic region. Beside BC-cloud interaction and albedo reduction of snow, BC may influence Arctic climate interacting directly with the solar radiation, warming the corresponding aerosol layer (Flanner, 2013). Such warming depends on BC atmospheric burden and also on the efficiency of BC to absorb light, in fact the light absorption is enhanced by mixing of BC with other atmospheric non-absorbing materials (lensing effect) (Bond et al., 2013). The BC reaching the Arctic is evilly processed, due to long range transport. Aging promote internal mixing and thus absorption enhancement. Such modification of mixing and is quantification after long range transport have been observed in the Atlantic ocean (China et al., 2015) but never investigated in the Arctic. During field experiments conducted at the Zeppelin research site in Svalbard during the 2012 Arctic spring, we investigated the relative precision of different BC measuring techniques; a single particle soot photometer was then used to assess the coating of Arctic black carbon. This allowed quantifying the absorption enhancement induced by internal mixing via optical modelling; the optical assessment of aged black carbon in the arctic will be of major interest for future radiative forcing assessment.Optical characterization of the total aerosol indicated that in 2012 no extreme smoke events took place and that the aerosol population was dominated by fine and non-absorbing particles. Low mean concentration of rBC was found (30 ng m-3), with a mean mass equivalent diameter above 200 nm. rBC concentration detected with the continuous soot monitoring system and the single particle soot photometer was agreeing within 15%. Combining absorption coefficient observed with an aethalometer and rBC mass

  5. Measured Wavelength-Dependent Absorption Enhancement of Internally Mixed Black Carbon with Absorbing and Nonabsorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    You, Rian; Radney, James G; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Optical absorption spectra of laboratory generated aerosols consisting of black carbon (BC) internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials (ammonium sulfate, AS, and sodium chloride, NaCl) and BC with a weakly absorbing brown carbon surrogate derived from humic acid (HA) were measured across the visible to near-IR (550 to 840 nm). Spectra were measured in situ using a photoacoustic spectrometer and step-scanning a supercontinuum laser source with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. BC had a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) of 7.89 ± 0.25 m(2) g(-1) at λ = 550 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 1.03 ± 0.09 (2σ). For internally mixed BC, the ratio of BC mass to the total mass of the mixture was chosen as 0.13 to mimic particles observed in the terrestrial atmosphere. The manner in which BC mixed with each material was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AS/BC and HA/BC particles were fully internally mixed, and the BC was both internally and externally mixed for NaCl/BC particles. The AS/BC, NaCl/BC, and HA/BC particles had AAEs of 1.43 ± 0.05, 1.34 ± 0.06, and 1.91 ± 0.05, respectively. The observed absorption enhancement of mixed BC relative to the pure BC was wavelength dependent for AS/BC and decreased from 1.5 at λ = 550 nm with increasing wavelength while the NaCl/BC enhancement was essentially wavelength independent. For HA/BC, the enhancement ranged from 2 to 3 and was strongly wavelength dependent. Removal of the HA absorption contribution to enhancement revealed that the enhancement was ≈1.5 and independent of wavelength. PMID:27359341

  6. The physical properties of black carbon and other light-absorbing material emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Yokelson, R. J.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fortner, E.; Onasch, T. B.; Akagi, S. K.; Taylor, J.; Coe, H.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol emitted from fires absorbs light, leading to visibility degradation as well as regional and global climate impacts. Fires also emit a wide range of trace gases and particulates that can interact with emitted BC and alter its optical properties and atmospheric lifetime. Non-BC particulate species emitted by fires can also scatter and absorb light, leading to additional effects on visibility. Recent work has shown that certain organic species can absorb light strongly at shorter wavelengths, giving it a brown or yellow color. This material has been classified as brown carbon, though it is not yet well defined. Land managers must find a balance between the negative impacts of prescribed fire emissions on visibility and air quality and the need to prevent future catastrophic wildfire as well as manage ecosystems for habitat restoration or other purposes. This decision process requires accurate assessments of the visibility impacts of fire emissions, including BC and brown carbon, which in turn depend on their optical properties. We present recent laboratory and aircraft measurements of black carbon and aerosol optical properties emitted from biomass burning. All measurement campaigns included a single particle soot photometer (SP2) instrument capable of providing size-resolved measurements of BC mass and number distributions and mixing state, which are needed to separate the BC and brown carbon contributions to total light absorption. The laboratory experiments also included a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer that provided accurate measurements of aerosol light absorption. The laboratory systems also characterized emissions after they had been treated with a thermal denuder to remove semi-volatile coatings, allowing an assessment of the role of non-BC coatings on bulk aerosol optical properties. Emissions were also aged in an environmental smog chamber to examine the role of secondary aerosol production on aerosol optical properties.

  7. Estimating absorbing black carbon and organic carbon optical properties from AERONET and MISR data over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Ramanathan, V.; Huang, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The radiative forcing due to carbonaceous aerosols is one of the largest source of uncertainties in global and regional climate change. Black carbon and organic carbon from biomass and fossil fuel are two major types of carbonaceous aerosols. In this study we use available ground based and satellite observations to infer the optical properties of black and organic carbon. NASA's AERONET and MISR data over East Asia provide the observational basis. We use the spectral variations in the observed aerosol extinction optical depth and absorption optical depth to categorize the optical properties including their mixing state with other aerosols such as dust and other inorganic aerosols. We create 8 different categories of aerosol mixtures: Dust, Biomass Burning, Fossil Fuel, Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Dust with Biomass Burning, Mixed Dust with Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Biomass Burning with Fossil Fuel, and Mixed Dust, Biomass Burning, with Fossil Fuel, over the following 6 regions of East Asia: Nepal, Gobi, North Industrial China, South Industrial China, Southeast Asia, and Korea/Japan. Our results are compared with independent surface observations over China using Aethalometers and Single Particle Soot Photometers.

  8. Light-absorbing properties of ambient black carbon and brown carbon from fossil fuel and biomass burning sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C.-H.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Willis, M. D.; Jaroudi, E.; Zimmerman, N.; Hilker, N.; Murphy, M.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Wenger, J. C.; Evans, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of ambient black carbon-containing particles and the composition of their associated coatings were investigated at a downtown site in Toronto, Canada, for 2 weeks in June 2013. The objective was to assess the relationship between black carbon (BC) coating composition/thickness and absorption. The site was influenced by emissions from local vehicular traffic, wildfires in Quebec, and transboundary fossil fuel combustion emissions in the United States. Mass concentrations of BC and associated nonrefractory coatings were measured using a soot particle-aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), while aerosol absorption and scattering were measured using a photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS). Absorption enhancement was investigated both by comparing ambient and thermally denuded PASS absorption data and by relating absorption data to BC mass concentrations measured using the SP-AMS. Minimal absorption enhancement attributable to lensing at 781 nm was observed for BC using both approaches. However, brown carbon was detected when the site was influenced by wildfire emissions originating in Quebec. BC coating to core mass ratios were highest during this period (~7), and while direct absorption by brown carbon resulted in an absorption enhancement at 405 nm (>2.0), no enhancement attributable to lensing at 781 nm was observed. The efficiency of BC coating removal in the denuder decreased substantially when wildfire-related organics were present and may represent an obstacle for future similar studies. These findings indicate that BC absorption enhancement due to lensing is minimal for downtown Toronto, and potentially other urban locations, even when impacted by long-range transport events.

  9. Light Absorbing Impurities in Snow in the Western US: Partitioning Radiative Impacts from Mineral Dust and Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, M.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Melt of annual mountain snow cover dominates water resources in the western United States. Recent studies in the Upper Colorado River Basin have shown that radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities (LAIs) in mountain snow cover has accelerated snowmelt, impacted runoff timing and magnitude, and reduced annual flow. However, these studies have assumed that LAIs are primarily mineral dust, and have not quantified the radiative contribution by carbonaceous particles from bio and fossil fuel (industrial and urban) sources. Here we quantify both dust and black carbon (BC) content and assess the unique BC radiative forcing contribution in this dust dominated impurity regime using a suite of advanced field, lab, and modeling techniques. Daily measurements of surface spectral albedo and optical grain radius were collected with a field spectrometer over the 2013 spring melt season in Senator Beck Basin Study Area in the San Juan Mountains, CO, Southwestern US. Coincident snow samples were collected daily and processed for; (1) dust and BC content (2) impurity particle size, and (3) impurity optical properties. Measured snow and impurity properties were then used to drive the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model. Partitioning the unique radiative contribution from each constituents is achieved through unique model runs for clean snow, dust only, and BC only.

  10. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  11. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm. PMID:27174890

  12. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N.; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-05-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm.

  13. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N.; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm. PMID:27174890

  14. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  15. Black phosphorus saturable absorber for ultrashort pulse generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sotor, J. Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M.; Macherzynski, W.; Paletko, P.

    2015-08-03

    Low-dimensional materials, due to their unique and versatile properties, are very interesting for numerous applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Recently rediscovered black phosphorus, with a graphite-like layered structure, can be effectively exfoliated up to the single atomic layer called phosphorene. Contrary to graphene, it possesses a direct band gap controllable by the number of stacked atomic layers. For those reasons, black phosphorus is now intensively investigated and can complement or replace graphene in various photonics and electronics applications. Here, we demonstrate that black phosphorus can serve as a broadband saturable absorber and can be used for ultrashort optical pulse generation. The mechanically exfoliated ∼300 nm thick layers of black phosphorus were transferred onto the fiber core, and under pulsed excitation at 1560 nm wavelength, its transmission increases by 4.6%. We have demonstrated that the saturable absorption of black phosphorus is polarization sensitive. The fabricated device was used to mode-lock an Er-doped fiber laser. The generated optical solitons with the 10.2 nm bandwidth and 272 fs duration were centered at 1550 nm. The obtained results unambiguously show that black phosphorus can be effectively used for ultrashort pulse generation with performances similar or even better than currently used graphene or carbon nanotubes. This application of black phosphorus proves its great potential to future practical use in photonics.

  16. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  17. Effect of weight fraction of carbon black and number of plies of E-glass fiber to reflection loss of E-glass/ripoxy composite for radar absorbing structure (RAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyastuti, Ramadhan, Rizal; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Zainuri, Mochamad

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, studies on investigating radar absorbing structure (RAS) using fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are becoming popular research field because the electromagnetic properties of FRP composites can be tailored effectively by just adding some electromagnetic powders, such as carbon black, ferrite, carbonyl iron, and etc., to the matrix of composites. The RAS works not only as a load bearing structure to hold the antenna system, but also has the important function of absorbing the in-band electromagnetic wave coming from the electromagnetic energy of tracking systems. In this study, E-glass fiber reinforced ripoxy resin composite was fabricated by blending the conductive carbon black (Ketjenblack EC300J) with the binder matrix of the composite material and maximizing the coefficient of absorption more than 90% (more than -10 dB) within the X-band frequency (8 - 12 GHz). It was measured by electrical conductivity (LCR meter) and vector network analyzer (VNA). Finally, the composite RAS with 0.02 weight fraction of carbon black and 4 plies of E-glass fiber showed thickness of 2.1 mm, electrical conductivity of 8.33 × 10-6 S/m, and maximum reflection loss of -27.123 dB, which can absorb more than 90% of incident EM wave throughout the entire X-band frequency range, has been developed.

  18. Large-area surveys for black carbon and other light-absorbing impurities in snow: Arctic, Antarctic, North America, China (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, S. G.; Doherty, S. J.; Hegg, D.; Dang, C.; Zhang, R.; Grenfell, T. C.; Brandt, R. E.; Clarke, A. D.; Zatko, M.

    2013-12-01

    Absorption of radiation by ice is extremely weak at visible and near-UV wavelengths, so small amounts of light-absorbing impurities (LAI) in snow can dominate the absorption of sunlight at these wavelengths, reducing the albedo relative to that of pure snow and leading to earlier snowmelt. Snow samples were collected in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Svalbard, Norway, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean, on tundra, glaciers, ice caps, sea ice, and frozen lakes, and in boreal forests. Snow was collected mostly in spring, when the entire winter snowpack was accessible for sampling. Snow was also collected at 67 sites in western North America. Expeditions from Lanzhou University obtained black carbon (BC) amounts at 84 sites in northeast and northwest China. BC was measured at 3 locations on the Antarctic Plateau, and at 5 sites on East Antarctic sea ice. The snow is melted and filtered; the filters are analyzed in a spectrophotometer. Median BC mixing ratios in snow range over 4 orders of magnitude from 0.2 ng/g in Antarctica to 1000 ng/g in northeast China. Chemical analyses, input to a receptor model, indicate that the major source of BC in most of the Arctic is biomass burning, but industrial sources dominate in Svalbard and the central Arctic Ocean. Non-BC impurities, principally brown (organic) carbon, are typically responsible for ~40% of the visible and ultraviolet absorption. In northeast China BC is the dominant LAI, but in Inner Mongolia soil dominates. When the snow surface layer melts, much of the BC is left at the top of the snowpack rather than carried away in meltwater, thus causing a positive feedback on snowmelt. This process was quantified through field studies in Greenland, Alaska, and Norway, where we found that only 10-30% of the BC is removed with meltwater. The BC content of the Arctic atmosphere has declined markedly since 1989, according to the continuous measurements of near-surface air in Canada, Alaska, and Svalbard. Correspondingly, our recent BC

  19. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the assessment of air emissions from the manufacture of carbon black, currently manufactured in the U.S. by two major processes: thermal and oil furnace. Sources of atmospheric emissions within oil furnace plants (about 90% of the 30 U.S. carbon black plants...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  10. Porous Carbon Nanoparticle Networks with Tunable Absorbability

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Kim, Seong Jin; Seong, Won-Kyeong; Kim, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Kim, Ho-Young; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2013-01-01

    Porous carbon materials with high specific surface areas and superhydrophobicity have attracted much research interest due to their potential application in the areas of water filtration, water/oil separation, and oil-spill cleanup. Most reported superhydrophobic porous carbon materials are fabricated by complex processes involving the use of catalysts and high temperatures but with low throughput. Here, we present a facile single-step method for fabricating porous carbon nanoparticle (CNP) networks with selective absorbability for water and oils via the glow discharge of hydrocarbon plasma without a catalyst at room temperature. Porous CNP networks were grown by the continuous deposition of CNPs at a relatively high deposition pressure. By varying the fluorine content, the porous CNP networks exhibited tunable repellence against liquids with various degrees of surface tension. These porous CNP networks could be applied for the separation of not only water/oil mixtures but also mixtures of liquids with different surface tension levels. PMID:23982181

  11. Gold-black as IR Absorber and Solar Cell Enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peale, Robert E.; Cleary, Justin W.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Smith, C. W.; Baillie, K.; Colwell, J. E.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Joly, Alan G.; Edwards, Oliver; Fredricksen, C. J.

    2010-03-01

    Infrared absorbance and visible/near-IR excited plasmon resonances are investigated in gold-black, a porous nano-structured conducting film. A two level full factorial optimization study with evaporation-chamber pressure, boat current, substrate temperature, and degree of polymer infusion (for hardening) was performed. Polymer infusion was found generally to reduce absorbance in the long wave IR but has little effect at THz wavelengths, although for samples with the highest absorbance there is a slight improvement in the absorbance figure of merit (FOM) in both wavelength regimes. The characteristic length scales of the structured films vary considerably as a function of deposition parameters, but the IR FOM is found to be only weakly correlated with these distributions, which are determined by wavelet analysis of scanning electron micrographs images. Initial investigations of gold-black by photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) reveal plasmon resonances, which have potential to enhance the efficiency of thin film solar cells. For films with different characteristic length scales, the plasmon resonances appear in portions of the film with similar length scales.

  12. Factorial Based Response Surface Modeling with Confidence Intervals for Optimizing Thermal Optical Transmission Analysis of Atmospheric Black Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    We demonstrate how thermal-optical transmission analysis (TOT) for refractory light-absorbing carbon in atmospheric particulate matter was optimized with empirical response surface modeling. TOT employs pyrolysis to distinguish the mass of black carbon (BC) from organic carbon (...

  13. Source attribution of black carbon in Arctic snow.

    PubMed

    Hegg, Dean A; Warren, Stephen G; Grenfell, Thomas C; Doherty, Sarah J; Larson, Timothy V; Clarke, Antony D

    2009-06-01

    Snow samples obtained at 36 sites in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean in early 2007 were analyzed for light-absorbing aerosol concentration together with a suite of associated chemical species. The light absorption data, interpreted as black carbon concentrations, and other chemical data were input into the EPA PMF 1.1 receptor model to explore the sources for black carbon in the snow. The analysis found four factors or sources: two distinct biomass burning sources, a pollution source, and a marine source. The first three of these were responsible for essentially all of the black carbon, with the two biomass sources (encompassing both open and closed combustion) together accounting for >90% of the black carbon. PMID:19569324

  14. Thermally Resilient, Broadband Optical Absorber from UV to IR Derived from Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Coles, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Optical absorber coatings have been developed from carbon-based paints, metal blacks, or glassy carbon. However, such materials are not truly black and have poor absorption characteristics at longer wavelengths. The blackness of such coatings is important to increase the accuracy of calibration targets used in radiometric imaging spectrometers since blackbody cavities are prohibitively large in size. Such coatings are also useful potentially for thermal detectors, where a broadband absorber is desired. Au-black has been a commonly used broadband optical absorber, but it is very fragile and can easily be damaged by heat and mechanical vibration. An optically efficient, thermally rugged absorber could also be beneficial for thermal solar cell applications for energy harnessing, particularly in the 350-2,500 nm spectral window. It has been demonstrated that arrays of vertically oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs), specifically multi-walled-carbon- nanotubes (MWCNTs), are an exceptional optical absorber over a broad range of wavelengths well into the infrared (IR). The reflectance of such arrays is 100x lower compared to conventional black materials, such as Au black in the spectral window of 350-2,500 nm. Total hemispherical measurements revealed a reflectance of approximately equal to 1.7% at lambda approximately equal to 1 micrometer, and at longer wavelengths into the infrared (IR), the specular reflectance was approximately equal to 2.4% at lambda approximately equal to 7 micrometers. The previously synthesized CNTs for optical absorber applications were formed using water-assisted thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD), which yields CNT lengths in excess of 100's of microns. Vertical alignment, deemed to be a critical feature in enabling the high optical absorption from CNT arrays, occurs primarily via the crowding effect with thermal CVD synthesized CNTs, which is generally not effective in aligning CNTs with lengths less than 10 m. Here it has been shown that the

  15. [Study on absorbing volatile oil with mesoporous carbon].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-mei; Jia, Xiao-bin; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Sun, E; Yang Nan

    2014-11-01

    Clove oil and turmeric oil were absorbed by mesoporous carbon. The absorption ratio of mesoporous carbon to volatile oil was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria Curing powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorietry (DSC). The effects of mesoporous carbon on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. They reached high adsorption rate when the absorption ratio of mesoporous carbon to volatile oil was 1:1. When volatile oil was absorbed, dissolution rate of active components had a little improvement and their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was absorbed by the loss rate decreasing more than 50%. Absorbing herbal volatile oil with mesoporous carbon deserves further studying. PMID:25850263

  16. Black Carbon Measurements in SOLVE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Gregory L.; Baumgardner, Darrel R.

    2004-01-01

    Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT), under funding from NASA s Radiation Sciences Program, participated in the SOLVE II field campaign with measurements of light absorbing particles (black carbon and metals). These measurements were made with the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2) on the NASA DC-8. The SP-2 is a new measurement technique that was developed under the SBIR program with funding from the Office of Naval Research. The original instrument suite for the DC-8 did not include the SP-2 and its addition and operation during SOLVE II was intended solely as a means to test its functionality and prepare it for future flight operations. For this reason it required several flights in the early stages of the project to tune its operation and fix some problems that arose. During the flights of January 26, 29, and 30, and February 2, 4 and 6, however, it worked as designed and acquired credible data.

  17. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  18. Black carbon contribution to global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Chylek, P.; Johnson, B.; Kou, L.; Wong, J.

    1996-12-31

    Before the onset of industrial revolution the only important source of black carbon in the atmosphere was biomass burning. Today, black carbon production is divided between the biomass and fossil fuel burning. Black carbon is a major agent responsible for absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols. Thus black carbon makes other aerosols less efficient in their role of reflecting solar radiation and cooling the earth-atmosphere system. Black carbon also contributes to the absorption of solar radiation by clouds and snow cover. The authors present the results of black carbon concentrations measurements in the atmosphere, in cloud water, in rain and snow melt water collected during the 1992--1996 time period over the southern Nova Scotia. Their results are put into the global and historical perspective by comparing them with the compilation of past measurements at diverse locations and with their measurements of black carbon concentrations in the Greenland and Antarctic ice cores. Black carbon contribution to the global warming is estimated, and compared to the carbon dioxide warming, using the radiative forcing caused by the black carbon at the top of the atmosphere.

  19. Black Carbon, Aerosols, and the Tooth Fairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Adachi, K.; Posfai, M.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is widely cited in the atmospheric literature as a major aerosol particle type with significant effects on climate warming. Several analytical techniques are used for its determination, primarily through optical absorption measurements. A recently developed and widely used method is single particle soot photometry (SP2). During attempts to obtain reliable BC samples for study using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it became apparent that no such samples exist. Instead, surrogate materials such as graphite, fullerene, Aquadag, and perhaps other things are used as calibration standards. It became rapidly evident that BC is an inferred rather than actual, identifiable substance with distinct material properties other than its absorption spectrum and refractory character (accounting for the subset of refractory black carbon, or rBC). Since climate effects depend on optical properties, and these are estimated for BC, it may not be critical at this time whether or not it is a discrete material. However, the same term is also used by other environmental communities for things that are distinctly different. Such imprecision in terms can lead to unnecessary confusion. The situation is summarized in the Table. We propose that 1) the term BC should be restricted to light-absorbing refractory carbonaceous matter of uncertain character and 2) the uncertainty be stated explicitly. We also propose a more precise definition for soot as a specific material, which we call ns-soot, where "ns" refers to carbon nanospheres. We define ns-soot as particles that consist of nanospheres, typically with diameters <100 nm, that possess distinct structures of concentrically wrapped, graphene-like layers of carbon and with grape-like (acinoform) morphologies.;

  20. Enhanced performance of VOx-based bolometer using patterned gold black absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan M.; Panjwani, Deep; Ginn, James; Warren, Andrew; Long, Christopher; Figuieredo, Pedro; Smith, Christian; Perlstein, Joshua; Walter, Nick; Hirschmugl, Carol; Peale, Robert E.; Shelton, David J.

    2015-06-01

    Patterned highly absorbing gold black film has been selectively deposited on the active surfaces of a vanadium-oxide-based infrared bolometer array. Patterning by metal lift-off relies on protection of the fragile gold black with an evaporated oxide, which preserves gold black's near unity absorption. This patterned gold black also survives the dry-etch removal of the sacrificial polyimide used to fabricate the air-bridge bolometers. Infrared responsivity is substantially improved by the gold black coating without significantly increasing noise. The increase in the time constant caused by the additional mass of gold black is a modest 14%.

  1. On the physical and geometrical properties responsible for the highly absorbing nature of black materials in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Steven Robert

    Black surfaces are of paramount importance in the design of terrestrial and space-borne optical systems. Optical designers can choose from a variety of black materials to suppress reflected and scattered stray light. Among these applications are the suppression of unwanted reflection or scattering of light in optical systems, solar collectors, blackbody absorbers, thermal insulators, telescope housing and baffles where stray light reduction is vital, and cold stops and light shields for infrared detectors. The physical mechanisms responsible for understanding the highly absorbing nature of black materials in the infrared spectral region are investigated in this dissertation. We present experimental data on the optical, surface, and constituent properties of black materials. In addition, we developed unique optical instrumentation to characterize the hemispherical reflectance and scattering properties of these materials as a function of incident angle and state of polarization. We compared the experimental data to theoretical rough surface scattering models to understand the absorption mechanisms of these black materials and found good agreement. Furthermore, results from a new, highly absorbing black material in the infrared wavelength regime, known as carbon aerogels, are presented and shown to be superior or equivalent to existing black materials used by optical designers. In addition, we presented a new cylindrical-spherical cavity enclosure and calculated the apparent emissivity along the bounding surfaces of this new cavity enclosure. To our knowledge, this was the first calculation of the apparent emissivity for a cavity enclosure with obscuration. Finally, we proposed several improvements for each individual black material in order to achieve even higher absorption levels.

  2. Highly effective metal vapor absorbents based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zongwen; Gao, Yihua; Bando, Yoshio

    2002-12-01

    It was shown that, when filled with gallium, carbon nanotubes can absorb copper vapor with extraordinarily high efficiency. The copper vapor generated from the supporting copper grid upon heating to 800 °C in an electron microscope under a pressure of 1.0×10-5 Pa quickly deposited into the carbon nanotubes and formed an alloy with gallium where the vapor pressure is up to 500 times higher (5×10-3 Pa). These filled carbon nanotubes may be used as highly sensitive toxic or radioactive metal vapor absorbents since gallium also tends to form alloys with metals like mercury and uranium.

  3. Microwave-absorbing properties of Co-filled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Haiyan; Zhu Hong Guo Hongfan; Yu Liufang

    2008-10-02

    Co-filled carbon nanotubes composites were synthesized via using a simple and efficient wet chemistry solution method. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Microwave-absorbing properties were investigated by measuring complex permittivity and complex permeability of the absorber in a frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The reflection loss (R.L.), matching frequency (f{sub m}) and matching thickness (d{sub m}) were calculated using the theory of the absorbing wall. The electromagnetic properties and microwave-absorbing characteristics effects of the modified carbon nanotubes by the encapsulation of metal Co were investigated. A matching thickness is found corresponding to a matching frequency. The maximum reflection loss is about -39.32 dB and the bandwidth corresponding to the reflection loss below -10 dB is 3.47 GHz. With increasing thickness, the maximum reflection loss shifts to lower frequency.

  4. Coal as a Substitute for Carbon Black

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushida, R. O.

    1982-01-01

    New proposal shows sprayed coal powder formed by extrusion of coal heated to plastic state may be inexpensive substitute for carbon black. Carbon black is used extensively in rubber industry as reinforcing agent in such articles as tires and hoses. It is made from natural gas and petroleum, both of which are in short supply.

  5. Evolution of black carbon properties in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black carbon deposited in soil from natural or deliberate wildfires and engineered black carbon products (biochar) intentionally added to soil are known to have significant effects on soil biogeochemical processes and in many cases to influence the yield and quality of crops and to enhance the abili...

  6. Hydroxyl radical and NOx production rates, black carbon concentrations and light-absorbing impurities in snow from field measurements of light penetration and nadir reflectivity of onshore and offshore coastal Alaskan snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, J. L.; Reay, H. J.; King, M. D.; Voisin, D.; Jacobi, H. W.; Domine, F.; Beine, H.; Anastasio, C.; MacArthur, A.; Lee-Taylor, J.

    2012-07-01

    Photolytic production rates of NO, NO2 and OH radicals in snow and the total absorption spectrum due to impurities in snowpack have been calculated for the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Snowpack (OASIS) campaign during Spring 2009 at Barrow, Alaska. The photolytic production rate and snowpack absorption cross-sections were calculated from measurements of snowpack stratigraphy, light penetration depths (e-folding depths), nadir reflectivity (350-700 nm) and UV broadband atmospheric radiation. Maximum NOx fluxes calculated during the campaign owing to combined nitrate and nitrite photolysis were calculated as 72 nmol m-2 h-1 for the inland snowpack and 44 nmol m-2 h-1 for the snow on sea-ice and snowpack around the Barrow Arctic Research Center (BARC). Depth-integrated photochemical production rates of OH radicals were calculated giving maximum OH depth-integrated production rates of ˜160 nmol m-2 h-1 for the inland snowpack and ˜110-120 nmol m-2 h-1 for the snow around BARC and snow on sea-ice. Light penetration (e-folding) depths at a wavelength of 400 nm measured for snowpack in the vicinity of Barrow and snow on sea-ice are ˜9 cm and 14 cm for snow 15 km inland. Fitting scaled HULIS (HUmic-LIke Substances) and black carbon absorption cross-sections to the determined snow impurity absorption cross-sections show a "humic-like" component to snowpack absorption, with typical concentrations of 1.2-1.5 μgC g-1. Estimates of black carbon concentrations for the four snowpacks are ˜40 to 70 ng g-1 for the terrestrial Arctic snowpacks and ˜90 ng g-1 for snow on sea-ice.

  7. EVALUATION OF CARBON BLACK SLURRIES AS CLEAN BURNING FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to examine the pumpability, atomization and combustion characteristics of slurries made of mixtures of carbon black with No. 2 fuel oil and methanol. Carbon black-No. 2 fuel oil and carbon black-methanol slurries, with carbon black contents of up to 50 ...

  8. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  9. Mid-infrared mode-locked pulse generation with multilayer black phosphorus as saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhipeng; Xie, Guoqiang; Zhao, Chujun; Wen, Shuangchun; Yuan, Peng; Qian, Liejia

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared saturable absorber mirror is successfully fabricated by transferring the mechanically exfoliated black phosphorus onto the gold-coated mirror. With the as-prepared black phosphorus saturable absorber mirror, a continuous-wave passively mode-locked Er:ZBLAN fiber laser is demonstrated at the wavelength of 2.8 μm, which delivers a maximum average output power of 613 mW, a repetition rate of 24 MHz, and a pulse duration of 42 ps. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a black phosphorus mode-locked laser at 2.8 μm wavelength has been demonstrated. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of black phosphorus flake as a new two-dimensional material for application in mid-infrared ultrafast photonics. PMID:26696157

  10. In Brief: Reducing black carbon emissions could immediately reduce global temperature increases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-03-01

    A new assessment by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) shows that measures to reduce emissions of black carbon, or soot, which is produced through burning of wood and other biofuels as well as by some industrial processes, could improve public health and help to significantly reduce projected global temperature increases. The Integrated Assessment of Black Carbon and Tropospheric Ozone highlights how specific measures targeting black carbon and other emissions from fossil fuel extraction, residential wood-burning cooking, diesel vehicles, waste management, agriculture, and small industries could affect climate. Full implementation of a variety of measures to reduce black carbon and methane emissions could reduce future global warming by about 0.5°C, the assessment found. Reducing black carbon could have substantial benefits in the Arctic, the Himalayas, and other snow-covered regions because black carbon that settles on top of snow absorbs heat, speeding melting of snow and ice. Black carbon emission reductions would affect global temperatures more quickly than carbon dioxide emission reductions. Furthermore, reducing black carbon emissions would improve public health in the regions that emit large amounts of the harmful air pollutant.

  11. Hollow carbon spheres in microwaves: Bio inspired absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Gorokhov, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Pasc, A.; Ballweg, T.; Mandel, K.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a heterostructure based on a monolayer of hollow glassy carbon spheres packed in 2D was experimentally surveyed with respect to its response to microwaves, namely, the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. Such an ordered monolayer of spheres mimics the well-known "moth-eye"-like coating structures, which are widely used for designing anti-reflective surfaces, and was modelled with the long-wave approximation. Based on the experimental and modelling results, we demonstrate that carbon hollow spheres may be used for building an extremely lightweight, almost perfectly absorbing, coating for Ka-band applications.

  12. Oxidation of electrodeposited black chrome selective solar absorber films

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, P.H.; Shanker, K.; Pettit, R.B.; Sowell, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopies have been used to study the composition and oxidation of electrodeposited black chrome films. The outer layer of the film is Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with the inner layer being a continuously changing mixture of Cr + Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Initially, approximately 40% by volume of the film is combined as Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and the volume percentage of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ increases to greater than 60% after only 136 hours at 250/sup 0/C. After approximately 3600 hours at 400/sup 0/C, the volume percentage of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ increased to as high as 80%. The thermal emittance decreased approximately linearly with increasing oxide content, while the solar absorptance remained constant until the percentage of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ exceeded approximately 70%. Oxidation was slower when the Cr/sup +3/ concentration in the plating bath was reduced from 16 g/l to 8 g/l, and when black chrome was deposited on stainless steel rather than sulfamate nickel.

  13. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and carbon... absorbers, condensers, or carbon adsorbers to meet a weight-percent emission reduction or parts per...

  14. Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Properties of Amorphous Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tingkai; Hou, Cuilin; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhu, Ruoxing; She, Shengfei; Wang, Jungao; Li, Tiehu; Liu, Zhifu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) with diameters in the range of 7–50 nm were used as absorber materials for electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic wave absorbing composite films were prepared by a dip-coating method using a uniform mixture of rare earth lanthanum nitrate doped ACNTs and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The microstructures of ACNTs and ACNT/PVC composites were characterized using transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, and their electromagnetic wave absorbing properties were measured using a vector-network analyzer. The experimental results indicated that the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ACNTs are superior to multi-walled CNTs, and greatly improved by doping 6 wt% lanthanum nitrate. The reflection loss (R) value of a lanthanum nitrate doped ACNT/PVC composite was −25.02 dB at 14.44 GHz, and the frequency bandwidth corresponding to the reflector loss at −10 dB was up to 5.8 GHz within the frequency range of 2–18 GHz. PMID:25007783

  15. Carbonaceous aerosols influencing atmospheric radiation: Black and organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere may both scatter and absorb solar radiation. The fraction associated with the absorbing component is generally referred to as black carbon (BC) and is mainly produced from incomplete combustion processes. The fraction associated with condensed organic compounds is generally referred to as organic carbon (OC) or organic matter and is mainly scattering. Absorption of solar radiation by carbonaceous aerosols may heat the atmosphere, thereby altering the vertical temperature profile, while scattering of solar radiation may lead to a net cooling of the atmosphere/ocean system. Carbonaceous aerosols may also enhance the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the fine particle (D < 2.5 {mu}m) source rates of both OC and BC. The source rates for anthropogenic organic aerosols may be as large as the source rates for anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, suggesting a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The role of BC in decreasing the amount of reflected solar radiation by OC and sulfates is discussed. The total estimated forcing depends on the source estimates for organic and black carbon aerosols which are highly uncertain. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is also described.

  16. Black Carbon Deposition on Glaciers and in the Seasonal Snowpack in Western Washington's Mountainous Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, I.; Kaspari, S.; Larrabee, M.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon deposition on snow and ice darkens the surface of glaciers and snowpack, reducing albedo. Radiation absorbed by black carbon in snow can accelerate snowmelt and change the timing of runoff. This is particularly important in Washington State, as glaciers and seasonal snowpack have shrunk considerably in recent years and are integral to the region's water resources. However, little data exists regarding the concentration of black carbon in Washington snow, which is necessary to determine if enough black carbon is present to substantially accelerate snowmelt. From the winter through the summer of 2012, we collected snow samples from the snow surface, snow pits and snow cores (< 5 m depth, in many cases capturing the entire annual snowpack). Study sites include the Nisqually and Emmons glaciers on Mt. Rainier, Blewett Pass in the central Cascades, N. Klawatti, Noisy and Sandalee glaciers in the North Cascades and Blue Glacier on Mt. Olympus. Samples were analyzed for black carbon using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), and select samples were also analyzed for black carbon using a Sunset Lab OC-EC Aerosol Analyzer to compare with the SP2 method. We use the resultant data set to examine how snow accumulation, dry deposition, and proximity to emission sources (such as the Puget Sound metropolitan area) affect black carbon concentration in snow and ice. The results of this research provide insight in to 1) regional scale variation in black carbon deposition, 2) temporal trends in black carbon deposition, and 3) the persistence of black carbon in the snowpack throughout the season.

  17. Black carbon concentrations and mixing state in the Finnish Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, T.; Brus, D.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Svensson, J.; Asmi, E.; Lihavainen, H.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition was measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) in the Finnish Arctic during winter 2011-2012. The Sammaltunturi measurement site at the Pallas GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station receives air masses from different source regions including the Arctic Ocean and continental Europe. The SP2 provides detailed information about mass distributions and mixing state of refractory black carbon (rBC). The measurements showed widely varying rBC mass concentrations (0-120 ng m-3), which were related to varying contributions of different source regions and aerosol removal processes. The rBC mass was log-normally distributed showing a relatively constant rBC core mass mean diameter with an average of 194 nm (75-655 nm sizing range). On average, the number fraction of particles containing rBC was 0.24 (integrated over 350-450 nm particle diameter range) and the average particle diameter to rBC core volume equivalent diameter ratio was 2.0 (averaged over particles with 150-200 nm rBC core volume equivalent diameters). These average numbers mean that the observed rBC core mass mean diameter is similar to those of aged particles, but the observed particles seem to have unusually high particle to rBC core diameter ratios. Comparison of the measured rBC mass concentration with that of the optically detected equivalent black carbon (eBC) using an Aethalometer and a MAAP showed that eBC was larger by a factor of five. The difference could not be fully explained without assuming that only a part of the optically detected light absorbing material is refractory and absorbs light at the wavelength used by the SP2. Finally, climate implications of five different black carbon mixing state representations were compared using the Mie approximation and simple direct radiative forcing efficiency calculations. These calculations showed that the observed mixing state means significantly lower warming effect or even a net cooling effect when compared with

  18. Modified carbon black materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Pollak, Elad; Lux, Simon

    2016-06-14

    A lithium (Li) ion battery comprising a cathode, a separator, an organic electrolyte, an anode, and a carbon black conductive additive, wherein the carbon black has been heated treated in a CO.sub.2 gas environment at a temperature range of between 875-925 degrees Celsius for a time range of between 50 to 70 minutes to oxidize the carbon black and reduce an electrochemical reactivity of the carbon black towards the organic electrolyte.

  19. Patterning and hardening of gold black infrared absorber by shadow mask deposition with ethyl cyanoacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjwani, Deep; Nader-Esfahani, Nima; Maukonen, Doug; Rezadad, Imen; Boroumand, Javaneh; Smith, Evan; Nath, Janardan; Peale, R. E.

    2013-06-01

    Patterning of gold-black infrared absorbing films by stencil lithography and hardening by polymer infusion is reported. Gold black nano-structured films are deposited through a thin metal shadow mask in a thermal evaporator in ~400 mTorr pressure of inert gas, followed by ethyl cyanoacrylate fuming through the same mask to produce rugged IR absorptive patterns of ~100 micron scale dimensions. Infrared absorptivity is determined by transmission and reflectivity measurements using a Fourier spectrometer and infrared microscope. Results indicate that the optimized hardening process reduces the usual degradation of the absorptivity with age. This work has potential application to infrared array bolometers.

  20. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Cheryl L; Shepson, Paul B; Subramanian, R; Cambaliza, Maria O L; Heimburger, Alexie; McCabe, David; Baum, Ellen; Stirm, Brian H; Bond, Tami C

    2016-02-16

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of natural gas is flared and vented in the world annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. About 7 BCM per year is flared in the United States, and half is from North Dakota alone. There are few emission measurements from associated gas flares and limited black carbon (BC) emission factors have been previously reported from the field. Emission plumes from 26 individual flares in the Bakken formation in North Dakota were sampled. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. Particle optical absorption was measured using a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a single particle soot photometer. The BC emission factors varied over 2 orders of magnitude, with an average and uncertainty range of 0.14 ± 0.12 g/kg hydrocarbons in associated gas and a median of 0.07 g/kg which represents a lower bound on these measurements. An estimation of the BC emission factor derived from PSAP absorption provides an upper bound at 3.1 g/kg. These results are lower than previous estimations and laboratory measurements. The BC mass absorption cross section was 16 ± 12 m(2)/g BC at 530 nm. The average absorption Ångström exponent was 1.2 ± 0.8, suggesting that most of the light absorbing aerosol measured was black carbon and the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon was small. PMID:26764563

  1. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  2. Brominated carbon black: An EDXD study

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Marilena; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2014-06-19

    An energy dispersive X-Ray study of pure and brominated carbon black was carried out. The analysis of the diffraction patterns reveals that the low bromine load (ca.1% mol) is trapped into the structure, without significantly modifying it. This allows the application of the difference methods, widely tested for electrolyte solutions, inorganic matrices containing metals and isomorphic substitutions.

  3. Carbon black and carbon black-conducting polymer composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeshwar, K.; Wampler, W.A.; Goeringer, S.; Gerspacher, M.

    1996-12-31

    A large fraction of the carbon black commercially produced in the U. S. and other parts of the world goes into the automobile tire industry and other rubber applications. However, specialty applications of this material are expected to grow in the future. The present study explores the applicability of composites of carbon black and an electronically conductive polymer, polypyrrole, in environmental pollution abatement scenarios. Chromium was used as a model environmental pollutant for demonstration of our approach.

  4. Cycling of Black Carbon in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Alysha I.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Black Carbon (BC) is a byproduct of biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial timescales in the world's oceans has remained unknown. Here, we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) isolated by solid phase extraction (SPE) and determined its residence time. The range of DBC structures and 14C ages indicates that DBC is not homogeneous in the ocean. We conclude that there are at least two distinct pools of marine DBC, a younger pool that cycles on centennial timescales and an ancient pool that cycles on >105 year timescales.

  5. Retrieval of Black Carbon Absorption from Proposed Satellite Measurements Over the Ocean Glint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Matins, J. V.; Remer, L. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Haze and air pollution includes many chemicals that together form small particles suspended in the air called aerosols. One of the main ingredients found to affect climate and human health is Black Carbon. Black particles emitted from engines that do not burn the fuel completely, e.g. old trucks. Black carbon absorption of sunlight emerges as one of the key components of man-made forcing of climate. However, global characterization of black carbon emissions, distribution and pathways in which it can affect the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the atmosphere is very uncertain. A new method is proposed to measure sunlight absorption by fine aerosol particles containing black carbon over the ocean glint from a satellite mission designed for this purpose. The satellite will scan the same spot over the ocean in the glint plane and a plane 40 degrees off-glint a minute apart, collecting measurements of the reflected light across the solar spectrum. First the dark ocean off the glint is used to derive aerosol properties. Then the black carbon absorption is derived prop the attenuation of the bright glint by the aerosol layer. Such measurements if realized in a proposed future mission - COBRA are expected to produce global monthly climatology of black carbon absorption with high accuracy (110 to 15%) that can show their effect on climate.

  6. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  7. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  8. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  9. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  10. Black carbon characterization in Quebec black spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Quideau, Sylvie; Wasylishen, Roderick; MacKenzie, M. Derek

    2014-05-01

    Black carbon (BC), an important component of the global soil carbon pool, is a major by-product of wildfires in Quebec black spruce forests. However, BC characteristics vary depending on the environmental conditions under which it is formed and this may further affect its resistance to degradation. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and physical properties of BC formed under variable fire severity to assess its potential for recalcitrance as a passive carbon pool. Samples (n = 267) of BC produced by early season wildfires in 2005-2007 were collected from the surface of black spruce forest floors to cover the range of severity encountered in these fire-affected forests. Representative samples (n = 33) were then analyzed using elemental analysis, solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and surface area analysis (BET method). Properties of BC sampled in the field were compared with those of samples produced under a range of controlled formation conditions in the laboratory. The NMR spectra of the BC collected on sites affected by low fire severity showed a distribution of total intensity between the different spectral regions very similar to those of unburned fuels, and were dominated by peaks indicative of cellulose, while spectra for BC from higher fire severity sites were dominated by a broad peak assigned to aromatic carbons. Atomic H/C and O/C ratios decreased along the fire severity gradient, confirming that increasing severity was associated with an increase in condensation. By comparing field- to laboratory-produced samples, we concluded that the temperature of formation in the field ranged between 75 and 250 ° C. In all analyzed BC samples, the fraction of aromatic carbon:total carbon was low, suggesting that the freshly produced BC in this boreal forest environment may be susceptible to rapid physical alteration and chemical degradation. Nevertheless, it is important to highlight

  11. Black Carbon characterization in Quebec black spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, L. N.; Wasylishen, R. E.; MacKenzie, M. D.; Quideau, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), the solid carbonaceous residue of incomplete combustion, is a major by-product of wildfires in Quebec black spruce forests. Because of its estimated recalcitrance, it is considered a valuable pool in the global carbon cycle. However, BC characteristics, and more specifically its resistance to degradation depend on its conditions of formation. The objective of this study was to characterize BC chemical and physical properties under varying fire severities in order to assess its potential for recalcitrance as a passive carbon pool. Fresh BC samples from the forest floor were collected in 2010 from Quebec black spruce forests stands that had burnt 3-5 years prior. Fire severity was assessed at each sampling location and a total of 33 samples were selected to cover the range of severity encountered in these burnt forests. Samples were further analyzed for aromaticity and porosity using elemental and proximate analyses, solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface area (SA) analysis. They were then compared to BC samples produced under controlled conditions in the laboratory (lab-BC). The 13C NMR spectra of the BC collected on low fire severity sites showed a distribution of total intensity between the different spectral regions very similar to those of unburnt fuels. They were generally dominated by a peak at 74 ppm indicative of cellulose. On the other hand, 13C NMR spectra obtained for BC from high fire severity sites were dominated by peaks from aromatic carbons. When compared to the lab-BC NMR spectra, we concluded that the temperature of formation for the 33 analyzed samples ranged between 75°C and 250°C and that pyrolysis conditions prevailed, which points towards BC formation by a smouldering fire. Atomic ratio values (H/C = [1.36-0.77]; O/C = [0.75-0.30]) decreased with increasing fire severity and were in agreement with the results from 13C NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the

  12. On the black carbon problem and its solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) warms air temperatures in at least seven major ways: (a) directly absorbing downward solar radiation, (b) absorbing upward reflected solar radiation when it is situated above bright surfaces, such as snow, sea ice, and clouds, (c) absorbing some infrared radiation, (d) absorbing additional solar and infrared radiation upon obtaining a coating, (e) absorbing radiation multiply reflected within clouds when situated interstitially between cloud drops, (f) absorbing additional radiation when serving as CCN or scavenged inclusions within cloud drops, and (g) absorbing solar radiation when deposited on snow and sea ice, reducing the albedos of both. Modeling of the climate effects of BC requires treatment of all these processes in detail. In particular, treatment of BC absorption interstitially between cloud drops and from multiply-dispersed cloud drop BC inclusions must be treated simultaneously with treatment of cloud indirect effects to determine the net effects of BC on cloud properties. Here, results from several simulations of the effects of BC from fossil fuel and biofuel sources on global and regional climate and air pollution health are summarized. The simulations account for all the processes mentioned. Results are found to be statistically significant relative to chaotic variability in the climate system. Over time and in steady state, fossil-fuel soot plus biofuel soot are found to enhance warming more than methane. The sum of the soots causes less steady-state warming but more short term warming than does carbon dioxide. Thus eliminating soot emissions from both sources may be the fastest method of reducing rapid climate warming and possibly the only method of saving the Arctic ice. Eliminating such emissions may also reduce over 1.5 million deaths worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Short term mitigation options include the targeting of fossil-fuel and biofuel BC sources with particle traps, new stove technologies, and rural

  13. Black Carbon Measurements of Flame-Generated Soot as Determinedby Optical, Thermal-Optical, Direct Absorption,and Laser Incandescence Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Black carbon (BC), light absorbing particles emitted primarily from incomplete combustion, is operationally defined through a variety of instrumental measurements rather than with a universal definition set forth by the research or regulatory communities. To examine the consiste...

  14. Environmental Technology Verification Program Advanced Monitoring Systems Center Quality Assurance Project Plan for Verification of Black Carbon Monitors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Black carbon is a term that is commonly used to describe strongly light absorbing carbon (LAC), which is thought to play a significant role in global climate change through direct absorption of light, interaction with clouds, and by reducing the reflectivity of snow and ice. BC ...

  15. Stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.

    I use a general circulation model of Earth's climate to simulate stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols, varying the altitude of injection, initial particle size, and whether the deposited black carbon modifies ground albedo. 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols injected into the stratosphere each year will cause significant enough surface cooling to negate anthropogenic warming if the aerosols are small (r=0.03 mum) or if the aerosols are injected into the middle stratosphere, although using small aerosols causes large regional cooling effects that would be catastrophic to agriculture. The aerosols cause significant stratospheric heating, resulting in stratospheric ozone destruction and circulation changes, most notably an increase in the Northern Hemisphere polar jet, which forms an Arctic ozone hole and forces a positive mode of the Arctic Oscillation. The hydrologic cycle is perturbed, specifically the summer monsoon system of India, Africa, and East Asia, resulting in monsoon precipitation collapse. Global primary productivity is decreased by 35.5% for the small particle case. Surface cooling causes some sea ice regrowth, but not at statistically significant levels. All of these climate impacts are exacerbated for small particle geoengineering, with high altitude geoengineering with the default particle size (r=0.08 mum) causing a reasonable amount of cooling, and large particle (r=0.15 mum) geoengineering or particle injection into the lower stratosphere causing few of these effects. The modification of ground albedo by the soot particles slightly perturbs the radiative budget but does not cause any distinguishable climate effects. The cheapest means we investigated for placing 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols into the stratosphere by diesel fuel combustion would cost 1.4 trillion initially and 541 billion annual, or 2.0% and 0.8% of GDP, respectively. The additional carbon dioxide released from combusting diesel to produce these aerosols is about 1

  16. Aerosol Absorption by Black Carbon and Dust: Implications of Climate Change and Air Quality in Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol distributions from 2000 to 2007 are simulated with the global model GOCART to attribute light absorption by aerosol to its composition and sources. We show the seasonal and interannual variations of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere over Asia, mainly black carbon and dust. and their linkage to the changes of anthropogenic and dust emissions in the region. We compare our results with observations from satellite and ground-based networks, and estimate the importance of black carbon and dust on regional climate forcing and air quality.

  17. High Black Carbon (BC) Concentrations along Indian National Highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract:Black carbon (BC), the optically absorbing component of carbonaceous aerosol, has direct influence on radiation budget and global warming. Vehicular pollution is one of the main sources for poor air quality and also atmospheric pollution. The number of diesel vehicles has increased on the Indian National Highways during day and night; these vehicles are used for the transport of goods from one city to another city and also used for public transport. A smoke plume from the vehicles is a common feature on the highways. We have made measurements of BC mass concentrations along the Indian National Highways using a potable Aethalometer installed in a moving car. We have carried out measurements along Varanasi to Kanpur (NH-2), Varanasi to Durgapur (NH-2), Varanasi to Singrauli (SH-5A) and Varanasi to Ghazipur (NH-29). We have found high concentration of BC along highways, the average BC mass concentrations vary in the range 20 - 40 µg/m3 and found high BC mass concentrations up to 600 μg/m3. Along the highways high BC concentrations were characteristics of the presence of industrial area, power plants, brick kilns and slow or standing vehicles. The effect of increasing BC concentrations along the National Highways and its impact on the vegetation and human health will be presented. Key Words: Black Carbon; Aethalometer; mass concentration; Indian National Highways.

  18. New Potential Sources for Black Onaping Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, L.; Schultz, P. H.; Wolbach, W. S.

    1997-01-01

    One intriguing and important issue of the Sudbury Structure concerns the source of the relatively large amount of C in the Onaping Formation Black member. This dilemma was recently addressed, and the conclusion was reached that an impactor could not have delivered all of the requisite C. Becker et al. have suggested that much of the C came from the impactor and reported the presence of interstellar He "caged" inside some fullerenes that may have survived the impact. So, conceivably, the C inventory in the Sudbury Structure comes from both target and impactor materials, although the known target rocks have little C. We discuss here the possibility of two terrestrial sources for at least some of the C: (1) impact evaporation/dissociation of C from carbonate target rocks and (2) the presence of heretofore-unrecognized C-rich (up to 26 wt%) siliceous "shale," fragments, which are found in the upper, reworked Black member. Experimental: Hypervelocity impact of a 0.635-diameter Al projectile into dolomite at 5.03 km/s (performed at the Ames Research Center vertical gun range) produced a thin, black layer (= 0.05 mm thick) that partially lined the crater and coated impactor remnants. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) imagery shows this layer to be spongelike on a submicron scale and Auger spectroscopic analyses yield: 33% C, 22% Mg, 19% 0, and 9% Al (from the projectile). Elemental mapping shows that all of the available 0 is combined with Ca and Mg, Al is not oxidized, and C is in elemental form. Dissociation efficiency of C from CO2 is estimated to be <10% of crater volume. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the C is highly disorganized graphite. Another impact experiment [4] also produced highly disordered graphite from a limestone target (reducing collector), in addition to small amounts of diamond/lonsdaleite/chaoite (oxidizing collector). These experiments confirm the reduction of C from carbonates in impact vapor plumes. Observational: SEM observations and

  19. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, A.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-05-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance) were determined over the course of a 28 day irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM-C to 55 ± 15 nM-C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. The concentration of DBC correlated with CDOM absorbance and the quality of DBC indicated by the ratios of different BPCAs correlated with CDOM absorbance spectral slope, suggesting the optical properties of CDOM may provide a proxy for both DBC concentrations and quality in natural waters. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 years. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Consequently, photo-degradation is posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the apparent survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but

  20. Qualitative determination of carbon black in food products.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Bermudez, E; Belai, N; Harp, B Petigara; Yakes, B J; Barrows, J N

    2012-01-01

    Carbon black (C.I. 77266) is an insoluble pigment produced by the partial combustion of hydrocarbons. The pigment is known by several synonyms, including vegetable carbon, lamp black and carbon ash, that correspond to the raw materials and methods used for its production. Vegetable carbon (E153) is permitted for use in colouring food in the European Union. The US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) has not approved the use of any type of carbon black for colouring food, although the agency batch certifies the pigment as D&C Black No. 2 for use in colouring certain cosmetics. Since carbon black (as vegetable carbon) may be present in food products offered for import into the United States, the USFDA's district laboratories need a qualitative analytical method for determining its presence. We have developed an extraction method for this purpose. A sample is broken down and dissolved with nitric acid. The resulting solution is filtered and treated with hydrochloric acid to dissolve any black iron oxide also present as a colour additive. A black residue remaining on the filter paper indicates the presence of carbon black in the food. We confirmed the presence of carbon black in residues from several standards and food products using Raman spectroscopy. The limit of detection for this method is 0.0001%. PMID:22035229

  1. Phase Behavior of Dilute Carbon Black Suspensions and Carbon Black Stabilized Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, Michael; Tiwari, Ayush; Bose, Arijit; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2014-11-01

    We use para-amino benzoic acid terminated carbon black (CB) as a tunable model particulate material to study the effect of inter-particle interactions on phase behavior and steady shear stresses in suspensions and particle-stabilized emulsions. We modulate inter-particle interactions by adding NaCl to the suspension, thus salting surface carboxylate groups. Surprisingly, yield stress behavior emerged at a volume fraction of CB as low as ϕCB = 0.008, and gel behavior was observed at ϕCB >0.05, well below the percolation threshold for non-interacting particles. The yield stress was found to grow rapidly with carbon black concentration suggesting that salt-induced hydrophobicity leads to strong inter-particle interactions and the formation of a network at low particle concentrations. The yield stresses of CB-stabilized emulsions also grows rapidly with carbon black concentrations, implying that inter-droplet interactions can be induced through the tuning of carbon black concentration in emulsion systems. Emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants show no inter-droplet interactions. In contrast, oil droplets in the CB-stabilized emulsion move collectively or are immobilized because of an interconnected CB network in the aqueous phase.

  2. Observation of black carbon, ozone and carbon monoxide in the Kali Gandaki Valley Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Kathayat, B.

    2014-12-01

    The increased melting of snow and ice in the arctic and the Himalaya is a growing concern for all of the earth's population. Deposition of black carbon (BC) on the snow and ice surface accelerates melting by absorbing the radiative energy and directly transferring all that energy onto the underlying surface. During pre-monsoon season, satellite images show a thick layer of haze covering the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) and the Himalayan foothills. Sub-micron particles are transported to the Himalaya from the IGP predominantly driven by the thermal valley wind system. The Himalayas consist of some of the tallest mountain ranges in the world, over 8000m tall that reach the stratosphere. The Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and has some of the highest up-valley winds in the world. It is also one of the most open connecting points for air from IGP to reach the Tibetan Plateau. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.) half-way along the Kali Gandaki valley. The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Here we present our observations of black carbon, ozone, carbon monoxide at Jomsom to show the diurnal and seasonal variability of the pollutants. The results show diurnal patterns in the concentration of these pollutants and also episodes of high pollutant transport along the valley. These transport episodes are more common during the pre-monsoon season which indicates that deep mountain valleys like the Kali Gandaki valley facilitate the transport of pollutants and thus promote snow and glacial melting.

  3. Finding consistency between different views of the absorption enhancement of black carbon: An observationally constrained hybrid model to support a transition in optical properties with mass fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Whitehead, J.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Villegas, E.; Kong, S.; Williams, P. I.; Ting, Y. C.; Haslett, S.; Taylor, J.; Morgan, W.; McFiggans, G.; Spracklen, D. V.; Reddington, C.

    2015-12-01

    The mixing state of black carbon is uncertain yet has a significant influence on the efficiency with which a particle absorbs light. In turn, this may make a significant contribution to the uncertainty in global model predictions of the black carbon radiative budget. Previous modelling studies that have represented this mixing state using a core-shell approach have shown that aged black carbon particles may be considerably enhanced compared to freshly emitted black carbon due to the addition of co-emitted, weakly absorbing species. However, recent field results have demonstrated that any enhancement of absorption is minor in the ambient atmosphere. Resolving these differences in absorption efficiency is important as they will have a major impact on the extent to which black carbon heats the atmospheric column. We have made morphology-independent measurements of refractory black carbon mass and associated weakly absorbing material in single particles from laboratory-generated diesel soot and black carbon particles in ambient air influenced by traffic and wood burning sources and related these to the optical properties of the particles. We compared our calculated optical properties with optical models that use varying mixing state assumptions and by characterising the behaviour in terms of the relative amounts of weakly absorbing material and black carbon in a particle we show a sharp transition in mixing occurs. We show that the majority of black carbon particles from traffic-dominated sources can be treated as externally mixed and show no absorption enhancement, whereas models assuming internal mixing tend to give the best estimate of the absorption enhancement of thickly coated black carbon particles from biofuel or biomass burning. This approach reconciles the differences in absorption enhancement previously observed and offers a systematic way of treating the differences in behaviour observed.

  4. Longitudinal variability of black carbon vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. P.; Weinzierl, B.; Samset, B. H.; Perring, A. E.; Dollner, M.; Heimerl, K.; Markovic, M. Z.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol contributes substantially to both climate forcing and climate forcing uncertainty. An important source of this uncertainty derives from the difficulty in predicting BC's global abundance and vertical distribution. Here we present a multi-year record of black carbon (BC) vertical concentration profiles from both sides of the Atlantic, obtained from airborne Single Particle Soot Photometers (SP2s) flown on the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon research aircraft from the CONCERT, ACCESS, DC3, SEAC4RS, and SALTRACE campaigns. The measurements constrain the relative rates of BC transport/removal from, and zonal mixing in, the upper troposphere, as well as the range of BC loadings in these regions. They also constrain the time-rates of change of BC loads in altitudes at which it is a highly efficient (although sparse) climate forcer, and a relatively long-lived aerosol tracer. We find that concentration of BC in the upper troposphere can vary by a factor 10. Over the Northern mid-latitudes concentrations are however consistent to a fraction of this range over wide longitudinal ranges, over month-long timescales. The data show that BC becomes zonally mixed here starting at 500 hPa and extending to near the tropopause. These results imply broader value than previously associated with measured vertical profiles in constraining global scale BC loadings aloft.

  5. Influence of public transport in black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Y.; Oyola, P.; Gramsch, E. V.; Moreno, F.; Rubio, M.

    2013-05-01

    As a consequence of poor air quality in Santiago de Chile, several measures were taken by the local authorities to improve the environmental conditions and protect the public health. In year 2005 the Chilean government implemented a project called "Transantiago" aimed to introduce major modifications in the public transportation system. The primary objectives of this project were to: provide an economically, socially and environmentally sustainable service and improve the quality of service without increasing fares. In this work we evaluate the impact of the Transantiago system on the black carbon pollution along four roads directly affected by the modification to the transport system. The black carbon has been used to evaluate changes in air quality due to changes in traffic. The assessment was done using measurements of black carbon before Transantiago (June-July 2005) and after its implementation (June-July 2007). Four sites were selected to monitor black carbon at street levels, one site (Alameda) that represents trunk-bus streets, i.e., buses crossing the city through main avenues. Buses using these streets had an important technological update with respect to 2005. Two streets (Usach and Departamental) show a mixed condition, i.e., they combine feeder and trunk buses. These streets combine new EURO III buses with old buses with more than 3 years of service. The last street (Eliodoro Yañez) represent private cars road without public transportation and did not experience change. Hence, the results from the years 2005 and 2007 can be directly compared using an appropriate methodology. To ensure that it was not the meteorological conditions that drive the trends, the comparison between year 2005 and 2007 was done using Wilcoxon test and a regression model. A first assessment at the four sites suggested a non decrease in black carbon concentration from 2005 to 2007, except for Alameda. A first statistical approach confirmed small increases in BC in Usach and E

  6. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, A.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzene polycarboxylic acid oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance) were determined over the course of a 28 d irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM C to 55 ± 15 nM C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 yr. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Photo-degradation is therefore posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but by the rate at which they are cycled through the surface ocean's photic zone.

  7. Respiratory health effects of carbon black: a survey of European carbon black workers.

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, K; Trethowan, N W; Harrington, J M; Rossiter, C E; Calvert, I A

    1993-01-01

    A study population of 3086 employees was identified in 18 carbon black production plants in seven European countries. Respiratory health questionnaires, spirometry, and chest radiographs were used to estimate effects on health and personal monitoring procedures were employed to measure current exposure to inspirable and respirable dust along with sulphur and carbon monoxide. The low concentrations of gaseous contaminants made the generation of their current and cumulative exposure indices impossible. Low responses from some plants restricted the final analysis to 1742 employees in 15 plants (81% response rate) for respiratory symptoms and spirometry, and 1096 chest radiographs from 10 plants (74% response rate). In total, 1298 respirable and 1317 inspirable dust samples, as well as 1301 sulphur dioxide and 1322 carbon monoxide samples were collected. This study is the first to include a comprehensive and concurrent assessment of occupational exposure to carbon black dust and its associated gaseous contaminants. Cough, sputum, and the symptoms of chronic bronchitis were found to be associated with increasing indices of current exposure. Lung function tests also showed small decreases in relation to increasing dust exposure in both smokers and non-smokers. Nearly 25% of the chest radiographs showed small opacities of category 0/1 or greater. These were strongly associated with indices of cumulative dust exposure. The findings are consistent with a non-irritant effect of carbon black dust on the airways combined with dust retention in the lungs. Further cross sectional studies are planned to investigate whether long term exposure to carbon black dust causes damage to the lung parenchyma. PMID:8280639

  8. Comment on "Radiative Absorption Enhancements Due to the Mixing State of Atmospheric Black Carbon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2013-01-01

    Cappa et al. (Reports, 31 August 2012, p. 1078) suggest that black carbon (BC) in a mixture absorbs only ~6% more sunlight than when volatile chemicals are evaporated from the mixture, and state that "many climate models may overestimate warming by BC." However, the authors misinterpret at least some model results and omit optical focusing at high relative humidity and of involatile components. Thus, their conclusion about model error is not demonstrated.

  9. The Effects of Black Carbon and Sulfate Aerosols in ChinaRegions on East Asia Monsoons

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bai; Liu, Yu; Sun, Jiaren

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China on East Asia monsoons and its precipitation processes by using the CAM3.0 model. It is demonstrated that sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China both have the effects to weaken East Asia monsoons in both summer and winter seasons. However, they certainly differ from each other in affecting vertical structures of temperature and atmospheric circulations. Their differences are expected because of their distinct optical properties, i.e., scattering vs. absorbing. Even for a single type of aerosol, its effects on temperature structures and atmospheric circulations are largely season-dependent. Applications of T-test on our results indicate that forcing from black carbon aerosols over China is relatively weak and limited. It is also evident from our results that the effects of synthetic aerosols (sulfate and black carbon together) on monsoons are not simply a linear summation between these two types of aerosols. Instead, they are determined by their integrated optical properties. Synthetic aerosols to a large degree resemble effects of sulfate aerosols. This implies a likely scattering property for the integration of black carbon and sulfate aerosols in China.

  10. Does carbon black disaggregate in lung fluid? A critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Len; Chaudhuri, Ishrat S; Krueger, Nils; McCunney, Robert J

    2012-10-15

    Carbon black is an industrially produced particulate form of nearly pure elemental carbon. The basic building blocks of carbon black are (1) primary particles, minute pieces of matter with defined physical boundaries; (2) aggregates, collections of strongly bound or fused particles; and (3) agglomerates, collections of weakly bound aggregates. Industrial carbon black is produced within a closed reactor where the primary particles form aggregates, which become the indivisible entities of carbon black. These aggregates then form agglomerates, which are the typical form of carbon black in commerce. Carbon black is often used in in vitro and in vivo particle toxicology investigations as a reference nanoparticle. The toxicology studies often report the sizes of the primary particles but rarely the sizes of the aggregates or agglomerates. It appears in many cases that there is a limited understanding of the fact that carbon black typically does not exist as primary particles but instead exists as aggregates and agglomerates. Moreover, many toxicology studies manipulate carbon black particles in order to disperse them so that the form of carbon black used in these toxicology studies may be substantially different from the form that may be encountered in the workplace environment. Since the main exposure route for carbon black is inhalation, the question arose as to whether inhaled carbon black may deagglomerate or disaggregate to either smaller aggregates or primary particles when in contact with lung fluids. This question relates to the concern that there may be additional hazards of smaller particles, such as their ability to translocate to tissues and organs beyond the lung and the ability to pass through the blood-brain barrier. The purpose of this assessment is to review the existing literature for evidence as to whether carbon black deagglomerates or disaggregates into smaller aggregates or primary particles when in contact with lung fluid. On the basis of a review

  11. Development of a prototype regeneration carbon dioxide absorber. [for use in EVA conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, P. S.; Baker, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    A prototype regenerable carbon dioxide absorber was developed to maintain the environmental quality of the portable life support system. The absorber works on the alkali metal carbonate-bicarbonate solid-gas reaction to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The prototype sorber module was designed, fabricated, and tested at simulated extravehicular activity conditions to arrive at optimum design. The unit maintains sorber outlet concentration below 5 mm Hg. An optimization study was made with respect to heat transfer, temperature control, sorbent utilization, sorber life and regenerability, and final size of the module. Important parameters influencing the capacity of the final absorber unit were identified and recommendations for improvement were made.

  12. Dual band sensitivity enhancements of a VO(x) microbolometer array using a patterned gold black absorber.

    PubMed

    Smith, Evan M; Panjwani, Deep; Ginn, James; Warren, Andrew P; Long, Christopher; Figuieredo, Pedro; Smith, Christian; Nath, Janardan; Perlstein, Joshua; Walter, Nick; Hirschmugl, Carol; Peale, Robert E; Shelton, David

    2016-03-10

    Infrared-absorbing gold black has been selectively patterned onto the active surfaces of a vanadium-oxide-based infrared bolometer array. Patterning by metal lift-off relies on protection of the fragile gold black with an evaporated oxide, which preserves much of gold black's high absorptance. This patterned gold black also survives the dry-etch removal of the sacrificial polyimide used to fabricate the air-bridge bolometers. For our fabricated devices, infrared responsivity is improved 22% in the long-wave IR and 70% in the mid-wave IR by the gold black coating, with no significant change in detector noise, using a 300°C blackbody and 80 Hz chopping rate. The increase in the time constant caused by the additional mass of gold black is ∼15%. PMID:26974804

  13. Double-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized using carbon black as the dot carbon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Li, Feng; Ren, Wen-Cai; Cong, Hongtao; Liu, Chang; Qing Lu, Gao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2006-07-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) were synthesized used carbon black as the dot carbon source by a semi-continuous hydrogen arc discharge process. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations revealed that most of the tubes were DWNTs with outer and inner diameters in the range of 2.67-4 nm and 1.96-3.21 nm, respectively. Most of the DWNTs were in a bundle form of about 10-30 nm in diameter with high purity (about 70%) from thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), resonant laser Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and TEM characterizations. It was found that carbon black as the dot carbon source could be easy controlled to synthesize one type of nanotube. A simple process combining oxidation and acid treatment to purify the DWNT bundles was used without damaging the bundles. The structure of carbon black, as the key element for influencing purity, bundle formation and purification of DWNTs, is discussed.

  14. Femtosecond solid-state laser based on a few-layered black phosphorus saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiancui; Wang, Yiran; Zhang, Baitao; Zhao, Ruwei; Yang, Kejian; He, Jingliang; Hu, Qiangqiang; Jia, Zhitai; Tao, Xutang

    2016-05-01

    In this Letter, a high-quality, few-layered black phosphorus (BP) saturable absorber (SA) was fabricated successfully, and a femtosecond solid-state laser modulated by BP-SA was experimentally demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Pulses as short as 272 fs were achieved with an average output power of 0.82 W, corresponding to the pulse energy of 6.48 nJ and peak power of 23.8 MW. So far, these represent the shortest pulse duration and highest output power ever obtained with a BP-based mode-locked solid-state laser. The results indicate the promising potential of few-layered BP-SA for applications in solid-state femtosecond mode-locked lasers. PMID:27128045

  15. Surface Chemistry and Water Dispersability of Carbon Black Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Burchell, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Formulation of water-stable carbon black dispersions is a double-sided task, which requires selection of a proper dispersing agents and matching it with the properties of a specific carbon black. Among other properties that affect water dispersability of carbon blacks (particle size, surface area, and aggregate structure), surface chemistry plays a prime-order role. We have characterized physical and chemical properties of several carbon black materials, and correlated them with the stability of dispersions formed with ionic and non-ionic surfactants. In particular, chemical characterization of surface functional groups on carbon blacks based on potentiometric titration measurements (pKa spectra) provided a comprehensive picture of pH effects on dispersion stability. The results obtained were complemented by information from physical characterization methods, such as XPS and FTIR. The selection of a suitable dispersing agent able to withstand large pH variations will be discussed.

  16. Thermal properties of carbon black aqueous nanofluids for solar absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongxiao; Meng, Zhaoguo; Wu, Daxiong; Zhang, Canying; Zhu, Haitao

    2011-07-01

    In this article, carbon black nanofluids were prepared by dispersing the pretreated carbon black powder into distilled water. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were explored. The photothermal properties, optical properties, rheological behaviors, and thermal conductivities of the nanofluids were also investigated. The results showed that the nanofluids of high-volume fraction had better photothermal properties. Both carbon black powder and nanofluids had good absorption in the whole wavelength ranging from 200 to 2,500 nm. The nanofluids exhibited a shear thinning behavior. The shear viscosity increased with the increasing volume fraction and decreased with the increasing temperature at the same shear rate. The thermal conductivity of carbon black nanofluids increased with the increase of volume fraction and temperature. Carbon black nanofluids had good absorption ability of solar energy and can effectively enhance the solar absorption efficiency.

  17. A comparison of black carbon measurement methods for combustion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, A. L.; Pavlovic, J.; Yelverton, T.; Hagler, G.; Aurell, J.; Ebersviller, S.; Seay, B.; Jetter, J.; Gullett, B.; Hays, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon is an important short-term climate forcer that has been linked with adverse health effects. Multiple black carbon measurement methodologies exist, but no standard measurement method or calibration material has been agreed upon. Moreover, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses elemental carbon in its ambient monitoring networks and in its emissions inventory, assuming that elemental carbon is equivalent to black carbon. Instrument comparisons with ambient aerosols have demonstrated considerable differences between black carbon and elemental carbon, as well as among different black carbon measurements. However, there have been few published comparable studies for source emissions. We used multiple measurement methods to quantify black carbon and elemental carbon emissions from a range of combustion sources (diesel gensets, coal fired boilers, prescribed fires and cookstoves) emitting particles of varying composition and physical characteristics. The ratio of black carbon to elemental carbon (BC/EC) ranged from 0.50 to 2.8 and depended upon the combustion source. The greatest agreement was observed for emissions from cookstoves (BC/EC = 1.1 ± 0.3). The largest differences were seen for emissions from large stationary diesel genset (BC/EC = 2.3 ± 0.5) and were most pronounced when a diesel particulate filter was used (BC/EC 2.5 ± 0.6). This suggests that this source category may be underrepresented in emissions inventories based on elemental carbon. Black carbon concentrations derived from filter-based attenuation were highly correlated with photo-acoustic absorption measurements, but were generally 50% greater. This is likely due to the choice of calibration factor, which is currently ambiguously defined. These results highlight the importance of developing a standard calibration material to improve comparability among measurements.

  18. Performance of a new carbon dioxide absorbent, Yabashi lime® as compared to conventional carbon dioxide absorbent during sevoflurane anesthesia in dogs

    PubMed Central

    KONDOH, Kei; ATIBA, Ayman; NAGASE, Kiyoshi; OGAWA, Shizuko; MIWA, Takashi; KATSUMATA, Teruya; UENO, Hiroshi; UZUKA, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we compare a new carbon dioxide (CO2) absorbent, Yabashi lime® with a conventional CO2 absorbent, Sodasorb® as a control CO2 absorbent for Compound A (CA) and Carbon monoxide (CO) productions. Four dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane. Each dog was anesthetized with four preparations, Yabashi lime® with high or low-flow rate of oxygen and control CO2 absorbent with high or low-flow rate. CA and CO concentrations in the anesthetic circuit, canister temperature and carbooxyhemoglobin (COHb) concentration in the blood were measured. Yabashi lime® did not produce CA. Control CO2 absorbent generated CA, and its concentration was significantly higher in low-flow rate than a high-flow rate. CO was generated only in low-flow rate groups, but there was no significance between Yabashi lime® groups and control CO2 absorbent groups. However, the CO concentration in the circuit could not be detected (≤5ppm), and no change was found in COHb level. Canister temperature was significantly higher in low-flow rate groups than high-flow rate groups. Furthermore, in low-flow rate groups, the lower layer of canister temperature in control CO2 absorbent group was significantly higher than Yabashi lime® group. CA and CO productions are thought to be related to the composition of CO2 absorbent, flow rate and canister temperature. Though CO concentration is equal, it might be safer to use Yabashi lime® with sevoflurane anesthesia in dogs than conventional CO2 absorbent at the point of CA production. PMID:25843038

  19. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Alysha I.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a by-product of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial time scales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon isolated by solid phase extraction at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is 1.2 ± 0.1 μM in the deep Atlantic. The average 14C age of surface DBC is 4800 ± 620 14C years and much older in a deep water sample (23,000 ± 3000 14C years). The range of DBC structures and 14C ages indicates that DBC is not homogeneous in the ocean. We show that there are at least two distinct pools of marine DBC, a younger pool that cycles on centennial time scales and an ancient pool that cycles on >105 year time scales.

  20. Optical Properties of Small Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Geier, M.; Arienti, M.

    2013-12-01

    The optical properties of ice crystals play a fundamental role in modeling atmospheric radiation and hydrological cycle, which are critical in monitoring climate change. While Black Carbon (BC) is recognized as the dominant absorber with positive radiative forcing (warming) (Ramanathan & Carmichael, 2008), in-situ observations (Cappa, et al, 2012) indicate that the characterization of the mixing state of BC with ice crystals and other non-BC particles in global climate models (Ghan & Schwartz, 2007) needs further investigation. The limitation in the available mixing models is due to the drastically different absorbing properties of BC compared to other aerosols. We explore the scattering properties of ice crystals (in shapes commonly found in cirrus clouds and contrails - Yang, et al. 2012) with the inclusion of BC particles. The Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) (Yurkin & Hoekstra, 2011) is utilized to directly calculate the optical properties of the crystals with multiple BC inclusions, modeled as a distribution of spheres. The results are then compared with the most popular models of internal and external mixing (Liou, et al. 2011). The DDA calculations are carried out over a broad range of BC particle sizes and volume fractions within the crystal at the 532 nm wavelength and for ice crystals smaller than 50 μm. The computationally intensive database generated in this study is critical for understanding the effect of different types of BC inclusions on the atmosphere radiative forcing. Examples will be discussed to illustrate the modification of BC optical properties by encapsulation in ice crystals and how the parameterization of the BC mixing state in global climate models can be improved. Acknowledgements Support by Sandia National Laboratories' LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of

  1. New Potential Sources for Black Onaping Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, L.; Schultz, P. H.; Wolbach, W. S.

    1997-01-01

    One intriguing and important issue of the Sudbury Structure concerns the source of the relatively large amount of C in the Onaping Formation Black member. This dilemma was recently addressed, and the conclusion was reached that an impactor could not have delivered all of the requisite C. Becker et al. have suggested that much of the C came from the impactor and reported the presence of interstellar He "caged" inside some fullerenes that may have survived the impact. So, conceivably, the C inventory in the Sudbury Structure comes from both target and impactor materials, although the known target rocks have little C. We discuss here the possibility of two terrestrial sources for at least some of the C: (1) impact evaporation/dissociation of C from carbonate target rocks and (2) the presence of heretofore-unrecognized C-rich (up to 26 wt%) siliceous "shale," fragments, which are found in the upper, reworked Black member. Experimental: Hypervelocity impact of a 0.635-diameter Al projectile into dolomite at 5.03 km/s (performed at the Ames Research Center vertical gun range) produced a thin, black layer (= 0.05 mm thick) that partially lined the crater and coated impactor remnants. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) imagery shows this layer to be spongelike on a submicron scale and Auger spectroscopic analyses yield: 33% C, 22% Mg, 19% 0, and 9% Al (from the projectile). Elemental mapping shows that all of the available 0 is combined with Ca and Mg, Al is not oxidized, and C is in elemental form. Dissociation efficiency of C from CO2 is estimated to be <10% of crater volume. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the C is highly disorganized graphite. Another impact experiment [4] also produced highly disordered graphite from a limestone target (reducing collector), in addition to small amounts of diamond/lonsdaleite/chaoite (oxidizing collector). These experiments confirm the reduction of C from carbonates in impact vapor plumes. Observational: SEM observations and

  2. Soliton Thulium-Doped Fiber Laser With Carbon Nanotube Saturable Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Kieu, K.; Wise, F. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report stabilization of a thulium–holmium codoped fiber soliton laser with a saturable absorber based on carbon nanotubes. The laser generates transform-limited 750-fs pulses with 0.5-nJ energy. PMID:21731403

  3. Soliton Thulium-Doped Fiber Laser With Carbon Nanotube Saturable Absorber.

    PubMed

    Kieu, K; Wise, F W

    2009-02-01

    We report stabilization of a thulium-holmium codoped fiber soliton laser with a saturable absorber based on carbon nanotubes. The laser generates transform-limited 750-fs pulses with 0.5-nJ energy. PMID:21731403

  4. Geolocating Russian sources for Arctic black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2014-08-01

    To design and implement an effective emission control strategy for black carbon (BC), the locations and strength of BC sources must be identified. Lack of accurate source information from the Russian Federation has created difficulty for a range of research and policy activities in the Arctic because Russia occupies the largest landmass in the Arctic Circle. A project was initiated to resolve emission sources of BC in the Russian Federation by using the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF). It used atmospheric BC data from two Arctic sampling stations at Alert Nunavut, Canada, and Tiksi Bay, Russia. The geographical regions of BC emission sources in Russia were identified and summarized as follows: (1) a region surrounding Moscow, (2) regions in Eurasia stretching along the Ural Mountains from the White Sea to the Black Sea, and (3) a number of scattered areas from western Siberia to the Russian Far East. Particulate potassium ions, non-marine sulfate, and vanadium were used to assist in resolving the source types: forest fire/biomass burning, coal-fired power plant, and oil combustion. Correlating these maps with the BC map helped to resolve source regions of BC emissions and connect them to their corresponding source types. The results imply that a region south of Moscow and another north of the Ural Mountains could be significant BC sources, but none of the grid cells in these regions could be linked to forest fires, oil combustion, or coal-fired power plants based on these three markers.

  5. Black carbon aerosols in urban central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Rao, Ruizhong; Huang, Yinbo; Mao, Mao; Berg, Matthew J.; Sun, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    The first ever (to our knowledge), year-round measurements of Black Carbon (BC) aerosols in Hefei, an urban site of central China, from June 2012 to May 2013 are performed. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the black carbon in Hefei in terms of seasonal, monthly and diurnal variations, including their source identification. The annual mean BC mass concentration MBC is found to be 3.5±2.5 μg m-3 in Hefei, while the aerosol optical depth shows a yearly average value of ~0.6. The seasonality of MBC depicts minimum values in the summer, moderate levels in the spring and fall, and maximum in the winter. The monthly average values of MBC vary threefold, ranging from the lowest average value of 2.0±1.0 μg m-3 in July to the highest 6.0±2.6 μg m-3 during January. Diurnal variations exhibit two BC peaks, corresponding to the morning and evening rush hours. Higher median BC concentrations are observed during haze episodes compared with non-haze periods, although low MBC is sometimes observed for high visibility, which is probably indicative of the aerosol scattering dominating diminished visibility. Based on trajectory analyses, the haze BC pollutions are mostly classified into three types from local areas, long-range transport from the Yangtze Delta, and transport from the North China Plain. The median MBC values for haze groups attributed to biomass burning from MODIS wildfire maps are higher than related groups that are not, which is indicative of the significant enhancement of BC aerosols due to agricultural biomass burning. The study suggests that aerosol absorption contributes more to the observed haze episodes in fall compared to other seasons.

  6. Microfiber-based few-layer black phosphorus saturable absorber for ultra-fast fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Meng; Guo, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Xiao-Fang; Luo, Ai-Ping; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Yu, Xue-Feng; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Han

    2015-07-27

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP), as the most alluring graphene analogue owing to its similar structure as graphene and thickness dependent direct band-gap, has now triggered a new wave of research on two-dimensional (2D) materials based photonics and optoelectronics. However, a major obstacle of practical applications for few-layer BPs comes from their instabilities of laser-induced optical damage. Herein, we demonstrate that, few-layer BPs, which was fabricated through the liquid exfoliation approach, can be developed as a new and practical saturable absorber (SA) by depositing few-layer BPs with microfiber. The saturable absorption property of few-layer BPs had been verified through an open-aperture z-scan measurement at the telecommunication band. The microfiber-based BP device had been found to show a saturable average power of ~4.5 mW and a modulation depth of 10.9%, which is further confirmed through a balanced twin detection measurement. By integrating this optical SA device into an erbium-doped fiber laser, it was found that it can deliver the mode-locked pulse with duration down to 940 fs with central wavelength tunable from 1532 nm to 1570 nm. The prevention of BP from oxidation through the "lateral interaction scheme" owing to this microfiber-based few-layer BP SA device might partially mitigate the optical damage problem of BP. Our results not only demonstrate that black phosphorus might be another promising SA material for ultrafast photonics, but also provide a practical solution to solve the optical damage problem of black phosphorus by assembling with waveguide structures such as microfiber. PMID:26367661

  7. Light Absorption in Arctic Sea Ice - Black Carbon vs Chlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunro, O. O.; Wingenter, O. W.; Elliott, S.; Hunke, E. C.; Flanner, M.; Wang, H.; Dubey, M. K.; Jeffery, N.

    2015-12-01

    The fingerprint of climate change is more obvious in the Arctic than any other place on Earth. This is not only because the surface temperature there has increased at twice the rate of global mean temperature but also because Arctic sea ice extent has reached a record low of 49% reduction relative to the 1979-2000 climatology. Radiation absorption through black carbon (BC) deposited on Arctic snow and sea ice surface is one of the major hypothesized contributors to the decline. However, we note that chlorophyll-a absorption owing to increasing biology activity in this region could be a major competitor during boreal spring. Modeling of sea-ice physical and biological processes together with experiments and field observations promise rapid progress in the quality of Arctic ice predictions. Here we develop a dynamic ice system module to investigate discrete absorption of both BC and chlorophyll in the Arctic, using BC deposition fields from version 5 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) and vertically distributed layers of chlorophyll concentrations from Sea Ice Model (CICE). To this point, our black carbon mixing ratios compare well with available in situ data. Both results are in the same order of magnitude. Estimates from our calculations show that sea ice and snow around the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay has the least black carbon absorption while values at the ice-ocean perimeter in the region of the Barents Sea peak significantly. With regard to pigment concentrations, high amounts of chlorophyll are produced in Arctic sea ice by the bottom microbial community, and also within the columnar pack wherever substantial biological activity takes place in the presence of moderate light. We show that the percentage of photons absorbed by chlorophyll in the spring is comparable to the amount attributed to BC, especially in areas where the total deposition rates are decreasing with time on interannual timescale. We expect a continuous increase in

  8. Addressing inconsistencies in black carbon literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shonkoff, S. B.; Chafe, Z.; Smith, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    The literature describing black carbon (BC) emissions, and their effect on Earth’s climate, is growing rapidly. Unfortunately, inconsistencies in definitions; data collection and characterization; system boundaries; and time horizons have led to confusion about the relative importance of BC compared to other climate-active pollutant (CAPs). We discuss three sources of confusion: 1) Currently available BC inventories are not directly comparable to those used by the IPCC to track the greenhouse gases (GHGs) considered in the Kyoto Protocol (CO2, CH4, N2O). In particular, BC inventories often include all emissions: natural and anthropogenic in origin, controllable and non-controllable. IPCC inventories include only anthropogenic emissions. This BC accounting is appropriate for atmospheric science deliberations, but risks being interpreted as an overstatement against official Kyoto GHG inventories in a policy or control context. The IPCC convention of using 1750 as the starting year for emission inventories further complicates matters: significant BC emissions were emitted previous to that date by both human and natural sources. Though none of the pre-1750 BC emissions remain in the atmosphere today, their legacy presents challenges in assigning historical responsibility for associated global warming among sectors and regional populations. 2) Inconsistencies exist in the specific emissions sources considered in atmospheric models used to predict net BC forcing often lead to widely varying climate forcing estimates. For example, while some analyses consider only fossil fuel 1, others include both open biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion 2, and yet others include sources beyond biomass and fossil fuel burning 3. 3) Inconsistencies exist in how analyses incorporate the relationship between BC emissions and the associated cooling aerosols and processes, such as organic carbon (OC), and aerosol indirect effects (AIE). Unlike Kyoto GHGs, BC is rarely emitted in pure

  9. Comparison of carbon onions and carbon blacks as conductive additives for carbon supercapacitors in organic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäckel, N.; Weingarth, D.; Zeiger, M.; Aslan, M.; Grobelsek, I.; Presser, V.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates carbon onions (∼400 m2 g-1) as a conductive additive for supercapacitor electrodes of activated carbon and compares their performance with carbon black with high or low internal surface area. We provide a study of the electrical conductivity and electrochemical behavior between 2.5 and 20 mass% addition of each of these three additives to activated carbon. Structural characterization shows that the density of the resulting film electrodes depends on the degree of agglomeration and the amount of additive. Addition of low surface area carbon black (∼80 m2 g-1) enhances the power handling of carbon electrodes but significantly lowers the specific capacitance even when adding small amounts of carbon black. A much lower decrease in specific capacitance is observed for carbon onions and the best values are seen for carbon black with a high surface area (∼1390 m2 g-1). The overall performance benefits from the addition of any of the studied additives only at either high scan rates and/or electrolytes with high ion mobility. Normalization to the volume shows a severe decrease in volumetric capacitance and only at high current densities nearing 10 A g-1 we can see an improvement of the electrode capacitance.

  10. Characterization of Ambient Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Levy, M. E.; Zheng, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the strong absorption over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon (BC) is a key short-lived climate forcer, which contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. The impact of BC on the radiative forcing of the Earth-Atmosphere system is highly dependent of the particle properties. In this presentation, emphasis will be placed on characterizing BC containing aerosols in at the California-Mexico border to obtain a greater understanding of the atmospheric aging and properties of ambient BC aerosols. A comprehensive set of directly measured aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, hygroscopicity, volatility, and several optical properties, will be discussed to quantify the mixing state and composition of ambient particles. In Tijuana, Mexico, submicron aerosols are strongly influenced by vehicle emissions; subsequently, the BC concentration in Tijuana is considerably higher than most US cities with an average BC concentration of 2.71 × 2.65 g cm-3. BC accounts for 24.75 % × 9.44 of the total submicron concentration on average, but periodically accounts for over 50%. This high concentration of BC strongly influences many observed aerosol properties such as single scattering albedo, hygroscopicity, effective density, and volatility.

  11. Long-term Airborne Black Carbon Measurements on a Lufthansa Passenger Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Su, H.; Ditas, J.; Scharffe, D.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Y.; McMeeking, G. R.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Poeschl, U.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles containing black carbon are the most absorbing component of incoming solar radiation and exert a significant positive radiative forcing thus forming next to CO2 the strongest component of current global warming. Nevertheless, the role of black carbon particles and especially their complex interaction with clouds needs further research which is hampered by the limited experimental data, especially observations in the free troposphere, and in the UTLS (upper troposphere and lower stratosphere). In August 2014, a single particle soot photometer (SP2) was included in the extensive scientific payload of the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) project. CARIBIC is in operation since 1997 and carries out systematic observations of trace gas and aerosol sampling and on-line analyses, as well as DOAS remote sensing system at 10-12 km altitude. For this a special air freight container combining different instruments is transported on a monthly basis using a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 passenger aircraft with destinations from 120°W to 120°E and 10°N to 75°N. The integration of a SP2 offers the possibility for the first long-term measurement of global distribution of black carbon. Up to date the SP2 measurements have been analyzed for 392 flights hours over four continents (Fig. 1). The first measurements show promising results of black carbon including periods when background concentrations in the UTLS were encountered. Beside a general distribution of number and mass of black carbon particles, peak events were detected with up to 20 times higher concentrations compared to the background. Moreover, high concentration plumes have been observed continuously over a range of 10,000 km. Interestingly, our results show also a generally lower amount of black carbon mass in the tropics compared to the mid latitude northern hemisphere.

  12. The Arctic is especially sensitive to black carbon emissions from within the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, M.; Berntsen, T.; Seland; Kristjansson, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic has warmed twice as fast as the global average over the past century and is likely to be especially sensitive to black carbon aerosols. Black carbon warm the air by absorbing solar radiation and can promote snow melt when deposited in snow. In this study we address the question of how sensitive the Arctic climate is to black carbon emitted within the Arctic compared to black carbon emitted at mid-latitudes. We consider the emission-climate response spectrum and present a set of experiments using a coupled global climate model. The climate model includes a snow model to simulate the climate effect of BC deposited on snow. A new emission data set including BC emissions from flaring and a seasonal variation in the domestic sector has been used. The dominating BC emissions in the Arctic is related to oil and gas fields in north western Russia. We find that most of the BC-induced warming in the Arctic is caused by black carbon deposited on snow, rather than in the atmosphere. Black carbon emitted in the Arctic is more likely to get deposited at the surface since most of the concentrations stay at lower altitudes. Especially during winter, BC emitted in North-Eurasia is transported into the high Arctic at low altitudes. We find that BC emitted within the Arctic has an almost 5-times larger Arctic surface temperature response (per unit of emitted mass) compared to emissions at mid-latitudes. Today there are few within-Arctic sources of BC, but the emissions are expected to grow due to increased human activity in the Arctic. There is a great need to improve cleaner technologies if further development is to take place in the Arctic, especially since the Arctic has a significantly higher sensitivity to BC emitted within the Arctic compared to BC emitted at mid-latitudes.

  13. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Robert James; O'Brien, Michael Joseph

    2015-12-29

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  14. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Robert James; O'Brien, Michael Joseph

    2014-06-10

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  15. Development of a prototype regenerable carbon dioxide absorber for portable life support systems. [for astronaut EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Baker, B.

    1977-01-01

    The design and development of a prototype carbon dioxide absorber using potassium carbonate (K2CO3) is described. Absorbers are constructed of thin, porous sheets of supported K2CO3 that are spirally wound to form a cylindrical reactor. Axial gas passages are formed between the porous sheets by corrugated screen material. Carbon dioxide and water in an enclosed life support system atmosphere react with potassium carbonate to form potassium bicarbonate. The potassium carbonate is regenerated by heating the potassium bicarbonate to 150 C at ambient pressure. The extravehicular mission design conditions are for one man for 8 h. Results are shown for a subunit test module investigating the effects of heat release, length-to-diameter ratio, and active cooling upon performance. The most important effect upon carbon dioxide removal is the temperature of the potassium carbonate.

  16. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert James; Lewis, Larry Neil; O'Brien, Michael Joseph; Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Kniajanski, Sergei; Lam, Tunchiao Hubert; Lee, Julia Lam; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona

    2011-10-04

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides an amino-siloxane composition comprising at least one of structures I, II, III, IV or V said compositions being useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from gas streams such as power plant flue gases. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane compositions are provided. Also provided are methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide. The reaction of the amino-siloxane compositions provided by the present invention with carbon dioxide is reversible and thus, the method provides for multicycle use of said compositions.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Absorbers: An Engaging Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ticich, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A simple and direct method for measuring the absorption of carbon dioxide by two different substances is described. Lithium hydroxide has been used for decades to remove the gas from enclosed living spaces, such as spacecraft and submarines. The ratio of the mass of carbon dioxide absorbed to the mass of lithium hydroxide used obtained from this…

  18. Black Carbon Contribution to Organic Carbon Stocks in Urban Soil.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Potter, Jonathan; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Manning, David A C; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2015-07-21

    Soil holds 75% of the total organic carbon (TOC) stock in terrestrial ecosystems. This comprises ecosystem-derived organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC), a recalcitrant product of the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. Urban topsoils are often enriched in BC from historical emissions of soot and have high TOC concentrations, but the contribution of BC to TOC throughout the urban soil profile, at a regional scale is unknown. We sampled 55 urban soil profiles across the North East of England, a region with a history of coal burning and heavy industry. Through combined elemental and thermogravimetic analyses, we found very large total soil OC stocks (31-65 kg m(-2) to 1 m), exceeding typical values reported for UK woodland soils. BC contributed 28-39% of the TOC stocks, up to 23 kg C m(-2) to 1 m, and was affected by soil texture. The proportional contribution of the BC-rich fraction to TOC increased with soil depth, and was enriched in topsoil under trees when compared to grassland. Our findings establish the importance of urban ecosystems in storing large amounts of OC in soils and that these soils also capture a large proportion of BC particulates emitted within urban areas. PMID:26114917

  19. Characterization of highly absorbing black appliqués in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Meier, S R

    2001-06-01

    Angular and polarimetric directional hemispherical reflectance (DHR) measurements of three highly absorbing appliqués in the 2.5-14.3-microm IR spectral region are presented. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images are presented to probe the surface morphology of these appliqués. DHR measurements of Energy Science Laboratory, Incorporated (ESLI), Rippey, and Rodel appliqués were obtained at incidence angles of 8 degrees, 30 degrees, and 50 degrees and as a function of S, P, and unpolarized incident light. The ESLI appliqué exhibited the lowest DHR for all angles and incident polarization states. SEM images revealed a fibrous structure for the ESLI appliqué with fiber diameters of the order of 7-8 microm, whereas the Rippey and the Rodel appliqués showed spongelike surfaces with pore diameters of 40-50 and 30-40 microm, respectively. All the appliqués use cavities or fibers in conjunction with carbon compounds to absorb IR radiation. The optical system designed to perform these measurements, a method for correcting off-normal DHR measurements in center-mount integrating spheres, and sources of measurement error are also discussed. PMID:18357296

  20. Aerosol black carbon over Svalbard regions of Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Thakur, Roseline C.; Chaubey, Jai Prakash; Nair, Vijayakumar S.

    2016-03-01

    In view of the climate impact of aerosol Black Carbon (BC) over snow covered regions (through enhanced absorption of radiation as well as snow-albedo forcing), and in view of the increasing anthropogenic presence and influence in the northern polar regions, continuous long term measurements of airborne BC have been undertaken from the Svalbard region of Norwegian Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, 79°N, 12°E, 8 m a.s.l.). This study, employing data over a period of 4-years (2010-2013) have shown a consistent spring-time enhancement in BC concentrations, having a (climatological) seasonal mean value of ∼50.3 ± 19.5 ng m-3, nearly 3-times higher than the lowest BC concentrations in summer (∼19.5 ± 6.5 ng m-3). Spectral variation of absorbance indicates that long-range transported biomass burning aerosols contribute as high as 25% to the high BC concentrations in the Arctic atmosphere in spring. Concurrent estimates of BC concentrations in the Arctic snow (for an ensemble of snow samples collected over a period of time during spring) showed values ranging from 0.6 ppb to 4.1 ppb. These values have been used to estimate the BC scavenging ratio (SR). Our studies revealed a mean value of SR ∼98 ± 46, which varied over wide range from 40 to 184 for individual samples. In a broader perspective, the seasonal variations of atmospheric BC concentrations at the Arctic are similar to those seen at the high altitude Himalayas; even though the concentrations are much lower at Arctic. It is found that synoptic conditions mainly influence the high altitude Himalayas, while the influences of local anthropogenic influences are not negligible at the Arctic in modulating the seasonal variations of absorbing aerosols.

  1. 40 CFR 458.40 - Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon black lamp process subcategory. 458.40 Section 458.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Lamp Process Subcategory § 458.40 Applicability; description of the carbon black...

  2. 40 CFR 458.40 - Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon black lamp process subcategory. 458.40 Section 458.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Lamp Process Subcategory § 458.40 Applicability; description of the carbon black...

  3. Raman Spectroscopy for the Investigation of Carbon Based Black Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccato, A.; Jehlicka, J.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon based black pigments play an important role among artists' materials. The disordered structure of these materials is investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy, which helps in the comprehension of their production processes.

  4. 'Glory and the Curse of the Black Carbon'

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Glory spacecraft will improve our understanding of how the sun and airborne particles called aerosols (black carbons among them), affect Earth's climate. Set to launch February 2011, the mis...

  5. 6. VIEW SOUTHWEST, COOLING TROUGH REMAINS Imperial Carbon Black ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SOUTHWEST, COOLING TROUGH REMAINS - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  6. 4. VIEW SOUTHEAST, COMPRESSOR PADS Imperial Carbon Black Plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SOUTHEAST, COMPRESSOR PADS - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  7. 7. VIEW NORTHEAST, COOLING TANK Imperial Carbon Black Plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW NORTHEAST, COOLING TANK - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  8. 3. VIEW NORTH, COOLING TANK REMAINS Imperial Carbon Black ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTH, COOLING TANK REMAINS - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  9. 5. VIEW SOUTH, STORAGE BUILDING PIERS Imperial Carbon Black ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SOUTH, STORAGE BUILDING PIERS - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  10. 9. VIEW EAST, STORAGE BUILDING PIERS Imperial Carbon Black ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW EAST, STORAGE BUILDING PIERS - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  11. 8. VIEW NORTHEAST, WORKSHOP PIERS Imperial Carbon Black Plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW NORTHEAST, WORKSHOP PIERS - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  12. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, COMPRESSOR PADS Imperial Carbon Black Plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, COMPRESSOR PADS - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  13. Global Civil Aviation Black Carbon Particle Mass and Number Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettler, M. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a product of incomplete combustion emitted by aircraft engines. In the atmosphere, BC particles strongly absorb incoming solar radiation and influence cloud formation processes leading to highly uncertain, but likely net positive warming of the earth's atmosphere. At cruise altitude, BC particle number emissions can influence the concentration of ice nuclei that can lead to contrail formation, with significant and highly uncertainty climate impacts. BC particles emitted by aircraft engines also degrade air quality in the vicinity of airports and globally. A significant contribution to the uncertainty in environmental impacts of aviation BC emissions is the uncertainty in emissions inventories. Previous work has shown that global aviation BC mass emissions are likely to have been underestimated by a factor of three. In this study, we present an updated global BC particle number inventory and evaluate parameters that contribute to uncertainty using global sensitivity analysis techniques. The method of calculating particle number from mass utilises a description of the mobility of fractal aggregates and uses the geometric mean diameter, geometric standard deviation, mass-mobility exponent, primary particle diameter and material density to relate the particle number concentration to the total mass concentration. Model results show good agreement with existing measurements of aircraft BC emissions at ground level and at cruise altitude. It is hoped that the results of this study can be applied to estimate direct and indirect climate impacts of aviation BC emissions in future studies.

  14. Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

    2002-09-26

    Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

  15. Radiative absorption enhancement from coatings on black carbon aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Xinfeng; Yang, Lingxiao; Chen, Bing; Chen, Jianmin; Andersson, August; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-05-01

    The radiative absorption enhancement of ambient black carbon (BC), by light-refractive coatings of atmospheric aerosols, constitutes a large uncertainty in estimates of climate forcing. The direct measurements of radiative absorption enhancement require the experimentally-removing the coating materials in ambient BC-containing aerosols, which remains a challenge. Here, the absorption enhancement of the BC core by non-absorbing aerosol coatings was quantified using a two-step removal of both inorganic and organic matter coatings of ambient aerosols. The mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of decoated/pure atmospheric BC aerosols of 4.4±0.8m(2)g(-1) was enhanced to 9.6±1.8m(2)g(-1) at 678-nm wavelength for ambiently-coated BC aerosols at a rural Northern China site. The enhancement of MAC (EMAC) rises from 1.4±0.3 in fresh combustion emissions to ~3 for aged ambient China aerosols. The three-week high-intensity campaign observed an average EMAC of 2.25±0.55, and sulfates were primary drivers of the enhanced BC absorption. PMID:26874760

  16. Global civil aviation black carbon emissions.

    PubMed

    Stettler, Marc E J; Boies, Adam M; Petzold, Andreas; Barrett, Steven R H

    2013-09-17

    Aircraft black carbon (BC) emissions contribute to climate forcing, but few estimates of BC emitted by aircraft at cruise exist. For the majority of aircraft engines the only BC-related measurement available is smoke number (SN)-a filter based optical method designed to measure near-ground plume visibility, not mass. While the first order approximation (FOA3) technique has been developed to estimate BC mass emissions normalized by fuel burn [EI(BC)] from SN, it is shown that it underestimates EI(BC) by >90% in 35% of directly measured cases (R(2) = -0.10). As there are no plans to measure BC emissions from all existing certified engines-which will be in service for several decades-it is necessary to estimate EI(BC) for existing aircraft on the ground and at cruise. An alternative method, called FOX, that is independent of the SN is developed to estimate BC emissions. Estimates of EI(BC) at ground level are significantly improved (R(2) = 0.68), whereas estimates at cruise are within 30% of measurements. Implementing this approach for global civil aviation estimated aircraft BC emissions are revised upward by a factor of ~3. Direct radiative forcing (RF) due to aviation BC emissions is estimated to be ~9.5 mW/m(2), equivalent to ~1/3 of the current RF due to aviation CO2 emissions. PMID:23844612

  17. Long-term airborne black carbon measurements on a Lufthansa passenger aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditas, Jeannine; Su, Hang; Scharffe, Dieter; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Yuxuan; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Pöschl, Ulrich; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles containing black carbon are the most absorbing component of incoming solar radiation and exert a significant positive radiative forcing thus forming next to CO² the strongest component of current global warming (Bond, 2013). Nevertheless, the role of black carbon particles and especially their complex interaction with clouds needs further research which is hampered by the limited experimental data, especially observations in the free and upper troposphere, and in the UTLS (upper troposphere and lower stratosphere). Many models underestimate the global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon by a factor of almost 3 (Bond, 2013). In August 2014, a single particle soot photometer was included in the extensive scientific payload of the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) project. CARIBIC is in operation since 1997 (with an interruption for 2002-2005) and carries out systematic observations at 10-12 km altitude. For this a special air freight container combining different instruments is transported on a monthly basis using a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 passenger aircraft with destinations from 120°W to 120°E and 10°N to 75°N. The container has equipment for trace gas analyses and sampling and aerosol analyses and sampling and is connected to an inlet system that is part of the aircraft which contains a camera and DOAS remote sensing system. The integration of a single particle soot photometer (SP2) offers the possibility for the first long-term measurement of global distribution of black carbon and so far flights up to November 2015 have been conducted with more than 400 flight hours. So far the SP2 measurements have been analysed for flights over four continents from Munich to San Francisco, Sao Paulo, Tokyo, Beijing, Cape Town, Los Angeles and Hong Kong). The first measurements show promising results of black carbon measurements. Background concentrations in the UTLS

  18. An observation-based estimate of global black carbon and brown carbon AODs and radiative forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C. E.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-12-01

    We combined AERONET AODs with MODIS AODs, and obtained global AODs. Using the wavelength dependence of AERONET SSA, we extracted black carbon (BlC), brown carbon (BrC) and dust components of AODs. The assumptions we made are that a) BlC SSA and BlC SSA wavelength-dependence are influenced by BlC particles mixed with non-absorbing aerosols and b) brown carbon spheres identified by Alexander et al. (2008) represent all the BrC particles. Our global BlC AOD is 0.007 and accounts for 4.7% of total AOD. Our BrC AOD is 0.0027 (about 2% of total AOD) and the dust AOD is 0.036 (about 24% of total AOD). In comparison, AEROCOM models give dust AOD in the range from 7% to 44% while AEOCOM BlC AOD ranges from 0.4% to 5.9%. Our BlC AOD is greater than average AEROCOM BlC AOD. Using our observation-based AODs, we calculated radiative forcing for BrC and BlC using the Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiaiton (MACR) model. The results will be presented at AGU.

  19. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube from different grades of carbon black using arc discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Neha; Sharma, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of nanotube from different grades (Tread * A(non-ASTM), N134,N121,N660 and N330)of carbon black using DC arc discharge method at 40A current for 60sec. Carbon black samples of different grades were procured from industry (Aditya Birla Science and Technology Limited, India). Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) of the deposited carbon nanostructures suggests that MWCNTs are formed at 40A and for a minimal exposure time of 60sec.The result formed indicates the N330 grade of carbon black gets converted to MWCNTs (Multiwall Carbon nanotube) as compared to other grades.

  20. Induction of Inflammasome-dependent Pyroptosis by Carbon Black Nanoparticles*

    PubMed Central

    Reisetter, Anna C.; Stebounova, Larissa V.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Powers, Linda; Gupta, Amit; Grassian, Vicki H.; Monick, Martha M.

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation of nanoparticles has been implicated in respiratory morbidity and mortality. In particular, carbon black nanoparticles are found in many different environmental exposures. Macrophages take up inhaled nanoparticles and respond via release of inflammatory mediators and in some cases cell death. Based on new data, we propose that exposure of macrophages (both a macrophage cell line and primary human alveolar macrophages) to carbon black nanoparticles induces pyroptosis, an inflammasome-dependent form of cell death. Exposure of macrophages to carbon black nanoparticles resulted in inflammasome activation as defined by cleavage of caspase 1 to its active form and downstream IL-1β release. The cell death that occurred with carbon black nanoparticle exposure was identified as pyroptosis by the protective effect of a caspase 1 inhibitor and a pyroptosis inhibitor. These data demonstrate that carbon black nanoparticle exposure activates caspase 1, increases IL-1β release after LPS priming, and induces the proinflammatory cell death, pyroptosis. The identification of pyroptosis as a cellular response to carbon nanoparticle exposure is novel and relates to environmental and health impacts of carbon-based particulates. PMID:21525001

  1. Black Smoke and Black Carbon: Further investigation of the relationship between these ambient air metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Paul; Butterfield, David; Green, David; Fuller, Gary W.

    2011-07-01

    A previous paper ( Quincey, 2007) described a simple quadratic relationship between OECD Black Smoke Index ( IBS) and Black Carbon (aethalometry) measurements of ambient particulate samples ( CBC): C=√{4.18I+59.6}-7.72, based on their common link to optical absorption coefficient, supported by a single dataset. Further parallel datasets are presented here that support the general validity of the relationship, while highlighting limitations to the traditional Black Smoke method at kerbside sites, and variations between sites. The opportunity is taken to clarify some confusing aspects concerning published standard methods for Black Smoke.

  2. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, carbon... Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, carbon... Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, carbon... Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, carbon... Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices. (a)...

  6. The atmospheric lifetime of black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cape, J. N.; Coyle, M.; Dumitrean, P.

    2012-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) in the atmosphere contributes to the human health effects of particulate matter and contributes to radiative forcing of climate. The lifetime of BC, particularly the smaller particle sizes (PM2.5) which can be transported over long distances, is therefore an important factor in determining the range of such effects, and the spatial footprint of emission controls. Theory and models suggest that the typical lifetime of BC is around one week. The frequency distributions of measurements of a range of hydrocarbons at a remote rural site in southern Scotland (Auchencorth Moss) between 2007 and 2010 have been used to quantify the relationship between atmospheric lifetime and the geometric standard deviation of observed concentration. The analysis relies on an assumed common major emission source for hydrocarbons and BC, namely diesel-engined vehicles. The logarithm of the standard deviation of the log-transformed concentration data is linearly related to hydrocarbon lifetime, and the same statistic for BC can be used to assess the lifetime of BC relative to the hydrocarbons. Annual average data show BC lifetimes in the range 4-12 days, for an assumed OH concentration of 7 × 105 cm-3. At this site there is little difference in BC lifetime between winter and summer, despite a 3-fold difference in relative hydrocarbon lifetimes. This observation confirms the role of wet deposition as an important removal process for BC, as there is no difference in precipitation between winter and summer at this site. BC lifetime was significantly greater in 2010, which had 23% less rainfall than the preceding 3 years.

  7. Australian climate-carbon cycle feedback reduced by soil black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Johannes; Skjemstad, Jan; Sohi, Saran; Carter, John; Barson, Michele; Falloon, Pete; Coleman, Kevin; Woodbury, Peter; Krull, Evelyn

    2008-12-01

    Annual emissions of carbon dioxide from soil organic carbon are an order of magnitude greater than all anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions taken together. Global warming is likely to increase the decomposition of soil organic carbon, and thus the release of carbon dioxide from soils, creating a positive feedback. Current models of global climate change that recognize this soil carbon feedback are inaccurate if a larger fraction of soil organic carbon than postulated has a very slow decomposition rate. Here we show that by including realistic stocks of black carbon in prediction models, carbon dioxide emissions are reduced by 18.3 and 24.4% in two Australian savannah regions in response to a warming of 3∘C over 100 years. This reduction in temperature sensitivity, and thus the magnitude of the positive feedback, results from the long mean residence time of black carbon, which we estimate to be approximately 1,300 and 2,600 years, respectively. The inclusion of black carbon in climate models is likely to require spatially explicit information about its distribution, given that the black carbon content of soils ranged from 0 to 82% of soil organic carbon in a continental-scale analysis of Australia. We conclude that accurate information about the distribution of black carbon in soils is important for projections of future climate change.

  8. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate), and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.

  9. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate),more » and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.« less

  10. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean reveals that black carbon (BC) is a significant component of previously uncharacterized DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon to the ocean.

  11. Enviro-HIRLAM Applicability for Black Carbon Studies in Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuterman, Roman; Mahura, Alexander; Baklanov, Alexander; Kurganskiy, Alexander; Amstrup, Bjarne; Kaas, Eigil

    2015-04-01

    One of the main aims of the Nordic CarboNord project ("Impact of black carbon on air quality and climate in Northern Europe and Arctic") is focused on providing new information on distribution and effects of black carbon in Northern Europe and Arctic. It can be done through assessing robustness of model predictions of long-range black carbon distribution and its relation to climate change and forcing. In our study, the online integrated meteorology-chemistry/aerosols model - Enviro-HIRLAM (Environment - HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model) - is used. This study, at first, is focused on adaptation (model setup, domain for the Northern Hemisphere and Arctic region, emissions, boundary conditions, refining aerosols microphysics and chemistry, cloud-aerosol interaction processes) of Enviro-HIRLAM model and selection of most unfavorable weather and air pollution episodes for the Arctic region. Simulations of interactions between black carbon and meteorological processes in northern conditions for selected episodes will be performed (at DMI's supercomputer HPC CRAY-XT5), and then long-term simulations at regional scale for selected winter vs. summer months. Modelling results will be compared on a diurnal cycle and monthly basis against observations for key meteorological parameters (such as air temperature, wind speed, relative humidity, and precipitation) as well as aerosol concentration. Finally, evaluation of black carbon atmospheric transport, dispersion, and deposition patterns at different spatio-temporal scales; physical-chemical processes and transformations of black carbon containing aerosols; and interactions and effects between black carbon and meteorological processes in Arctic weather conditions will be done.

  12. Secondary brown carbon - Formation of light-absorbing compounds in atmospheric particulates from selected dicarbonyls and amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Christopher; Filippi, Alexander; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    One of the main open questions regarding organic compounds in atmospheric chemistry today is related to the formation of optically-active compounds and the occurrence of so called brown carbon (Andreae and Gelencsér, 2006). While organic compounds in ambient fine particles for decades have been assumed to not absorb solar radiation, thus resulting in a net cooling effect on climate (IPCC, 2007), it is now generally accepted that a continuum of light-absorbing carbonaceous species is present in fine aerosols (Pöschl, 2003). In this study, light-absorbing compounds from reactions between dicarbonyl compounds, i.e., glyoxal, methylglyoxal, acetylacetone, 2,3-butanedione, 2,5-hexanedione, and glutaraldehyde, and amine species, i.e., ammonia and glycine, were investigated at atmospherically relevant concentrations in bulk solution experiments mimicking atmospheric particulates. Product analyses were performed using UV/Vis spectrophotometry and (ultra) high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS), as well as ultra-high resolution (Orbitrap) mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-HRMS/MS). We demonstrate that light-absorbing compounds are formed from a variety of atmospherically relevant dicarbonyls via particle phase reactions with amine nucleophiles. Single dicarbonyl and mixed dicarbonyl experiments were performed and products were analyzed. The reaction products are suggested to be cyclic nitrogen containing compounds such as imidazoles or dihydropyridines as well as open chain compounds resulting from aldol condensation reactions. Further, the reactive turnover was found to be higher at increasing pH values. The aforementioned processes may be of higher relevance in regions with high aerosol pH, e.g., resulting from high ammonia emissions as for example in northern India (Clarisse et al., 2009). References Andreae, M.O., and Gelencsér, A. (2006): Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing

  13. Russian anthropogenic black carbon: Emission reconstruction and Arctic black carbon simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Storey, John M.; Romanov, Alexander; Hodson, Elke L.; Cresko, Joe; Morozova, Irina; Ignatieva, Yulia; Cabaniss, John

    2015-11-01

    Development of reliable source emission inventories is particularly needed to advance the understanding of the origin of Arctic haze using chemical transport modeling. This study develops a regional anthropogenic black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Russian Federation, the largest country by land area in the Arctic Council. Activity data from combination of local Russia information and international resources, emission factors based on either Russian documents or adjusted values for local conditions, and other emission source data are used to approximate the BC emissions. Emissions are gridded at a resolution of 0.1° × 0.1° and developed into a monthly temporal profile. Total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia in 2010 is estimated to be around 224 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a significant fraction of 36.2% to Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 25.0%, 20.3%, 13.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Three major BC hot spot regions are identified: the European part of Russia, the southern central part of Russia where human population densities are relatively high, and the Urals Federal District where Russia's major oil and gas fields are located but with sparse human population. BC simulations are conducted using the hemispheric version of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model with emission inputs from a global emission database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulation using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 30-65% of absorption aerosol optical depth measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four ground monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow

  14. Russian anthropogenic black carbon: Emission reconstruction and Arctic black carbon simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Storey, John M.; Romanov, Alexander; Hodson, Elke L.; Cresko, Joe; Morozova, Irina; Ignatieva, Yulia; Cabaniss, John

    2015-10-02

    Development of reliable source emission inventories is needed to advance the understanding of the origin of Arctic haze using chemical transport modeling. This paper develops a regional anthropogenic black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Russian Federation, the largest country by land area in the Arctic Council. Activity data from combination of local Russia information and international resources, emission factors based on either Russian documents or adjusted values for local conditions, and other emission source data are used to approximate the BC emissions. Emissions are gridded at a resolution of 0.1° × 0.1° and developed into a monthly temporal profile.more » Total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia in 2010 is estimated to be around 224 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a significant fraction of 36.2% to Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 25.0%, 20.3%, 13.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Three major BC hot spot regions are identified: the European part of Russia, the southern central part of Russia where human population densities are relatively high, and the Urals Federal District where Russia's major oil and gas fields are located but with sparse human population. BC simulations are conducted using the hemispheric version of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model with emission inputs from a global emission database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulation using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 30–65% of absorption aerosol optical depth measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four ground monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow, Alert

  15. Russian anthropogenic black carbon: Emission reconstruction and Arctic black carbon simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Storey, John M.; Romanov, Alexander; Hodson, Elke L.; Cresko, Joe; Ignatieva, Yulia; Cabaniss, John

    2015-10-02

    Development of reliable source emission inventories is needed to advance the understanding of the origin of Arctic haze using chemical transport modeling. This paper develops a regional anthropogenic black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Russian Federation, the largest country by land area in the Arctic Council. Activity data from combination of local Russia information and international resources, emission factors based on either Russian documents or adjusted values for local conditions, and other emission source data are used to approximate the BC emissions. Emissions are gridded at a resolution of 0.1° × 0.1° and developed into a monthly temporal profile. Total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia in 2010 is estimated to be around 224 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a significant fraction of 36.2% to Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 25.0%, 20.3%, 13.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Three major BC hot spot regions are identified: the European part of Russia, the southern central part of Russia where human population densities are relatively high, and the Urals Federal District where Russia's major oil and gas fields are located but with sparse human population. BC simulations are conducted using the hemispheric version of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model with emission inputs from a global emission database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulation using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 30–65% of absorption aerosol optical depth measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four ground monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow, Alert, and

  16. Formation mechanism of diamond nanocrystal from catalysed carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bin; Li, Tingju; Dong, Chuang; Zhang, Xingguo; Yao, Shan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Dehe; Ji, Shouhua; Jin, Junze

    2004-10-01

    Recently, our group has synthesized nanocrystal n-diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) from catalysed carbon black. Based on the results of XRD, TGA and DTA, a formation mechanism has been proposed to explain the phase transformation from carbon black to diamond nanocrystal. With the increase of temperature and hence the carbon diffusion in iron, the phase sequence is from Fe(OH)3 into Fe2O3, agr-Fe, ggr-Fe, then liquid iron. When the carbon in the liquid iron is saturated, DLC or graphite separates out of the liquid iron. With decrease of temperature, the carbon in ggr-Fe is separated out, and n-diamond nuclei form and grow.

  17. Black carbon and organic matter stabilization in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, J.; Liang, B.; Sohi, S.; Gaunt, J.

    2007-12-01

    Interaction with minerals is key to stabilization of organic matter in soils. Stabilization is commonly perceived to occur due to entrapment in pore spaces, encapsulation within aggregates or interaction with mineral surfaces. Typically only interactions between organic matter and minerals are considered in such a model. Here we demonstrate that black carbon may act very similar to minerals in soil in that it enhances the stabilization of organic matter. Mineralization of added organic matter was slower and incorporation into intra-aggregate fractions more rapid in the presence of black carbon. Added double-labeled organic matter was recovered in fractions with high amounts of black carbon. Synchrotron-based near-edge x-ray fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy coupled to scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) suggested a possible interaction of microorganisms with black carbon surfaces and metabolization of residues. These findings suggest a conceptual model that includes carbon-carbon interactions and by-passing for more rapid stabilization of litter into what is commonly interpreted as stable carbon pools.

  18. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract global warming?

    SciTech Connect

    Tami C. Bond; Haolin Sun

    2005-08-15

    Field measurements and model results have recently shown that aerosols may have important climatic impacts. One line of inquiry has investigated whether reducing climate-warming soot or black carbon aerosol emissions can form a viable component of mitigating global warming. Black carbon is produced by poor combustion, from our example hard coal cooking fires for and industrial pulverized coal boilers. The authors review and acknowledge scientific arguments against considering aerosols and greenhouse gases in a common framework, including the differences in the physical mechanisms of climate change and relevant time scales. It is argued that such a joint consideration is consistent with the language of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Results from published climate-modeling studies are synthesized to obtain a global warming potential for black carbon relative to that of CO{sub 2} (680 on a 100 year basis). This calculation enables a discussion of cost-effectiveness for mitigating the largest sources of black carbon. It is found that many emission reductions are either expensive or difficult to enact when compared with greenhouse gases, particularly in Annex I countries. Finally, a role for black carbon in climate mitigation strategies is proposed that is consistent with the apparently conflicting arguments raised during the discussion. Addressing these emissions is a promising way to reduce climatic interference primarily for nations that have not yet agreed to address greenhouse gas emissions and provides the potential for a parallel climate agreement. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Black carbon particles in the urban atmosphere in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gengchen; Bai, Jianhui; Kong, Qinxin; Emilenko, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    A study of the concentration of black carbon particles and its variation in the urban atmosphere has been carried out since 1996 in the Beijing area. The measurements were done in the late autumn and early winter each year, the period before and after domestic heating activities begin. The results show the presence of black carbon particles at the high level that vary over a large range in the urban atmosphere in Beijing. The mean value of daily average concentration for the whole observation period of 1996 2004 is 20.0 μg m-3. An evident decrease of black carbon particle concentration in the Beijing area is observed after 2000, and the daily average concentration of black carbon particles is estimated to be 16.0 μg m-3 with a variation range of 2.10 50.50 μg m-3 for the period of 2000 2004. The observation method and main variation behavior characteristics of black carbon particles in the urban atmosphere in the Beijing area are given and discussed.

  20. DEVELOP NEW TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON/SPECIFIC UV ABSORBANCE METHOD WITH EXPANDED QUALITY CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to provide a total organic carbon (TOC)/specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) method that will be used by the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (OGWDW) to support monitoring requirements of the Stage 2 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-products ...

  1. 40 CFR 458.30 - Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon black channel process subcategory. 458.30 Section 458.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Channel Process Subcategory § 458.30 Applicability; description of the carbon...

  2. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Thermal Process Subcategory § 458.20 Applicability: description of the carbon...

  3. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process Subcategory § 458.10 Applicability; description of the carbon...

  4. 40 CFR 458.30 - Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon black channel process subcategory. 458.30 Section 458.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Channel Process Subcategory § 458.30 Applicability; description of the carbon...

  5. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Thermal Process Subcategory § 458.20 Applicability: description of the carbon...

  6. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process Subcategory § 458.10 Applicability; description of the carbon...

  7. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Salil; Evans, Katherine J.; Hack, James J.; Truesdale, John

    2013-04-19

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $W^{-1}m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $ PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  8. Dye sensitized solar cells with carbon black as counter electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Feng; Chou, Yu-Chen; Haung, Jhang-Fu; Chen, Pin-Hung; Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Chiu, Kuo-Yuan; Su, Yuhlong Oliver

    2016-03-01

    In this experiment, we use carbon black as counter electrodes to replace the conventional platinum electrodes in dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The electrical properties and device efficiency with carbon black counter electrodes with various concentrations, and under the annealing temperature from 100 to 500 °C are discussed. After the proper annealing process, the conductivity and redoxing ability of the carbon black is improved, resulted in the enhancement of the electrical characteristics, especially fill factor, of the device. The highest device efficiency was 7.28% with the JSC of 14.70 mA/cm2, VOC of 0.75 V, and fill factor of 0.67 under 1-sun AM 1.5G solar illumination.

  9. Enhanced light absorption by mixed source black and brown carbon particles in UK winter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shang; Aiken, Allison C.; Gorkowski, Kyle; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Williams, Leah R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Massoli, Paola; Fortner, Edward C.; Chhabra, Puneet S.; Brooks, William A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; China, Swarup; Sharma, Noopur; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James D.; Lee, James D.; Fleming, Zoë L.; Mohr, Claudia; Zotter, Peter; Szidat, Sönke; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) and light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon, BrC) play key roles in warming the atmosphere, but the magnitude of their effects remains highly uncertain. Theoretical modelling and laboratory experiments demonstrate that coatings on BC can enhance BC's light absorption, therefore many climate models simply assume enhanced BC absorption by a factor of ∼1.5. However, recent field observations show negligible absorption enhancement, implying models may overestimate BC's warming. Here we report direct evidence of substantial field-measured BC absorption enhancement, with the magnitude strongly depending on BC coating amount. Increases in BC coating result from a combination of changing sources and photochemical aging processes. When the influence of BrC is accounted for, observationally constrained model calculations of the BC absorption enhancement can be reconciled with the observations. We conclude that the influence of coatings on BC absorption should be treated as a source and regionally specific parameter in climate models. PMID:26419204

  10. Carbon nanowalls: the next step for physical manifestation of the black body coating

    PubMed Central

    Krivchenko, V. A.; Evlashin, S. A.; Mironovich, K. V.; Verbitskiy, N. I.; Nefedov, A.; Wöll, C.; Kozmenkova, A. Ya.; Suetin, N. V.; Svyakhovskiy, S. E.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Rakhimov, A. T.; Egorov, A. V.; Yashina, L. V.

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of carbon nanowall (CNW) films in the visible range have been studied and reported for the first time. Depending on the film structure, ultra-low total reflectance up to 0.13% can be reached, which makes the CNW films a promising candidate for the black body-like coating, and thus for a wide range of applications as a light absorber. We have estimated important trends in the optical property variation from sample to sample, and identified the presence of edge states and domain boundaries in carbon nanowalls as well as the film mass density variation as the key factors. Also we demonstrated that at much lower film thickness and density than for a carbon nanotube forest the CNWs yield one order higher specific light absorption. PMID:24270355

  11. Preparation and microwave absorbing properties of carbon/cobalt ferromagnetic composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangchang; Qiao, Xiaojing; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Shuman; Ren, Qingguo

    2013-02-01

    Carbon/cobalt ferromagnetic light composites with high performance of microwave absorbing properties were prepared by hydrothermal method using starch and hollow cobalt ferrites. It was concluded that after carbonization the spinel structure ferrites changed to Co3Fe7 alloys and the temperature of graphitization was significantly decreased for the catalytic of CoFe2O4/Co3Fe7. The increase of carbon content, and exist of CoFe2O4/Co3Fe7 heightened the microwave absorbing properties. Electromagnetic parameters were tested with 40% of the titled materials and 60% of paraffin wax composites by using HP8722ES vector network analyzer. The reflection was also simulated through transmission line theory. The microwave absorbers exhibited a maximum reflection loss -43 dB and the electromagnetic wave absorption less than -10 dB was found to exceed 3.0 GHz between 11.6 GHz and 15 GHz for an absorber thickness of 2 mm. PMID:23646517

  12. Measurements of Black Carbon and aerosol absorption during global circumnavigation and Arctic campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Močnik, Griša; Drinovec, Luka; Vidmar, Primož; Lenarčič, Matevž

    2015-04-01

    During two flight campaigns: around the world (2012) and over the Arctic (2013) we demonstrated the feasibility of scientific research and aerial measurements of aerosolized Black Carbon with ultra-light aircraft. Conducted measurements provided first ever information on Black Carbon concentrations and sources over such a large area at altitude. Ground-level measurements of atmospheric aerosols are routinely performed around the world, but there exists very little data on their vertical and geographical distribution in the global atmosphere. These data is a crucial requirement for our understanding of the dispersion of pollutant species of anthropogenic origin, and their possible effects on radiative forcing, cloud condensation, and other phenomena which can contribute to adverse outcomes. Light absorbing carbonaceous aerosols and black carbon (BC) in particular are a unique tracer for combustion emissions, and can be detected rapidly and with great sensitivity by filter-based optical methods. A single-seat ultra-light aircraft flew around the world and on a Arctic expedition. The flights covered all seven continents; crossed all major oceans; and operated at altitudes around 3000 m ASL and up to 8900 m ASL. The aircraft carried a specially-developed high-sensitivity miniaturized dual-wavelength Aethalometer, which recorded BC concentrations with very high temporal resolution and sensitivity [1, 2]. We present examples of data from flight tracks over remote oceans, uninhabited land masses, and densely populated areas. Measuring the dependence of the aerosol absorption on the wavelength, we show that aerosols produced during biomass combustion can be transported to high altitude in high concentrations and we estimate the underestimation of the direct forcing by models assuming a simple linear relationship between BC concentration and forcing in comparison to observations [3,4]. 1. , Carbon Sampling Takes Flight, Science 2012, 335, 1286. 2. G. Močnik, L. Drinovec, M

  13. Automatically acquired broadband plasmonic-metamaterial black absorber during the metallic film-formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengqi; Liu, Xiaoshan; Huang, Shan; Pan, Pingping; Chen, Jing; Liu, Guiqiang; Gu, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Broadband electromagnetic wave absorbers are highly desirable in numerous applications such as solar-energy harvesting, thermo-photovoltaics, and photon detection. The aim to efficiently achieve ultrathin broadband absorbers with high-yield and low-cost fabrication process has long been pursued. Here, we theoretically propose and experimentally demonstrate a unique broadband plasmonic-metamaterial absorber by utilizing a sub-10 nm meta-surface film structure to replace the precisely designed metamaterial crystal in the common metal-dielectric-metal absorbers. The unique ultrathin meta-surface can be automatically obtained during the metal film formation process. Spectral bandwidth with absorbance above 80% is up to 396 nm, where the full absorption width at half-maximum is about 92%. The average value of absorbance across the whole spectral range of 370-880 nm reaches 83%. These super absorption properties can be attributed to the particle plasmon resonances and plasmon near-field coupling by the automatically formed metallic nanoparticles as well as the plasmon polaritons of the metal film with the induced plasmonic magnetic resonances occurring between the top meta-surface and the bottom metal mirror. This method is quite simple, cost-effective for large-area fabrication, and compatible with current industrial methods for microelectro-mechanical systems, which makes it an outstanding candidate for advanced high-efficiency absorber materials. PMID:25679790

  14. Thermal damage suppression of a black phosphorus saturable absorber for high-power operation of pulsed fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghyun; Park, Kichul; Debnath, Pulak C; Kim, Inho; Song, Yong-Won

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of black phosphorus (BP) have shown its future potential in the field of photonics. We determined the optical damage threshold of BP at 21.8 dBm in a fiber ring laser cavity, and demonstrated the high-power operation capacity of an evanescent field interaction-based BP saturable absorber. The long-term stability of a passively mode-locked fiber laser with a saturable absorber operating at the optical power of 23.3 dBm was verified for 168 h without any significant performance degradation. The center wavelength, spectral width, and pulse width of the laser output are 1558.8 nm, 14.2 nm, and 805 fs, respectively. PMID:27479185

  15. Thermal damage suppression of a black phosphorus saturable absorber for high-power operation of pulsed fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghyun; Park, Kichul; Debnath, Pulak C.; Kim, Inho; Song, Yong-Won

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of black phosphorus (BP) have shown its future potential in the field of photonics. We determined the optical damage threshold of BP at 21.8 dBm in a fiber ring laser cavity, and demonstrated the high-power operation capacity of an evanescent field interaction-based BP saturable absorber. The long-term stability of a passively mode-locked fiber laser with a saturable absorber operating at the optical power of 23.3 dBm was verified for 168 h without any significant performance degradation. The center wavelength, spectral width, and pulse width of the laser output are 1558.8 nm, 14.2 nm, and 805 fs, respectively.

  16. Effects of airborne black carbon pollution on maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illes, Bernadett; Anda, Angela; Soos, Gabor

    2013-04-01

    The black carbon (BC) changes the radiation balance of the Earth and contributes to global warming. The airborne BC deposited on the surface of plant, changing the radiation balance, water balance and the total dry matter (TDM) content of plant. The objective of our study was to investigate the impact of soot originated from motor vehicle exhaust on maize. The field experiment was carried out in Keszthely Agrometeorological Research Station (Hungary) in three consecutive years (2010, 2011, 2012) of growing season. The test plant was the maize hybrid Sperlona (FAO 340) with short growing season. The BC was chemically "pure", which means that it is free any contaminants (e.g. heavy metals). The BC was coming from the Hankook Tyre Company (Dunaújváros, Hungary), where used that for improve the wear resistance of tires. We used a motorised sprayer of SP 415 type to spray the BC onto the leaf surface. The leaf area index (LAI) was measured each week on the same 12 sample maize in each treatment using an LI 3000A automatic planimeter (LI-COR, Lincoln, NE). Albedo was measured by pyranometers of the CMA-11 type (Kipp & Zonen, Vaisala), what we placed the middle of the plot of 0.3 ha. The effects of BC were studied under two different water supplies: evapotranspirometers of Thornthwaite type were used for "ad libitum" treatment and rainfed treatment in field plots. In 2010 and 2012, a big difference was not observed in the case of LAI in the effects of BC. However, in 2011 there was a significant difference. The LAI of the BC polluted maize was higher (10-15%, P<0.05), than the LAI of the control maize in the rainfed plot and in the ET chambers, respectively. The albedo of the BC contaminated maize decreased (15-30%, P<0.05) in all three years. We also detected that the green plant surface of maize increased on BC contaminated treatment. These results may suggest that the plant is able to absorb the additional carbon source through the leaves. The albedo decreased

  17. Black phosphorus as broadband saturable absorber for pulsed lasers from 1 μm to 2.7 μm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingchen; Qin, Zhipeng; Xie, Guoqiang; Guo, Zhinan; Zhang, Han; Yuan, Peng; Qian, Liejia

    2016-04-01

    Universal saturable absorbers covering wavelengths from near-infrared to mid-infrared bands have attracted widespread interest. In this contribution, we experimentally demonstrated the broadband saturable absorption of multilayer black phosphorus from 1 μm to 2.7 μm wavelengths. With liquid-phase-exfoliated black phosphorus nanoflakes as the saturable absorber, the Q-switching operation of bulk lasers at 1.03 μm, 1.93 μm, and 2.72 μm was realized, respectively. This work will open up promising optoelectronic applications of black phosphorus for the mid-infrared spectral region.

  18. TECHNICAL NOTE: Design and development of electromagnetic absorbers with carbon fiber composites and matching dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neo, C. P.; Varadan, V. K.

    2001-10-01

    Radar absorbing materials are designed and developed with carbon fibers and suitable matching layers. Complex permittivities of carbon fiber composite are predicted on the basis that the modulus of permittivity obeys a logarithmic law of mixtures and the dielectric loss tangents are related through a linear law of mixtures. Linear regression analysis performed on the data points provides the constants which are used to predict the effective permittivities of carbon fiber composite at different frequencies. Using the free space measurement system, complex permittivities of the lossy dielectric at different frequencies are obtained. These complex permittivities are used to predict the reflectivity of a thin lossy dielectric layer on carbon fiber composite substrate. The predicted results agree quite well with the measured data. It is interesting to note that the thin lossy dielectric layer, about 0.03 mm thick, has helped to reduce the reflectivity of the 5.2 mm thick carbon fiber composite considerably.

  19. Deposition and characterization of far-infrared absorbing gold black films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Advena, Donna J.; Bly, Vincent T.; Cox, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A process is described for producing gold black films with high absorptance in the far IR. The optical and electrical properties of these films have been studied with particular emphasis on the absorptance of films at wavelengths as long as 50 microns. A substantial decrease in absorptance near 50 microns has been observed for pure gold black films on aging in air. This degradation can be largely avoided by alloying the gold with a small percentage of copper during the deposition. Preliminary results on two methods for delineating gold black films are also presented.

  20. Variability in and agreement between modeled and personal continuously measured black carbon levels using novel smartphone and sensor technologies.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Rivas, Ioar; de Castro, Montserrat; Cirach, Marta; Hoek, Gerard; Seto, Edmund; Jerrett, Michael; Sunyer, Jordi

    2015-03-01

    Novel technologies, such as smartphones and small personal continuous air pollution sensors, can now facilitate better personal estimates of air pollution in relation to location. Such information can provide us with a better understanding about whether and how personal exposures relate to residential air pollution estimates, which are normally used in epidemiological studies. The aims of this study were to examine (1) the variability in personal air pollution levels during the day and (2) the relationship between modeled home and school estimates and continuously measured personal air pollution exposure levels in different microenvironments (e.g., home, school, and commute). We focused on black carbon as an indicator of traffic-related air pollution. We recruited 54 school children (aged 7-11) from 29 different schools around Barcelona as part of the BREATHE study, an epidemiological study of the relation between air pollution and brain development. For 2 typical week days during 2012-2013, the children were given a smartphone with CalFit software to obtain information on their location and physical activity level and a small sensor, the micro-aethalometer model AE51, to measure their black carbon levels simultaneously and continuously. We estimated their home and school exposure to PM2.5 filter absorbance, which is well-correlated with black carbon, using a temporally adjusted PM2.5 absorbance land use regression (LUR) model. We found considerable variation in the black carbon levels during the day, with the highest levels measured during commuting periods (geometric mean = 2.8 μg/m(3)) and the lowest levels at home (geometric mean = 1.3 μg/m(3)). Hourly temporally adjusted LUR model estimates for the home and school showed moderate to good correlation with measured personal black carbon levels at home and school (r = 0.59 and 0.68, respectively) and lower correlation with commuting trips (r = 0.32 and 0.21, respectively). The correlation between modeled home

  1. Green Carbon, Black Carbon, White Carbon: Simultaneous Differentiation Between Soil Organic Matter, Pyrogenic Carbon and Carbonates Using Thermal Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Peltre, C.; Chan, J.; Baumgartl, T.; Erskine, P.; Apesteguía, M.; Virto, I.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of soil carbon stocks and fluxes continues to be an important endeavor in assessments of soil quality, and more broadly in assessments of ecosystem functioning. The quantification of soil carbon in alkaline, carbonate-containing soils, such as those found in Mediterranean areas, is complicated by the need to differentiate between organic carbon (OC) and inorganic carbon (IC), which continues to present methodological challenges. Acidification is frequently used to eliminate carbonates prior to soil OC quantification, but when performed in the liquid phase, can promote the dissolution and loss of a portion of the OC. Acid fumigation (AF) is increasingly preferred for carbonate removal, but its effectiveness is difficult to assess using conventional elemental and isotopic analyses. The two-step approach is time, labor and cost intensive, and generates additional uncertainties from the calculations. Quantification of the actively cycling pool of soil organic C (SOC) in many soils is further complicated by the potential presence of more recalcitrant/stable forms such as pyrogenic or black carbon (BC) derived from incomplete combustion of vegetation, or even geogenic carbon such as coal. The wide spectrum of materials currently considered BC makes its quantification challenging. The chemical method using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) as markers of condensed aromatic structures indicative of pyrogenic C is highly time, labor and cost intensive, and can generate artifacts. Several research groups are now developing method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of these various forms of soil carbon using thermal analysis techniques such as thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis. The objective of this presentation is to provide a general overview and specific examples of the current progress and technical challenges in this evolving methodology.

  2. Occupational exposure to carbon black: a particulate sampling study.

    PubMed

    Smith, R G; Musch, D C

    1982-12-01

    In order to determine the particulate exposure levels within carbon black production plants, a sampling survey involving workers from seven carbon black producers was initiated in late 1979. A total of 1,951 acceptable samples (1,564 total dust and 387 respirable dust) were collected from closed-face filter cassettes worn by carbon black workers performing normal work operations. A one-centimeter cyclone separator was employed for respirable dust sampling. Overall sampling distributions of the time-weighted average values generated from the survey were best described by the log-normal distribution. Characterization of the particulate exposures to workers is provided for the various areas of employment and specific jobs within these areas. Summary geometric mean time-weighted average values by area of employment and by job category are well within the carbon black permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 3.5 mg/m3. Identification of those job categories subject to relatively higher particulate exposures, and quantification of these exposures, is essential to the effective industrial hygiene monitoring and control of worker exposures. PMID:7158607

  3. Overview of EPA activities and research related to black carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this international presentation is to give an overview of EPA activities related to black carbon (BC). This overview includes some summary information on how EPA defines BC, current knowledge on United States emissions and forecasted emission reductions, and ongoin...

  4. Black carbon emissions reductions from combustion of alternative jet fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speth, Raymond L.; Rojo, Carolina; Malina, Robert; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2015-03-01

    Recent measurement campaigns for alternative aviation fuels indicate that black carbon emissions from gas turbines are reduced significantly with the use of alternative jet fuels that are low in aromatic content. This could have significant climate and air quality-related benefits that are currently not accounted for in environmental assessments of alternative jet fuels. There is currently no predictive way of estimating aircraft black carbon emissions given an alternative jet fuel. We examine the results from available measurement campaigns and propose a first analytical approximation (termed 'ASAF') of the black carbon emissions reduction associated with the use of paraffinic alternative jet fuels. We establish a relationship between the reduction in black carbon emissions relative to conventional jet fuel for a given aircraft, thrust setting relative to maximum rated thrust, and the aromatic volume fraction of the (blended) alternative fuel. The proposed relationship is constrained to produce physically meaningful results, makes use of only one free parameter and is found to explain a majority of the variability in measurements across the engines and fuels that have been tested.

  5. Carbon dioxide gasification of carbon black: isotope study of carbonate catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saber, J.M.; Falconer, J.L.; Brown, L.F.

    1984-11-01

    Temperature-programmed reaction was used with labeled isotopes (/sup 13/C and /sup 18/O) to study interactions between carbon black and potassium carbonate in pure He and 10% CO/sub 2//90% He atmospheres. Catalytic gasification precursor complexes were observed. Carbon and oxygen-bearing carbon surface groups interacted with the carbonate above 500 K to form surface complexes. Between 500 and 950 K, and in the presence of gaseous CO/sub 2/, the complexes participated in C and O exchange with the gas phase while oxygen atoms within the complexes also exchanged with those on the carbon surface. As the temperature rose, the complexes decomposed, with CO/sub 2/ the initial product. Decomposition started around 500 K in pure He, and around 950 K in CO/sub 2//He. Catalytic gasification began only after decomposition of significant portions of the complexes. Elemental potassium formed, and the active catalyst appears to alternate between being potassium metal and a potassium-oxygen-carbon complex. Potassium carbonate is not part of the catalytic cycle. 20 references, 10 figures.

  6. A covalent route for efficient surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon as high performance microwave absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hu; Wang, Jiacheng; Zhuang, Jiandong; Liu, Qian

    2013-11-01

    A covalent route has been successfully utilized for the surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) CMK-3 by in situ polymerization and grafting of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in the absence of any solvent. The modified CMK-3 carbon particles have a high loading of 19 wt% poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), named PMMA-g-CMK-3, and also maintain their high surface area and mesoporous structure. The in situ polymerization technique endows a significantly enhanced electric conductivity (0.437 S m-1) of the resulting PMMA-g-CMK-3/PMMA composite, about two orders of magnitude higher than 1.34 × 10-3 S m-1 of PMMA/CMK-3 obtained by the solvent mixing method. A minimum reflection loss (RL) value of -27 dB and a broader absorption band (over 3 GHz) with RL values <-10 dB are obtained for the in situ polymerized PMMA-g-CMK-3/PMMA in a frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz (X-band), implying its great potential as a microwave absorbing material. The maximum absorbance efficiency for the in situ polymerized sample increases remarkably compared to that (-10 dB) of CMK-3/PMMA prepared by the solvent mixing method. Changing the thickness of the absorber can efficiently adjust the frequency corresponding to the best microwave absorbance ability. The enhanced microwave absorption by the surface modified CMK-3 is ascribed to high dielectric loss. This in situ polymerization for the surface modification of mesoporous carbons opens up a new method and idea for developing light-weight and high-performance microwave absorbing materials.

  7. A covalent route for efficient surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon as high performance microwave absorbers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hu; Wang, Jiacheng; Zhuang, Jiandong; Liu, Qian

    2013-12-21

    A covalent route has been successfully utilized for the surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) CMK-3 by in situ polymerization and grafting of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in the absence of any solvent. The modified CMK-3 carbon particles have a high loading of 19 wt% poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), named PMMA-g-CMK-3, and also maintain their high surface area and mesoporous structure. The in situ polymerization technique endows a significantly enhanced electric conductivity (0.437 S m(-1)) of the resulting PMMA-g-CMK-3/PMMA composite, about two orders of magnitude higher than 1.34 × 10(-3) S m(-1) of PMMA/CMK-3 obtained by the solvent mixing method. A minimum reflection loss (RL) value of -27 dB and a broader absorption band (over 3 GHz) with RL values <-10 dB are obtained for the in situ polymerized PMMA-g-CMK-3/PMMA in a frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz (X-band), implying its great potential as a microwave absorbing material. The maximum absorbance efficiency for the in situ polymerized sample increases remarkably compared to that (-10 dB) of CMK-3/PMMA prepared by the solvent mixing method. Changing the thickness of the absorber can efficiently adjust the frequency corresponding to the best microwave absorbance ability. The enhanced microwave absorption by the surface modified CMK-3 is ascribed to high dielectric loss. This in situ polymerization for the surface modification of mesoporous carbons opens up a new method and idea for developing light-weight and high-performance microwave absorbing materials. PMID:24170288

  8. Snow darkening caused by black carbon emitted from fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Jessica; Kloster, Silvia; Bourgeois, Quentin

    2014-05-01

    We implemented the effect of snow darkening caused by black carbon (BC) emitted from forest fires into the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model (MPI-M ESM) to estimate its potential climate impact of present day fire occurrence. Considerable amounts of black carbon emitted from fires are transported into snow covered regions. Already very small quantities of black carbon reduce the snow reflectance, with consequences for snow melting and snow spatial coverage. Therefore, the SNICAR (SNow And Ice Radiation) model (Flanner and Zender (2005)) is implemented in the land surface component (JSBACH) of the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6, developed at the MPI-M. The SNICAR model includes amongst other processes a complex calculation of the snow albedo depending on black carbon in snow and snow grain growth depending on water vapor fluxes for a five layer snow scheme. For the implementation of the SNICAR model into the one layer scheme of ECHAM6-JSBACH, we used the SNICAR-online version (http://snow.engin.umich.edu). This single-layer simulator provides the albedo of snow for selectable combinations of impurity content (e.g. black carbon), snow grain size, and incident solar flux characteristics. From this scheme we derived snow albedo values for black carbon in snow concentrations ranging between 0 and 1500 ng(BC)/g(snow) and for different snow grain sizes for the visible (0.3 - 0.7 µm) and near infrared range (0.7 - 1.5 µm). As snow grains grow over time, we assign different snow ages to different snow grain sizes (50, 150, 500, and 1000 µm). Here, a radius of 50 µm corresponds to new snow, whereas a radius of 1000 µm corresponds to old snow. The required snow age is taken from the BATS (Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme, Dickinson et al. (1986)) snow albedo implementation in ECHAM6-JSBACH. Here, we will present an extended evaluation of the model including a comparison of modeled black carbon in snow concentrations to observed

  9. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Thermal Process Subcategory § 458.20 Applicability: description of...

  10. 40 CFR 458.30 - Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon black channel process subcategory. 458.30 Section 458.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Channel Process Subcategory § 458.30 Applicability; description of...

  11. 40 CFR 458.40 - Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon black lamp process subcategory. 458.40 Section 458.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Lamp Process Subcategory § 458.40 Applicability; description of the...

  12. 40 CFR 458.30 - Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon black channel process subcategory. 458.30 Section 458.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Channel Process Subcategory § 458.30 Applicability; description of...

  13. 40 CFR 458.40 - Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon black lamp process subcategory. 458.40 Section 458.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Lamp Process Subcategory § 458.40 Applicability; description of the...

  14. 40 CFR 458.30 - Applicability; description of the carbon black channel process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon black channel process subcategory. 458.30 Section 458.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Channel Process Subcategory § 458.30 Applicability; description of...

  15. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Thermal Process Subcategory § 458.20 Applicability: description of...

  16. 40 CFR 458.40 - Applicability; description of the carbon black lamp process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon black lamp process subcategory. 458.40 Section 458.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Lamp Process Subcategory § 458.40 Applicability; description of the...

  17. 40 CFR 458.20 - Applicability: description of the carbon black thermal process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon black thermal process subcategory. 458.20 Section 458.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Thermal Process Subcategory § 458.20 Applicability: description of...

  18. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process Subcategory § 458.10 Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  19. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process Subcategory § 458.10 Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  20. 40 CFR 458.10 - Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon black furnace process subcategory. 458.10 Section 458.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process Subcategory § 458.10 Applicability; description of the carbon black furnace process subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10150 - Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10150 Carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (4-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-523)...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10149 - Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10149 Carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified... substance identified generically as carbon black, (3-methylphenyl)-modified, substituted (PMN P-07-522)...

  11. Aqueous carbon black dispersions prepared with steam jet-cooked corn starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utilization of jet-cooked waxy and normal corn starch to prepare aqueous dispersions of hydrophobic carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) is reported. Blending carbon black (CB) into aqueous jet-cooked dispersions of starch followed by high pressure homogenization produced stable aqueous carbon black di...

  12. Modified thermal-optical analysis using spectral absorption selectivity to distinguish black carbon from pyrolized organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Odelle; Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.

    2008-04-14

    Black carbon (BC), a main component of combustion-generated soot, is a strong absorber of sunlight and contributes to climate change. Measurement methods for BC are uncertain, however. This study presents a method for analyzing the BC mass loading on a quartz fiber filter using a modified thermal-optical analysis method, wherein light transmitted through the sample is measured over a spectral region instead of at a single wavelength as the sample is heated. Evolution of the spectral light transmission signal depends on the relative amounts of light-absorbing BC and char, the latter of which forms when organic carbon in the sample pyrolyzes during heating. Absorption selectivities of BC and char are found to be distinct and are used to apportion the amount of light attenuated by each component in the sample. Light attenuation is converted to mass concentration based on derived mass attenuation efficiencies (MAE) of BC and char. The fraction of attenuation due to each component are scaled by their individual MAE values and added together as the total mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC). An iterative algorithm is used to find the MAE values for both BC and char that provide the best fit to the carbon mass remaining on the filter (derived from direct measurements of thermally evolved CO{sub 2}) at temperatures higher than 480 C. This method was applied to measure the BC concentration in precipitation samples collected from coastal and mountain sites in Northern California. The uncertainty in measured BC concentration of samples that contained a high concentration of organics susceptible to char ranged from 12 to 100 percent, depending on the mass loading of BC on the filter. The lower detection limit for this method was approximately 0.35 {micro}g BC and uncertainty approached 20 percent for BC mass loading greater than 1.0 {micro}g BC.

  13. Retention and clearance of inhaled submicron carbon black particles.

    PubMed

    Strom, K A; Johnson, J T; Chan, T L

    1989-01-01

    Carbon black aerosols were used as a probe of the pulmonary retention and clearance of submicron particles. Male Fischer rats (COBS CD) were exposed for 20 h/d, 7 d/wk for 1, 3, or 6 wk to either 7 +/- 2 mg/m3 carbon black or filtered air. The submicron aerosol (mass median aerodynamic diameter, MMAD, 0.24 microns) was generated with a Wright dust feed-cyclone system. Lung and hilar lymph node particle burdens were determined immediately following the exposure and at preselected intervals up to 1 yr postexposure. After 1-, 3-, and 6-wk exposures, the lung burdens were 1.1 +/- 0.1, 3.5 +/- 0.2, and 5.9 +/- 0.1 mg, respectively. One year after a 1-, 3-, or 6-wk exposure, 8%, 46%, and 61% of the initial lung burden remained in the lungs. Initially, the hilar lymph nodes contained 0.2%, 0.9%, and 2.0% of the lung burdens in the 3 exposure groups, respectively. At 1 yr postexposure, particle translocation from the lungs led to a rise in lymph node burdens to 1%, 21%, and 27% of the initial lung burden. The retention of carbon black in both the lungs and lymph nodes combined was 9%, 67%, and 89% for the 1-, 3-, and 6-wk exposed animals. Lung clearance was modeled as a compartmental system consisting of four lung compartments and a regional lymph node compartment. The results from the model are similar for carbon black and diesel engine exhaust particles. However, the compartmental kinetics of carbon black differed in two ways: the deposition efficiency in the alveolar region was lower than that for diesel exhaust particles, and there was earlier transport of particles to the regional lymph nodes. These results showed that when lung burdens reached 0.8 mg, lung clearance was decreased by 50% and lymphatic transport of insoluble particles was increased. PMID:2466129

  14. A Multi-Instrument Study of the Optical Properties of Various Mixing-States of Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyard, P.; Scarnato, B. V.; Strawa, A. W.; Kirchstetter, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    The study of black carbon and its aging processes remains an area where advancement is needed in order to better understand how black carbon influences climate. After emission to the atmosphere, black carbon (BC) becomes increasingly internally mixed with other aerosol constituents. Several studies have demonstrated an increase in the mass absorption efficiency of BC when it becomes internally mixed with non-absorbing organic compounds (1,2). Recent work in our lab has quantified this absorption enhancement of BC coated with succinic acid using a DMT photoacoustic instrument and compared the results to Mie Theory calculations. The data and theory both show a sharp increase in absorption at lower coating thickness, which continues to rise and eventually seems to plateau at large coating thickness (the ratio of total particle diameter to core diameter of about 2). A comparison of theory with experimental measurement generally shows the same trend but is not definitive. In order to more fully elucidate the relationship between optical properties and black carbon aging, we studied various forms of black carbon including soot generated from an inverted diffusion flame, flame soot nebulized from an aqueous suspension, glassy carbon spheres, and fullerene soot. Further, we have investigated optical properties associated with various types of organic and inorganic coatings. We have used a full suite of optical instruments to ascertain the absolute optical properties of these particles as well as the properties of coated black carbon relative to its uncoated form. The instruments include the Ames Aerosol Instrument (AAI), a homebuilt instrument based on reciprocal nephelometry and cavity ringdown spectroscopy, as well as commercial instruments, including the TSI nephelometer, PSAP, DMT SP2, DMT PASS3, and Aerodyne CAPS. SEM and TEM images have been taken to correlate optical properties with particle morphology.

  15. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Greg; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Clothiaux, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output. This requires long-term measurements in many regions, as model success in one region or season does not apply to all regions and seasons. AERONET is an automated network of more than 180 surface radiometers located throughout the world. The sky radiance measurements obtained by AERONET are inverted to provide column-averaged aerosol refractive indices and size distributions for the AERONET database, which we use to derive column-averaged black carbon concentrations and specific absorptions that are constrained by the measured radiation field. This provides a link between AERONET sky radiance measurements and the elemental carbon concentration of transport models without the need for an optics module in the transport model. Knowledge of both the black carbon concentration and aerosol absorption optical depth (i.e., input and output of the optics module) will enable improvements to the transport model optics module.

  16. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent N.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-01-01

    The carbon emissions inventories used to initialize transport models and general circulation models are highly parameterized, and created on the basis of multiple sparse datasets (such as fuel use inventories and emission factors). The resulting inventories are uncertain by at least a factor of 2, and this uncertainty is carried forward to the model output. [Bond et al., 1998, Bond et al., 2004, Cooke et al., 1999, Streets et al., 2001] Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output on a continuous basis.

  17. Online single particle measurements of black carbon coatings, structure and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, James; Liu, Dantong; Taylor, Jonathan; Flynn, Michael; Williams, Paul; Morgan, William; Whitehead, James; Alfarra, Rami; McFiggans, Gordon; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    The impacts of black carbon on meteorology and climate remain a major source of uncertainty, owing in part to the complex relationship between the bulk composition of the particulates and their optical properties. A particular complication stems from how light interacts with particles in response to the microphysical configuration and any 'coatings', i.e. non-black carbon material that is either co-emitted or subsequently obtained through atmospheric processing. This may cause the particle to more efficiently absorb or scatter light and may even change the sign of its radiative forcing potential. While much insight has been gained through measurements of bulk aerosol properties, either while suspended or after collection on a filter or impactor substrate, this does not provide a complete picture and thus may not adequately constrain the system. Here we present an overview of recent work to better constrain the properties of black carbon using online, in situ measurements of single particles, primarily using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). We have developed novel methods of inverting the data produced and combining the different metrics derived so as to give the most effective insights into black carbon sources, processes and properties. We have also used this measurement in conjunction with other instruments (sometimes in series) and used the data to challenge many commonly used models of optical properties such as core-shell Mie, Rayleigh-Debeye-Gans and effective medium. This work has been carried out in a variety of atmospheric environments and with laboratory-produced soots, e.g. from a diesel engine rig. Highlights include the finding that with real-world atmospheric aerosols, bulk optical measurements may be insufficient to derive brown carbon parameters without detailed morphological data. We also show that the enhancement of absorption for both ambient and laboratory generated particles only occurs after the coating mass fraction reaches a certain

  18. Black carbon and the Himalayan cryosphere: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertler, Charles G.; Puppala, Siva Praveen; Panday, Arnico; Stumm, Dorothea; Shea, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The Himalayan cryosphere borders global hotspots for emissions of black carbon (BC), a carbonaceous aerosol with a short atmospheric lifespan and potentially significant impacts on glaciers and snow cover. BC in the atmosphere absorbs radiation efficiently, leading to localized positive climate forcing. BC may also be deposited onto snow and ice surfaces, thereby changing their albedo. This review presents up-to-date observational data of BC in the atmosphere and in snow and ice, as well as its effects on the cryosphere in the Hindu-Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region along the northern edge of South Asia. Significant spatial variation exists in the measured concentrations of BC in the atmosphere and cryosphere. A strong seasonal pattern exists, with highest concentrations in the pre-monsoon and lowest during the monsoon. Existing observations show bias towards certain areas, with a noticeable lack of measurements on the south side of the Himalaya. Significant uncertainty persists in the emissions estimates of BC in the HKH region, with a standard deviation of regional emissions from various emission inventories of 0.5150 × 10-9 kg m-2 s-1, or 47.1% of the mean (1.0931 × 10-9 kg m-2 s-1). This and other uncertainties, including poor model resolution, imprecision in deposition modeling, and incongruities among measurement types, propagate through simulations of BC concentration in atmosphere and cryosphere. Modeled atmospheric concentrations can differ from observations by as much as a factor of three with no systematic bias, and modeled concentrations in snow and ice can differ from observations by a factor of 60 in certain regions. In the Himalaya, estimates of albedo change due to BC range from about 2 to 10%, estimates of direct radiative forcing due to BC in the atmosphere from (-2)-7 W m-2, and surface forcing estimates from 0 to 28 W m-2, though every forcing estimate uses its own definition, with varying degrees of complexity and numbers of feedbacks. We find the

  19. ENHANCED TOXICITY OF CHARGED CARBON NANOTUBES AND ULTRAFINE CARBON BLACK PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Man-made carbonaceous nano-particles such as single and multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (CNT) and ultra-fine carbon black (UFCB) particles are finding increasing applications in industry, but their potential toxic effects is of concern. In aqueous media, these particles cluster in...

  20. Dissolved black carbon in Antarctic lakes: Chemical signatures of past and present sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Alia L.; Jaffé, Rudolf; Ding, Yan; McKnight, Diane M.

    2016-06-01

    The perennially ice-covered, closed-basin lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, serve as sentinels for understanding the fate of dissolved black carbon from glacial sources in aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that dissolved black carbon can persist in freshwater and saline surface waters for thousands of years, while preserving the chemical signature of the original source materials. The ancient brines of the lake bottom waters have retained dissolved black carbon with a woody chemical signature, representing long-range transport of black carbon from wildfires. In contrast, the surface waters are enriched in contemporary black carbon from fossil fuel combustion. Comparison of samples collected 25 years apart from the same lake suggests that the enrichment in anthropogenic black carbon is recent. Differences in the chemical composition of dissolved black carbon among the lakes are likely due to biogeochemical processing such as photochemical degradation and sorption on metal oxides.

  1. Enhanced microwave absorbing performance of CoNi alloy nanoparticles anchored on a spherical carbon monolith.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hu, Changwen; Cao, Minhua

    2013-05-28

    CoNi alloy nanoparticles anchored on a spherical carbon monolith (CoNi-C) were prepared by a solvothermal route and subsequent heat treatment without any templates. Their permittivity and permeability behaviors were studied in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The CoNi-C composites showed the best microwave absorbing performances compared to those of Co-C and Ni-C. The maximum reflection loss of the CoNi-C nanocomposites can reach -50.2 dB at 7.7 GHz with samples of 4 mm in thickness, better than that of the Ni-C composites, while the Co-C composites showed almost no absorption at all. The absorption mechanism of the three absorbents was also discussed. PMID:23595353

  2. Potential climate impact of black carbon emitted by rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Martin; Mills, Michael; Toohey, Darin

    2010-12-01

    A new type of hydrocarbon rocket engine is expected to power a fleet of suborbital rockets for commercial and scientific purposes in coming decades. A global climate model predicts that emissions from a fleet of 1000 launches per year of suborbital rockets would create a persistent layer of black carbon particles in the northern stratosphere that could cause potentially significant changes in the global atmospheric circulation and distributions of ozone and temperature. Tropical stratospheric ozone abundances are predicted to change as much as 1%, while polar ozone changes by up to 6%. Polar surface temperatures change as much as one degree K regionally with significant impacts on polar sea ice fractions. After one decade of continuous launches, globally averaged radiative forcing from the black carbon would exceed the forcing from the emitted CO2 by a factor of about 105 and would be comparable to the radiative forcing estimated from current subsonic aviation.

  3. Final recommendations for reference materials in black carbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Skjemstad, Jan O.

    Last summer, a symposium was held to discuss aspects of global biogeochemical cycles, including organic matter cycling in soils, rivers, and marine environments; black carbon particle fluxes and the biological pump; dissolved organic matter; and organic matter preservation. Seventy scientists from various disciplines, including oceanography, soil science, geology, and chemistry attended the 3-day meeting at the Friday Harbor Laboratories, a research station of the University of Washington.“New Approaches in Marine Organic Biogeochemistry” commemorated the life and science of a colleague and friend, John I. Hedges, who was also involved in several groups developing chemical reference materials. Part of this symposium included a workshop on chemical reference materials, where final recommendations of the Steering Committee for Black Carbon Reference Materials were presented.

  4. Electrophoretic mobility of concentrated carbon black dispersions in a low-permittivity solvent by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mehul N; Smith, P Griffin; Kim, Jihoon; Milner, Thomas E; Johnston, Keith P

    2010-05-15

    Electrophoretic mobilities of concentrated dispersions of carbon black particles in a low-permittivity solvent were measured using differential-phase optical coherence tomography (DP-OCT). An electrode spacing of only 0.18 mm enables measurement of highly concentrated dispersions up to 1 wt.% of highly absorbing carbon black particles with high electric fields at low potentials. The capabilities of this DP-OCT method, including high sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and strong electric fields, enable enhanced measurement of low electrophoretic mobilities encountered in low-permittivity solvents. The zeta potential of carbon black particles ranged from -24 mV to -12 mV as the concentration of surfactant sodium bis(2-ethyl-1-hexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) was increased from 1 mM to 100 mM. A mechanism is presented to explain the electrostatic charging of carbon black particles in terms of the partitioning of the ions between the reverse micelles in the double layer and the surfactant adsorbed on the particle surface, as AOT concentration is varied. PMID:20176365

  5. Void morphology in polyethylene/carbon black composites

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, D.W.M.; Wartenberg, M.; Schwartz, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    A combination of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and contrast matching techniques is used to determine the size and quantity of voids incorporated during fabrication of polyethylene/carbon black composites. The analysis used to extract void morphology from SANS data is based on the three-phase model of microcrack determination via small angle x-rayscattering (SAXS) developed by W.Wu{sup 12} and applied to particulate reinforced composites.

  6. Carbon nanotube-based tandem absorber with tunable spectral selectivity: transition from near-perfect blackbody absorber to solar selective absorber.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, N; Krupanidhi, S B; Barshilia, Harish C

    2014-04-23

    CVD grown CNT thin film with a thickness greater than 10 μm behaves like a near-perfect blackbody absorber (i.e., α/ε = 0.99/0.99). Whereas, for a thickness ≤ 0.4 µm, the CNT based tandem absorber acts as a spectrally selective coating (i.e., α/ε = 0.95/0.20). These selective coatings exhibit thermal stability up to 650 °C in vacuum, which can be used for solar thermal power generation. PMID:24474148

  7. Electromagnetic and microwave-absorbing properties of magnetite decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes prepared with poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chunying; Zhang, Aibo; Zheng, Yaping; Luan, Jingfan

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWNTs hybrids prepared with PVP achieve a maximum reflection loss is -35.8 dB at 8.56 GHz, and the bandwidth below -10 dB is more than 2.32 GHz. More importantly, a new reflection loss peak occurs at the frequency of 14.6 GHz, which indicates that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWNTs hybrids have better absorption properties in the high-frequency range. Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} decorated MWNTs hybrids were prepared using PVP as dispersant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many more Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles were attached homogeneously on the surface of MWNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWNTs hybrids achieve a maximum reflection loss of -35.8 dB at 8.56 GHz. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new reflection loss peak occurs at the high-frequency of 14.6 GHz. -- Abstract: The magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) hybrids were prepared by an in situ chemical precipitation method using poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) as dispersant. The structure and morphology of hybrids are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron-microscopy (TEM). The TEM investigation shows that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWNTs hybrids exhibit less entangled structure and many more Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles are attached homogeneously on the surface of MWNTs, which indicated that PVP can indeed help MWNTs to disperse in isolated form. The electromagnetic and absorbing properties were investigated in a frequency of 2-18 GHz. The results show that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWNTs hybrids exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior and possess a saturation magnetization of 22.9 emu/g. The maximum reflection loss is -35.8 dB at 8.56 GHz, and the bandwidth below -10 dB is more than 2.32 GHz. More importantly, a new reflection loss peak occurs at the frequency of 14.6 GHz, which indicates that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWNTs

  8. Personal exposure to Black Carbon in transport microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dons, Evi; Int Panis, Luc; Van Poppel, Martine; Theunis, Jan; Wets, Geert

    2012-08-01

    We evaluated personal exposure of 62 individuals to the air pollutant Black Carbon, using 13 portable aethalometers while keeping detailed records of their time-activity pattern and whereabouts. Concentrations encountered in transport are studied in depth and related to trip motives. The evaluation comprises more than 1500 trips with different transport modes. Measurements were spread over two seasons. Results show that 6% of the time is spent in transport, but it accounts for 21% of personal exposure to Black Carbon and approximately 30% of inhaled dose. Concentrations in transport were 2-5 times higher compared to concentrations encountered at home. Exposure was highest for car drivers, and car and bus passengers. Concentrations of Black Carbon were only half as much when traveling by bike or on foot; when incorporating breathing rates, dose was found to be twice as high for active modes. Lowest 'in transport' concentrations were measured in trains, but nevertheless these concentrations are double the concentrations measured at home. Two thirds of the trips are car trips, and those trips showed a large spread in concentrations. In-car concentrations are higher during peak hours compared to off-peak, and are elevated on weekdays compared to Saturdays and even more so on Sundays. These findings result in significantly higher exposure during car commute trips (motive 'Work'), and lower concentrations for trips with motive 'Social and leisure'. Because of the many factors influencing exposure in transport, travel time is not a good predictor of integrated personal exposure or inhaled dose.

  9. Measuring black carbon spectral extinction in the visible and infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Peters, D. M.; McPheat, R.; Lukanihins, S.; Grainger, R. G.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents measurements of the spectral extinction of black carbon aerosol from 400 nm to 15 μm. The aerosol was generated using a Miniature Combustion Aerosol Standard soot generator and then allowed to circulate in an aerosol cell where its extinction was measured using a grating spectrometer in the visible and a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared. Size distribution, number concentration, and mass extinction cross sections have also been obtained using single-particle aerosol samplers. A mean mass extinction cross section at 550 nm of 8.3 ± 1.6 m2 g-1 is found which, assuming a reasonable single scatter albedo of 0.2, corresponds to a mass absorption cross section of 6.6 ± 1.3 m2 g-1. This compares well with previously reported literature values. Computer analysis of electron microscope images of the particles provides independent confirmation of the size distribution as well as fractal parameters of the black carbon aerosol. The aerosol properties presented in this work are representative of very fresh, uncoated black carbon aerosol. After atmospheric processing of such aerosols (which could include mixing with other constituents and structural changes), different optical properties would be expected.

  10. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  11. Thulium/holmium-doped fiber laser passively mode locked by black phosphorus nanoplatelets-based saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Zheng, Xin; Yin, Ke; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Jiang, Tian

    2015-12-01

    By coupling black phosphorus (BP) nanoplatelets (NPs) with a fiber-taper evanescent light field, a saturable absorber (SA) based on the BP NPs has been successfully fabricated and used in a thulium/holmium-doped fiber laser as the mode locker. The SA had a modulation depth of ∼9.8% measured at 1.93 μm. A stable mode-locking operation at 1898 nm was achieved with a pulse width of 1.58 ps and a fundamental mode-lock repetition rate of 19.2 MHz. By increasing the pump intensity, phenomena of multi-pulsing operations, including harmonic mode-locked states and soliton bunches, were obtained in the experiment, showing that the BP NPs possess an ultrafast optical response time. This work suggests that the BP NPs-based SA is potentially useful for ultrashort, pulsed laser operations in the eye-safe region of 2 μm. PMID:26836690

  12. Analysis of Transpacific Transport of Black Carbon during HIPPO-3 and Implications for Black Carbon Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Liu, J.; Horowitz, L. W.; Henze, D. K.; Gao, R.; Lin, J.; Tao, S.

    2013-12-01

    Long-range transport of black carbon (BC) is a growing concern as a result of the great effect of BC on climate change and air quality. We study transpacific transport of BC during HIPPO-3 based on a combination of inverse modeling and sensitivity analysis. We use the GEOS-Chem Model and its adjoint to estimate the origin of BC over the North Pacific and constrain Asian BC emissions. We find that the sources of BC transported to the North Pacific in March and April, 2010 are different. While biomass burning in Southeast Asia contributes about 60% of BC in March, more than 90% BC comes from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion in East Asia in April. GEOS-Chem model generally resolves the spatial and temporal variation of BC concentrations over the North Pacific, but is unable to reproduce the low end and high end of BC observations. We find that using the optimized BC emissions derived from inverse modeling cannot significantly improve model simulations. This indicates that uncertainties remaining in BC transport account for the major biases in BC simulations. The aging process is one of the key factors controlling the wet scavenging and remote concentrations of BC. We conduct several sensitivity tests on BC aging and find that the aging time scale of anthropogenic BC is several hours, smaller than the values used in most global models, while the aging process of biomass burning BC may occur much slower on a time scale of a few days. To evaluate the effect of BC aging and wet deposition on transpacific transport of BC, we develop an idealized BC transport model. We find that the mid-latitude air mass captured by HIPPO-3 aircraft may experience a series of precipitation events, particularly near the East Asia source region. Therefore, transpacific transport of BC is sensitive to BC aging when the aging rate is fast, and the effect of the aging process peaks when the aging time scale is in the range of 1-1.5 d. This further indicates that BC aging close to the sources

  13. Analysis of transpacific transport of black carbon during HIPPO-3: implications for black carbon aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Liu, J.; Horowitz, L. W.; Henze, D. K.; Fan, S.; Levy, H., II; Mauzerall, D. L.; Lin, J.-T.; Tao, S.

    2014-01-01

    Long-range transport of black carbon (BC) is a growing concern as a result of the efficiency of BC in warming the climate and its adverse impact on human health. We study transpacific transport of BC during HIPPO-3 using a combination of inverse modeling and sensitivity analysis. We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint to constrain Asian BC emissions and estimate the source of BC over the North Pacific. We find that different sources of BC dominate the transport to the North Pacific during the southbound (29 March 2010) and northbound (13 April 2010) measurements in HIPPO-3. While biomass burning in Southeast Asia (SE) contributes about 60% of BC in March, more than 90% of BC comes from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion in East Asia (EA) during the April mission. GEOS-Chem simulations generally resolve the spatial and temporal variation of BC concentrations over the North Pacific, but are unable to reproduce the low and high tails of the observed BC distribution. We find that the optimized BC emissions derived from inverse modeling fail to improve model simulations significantly. This failure indicates that uncertainties in BC transport, rather than in emissions, account for the major biases in GEOS-Chem simulations of BC. The aging process, transforming BC from hydrophobic into hydrophilic form, is one of the key factors controlling wet scavenging and remote concentrations of BC. Sensitivity tests on BC aging suggest that the aging time scale of anthropogenic BC from EA is several hours, faster than assumed in most global models, while the aging process of biomass burning BC from SE may occur much slower, with a time scale of a few days. To evaluate the effects of BC aging and wet deposition on transpacific transport of BC, we develop an idealized model of BC transport. We find that the mid-latitude air masses sampled during HIPPO-3 may have experienced a series of precipitation events, particularly near the EA and SE source region

  14. Analysis of transpacific transport of black carbon during HIPPO-3: implications for black carbon aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Liu, J.; Horowitz, L. W.; Henze, D. K.; Fan, S.; Levy, H., II; Mauzerall, D. L.; Lin, J.-T.; Tao, S.

    2014-06-01

    Long-range transport of black carbon (BC) is a growing concern as a result of the efficiency of BC in warming the climate and its adverse impact on human health. We study transpacific transport of BC during HIPPO-3 using a combination of inverse modeling and sensitivity analysis. We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint to constrain Asian BC emissions and estimate the source of BC over the North Pacific. We find that different sources of BC dominate the transport to the North Pacific during the southbound (29 March 2010) and northbound (13 April 2010) measurements in HIPPO-3. While biomass burning in Southeast Asia (SE) contributes about 60% of BC in March, more than 90% of BC comes from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion in East Asia (EA) during the April mission. GEOS-Chem simulations generally resolve the spatial and temporal variation of BC concentrations over the North Pacific, but are unable to reproduce the low and high tails of the observed BC distribution. We find that the optimized BC emissions derived from inverse modeling fail to improve model simulations significantly. This failure indicates that uncertainties in BC removal as well as transport, rather than in emissions, account for the major biases in GEOS-Chem simulations of BC over the North Pacific. The aging process, transforming BC from hydrophobic into hydrophilic form, is one of the key factors controlling wet scavenging and remote concentrations of BC. Sensitivity tests on BC aging (ignoring uncertainties of other factors controlling BC long range transport) suggest that in order to fit HIPPO-3 observations, the aging timescale of anthropogenic BC from EA may be several hours (faster than assumed in most global models), while the aging process of biomass burning BC from SE may occur much slower, with a timescale of a few days. To evaluate the effects of BC aging and wet deposition on transpacific transport of BC, we develop an idealized model of BC transport. We find that

  15. State of mixture of atmospheric submicrometer black carbon particles and its effect on particulate light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Shuichi; Heintzenberg, Jost; Okada, Kikuo; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Zaizen, Yuji; Kobayashi, Eriko; Yamazaki, Akihiro

    The state of mixture of light-absorbing carbonaceous particles was investigated in relation to light absorption properties using electron microscopic examinations, black carbon (BC) analyses of quartz filter by thermal/optical reflectance (TOR) method, measurements with two continuous light-absorbing photometers at a suburban site of Tsukuba, about 60 km northeast of Tokyo. The volume fraction of water-soluble material ( ɛ) in individual particles is important for assessing particulate light-absorbing and/or scattering of atmospheric aerosols. The values of ɛ in BC particles were evaluated by electron micrographs before and after dialysis (extraction) of water-soluble material. The mass absorption coefficient (MAC in units of m 2 g -1) tended to increase with increasing the average ɛ in BC particles with the radius range of 0.05-0.5 μm. Thus, our results indicate that coatings of water-soluble material around BC particles can enhance the absorption of solar radiation. Moreover, the single scattering albedo (SSA) will increase because a large amount of coating material will scatter more light.

  16. Arctic Black Carbon Initiative: Reducing Emissions of Black Carbon from Power & Industry in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresko, J.; Hodson, E. L.; Cheng, M.; Fu, J. S.; Huang, K.; Storey, J.

    2012-12-01

    Deposition of black carbon (BC) on snow and ice is widely considered to have a climate warming effect by reducing the surface albedo and promoting snowmelt. Such positive climate feedbacks in the Arctic are especially problematic because rising surface temperatures may trigger the release of large Arctic stores of terrestrial carbon, further amplifying current warming trends. Recognizing the Arctic as a vulnerable region, the U.S. government committed funds in Copenhagen in 2009 for international cooperation targeting Arctic BC emissions reductions. As a result, the U.S. Department of State has funded three research and demonstration projects with the goal to better understand and mitigate BC deposition in the Russian Arctic from a range of sources. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Arctic BC initiative presented here is focused on mitigating BC emissions resulting from heat and power generation as well as industrial applications. A detailed understanding of BC sources and its transport and fate is required to prioritize efforts to reduce BC emissions from sources that deposit in the Russian Arctic. Sources of BC include the combustion of fossil fuels (e.g. coal, fuel oil, diesel) and the combustion of biomass (e.g. wildfires, agricultural burning, residential heating and cooking). Information on fuel use and associated emissions from the industrial and heat & power sectors in Russia is scarce and difficult to obtain from the open literature. Hence, our project includes a research component designed to locate Arctic BC emissions sources in Russia and determine associated BC transport patterns. We use results from the research phase to inform a subsequent assessment/demonstration phase. We use a back-trajectory modeling method (potential source contribution function - PSCF), which combines multi-year, high-frequency measurements with knowledge about atmospheric transport patterns. The PSCF modeling allows us to map the probability (by season and year) at course

  17. Black phosphorus as saturable absorber for the Q-switched Er:ZBLAN fiber laser at 2.8 μm.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhipeng; Xie, Guoqiang; Zhang, Han; Zhao, Chujun; Yuan, Peng; Wen, Shuangchun; Qian, Liejia

    2015-09-21

    Black phosphorus, a newly emerged two-dimensional material, has attracted wide attention as novel photonic material. Here, multilayer black phosphorus is successfully fabricated by liquid phase exfoliation method. By employing black phosphorus as saturable absorber, we demonstrate a passively Q-switched Er-doped ZBLAN fiber laser at the wavelength of 2.8 μm. The modulation depth and saturation fluence of the black phosphorus saturable absorber are measured to be 15% and 9 μJ/cm(2), respectively. The Q-switched fiber laser delivers a maximum average power of 485 mW with corresponding pulse energy of 7.7 μJ and pulse width of 1.18 μs at repetition rate of 63 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to demonstrate that black phosphorus can realize Q-switching of 2.8-μm fiber laser. Our research results show that black phosphorus is a promising saturable absorber for mid-infrared pulsed lasers. PMID:26406672

  18. The effect of gamma irradiation on the thermal behavior of dielectric properties of linear low-density/carbon black semiconductive composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudić, D.; Luyt, A. S.; Marinković, F.; Petronijević, I.; Dojčilović, J.; Kostoski, D.

    2015-02-01

    Electrical AC conductivity of semiconducting low-density polyethylene (LDPE)-carbon black (CB) composites has been studied in the frequency range between 24 Hz and 75 kHz and the temperature range from 295 to 355 K. The composites were gamma irradiated at room temperature to different absorbed doses up to 300 kGy. The effects of gamma irradiation on the AC conductivity at room temperature and the conductive temperature coefficients (CTC) were observed. It was found that the effect of gamma irradiation on the stability of AC conductivity at elevated temperature (355 K) is dependent on the carbon black content and the gamma irradiation dose.

  19. Modified thermal-optical analysis using spectral absorption selectivity to distinguish black carbon from pyrolized organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Odelle L; Corrigan, Craig E; Kirchstetter, Thomas W

    2008-11-15

    This study presents a method for analyzing the black carbon (BC) mass loading on a quartz fiber filter using a modified thermal-optical analysis method, wherein light transmitted through the sample is measured over a spectral region instead of at a single wavelength. Evolution of the spectral light transmission signal depends on the relative amounts of light-absorbing BC and char, the latter of which forms when organic carbon in the sample pyrolyzes during heating. Absorption selectivities of BC and char are found to be distinct and are used to apportion the amount of light attenuated by each component in the sample. Light attenuation is converted to mass concentration on the basis of derived mass attenuation efficiencies (MAEs) of BC and char. The fractions of attenuation due to each component are scaled by their individual MAE values and added together as the total mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC). An iterative algorithm is used to find the MAE values for both BC and char that provide the best fit to the carbon mass remaining on the filter (derived from direct measurements of thermally evolved CO2) at temperatures higher than 480 degrees C. This method was applied to measure the BC concentration in precipitation samples collected in northern California. The uncertainty in the measured BC concentration of samples that contained a high concentration of organics susceptible to char ranged from 12% to 100%, depending on the mass loading of BC on the filter. The lower detection limit for this method was approximately 0.35 microg of BC, and the uncertainty approached 20% for BC mass loading greater than 1.0 microg of BC. PMID:19068832

  20. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; AlAraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a ‘Yin-Yang’ all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser. PMID:27063511

  1. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; AlAraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a 'Yin-Yang' all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser. PMID:27063511

  2. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; Alaraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-04-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a ‘Yin-Yang’ all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser.

  3. Effect of Pt and Fe catalysts in the transformation of carbon black into carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asokan, Vijayshankar; Myrseth, Velaug; Kosinski, Pawel

    2015-06-01

    In this research carbon nanotubes and carbon nano onion-like structures were synthesized from carbon black using metal catalysts at 400 °C and 700 °C. Platinum and iron-group metals were used as catalysts for the transformation of CB into graphitized nanocarbon and the effect of both metals was compared. The synthesized products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization shows that this process is very efficient in the synthesis of high quality graphitized products from amorphous carbon black, even though the process temperature was relatively low in comparison with previous studies. Distinguished graphitic walls of the newly formed carbon nanostructures were clearly visible in the HRTEM images. Possible growth difference related to the type of catalyst used is briefly explained with the basis of electron vacancies in d-orbitals of metals.

  4. Black carbon in grassland ecosystems of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Andrej; Amelung, Wulf; Peinemann, Norman; Haumaier, Ludwig; Zhang, Xudong; Kleber, Markus; Glaser, Bruno; Urusevskaya, Inga; Zech, Wolfgang

    2010-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the product of incomplete burning processes and a significant component of the passive soil organic carbon (SOC) pool. The role of BC in the global carbon cycle is still unclear. This study aimed to quantify and characterize BC in major grassland ecosystems of the world. Twenty-eight representative soil profiles (mainly Mollisols) were sampled in the Russian Steppe, the U.S. Great Plains, the Argentinian Pampa, the Manchurian Plains in China, and the Chernozem region in central Germany. Black carbon contents were estimated using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA) as a molecular marker, and indications about the origin of the BC were derived from bulk and compound-specific δ13C analyses and radiocarbon dating of bulk soil organic matter (SOM). Our findings suggest that between 5% and 30% of SOC stocks consist of BC. Maximum BC contributions to SOC frequently were found at deeper parts of the A horizon with 14C ages younger than 7000 years BP; that is, incorporation of C as charred particles accompanied ecosystem development since the mid-Holocene. Most of this BC formed from local vegetation, as indicated by a 13C isotope signature similar to that of bulk SOM. At some sites, also nonlocal sources contributed to soil BC, e.g., fossil fuel BC inputs at the German sites. Black carbon stocks were highest in Chernozems and lowest in Kastanozems. The Russian Steppe and Chinese Manchurian sites stored about 3-4 times more BC (around 3 kg m-2) than did the other sites because of thicker A horizons that were rich in BC. On a global scale, we estimate that steppe ecosystems contain between 4 and 17 Pg BC.

  5. Application of the integrating sphere method to separate the contributions of brown and black carbon in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Hitzenberger, Regina; Bauer, Heidi; Pouresmaeil, Parissa; Klatzer, Barbara; Caseiro, Alexandre; Puxbaum, Hans

    2009-02-15

    Until about a decade ago, black carbon (BC) was thought to be the only light absorbing substance in the atmospheric aerosol except for soil or desert dust In more recent years, light absorbing polymeric carbonaceous material was found in atmospheric aerosols. Absorption increases appreciably toward short wavelengths, so this fraction was called brown carbon. Because brown carbon is thermally rather refractory, it influences the split between organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in thermal methods and, through its light absorption characteristics, leads to overestimations of BC concentrations. The goal of the present study was to extend the integrating sphere method to correct the BC signal for the contribution of brown carbon and to obtain an estimate of brown carbon concentrations. Humic acid sodium salt was used as proxy for brown carbon. The extended method is first tested on mixtures of test substances and then applied to atmospheric samples collected during biomass smoke episodes (Easter bonfires) in Austria. The resulting concentrations of black and brown carbon are compared to EC obtained with a widely used thermal method, the Cachier method (Cachier et al. Tellus 1989, 41B, 379-390) and a thermal-optical method (Schmid et al. Atmos. Environ. 2001, 35, 2111-2121), as well as to concentrations of humic like substances (HULIS) and to biomass smoke POM (particulate organic matter). Both the thermal methods were found to overestimate BC on days with large contributions of woodsmoke, which agrees with the findings of the method intercomparison study by Reisinger et at. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42, 884-889). During the days of the bonfires, the Cachier method gave EC concentrations that were higher by a factor of 3.8 than the BC concentrations, while the concentrations obtained with the thermal-optical method were higher by a factor of 2.6. PMID:19320171

  6. Global mountain snow and ice loss driven by dust and black carbon radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in mountain snow and glaciers have been our strongest indicators of the effects of changing climate. Earlier melt of snow and losses of glacier mass have perturbed regional water cycling, regional climate, and ecosystem dynamics, and contributed strongly to sea level rise. Recent studies however have revealed that in some regions, the reduction of albedo by light absorbing impurities in snow and ice such as dust and black carbon can be distinctly more powerful than regional warming at melting snow and ice. In the Rocky Mountains, dust deposition has increased 5 to 7 fold in the last 150 years, leading to ~3 weeks earlier loss of snow cover from forced melt. In absolute terms, in some years dust radiative forcing there can shorten snow cover duration by nearly two months. Remote sensing retrievals are beginning to reveal powerful dust and black carbon radiative forcing in the Hindu Kush through Himalaya. In light of recent ice cores that show pronounced increases in loading of dust and BC during the Anthropocene, these forcings may have contributed far more to glacier retreat than previously thought. For example, we have shown that the paradoxical end of the Little Ice Age in the European Alps beginning around 1850 (when glaciers began to retreat but temperatures continued to decline and precipitation was unchanged) very likely was driven by the massive increases in deposition to snow and ice of black carbon from industrialization in surrounding nations. A more robust understanding of changes in mountain snow and ice during the Anthropocene requires that we move past simplistic treatments (e.g. temperature-index modeling) to energy balance approaches that assess changes in the individual forcings such as the most powerful component for melt - net solar radiation. Remote sensing retrievals from imaging spectrometers and multispectral sensors are giving us more powerful insights into the time-space variation of snow and ice albedo.

  7. Preparation and study on microwave absorbing materials of boron nitride coated pyrolytic carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Xiao, Peng; Li, Yang

    2012-09-01

    Boron nitride coatings were synthesized on pyrolytic carbon (BN-coated PyC) particles via chemical reaction of boric acid and urea in nitrogen. The results of Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FI-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) show the formation of boron nitride coating. The TGA curves indicate that the oxidation resistance of the PyC particles is improved by incorporating BN coating on the surface. The mass of the BN-coated PyC particles remains over 60% at 1200 °C whereas the PyC particles are oxidized completely at 920 °C. The investigation of microwave absorbing property reveals that compared with the PyC particles, the BN-coated PyC particles have lower permittivity (ɛ', ɛ″) and better absorbing property. The BN-coated PyC particles show a strong absorbing peak at 10.64 GHz, where the lowest reflectivity -21.72 dB is reached. And the reflectivity less than -10 dB is over the range of 9.6-12 GHz.

  8. Absorption and scattering properties of carbon nanohorn-based nanofluids for direct sunlight absorbers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the scattering and spectrally resolved absorption properties of nanofluids consisting in aqueous and glycol suspensions of single-wall carbon nanohorns. The characteristics of these nanofluids were evaluated in view of their use as sunlight absorber fluids in a solar device. The observed nanoparticle-induced differences in optical properties appeared promising, leading to a considerably higher sunlight absorption with respect to the pure base fluids. Scattered light was found to be not more than about 5% with respect to the total attenuation of light. Both these effects, together with the possible chemical functionalization of carbon nanohorns, make this new kind of nanofluids very interesting for increasing the overall efficiency of the sunlight exploiting device. PACS 78.40.Ri, 78.35.+c, 78.67.Bf, 88.40.fh, 88.40.fr, 81.05.U. PMID:21711795

  9. Contribution of regional transport to the black carbon aerosol during winter haze period in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyuan; Huang, Ru-Jin; Cao, Junji; Tie, Xuexi; Shen, Zhenxing; Zhao, Shuyu; Han, Yongming; Li, Guohui; Li, Zhengqiang; Ni, Haiyan; Zhou, Yaqing; Wang, Meng; Chen, Yang; Su, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    The mass concentrations of atmospheric refractory black carbon (rBC), an important absorber of solar radiation, were continuously measured with a single particle soot photometer (SP2) during wintertime haze period to investigate the transport of pollution to Beijing. The average mass concentration of rBC was 6.1 ± 3.9 μg m-3 during hazy periods, which was 4.7 times higher than it during non-hazy periods. Cluster analysis showed that the air parcels arriving at Beijing mainly originated from the northwest, passed through the south and brought the most polluted air to Beijing. Concentration-weighted trajectory analyses indicated that the central North China Plain were the most likely source region for the rBC that impacted Beijing. Furthermore, the Weather Research and Forecasting-Black Carbon model showed that 71.4-82.0% of the rBC at Beijing was from regional transport during the high rBC episodes and that 47.9-56.8% of the rBC can be attributed to sources in the central North China Plain. These results suggest that regional transport from the central North China Plain, rather than local emissions, was a more important source for rBC pollution in Beijing.

  10. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Healy, R. M.; Riemer, N.; West, M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C.-H.; Wenger, J. C.; Evans, G. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particles was 0.02-0.08 and 0.72-0.93, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  11. Sensitivity of Stratospheric Geoengineering with Black Carbon to Aerosol Size and Altitude of Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan; Shindell, Drew T.; Miller, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon (BC) aerosols using a general circulation model with fixed sea surface temperatures show that the climate effects strongly depend on aerosol size and altitude of injection. 1 Tg BC/a injected into the lower stratosphere would cause little surface cooling for large radii but a large amount of surface cooling for small radii and stratospheric warming of over 60 C. With the exception of small particles, increasing the altitude of injection increases surface cooling and stratospheric warming. Stratospheric warming causes global ozone loss by up to 50% in the small radius case. The Antarctic shows less ozone loss due to reduction of polar stratospheric clouds, but strong circumpolar winds would enhance the Arctic ozone hole. Using diesel fuel to produce the aerosols is likely prohibitively expensive and infeasible. Although studying an absorbing aerosol is a useful counterpart to previous studies involving sulfate aerosols, black carbon geoengineering likely carries too many risks to make it a viable option for deployment.

  12. Contribution of regional transport to the black carbon aerosol during winter haze period in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyuan; Huang, Ru-Jin; Cao, Junji; Tie, Xuexi; Shen, Zhenxing; Zhao, Shuyu; Han, Yongming; Li, Guohui; Li, Zhengqiang; Ni, Haiyan; Zhou, Yaqing; Wang, Meng; Chen, Yang; Su, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    The mass concentrations of atmospheric refractory black carbon (rBC), an important absorber of solar radiation, were continuously measured with a single particle soot photometer (SP2) during wintertime haze period to investigate the transport of pollution to Beijing. The average mass concentration of rBC was 6.1 ± 3.9 μg m-3 during hazy periods, which was 4.7 times higher than it during non-hazy periods. Cluster analysis showed that the air parcels arriving at Beijing mainly originated from the northwest, passed through the south and brought the most polluted air to Beijing. Concentration-weighted trajectory analyses indicated that the central North China Plain were the most likely source region for the rBC that impacted Beijing. Furthermore, the Weather Research and Forecasting-Black Carbon model showed that 71.4-82.0% of the rBC at Beijing was from regional transport during the high rBC episodes and that 47.9-56.8% of the rBC can be attributed to sources in the central North China Plain. These results suggest that regional transport from the central North China Plain, rather than local emissions, was a more important source for rBC pollution in Beijing.

  13. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol -Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inmore » two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.« less

  14. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  15. Solid fuel production by hydrothermal carbonization of black liquor.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shimin; Li, Xianglan; Fan, Juan; Chang, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Formaldehyde was used as a polymerization agent to perform hydrothermal carbonization of black liquor for solid fuel production from 220 to 285°C. Compared to hydrochar prepared without formaldehyde, hydrochar produced in the presence of a 2.8wt.% formaldehyde solution (hydrochar-F) had 1.27-2.13 times higher yield, 1.02-1.36 times higher heating value (HHV), 1.20-2.31 times higher C recovery efficiency, 1.20-2.44 times higher total energy recovery efficiency, 0.51-0.64 times lower sulfur content, and 0.48-0.89 times lower ash content. The HHV of hydrochar-Fs ranged from 2.2×10(4) to 3.0×10(4)kJ/kg, while the HHV of hydrochar-F produced at 285°C was 1.90 times greater than that of the raw material (black liquor solid). These considerable improvements indicated that formaldehyde was an effective additive in hydrothermal carbonization of black liquor. PMID:22330593

  16. Intercontinental transport of black carbon to the Arctic free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dantong; Quennehen, Boris; Allan, James; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Williams, Paul; Taylor, Jonathan; Flynn, Michael; Bower, Keith; Coe, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon has a large radiative forcing potential in the Arctic, through altering the atmosphere's radiative balance and also initiating ice melt after deposition. Here we present an analysis of aerosol data collected aboard the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft during five flights in the free troposphere in the region of Svalbard in March 2013 as part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Aerosol-Cloud Coupling and Climate Interaction in the Arctic (ACCACIA) project. A number of discrete layers of pollution typical of continental emissions were detected, evidenced by black carbon (measured using a single particle soot photometer), carbon monoxide, organic matter and sulphate (measured using an aerosol mass spectrometer). These were detected at all altitudes within the free troposphere (up to 8 km) and potential source regions were investigated on a plume-by-plume basis using FLEXPART and HYSPLIT. Continental areas were identified as separate potential sources for the different plumes, with transit times of up to 12 days. East Asia showed the strongest influence, being responsible for high concentration plumes at all layers and Europe was found to be responsible for plumes in the lower to mid troposphere. North America had a somewhat weaker influence and no significant influence from Northern Russia was found. Emissions inventory data was used in conjunction with the FLEXPART potential source footprints to try to estimate the relative significance of different sources and it was found that direct emissions from human activities (e.g. transport, industry) were more prevalent than open biomass burning. Significant loadings were detected (of the order of 100 ng sm-3 black carbon relative to CO concentrations of around 50 ppbv) even when instrumental data and model outputs suggest that significant precipitation occurred during uplift, indicating that inefficient scavenging is taking place.

  17. Characterization of carbon black modified by maleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asokan, Vijayshankar; Kosinski, Pawel; Skodvin, Tore; Myrseth, Velaug

    2013-09-01

    We present here a method for modifying the surface of carbon black (CB) using a simple heat treatment in the presence of a carboxylic acid as well as water or ethylene glycol as a solvent. CB was mixed with maleic acid and either water or ethylene glycol, and heated at 250°C. Unlike the traditional surface modification processes which use heat treatment of carbon with mineral acids the present modification method using a carboxylic acid proved to be simple and time efficient. CB from two different vendors was used, and the modified samples were characterized by TGA, BET surface area measurement, XRD, particle size and zeta potential measurements, and FTIR. It was found that several material properties, including thermal stability and surface area, of the modified CB are significantly altered relative to the parental carbon samples. This method provides a rapid and simple route to tailor new materials with desired properties.

  18. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  19. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  20. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  1. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  2. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  3. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  4. Saturable absorbers incorporating carbon nanotubes directly synthesized onto substrates and fibers and their application to mode-locked fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, S.; Inoue, Y.; Maruyama, S.; Murakami, Y.; Yaguchi, H.; Jablonski, M.; Set, S. Y.

    2004-07-01

    We present novel carbon-nanotube-based saturable absorbers. Using the low-temperature alcohol catalytic chemical-vapor deposition method, high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were directly synthesized on quartz substrates and fiber ends. We successfully applied the SWNTs to mode lock a fiber laser producing subpicosecond pulses at a 50-MHz repetition rate.

  5. Birchwood biochar as partial carbon black replacement in styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birchwood feedstock was used to make slow pyrolysis biochar that contained 89% carbon and < 2% ash. This biochar was blended with carbon black as filler for styrene-butadiene rubber. Composites made from blended fillers of 25/75 biochar/carbon black were equivalent to or superior to their 100% carbo...

  6. Roles of black carbon on the fate of heavy metals and agrochemicals in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Char(coal) and other black carbon materials can comprise up to 35% of total organic carbon in US agricultural soils, and are known to strongly and often irreversibly bind contaminants including heavy metals. Black carbon has received renewed interests in recent years as a solid co-product formed du...

  7. The relationship between black carbon concentration and black smoke: A more general approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heal, Mathew R.; Quincey, Paul

    2012-07-01

    The black carbon (BC) component of ambient particulate matter is an important marker for combustion sources and for its impact on human health and radiative forcing. Extensive data archives exist for the black smoke metric, the historic measure of ambient particle darkness. An expression presented in earlier publications (Quincey, 2007; Quincey et al., 2011) for estimating BC concentrations from traditional black smoke measurements is shown to have limitations that can be addressed by using a more systematic approach to the issue of corrections for increasing darkening of the filter. The form of the more general relationship is shown to be an off-axis parabola rather than the on-axis parabola of the earlier work. Existing data from co-located black smoke and aethalometer measurements at 5 UK sites are reanalysed in this context. At very low concentrations of dark particles (British Black Smoke index < ˜10 μg m-3) a simple linear relationship BC (/μg m-3) ≈ 0.27·BSIBRITISH will suffice. A parabolic relationship, [BC/μgm]=√{5.2-1.1+1.5×BSI+62-13+19}-7.9-0.9+1.1, quantitatively similar to the previously published relationship will be more reliable for BSIBRITISH values up to 20-25 μg m-3. The full set of data available was fitted empirically to the off-axis parabola over the range 0-80 μg m-3 as the quadratic: [BC/μg m-3] = (0.27 ± 0.03) · BSIBRITISH - (4.0 ± 0.2) × 10-4(BSIBRITISH)2, but this curve is highly dependent on the variations between the individual data sets. Adding the extra complexity of the full off-axis parabolic relationship is unlikely to be justified in practical situations. All expressions apply also to the OECD definition of black smoke with the substitution BSIBRITISH = 0.85·BSIOECD. However, in common with the previous approach, they apply only to black smoke values obtained from standard black smoke samplers with 25 mm diameter filters and ˜2 m3 day-1 volumetric flow rate, and presume a value 16.6 m2 g-1 for the specific

  8. Relating black carbon content to reduction of snow albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, R. E.; Warren, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    In remote snow of the Northern Hemisphere, the levels of soot pollution are in the parts-per-billion (ppb) range, where the effect on albedo is at the level of a few percent. A reduction of albedo by 1-2% is significant for climate but is difficult to detect experimentally, because snow albedo depends on several other variables. In our work to quantify the climatic effect of black carbon (BC) in snow, we therefore do not directly measure the albedo reduction. Instead, we use a two-step procedure: (1) We collect snow samples, melt and filter them, and analyze the filters spectrophotometrically for BC concentration. (2) We use the BC amount from the filter measurement, together with snow grain size, in a radiative transfer model to compute the albedo reduction. Our radiative transfer model uses the discrete ordinates algorithm DISORT 2.0. We have chosen a representative BC size distribution and optical constants, and have incorporated those of mineral dust as well. While a given mass of BC causes over an order of magnitude more snow albedo reduction compared to dust, a snowpack containing dust mutes the albedo-reducing effect of BC. Because the computed reduction of snow albedo is model-based, it requires experimental verification. We doubt that direct measurement of albedo-reduction will be feasible in nature, because of the vertical variation of both snow grain size and soot content, and because the natural soot content is small. We conclude that what is needed is an artificial snowpack, with uniform grain size and large uniform soot content (ppm not ppb), to produce a large signal on albedo. We have chosen to pursue this experiment outdoors rather than in the laboratory, for the following reasons: (1) The snowpack in the field of view is uniformly illuminated if the source of radiation is the Sun. (2) Visible radiation penetrates into the snow, so photons emerge horizontally distant from where they entered. In the limited width of a laboratory snowpack, radiation

  9. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) in ultrafiltered high-molecular-weight DOM (UDOM) was measured in surface waters of Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean (USA) to ascertain the importance of riverine and estuarine DOM as a source of BC to the ocean. BC comprised 5-72% of UDOM-C (27+/-l7%) and on average 8.9+/-6.5% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) with higher values in the turbid region of the Delaware Estuary and lower yields in the river and coastal ocean. The spatial and seasonal distributions of BC along the salinity gradient of Delaware Bay suggest that the higher levels of BC in surface water UDOM originated from localized sources, possibly from atmospheric deposition or released from resuspended sediments. Black carbon comprised 4 to 7% of the DOC in the coastal Atlantic Ocean, revealing that river-estuary systems are important exporters of colloidal BC to the ocean. The annual flux of BC from Delaware Bay UDOM to the Atlantic Ocean was estimated at 2.4x10(exp 10) g BC yr(exp -1). The global river flux of BC through DOM to the ocean could be on the order of 5.5x1O(exp 12)g BC yr (exp -1). These results support the hypothesis that the DOC pool is the intermediate reservoir in which BC ages prior to sedimentary deposition.

  10. Relation between CO and Black Carbon from Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. S.; Kim, J.; Lim, H.; Mok, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Black Carbon (BC) is designated by one of the potential factor for global warming (IPCC, 2007). Furthermore, carbon monoxide (CO) is also important gas to modify chemical, physical and climatological properties of tropospheric chemistry. Both CO and carbonaceous aerosol, especial to the black carbon, are similar emission sources, fuel combustion and biomass burning. Previously, the MODIS-OMI algorithm (MOA) identified the BC amount and its location by using Angstrom Exponent (AE) from MODIS and Aerosol Index (AI) from OMI. In addition, the CO amount has been traced by the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) since 1999. Therefore, the correlation between the AOD of BC (AODBC) and total column densities of CO (TCDCO) can be estimated by MOA and MOPITT. The correlation between AODBC and TCDCO becomes better than that between fine mode AOD and TCDCO in most global regions. Highly correlated case is the region with biomass burning and wild fires. In Southern Africa, however, the correlation coefficient between AODBC and TCDCO is lower than those between fine mode AOD and TCDCO. It is explained by the characteristics of wind fields, sources of aerosols, and distance from the source regions from the difference in the correlation. The results from correlation studies propose the possibilities that CO can be used as surrogates of BC and reference of the validation for the aerosol classification algorithm of BC from satellite measurements.

  11. Biomass burning in boreal forests and peatlands: Effects on ecosystem carbon losses and soil carbon stabilization as black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turetsky, M. R.; Kane, E. S.; Benscoter, B.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change has increased both annual area burned and the severity of biomass combustion in some boreal regions. For example, there has been a four-fold increase in late season fires in boreal Alaska over the last decade relative to the previous 50 years. Such changes in the fire regime are expected to stimulate ecosystem carbon losses through fuel combustion, reduced primary production, and increased decomposition. However, biomass burning also will influence the accumulation of black carbon in soils, which could promote long-term soil carbon sequestration. Variations in slope and aspect regulate soil temperatures and drainage conditions, and affect the development of permafrost and thick peat layers. Wet soil conditions in peatlands and permafrost forests often inhibit combustion during wildfires, leading to strong positive correlations between pre- and post- fire organic soil thickness that persist through multiple fire cycles. However, burning can occur in poorly drained ecosystems through smouldering combustion, which has implications for emission ratios of CO2:CH4:CO as well as black carbon formation. Our studies of combustion severity and black carbon concentrations in boreal soils show a negative relationship between concentrations of black carbon and organic carbon in soils post-fire. Relative to well drained stands, poorly drained sites with thick peat layers (such as north-facing stands) had less severe burning and low concentrations of black carbon in mineral soils post-fire. Conversely, drier forests lost a greater proportion of their organic soils during combustion but retained larger black carbon stocks following burning. Overall, we have quantified greater black carbon concentrations in surface mineral soil horizons than in organic soil horizons. This is surprising given that wildfires typically do not consume the entire organic soil layer in boreal forests, and could be indicative of the vulnerability of black carbon formed in organic horizons

  12. Spatiotemporal variability of light-absorbing carbon concentration in a residential area impacted by woodsmoke.

    PubMed

    Krecl, Patricia; Johansson, Christer; Ström, Johan

    2010-03-01

    Residential wood combustion (RWC) is responsible for 33% of the total carbon mass emitted in Europe. With the new European targets to increase the use of renewable energy, there is a growing concern that the population exposure to woodsmoke will also increase. This study investigates observed and simulated light-absorbing carbon mass (MLAC) concentrations in a residential neighborhood (Lycksele, Sweden) where RWC is a major air pollution source during winter. The measurement analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient, coefficient of divergence, linear regression, concentration roses, diurnal pattern, and weekend versus weekday concentration ratios. Hourly RWC and road traffic contributions to MLAC were simulated with a Gaussian dispersion model to assess whether the model was able to mimic the observations. Hourly mean and standard deviation concentrations measured at six sites ranged from 0.58 to 0.74 microg m(-3) and from 0.59 to 0.79 microg m(-3), respectively. The temporal and spatial variability decreased with increasing averaging time. Low-wind periods with relatively high MLAC concentrations correlated more strongly than high-wind periods with low concentrations. On average, the model overestimated the observations by 3- to 5-fold and explained less than 10% of the measured hourly variability at all sites. Large residual concentrations were associated with weak winds and relatively high MLAC loadings. The explanation of the observed variability increased to 31-45% when daily mean concentrations were compared. When the contribution from the boilers within the neighborhood was excluded from the simulations, the model overestimation decreased to 16-71%. When assessing the exposure to light-absorbing carbon particles using this type of model, the authors suggest using a longer averaging period (i.e., daily concentrations) in a larger area with an updated and very detailed emission inventory. PMID:20397565

  13. Extended charge accumulation in ruthenium-4H-imidazole-based black absorbers: a theoretical design concept.

    PubMed

    Kupfer, Stephan

    2016-05-11

    A theoretical-guided design concept aiming to achieve highly efficient unidirectional charge transfer and multi-charge separation upon successive photoexcitation for light-harvesting dyes in the scope of supramolecular photocatalysts is presented. Four 4H-imidazole-ruthenium(ii) complexes incorporating a biimidazole-based electron-donating ligand sphere have been designed based on the well-known 4H-imidazole-ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl dyes. The quantum chemical evaluation, performed at the density functional and time-dependent density functional level of theory, revealed extraordinary unidirectional charge transfer bands from the near-infrared to the ultraviolet region of the absorption spectrum upon multi-photoexcitation. Spectro-electrochemical simulations modeling photoexcited intermediates determined the outstanding multi-electron storage capacity for this novel class of black dyes. These remarkable photochemical and photophysical properties are found to be preserved upon site-specific protonation rendering 4H-imidazole-ruthenium(ii) biimidazole dyes ideal for light-harvesting applications in the field of solar energy conversion. PMID:27121270

  14. Polarization and Thickness Dependent Absorption Properties of Black Phosphorus: New Saturable Absorber for Ultrafast Pulse Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Diao; Jussila, Henri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ye, Guojun; Lipsanen, Harri; Chen, Xianhui; Sun, Zhipei

    2015-10-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has recently been rediscovered as a new and interesting two-dimensional material due to its unique electronic and optical properties. Here, we study the linear and nonlinear optical properties of BP flakes. We observe that both the linear and nonlinear optical properties are anisotropic and can be tuned by the film thickness in BP, completely different from other typical two-dimensional layered materials (e.g., graphene and the most studied transition metal dichalcogenides). We then use the nonlinear optical properties of BP for ultrafast (pulse duration down to ~786 fs in mode-locking) and large-energy (pulse energy up to >18 nJ in Q-switching) pulse generation in fiber lasers at the near-infrared telecommunication band ~1.5 μm. We observe that the output of our BP based pulsed lasers is linearly polarized (with a degree-of-polarization ~98% in mode-locking, >99% in Q-switching, respectively) due to the anisotropic optical property of BP. Our results underscore the relatively large optical nonlinearity of BP with unique polarization and thickness dependence, and its potential for polarized optical pulse generation, paving the way to BP based nonlinear and ultrafast photonic applications (e.g., ultrafast all-optical polarization switches/modulators, frequency converters etc.).

  15. Polarization and Thickness Dependent Absorption Properties of Black Phosphorus: New Saturable Absorber for Ultrafast Pulse Generation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Diao; Jussila, Henri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ye, Guojun; Lipsanen, Harri; Chen, Xianhui; Sun, Zhipei

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has recently been rediscovered as a new and interesting two-dimensional material due to its unique electronic and optical properties. Here, we study the linear and nonlinear optical properties of BP flakes. We observe that both the linear and nonlinear optical properties are anisotropic and can be tuned by the film thickness in BP, completely different from other typical two-dimensional layered materials (e.g., graphene and the most studied transition metal dichalcogenides). We then use the nonlinear optical properties of BP for ultrafast (pulse duration down to ~786 fs in mode-locking) and large-energy (pulse energy up to >18 nJ in Q-switching) pulse generation in fiber lasers at the near-infrared telecommunication band ~1.5 μm. We observe that the output of our BP based pulsed lasers is linearly polarized (with a degree-of-polarization ~98% in mode-locking, >99% in Q-switching, respectively) due to the anisotropic optical property of BP. Our results underscore the relatively large optical nonlinearity of BP with unique polarization and thickness dependence, and its potential for polarized optical pulse generation, paving the way to BP based nonlinear and ultrafast photonic applications (e.g., ultrafast all-optical polarization switches/modulators, frequency converters etc.). PMID:26514090

  16. Continuous flux of dissolved black carbon from a vanished tropical forest biome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, T.; Rezende, C. E.; Manecki, M.; Niggemann, J.; Coelho Ovalle, A. R.; Bernardes, M. C.

    2012-04-01

    Humans have extensively used fire as a tool to shape Earth's vegetation. One of the biggest events in this context was the destruction of Brazilian's Atlantic forest, once among the largest tropical forest biomes on Earth. We estimate that the slash-and-burn practice produced 200 to 500 million tons of black carbon from the 1850' to 1973. The fate of this charred organic matter is unknown. Here we show continuous runoff of dissolved black carbon from the cleared forest biome, more than 35 years after the widespread burning of the forest ended. During the 11-year observation period (1997-2008) of this study, on average 0.04 to 0.08 tons of dissolved black carbon were annually exported per square kilometer land. We estimate an annual runoff of 48,000 to 97,000 tons dissolved black carbon from the former Atlantic forest biome. Dissolved black carbon was mobilized by water percolating through the soil during the rainy season. During base flow conditions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) did not contain black carbon, whereas at peak flow up to 6% of DOC was combustion-derived. If runoff was the only removal mechanism of black carbon from soils, even the highly condensed and presumably refractory component of black carbon would have a half-life of only 440 to 2300 years in the soil. In areas with higher precipitation, stronger runoff and consequently a shorter half-life can be expected. In the deep ocean, dissolved black carbon is virtually inert on this time scale. The disappearance of the Atlantic forest provides a worst-case scenario for tropical forests worldwide, most of which are cleared at increasing rate. Because of the comparably fast mobilization of dissolved black carbon from soils and its resistivity in the deep ocean, an increase of black carbon production on land may alter the size of the global pool of >12 Pg carbon of thermally altered DOC in the ocean on the long term.

  17. Tungsten nitride nanocrystals on nitrogen-doped carbon black as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Youzhen; Li, Jinghong

    2015-01-11

    The direct synthesis of tungsten nitride (WN) nanoparticles on nitrogen-doped carbon black (N-carbon black) was achieved through facile nucleation and growth of WN nanoparticles on simultaneously generated N-carbon black under ammonia annealing. As a noble-metal-free catalyst, the WN/N-carbon black hybrid exhibited excellent performance in ORR, coupled with superior methanol tolerance and long-term stability in comparison to commercial Pt/C catalysts, through an efficient four-electron-dominant ORR process. PMID:25413157

  18. Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2001-02-01

    Aerosols affect the Earth's temperature and climate by altering the radiative properties of the atmosphere. A large positive component of this radiative forcing from aerosols is due to black carbon-soot-that is released from the burning of fossil fuel and biomass, and, to a lesser extent, natural fires, but the exact forcing is affected by how black carbon is mixed with other aerosol constituents. From studies of aerosol radiative forcing, it is known that black carbon can exist in one of several possible mixing states; distinct from other aerosol particles (externally mixed) or incorporated within them (internally mixed), or a black-carbon core could be surrounded by a well mixed shell. But so far it has been assumed that aerosols exist predominantly as an external mixture. Here I simulate the evolution of the chemical composition of aerosols, finding that the mixing state and direct forcing of the black-carbon component approach those of an internal mixture, largely due to coagulation and growth of aerosol particles. This finding implies a higher positive forcing from black carbon than previously thought, suggesting that the warming effect from black carbon may nearly balance the net cooling effect of other anthropogenic aerosol constituents. The magnitude of the direct radiative forcing from black carbon itself exceeds that due to CH4, suggesting that black carbon may be the second most important component of global warming after CO2 in terms of direct forcing.

  19. Seasonal Variability of the Black Carbon Size Distribution in the Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. S.; Shmargunov, V. P.; Panchenko, M. V.; Chernov, D. G.; Kozlov, A. S.; Malyshkin, S. B.

    2016-04-01

    Round-the-clock measurements of the black carbon size distribution in the submicron near-ground aerosol of Western Siberia performed in 2014 by the diffusion method developed by the authors are analyzed. It is revealed that the tendency for decreasing the volume median diameter and the amplitude of distribution of the black carbon is traced in the seasonal dynamics of the average monthly black carbon particle size distribution (approximated by a single-mode lognormal function) during winter-to-summer season transition. The shape of the black carbon size distributions is in agreement with measurements by other well-known methods in different geographic regions.

  20. Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes, K.; Torn, M.S.; Lapenas, A.G.; Schmidt, M.W.I.

    2008-09-15

    Black carbon (BC), from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded in soils. We use two soils with very low spatial variability sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. Quantities of fire residues in soil changed significantly over a century. Black carbon stock was 2.5 kg m{sup -2}, or about 7-10% of total organic C in 1900. With cessation of biomass burning, BC stocks decreased 25% over a century, which translates into a centennial soil BC turnover (293 years best estimate; range 182-541 years), much faster than so-called inert or passive carbon in ecosystem models. The turnover time presented here is for loss by all processes, namely decomposition, leaching, and erosion, although the latter two were probably insignificant in this case. Notably, at both time points, the peak BC stock was below 30 cm, a depth interval, which is not typically accounted for. Also, the quality of the fire residues changed with time, as indicated by the use benzene poly carboxylic acids (BPCA) as molecular markers. The proportions of less-condensed (and thus more easily degradable) BC structures decreased, whereas the highly condensed (and more recalcitrant) BC structures survived unchanged over the 100-year period. Our results show that BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils, and other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

  1. Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russian steppe soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammes, K.; Torn, M. S.; Lapenas, A. G.; Schmidt, M. W. I.

    2008-09-01

    Black carbon (BC), from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded in soils. We use two soils with very low spatial variability sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. Quantities of fire residues in soil changed significantly over a century. Black carbon stock was 2.5 kg m-2, or about 7 10% of total organic C in 1900. With cessation of biomass burning, BC stocks decreased 25% over a century, which translates into a centennial soil BC turnover (293 years best estimate; range 182 541 years), much faster than so-called inert or passive carbon in ecosystem models. The turnover time presented here is for loss by all processes, namely decomposition, leaching, and erosion, although the latter two were probably insignificant in this case. Notably, at both time points, the peak BC stock was below 30 cm, a depth interval, which is not typically accounted for. Also, the quality of the fire residues changed with time, as indicated by the use benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA) as molecular markers. The proportions of less-condensed (and thus more easily degradable) BC structures decreased, whereas the highly condensed (and more recalcitrant) BC structures survived unchanged over the 100-year period. Our results show that BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils, and other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

  2. Seasonal features of black carbon measured at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, K.; Osada, K.; Yabuki, M.; Shiobara, M.; Yamanouchi, T.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is one of important aerosol constituents because the strong light absorption ability. Low concentrations of aerosols and BC let BC make insignificant contribution to aerosol radiative forcing in the Antarctica at the moment. Because of less or negligible source strength of BC in the Antarctic circle, BC can be used as a tracer of transport from the mid-latitudes. This study aims to understand seasonal feature, transport pathway, and origins of black carbon in the Antarctic coats. Black carbon measurement has been made using 7-wavelength aethalometer at Syowa Station, Antarctica since February, 2005. Mass BC concentrations were estimated from light attenuation by Weingartner's correction procedure (Weingartner et al., 2003) in this study. Detection limit was 0.2 - 0.4 ng/m3 in our measurement conditions (2-hour resolution and flow rate of ca. 10LPM). BC concentrations ranged from near detection limit to 55.7 ng/m3 at Syowa Station, Antarctica during the measurements. No trend has been observed since February, 2005. High BC concentrations were coincident with poleward flow from the mid-latitudes under the storm conditions by cyclone approach, whereas low BC concentrations were found in transport from coastal regions and the Antarctic continent. Considering that outflow from South America and Southern Africa affect remarkably air quality in the Southern Ocean of Atlantic and Indian Ocean sectors, BC at Syowa Station might be originated from biomass burning and human activity on South America and Southern Africa. Seasonal features of BC at Syowa Station shows maximum in September - October and lower in December - April. Spring maximum in September - October was obtained at the other Antarctic stations (Neumayer, Halley, South pole, and Ferraz). Although second maximum was found in January at the other stations, the maximum was not observed at Syowa Station.

  3. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  4. Multifunctional superhydrophobic polymer/carbon nanocomposites: graphene, carbon nanotubes, or carbon black?

    PubMed

    Asthana, Ashish; Maitra, Tanmoy; Büchel, Robert; Tiwari, Manish K; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-06-11

    Superhydrophobic surfaces resisting water penetration into their texture under dynamic impact conditions and offering simultaneously additional functionalities can find use in a multitude of applications. We present a facile, environmentally benign, and economical fabrication of highly electrically conductive, polymer-based superhydrophobic coatings, with impressive ability to resist dynamic water impalement through droplet impact. To impart electrical conductivity, the coatings were prepared by drop casting suspensions with loadings of different kinds of carbon nanoparticles, namely, carbon black (CB), carbon nanotubes (CNT), graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) and their combinations, in a fluoropolymer dispersion. At 50 wt % either CB or CNT, the nanocomposite coatings resisted impalement by water drops impacting at 3.7 m/s, the highest attainable speed in our setup. However, when tested with 5 vol % isopropyl alcohol-water mixture, i.e., a lower surface tension liquid posing a stiffer challenge with respect to impalement, only the CB coatings retained their impalement resistance behavior. GNP-based surfaces featured very high conductivity ∼1000 S/m, but the lowest resistance to water impalement. The optimal performance was obtained by combining the carbon fillers. Coatings containing CB:GNP:polymer = 1:1:2 showed both excellent impalement resistance (up to 3.5 m/s with 5 vol % IPA-water mixture drops) and electrical conductivity (∼1000 S/m). All coatings exhibited superhydrophobic and oleophilic behavior. To exemplify the additional benefit coming from this property, the CB and the optimal, combined CB/GNP coatings were used to separate mineral oil and water through filtration of their mixture. PMID:24846501

  5. Electrical conductivity and rheology of carbon black composites under elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Zdeněk

    2015-04-01

    Electrical properties of conductive polymer composites are governed by filler particle structures which are formed in the material during the mixing. Therefore, knowledge of the behavior of conductive particle structures under defined conditions of deformation is necessary to produce materials with balanced electrical and rheological properties. Whereas the electrical conductivity evolution under shear can be nowadays studied even with the commercial rheometers, the investigations under elongation were not performed up to now. In this work simultaneous electrical and rheological measurements in elongation on polystyrene/carbon black composites are introduced. Such kind of experiment can help in understanding the relationships between processing conditions and properties of conductive polymer composites.

  6. Carbon in black crusts from the Tower of London

    SciTech Connect

    Alessandra Bonazza; Peter Brimblecombe; Carlota M. Grossi; Cristina Sabbioni

    2007-06-15

    This paper investigates the origin, fluxes, and transformation of carbon compounds within black crusts on the stone walls of the Tower of London. The crusts were analyzed for elemental and organic carbon, including the water soluble fraction. The stratigraphy of the old, thicker crusts highlighted the presence of prismatic particles, spherical aluminosilicates and metals, and carbonaceous particles. These are indicative of wood, coal and oil combustion processes. Elemental carbon and low solubility compounds such as oxalates appeared to be conserved because of long residence times. Conversely, more soluble ions, like chloride and formate would be removed from the layers relatively quickly by rainfall. At higher organic carbon concentrations acetic acid may be produced within the crusts from biological transformations. Currently, traffic sources contribute to increasingly organic rich crusts. The deposition of elemental carbon to buildings darkens surfaces and has important aesthetic implications. The increased organic content may have further aesthetic consequence by changing the color of buildings to warmer tones, particularly browns and yellows. Management of historic buildings requires us to recognize the shift away from simple gypsum crusts to those richer in organic materials. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Effect of the Purple carbon black on the properties of NR/BR blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanfang, Zhao; Dan, Liu; Shengbo, Lin; Binjian; Yinmei, Zhao; Shuangquan, Liao

    2014-08-01

    Purple black is light colored mineral filler mining in recent years in Hainan. The effect of the dosage of the purple carbon black and purple carbon black modificated by Si69 on the vulcanization characteristics, mechanical properties, thermal stability, the damping performance of NR/BR blend rubber were studied, and the blending adhesive tensile sections were analyzed by SEM. Research showed that, with the increasing dosage of the purple carbon black, vulcanization characteristics of NR/BR blend had a little change. Adding the purple carbon black into blending had a reinforcing effect. when the dosage of the purple carbon black was 20, the mechanical properties of blending adhesive was good; Coupling agent Si69 had a modification effect on the purple carbon black. With increasing dosage of Si69, performance of the rubber was improved initially and then decreased; when the mass fraction of Si69 was 8% of the dosage of the purple carbon black, rubber performance was optimal. Purple carbon black had no obvious effect on thermal stability of the rubber, but it improved the damping rubber temperature and damping factor.

  8. A photochemically resistant component in riverine dissolved black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, Thorsten; Riedel, Thomas; Niggemann, Jutta; Vähätalo, Anssi

    2015-04-01

    Rivers transport combustion-derived dissolved black carbon (DBC) to the oceans at an annual flux that is much higher than required to balance the oceanic inventory of DBC. To resolve this mismatch we studied the long-term stability of DBC in ten major world rivers that together account for approximately 1/3 of the global freshwater discharge to the oceans. Riverine DBC was remarkably resistant against microbial degradation, but decomposition of nearly all chromophoric dissolved organic matter under extensive irradiation with simulated sunlight removed almost 80% of DBC. Photochemically transformed DBC was further microbially decomposed by more than 10% in a subsequent one-year long bioassay. Based on these findings, on a global scale, the estimated riverine flux of microbially degraded and photo-resistant DBC is sufficient to replenish the oceans with DBC and likely contributes to the dissolved organic matter pool that persists in the oceans and sequesters carbon for centuries to millennia.

  9. Importance of unburned coal carbon, black carbon, and amorphous organic carbon to phenanthrene sorption in sediments.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Gustafsson, Orjan

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to estimate the contribution to total phenanthrene sorption from unburned coal and black carbon (BC; soot and charcoal) in sediment. We determined sorption isotherms for five Argonne Premium Coal standards over a wide concentration interval (0.01-10 000 ng/L). The coals showed strong and nonlinear sorption (carbon-normalized K(F) = 5.41-5.96; nF = 0.68-0.82). Coal sorption appeared to become more nonlinear with increasing coal maturity. The coal's specific surface area appeared to influence K(F). On the basis of the current coal sorption observations combined with earlier petrographic analyses and BC sorption experiments, we calculated for one particular sediment that coal, BC, and "other" OC were all important to PHE sorption in the environmentally relevant nanogram per liter range. This indicates that it is important to consider strong sorption to coal in the risk assessment of coal-impacted geosorbents (e.g., river beds) where coal is mined/shipped and manufactured gas plant sites. PMID:15757337

  10. Calcium absorbability from milk products, an imitation milk, and calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, R.R.; Bammi, A.; Barger-Lux, M.J.; Heaney, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Whole milk, chocolate milk, yogurt, imitation milk (prepared from dairy and nondairy products), cheese, and calcium carbonate were labeled with /sup 45/Ca and administered as a series of test meals to 10 healthy postmenopausal women. Carrier Ca content of the test meals was held constant at 250 mg and subjects fasted before each meal. The absorbability of Ca from the six sources was compared by measuring fractional absorption by the double isotope method. The mean absorption values for all six sources were tightly clustered between 21 and 26% and none was significantly different from the others using one-way analysis of variance. We conclude that none of the sources was significantly superior or inferior to the others.

  11. Enhanced light absorption by mixed source black and brown carbon particles in UK winter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shang; Aiken, Allison C.; Gorkowski, Kyle; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Williams, Leah R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Massoli, Paola; Fortner, Edward C.; Chhabra, Puneet S.; Brooks, William A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; China, Swarup; Sharma, Noopur; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James D.; Lee, James D.; Fleming, Zoë L.; Mohr, Claudia; Zotter, Peter; Szidat, Sönke; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2015-09-30

    We report that black carbon (BC) and light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon, BrC) play key roles in warming the atmosphere, but the magnitude of their effects remains highly uncertain. Theoretical modelling and laboratory experiments demonstrate that coatings on BC can enhance BC’s light absorption, therefore many climate models simply assume enhanced BC absorption by a factor of ~1.5. However, recent field observations show negligible absorption enhancement, implying models may overestimate BC’s warming. Here we report direct evidence of substantial field-measured BC absorption enhancement, with the magnitude strongly depending on BC coating amount. Increases in BC coating result from a combination of changing sources and photochemical aging processes. When the influence of BrC is accounted for, observationally constrained model calculations of the BC absorption enhancement can be reconciled with the observations. In conclusion, we find that the influence of coatings on BC absorption should be treated as a source and regionally specific parameter in climate models.

  12. Enhanced light absorption by mixed source black and brown carbon particles in UK winter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Shang; Aiken, Allison C.; Gorkowski, Kyle; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Williams, Leah R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Massoli, Paola; Fortner, Edward C.; Chhabra, Puneet S.; et al

    2015-09-30

    We report that black carbon (BC) and light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon, BrC) play key roles in warming the atmosphere, but the magnitude of their effects remains highly uncertain. Theoretical modelling and laboratory experiments demonstrate that coatings on BC can enhance BC’s light absorption, therefore many climate models simply assume enhanced BC absorption by a factor of ~1.5. However, recent field observations show negligible absorption enhancement, implying models may overestimate BC’s warming. Here we report direct evidence of substantial field-measured BC absorption enhancement, with the magnitude strongly depending on BC coating amount. Increases in BC coating result from a combinationmore » of changing sources and photochemical aging processes. When the influence of BrC is accounted for, observationally constrained model calculations of the BC absorption enhancement can be reconciled with the observations. In conclusion, we find that the influence of coatings on BC absorption should be treated as a source and regionally specific parameter in climate models.« less

  13. Black carbon absorption at the global scale is affected by particle-scale diversity in composition.

    PubMed

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C; Bauer, Susanne E; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (Eabs) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find Eabs=1-1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models. PMID:27580627

  14. Using a black phosphorus saturable absorber to generate dual wavelengths in a Q-switched ytterbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, F. A. A.; Azzuhri, Saaidal R.; Salim, M. A. M.; Shaharuddin, R. A.; Ismail, M. A.; Ismail, M. F.; Razak, M. Z. A.; Ahmad, H.

    2016-08-01

    Using a few-layer black phosphorus (BP) thin film that acts as a saturable absorber (SA) in an ytterbium-doped fiber laser setup, we experimentally demonstrated a passively dual-wavelength Q-switching laser operation. The setup also incorporated a D-shaped polished fiber as a wavelength selective filter. As the SA was used in the ring cavity, a dual-wavelength Q-switch produced consistent outputs at 1038.68 and 1042.05 nm. A maximum pulse energy of 2.09 nJ with a shortest pulse width of 1.16 µs was measured for the achieved pulses. In addition, the repetition rate increased from 52.52 to 58.73 kHz with the increment of the pump level. Throughout the measurement process, the results were obtained consistently and this demonstrates that the BP film is a very good candidate to produce Q-switching pulses for the 1 micron region.

  15. Reflectance and scattering properties of highly absorbing black appliqués over a broadband spectral region.

    PubMed

    Meier, S R

    2001-12-01

    I present angle-dependent directional hemispherical reflectance (DHR) and bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements of three highly absorbing black appliqués in the 250-2000-nm broadband spectral region. DHR measurements of Energy Science Laboratories, Inc. (ESLI), Rippey, and Rodel appliqués were obtained at incidence angles of 8 degrees , 50 degrees , and 70 degrees . For an incidence angle of 8 degrees , the ESLI appliqué exhibited the lowest DHR value of 0.3% across this entire spectral region, whereas the Rippey and Rodel had DHR values of 1.5% and 2.0-2.5%, respectively. In-plane BRDF measurements of the appliqués, obtained at a wavelength of 633 nm and incidence angle of 10 degrees , yielded Lambertian profiles from -80 degrees to +80 degrees with values ranging from ~10(-3) sr(-1) for the ESLI, 6 x 10(-3) sr(-1) for the Rippey, and 9 x 10(-3) sr(-1) for the Rodel appliqué. In addition, rms surface roughness and correlation lengths for the Rippey and the Rodel appliqués were determined. The in-plane BRDF data were used to estimate the reflected specular component from Beckmann's scattering theory, and excellent agreement was found. PMID:18364931

  16. Methane and carbon dioxide increases in the urban boundary layer: Inferences from whole-column infrared absorbance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, K.R.; Hansen, A.D.A.; Rosen, H.

    1988-01-01

    Using the sun as an infrared source, we determined the total atmospheric column absorbance of methane and carbon dioxide spectral lines in the 8- to 10-..mu..m infrared region. At our laboratory located in an urban region, these absorbances showed fluctuations larger than can be accounted for by known variabilities in the background atmosphere. We interpret these observations in terms of large changes in concentration of methane and carbon dioxide within the urban boundary layer. These increases could affect the radiative balance in urban locations and contribute to the urban heat island. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  17. Changing Export of Dissolved Black Carbon from Arctic Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, A.; Spencer, R. G.; Mann, P. J.; Dittmar, T.; Niggemann, J.; Holmes, R. M.; McClelland, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic rivers carry black carbon (BC) from Arctic soils to the ocean, linking two of the largest carbon stores on Earth. Wildfires have charred biomass since land plants emerged. BC, a refractory component of char, has accumulated in soils. In the oceans, dissolved BC (DBC) has also accumulated. Here we use samples and data collected as part of the long-term, high temporal resolution Arctic Great Rivers Observatory to model export of DBC from the six largest Arctic Rivers. Scaling to the pan-Arctic catchment, we report that ~3 million tons of DBC are delivered to the Arctic Ocean each year, which is ~8% of dissolved organic carbon loads to the Arctic Ocean. We suggest the transfer of Arctic river DBC to areas of deep water formation is a major source of DBC to the deep ocean carbon store. As the Arctic warms, greater wildfire occurrence is expected to produce more BC and changing hydrology and permafrost thaw to promote DBC export. Thus, the transfer of BC from Arctic soils to the ocean is predicted to increase.

  18. Black carbon and particulate matter optical properties from agricultural residue burning in the Pacific Northwest United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, A. L.; Aurell, J.; Urbanski, S. P.; Hays, M. D.; Gullett, B.

    2014-12-01

    Burning of agricultural residues in field is a common management practice that is used to quickly clear fields of post-harvest vegetation and to stimulate seed production in some grass species. Although cropland burning contributes only a minor fraction to the United States particulate matter and black carbon emissions, it can have substantial impacts on local and regional air quality and visibility. During the 2013 burning season in the Pacific Northwest United States emissions were measured from a series of burns carried out on cropland. Kentucky bluegrass residues (Poa pratensis), winter wheat stubble (Triticum aestivum), and chemically fallowed winter wheat stubble were burned in field. Particulate matter, light absorption and scattering, and black carbon concentrations were measured at ground level downwind of the field. Although particulate emissions varied substantially by fuel type and even among fields of the same fuel with different treatments (i.e., light versus heavy residues) the black carbon fraction of particulate matter was consistently less than 5% and accordingly single scattering albedos were above 0.9. The emissions exhibited strong spectral variation, with absorption angstrom exponents in the range of 3 - 5 in the wavelength range of 405 to 532 nm. Laboratory burns with residues collected from the fields produced emissions that were considerably more absorbing with single scattering albedos near 0.65 and lower absorption angstrom exponents of 1 - 2.

  19. Black Carbon in Sedimentary Organic Carbon in the Northeast Pacific using the Benzene Polycarboxylic Acid Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, A. I.; Ziolkowski, L. A.; Druffel, E. R.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) in the Northeast Pacific ultrafiltered dissolved organic matter (UDOM) was found to be surprisingly old with a 14C age of 18,000 +/-3,000 14C years (Ziolkowski and Druffel, 2010) using the Benzene Polycarboxylic Acid (BPCA) method, while BC in sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) was found to be 2,400-12,900 14C years older than non-BC SOC (Masiello and Druffel, 1998) with a different method. Using the dichromate-sulfuric acid oxidation method (Wolbach and Anders, 1989), Masiello and Druffel (1998) estimated that 12-31% of SOC in the Northeast Pacific and the Southern Ocean surface sediments was black carbon (BC). However, the dichromate-sulfuric acid oxidation may over-estimate the concentration of BC, because this method is more biased toward modern (char) material (Currie et al., 2002). Alternatively, the BPCA method isolates aromatic components of BC as benzene rings substituted with carboxylic acid groups, and provides structural information about the BC. Recent modifications to the BPCA method by Ziolkowski and Druffel (2009) involve few biases in quantifying BC in the continuum between char and soot in UDOM. Here we use the BPCA method to determine the concentrations and 14C values of BC in sediments from three sites in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Constraining the difference between non-BC SOC and BC-SOC using the BPCA method allows for a more precise estimate of how much BC is present in the sediments and its 14C age. Presumably, the intermediate reservoir of BC is oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and is, in part, responsible for DOC’s great 14C age. These results can be utilized to better constrain the oceanic carbon budget as a possible sink of BC. References: Currie, L. A., Benner Jr., B. A., Kessler, J.D., et al (2002), A critical evaluation of interlaboratory data on total, elemental, and isotopic carbon in the carbonaceous particle reference material, nist srm 1649a, J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol., 107, 279-298. Masiello, C

  20. Laboratory Evaluation of Selected Ways for Determining Black Carbon Source Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have been conducted which compare various methods for the determination of black carbon in the atmosphere. Relatively little attention has been paid, however, to similar measurements of black carbon from different types of emission sources. Of particular int...

  1. CONTINUOUS BLACK CARBON MEASUREMENTS INDOORS AND OUTDOORS AT AN OCCUPIED HOUSE FOR ONE YEAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Black carbon is one of the components of particulate matter, and is of importance because the only known source of aerosol black carbon in the atmosphere is the combustion of carbonaceous fuels (Hansen, 1997). Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formed in the combustion process ar...

  2. CARBON BLACK DISPERSION PRE-PLATING TECHNOLOGY FOR PRINTED WIRE BOARD MANUFACTURING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project compared chemical use, waste generation, cost, and product quality between electroless copper and carbon-black-based preplating technologies at the printed wire board (PWB). manufacturing facility of McCurdy Circuits in Orange, CA. he carbon-black based preplating te...

  3. INDOOR-OUTDOOR RELATIONSHIPS OF PARTICLES, PAH, AND BLACK CARBON IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time instrumentation for measuring particles, PAH, and black carbon (soot) has been operated since May of 1998 in an occupied 3-story town house in Reston, VA. Indoor and outdoor concentrations have been measured every five minutes for the particles and black carbon and ev...

  4. End of the "Little Ice Age" in the Alps not forced by industrial black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Michael; Osmont, Dimtri; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Barbante, Carlo; Schwikowski, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Light absorbing aerosols present in the atmosphere and cryosphere play an important role in the climate system. Their presence in ambient air and snow changes radiative properties of these media, thus contributing to increased atmospheric warming and snowmelt. High spatio-temporal variability of aerosol concentrations in these media and a shortage of long-term observations contribute to large uncertainties in properly assigning the climate effects of these aerosols through time. Glaciers in the European Alps began to retreat abruptly from their mid-19th century maximum, marking what appeared to be the end of the Little Ice Age. Radiative forcing by increasing deposition of industrial black carbon to snow has been suggested as the main driver of the abrupt glacier retreats in the Alps (Painter et al. 2012). Basis for this hypothesis were model simulations using ice-core measurements of elemental carbon at low temporal resolution from two ice cores in the Alps. Here we present sub-annually resolved, well replicated ice-core measurements of refractory black carbon (rBC; using a SP2 soot photometer), mineral dust (Fe, Ca), biomass burning (NH4, K) and distinctive industrial pollution tracers (Bi, Pb, SO4) from an ice core in the Alps covering the past 250 years. These reconstructions allow to precisely compare the timing of observed acceleration of glacier melt in the mid-19th century with that of the increase of soot deposition on ice-sheets caused by the industrialization of Western Europe. Our study suggests that at the time when European rBC emission rates started to significantly increase Alpine glaciers have already experienced more than 70% of their total 19th century length reduction. Industrial BC emissions can therefore not been considered as the primary forcing of the rapid deglaciation at the end of the Little Ice Age in the Alps. References: Painter, T. H., M. G. Flanner, G. Kaser, B. Marzeion, R. A. VanCuren, and W. Abdalati (2013), End of the Little Ice

  5. Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of High-Abrasion-Furnace Carbon Black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Harada, Ryusuke; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2007-02-01

    The soft x-ray absorption spectra of high-abrasion-furnace carbon black were measured to obtain local-structure/chemical-states information of the primary particles and/or crystallites. The soft x-ray absorption spectral features of carbon black represent broader π* and σ* peak structures compared to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The subtracted spectra between the carbon black and HOPG, (carbon black) — (HOPG), show double-peak structures on both sides of the π* peak. The lower-energy peak, denoted as the "pre-peak", in the subtracted spectra and the π*/σ* peak intensity ratio in the absorption spectra clearly depend on the specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption (NSA). Therefore, it is concluded that the pre-peak intensity and the π*/σ* ratio reflect the local graphitic structure of carbon black.

  6. Metal oxide absorbents for regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal for advanced portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Stonesifer, Greg T.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of Allied Signal metal oxide based absorbents demonstrated that these absorbents offer a unique capability to regeneratively remove both metabolic carbon dioxide and water vapor from breathing air; previously, metal oxides were considered only for the removal of CO2. The concurrent removal of CO2 and H2O vapor can simplify the astronaut Portable Life Support System (PLSS) by combining the CO2 and humidity control functions into one regenerative component. The use of metal oxide absorbents for removal of both CO2 ad H2O vapor in the PLSS is the focus of an ongoing program. The full scale Metal Oxide Carbon dioxide and Humidity Remover (MOCHR) and regeneration unit is described.

  7. A wormhole-like porous carbon/magnetic particles composite as an efficient broadband electromagnetic wave absorber.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiyong; Liu, Tao; Chen, Zheng; Wang, Yan; Wei, Wei; Yue, Xigui; Jiang, Zhenhua

    2016-04-28

    A method combining liquid-liquid phase separation and the pyrolysis process has been developed to fabricate the wormhole-like porous carbon/magnetic nanoparticles composite with a pore size of about 80 nm (WPC/MNPs-80). In this work, the porous structure was designed to enhance interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) wave and the absorber, while the magnetic nanoparticles were used to bring about magnetic loss ability. The structure, morphology, porosity and magnetic properties of WPC/MNPs-80 were investigated in detail. To evaluate its EM wave attenuation performance, the EM parameters of the absorber and wax composite were measured at 2-18 GHz. WPC/MNPs-80 has an excellent EM wave absorbency with a wide absorption band at a relatively low loading and thin absorber thickness. At the absorber thickness of 1.5 and 2.0 mm, minimum RL values of -29.2 and -47.9 dB were achieved with the RL below -10 dB in 12.8-18 and 9.2-13.3 GHz, respectively. The Co and Fe nanoparticles derived from the chemical reduction of Co0.2Fe2.8O4 can enhance the graphitization process of carbon and thus improve dielectric loss ability. Polarizations in the nanocomposite absorber also play an important role in EM wave absorption. Thus, EM waves can be effectively attenuated by dielectric loss and magnetic loss through multiple reflections and absorption in the porous structure. WPC/MNPs-80 could be an excellent absorber for EM wave attenuation; and the design strategy could be extended as a general method to synthesize other high-performance absorbers. PMID:27072200

  8. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  9. [Cleft in carbon dioxide absorber. Intraoperative problems with ventilation due to a leak in the breathing circuit].

    PubMed

    Paul, C; Böttiger, B W

    2010-07-01

    In the case presented problems with mechanical and manual ventilation of a patient occurred during the operation. Prior to this endotracheal intubation had been performed without difficulty and the respirator had passed all system checks. A leakage in the recently changed carbon dioxide absorber could be detected which had been accidentally dropped and damaged internally. PMID:20574760

  10. Two-year black carbon observations at Everest-Pyramid GAW Station (Nepal, 5079 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinoni, A.; Cristofanelli, P.; Duchi, R.; Calzolari, F.; Roccato, F.; Laj, P.; Vuillermoz, E.; Verza, G. P.; Bonasoni, P.

    2009-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol play a complex role in atmospheric radiative balance; in particular black carbon, primary produced by fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, both absorbs and reflects incoming solar radiation, thus heating the lower troposphere and cooling the Earth surface. India and China, the most populated and rapidly developing countries, are between the actual major emitters. Thus the Himalayas range is an ideal location to investigate atmospheric composition changes. Due to technical and logistic difficulties, only few continuous observations of atmospheric constituents are available in this area. One of these observation sites is located in the Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l, where black carbon and other aerosol parameters as well as trace gas concentrations measurements are carried out since March 2006. The BC seasonal behaviour clearly shows a minimum in summer monsoon season with an averaged concentration of 52 ng m-3 and a standard deviation of 62 ng m-3; the seasonal maximum appears in pre-monsoon period with an averaged concentration of 340 ng m-3 and a standard deviation of 415 ng m-3. During this season black carbon values reached sometime very high levels up to 5 μg m-3 on 30 minutes base, showing high polluted conditions even at 5000 m. Aerosol mass (PM-1), as well as accumulation particle number show very similar seasonal trends, while ultrafine (Aitken+Nucleation) particles are more influenced by nucleation processes. In this work, we present an analysis of black carbon and aerosol mass variations during the first two years of measurements at the Everest-Pyramid station with the aim to identify background and polluted conditions.

  11. Optical Properties of Black and Brown Carbon Aerosols from Laboratory Combustion of Wildland Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.; Molzan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol light absorption in the solar spectral region (300 nm - 2300 nm) of the atmosphere is key for the direct aerosol radiative forcing, which is determined by aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), asymmetry parameter, and by the albedo of the underlying surface. SSA is of key importance for the sign and quantity of aerosol direct radiative forcing; that is, does the aerosol make the earth look darker (heating) or whiter (cooling)? In addition, these optical properties are needed for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth and properties. During wildland fires, aerosol optical absorption is largely determined by black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) emissions. BC is strongly absorbing throughout the solar spectrum, while BrC absorption strongly increases toward shorter wavelength and can be neglected in the red and infrared. Optical properties of BrC emitted from wildland fires are poorly understood and need to be studied as function of fuel type and moisture content and combustion conditions. While much more is known about BC optical properties, knowledge for the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region is still lacking and critically needed for satellite remote sensing (e.g., TOMS, OMI) and for modeling of tropospheric photochemistry. Here, a project to better characterize biomass burning aerosol optical properties is described. It utilizes a laboratory biomass combustion chamber to generate aerosols through combustion of different wildland fuels of global and regional importance. Combustion aerosol optics is characterized with an integrating nephelometer to measure aerosol light scattering and a photoacoustic instrument to measure aerosol light absorption. These measurements will yield optical properties that are needed to improve qualitative and quantitative understanding of aerosol radiative forcing and satellite retrievals for absorbing carbonaceous aerosols from combustion of wildland fuels.

  12. Electrical properties of foamed polypropylene/carbon black composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, M.; Kotzev, G.; Vulchev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Polypropylene composites containing carbon black fillers were produced by vibration assisted extrusion process. Solid (unfoamed) composite samples were molded by conventional injection molding method, while structural foams were molded by a low pressure process. The foamed samples were evidenced to have a solid skin-foamed core structure which main parameters were found to depend on the quantity of material injected in the mold. The average bubbles' sizes and their distribution were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. It is established that the conductivity of the foamed samples gradually decreases when reducing the sample density. Nevertheless, the conductivity is found to be lower than the conductivity of the unfoamed samples both being of the same order. The flexural properties of the composites were studied and the results were discussed in the context of the structure parameters of the foamed samples.

  13. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. We conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. We also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  14. Enhanced haze pollution by black carbon in megacities in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, A. J.; Huang, X.; Nie, W.; Sun, J. N.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.; Su, H.; Cheng, Y. F.; Yang, X.-Q.; Wang, M. H.; Chi, X. G.; Wang, J. P.; Virkkula, A.; Guo, W. D.; Yuan, J.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Wu, Y. F.; Song, Y.; Zhu, T.; Zilitinkevich, S.; Kulmala, M.; Fu, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol-planetary boundary layer (PBL) interactions have been found to enhance air pollution in megacities in China. We show that black carbon (BC) aerosols play the key role in modifying the PBL meteorology and hence enhancing the haze pollution. With model simulations and data analysis from various field observations in December 2013, we demonstrate that BC induces heating in the PBL, particularly in the upper PBL, and the resulting decreased surface heat flux substantially depresses the development of PBL and consequently enhances the occurrences of extreme haze pollution episodes. We define this process as the "dome effect" of BC and suggest an urgent need for reducing BC emissions as an efficient way to mitigate the extreme haze pollution in megacities of China.

  15. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect Its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  16. Comparative studies of industrial grade carbon black powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Komal; Chauhan, Alok P. S.

    2016-05-01

    Comparative studies of two dissimilar industrial grade Carbon Black (CB) powders (N375 and N405) were conducted. The structure, surface area and particle size are the three important characteristics of CB powder that determine their processability and application as filler in preparing rubber compounds. The powders were characterized for their structure using dibutyl phthalate absorption (DBPA), particle size via laser particle size analyzer and surface area by nitrogen adsorption method. The structural characterization showed that N405 had lower DBPA in comparison to N375, confirming low structure of N405 grade CB powder. It was observed from the particle size analysis that N375 was coarser than N405 grade CB. The total surface area values were determined by the BET method based on the cross sectional area of the nitrogen molecule. N375, a coarse grade CB powder with high structure, depicted less surface area as compared to N405.

  17. Potentiometric sensors with carbon black supporting platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paczosa-Bator, Beata; Cabaj, Leszek; Piech, Robert; Skupień, Krzysztof

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, a single-piece, all-solid-state ion-selective electrode was fabricated with carbon black supporting platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs-CB) and a polymeric membrane. The PtNPs-CB, as an intermediate layer, was drop-casted directly on the solid substrate, and then an ionophore-doped solvent polymeric membrane was added in order to form a sensor. The performance of the newly developed electrodes was evaluated on the basis of potassium and nitrate ions. The stability of the electrical potential for the electrodes was examined by performing current-reversal chronopotentiometry, and the influence of the interfacial water film was assessed by the potentiometric aqueous-layer test. Fabricated potassium- and nitrate-selective electrodes displayed a Nernstian slope and several outstanding properties such as high long-term potential stability, potential repeatability, and reproducibility. PMID:24094044

  18. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, Stefan; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, Kai

    2013-03-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  19. Laser-initiated decomposition products of indocyanine green (ICG) and carbon black sensitized biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokosa, John M.; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Motamedi, Massoud; Hayes, Donald J.; Wallace, David B.; Frederickson, Christopher J.

    1997-05-01

    Organic dyes have found increasing use a s sensitizers in laser surgical procedures, due to their high optical absorbances. Little is known, however, about the nature of the degradation products formed when these dyes are irradiated with a laser. Previous work in our laboratories has shown that irradiation of polymeric and biological tissues with CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers produces a host of volatile and semivolatile by-products, some of which are known to be potential carcinogens. This work focuses on the identification of the chemical by-products formed by diode laser and Nd:YAG laser irradiation of indocyanine green (ICG) and carbon black based ink sensitized tissues, including bone, tendon and sheep's teeth. Samples were mounted in a 0.5-L Pyrex sample chamber equipped with quartz optical windows, charcoal filtered air inlet and an outlet attached to an appropriate sample trap and a constant flow pump. By-products were analyzed by GC/MS and HPLC. Volatiles identified included benzene and formaldehyde. Semi-volatiles included traces of polycyclic aromatics, arising from the biological matrix and inks, as well as fragments of ICG and the carbon ink components. The significance of these results will be discussed, including the necessity of using appropriate evacuation devices when utilizing lasers for surgical procedures.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10075 - Carbon black, 4-[[2-(Sulfooxy) ethyl]substituted] phenyl- modified, sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10075 Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl...) The chemical substance identified generically as carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl-modified,...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10075 - Carbon black, 4-[[2-(Sulfooxy) ethyl]substituted] phenyl- modified, sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10075 Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl...) The chemical substance identified generically as carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl-modified,...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10075 - Carbon black, 4-[[2-(Sulfooxy) ethyl]substituted] phenyl- modified, sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10075 Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl...) The chemical substance identified generically as carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl-modified,...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10075 - Carbon black, 4-[[2-(Sulfooxy) ethyl]substituted] phenyl- modified, sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10075 Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl...) The chemical substance identified generically as carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl-modified,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10075 - Carbon black, 4-[[2-(Sulfooxy) ethyl]substituted] phenyl- modified, sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10075 Carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl...) The chemical substance identified generically as carbon black, 4- substituted] phenyl-modified,...

  5. Continuous flux of dissolved black carbon from a vanished tropical forest biome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, Thorsten; de Rezende, Carlos Eduardo; Manecki, Marcus; Niggemann, Jutta; Coelho Ovalle, Alvaro Ramon; Stubbins, Aron; Bernardes, Marcelo Correa

    2012-09-01

    Humans have used fire extensively as a tool to shape Earth's vegetation. The slash-and-burn destruction of Brazil's Atlantic forest, which once covered over 1.3millionkm2 of present-day Brazil and was one of the largest tropical forest biomes on Earth, is a prime example. Here, we estimate the amount of black carbon generated by the burning of the Atlantic forest, using historical records of land cover, satellite data and black carbon conversion ratios. We estimate that before 1973, destruction of the Atlantic forest generated 200-500 million tons of black carbon. We then estimate the amount of black carbon exported from this relict forest between 1997 and 2008, using measurements of polycyclic aromatic black carbon collected from a large river draining the region, and a continuous record of river discharge. We show that dissolved black carbon (DBC) continues to be mobilized from the watershed each year in the rainy season, despite the fact that widespread forest burning ceased in 1973. We estimate that the river exports 2,700 tons of DBC to the ocean each year. Scaling our findings up, we estimate that 50,000-70,000 tons of DBC are exported from the former forest each year. We suggest that an increase in black carbon production on land could increase the size of the refractory pool of dissolved organic carbon in the deep ocean.

  6. Carbon black dispersion pre-plating technology for printed wire board manufacturing. Final technology evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, D.W.; Gavaskar, A.R.; Jones, J.A.; Olfenbuttel, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    The project compared chemical use, waste generation, cost, and product quality between electroless copper and carbon-black-based preplating technologies at the printed wire board (PWB) manufacturing facility of McCurdy Circuits in Orange, CA. The carbon-black based preplating technology evaluated is used as an alternative process for electroless copper (EC) plating of through-holes before electrolytic copper plating. The specific process used at McCurdy is the BlackHole (BH) technology process, which uses a dispersion of carbon black in an aqueous solution to provide a conductive surface for subsequent electrolytic copper plating. The carbon-black dispersion technology provided effective waste reduction and long-term cost savings. The economic analysis determined that the new process was cost efficient because chemical use was reduced and the process proved more efficient; the payback period was less than 4 yrs.

  7. Predicting trace organic compound breakthrough in granular activated carbon using fluorescence and UV absorbance as surrogates.

    PubMed

    Anumol, Tarun; Sgroi, Massimiliano; Park, Minkyu; Roccaro, Paolo; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the applicability of bulk organic parameters like dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254), and total fluorescence (TF) to act as surrogates in predicting trace organic compound (TOrC) removal by granular activated carbon in water reuse applications. Using rapid small-scale column testing, empirical linear correlations for thirteen TOrCs were determined with DOC, UV254, and TF in four wastewater effluents. Linear correlations (R(2) > 0.7) were obtained for eight TOrCs in each water quality in the UV254 model, while ten TOrCs had R(2) > 0.7 in the TF model. Conversely, DOC was shown to be a poor surrogate for TOrC breakthrough prediction. When the data from all four water qualities was combined, good linear correlations were still obtained with TF having higher R(2) than UV254 especially for TOrCs with log Dow>1. Excellent linear relationship (R(2) > 0.9) between log Dow and the removal of TOrC at 0% surrogate removal (y-intercept) were obtained for the five neutral TOrCs tested in this study. Positively charged TOrCs had enhanced removals due to electrostatic interactions with negatively charged GAC that caused them to deviate from removals that would be expected with their log Dow. Application of the empirical linear correlation models to full-scale samples provided good results for six of seven TOrCs (except meprobamate) tested when comparing predicted TOrC removal by UV254 and TF with actual removals for GAC in all the five samples tested. Surrogate predictions using UV254 and TF provide valuable tools for rapid or on-line monitoring of GAC performance and can result in cost savings by extended GAC run times as compared to using DOC breakthrough to trigger regeneration or replacement. PMID:25792436

  8. Methods to Parameterize Brown Carbon, Distinguish Brown Carbon Absorption From Enhanced Black Carbon Absorption, and Assess the Stability of Brown Carbon to Photochemical Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. M.; Pokhrel, R. P.; Beamesderfer, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Langridge, J.; Lack, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present results obtained during the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment-4 (FLAME-4) with a combination of multi-wavelength photoacoustic and cavity ringdown spectrometers. It will be shown that the single scattering albedo and Angstrom exponent of biomass burning emissions can be better parameterized by the organic carbon to black carbon ratio than by the modified combustion efficiency. Two different methods to distinguish the contribution to aerosol absorption from brown carbon versus black carbon and enhanced black carbon absorption will be presented. One method is based on extending the absorption seen at 660 nm with an assumed Angstrom exponent while the other assumes a similar absorption enhancement (determined via thermal denuder) of black carbon at 660 and 405 nm. Potential errors and advantages of both methods will be discussed. Finally, chamber experiments that show degradation of brown carbon by photochemical oxidation will be presented along with a number of methods by which to assess the amount of brown carbon that is degraded.

  9. Fe-, Co-, and Ni-Loaded Porous Activated Carbon Balls as Lightweight Microwave Absorbents.

    PubMed

    Li, Guomin; Wang, Liancheng; Li, Wanxi; Xu, Yao

    2015-11-16

    Porous activated carbon ball (PACB) composites impregnated with iron, cobalt, nickel and/or their oxides were synthesized through a wet chemistry method involving PACBs as the carrier to load Fe(3+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) ions and a subsequent carbothermal reduction at different annealing temperatures. The results show that the pyrolysis products of nitrates and/or the products from the carbothermal reduction are embedded in the pores of the PACBs, with different distributions, resulting in different crystalline phases. The as-prepared PACB composites possessed high specific surface areas of 791.2-901.5 m(2)  g(-1) and low densities of 1.1-1.3 g cm(-3). Minimum reflection loss (RL) values of -50.1, -20.6, and -20.4 dB were achieved for Fe-PACB (annealed at 500 °C), Co-PACB (annealed at 800 °C), and Ni-PACB (annealed at 800 °C) composites, respectively. Moreover, the influence of the amount of the magnetic components in the PACB composites on the microwave-absorbing performances was investigated, further confirming that the dielectric loss was the primary contributor to microwave absorption. PMID:26373310

  10. Impacts of black carbon mixing state on black carbon nucleation scavenging: Insights from a particle-resolved model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, J.; Riemer, N.; West, M.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an advancement of the recently developed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC (Particle Monte Carlo-Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry) to investigate the impacts of mixing state on cloud droplet formation and to provide a tool for the quantification of errors in cloud properties introduced by simplifying mixing state assumptions. We coupled PartMC-MOSAIC with a cloud parcel model. We initialized the cloud parcel simulation with hourly PartMC-MOSAIC model output from a 48-hour urban plume simulation. The cloud parcel model then explicitly simulated activation and condensational growth of the particles as the parcel underwent cooling at a specified rate and the particles of the aerosol population competed for water vapor. We used this capability to quantify the relative importance of size information versus composition information for the prediction of the cloud droplet number fraction, mass fraction of black carbon that is nucleation-scavenged, cloud droplet effective radius, and relative dispersion of the droplet size distribution by introducing averaging of particle-resolved information within prescribed bins. For the cloud droplet number fraction, both composition averaging and size-bin averaging individually led to an error of less than 25% for all cloud parcel simulations, while averaging in both size bins and composition resulted in errors of up to 34% for the base case cooling rate of 0.5 K/min. In contrast, for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon mass fraction, the results for size-bin averaging tracked the reference case well, while composition averaging, with or without size-bin averaging, led to overestimation of this quantity by up to 600%.

  11. Nanoscale mapping of carbon oxidation in pyrogenic black carbon from ancient Amazonian anthrosols.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, B S; Baptista, D L; Sena, L A; Cançado, L G; Falcão, N P S; Jorio, A; Achete, C A

    2015-04-01

    Understanding soil organic matter is necessary for the development of soil amendments, which are important for sustaining agriculture in humid tropical climates. Ancient Amazonian anthrosols are uniquely high in black recalcitrant carbon, making them extremely fertile. In this study, we use high-resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy to resolve the oxidation process of carbon in the nanoscale crystallites within the black carbon grains of this special soil. Most alkali and acid chemical extraction methods are known to cause chemical modifications in soil organic matter and to give poor or no information about the real spatial structure of soil aggregates. However, here we show that carbon-oxygen functional groups such as phenol, carbonyl, and carboxyl dominate over different spatial regions, with areas varying from over tens to hundreds of nm(2). The chemical maps show that in the nanoscale grain, the surface has a tendency to be less aromatic than the grain core, where higher oxidative-degradation levels are indicated by the presence of carbonyl and carboxyl groups. A deep understanding of these structures could allow artificial reproduction of these natural events. PMID:25699655

  12. Uptake Mechanism for Iodine Species to Black Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Choung, Sungwook; Um, Wooyong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Min-Gyu

    2013-08-13

    Natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role in determining the fate and transport of iodine species such as iodide (I-) and iodate (IO3-) in groundwater system. Although NOM exists as diverse forms in environments, prior iodine studies have mainly focused on uptake processes of iodide and iodate to humic materials. This study was conducted to determine the iodide and iodate uptake potential for a particulate NOM (i.e., black carbon [BC]). A laboratory-produced BC and commercial humic acid were used for batch experiments to compare their iodine uptake properties. The BC exhibited >100 times greater uptake capability for iodide than iodate at low pH~3, while iodide uptake was negligible for the humic acid. The uptake properties of both solids strongly depend on the initial iodine aqueous concentrations. After uptake reaction of iodide to the BC, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy results indicated that the iodide was converted to electrophilic species, and iodine was covalently bound to carbon atom in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in the BC. The computed distribution coefficients (i.e., Kd values) suggest that the BC materials retard significantly the transport of iodide at low pH in environmental systems containing even a small amount of BC.

  13. Dissolved Black Carbon in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Yang, W.; Chen, M.; Ma, H.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC) has been ubiquitously reported in dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, the abundance and provenance of DBC in the ocean are not well understood. Here, DBC in the South China Sea (SCS) was determined at molecular level using the benzenepolycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) method. DBC showed high concentrations in the upper 100 m seawater with the average of 1.13 μmol l-1 (n=55). In the intermediate seawater (200-1500 m), DBC ranged from 0.67 to 0.89 μmol l-1 with the average of 0.78 μmol l-1 (n=9), exhibiting nearly homogeneous distributions. The vertical distribution pattern indicated that DBC significantly degraded in the photic zone, corresponding to an attenuate constant of 12.5±4.9 km-1. The ratios of B6CA/B3CAs increased downward, implying that aromatic condensation degree of DBC increase during transport from surface to deep water. Using the standing crops of DBC in the upper 200 m and the residence time of seawater, atmospheric deposition of DBC was estimated to be 1.94 TgC yr-1, accounting for around 16% of the global BC deposition. Our study highlights that DBC could be an important component of ocean carbon cycling in Pacific Asia Marginal Seas.

  14. Synthesis of carbon black/polystyrene conductive nanocomposite. Pickering emulsion effect characterized by TEM.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza-Contreras, Erasto Armando; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia Alejandra; Navarrete-Fontes, Alfredo; Flores-Gallardo, Sergio Gabriel

    2011-04-01

    In this study, carbon black/polystyrene electrically conductive composites were obtained by suspension polymerization technique. The composite was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, which indicated two outstanding features concerning to the carbon black; first, that the carbon particles were adsorbed onto the surface of the polystyrene particles, similarly as in the Pickering emulsion phenomenon and second, that the primary aggregate structure of the carbon black was significantly affected by the dispersion process. On the other hand, the composite resistivity was in the order of 200 Ωcm, which was attributed to the direct contact of primary carbon black particles (percolation) and not to the tunneling effect. The obtained composite was evaluated as the electrically conductive element in SBR matrix. PMID:21131206

  15. An approach to a black carbon emission inventory for Mexico by two methods.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Núñez, Xochitl

    2014-05-01

    A black carbon (BC) emission inventory for Mexico is presented. Estimate was performed by using two approaches, based on fuel consumption and emission factors in a top-down scheme, and the second from PM25 emission data and its correlation with black carbon by source category, assuming that black carbon=elemental carbon. Results show that black carbon emissions are in interval 53-473Gg using the fuel consumption approach and between 62 and 89 using the sector method. Black carbon key sources come from biomass burning in the rural sector, with 47 percent share to the National total. Mobile sources emissions account to 16% to the total. An opportunity to reduce, in the short-term, carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-eq) emissions by reducing black carbon emissions would be obtained in reducing emissions mainly from biomass burning in rural housing sector and diesel emissions in the transport sector with important co-benefits in direct radiative forcing, public health and air quality. PMID:24561296

  16. Cohort Study of Carbon Black Exposure and Risk of Malignant and Nonmalignant Respiratory Disease Mortality in the US Carbon Black Industry

    PubMed Central

    Dell, Linda D.; Gallagher, Alexa E.; Crawford, Lori; Jones, Rachael M.; Mundt, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate lung cancer and respiratory disease mortality associations with cumulative inhalable carbon black exposure among 6634 US carbon black workers. Methods: This analysis was performed using standardized mortality ratio (SMRs) and Cox regression analyses. Results: Lung cancer mortality was decreased overall (SMR = 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 0.89) but less so among hourly male workers (SMR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.71 to 1.05). No exposure–response association was observed with time-dependent cumulative inhalable carbon black: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.0 (95% CI, 0.6 to 1.6) for 20 to less than 50 mg/m3·yr); HR = 1.3 (95% CI, 0.8 to 2.1) for 50 to less than 100 mg/m3·yr; and HR = 1.4 (95% CI, 0.9 to 2.1) for 100 mg/m3·yr or more compared with referent (<20 mg/m3·yr). No consistent associations were observed between cumulative inhalable carbon black exposure and respiratory disease mortality. Conclusion: Quantitative carbon black exposure estimates were not related to lung cancer or nonmalignant respiratory disease mortality. PMID:26340287

  17. Effect Of Black Carbon Radiative Heating On Cloud Microphysics Over Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne black carbon (BC), the most significant particulate absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, is an important contributor to both global and regional-scale climate forcing (Tripathi et al., 2005). In context of cloud microphysics, freshly emitted pure BC particles are hydrophobic (i.e., bad cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)). However, exposure in the atmosphere may transform BC to a hydrophilic state if these particles are coated with additional materials, such as sulfate and organic carbon (OC). In a recent study, Conant et al. (2002) has examined the effect of radiative heating of BC on the critical supersaturation spectrum of internally mixed aerosols. Two main uncertainties introduced in this work are due to lack of knowledge of actual state of mixing and realistic distributions of different aerosol species. Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) in the northern India is one of the most polluted regions in the world. The cloud microphysical processes in IGB are very complex and it requires an in depth investigation for understanding of the aerosol-cloud interaction in the region (Tripathi, et al., 2007). In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the effect of radiative heating due to BC particles coated with hydrophilic materials on cloud microphysics over IGB. For this purpose, we have used (a) a two-layer radiative parameter model based on Mie theory (Toon and Ackerman, 1981) to calculate the particle (monodisperse) absorption cross section; (b) a three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model, the spherical harmonics discrete ordinate method (SHDOM) (Evans,1998), which assumes a tropical continental atmosphere, to simulate the 3D spectral actinic flux over the study region; and (c) Extended Köhler theory (Conant et al., 2002) to simulate the effect the BC radiative heating on cloud droplet activation. The solar wavelength spectrum used ranges from 0.2 to 5 micrometer. Following the in situ measurements and modeling studies on mixing state (Dey

  18. Central Asian supra-glacier snow melt enhanced by anthropogenic black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, Julia; Flanner, Mark; Kang, Shichang; Sprenger, Michael; Farinotti, Daniel; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Li, Yang; Lawrence, Mark; Schwikowski, Margit

    2016-04-01

    In Central Asia, more than 60 % of the population depends on water stored in glaciers and mountain snow. Densely populated areas near lower-lying mountain ranges are particularly vulnerable and a recent study showed that the region might lose 50 % of its glacier mass by 2050. While temperature, precipitation and dynamic processes are key drivers of glacial change, deposition of light absorbing impurities such as mineral dust and black carbon can lead to accelerated melting through surface albedo reduction. Here, we discuss the origin of deposited mineral dust and black carbon and their impacts on albedo change and snow melt. 218 snow samples were taken on 4 glaciers, Abramov (Pamir), Suek, Glacier No. 354 and Golubin (Tien Shan), representing deposition between summer 2012 and 2014. They were analyzed for elemental carbon, mineral dust and iron among other parameters. We find the elemental carbon concentration to be at the higher end of the range reported for neighboring mountain ranges between 70 and 502 ng g-1 (interquartile range). To investigate the origin of the snow impurities, we used a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, LAGRANTO. Back trajectory ensembles of 40 members with varied starting points to capture the meteorological spread were released every 6 hours for the covered period at all sites. "Footprints" were calculated and combined with emission inventories to estimate the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural BC to deposited aerosol on the glaciers. We find that more than 94 % of BC is of anthropogenic origin and the major source region is Central Asia followed by the Middle East. Further exploring the implications of mineral dust and BC deposition, we calculate the snow albedo reduction with the Snow-Ice-Aerosol-Radiative model (SNICAR). Even though mineral dust concentrations were up to a factor of 50 higher than BC concentrations, BC dominates the albedo reduction. Using these results we calculate the snow melt induced by

  19. Oxidation of Black Carbon by Biotic and Abiotic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-hsin; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Thies, Janice E.; Burton, Sarah D.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2006-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to quantify the relative importance of either biotic or abiotic oxidation of biomass-derived black carbon (BC) and to characterize the surface properties and charge characteristics of oxidized particulate BC. We incubated BC and BC-soil mixtures at two different temperatures (30 C and 70 C) with and without microbial inoculation, nutrient additions, or manure amendments for four months. Abiotic processes were more important for oxidation of BC than biotic processes during this short-term incubation, as inoculation with microorganisms did not change any of the measured parameters. Black C incubated at both 30 C and 70 C without microbial activity showed dramatic decreases in pH (in water) from 5.4 to 5.2 and 3.4, as well as increases in cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7) by 53% and 538% and in oxygen (O) contents by 4% and 38%, respectively. Boehm titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested that the formation of carboxylic functional groups was the reason for the enhanced CEC during oxidation. The analyses of BC surface properties by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the oxidation of BC particles initiated on the surface. Incubation at 30 C only enhanced oxidation on particle surfaces, while oxidation during incubation at 70 C penetrated into the interior of particles. Such short-term oxidation of BC has great significance for the stability of BC in soils as well as for its effects on soil fertility and biogeochemistry.

  20. Variable effects of labile carbon on the carbon use of different microbial groups in black slate degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Anne-Gret; Trumbore, Susan; Xu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dachung; Kothe, Erika; Gleixner, Gerd

    2011-05-01

    Weathering of ancient organic matter contributes significantly to biogeochemical carbon cycles over geological times. The principle role of microorganisms in this process is well recognized. However, information is lacking on the contribution of individual groups of microorganisms and on the effect of labile carbon sources to the degradation process. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the degradation process using a column experiment. Investigations were performed on low metamorphic black slates. All columns contained freshly crushed, sieved (0.63-2 mm), not autoclaved black slates. Two columns were inoculated with the lignite-degrading fungus Schizophyllum commune and received a culture medium containing 13C labeled glucose, two columns received only this culture medium and two control columns received only water. The total mass balance was calculated from all carbon added to the slate and the CO 2 and DOC losses. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were extracted to investigate microbial communities. We used both the compound specific 14C and 13C signal of the PLFA to quantify carbon uptake from black slates and the glucose of the culture medium, respectively. The total carbon loss in these columns exceeded the amount of added carbon by approximately 60%, indicating that black slate carbon has been used. PLFA associated with Gram-positive bacteria dominated the indigenous community and took up 22% of carbon from black slate carbon, whereas PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria used only 8% of carbon from the slates. PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi were both mostly activated by the glucose addition. The added Schizophyllum did not establish well in the columns and was overgrown by the indigenous microbial community. Our results suggest that especially Gram-positive bacteria are able to live on and degrade black slate material. They also benefit from easy degradable carbon from the nutrient broth. In

  1. Mode-locking of solid-state lasers by single-walled carbon-nanotube based saturable absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Rotermund, F; Cho, W B; Choi, S Y; Baek, I H; Yim, J H; Lee, S; Schmidt, A; Steinmeyer, G; Griebner, U; Yeom, D I; Kim, K; Petrov, V

    2012-08-31

    Universal use of single-walled carbon-nanotube based saturable absorber devices for mode-locking of bulk solid-state lasers between 0.8 and 2 {mu}m is discussed. The advantages in comparison to semiconductor saturable absorbers are emphasised. We briefly describe the manufacturing process and the essential optical properties, and review experimental results obtained with various types of femtosecond and picosecond solid-state lasers in the steady-state regime. We also demonstrate that a single hybrid saturable absorber used in transmission can be used to mode-lock four different types of lasers operating between 1 and 2 {mu}m. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  2. Fabrication and Electromagnetic Wave-Absorbing Property of Si3N4 Ceramics with Gradient Pyrolytic Carbon Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangming; Gao, Mingjun

    2016-04-01

    A Si3N4 ceramic with gradient distribution of pyrolytic carbon (Gradient-PyC-Si3N4) was fabricated by a combined technique of precursor infiltration pyrolysis and directional oxidation. An electromagnetic wave could enter Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 with little reflection because of a weak impedance mismatch at its surface, and the electromagnetic wave entering Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 could propagate forward along the PyC changing belt and simultaneously be absorbed by PyC with little reflection. The electromagnetic reflectivity of the Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 with an absence of PyC could reach a low level of -12.1 dB, which means that about 94% of the incident energy is absorbed and so makes the Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 a promising electromagnetic absorbing material for covert action.

  3. Fabrication and Electromagnetic Wave-Absorbing Property of Si3N4 Ceramics with Gradient Pyrolytic Carbon Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangming; Gao, Mingjun

    2016-07-01

    A Si3N4 ceramic with gradient distribution of pyrolytic carbon (Gradient-PyC-Si3N4) was fabricated by a combined technique of precursor infiltration pyrolysis and directional oxidation. An electromagnetic wave could enter Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 with little reflection because of a weak impedance mismatch at its surface, and the electromagnetic wave entering Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 could propagate forward along the PyC changing belt and simultaneously be absorbed by PyC with little reflection. The electromagnetic reflectivity of the Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 with an absence of PyC could reach a low level of -12.1 dB, which means that about 94% of the incident energy is absorbed and so makes the Gradient-PyC-Si3N4 a promising electromagnetic absorbing material for covert action.

  4. Wall paper single-walled carbon nanotubes absorber for passively mode-locked Nd: GdVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong Gang; Chen, Hou Ren; Wen, Xiao Min; Hsieh, Wen Feng; Tang, Jau

    2012-04-01

    A novel and low-cost wall paper single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) absorber was fabricated by high viscosity of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) aqueous solution and vertical evaporation technique. Sandwich structure wall paper SWCNT (SSWA-SWCNT) absorber was constructed by a piece of wall paper SWCNT absorber, a piece of round quartz and an output coupler mirror. We exploited it to realize mode locking operation in a diode-pumped Nd: GdVO4 laser. A pulse duration of 9.6 ps was produced with an average power of 870 mW. The stable mode locking operation was obtained when the average power is less than 300 mW.

  5. Raman spectroscopic investigation of carbon-based materials and their composites. Comparison between carbon nanotubes and carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokobza, Liliane; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Couzi, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy experiments on multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNTs), carbon black (CB) and on a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) filled either with MWCNTs or CB and also with a mixture of both particles (MWCNTs + CB) are reported. Emphasis is given on the dispersive effects of the Raman D band with laser energy that are shown for the first time to differ in each type of composites revealing a different polymer-filler interface. In addition, an upshift of the G band is observed when CB particles are incorporated into the polymer matrix.

  6. Black and brown carbon fractal aggregates from combustion of two fuels widely used in Asian rituals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Arnold, Ian J.; Francisco, Dianna M.; Hatchett, Benjamin; Hosseinpour, Farnaz; Loria, Marcela; Pokharel, Ashok; Woody, Brian M.

    2013-06-01

    Incense sticks and mustard oil are the two most popular combustion fuels during rituals and social ceremonies in Asian countries. Given their widespread use in both closed and open burning activities, it is important to quantify the spectral radiative properties of aerosols emitted from the combustion of both fuels. This information is needed by climate models to assess the impact of these aerosols on radiative forcing. In this study, we used a 3-wavelength integrated photoacoustic-nephelometer - operating simultaneously at 405, 532 and 781nm - to measure the optical coefficients of aerosols emitted from the laboratory combustion of mustard oil lamp and two types of incense sticks. From the measured optical coefficients at three wavelengths, time-varying single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption Ångström exponent (AAE), and scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) were calculated. For incense smoke particles, the time-averaged mean AAE values were found to be as high as 8.32 (between 405 and 532nm) and 6.48 (between 532 and 781nm). This spectrally-varying characteristic of AAE indicates that brown carbon - a class of organic carbon which strongly absorbs solar radiation in the blue and near ultraviolet - is the primary component of incense smoke aerosols. For aerosols emitted from the burning of mustard oil lamp, the time-averaged mean AAE values were ˜1.3 (between 405 and 781nm) indicating that black carbon (BC) is the primary constituent. Scanning electron microscopy combined with image processing revealed the morphology of incense smoke aerosols to be non-coalescing and weakly-bound aggregates with a mean two-dimensional (2-d) fractal dimension (Df)=1.9±0.07, while the mustard oil smoke aerosols had typical fractal-like BC aggregate morphology with a mean 2-d Df=1.85±0.09.

  7. Black carbon, a 'hidden' player in the global C cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santín, C.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    During the 2011 alone more than 600 scientific papers about black carbon (BC) were published, half of them dealing with soils (ISI Web of Knowledge, accessed 15/01/2012). If the search is extended to the other terms by which BC is commonly named (i.e. biochar, charcoal, pyrogenic C or soot), the number of 2011 publications increases to >2400, 20% of them also related to soils. These figures confirm BC as a well-known feature in the scientific literature and, thus, in our research community. In fact, there is a wide variety of research topics where BC is currently studied: from its potential as long-term C reservoir in soils (man-made biochar), to its effects on the Earth's radiation balance (soot-BC), including its value as indicator in paleoenvironmental studies (charcoal) or, even surprisingly, its use in suicide attempts. BC is thus relevant to many aspects of our environment, making it a very far-reaching, but also very complex topic. When focusing 'only' on the role of BC in the global C cycle, numerous questions arise. For example: (i) how much BC is produced by different sources (i.e. vegetation fires, fossil fuel and biofuel combustion); (ii) what are the main BC forms and their respective proportions generated (i.e. proportion of atmospheric BC [BC-soot] and the solid residues [char-BC]); (iii) where does this BC go (i.e. main mobilization pathways and sinks); (iv) how long does BC stay in the different systems (i.e. residence times in soils, sediments, water and atmosphere); (v) which are the BC stocks and its main transformations within and between the different systems (i.e. BC preservation, alteration and mineralization); (vi) what is the interaction of BC with other elements and how does this influence BC half-life (i.e. physical protection, interaction with pollutants, priming effects in other organic materials)? These questions, and some suggestions about how to tackle these, will be discussed in this contribution. It will focus in particular on the

  8. Carbon black nanoparticles and other problematic constituents of black ink and their potential to harm tattooed humans.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Clausen, Per Axel

    2015-01-01

    Black is the most common tattoo color, but only a few studies have shed light on the multitude of functional and contaminating chemicals present in black inks. These studies have generally shown that black inks are a diverse group, containing anything from 5 to 50+ organic components. Little is known about the possible effects on humans of internalizing these chemicals. Analysis has shown that the production of the main component, carbon black, can lead to the formation of pigments with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contents that range from very high to almost completely absent. Similar variations in PAH concentrations are observed in black inks. PAHs are known carcinogens and thus, low recommended levels have been suggested by the Council of Europe. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have recently been a topic in scientific literature related to tattoo ink. Again, it has been shown that some inks produce deleterious ROS (e.g. singlet oxygen or peroxyl radicals), presumably via either adhered organic compounds or particle surface defects. It has been shown that black tattoo inks may contain a multitude of chemicals, including carcinogens and allergens, and some have unknown toxicologies. However, it has additionally been demonstrated that some black inks already on the market do not produce ROS and also contain PAHs at levels that are below those recommended by the Council of Europe and very few additional contaminants. PMID:25833640

  9. Measurements of black carbon particles’ chemical, physical, and optical properties (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onasch, T. B.; Cross, E. S.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Ahern, A.; Lack, D. A.; Cappa, C. D.; Trimborn, A.; Freedman, A.; Olfert, J. S.; Jayne, J. T.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Mazzoleni, C.; Schwarz, J. P.; Thornhill, D. A.; Slowik, J. G.; Kok, G. L.; Brem, B. T.; Subramanian, R.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Spackman, J. R.; Freitag, S.; Dubey, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    Accurate measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of aerosol particles containing black carbon are necessary to improve current estimates of the radiative forcing in the atmosphere. A collaborative research effort between Aerodyne Research, Inc. and Boston College has focused on conducting field and laboratory experiments on carbonaceous particles and the development and characterization of new particulate instrumentation. This presentation will focus on the chemical, physical, and optical properties of black carbon particles measured in the laboratory in order to understand the effects of atmospheric processing on black carbon particles. Results from a three-week study during July 2008 of mass- and optical-based black carbon measurements will be presented. The project utilized the Boston College laboratory flame apparatus and aerosol conditioning and characterization equipment. A pre-mixed flat flame burner operating at controlled fuel-to-air ratios produced stable and reproducible concentrations of soot particles with known sizes, morphologies, and chemical compositions. In addition, other black carbon particle types, including fullerene soot, glassy carbon spheres, oxidized flame soot, Regal black, and Aquadag, were also atomized, size selected, and sampled. The study covered an experimental matrix that systematically selected particle mobility size (30 to 300 nm) and black carbon particle mass, particle number concentration, particle shape (dynamic shape factor and fractal dimension), and particle chemistry and density (changed via coatings). Particles were coated with a measured thickness (few nm to ~150 nm) of sulfuric acid or bis (2-ethylhexyl) sebacate and passed through a thermal denuder to remove the coatings. Highlights of the study to be presented include: (1) Characterization of the chemical and physical properties of various types of black carbon particles, (2) Mass specific absorption measurements as a function of fuel

  10. Aerosol optical properties and mixing state of black carbon in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Haobo; Liu, Li; Fan, Shaojia; Li, Fei; Yin, Yan; Cai, Mingfu; Chan, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols contribute the largest uncertainty to the total radiative forcing estimate, and black carbon (BC) that absorbs solar radiation plays an important role in the Earth's energy budget. This study analysed the aerosol optical properties from 22 February to 18 March 2014 at the China Meteorological Administration Atmospheric Watch Network (CAWNET) station in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. The representative values of dry-state particle scattering coefficient (σsp), hemispheric backscattering coefficient (σhbsp), absorption coefficient (σabsp), extinction coefficient (σep), hemispheric backscattering fraction (HBF), single scattering albedo (SSA), as well as scattering Ångström exponent (α) were presented. A comparison between a polluted day and a clean day shows that the aerosol optical properties depend on particle number size distribution, weather conditions and evolution of the mixing layer. To investigate the mixing state of BC at the surface, an optical closure study of HBF between measurements and calculations based on a modified Mie model was employed for dry particles. The result shows that the mixing state of BC might be between the external mixture and the core-shell mixture. The average retrieved ratio of the externally mixed BC to the total BC mass concentration (rext-BC) was 0.58 ± 0.12, and the diurnal pattern of rext-BC can be found. Furthermore, considering that non-light-absorbing particles measured by a Volatility-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (V-TDMA) exist independently with core-shell and homogenously internally mixed BC particles, the calculated optical properties were just slightly different from those based on the assumption that BC exist in each particle. This would help understand the influence of the BC mixing state on aerosol optical properties and radiation budget in the PRD.

  11. Estimation of polyurethane-carbon black interactions by means of inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Strzemiecka, Beata; Voelkel, Adam; Donate-Robles, Jessica; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2013-11-01

    The properties of composites depend mainly on the interfacial interactions between filler and matrix that can be related to the adhesion between filler and polymer matrix. In this study the work of cohesion between the carbon black particles - Wcoh - and the thermodynamic work of adhesion - Wa - between four carbon blacks of different specific surface area and surface chemistry (nature and content of carbon-oxygen functional groups) and thermoplastic polyurethane were calculated by means of inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at infinite dilution. IGC derived data indicated that the work of adhesion increased by increasing the surface area of the carbon black, but the opposite trend was found in Wa/Wcoh and work of cohesion. According to the Wa/Wcoh values the filler particles should be well dispersed into the polyurethane matrix giving homogenous composites. The carbon black-thermoplastic polyurethane interactions determined by plate-plate rheology showed the same trend than that for the Wa/Wcoh values. However, the thermodynamic work of adhesion values derived from IGC were not in agreement with the carbon black-polyurethane interfacial interactions, likely due to the dominant effect of the carbon black in reducing the crystallinity and increasing the degree of phase separation of the thermoplastic polyurethane. PMID:24063983

  12. One-dimensional carbon nanotube@barium titanate@polyaniline multiheterostructures for microwave absorbing application.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing-Qing; Zhu, Yao-Feng; Yu, Lu-Jun; Fu, Ya-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-phase nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been developed for their significant potential in microwave attenuation. The introduction of other phases onto the CNTs to achieve CNT-based heterostructures has been proposed to obtain absorbing materials with enhanced microwave absorption properties and broadband frequency due to their different loss mechanisms. The existence of polyaniline (PANI) as a coating with controllable electrical conductivity can lead to well-matched impedance. In this work, a one-dimensional CNT@BaTiO3@PANI heterostructure composite was fabricated. The fabrication processes involved coating of an acid-modified CNT with BaTiO3 (CNT@BaTiO3) through a sol-gel technique followed by combustion and the formation of CNT@BaTiO3@PANI nanohybrids by in situ polymerization of an aniline monomer in the presence of CNT@BaTiO3, using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and HCl as a dopant. The as-synthesized CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites with heterostructures were confirmed by various morphological and structural characterization techniques, as well as conductivity and microwave absorption properties. The measured electromagnetic parameters showed that the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites exhibited excellent microwave absorption properties. The minimum reflection loss of the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites with 20 wt % loadings in paraffin wax reached -28.9 dB (approximately 99.87% absorption) at 10.7 GHz with a thickness of 3 mm, and a frequency bandwidth less than -20 dB was achieved from 10 to 15 GHz. This work demonstrated that the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI heterostructure composite can be potentially useful in electromagnetic stealth materials, sensors, and electronic devices. PMID:25977651

  13. One-dimensional carbon nanotube@barium titanate@polyaniline multiheterostructures for microwave absorbing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qing-Qing; Zhu, Yao-Feng; Yu, Lu-Jun; Fu, Ya-Qin

    2015-04-01

    Multiple-phase nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been developed for their significant potential in microwave attenuation. The introduction of other phases onto the CNTs to achieve CNT-based heterostructures has been proposed to obtain absorbing materials with enhanced microwave absorption properties and broadband frequency due to their different loss mechanisms. The existence of polyaniline (PANI) as a coating with controllable electrical conductivity can lead to well-matched impedance. In this work, a one-dimensional CNT@BaTiO3@PANI heterostructure composite was fabricated. The fabrication processes involved coating of an acid-modified CNT with BaTiO3 (CNT@BaTiO3) through a sol-gel technique followed by combustion and the formation of CNT@BaTiO3@PANI nanohybrids by in situ polymerization of an aniline monomer in the presence of CNT@BaTiO3, using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and HCl as a dopant. The as-synthesized CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites with heterostructures were confirmed by various morphological and structural characterization techniques, as well as conductivity and microwave absorption properties. The measured electromagnetic parameters showed that the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites exhibited excellent microwave absorption properties. The minimum reflection loss of the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites with 20 wt % loadings in paraffin wax reached -28.9 dB (approximately 99.87% absorption) at 10.7 GHz with a thickness of 3 mm, and a frequency bandwidth less than -20 dB was achieved from 10 to 15 GHz. This work demonstrated that the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI heterostructure composite can be potentially useful in electromagnetic stealth materials, sensors, and electronic devices.

  14. Mass spectrometry of refractory black carbon particles from six sources: carbon-cluster and oxygenated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Sierau, B.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Keller, A.; Kim, J.; Petzold, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Lohmann, U.; Mensah, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the major mass spectral features of different types of refractory carbonaceous particles, ionized after laser vapourization with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated with a switchable 1064 nm laser and a 600 °C thermal vapourizer, yielding respective measurements of the refractory and non-refractory particle components. Six samples were investigated, all of which were composed primarily of refractory material: fuel-rich and fuel-lean propane/air diffusion-flame combustion particles; graphite-spark-generated particles; a commercial Fullerene-enriched Soot; Regal Black, a commercial carbon black; and nascent aircraft-turbine combustion particles. All samples exhibited a spectrum of carbon-cluster ions Cxn+ in their refractory mass spectrum. Smaller clusters (x<6) were found to dominate the Cxn+ distribution. For Fullerene Soot, fuel-rich-flame particles and spark-generated particles, significant Cxn+ clusters at x≫6 were present, with significant contributions from multiply-charged ions (n>1). In all six cases, the ions C1+ and C3+ contributed over 60% to the total C15 were present. When such signals were present, C1+/C3+ was close to 1. When absent, C1+/C3+ was <0.8. This ratio may therefore serve as a proxy to distinguish between the two types of spectra in atmospheric SP-AMS measurements. Significant refractory oxygenated ions such as CO+ and CO2+ were also observed for all samples. We discuss these signals in detail for Regal Black, and describe their formation via decomposition of oxygenated moieties incorporated into the refractory carbon structure. These species may be of importance in atmospheric processes such as water uptake, aging and heterogeneous chemistry.

  15. Evaluation of specific ultraviolet absorbance as an indicator of the chemical composition and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weishaar, J.L.; Aiken, G.R.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Fram, M.S.; Fujii, R.; Mopper, K.

    2003-01-01

    Specific UV absorbance (SUVA) is defined as the UV absorbance of a water sample at a given wavelength normalized for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. Our data indicate that SUVA, determined at 254 nm, is strongly correlated with percent aromaticity as determined by 13C NMR for 13 organic matter isolates obtained from a variety of aquatic environments. SUVA, therefore, is shown to be a useful parameter for estimating the dissolved aromatic carbon content in aquatic systems. Experiments involving the reactivity of DOC with chlorine and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), however, show a wide range of reactivity for samples with similar SUVA values. These results indicate that, while SUVA measurements are good predictors of general chemical characteristics of DOC, they do not provide information about reactivity of DOC derived from different types of source materials. Sample pH, nitrate, and iron were found to influence SUVA measurements.

  16. Modern biofuels life-cycle effects on black carbon emissions and impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Spak, S.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Chen, Y.; Tsao, C.

    2010-12-01

    The rapid growth of modern biofuels production (primarily ethanol) contributes to increased black carbon and co-pollutant emissions, particularly due to the field burning of agriculture wastes and the indirect land use impacts of forest clearing. U.S. bioenergy policy has already mandated life-cycle emissions thresholds for greenhouse gases from biofuels but there is still a need to incorporate black carbon and other short-lived climate forcers into these metrics. Thus, an understanding of the biofuels sector for black carbon and co-pollutant emissions and impacts remains a critical knowledge gap. Here we combine high-resolution agronomic data and regional chemical transport modeling to consider the life-cycle emissions of black carbon from sugarcane ethanol production in Brazil. Furthermore, we explore the potential for significant radiative forcing from the pre-harvest burning of sugarcane fields and the indirect land use emissions associated with deforestation.

  17. Stability of black carbon in soils across a climatic gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-hsin; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Thies, Janice E.; Burton, Sarah D.

    2008-06-04

    The recalcitrant properties of black carbon (BC) grant it to be a significant pool of stable C in soils. Up to now, however, the longevity of BC under different climates is still unclear. In this study, we used BC samples from historical charcoal blast furnace sites to examine the stability of BC across a climatic gradient of mean annual temperatures (MAT) from 3.9 to 17.2ºC. The results showed that C concentration and C storage in the BC-containing soils at a soil depth of 0 - 0.2 m were 9.0 and 4.7 times higher than those in adjacent soils, respectively. Carbon in the BC-containing soils was more stable, with a significantly lower amount of labile C fraction (4.4 mg g C-1 vs. 27.5 mg g C-1) and longer half-life of the recalcitrant C fraction (59 years vs. 9 years) than the adjacent soils determined from incubation experiments. The stability of BC was primarily due to its inherently recalcitrant chemical composition as suggested by short-term incubation and solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of isolated BC particles. A significant negative relationship between C storage and MAT (-0.62; P<0.01) further indicated that C storage was decreased with warmer climate. However, the lack of a relationship between MAT and BC mineralization (P>0.05) suggested that the stability of the remaining BC was similar between sites with very different MAT. Despite the fact that warming or cooling result in immediate consequences for BC stocks, it may have little impact on the stability of the remaining BC over the period studied.

  18. Black carbon reduction will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in a short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate coupled model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with present-day conditions if the BC emission is reduced exclusively to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial for the mitigation of global warming. However, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 relative to present-day conditions if emissions of BC and co-emitted sulfur dioxide and organic carbon are simultaneously reduced as the most close conditions to the actual situation to the level projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  19. Effects of Black Carbon on Climate: Advances in Measurement and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles are non-spherical agglomerates consisting of hundreds or thousands of graphitic carbon spherules the diameters of which are about 15-50 nm. The spherules are graphitic in their molecular states and are, thus, strongly light-absorbing. BC particles are emitted by the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fossil fuels and biomass. BC mass in the atmosphere resides in agglomerates typically between 100 and 600 nm in diameter. They influence the global radiation budget by strongly absorbing solar radiation in the visible wavelengths and by changing the albedo of snow through deposition. Radiative forcing (RF) of BC is defined as the change in net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere in W m-2 due to a change of BC between the pre-industrial time and present-day periods. The instantaneous direct radiative forcing of airborne BC particles (BC DRF), which does not include climate feedbacks, is determined by their absorption cross sections and spatial distributions. The distributions of BC are, in turn, controlled by its emission, dynamical transport, and loss during transport. The absorption cross section of BC is controlled by its optical properties (i.e., refractive index) and microphysical properties (size distribution, morphology, and mixing state). Because it is crucial to characterize these parameters, we first developed techniques to measure them accurately. Newly-developed BC measurement technologies constitute the firm basis of our studies. The techniques were applied to laboratory experiments and field observations of BC particles in air and rainwater. We also developed regional scale three-dimensional (3D) models to quantitatively interpret the observational results. One of the models calculates BC aging and optical/radiative processes explicitly without parameterizations. The reliable field measurements and model calculations of BC has enabled an improved understanding of the physical and chemical processes that control the

  20. Simulated responses of terrestrial aridity to black carbon and sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Gettelman, A.; Xu, Y.; Fu, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Aridity index (AI), defined as the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (PET), is a measure of the dryness of terrestrial climate. Global climate models generally project future decreases of AI (drying) associated with global warming scenarios driven by increasing greenhouse gas and declining aerosols. Given their different effects in the climate system, scattering and absorbing aerosols may affect AI differently. Here we explore the terrestrial aridity responses to anthropogenic black carbon (BC) and sulfate (SO4) aerosols with Community Earth System Model simulations. Positive BC radiative forcing decreases precipitation averaged over global land at a rate of 0.9%/°C of global mean surface temperature increase (moderate drying), while BC radiative forcing increases PET by 1.0%/°C (also drying). BC leads to a global decrease of 1.9%/°C in AI (drying). SO4 forcing is negative and causes precipitation a decrease at a rate of 6.7%/°C cooling (strong drying). PET also decreases in response to SO4 aerosol cooling by 6.3%/°C cooling (contributing to moistening). Thus, SO4 cooling leads to a small decrease in AI (drying) by 0.4%/°C cooling. Despite the opposite effects on global mean temperature, BC and SO4 both contribute to the twentieth century drying (AI decrease). Sensitivity test indicates that surface temperature and surface available energy changes dominate BC- and SO4-induced PET changes.

  1. Redistribution of black carbon in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunamonti, S.; Krieger, U. K.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a major anthropogenic greenhouse agent, yet substantial uncertainties obstruct understanding its radiative forcing. Particularly debated is the extent of the absorption enhancement by internally compared to externally mixed BC, which critically depends on the interior morphology of the BC-containing particles. Here we suggest that a currently unaccounted morphology, optically very different from the customary core-shell and volume-mixing assumptions, likely occurs in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Using Raman spectroscopy on micrometer-sized droplets, we show that LLPS of an organic/inorganic model system drives redistribution of BC into the outer (organic) phase of the host particle. This results in an inverted core-shell structure, in which a transparent aqueous core is surrounded by a BC-containing absorbing shell. Based on Mie theory calculations, we estimate that such a redistribution can increase the absorption efficiency of internally mixed BC aerosols by up to 25% compared to the core-shell approximation.

  2. Climatic impacts of stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate, black carbon and titania injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anthony C.; Haywood, James M.; Jones, Andy

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the potential climatic effects of geoengineering by sulfate, black carbon and titania injection against a baseline RCP8.5 scenario. We use the HadGEM2-CCS model to simulate scenarios in which the top-of-the-atmosphere radiative imbalance due to rising greenhouse gas concentrations is offset by sufficient aerosol injection throughout the 2020-2100 period. We find that the global-mean temperature is effectively maintained at historical levels for the entirety of the period for all three aerosol-injection scenarios, though there is a wide range of side-effects which are discussed in detail. The most prominent conclusion is that although the BC injection rate necessary to produce an equivalent global mean temperature response is much lower, the severity of stratospheric temperature changes (> +70 °C) and precipitation impacts effectively exclude BC from being a viable option for geoengineering. Additionally, while it has been suggested that titania would be an effective particle because of its high scattering efficiency, it also efficiently absorbs solar ultraviolet radiation producing a significant stratospheric warming (> +20 °C). As injection rates and climatic impacts for titania are close to those for sulfate, there appears to be little benefit in terms of climatic influence of using titania when compared to the injection of sulfur dioxide, which has the added benefit of being well-modeled through extensive research that has been carried out on naturally occurring explosive volcanic eruptions.

  3. Climatic impacts of stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate, black carbon and titania injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. C.; Haywood, J. M.; Jones, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we examine the potential climatic effects of geoengineering by sulfate, black carbon and titania injection against a baseline RCP8.5 scenario. We use the HadGEM2-CCS model to simulate scenarios in which the top-of-the-atmosphere radiative imbalance due to rising greenhouse gas concentrations is offset by sufficient aerosol injection throughout the 2020-2100 period. We find that the global-mean temperature is effectively maintained at historical levels for the entirety of the period for all 3 aerosol-injection scenarios, though there are a wide range of side-effects which are discussed in detail. The most prominent conclusion is that although the BC injection rate necessary to produce an equivalent global mean temperature-response is much lower, the severity of stratospheric temperature changes (> +70 °C) and precipitation impacts effectively exclude BC from being a viable option for geoengineering. Additionally, while it has been suggested that titania would be an effective particle because of its high scattering efficiency, it also efficiently absorbs solar ultraviolet radiation producing a significant stratospheric warming (> +20 °C). As injection rates for titania are close to those for sulfate, there appears little benefit of using titania when compared to injection of sulfur dioxide, which has the added benefit of being well modelled through extensive research that has been carried out on naturally occurring explosive volcanic eruptions.

  4. Degradation of modified carbon black/epoxy nanocomposite coatings under ultraviolet exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-10-01

    Degradation of epoxy coatings with and without Carbon Black (CB) nanoparticles under ultraviolet (UV) radiation were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to obtain a good dispersion of CB nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. TEM analysis proved a uniform dispersion of modified CB nanoparticles in epoxy coating. The coatings were subjected to UV radiation to study the degradation behavior and then immersed in 3.5 wt% NaCl. The results showed that the electrochemical behavior of neat epoxy coating was related to the formation and development of microcracks on the surface. The occurrence of microcracks on the surface of the coatings and consequently the penetration of ionic species reduced by adding CB nanoparticles into the formulation of the coatings. CB nanoparticles decreased degradation of CB coatings by absorbing UV irradiation. The ATR-FTIR results showed that decrease in the intensity of methyl group as main peak in presence of 2.5 wt% CB was lower than neat epoxy. In addition, the reduction in impedance of neat epoxy coating under corrosive environment was larger than CB coatings. The CB coating with 2.5 wt% nanoparticles had the highest impedance to corrosive media after 2000 h UV irradiation and 24 h immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl.

  5. Photochemistry of Dissolved Black Carbon Released from Biochar: Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Phototransformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Liu, Huiting; Mao, Jingdong; Chu, Wenying; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved black carbon (BC) released from biochar can be one of the more photoactive components in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Dissolved BC was mainly composed of aliphatics and aromatics substituted by aromatic C-O and carboxyl/ester/quinone moieties as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. It underwent 56% loss of absorbance at 254 nm, almost complete loss of fluorescence, and 30% mineralization during a 169 h simulated sunlight exposure. Photoreactions preferentially targeted aromatic and methyl moieties, generating CH2/CH/C and carboxyl/ester/quinone functional groups. During irradiation, dissolved BC generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen and superoxide. The apparent quantum yield of singlet oxygen was 4.07 ± 0.19%, 2-3 fold higher than many well-studied DOM. Carbonyl-containing structures other than aromatic ketones were involved in the singlet oxygen sensitization. The generation of superoxide apparently depended on electron transfer reactions mediated by silica minerals in dissolved BC, in which phenolic structures served as electron donors. Self-generated ROS played an important role in the phototransformation. Photobleaching of dissolved BC decreased its ability to further generate ROS due to lower light absorption. These findings have significant implications on the environmental fate of dissolved BC and that of priority pollutants. PMID:26717492

  6. Black carbon measurement in a coastal area of south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, K. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Cao, J. J.; Chow, J. C.; Watson, J. G.

    2006-06-01

    To better understand anthropogenic pollution originating in Asia and its transport into the global atmosphere, black carbon (BC) emissions were measured continuously from June 2004 to May 2005 at Hok Tsui (22.13°N, 114.15°E). Hok Tsui is a continental outflow, downwind monitoring site, located in a coastal area near Hong Kong. Using an Aethalometer, hourly BC concentrations ranged from 63.0 ng/m3 to 17.3 μg/m3, showing a clear seasonal pattern with high concentrations in winter, spring, and fall and low values in summer. During the winter, high BC concentrations occurred frequently as a result of southward long-range transport of polluted air masses in the boundary layer over the Asian continent. Anthropogenic emissions in coastal areas of southeastern China were the major potential sources for the observed pollutants. During the summer, high BC concentrations were measured occasionally when the air masses came from the northwest. These anthropogenic pollutants were found to be regional in nature, originating from sources in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, which included emissions from residential and agricultural combustion, industry, power plants, motor vehicles, and ships.

  7. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  8. Inhalation of Carbon Black Nanoparticles Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saputra, Devina; Yoon, Jin-ha; Park, Hyunju; Heo, Yongju; Yang, Hyoseon; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Sangjin; Song, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of recent studies have focused on the impact of particulate matter on human health. As a model for atmospheric particulate inhalation, we investigated the effects of inhaled carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) on mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The CNBPs were generated by a novel aerosolization process, and the mice were exposed to the aerosol for 4 hours. We found that CBNP inhalation exacerbated lung inflammation, as evidenced by histopathology analysis and by the expression levels of interleukin-6 protein, fibronectin, and interferon-γ mRNAs in lung tissues. Notably, fibronectin mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase in expression after CBNP exposure. These data suggest that the concentration of CBNPs delivered (calculated to be 12.5 μg/m3) can aggravate lung inflammation in mice. Our results also suggest that the inhalation of ultrafine particles like PM 2.5 is an impactful environmental risk factor for humans, particularly in susceptible populations with predisposing lung conditions. PMID:25071917

  9. Trend in global black carbon emissions from 1960 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Tao, Shu; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Balkanski, Yves; Boucher, Olivier; Ciais, Philippe; Shen, Guofeng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yanyan; Chen, Yuanchen; Lin, Nan; Su, Shu; Li, Bengang; Liu, Junfeng; Liu, Wenxin

    2014-06-17

    Black carbon (BC) plays an important role in both climate change and health impact. Still, BC emissions as well as the historical trends are associated with high uncertainties in existing inventories. In the present study, global BC emissions from 1960 to 2007 were estimated for 64 sources, by using recompiled fuel consumption and emission factor data sets. Annual BC emissions had increased from 5.3 (3.4-8.5 as an interquartile range) to 9.1 (5.6-14.4) teragrams during this period. Our estimations are 11-16% higher than those in previous inventories. Over the period, we found that the BC emission intensity, defined as the amount of BC emitted per unit of energy production, had decreased for all the regions, especially China and India. Improvements in combustion technology and changes in fuel composition had led to an increase in energy use efficiency, and subsequently a decline of BC emission intensities in power plants, the residential sector, and transportation. On the other hand, the BC emission intensities had increased in the industrial and agricultural sectors, mainly due to an expansion of low-efficiency industry (coke and brick production) in developing countries and to an increasing usage of diesel in agriculture in developed countries. PMID:24825392

  10. Characterization of the interactions between protein and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzu-Tao; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Chen, Chun-Chao; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Wang, Liang-Shun; Gregory, Clive; Jones, Tim; BéruBé, Kelly; Lee, Chun-Nin; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2014-01-15

    A considerable amount of studies have been conducted to investigate the interactions of biological fluids with nanoparticle surfaces, which exhibit a high affinity for proteins and particles. However, the mechanisms underlying these interactions have not been elucidated, particularly as they relate to human health. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and mice bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as models for protein-particle conjugates, we characterized the physicochemical modifications of carbon blacks (CB) with 23nm or 65nm in diameter after protein treatment. Adsorbed BALF-containing proteins were quantified and identified by pathways, biological analyses and protein classification. Significant modifications of the physicochemistry of CB were induced by the addition of BSA. Enzyme modulators and hydrolase predominately interacted with CB, with protein-to-CB interactions that were associated with the coagulation pathways. Additionally, our results revealed that an acute-phase response could be activated by these proteins. With regard to human health, the present study revealed that the CB can react with proteins (∼55kDa and 70kDa) after inhalation and may modify the functional structures of lung proteins, leading to the activation of acute-inflammatory responses in the lungs. PMID:24291665

  11. Radiative forcing of black carbon over eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekanth, V.; Niranjan, K.; Madhavan, B. L.

    2007-09-01

    Measurements of aerosol Black Carbon using a 7 channel Aethalometer at Visakhapatnam, a coastal tropical station on the east coast of India are used to study the temporal variation of surface BC mass concentration. The surface BC mass concentrations show a significant diurnal variation which is seasonally dependant. Analysis using the multi spectral data indicates that the BC mass does not show significant absorption due to non-BC aerosol species which indicates that the surface BC mass is dominated by fossil fuel sources with no indication of any other strong anthropogenic source. The Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model was used in conjunction with Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) to estimate the BC radiative forcing. The results show large negative surface forcing during winter (-35.78 W/m2), moderate during summer (-16.8 W/m2) and lower forcing during monsoon (-9.9 W/m2) and post monsoon (-2.81 W/m2). The forcing at the top of the atmosphere is positive for all the seasons.

  12. Black carbon radiative forcing over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cenlin; Li, Qinbin; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Takano, Yoshi; Gu, Yu; Qi, Ling; Mao, Yuhao; Leung, L. Ruby

    2014-11-01

    We estimate the snow albedo forcing and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in the Tibetan Plateau using a global chemical transport model in conjunction with a stochastic snow model and a radiative transfer model. The annual mean BC snow albedo forcing is 2.9 W m-2 averaged over snow-covered plateau regions, which is a factor of 3 larger than the value over global land snowpack. BC-snow internal mixing increases the albedo forcing by 40-60% compared with external mixing, and coated BC increases the forcing by 30-50% compared with uncoated BC aggregates, whereas Koch snowflakes reduce the forcing by 20-40% relative to spherical snow grains. The annual BC DRF at the top of the atmosphere is 2.3 W m-2 with uncertainties of -70-85% in the plateau after scaling the modeled BC absorption optical depth to Aerosol Robotic Network observations. The BC forcings are attributed to emissions from different regions.

  13. Black carbon emissions in China from 1949 to 2050.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Tao, Shu; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Junfeng; Shen, Huizhong; Shen, Guofeng; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiaopeng; Li, Wei; Huang, Ye; Zhang, Yanyan; Lu, Yan; Chen, Han; Chen, Yuanchen; Wang, Chen; Zhu, Dan; Wang, Xilong; Li, Bengang; Liu, Wenxin; Ma, Jianmin

    2012-07-17

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from China are of global concern. A new BC emission inventory (PKU-BC(China)) has been developed with the following improvements: (1) The emission factor database was updated; (2) a 0.1° × 0.1° gridded map was produced for 2007 based on county-level proxies; (3) time trends were derived for 1949-2007 and predicted for 2008-2050; and (4) the uncertainties associated with the inventory were quantified. It was estimated that 1957 Gg of BC were emitted in China in 2007, which is greater than previously reported. Residential coal combustion was the largest source, followed by residential biofuel burning, coke production, diesel vehicles, and brick kilns. By using a county-level disaggregation method, spatial bias in province-level disaggregation, mainly due to uneven per capita emissions within provinces, was reduced by 42.5%. Emissions increased steadily since 1949 until leveling off in the mid-1990s, due to a series of technological advances and to socioeconomic progress. BC emissions in China in 2050 are predicted to be 920-2183 Gg/yr under various scenarios; and the industrial and transportation sectors stand to benefit the most from technological improvements. PMID:22730898

  14. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-23

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. In this paper, we conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. Finally, we also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  15. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-23

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. In this paper, we conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCMmore » biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. Finally, we also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.« less

  16. Assessing the climatic benefits of black carbon mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Robert E.; Mauzerall, Denise L.

    2010-01-01

    To limit mean global warming to 2 °C, a goal supported by more than 100 countries, it will likely be necessary to reduce emissions not only of greenhouse gases but also of air pollutants with high radiative forcing (RF), particularly black carbon (BC). Although several recent research papers have attempted to quantify the effects of BC on climate, not all these analyses have incorporated all the mechanisms that contribute to its RF (including the effects of BC on cloud albedo, cloud coverage, and snow and ice albedo, and the optical consequences of aerosol mixing) and have reported their results in different units and with different ranges of uncertainty. Here we attempt to reconcile their results and present them in uniform units that include the same forcing factors. We use the best estimate of effective RF obtained from these results to analyze the benefits of mitigating BC emissions for achieving a specific equilibrium temperature target. For a 500 ppm CO2e (3.1 W m-2) effective RF target in 2100, which would offer about a 50% chance of limiting equilibrium warming to 2.5 °C above preindustrial temperatures, we estimate that failing to reduce carbonaceous aerosol emissions from contained combustion would require CO2 emission cuts about 8 years (range of 1–15 years) earlier than would be necessary with full mitigation of these emissions. PMID:20566891

  17. Factors controlling seasonal variations in Arctic black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Ming, Y.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic haze has a distinct seasonality with higher concentrations in winter and spring. This study evaluates how different processes of large-scale circulation and removal control seasonal variations in Arctic black carbon (BC) using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric general circulation model (AM3). We find that transport and wet deposition play unequal roles in determining Arctic BC seasonal cycle. Despite seasonal differences in general circulation patterns, the eddy-driven BC transport changes little throughout the year, and the seasonal cycle of Arctic BC is attributed to wet removal. BC hydrophilic fraction affected by the aging process and hydrophilic BC (BCpi) wet deposition rate affected by cloud microphysics determine wet deposition. Both low hydrophilic fraction and low wet deposition rate account for the peak of BC in winter. The transition to low BC in summer results from an increase in wet deposition rate, while the return of BC in late autumn is mainly caused by a sharp decrease in hydrophilic fraction. The results suggest that the concentrations of Arctic aerosols as well as their climate impacts may be susceptible to modification in a future climate.

  18. Black Carbon Radiative Forcing over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    He, Cenlin; Li, Qinbin; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Gu, Yu; Qi, L.; Mao, Yuhao; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-11-28

    We estimate the snow albedo forcing and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in the Tibetan Plateau using a global chemical transport model in conjunction with a stochastic snow model and a radiative transfer model. Our best estimate of the annual BC snow albedo forcing in the Plateau is 2.9 W m-2 (uncertainty: 1.5–5.0 W m-226 ). We find that BC-snow internal mixing increases the albedo forcing by 40-60% compared with external mixing and coated BC increases the forcing by 30-50% compared with uncoated BC, whereas Koch snowflakes reduce the forcing by 20-40% relative to spherical snow grains. Our best estimate of the annual BC DRF at the top of the atmosphere is 2.3 W m-2 (uncertainty: 0.7–4.3 W m-230 ) in the Plateau after scaling the modeled BC absorption optical depth to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations. The BC forcings are attributed to emissions from different regions.

  19. Daily personal exposure to black carbon: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ryan D.; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2016-05-01

    Continuous personal monitoring is the benchmark for air pollution exposure assessment. Black carbon (BC) is a strong marker of primary combustion like vehicle and biomass emissions. There have been few studies that quantified daily personal BC exposure and the contribution that different microenvironments make to it. In this pilot study, we used a portable aethalometer to measure BC concentrations in an individual's breathing zone at 30-s intervals while he performed his usual daily activities. We used a GPS and time-activity diary to track where he spent his time. We performed twenty 24-h measurements, and observed an arithmetic mean daily exposure concentration of 603 ng/m3. We estimated that changing commute modes from bus to train reduced the 24-h mean BC exposure concentration by 29%. Switching from open windows to closed windows and recirculated air in a car led to a reduction of 32%. Living in a home without a wood-fired heater caused a reduction of 50% compared with a wood-heated home. Our preliminary findings highlight the potential utility of simple approaches to reduce a person's daily BC exposure.

  20. Daily personal exposure to black carbon: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ryan D.; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2016-05-01

    Continuous personal monitoring is the benchmark for air pollution exposure assessment. Black carbon (BC) is a strong marker of primary combustion like vehicle and biomass emissions. There have been few studies that quantified daily personal BC exposure and the contribution that different microenvironments make to it. In this pilot study, we used a portable aethalometer to measure BC concentrations in an individual's breathing zone at 30-s intervals while he performed his usual daily activities. We used a GPS and time-activity diary to track where he spent his time. We performed twenty 24-h measurements, and observed an arithmetic mean daily exposure concentration of 603 ng/m3. We estimated that changing commute modes from bus to train reduced the 24-h mean BC exposure concentration by 29%. Switching from open windows to closed windows and recirculated air in a car led to a reduction of 32%. Living in a home without a wood-fired heater caused a reduction of 50% compared with a wood-heated home. Our preliminary findings highlight the potential utility of simple approaches to reduce a person's daily BC exposure.

  1. Organic Carbon--water Concentration Quotients (IIsocS and [pi]pocS): Measuring Apparent Chemical Disequilibria and Exploring the Impact of Black Carbon in Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    When black carbon (bc) and biologically derived organic carbon (bioc) phases are present in sediments or suspended particulates, both forms of carbon act additively to sorb organic chemicals but the bc phase has more sorption capacity per unit mass. . . .

  2. Selection and Characterization of Carbon Black and Surfactants for Development of Small Scale Uranium Oxicarbide Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I

    2006-01-01

    This report supports the effort for development of small scale fabrication of UCO (a mixture of UO{sub 2} and UC{sub 2}) fuel kernels for the generation IV high temperature gas reactor program. In particular, it is focused on optimization of dispersion conditions of carbon black in the broths from which carbon-containing (UO{sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O + C) gel spheres are prepared by internal gelation. The broth results from mixing a hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and urea solution with an acid-deficient uranyl nitrate (ADUN) solution. Carbon black, which is previously added to one or other of the components, must stay dispersed during gelation. The report provides a detailed description of characterization efforts and results, aimed at identification and testing carbon black and surfactant combinations that would produce stable dispersions, with carbon particle sizes below 1 {micro}m, in aqueous HMTA/urea and ADUN solutions. A battery of characterization methods was used to identify the properties affecting the water dispersability of carbon blacks, such as surface area, aggregate morphology, volatile content, and, most importantly, surface chemistry. The report introduces the basic principles for each physical or chemical method of carbon black characterization, lists the results obtained, and underlines cross-correlations between methods. Particular attention is given to a newly developed method for characterization of surface chemical groups on carbons in terms of their acid-base properties (pK{sub a} spectra) based on potentiometric titration. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic. In addition, background information on carbon black properties and the mechanism by which surfactants disperse carbon black in water is also provided. A list of main physical and chemical properties characterized, samples analyzed, and results obtained, as well as information on the desired trend or

  3. Empirical correlations between black carbon aerosol and carbon monoxide in the lower and middle troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Schwarz, J. P.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Thomson, D. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Holloway, J. S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2008-10-01

    Single-particle measurements of black carbon (BC) aerosol and simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) were acquired aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS). Observed average BC mass loadings, estimated to account for ~90% of the ambient BC mass, decreased by more than 2 orders of magnitude from the polluted boundary layer to the clean middle troposphere (6 km). A strong positive, but non-linear, correlation was observed between simultaneous measurements of BC and CO. Based on an analysis of all the data below 1 km, we report a compact relationship between BC and CO with a slope of 5.8 +/- 1.0 ng BC (kg dry air)-1 (ppb CO)-1 that is representative of regional urban and industrial emissions from Houston and Dallas. The BC/CO emission ratio for a fresh biomass-burning plume was estimated at 9 +/- 2 ng kg-1 ppb-1.

  4. Latitudinal distribution of black carbon soot in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Kato, Katharine

    1995-01-01

    Black carbon soot from the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere has been systematically collected at latitudes from 90 deg N to 45 deg S. The measured latitudinal distribution of this soot at 10 to 11 km altitude is found to covary with commercial air traffic fuel use, suggesting that aircraft fuel combustion at altitude is the principal source. In addition, at latitudes where the commercial air traffic is high, measured black carbon soot values are high even at 20 km altitude, suggesting that aircraft-generated soot injected just above the tropopause may be transported to higher altitudes. During the volcanically influenced period in which these samples were collected, the number abundances, total mass, and calculated total surface area of black carbon soot are 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than similar measures of sulfuric acid aerosol. During volcanically quiescent periods, the calculated total surface area of black carbon soot aerosol is of the same order of magnitude as that of the background sulfuric acid aerosol. It appears from this comparison that black carbon soot is only capable of influencing lower stratosphere or upper troposphere chemistry during periods when the aerosol budget is not dominated by volcanic activity. It remains to determine the extent to which black carbon soot particles act as nuclei for sulfuric acid aerosol formation. However, mass balance calculations suggest that aircraft soot injected at altitude does not represent a significant source of condensation nuclei for sulfuric acid aerosols.

  5. Latitudinal distribution of black carbon soot in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, D.F.; Kato, K.

    1995-04-20

    Black carbon soot from the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere has been systematically collected at latitudes from 90{degrees}N to 45{degrees}S. The measured latitudinal distribution of this soot at 10- to 11-km altitude is found to covary with commercial air traffic fuel use, suggesting that aircraft fuel combustion at altitude is the principal source. In addition, at latitudes where the commercial air traffic is high, measured black carbon soot values are high even at 20-km altitude, suggesting that aircraft-generated soot injected just above the tropopause may be transported to higher altitudes. During the volcanically influenced period in which these samples were collected, the number abundances, total mass, and calculated total surface area of black carbon soot are 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than similar measures of sulfuric acid aerosol. During volcanically quiescent periods, the calculated total surface area of black carbon soot aerosol is of the same order of magnitude as that of the background sulfuric acid aerosol. It appears from this comparison that black carbon soot is only capable of influencing lower stratosphere or upper troposphere chemistry during periods when the aerosol budget is not dominated by volcanic activity. It remains to determine the extent to which black carbon soot particles act as nuclei for sulfuric acid aerosol formation. However, mass balance calculations suggest that aircraft soot injected at altitude does not represent a significant source of condensation nuclei for sulfuric acid aerosols. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Measurement of Black Carbon and Co-pollutants Emitted from Diesel Vehicles in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M. A.; Molina, L. T.; Fortner, E.; Herndon, S.; Knighton, B.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Roscioli, J. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Paramo, V. H.; Zirath, S.; Mejia, J.; Jazcilevich, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Freight, public transport, and heavy-duty trucks can contribute to harmful emissions of black carbon and other co-pollutants in many urban areas. Controlling the emissions of black carbon from the transport sector is important for the potential of mitigating its impacts on climate, ecosystems, and human health. However, reducing the emissions of black carbon from mobile sources is be a challenging task in many developing urban areas due to economic, social, and technical constrains, as well as the uncertainties surrounding the accurate quantification of the associated benefits. Several emissions control technologies offer a proven approach for reducing emissions of black carbon from diesel-powered mobile sources, but the accurate quantification of associated emissions benefits in developing urban areas is not well documented. We present the results of the measurement of black carbon and co-emitted pollutants of dozens of diesel powered vehicles, including freight trucks, public transport buses, and intra-city metrobuses sampled during a 4-day experiment in Mexico City in February of 2013 as part of the SLCFs-Mexico project. Measurements were obtained with the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory, remote sensing, and portable emissions measurements, and encompassed the sampling of several vehicle models and technologies in experimental and real-world driving conditions. The results can help in the identification of key factors that hinder the implementation of control emissions for reducing emissions of black carbon elsewhere and the potential benefits of implementing various emission control technologies.

  7. Challenges for Reducing Emissions of Black Carbon from the Transport Sector in Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M. A.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-05-01

    The transport sector is a large contributor of harmful gaseous and particulate emissions in many urban areas. Black carbon is a component of short-lived particulate matter emitted predominantly by freight, public transport, and heavy- duty trucks. Controlling the emissions of black carbon from the transport sector is important for mitigating its impacts on climate, ecosystems, and human health. However, reducing the emissions of black carbon from mobile sources may be a challenging task in many developing urban areas due to economic, social, and technical constrains. Several emissions control technologies offer a proven approach for reducing emissions of black carbon from diesel-powered mobile sources, but the accurate quantification of associated emissions benefits in developing urban areas is not well documented. We describe recent advances for the estimation of black carbon emissions from the transport sector in real world driving conditions and present examples of the potential benefits of implementing various emission control technologies in Mexico. The results can help in the identification of key factors that hinder the implementation of control emissions for reducing emissions of black carbon elsewhere.

  8. Are emissions of black carbon from gasoline vehicles overestimated? Real-time, in situ measurement of black carbon emission factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xing, Zhenyu; Zhao, Shuhui; Zheng, Mei; Mu, Chao; Du, Ke

    2016-03-15

    Accurately quantifying black carbon (BC) emission factors (EFs) is a prerequisite for estimation of BC emission inventory. BC EFs determined by measuring BC at the roadside or chasing a vehicle on-road may introduce large uncertainty for low emission vehicles. In this study, BC concentrations were measured inside the tailpipe of gasoline vehicles with different engine sizes under different driving modes to determine the respective EFs. BC EFs ranged from 0.005-7.14 mg/kg-fuel under the speeds of 20-70 km/h, 0.05-28.95 mg/kg-fuel under the accelerations of 0.5-1.5m/s(2). Although the water vapor in the sampling stream could result in an average of 12% negative bias, the BC EFs are significantly lower than the published results obtained with roadside or chasing vehicle measurement. It is suggested to conduct measurement at the tailpipe of gasoline vehicles instead of in the atmosphere behind the vehicles to reduce the uncertainty from fluctuation in ambient BC concentration. PMID:26799329

  9. Effect of Carbon Black on Dielectric and Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Cordierite Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jinbu; Zhou, Wancheng; Liu, Yi; Qing, Yuchang; Luo, Fa; Zhu, Dongmei

    2015-06-01

    Carbon black (CB)/cordierite composite coatings with different CB contents were fabricated by a multi-function micro-plasma spraying system developed by the Second Artillery Engineering College. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the microstructure of the spray-dried powders and as-sprayed coatings. The complex permittivities of the coatings and powders with different CB contents were investigated at the frequency of 8.2-12.4 GHz. The results show that both real and imaginary part of the permittivity increase with increasing CB content, which can be ascribed to the increase of the number of micro-capacitors and the polarization centers. Reflection loss of the as-sprayed coatings with different CB contents and thicknesses was calculated according to the transmission line theory. The coating with 4.54% CB content and 3.0 mm thickness shows optical microwave absorption with a minimum reflection loss of -23.90 dB at 10.13 GHz and reflection loss less than -9 dB over the whole investigated frequency.

  10. A wormhole-like porous carbon/magnetic particles composite as an efficient broadband electromagnetic wave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiyong; Liu, Tao; Chen, Zheng; Wang, Yan; Wei, Wei; Yue, Xigui; Jiang, Zhenhua

    2016-04-01

    A method combining liquid-liquid phase separation and the pyrolysis process has been developed to fabricate the wormhole-like porous carbon/magnetic nanoparticles composite with a pore size of about 80 nm (WPC/MNPs-80). In this work, the porous structure was designed to enhance interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) wave and the absorber, while the magnetic nanoparticles were used to bring about magnetic loss ability. The structure, morphology, porosity and magnetic properties of WPC/MNPs-80 were investigated in detail. To evaluate its EM wave attenuation performance, the EM parameters of the absorber and wax composite were measured at 2-18 GHz. WPC/MNPs-80 has an excellent EM wave absorbency with a wide absorption band at a relatively low loading and thin absorber thickness. At the absorber thickness of 1.5 and 2.0 mm, minimum RL values of -29.2 and -47.9 dB were achieved with the RL below -10 dB in 12.8-18 and 9.2-13.3 GHz, respectively. The Co and Fe nanoparticles derived from the chemical reduction of Co0.2Fe2.8O4 can enhance the graphitization process of carbon and thus improve dielectric loss ability. Polarizations in the nanocomposite absorber also play an important role in EM wave absorption. Thus, EM waves can be effectively attenuated by dielectric loss and magnetic loss through multiple reflections and absorption in the porous structure. WPC/MNPs-80 could be an excellent absorber for EM wave attenuation; and the design strategy could be extended as a general method to synthesize other high-performance absorbers.A method combining liquid-liquid phase separation and the pyrolysis process has been developed to fabricate the wormhole-like porous carbon/magnetic nanoparticles composite with a pore size of about 80 nm (WPC/MNPs-80). In this work, the porous structure was designed to enhance interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) wave and the absorber, while the magnetic nanoparticles were used to bring about magnetic loss ability. The structure

  11. Impacts of black carbon and co-pollutant emissions from transportation sector in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, Miguel; Almanza, Victor; Garcia, Agustin; Jazcilevich, Aron; Lei, Wenfang; Molina, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon is one of the most important short-lived climate-forcing agents, which is harmful to human health and also contributes significantly to climate change. Transportation is one of the largest sources of black carbon emissions in many megacities and urban complexes, with diesel vehicles leading the way. Both on-road and off-road vehicles can emit substantial amounts of harmful BC-containing particulate matter (PM) and are also responsible for large emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and many other co-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Regionally, black carbon emissions contributions from mobile sources may vary widely depending on the technical characteristics of the vehicle fleet, the quality and chemical properties of the fuels consumed, and the degree of local development and economic activities that foster wider and more frequent or intensive use of vehicles. This presentation will review and assess the emissions of black carbon from the on-road and off-road transportation sector in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. Viable mitigation strategies, including innovative technological alternatives to reduce black carbon and co-pollutants in diesel vehicles and their impacts on climate, human health and ecosystems will be described.

  12. 20 years of Black Carbon measurements in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Rebecca; Quedenau, Jörn; Kuik, Friderike; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Schmale, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Black Carbon (BC) is an important short-lived climate-forcing pollutant contributing to global warming through absorption of sunlight. At the same time, BC, as a component of particulate matter (PM) exerts adverse health effects, like decreased lung function and exacerbated asthma. Globally, anthropogenic emission sources of BC include residential heating, transport, and agricultural fires, while the dominant natural emission sources are wildfires. Despite the various adverse effects of BC, legislation that requires mandatory monitoring of BC concentrations does not currently exist in the European Union. Instead, BC is only indirectly monitored as component of PM10 and PM2.5 (particulate matter with a diameter smaller 10 μm and 2.5 μm). Before the introduction of mandatory PM10 and PM2.5 monitoring in the European Union in 2005 and 2015, respectively, 'black smoke', a surrogate for BC, was a required measurement in Germany from the early 1990s. The annual mean limit value was 14 μg m-3 from 1995 and 8 μg m-3 from 1998 onwards. Many 'black smoke' measurements were stopped in 2004, with the repeal of the regulations obtaining at the time. However, in most German federal states a limited number BC monitoring stations continued to operate. Here we present a synthesis of BC data from 213 stations across Germany covering the period between 1994 and 2014. Due to the lack of a standardized method and respective legislation, the data set is very heterogeneous relying on twelve different measurement methods including chemical, optical, and thermal-optical methods. Stations include locations classified as background, urban-background, industrial and traffic among other types. Raw data in many different formats has been modelled and integrated in a relational database, allowing various options for further data analysis. We highlight results from the year 2009, as it is the year with the largest measurement coverage based on the same measurement method, with 30 stations. In

  13. Multi-wavelength Characterization of Brown and Black Carbon from Filter Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. M.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Chen, L. W. A. A.; Gyawali, M. S.; Arnott, W. P.; Wang, X.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmüller, H.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) scatters and absorbs solar radiation and thereby affects visibility, the Earth's radiation balance, and properties and lifetimes of clouds. Understanding the radiative forcing (RF) of PM is essential to reducing the uncertainty in total anthropogenic and natural RF. Many instruments that measure light absorption coefficients (βabs [λ], Mm-1) of PM have used light at near-infrared (NIR; e.g., 880 nm) or red (e.g., 633 nm) wavelengths. Measuring βabs over a wider wavelength range, especially including the ultraviolet (UV) and visible, allows for contributions from black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and mineral dust (MD) to be differentiated. This will help to determine PM RF and its emission sources. In this study, source and ambient samples collected on Teflon-membrane and quartz-fiber filters are used to characterize and develop a multi-wavelength (250 - 1000 nm) filter-based measurement method of PM light absorption. A commercially available UV-visible spectrometer coupled with an integrating sphere is used for quantifying diffuse reflectance and transmittance of filter samples, from which βabs and absorption Ǻngström exponents (AAE) of the PM deposits are determined. The filter-based light absorption measurements of laboratory generated soot and biomass burning aerosol are compared to 3-wavelength photoacoustic absorption measurements to evaluate filter media and loading effects. Calibration factors are developed to account for differences between filter types (Teflon-membrane vs. quartz-fiber), and between filters and in situ photoacoustic absorption values. Application of multi-spectral absorption measurements to existing archived filters, including specific source samples (e.g. diesel and gasoline engines, biomass burning, dust), will also be discussed.

  14. Dissolved Organic Carbon in Boreal Black Spruce Forest: Sources, Chemistry, and Biodegradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickland, K. P.; Neff, J. C.; Aiken, G. R.

    2006-12-01

    Northern terrestrial ecosystems are commonly characterized by large stores of soil organic matter and are a major source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to aquatic systems. Recent changes in climate may be impacting the fate of terrestrial DOC in these high latitude ecosystems. Terrestrially-derived DOC can be metabolized by microbes in soils, sorbed to mineral soils, or transported to ground or surface waters. To understand what determines the fate of terrestrial DOC in northern ecosystems, it is essential to quantify the chemical nature and potential biodegradability of this DOC, and to know how factors such as vegetation and hydrology influence these qualities. We examined the chemistry and potential biodegradability of DOC from black spruce forest, a dominant ecosystem type in the boreal regions of Alaska and Canada. Over the course of one year, soil pore waters were collected from three black spruce sites that spanned a range of hydrologic regimes and permafrost extents, designated as well drained (WD), moderately well drained (MD), and poorly drained (PD), and from thermokarst wetlands (TW) that had formed within the PD site due to permafrost melting. DOC chemistry was characterized using XAD resin fractionation, UV-Vis absorbance, and DOC fluorescence measurements. Potential biodegradability was assessed by incubating the samples for one month, and measuring CO2 production over time. We also measured chemistry and potential biodegradability of DOC leached from dominant vegetation species. Soil pore water DOC from all sites was dominated by hydrophobic acids and was highly aromatic, while the chemical composition of vegetation leachate DOC varied with species. There was no seasonal variability in soil pore water DOC chemistry or biodegradability; however DOC collected from PD was less biodegradable than DOC from the other sites (6% loss vs. 13-15% loss). The potential biodegradability of vegetation-derived DOC ranged from 10%-90% loss, and was strongly

  15. Multiscale Assembly of Grape-Like Ferroferric Oxide and Carbon Nanotubes: A Smart Absorber Prototype Varying Temperature to Tune Intensities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Ming; Cao, Mao-Sheng; Chen, Yi-Hua; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Jia; Shi, Hong-Long; Zhang, De-Qing; Wang, Wen-Zhong; Yuan, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Ideal electromagnetic attenuation material should not only shield the electromagnetic interference but also need strong absorption. Lightweight microwave absorber with thermal stability and high efficiency is a highly sought-after goal of researchers. Tuning microwave absorption to meet the harsh requirements of thermal environments has been a great challenge. Here, grape-like Fe3O4-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized, which have unique multiscale-assembled morphology, relatively uniform size, good crystallinity, high magnetization, and favorable superparamagnetism. The Fe3O4-MWCNTs is proven to be a smart microwave-absorber prototype with tunable high intensities in double belts in the temperature range of 323-473 K and X band. Maximum absorption in two absorbing belts can be simultaneously tuned from ∼-10 to ∼-15 dB and from ∼-16 to ∼-25 dB by varying temperature, respectively. The belt for reflection loss ≤-20 dB can almost cover the X band at 323 K. The tunable microwave absorption is attributed to effective impedance matching, benefiting from abundant interfacial polarizations and increased magnetic loss resulting from the grape-like Fe3O4 nanocrystals. Temperature adjusts the impedance matching by changing both the dielectric and magnetic loss. The special assembly of MWCNTs and magnetic loss nanocrystals provides an effective pathway to realize excellent absorbers at elevated temperature. PMID:26284741

  16. Cellphones as a Distributed Platform for Black Carbon Data Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, N.; Ramana, M.; Lukac, M. L.; Siva, P.; Ahmed, T.; Kar, A.; Rehman, I.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), the visible component of soot that gives emissions such as diesel engine exhaust their dark color, has come to be recognized as a major contributor to global warming, and a frontline concern for climate change strategies (Ramanathan 2001, Jacobson 2010). We have developed a new low-cost instrument for gathering and measuring atmospheric BC concentrations that leverages cellphones to transmit data from an air filtration unit to a centralized database for analysis. Our new system relies on image processing techniques, as opposed to other more expensive optical methods, to interpret images of filters captured with a cellphone camera. As a result, the entire system costs less than $500 (and is orders of magnitude cheaper than an Aethalometer, the prevailing method for measuring atmospheric BC). We are working with three community groups in Los Angeles, and will recruit three groups in the San Francisco Bay Area, to enable 40 citizens to be actively engaged in monitoring BC across California. We are working with The Energy Resources Institute, an international NGO based in India, to deploy this instrument with 60 people in conjunction with Project Surya, which aims to deploy clean cookstoves and rigorously evaluate their impact on BC emissions. Field tests of this new instrument performed in California report an average error of 0.28 µg/m3 when compared with an Aethelometer. These excellent results hold the promise of making large-scale data collection of BC feasible and relatively easy to reproduce (Ramanathan et al., forthcoming). The use of cellphones for data collection permits monitoring of BC to occur on a greater, more comprehensive scale not previously possible, and serves as a means of instituting more precise, variation-sensitive evaluations of emissions. By storing the data in a publicly available repository, our system will provide real-time access to mass-scale BC measurements to researchers and the public. Through our pilot

  17. Black Carbon Mass Concentration in California Mountain Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, O. L.; Corrigan, C.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Cliff, S. S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2007-12-01

    Recent modeling studies have shown that deposition of black carbon (BC) to snow and ice lowers the albedo of snow and exerts a positive forcing on the climate. This effect is also a likely contributor to the observed ice and snow retreat in glaciers, ice sheets, and mountain snow pack. Observational data of actual BC concentrations in snow, which would help to constrain and validate these results, are scarce. This study presents the concentration of BC in fresh snow measured at two mountain locations in Northern California (Lassen Volcano Natl. Park and Donner Summit), as well as that in coastal rainfall at Trinidad Head, CA. These measurements are the first of this kind made in California. Average BC concentration at Lassen Natl. Park and Donner summit were respectively 6.8 and 9.7 ng per gram of snow. When placed in context with the modeled effect of BC on fresh snow albedo, these concentrations indicate a lowering of the snow albedo by 0.5 to 0.8%. As the snow pack ages, models predict that this effect will be increasingly amplified. Measurements of ambient aerosols during the rain events, as well as HySPLIT back-trajectories, provide additional information regarding possible sources of BC in California mountain snow packs. For the samples collected in this study, most of the soot in the snow appears to be of local origin. The average BC concentration in the coastal rain was 6.0 ng per gram of water, with the highest concentrations (12 ng/g) corresponding to the only back-trajectories clearly indicative of long-range trans-Pacific transport.

  18. Black Carbon Increases Cation Exchange Capcity in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Liang,B.; Lehmann, J.; Solomon, D.; Kinyangi, J.; Grossman, J.; ONeill, B.; Skjemstad, J.; Thies, J.; Luizao, F.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Black Carbon (BC) may significantly affect nutrient retention and play a key role in a wide range of biogeochemical processes in soils, especially for nutrient cycling. Anthrosols from the Brazilian Amazon (ages between 600 and 8700 yr BP) with high contents of biomass-derived BC had greater potential cation exchange capacity (CEC measured at pH 7) per unit organic C than adjacent soils with low BC contents. Synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy coupled with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) techniques explained the source of the higher surface charge of BC compared with non-BC by mapping cross-sectional areas of BC particles with diameters of 10 to 50 {micro}m for C forms. The largest cross-sectional areas consisted of highly aromatic or only slightly oxidized organic C most likely originating from the BC itself with a characteristic peak at 286.1 eV, which could not be found in humic substance extracts, bacteria or fungi. Oxidation significantly increased from the core of BC particles to their surfaces as shown by the ratio of carboxyl-C/aromatic-C. Spotted and non-continuous distribution patterns of highly oxidized C functional groups with distinctly different chemical signatures on BC particle surfaces (peak shift at 286.1 eV to a higher energy of 286.7 eV) indicated that non-BC may be adsorbed on the surfaces of BC particles creating highly oxidized surface. As a consequence of both oxidation of the BC particles themselves and adsorption of organic matter to BC surfaces, the charge density (potential CEC per unit surface area) was greater in BC-rich Anthrosols than adjacent soils. Additionally, a high specific surface area was attributable to the presence of BC, which may contribute to the high CEC found in soils that are rich in BC.

  19. Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Biqing; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Solomon, Dawit; Sohi, Saran; Thies, Janice E.; Skjemstad, Jan O.; Luizao, Flavio J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Neves, Eduaro G.; Wirick, Sue

    2008-12-15

    Black carbon (BC) may play an important role in the global C budget, due to its potential to act as a significant removal (sink) of atmospheric CO2. In order to fully evaluate the influence of BC on the global C cycle, a sound understanding of the stability of BC is required. The biochemical stability of BC was assessed in a chronosequence of high-BC containing Anthrosols from the central Amazon, Brazil, using a range of spectroscopic and biological methods. Results revealed that the Anthrosols had 61-80% lower (P<0.05) CO2 evolution over 532 days compared to that in the corresponding adjacent soils with low BC contents. No significant (P>0.05) differences of CO2 respiration were observed between Anthrosols with contrasting ages of BC and soil textures. Molecular forms of core regions of micrometer-sized BC particles quantified by synchrotron-based near-edge x-ray fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy coupled to scanning x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) remained similar regardless of their ages (600 to 8,700 years) and closely resembled the spectral characteristics of fresh BC. Deconvolution of NEXAFS spectra revealed greater oxidation on the surfaces of BC particles with little penetration into the core of the particles. The similar C mineralization between different BC-rich soils regardless of soil texture underpins the importance of chemical recalcitrance for the stability of BC, in contrast to adjacent soils which showed the highest mineralization in the sandiest soil. However, C distribution between free, intra-aggregate and organo-mineral pools was significantly different between soils with high and low BC contents, suggesting some degree of physical stabilization, and BC-rich Anthrosols had higher proportions (72-90%) of C in the organo-mineral fraction than BC-poor adjacent soils (2-70%).

  20. Speciation of the ionizable antibiotic sulfamethazine on black carbon (biochar).

    PubMed

    Teixidó, Marc; Pignatello, Joseph J; Beltrán, José L; Granados, Mercè; Peccia, Jordan

    2011-12-01

    Adsorption of ionizable compounds by black carbon is poorly characterized. Adsorption of the veterinary antibiotic sulfamethazine (SMT; a.k.a., sulfadimidine; pK(a1) = 2.28, pK(a2) = 7.42) on a charcoal was determined as a function of concentration, pH, inorganic ions, and organic ions and molecules. SMT displayed unconventional adsorption behavior. Despite its hydrophilic nature (log K(ow) = 0.27), the distribution ratio K(d) at pH 5, where SMT(0) prevails, was as high as 10(6) L kg(-1), up to 10(4) times greater than literature reported K(oc). The K(d) decreases at high and low pH but not commensurate with the decline in K(ow) of the ionized forms. At pH 1, where SMT(+) is predominant and the surface is positive, a major driving force is π-π electron donor-acceptor interaction of the protonated aniline ring with the π-electron rich graphene surface, referred to as π(+)-π EDA, rather than ordinary electrostatic cation exchange. In the alkaline region, where SMT(-) prevails and the surface is negative, adsorption is accompanied by near-stoichiometric proton exchange with water, leading to the release of OH(-) and formation of an exceptionally strong H-bond between SMT(0) and a surface carboxylate or phenolate, classified as a negative charge-assisted H-bond, (-)CAHB. At pH 5, SMT(0) adsorption is accompanied by partial proton release and is competitive with trimethylphenylammonium ion, signifying contributions from SMT(+) and/or the zwitterion, SMT(±), which take advantage of π(+)-π EDA interaction and Coulombic attraction to deprotonated surface groups. In essence, both pK(a1) and pK(a2) increase, and SMT(±) is stabilized, in the adsorbed relative to the dissolved state. PMID:22026725

  1. New Routes to Functionalize Carbon Black for Polypropylene Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Céline; Hadzifejzovic, Emina; Shkal, Fatma; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Moghal, Jonathan; Parker, Emily M; Sawangphruk, Montree; Slocombe, Daniel R; Foord, John S; Moloney, Mark G

    2016-08-01

    Methods for chemical surface functionalization for carbon black (CB) nanoparticles were studied to produce (CB)/polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites with superior electrical and thermal properties. Nanoparticle dispersion is known to directly control the extent to which nanocomposites maximize the unique attributes of their nanoscale fillers. As a result, tailored nanoparticle surface chemistry is a widely utilized method to enhance the interfacial interactions between nanoparticles and polymer matrices, assisting improved filler dispersion. In this work, a rapid chemical functionalization approach using a number of diarylcarbene derivatives, followed by the azo-coupling of substituted diazonium salts, for the covalent introduction of selected functional groups to the CB surface, is reported. Characterization of the modified CB by XPS, TGA, CHN, and ATR-IR collectively confirmed surface functionalization, estimating surface grafting densities of the order of 10(13) and 10(14) molecules/cm(2). Nanocomposites, synthesized by solvent mixing PP with pristine and modified CB, demonstrated macroscopic property changes as a result of the nanoparticle surface functionalization. Pronounced improvements were observed for PP nanocomposites prepared with a dodecyl-terminated diaryl functionalized CB, in which TEM analysis established improved nanofiller dispersion owing to the enhanced CB-PP interfacial interactions in the nanocomposite. Observed dielectric relaxation responses at 20 wt % loading and a reduced percolation threshold realized conductivities of 1.19 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 10 wt %, compared to 2.62 × 10(-15) S cm(-1) for pristine CB/PP nanocomposites at the same filler loading. In addition, thermal properties signify an increase in the number of nucleation sites by the raised degree of crystallinity as well as increased melting and crystallization temperatures. PMID:27417277

  2. Black carbon aerosols in urban air in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Vincent A.; Alvi, Sofia; Ghauri, Badar M.; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Husain, Liaquat

    We report data from a yearlong (2006-2007) study of black carbon concentrations ([BC]) measured at 5-min intervals with an Aethalometer in Karachi, Pakistan. Daily mean [BC] varied from about 1 to 15 μg m -3. However, short-term spikes exceeding 40 μg m -3 were common, occurring primarily during the morning and evening rush-hour periods. The [BC] values were highest during November through February, ˜10 μg m -3, and lowest during June through September, ˜2 μg m -3. Diurnal, seasonal, and day-of-the-week trends are discussed. It is demonstrated that these trends are strongly affected by meteorological patterns. A simple expression is applied to the concentration profiles to separate the effects of meteorological conditions and elucidate the underlying emissions patterns. Daily emissions varied from 14,000 to 22,000 kg of BC per day. When integrated over the year emissions for Karachi Proper were estimated at 6.7 kilometric tons per year and emissions for greater Karachi were 17.5 kilometric tons per year. Folding in the populations of each area yields BC emissions of 0.74 and 1.1 kg per person per year, respectively. Applying the model to previously collected data at Lahore, Pakistan yields emissions during November-January that are around a factor of two higher than those in Karachi, but because the BC measurements in Lahore covered only three months, no estimates of annual emissions were attempted. Given the large populations of these cities the local health impact from PM alone is expected to be severe but because of the high [BC] emissions the impact on the global climate may be equally significant.

  3. Climate Response of Direct Radiative Forcing of Anthropogenic Black Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Serena H.; Seinfeld,John H.

    2008-01-01

    The equilibrium climate effect of direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) is examined by 100-year simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model II-prime coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model. Anthropogenic BC is predicted to raise globally and annually averaged equilibrium surface air temperature by 0.20 K if BC is assumed to be externally mixed. The predicted increase is significantly greater in the Northern Hemisphere (0.29 K) than in the Southern Hemisphere (0.11 K). If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with the present day level of sulfate aerosol, the predicted annual mean surface temperature increase rises to 0.37 K globally, 0.54 K for the Northern Hemisphere, and 0.20 K for the Southern Hemisphere. The climate sensitivity of BC direct radiative forcing is calculated to be 0.6 K W (sup -1) square meters, which is about 70% of that of CO2, independent of the assumption of BC mixing state. The largest surface temperature response occurs over the northern high latitudes during winter and early spring. In the tropics and midlatitudes, the largest temperature increase is predicted to occur in the upper troposphere. Direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic BC is also predicted to lead to a change of precipitation patterns in the tropics; precipitation is predicted to increase between 0 and 20 N and decrease between 0 and 20 S, shifting the intertropical convergence zone northward. If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with sulfate instead of externally mixed, the change in precipitation pattern is enhanced. The change in precipitation pattern is not predicted to alter the global burden of BC significantly because the change occurs predominantly in regions removed from BC sources.

  4. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massling, A.; Nielsen, I. E.; Kristensen, D.; Christensen, J. H.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Glasius, M.; Skov, H.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of equivalent black carbon (EBC) in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS) at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in EBC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. Average measured concentrations were about 0.067 ± 0.071 for the winter and 0.011 ± 0.009 for the summer period. These data were obtained using a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP). A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. Here, measured average concentrations were about 0.485 ± 0.397 for the winter and 0.112 ± 0.072 for the summer period. A correlation between EBC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013 stating a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.72. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. BC and sulfate are known to have only partly similar sources with respect to their transport pathways when reaching the high Arctic. Aging processes may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon) based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to EBC measurements. EBC measurements were generally higher, but a correlation between EC and EBC resulted in a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.64. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and

  5. Increased fire frequency optimization of black carbon mixing and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Lacey; Masiello, Caroline; Clark, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon makes up a substantial part of the global carbon budget and black carbon (BC - produced from incomplete combustion of biomass) can be significant fraction of soil carbon. Soil BC cycling is still poorly understood - very old BC is observed in soils, suggesting recalcitrance, yet in short term lab and field studies BC sometimes breaks down rapidly. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency of fires, which will increase global production of BC. As up to 80% of BC produced in wildfires can remain at the fire location, increased fire frequency will cause significant perturbations to soil BC accumulation. This creates a challenge in estimating soil BC storage, in light of a changing climate and an increased likelihood of fire. While the chemical properties of BC are relatively well-studied, its physical properties are much less well understood, and may play crucial roles in its landscape residence time. One important property is density. When BC density is less than 1 g/cm3 (i.e. the density of water), it is highly mobile and can easily leave the landscape. This landscape mobility following rainfall may inflate estimates of its degradability, making it crucial to understand both the short- and long term density of BC particles. As BC pores fill with minerals, making particles denser, or become ingrown with root and hyphal anchors, BC is likely to become protected from erosion. Consequently, how quickly BC is mixed deeper into the soil column is likely a primary controller on BC accumulation. Additionally the post-fire recovery of soil litter layers caps BC belowground, protecting it from erosional forces and re-combustion in subsequent fires, but still allowing bioturbation deeper into the soil column. We have taken advantage of a fire chronosequence in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey to investigate how density of BC particles change over time, and how an increase in fire frequency affects soil BC storage and soil column movement. Our plots have

  6. Estimates of increased black carbon emissions from electrostatic precipitators during powdered activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control.

    PubMed

    Clack, Herek L

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of mercury sorbents within electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is not well-understood, despite a decade or more of full-scale testing. Recent laboratory results suggest that powdered activated carbon exhibits somewhat different collection behavior than fly ash in an ESP and particulate filters located at the outlet of ESPs have shown evidence of powdered activated carbon penetration during full-scale tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control. The present analysis considers a range of assumed differential ESP collection efficiencies for powdered activated carbon as compared to fly ash. Estimated emission rates of submicrometer powdered activated carbon are compared to estimated emission rates of particulate carbon on submicrometer fly ash, each corresponding to its respective collection efficiency. To the extent that any emitted powdered activated carbon exhibits size and optical characteristics similar to black carbon, such emissions could effectively constitute an increase in black carbon emissions from coal-based stationary power generation. The results reveal that even for the low injection rates associated with chemically impregnated carbons, submicrometer particulate carbon emissions can easily double if the submicrometer fraction of the native fly ash has a low carbon content. Increasing sorbent injection rates, larger collection efficiency differentials as compared to fly ash, and decreasing sorbent particle size all lead to increases in the estimated submicrometer particulate carbon emissions. PMID:22663136

  7. Simulation of Arctic Black Carbon using Hemispheric CMAQ: Role of Russia's BC Emissions, Transport, and Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Fu, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon plays a unique role in the Arctic climate system due to its multiple effects. It causes Arctic warming by directly absorbing sunlight from space and by darkening the surface albedo of snow and ice, which indirectly leads to further warming and melting, thus inducing an Arctic amplification effect. BC depositions over the Arctic are more sensitive to regions in close proximity. In this study, we reconstruct BC emissions for Russian Federation, which is the country that occupies the largest area in the Arctic Circle. Local Russia information such as activity data, emission factors and other emission source data are used. In 2010, total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia is estimated to be around 254 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a dominant 43.9% of Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 22.0%, 17.8%, 11.5%, and 4.8%, respectively. BC simulations were conducted using the hemispheric version of CMAQ with polar projection. Emission inputs are from a global emissions database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulations using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 46 - 61% of the Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four air monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow, Alert, and Tiksi) in the Arctic Circle, surface BC simulations are improved the most during the Arctic haze periods (October - March). Emission perturbation studies show that Russia's BC emissions contribute over 50% of the surface BC concentrations over the Arctic during the cold seasons. This study demonstrates the good capability of H-CMAQ in

  8. Relationship between Black Carbon and heavy traffic in São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, R. M.; Perez-Martinez, P.; Ribeiro, F. N. D.; Andrade, M. D. F.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in air quality, human health and global climate change. Black Carbon (BC) can be considered the most efficient light absorber in the visible spectrum and is mainly found in the fine fraction of aerosol. Typically is emitted by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels related to traffic, industrial processes and biomass burning. São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) with more than 19 million inhabitants, 7 million vehicles, as well as the major industrial and technological park of the country, has high concentrations of air pollutants, especially in the winter and vehicles are considered the principal source of particles emitted to the atmosphere. Since November 2014, Black Carbon and PM2.5 are being monitored using a MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer) Thermo 5012 and a Dust Trak DRX-8533 TSI in the East Campus of University of São Paulo, close to important highways and also to the largest airport of Brazil (Guarulhos Airport). Average BC concentration was 1.7 μg/m3 with some peaks above 17.0 μg/m3 and for PM2.5 average was 10.2 μg/m3. Particle concentrations reached values greater than the air quality standard (60 μg/m3) in the winter months. Winds coming from the East direction predominate. Traffic restrictions to heavy duty vehicles in the road-rings next to the sampling site during some hours of the day are the responsible for the daily BC and PM2.5 behavior (figure below), where high concentrations occur early in the morning and late at night, when heavy diesel vehicles are released for transit. Seasonal variations are different for BC and PM2.5 due to local sources of BC and meteorological conditions that have more influence on the particles. The weekly variation indicates that concentrations are lower on Sundays and higher from Tuesday to Thursday. Emission factors for BC were calculated based on traffic information.

  9. Sonochemical Degradation of Reactive Black 5 with a Composite Catalyst of TiO2/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunju; Choi, Jongbok; Lee, Yonghyeon; Park, Jeong Min; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2013-07-01

    In the sonocatalytic process, composites of TiO2-carbon were used because carbon provides more adsorption sites and acts like an electron sink to prevent the recombination of an electron/hole. Therefore, in the present study, the characteristics of a TiO2/single-walled carbon nanotubes catalyst (TiO2/SWCNTs) have been investigated, and the optimal weight ratio of SWCNTs and the dose for degradation of reactive black 5 (RB5) were also evaluated. TiO2/SWCNT composite was characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction microanalysis and spectra, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The degradation rate constants of RB5 with the ratio of SWCNTs were found to depend on the adsorption phenomenon of a surface catalyst, light absorbance, and the recombination of electrons and holes. As a result, the optimal ratio of carbon in the sono-TiO2/SWCNTs process for degradation of RB5 was TiO2:SWCNTs= 200:1. Additionally, the optimal dose of the catalyst was 0.5 g/L.

  10. Reduction of nitroaromatics sorbed to black carbon by direct reaction with sorbed sulfides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqing; Pignatello, Joseph J; Mitch, William A

    2015-03-17

    Sorption to black carbons is an important sink for organic contaminants in sediments. Previous research has suggested that black carbons (graphite, activated carbon, and biochar) mediate the degradation of nitrated compounds by sulfides by at least two different pathways: reduction involving electron transfer from sulfides through conductive carbon regions to the target contaminant (nitroglycerin) and degradation by sulfur-based intermediates formed by sulfide oxidation (RDX). In this study, we evaluated the applicability of black carbon-mediated reactions to a wider variety of contaminant structures, including nitrated and halogenated aromatic compounds, halogenated heterocyclic aromatic compounds, and halogenated alkanes. Among these compounds, black carbon-mediated transformation by sulfides over a 3-day time scale was limited to nitroaromatic compounds. The reaction for a series of substituted nitroaromatics proceeded by reduction, as indicated by formation of 3-bromoaniline from 3-bromonitrobenzene, and inverse correlation of log kobs with energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO). The log kobs was correlated with sorbed sulfide concentration, but no reduction of 3-bromonitrobenzene was observed in the presence of graphite and sulfite, thiosulfate, or polysulfides. Whereas nitroglycerin reduction occurred in an electrochemical cell containing sheet graphite electrodes in which the reagents were placed in separate compartments, nitroaromatic reduction only occurred when sulfides were present in the same compartment. The results suggest that black carbon-mediated reduction of sorbed nitroaromatics by sulfides involves electron transfer directly from sorbed sulfides rather than transfer of electrons through conductive carbon regions. The existence of three different reaction pathways suggests a complexity to the sulfide-carbon system compared to the iron-carbon system, where contaminants are reduced by electron transfer through conductive carbon

  11. Dynamac molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (Biochar)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Char black carbon (BC), the solid residue of incomplete combustion, is continuously being added to soils and sediments due to natural vegetation fires, anthropogenic pollution, and new strategies for carbon sequestration (“biochar”). Here we present a molecular-level assessment o...

  12. Is Carbon Black a Suitable Model Colloidal Substrate for Diesel Soot?

    PubMed

    Growney, David J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Middlemiss, Laurence; Fielding, Lee A; Derry, Matthew J; Aragrag, Najib; Lamb, Gordon D; Armes, Steven P

    2015-09-29

    Soot formation in diesel engines is known to cause premature engine wear. Unfortunately, genuine diesel soot is expensive to generate, so carbon blacks are often used as diesel soot mimics. Herein, the suitability of a commercial carbon black (Regal 250R) as a surrogate for diesel soot dispersed in engine base oil is examined in the presence of two commonly used polymeric lubricant additives. The particle size, morphology, and surface composition of both substrates are assessed using BET surface area analysis, TEM, and XPS. The extent of adsorption of a poly(ethylene-co-propylene) (dOCP) statistical copolymer or a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-co-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymer onto carbon black or diesel soot from n-dodecane is compared indirectly using a supernatant depletion assay technique via UV spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis is also used to directly determine the extent of copolymer adsorption. Degrees of dispersion are examined using optical microscopy, TEM, and analytical centrifugation. SAXS studies reveal some structural differences between carbon black and diesel soot particles. The mean radius of gyration determined for the latter is significantly smaller than that calculated for the former, and in the absence of any copolymer, diesel soot suspended in n-dodecane forms relatively loose mass fractals compared to carbon black. SAXS provides evidence for copolymer adsorption and indicates that addition of either copolymer transforms the initially compact agglomerates into relatively loose aggregates. Addition of dOCP or PS-PEP does not significantly affect the structure of the carbon black primary particles, with similar results being observed for diesel soot. In favorable cases, remarkably similar data can be obtained for carbon black and diesel soot when using dOCP and PS-PEP as copolymer dispersants. However, it is not difficult to identify simple copolymer-particle-solvent combinations for which substantial differences can be observed

  13. Mass spectrometry of refractory black carbon particles from six sources: carbon-cluster and oxygenated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Sierau, B.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Keller, A.; Kim, J.; Petzold, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Lohmann, U.; Mensah, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the major mass spectral features of different types of refractory carbonaceous particles, ionized after laser vaporization with an Aerodyne high-resolution soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated with a switchable 1064 nm laser and a 600 °C thermal vaporizer, yielding respective measurements of the refractory and non-refractory particle components. Six samples were investigated, all of which were composed primarily of refractory material: fuel-rich and fuel-lean propane/air diffusion-flame combustion particles; graphite-spark-generated particles; a commercial fullerene-enriched soot; Regal Black, a commercial carbon black; and nascent aircraft-turbine combustion particles. All samples exhibited a spectrum of carbon-cluster ions Cxn+ in their refractory mass spectrum. Smaller clusters (x < 6) were found to dominate the Cxn+ distribution. For fullerene soot, fuel-rich-flame particles and spark-generated particles, significant Cxn+ clusters at x ≫ 6 were present, with significant contributions from multiply charged ions (n > 1). In all six cases, the ions C1+ and C3+ contributed over 60% to the total C1 5 were present. When such signals were present, C1+ / C3+ was close to 1. When absent, C1+ / C3+ was < 0.8. This ratio may therefore serve as a proxy to distinguish between the two types of spectra in atmospheric SP-AMS measurements. Significant refractory oxygenated ions such as CO+ and CO2+ were also observed for all samples. We discuss these signals in detail for Regal Black, and describe their formation via decomposition of oxygenated moieties incorporated into the refractory carbon structure. These species may be of importance in atmospheric processes such as water uptake and heterogeneous chemistry. If atmospherically stable, these oxidized species may be useful for distinguishing

  14. Observational and laboratory studies of optical properties of black and brown carbon particles in the atmosphere using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Light absorption and scattering by aerosols are as an important contributor to radiation balance in the atmosphere. Black carbon (BC) is considered to be the most potent light absorbing material in the visible region of the spectrum, although light absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon or BrC) and mineral dust may also act as sources of significant absorption, especially in the ultraviolet (UV) and shorter visible wavelength regions. The optical properties of such particles depend on wavelength, particle size and shape, morphology, coating, and complex refractive index (or chemical composition), and therefore accurate in situ measurements of the wavelength dependence of the optical properties of particles are needed. Recently, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) have been used for the direct measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients of particles suspended in air. We have applied these techniques to the observational studies of optical properties of BC and BrC in an urban site in Japan and to the laboratory studies of optical properties of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds and those of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). In the presentation, the basic principles of these techniques and the results obtained in our studies and in the recent literatures will be overviewed. References Guo, X. et al., Measurement of the light absorbing properties of diesel exhaust particles using a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer, Atmos. Environ., 94, 428-437 (2014). Nakayama, T. et al., Measurements of aerosol optical properties in central Tokyo during summertime using cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Comparison with conventional techniques, Atmos. Environ., 44, 3034-3042 (2010). Nakayama, T. et al., Laboratory studies on optical properties of secondary organic aerosols generated during the photooxidation of toluene and the ozonolysis of alpha

  15. Numerical Analysis of Carbon Black Production from Sub-Quality Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghiman, M.; Javadi, M.; Ghodsirad, M. H.; Hosseini, N.; Soleimani, M.

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this paper is computational investigation of the carbon black production through the oxidative thermal decomposition of waste gases contain CH4 and H2S without requiring a H2S separation process. The chemical reaction model, which involves solid carbon, sulfur compounds and other precursor species for formation carbon black, based on an assumed Probability Density Function (PDF) is parameterized by the mean and variance of mixture fraction and β-PDF shape. The effects of feedstock mass flow rate and reactor temperature on carbon black, soot, CO, S2, SO2, COS and CS2 formation are investigated. The results show that the major factor influencing CH4 and H2S conversions is reactor temperature. The results reveal that at any temperature, H2S conversion is less than that of CH4 especially at temperature below 1300 °k wherein H2S conversion is less than 5%.

  16. Black carbon from the Mississippi River: quantities, sources, and potential implications for the global carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Siddhartha; Bianchi, Thomas S; McKee, Brent A; Sutula, Martha

    2002-06-01

    Black carbon (BC) may be a major component of riverine carbon exported to the ocean, but its flux from large rivers is unknown. Furthermore, the global distribution of BC between natural and anthropogenic sources remains uncertain. We have determined BC concentrations in suspended sediments of the Mississippi River, the 7th largest river in the world in terms of sediment and water discharge, during high flow and low flow in 1999. The 1999 annual flux of BC from the Mississippi River was 5 x 10(-4) petagrams (1 Pg = 10(15) g = 1 gigaton). We also applied a principal components analysis to particulate-phase high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon isomer ratios in Mississippi River suspended sediments. In doing so, we determined that approximately 27% of the BC discharged from the Mississippi River in 1999 originated from fossil fuel combustion (coal and smelter-derived combustion), implicating fluvial BC as an important source of anthropogenic BC contamination into the ocean. Using our value for BC flux and the annual estimate for BC burial in ocean sediments, we calculate that, in 1999, the Mississippi River discharged approximately 5% of the BC buried annually in the ocean. These results have important implications, not only for the global carbon cycle but also for the fluvial discharge of particulate organic contaminants into the world's oceans. PMID:12075780

  17. Thermally-Resilient, Broadband Optical Absorber from UV-to-IR Derived from Carbon Nanostructures and Method of Making the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor); Coles, James B. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A monolithic optical absorber and methods of making same. The monolithic optical absorber uses an array of mutually aligned carbon nanotubes that are grown using a PECVD growth process and a structure that includes a conductive substrate, a refractory template layer and a nucleation layer. Monolithic optical absorbers made according to the described structure and method exhibit high absorptivity, high site densities (greater than 10.sup.9 nanotubes/cm.sup.2), very low reflectivity (below 1%), and high thermal stability in air (up to at least 400.degree. C.). The PECVD process allows the application of such absorbers in a wide variety of end uses.

  18. A reliable light scattering computing for black carbon-containing particles: Hybrid discrete dipole approximation (h-DDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteki, N.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosol emitted from combustions of fossil fuels and biomasses and is estimated as the second most important contributor to positive climate forcing after the carbon dioxide. In the atmosphere, the fractal aggregate of BC-spherules may be mixed with non-absorbing (or weakly absorbing) compounds that forms morphologically complex "BC-containing particle". A reliable scattering code for BC-containing particles is necessary for predicting mass absorption efficiency of BC and designing/evaluating optical techniques for estimating microphysical properties (i.e., size distribution, mixing state, shape, refractive index) of BC-containing particles. The computational methods that derived from the volume-integral form of the Maxwell equation, such as discrete dipole approximation (DDA), are method of choice for morphologically complex object like BC-containing particles. In ordinary DDA, the entire particle volume is approximated as a collection of tiny cubical dipoles (with side length d) placed on a 3D cubic lattice. For several model BC-containing particles, the comparisons with numerically exact T-matrix method reveals that the ordinary DDA suffered from persistent positive systematic error (up to +30%) in absorption even under d <<λ. The cause of this DDA error is identified to be the shape error in BC-spherules. To eliminate the shape error in BC-spherules, we propose a new DDA methodology which may be called hybrid DDA (h-DDA): each primary BC sphere is assumed as a spherical dipole, while remaining particle volume of coating material is approximated by a collection of tiny cubical dipoles on a 3D cubic lattice. Positive absorption bias up to +30% in ordinary DDA is suppressed to within 3% in h-DDA. In h-DDA code, an efficient FFT-based algorithm for solving the matrix equation has been implemented, by utilizing the multilevel block-Toeplitz property of the submatrix corresponding to inter-dipole interaction within

  19. Carbon dioxide absorber and regeneration assemblies useful for power plant flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang

    2012-11-06

    Disclosed are apparatus and method to treat large amounts of flue gas from a pulverized coal combustion power plant. The flue gas is contacted with solid sorbents to selectively absorb CO.sub.2, which is then released as a nearly pure CO.sub.2 gas stream upon regeneration at higher temperature. The method is capable of handling the necessary sorbent circulation rates of tens of millions of lbs/hr to separate CO.sub.2 from a power plant's flue gas stream. Because pressurizing large amounts of flue gas is cost prohibitive, the method of this invention minimizes the overall pressure drop in the absorption section to less than 25 inches of water column. The internal circulation of sorbent within the absorber assembly in the proposed method not only minimizes temperature increases in the absorber to less than 25.degree. F., but also increases the CO.sub.2 concentration in the sorbent to near saturation levels. Saturating the sorbent with CO.sub.2 in the absorber section minimizes the heat energy needed for sorbent regeneration. The commercial embodiments of the proposed method can be optimized for sorbents with slower or faster absorption kinetics, low or high heat release rates, low or high saturation capacities and slower or faster regeneration kinetics.

  20. Photoacoustic measurements of black carbon light absorption coefficients in Irbid city, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Hamasha, Khadeejeh M; Arnott, W Patrick

    2010-07-01

    There is a need to recognize air pollution levels by particles, especially in developing countries such as Jordan where data are scarce due to the absence of routine monitoring of ambient air quality. This study aims at studying the air quality in different locations at Irbid, Jordan through the measurement and analysis of the time series of black carbon light absorption coefficients (B (abs)). Black carbon light absorption coefficients were measured with a photoacoustic instrument at a wavelength of 870 nm. The measurements were conducted during July 2007 at six sites in Irbid city, Jordan. Comparisons of black carbon concentrations at various locations were conducted to understand where values tend to be largest. The average value of B (abs) of all sites was 40.4 Mm(-1). The largest value of B (abs) was 61.2 Mm(-1) at Palestine Street which is located at a very crowded street in a highly populated region in the city center. The lowest value was 14.1 Mm(-1) at Thirtieth Street which is located at a main street in an open plain region in the east of the city. The black carbon light absorption coefficients fluctuate above a background level (transported black carbon from the neighboring states), which are almost identical at all sampling sites. The light absorption coefficients will be used as a benchmark in later years as combustion efficiencies and population patterns change. PMID:19479334

  1. Migration of nanoparticles from plastic packaging materials containing carbon black into foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Bott, Johannes; Störmer, Angela; Franz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Carbon black was investigated to assess and quantify the possibility that nanoparticles might migrate out of plastic materials used in the food packaging industry. Two types of carbon black were incorporated in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polystyrene (PS) at 2.5% and 5.0% loading (w/w), and then subjected to migration studies. The samples were exposed to different food simulants according to European Union Plastics Regulation 10/2011, simulating long-term storage with aqueous and fatty foodstuffs. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a multi-angle laser light-scattering (MALLS) detector was used to separate, characterise and quantify the potential release of nanoparticles. The AF4 method was successful in differentiating carbon black from other matrix components, such as extracted polymer chains, in the migration solution. At a detection limit of 12 µg kg⁻¹, carbon black did not migrate from the packaging material into food simulants. The experimental findings are in agreement with theoretical considerations based on migration modelling. From both the experimental findings and theoretical considerations, it can be concluded that carbon black does not migrate into food once it is incorporated into a plastics food contact material. PMID:25105506

  2. Effect of molecular weight on the electrophoretic deposition of carbon black nanoparticles in moderately viscous systems.

    PubMed

    Modi, Satyam; Panwar, Artee; Mead, Joey L; Barry, Carol M F

    2013-08-01

    Electrophoretic deposition from viscous media has the potential to produce in-mold assembly of nanoparticles onto three-dimensional parts in high-rate, polymer melt-based processes like injection molding. The effects of the media's molecular weight on deposition behavior were investigated using a model system of carbon black and polystyrene in tetrahydrofuran. Increases in molecular weight reduced the electrophoretic deposition of the carbon black particles due to increases in suspension viscosity and preferential adsorption of the longer polystyrene chains on the carbon black particles. At low deposition times (≤5 s), only carbon black deposited onto the electrodes, but the deposition decreased with increasing molecular weight and the resultant increases in suspension viscosity. For longer deposition times, polystyrene codeposited with the carbon black, with the amount of polystyrene increasing with molecular weight and decreasing with greater charge on the polystyrene molecules. This deposition behavior suggests that use of lower molecular polymers and control of electrical properties will permit electrophoretic deposition of nanoparticles from polymer melts for high-rate, one-step fabrication of nano-optical devices, biochemical sensors, and nanoelectronics. PMID:23848316

  3. Migration of nanoparticles from plastic packaging materials containing carbon black into foodstuffs

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Johannes; Störmer, Angela; Franz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Carbon black was investigated to assess and quantify the possibility that nanoparticles might migrate out of plastic materials used in the food packaging industry. Two types of carbon black were incorporated in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polystyrene (PS) at 2.5% and 5.0% loading (w/w), and then subjected to migration studies. The samples were exposed to different food simulants according to European Union Plastics Regulation 10/2011, simulating long-term storage with aqueous and fatty foodstuffs. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a multi-angle laser light-scattering (MALLS) detector was used to separate, characterise and quantify the potential release of nanoparticles. The AF4 method was successful in differentiating carbon black from other matrix components, such as extracted polymer chains, in the migration solution. At a detection limit of 12 µg kg−1, carbon black did not migrate from the packaging material into food simulants. The experimental findings are in agreement with theoretical considerations based on migration modelling. From both the experimental findings and theoretical considerations, it can be concluded that carbon black does not migrate into food once it is incorporated into a plastics food contact material. PMID:25105506

  4. Optical properties of light absorbing carbon aggregates mixed with sulfate: assessment of different model geometries for climate forcing calculations.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Michael; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Ebert, Martin

    2012-04-23

    Light scattering by light absorbing carbon (LAC) aggregates encapsulated into sulfate shells is computed by use of the discrete dipole method. Computations are performed for a UV, visible, and IR wavelength, different particle sizes, and volume fractions. Reference computations are compared to three classes of simplified model particles that have been proposed for climate modeling purposes. Neither model matches the reference results sufficiently well. Remarkably, more realistic core-shell geometries fall behind homogeneous mixture models. An extended model based on a core-shell-shell geometry is proposed and tested. Good agreement is found for total optical cross sections and the asymmetry parameter. PMID:22535095

  5. Factors Controlling Black Carbon Deposition in Snow in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, L.; Li, Q.; He, C.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of black carbon (BC) concentration in snow in the Arctic to BC emissions, dry deposition and wet scavenging efficiency using a 3D global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem driven by meteorological field GEOS-5. With all improvements, simulated median BC concentration in snow agrees with observation (19.2 ng g-1) within 10%, down from -40% in the default GEOS-Chem. When the previously missed gas flaring emissions (mainly located in Russia) are included, the total BC emission in the Arctic increases by 70%. The simulated BC in snow increases by 1-7 ng g-1, with the largest improvement in Russia. The discrepancy of median BC in snow in the whole Arctic reduces from -40% to -20%. In addition, recent measurements of BC dry deposition velocity suggest that the constant deposition velocity of 0.03 cm s-1 over snow and ice used in the GEOS-Chem is too low. So we apply resistance-in-series method to calculate the dry deposition velocity over snow and ice and the resulted dry deposition velocity ranges from 0.03 to 0.24 cm s-1. However, the simulated total BC deposition flux in the Arctic and BC in snow does not change, because the increased dry deposition flux has been compensated by decreased wet deposition flux. However, the fraction of dry deposition to total deposition increases from 16% to 25%. This may affect the mixing of BC and snow particles and further affect the radative forcing of BC deposited in snow. Finally, we reduced the scavenging efficiency of BC in mixed-phase clouds to account for the effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process based on recent observations. The simulated BC concentration in snow increases by 10-100%, with the largest increase in Greenland (100%), Tromsø (50%), Alaska (40%), and Canadian Arctic (30%). Annual BC loading in the Arctic increases from 0.25 to 0.43 mg m-2 and the lifetime of BC increases from 9.2 to 16.3 days. This indicates that BC simulation in the Arctic is really sensitive to

  6. Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

    2009-11-27

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the

  7. Black carbon over the Amazon during SAMBBA: it gets everywhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Darbyshire, E.; Liu, D.; Szpek, K.; Langridge, J.; Johnson, B. T.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning represents a major source of Black Carbon (BC) aerosol to the atmosphere, which can result in major perturbations to weather, climate and ecosystem development. Large uncertainties in these impacts prevail, particularly on regional scales. One such region is the Amazon Basin, where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis during the dry season. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to BC aerosol properties. Results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) and an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). The physical, chemical and optical properties of BC-containing particles across the region will be characterised, with particular emphasis on the vertical distribution. BC was ubiquitous across the region, with measurements extending from heavily deforested regions in the Western Amazon Basin, through to agricultural fires in the Cerrado (Savannah-like) region and more pristine areas over the Amazon Rainforest. Measurements in the vicinity of Manaus (a city located deep into the jungle) were also conducted. BC concentrations peaked within the boundary layer at a height of around 1.5km. BC-containing particles were found to be rapidly coated in the near-field, with little evidence for additional coating upon advection and dilution. Biomass burning layers within the free troposphere were routinely observed. BC-containing particles within such layers were typically associated with less coating than those within the boundary layer, suggestive of wet removal of more coated BC particles. The importance of such properties in relation to the

  8. Heavy duty piezoresistivity induced strain sensing natural rubber/carbon black nanocomposites reinforced with different carbon nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingliang; Yuan, Tingting; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Shimei; Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Jiurong; Liu, Xinyu; Sun, Luyi; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2014-09-01

    Durable piezoresistive effects of natural rubber nanocomposites have been demonstrated, i.e., with stable and reversible electrical resistance change within the tested 3000 cycles upon applying a small compressive strain (˜16.7%) under a relatively high frequency (0.5 Hz, 2 s/cycle). This unique function was achieved for the first time by combining carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers with natural rubber composites pretreated with carbon black. Even though the combination of different carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheets and carbon nanotubes, can improve the dispersion quality of both the nanostructures in solution or in polymer matrices, this type of synergistic effect between carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers in producing stable and reversible piezoresistive effect has been rarely reported. Besides, the strong reinforcement (compressive stress at a maximum strain of 16.7% was increased from 12.6 for untreated to 18.5 MPa for the natural rubber/carbon black composites treated with a combination of 1.0 wt% carbon nanotubes and 1.0 wt% carbon nanofibers) makes the as-prepared composites promising for heavy duty pressure sensors, i.e., healthy motion monitoring of industrial machinery vibrations.

  9. Measuring Black Carbon Concentrations in Liquid Samples Using the Single Particle Soot Photometer: Addressing Black Carbon Losses During Sample Storage and Nebulization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, J. A.; Kaspari, S.; Jenkins, M.

    2011-12-01

    Black Carbon (BC), an aerosol created from the incomplete combustion of fossil and bio-fuels, is the second largest contributor to global warming next to CO2. BC deposited on snow and ice reduces the surface albedo, accelerating seasonal snowmelt and glacier retreat and influencing the regional water cycle and climate (Hansen and Nazarenko, 2004). BC emissions and its post-depositional spatial distribution in snow and ice are a large uncertainty in climate change analyses, thus measurements of global BC concentrations in liquid samples of snow and ice are desirable. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) is a relatively new method for measuring BC concentrations in liquid samples with promising advantages over other commonly used methods, namely that measurements require smaller sample volumes and are not affected by the presence of other absorbing particles. Despite potential advantages over traditional methods, total BC in liquid samples cannot be quantified because of methodological uncertainties. Preliminary tests show BC losses related to (1) nebulization and (2) changes to the sample during storage. BC in storage may adhere to the vial walls, resulting in BC losses. Particles containing BC may also agglomerate to form large particles with sizes outside of the SP2 detection range (80-650nm). Further losses are indicated in a comparison of polydisperse Aquadag (BC standard) particle size distributions between the ultrasonic nebulizer and a collision-type atomizer, which shows a loss of particles > ~500nm associated with the Cetac U-5000AT+ ultrasonic nebulizer. Larger particles may not be nebulized because of inefficiencies related to the ultrasonic transducer plate, and/or highly charged particles may adhere to the glass within the nebulizer, also resulting in BC losses. The purpose of this study was to determine the methods of storage and nebulization that maximize the amount of BC delivered to the SP2 inlet. Storage and sample parameters tested include

  10. Multiple Types of Light Absorbing Carbon Aerosol in East Asian Outflow: Variatons in Morphology and Internal Structure as Characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. R.; Alexander, D. T.; Crozier, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    The importance of light absorbing carbon (LAC) aerosols to climate forcing is well established, but such aerosols are typically treated in climate models as uniform in optical properties. When examined by electron microscopy, however, LAC aerosols from regions with significant anthropogenic pollution show a wide variety of morphologies and internal structures. Electron energy loss spectral analysis to date on brown carbon and black carbon, albeit limited, suggests a linkage between internal structure and fundamental optical properties. Some of these LAC varieties can be easily defined as distinct “types” and other varieties show a continuum of variation within which general “types” can be defined. The data discussed here are from a research flight of the NCAR C-130 aircraft flown in April 2001 above the Yellow Sea during the ACE-Asia project. Perhaps the most common LAC type is “soot”, branched and chainlike aggregates of carbonaceous spherules. The spherule size in East Asian soot particles is 20-60 nm in many cases, but soot with large spherules (100 nm or larger) are also present. Spherule size is a “source effect” and not something altered during transport and aging. Some laboratory studies have suggested that as soot ages, the aggregates become more compact, but in these aerosols both compact and open soot particles coexist and compact soot is known to be the initial LAC product under some combustion conditions. In cases where the spherule size of the compact soot is different from that of open-structured soot, clearly the compact soot is not an aged form of the latter. Variability of ordering of the graphene sheets that make up the spherules is also a source effect. The more ordered soot particles consist of graphene sheets that curve concentrically, onion-like, around the spherule center, probably indicative of a high degree of carbonization that accompanies high temperature combustion. There is a range of ordering from highly ordered down to

  11. Effect of Thermal Aging on the Viscosity of Suspensions of Carbon Black in Polybutadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Meerwall, E.; Hong, M. P.; Kelley, F. N.

    1998-05-01

    We have studied the effects of aging time and temperature on the viscosity of an hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) containing suspended carbon black. After surface application such HTPB suspensions are crosslinked to form liners in solid rocket motors. The suspension viscosity decreases with aging time, more rapidly at higher temperatures, and approaches a lower asymptote which depends on filler fraction. Heat-drying the carbon black before incorporation lessens the magnitude of this effect and accelerates the approach to equilibrium; moistening the black enlarges it and delays the approach. We conclude that this effect is related to the moisture adsorbed on the black particles. The water is not completely soluble in the polymer, resulting in reversible emulsification, and is driven off during aging. A variety of secondary experiments performed (use of a wetting agent, centrifugation, dc electrical resistivity, NMR spin-spin relaxation and self-diffusion, optical microscopy) eliminate several other likely explanations.

  12. Properties of light-absorbing aerosols in the Nagoya urban area, Japan, in August 2011 and January 2012: Contributions of brown carbon and lensing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kawana, Kaori; Mochida, Michihiro; Ikemori, Fumikazu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    The optical properties of aerosols at 405 and 781 nm were measured in an urban site in Nagoya, Japan, in August 2011 and in January 2012 using a photoacoustic spectrometer. Comparison of the absorption coefficient at 781 nm of aerosols that did and did not pass through a thermo-denuder showed that an increase in black carbon (BC) light absorption due to the coating of non-refractory materials (i.e., the lensing effect) was small (on average, 10%) in August and negligible in January. The effective density distributions for the particles that did and did not pass through the thermo-denuder, which were measured simultaneously in August, suggested that the majority of BC particles sampled had a minimal coating. The small lensing effect observed can be explained partly by assuming that a large portion of non-refractory materials was mixed externally with BC. The contribution of direct light absorption by organic matter (OM) that vaporized at temperatures below 300°C to the total light absorption at 405 nm was negligible in August, but those by OM that vaporized below 300 and 400°C averaged 11 and 17%, respectively, in January. The larger contribution of light-absorbing OM in January is likely due to the greater contribution of OM originating from the burning of biomass, including biofuel and agricultural residue, in Japan, northern China, or Siberia, during the winter.

  13. Particles of spilled oil-absorbing carbon in contact with water

    DOEpatents

    Muradov, Nazim

    2011-03-29

    Hydrogen generator coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. Carbon particles with surface filaments having a hydrophobic property of oil film absorption, compositions of matter containing those particles, and a system for using the carbon particles for cleaning oil spills.

  14. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range.

    PubMed

    González, M; Crespo, M; Baselga, J; Pozuelo, J

    2016-05-19

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials. PMID:27152472

  15. Pole-to-Pole Distribution of Stratospheric Black Carbon (Soot) Aerosol from Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Verma, S.; Howard, S. D.; Strawa, Anthony W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of black carbon (soot) aerosol (BCA) in the atmosphere is of interest for several reasons: (1) Because BCA has the highest absorption cross section of any compound known, it can absorb solar radiation to cause atmospheric warming. (2) Because it is a strong adsorber of gases, it can catalyze heterogeneous reactions to change the chemical composition of the atmosphere.(3) If aircraft are a major source of BCA, it is an important tracer of aircraft emissions. Analysis for BCA of impactor samples from Arctic and Antarctic deployments, utilizing particle morphology of scanning electron microscopy images, permits the following conclusions: (1) The BCA concentration in the northern stratosphere varies between 0 and 2.6 ng m-3 averaging 0.6 ng/cu m. (2) This BCA loading is commensurate with estimated fuel consumptions in the stratosphere by the current commercial fleet and an emission index E=0.03 g BCA per kg fuel burnt which was measured in jet exhaust at al titude.Thus, most stratospheric BCA in the northern stratosphere results from aircraft emissions. The background BCA concentration in the southern stratosphere varies between 0 and 0.6 ng cu m averaging 0.1 ng/cu m. This strong meridional gradient implies that stratospheric BCA residence time- is shorter than are mixing times between hemispheres. Projected annual fuel consumption of a future supersonic commercial fleet is 7E13 g. This fleet would increase stratospheric BCA loadings by a factor of 2-3, because almost all fuel would be burnt above the tropopause. An improved EI(BCA) by a factor of ten would result in an increase of stratospheric BCA loadings by approximately 50 %.

  16. Observation of vertical variability of black carbon concentration in lower troposphere on campaigns in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilinski, M. T.; Markowicz, K. M.; Markowicz, J.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents two methods for observation of black carbon (BC) vertical profiles in lower troposphere based on the micro-aethalometer AE-51. In the first method micro-aethalometer was carried by observer along trail on slope of mountain valley. Second method uses unmanned aerial vehicle as a platform for collecting data up to 1500 m above ground. Our study presents vertical profiles collected in and above Subcarphatian Wislok valley. Profiles measured on trial on slopes of Wislok valley, were collected during strong smog conditions during autumn/winter season, when BC concentration reached values above 60 μg/m3. The smog intensive layer is usually close to the surface (up to 100 m) as a results of surface inversion and the mountain breeze circulation, which during the night transports air pollution emitted from houses toward the valley's bottom. Usually the vertical profiles of BC concentration show significant reduction with the altitude, however, some multilayered structures are also observed during night time inversion conditions. It has found that smog condition can develop in clean air mass, and in those cases local pollution has significant impact on the columnar aerosol properties. During such conditions the aerosol optical depth shows diurnal cycle which is rather not observed in the long-term data. UAV flights in the lower troposphere were conducted during two sessions, one with clean polar air masses (BC concentration < 1 μg/m3) and second with moderate aerosol conditions (BC concentration 1-5 μg/m3). Profile of BC concentration shows stratification of absorbing aerosols in a shape of multi-layer structures similarly to the lidar/ceilometer signals.

  17. Modeling Study of the Contribution of Wildfires to Ambient Black Carbon Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S. H.; Gonzalez-Abraham, R.; Lamb, B. K.; Larkin, N. K.; Strand, T.; O'Neill, S.

    2013-12-01

    Wildland fires are a major source of particulate emissions, including black carbon (BC). In combination with other emissions, these BC and particulate emissions can directly lead to air quality degradation, both locally and more regionally. BC and other particulate matter (PM) can also affect climate in various ways, including by scattering and absorbing radiation, modifying cloud formation and properties, and changing snow albedo. BC emissions reduction is a potential strategy for mitigating global warming because it is emitted in large quantities and has a relatively short lifetime in the atmosphere in comparison to long-live greenhouse gases. Due to the highly variable nature of wildland fires, both in terms of fire occurrences on the landscape and the high spatial and temporal variability of fuels, consumption, and emissions, the impact of wildfire emissions varies significantly over the period of the wildfire season as well as inter-annually. In the U.S., while anthropogenic emissions are projected to decrease, as the climate warms wildfire activity is predicted to increase along with the contribution of fire emissions. Thus, a robust analysis of the effects of BC from fire emissions on air quality and climate necessitates a comprehensive, multi-scale study of all fire-related pollutants and other emission sources spanning multiple years of fire data and weather conditions. In this study we apply the WRF-BlueSky-SMOKE-CMAQ regional air-quality modeling system for multi-year (1997-2005) summertime simulations to evaluate the contribution of fire emissions to atmospheric BC and total PM2.5 concentrations. Historical fire records from the Bureau of Land Management are used by the BlueSky framework to calculate fire emissions. Plume rise is calculated by the SMOKE emission processor, taking into account meteorology from the WRF model. These emissions are combined with anthropogenic emissions from the NEI 2002 and biogenic emissions from the MEGAN model. CMAQ is

  18. Black Carbon and Dust in Snow and Ice on Snow Dome, Mt. Olympus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, S.; Delaney, I.; Skiles, M.; Dixon, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Deposition of black carbon (BC) and dust on highly reflective snow and glacier ice causes darkening of the surface, resulting in greater absorption of solar energy, heating of the snow/ice, and accelerated snow and glacier melt. The deposition of BC and dust may be affecting the timing and availability of water resources in the Pacific Northwest where the majority of runoff comes from snow and glacier melt, but minimal related research has taken place in this region. A recent modeling study suggested that BC deposition is causing a decrease in spring snow water equivalent and a shift to earlier peak runoff in the spring in the Western United States. Additionally, limited observations made in the early 1980s in Washington State determined that light absorbing impurities (e.g., BC and dust) were reducing the snow albedo. Since 2009, we have collected snow and ice samples from glaciers and the seasonal snowpack from spatially distributed sites in Washington State to determine impurity content, and to assess how impurity concentrations vary in relation to emission source proximity. Here we present results from the summer 2012 fieldwork on Snow Dome, Mt. Olympus in Washington State. Mt. Olympus is located upwind from major regional sources of BC and dust, but may receive BC from ocean shipping and trans-Pacific transport of BC and dust from large Asian sources. We used a field spectrometer to measure spectral albedo on Snow Dome, and analyzed surface snow samples and shallow ice cores to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of impurity deposition. Total impurity load was determined gravimetrically. Dust concentrations are inferred from ICPMS analyses and BC concentrations are determined using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), with select samples also analyzed for BC using a Sunset EC-OC to facilitate method inter-comparison. We assess the role that absorbing impurities may play in accelerating melt at Snow Dome, and briefly compare our results to

  19. Electrical transport in carbon black-epoxy resin composites at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macutkevic, J.; Kuzhir, P.; Paddubskaya, A.; Maksimenko, S.; Banys, J.; Celzard, A.; Fierro, V.; Bistarelli, S.; Cataldo, A.; Micciulla, F.; Bellucci, S.

    2013-07-01

    Results of broadband electric/dielectric properties of different surface area—carbon black/epoxy resin composites above the percolation threshold are reported in a wide temperature range (25-500 K). At higher temperatures (above 400 K), the electrical conductivity of composites is governed by electrical transport in polymer matrix and current carriers tunneling from carbon black clusters to polymer matrix. The activation energy of such processes decreases when the carrier concentration increases, i.e., with the increase of carbon black concentration. At lower temperatures, the electrical conductivity is governed by electron tunneling and hopping. The electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of composites strongly decrease after annealing composites at high temperatures (500 K); at the same time potential barrier for carriers tunneling strongly increases. All the observed peculiarities can be used for producing effective low-cost materials on the basis of epoxy resin working at different temperatures for electrical applications.

  20. Cross-sectional study of pulmonary function in carbon black workers in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.M.; Diaz, J.F.; Fyfe, I.M.; Ingalls, T.H.

    1988-04-01

    Since a proportion of airborne carbon black particles is of respirable size, the possibility that it may affect pulmonary function was investigated in 913 employees of 6 carbon black producers in the United States. Exposure was estimated by combining the mean total dust exposures of each job category with the length of time workers had spent in each job, giving a measurement expressed in mg/m3.months. Pulmonary function was measured by spirometry. The major variables affecting pulmonary function were age and cigarette smoking. When the effects of age and smoking were controlled in an age-specific, two-way analysis of variance, no consistent effects of total dust exposure were detectable in these workers. This study provided no evidence that exposure to total dust under the conditions pertaining in the contemporary carbon black industry had detrimental effects on the pulmonary function of men employed in the production and handling of this product.

  1. A method for monitoring mass concentration of black carbon particulate matter using photothermal interferometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Baosheng; Wang, Yicheng; Li, Zhengqiang

    2016-03-01

    A method for measurements of mass concentration of black carbon particulate matter (PM) is proposed based on photothermal interferometry (PTI). A folded Jamin photothermal interferometer was used with a laser irradiation of particles deposited on a filter paper. The black carbon PM deposited on the filter paper was regarded as a film while the quartz filter paper was regarded as a substrate to establish a mathematical model for measuring the mass concentration of PM using a photothermal method. The photothermal interferometry system was calibrated and used to measure the atmospheric PM concentration corresponding to different dust-treated filter paper. The measurements were compared to those obtained using β ray method and were found consistent. This method can be particularly relevant to polluted atmospheres where PM is dominated by black carbon. PMID:26527346

  2. Historical Black Carbon Emission of South Asia recorded in the Southeastern Tibetan Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Xu, B.

    2012-12-01

    South Asian black carbon (BC) emission draws much attention in recent years as its accelerated increasing tendency and the important role of BC for human health, climate modification, and glacier retreat. We present the measurements of the elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) covering the time period of 1956-2006 in a high resolution ice core from the southeastern Tibetan Plateau dominated by South Asian emission. The variation tendencies of black soot concentrations are consistent with South Asian emission inventory and fossil fuel consumption. The fossil fuel combustion might be largely responsible for the increasing trend of black soot emission, but biomass-burning share has been increased since the middle of 1990s revealed by the continued decrease of EC/OC ratio.

  3. Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis ofpublished data and implications for climate forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

    2005-07-11

    Measurements of organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC)concentrations over a variety of locations worldwide, have been analyzed to infer the spatial distributions of the ratios of OC to BC. Since these ratios determine the relative amounts of scattering and absorption, they are often used to estimate the radiative forcing due to aerosols. An artifact in the protocol for filter measurements of OC has led to widespread overestimates of the ratio of OC to BC in atmospheric aerosols. We developed a criterion to correct for this artifact and analyze corrected OC to BC ratios. The OC to BC ratios, ranging from 1.3to 2.4, appear relatively constant and are generally unaffected by seasonality, sources or technology changes, at the locations considered here. The ratios compare well with emission inventories over Europe and China but are a factor of two lower in other regions. The reduced estimate for OC/BC in aerosols strengthens the argument that reduction of soot emissions maybe a useful approach to slow global warming.

  4. IMPORTANCE OF BLACK CARBON IN DISTRIBUTION AND BIOACCUMULATION MODELS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The roles and relative importance of nonpyrogenic organic carbon (NPOC) and black carbon (BC) as binding phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed by their ability to estimate pore water concentrations and biological uptake in various marine sediments. Sedim...

  5. Q-switched Tm3+-doped fiber laser with a micro-fiber based black phosphorus saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yazhou; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Lian; Lu, Rongguo; Hu, Yunxiao; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    We report a passively Q-switched Tm3+-doped fiber laser using a black phosphorus deposited micro-fiber (BPDMF) as a saturable absorption (SA) device for the first time. The BPDMF prepared by depositing black phosphorus (BP) on the micro-fiber waist with heat convention effect and optical tweezer effect has a measured modulation depth of 40.2% and a nonsaturable loss of 55.9%. By employing this device in an all-fiber ring cavity, a stable Q-switched pulse train at 1948 nm was achieved with a repetition rate from 12.5 to 28.1 kHz and a pulse width from 15.1 to 5.6 μs, respectively.

  6. Estimation of black carbon content for biomass burning aerosols from multi-channel Raman lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Marmureanu, Luminita; Nicolae, Doina

    2015-04-01

    Biomass burning due to natural processes (forest fires) or anthropical activities (agriculture, thermal power stations, domestic heating) is an important source of aerosols with a high content of carbon components (black carbon and organic carbon). Multi-channel Raman lidars provide information on the spectral dependence of the backscatter and extinction coefficients, embedding information on the black carbon content. Aerosols with a high content of black carbon have large extinction coefficients and small backscatter coefficients (strong absorption), while aerosols with high content of organic carbon have large backscatter coefficients (weak absorption). This paper presents a method based on radiative calculations to estimate the black carbon content of biomass burning aerosols from 3b+2a+1d lidar signals. Data is collected at Magurele, Romania, at the cross-road of air masses coming from Ukraine, Russia and Greece, where burning events are frequent during both cold and hot seasons. Aerosols are transported in the free troposphere, generally in the 2-4 km altitude range, and reaches the lidar location after 2-3 days. Optical data are collected between 2011-2012 by a multi-channel Raman lidar and follows the quality assurance program of EARLINET. Radiative calculations are made with libRadTran, an open source radiative model developed by ESA. Validation of the retrievals is made by comparison to a co-located C-ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, biomass burning, radiative model, black carbon Acknowledgment: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project no. 39/2012 - SIAFIM, and by Romanian Partnerships in priority areas PNII implemented with MEN-UEFISCDI support, project no. 309/2014 - MOBBE

  7. Commuter exposure to black carbon, carbon monoxide, and noise in the mass transport khlong boats of Bangkok, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A. D.; Velasco, E.; Ho, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Khlong (canal) boats are a unique mass transport alternative in the congested city of Bangkok. Canals and rivers provide exclusive transit-ways for reducing the commuting time of thousands of city residents daily. However, as a consequence of the service characteristics and boats design and state of repair, they can represent a potential public health risk and an important source of black carbon and greenhouse gases. This work quantifies commuter exposure to black carbon, CO and noise when waiting for and travelling in these diesel fueled boats. Exposure to toxic pollutants and acute noise is similar or worse than for other transportation modes. Mean black carbon concentrations observed at one busy pier and along the main canal were much higher than ambient concentrations at sites impacted by vehicular traffic. Concentrations of CO were similar to those reported for roadside areas of Bangkok. The equivalent continuous sound levels registered at the landing pier were similar to those reported for roadsides, but values recorded inside the boats were significantly higher. We believe that the boat service is a viable alternative mode of mass transport, but public safety could be improved to provide a high quality service, comparable to modern rail systems or emerging bus rapid transit systems. These investments would also contribute to reduce the emission of black carbon and other greenhouse and toxic pollutants.

  8. Method 415.3, Rev. 1.2: Determination of Total Organic Carbon and Specific UV Absorbance at 254 nm in Source Water and Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV absorption at 254 nm (UVA) in source waters and drinking waters. The DOC and UVA determinations are used in the calculation of the Specific UV Absorbance (S...

  9. Bio-lnspired dielectric elastomer actuator with AgNWs coated on carbon black electrode.

    PubMed

    Jun, K W; Lee, J M; Lee, J Y; Ohl, I K

    2014-10-01

    Bio-inspired dielectric elastomer actuators with AgNW-coated carbon black electrodes were developed in this study. The novel elastomer actuators show large in-plane deformations by electrical stimulation through the both electrodes. When a certain input voltage is applied to the elastomer electrode, the electrostatic force between cathode and anode electrodes compress the dielectric elastomer film, resulting large in in-plane direction deformation. The expanded area of the circular actuation device under 70 mV/m electric field was measured up to 50% due to a synergistic effect of highly conductive AgNW network and ultrahigh capacitance of carbon black electrodes. PMID:25942813

  10. Polymer-carbon black composite sensors in an electronic nose for air-quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Homer, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    An electronic nose that uses an array of 32 polymer-carbon black composite sensors has been developed, trained, and tested. By selecting a variety of chemical functionalities in the polymers used to make sensors, it is possible to construct an array capable of identifying and quantifying a broad range of target compounds, such as alcohols and aromatics, and distinguishing isomers and enantiomers (mirror-image isomers). A model of the interaction between target molecules and the polymer-carbon black composite sensors is under development to aid in selecting the array members and to enable identification of compounds with responses not stored in the analysis library.

  11. Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: a Scientific Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, P. M.; Bernsten, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, S.; Karcher, B.; Koch, D.; Kinne, S.; Kondo, Y.; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, M. C.; Schultz, M. G.; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, J. P.; Shindell, D.; Storelvmo, T.; Warren, S. G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth's climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption; influence on liquid, mixed phase, and ice clouds; and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with climate models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Predominant sources are combustion related, namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg/yr in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. However, global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models and should be increased by a factor of almost 3. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of atmospheric black carbon is +0.71 W/sq m with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.08, +1.27)W/sq m. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources, without subtracting the preindustrial background, is estimated as +0.88 (+0.17, +1.48) W/sq m. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings, including rapid adjustments. The best estimate of industrial-era climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms, including clouds and cryosphere forcing, is +1.1 W/sq m with 90% uncertainty bounds of +0.17 to +2.1 W/sq m. Thus, there is a very high probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing

  12. Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: A Scientific Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tami C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, Piers; Berntsen, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Karcher, B.; Koch, Dorothy; Kinne, Stefan; Kondo, Yutaka; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, Marcus; Schultz, Martin; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Shiqiu; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Shindell, Drew; Storelvmo, Trude; Warren, Stephen G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-06-06

    Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth’s climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. Predominant sources are combustion related; namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption, influence on liquid, mixed-phase, and ice clouds, and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models, and should be increased by about about 60%. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of black carbon is +0.43 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.17, +0.68) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources in the present day is estimated as +0.49 (+0.20, +0.76) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings and their rapid responses and feedbacks. The best estimate of industrial-era (1750 to 2005) climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms is +0.77 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +-0.06 to +1.53 W m-2. Thus, there is a 96% probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm the climate. With a value of +0.77 W m-2, black carbon is likely the second

  13. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Crespo, M.; Baselga, J.; Pozuelo, J.

    2016-05-01

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials.Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Scheme of hydrogenated derivative of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (HDGEBA) and m-xylylenediamine; X-ray diffractograms of pristine CNT

  14. An index-based approach to assessing recalcitrance and soil carbon sequestration potential of engineered black carbons (biochars).

    PubMed

    Harvey, Omar R; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E; Herbert, Bruce E

    2012-02-01

    The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R(50), for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R(50) is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R(50), with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R(50) and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R(50) is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R(50) ≥ 0.70), Class B (0.50 ≤ R(50) < 0.70) or Class C (R(50) < 0.50) recalcitrance/carbon sequestration classes. Class A and Class C biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, whereas Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R(50), to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars. PMID:22242866

  15. An Index-Based Approach to Assessing Recalcitrance and Soil Carbon Sequestration Potential of Engineered Black Carbons (Biochars)

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Omar R.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E.; Herbert, Bruce

    2012-01-10

    The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R{sub 50}, for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R{sub 50} is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R{sub 50}, with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R{sub 50} and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R{sub 50} is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R{sub 50} {>=} 0.70), Class B (0.50 {<=} R{sub 50} < 0.70) or Class C (R{sub 50} < 0.50) recalcitrance/carbon sequestration classes. Class A and Class C biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, while Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R{sub 50}, to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

  16. Eight combinatorial stacks of three layers of carbon black/PVA-carbon black/EVA composite as a vapor detector array.

    PubMed

    Setasuwon, Paisan; Menbangpung, Laongdao; Sahasithiwat, Somboon

    2008-01-01

    Eight specimens of combinatorial stacking of 3 layers of carbon black/PVA-carbon black/EVA composite were prepared on substrate with interdigitated electrode. They were subjected to 15 solvent vapors with dielectric constants from 2-80,and their responses were processed for calculation of resolution factor (RF). If the detector responses are assumed to have a normal distribution, RF values of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 indicate the 76, 92, and 98% confidence, respectively, of correctly identifying one analyte from the other of a specific pair. Of the possible 105 pairs, 99 pairs have RF values of more than 3, 5 pairs have RF values of more than 1, and only one pair has an RF value of less than 1. The resolution factor was affected by both the dielectric constant and boiling point of tested solvents. Employing Fisher linear discrimination improves all RF values greater than 3, making confidence in resolving the pair reach almost 100%. Contributions from each combination were studied, and it was shown that diversity by combinatorial stacking is essential to the improvement of RF value. All of these capabilities are derived from combinatorial stacking of 3 layers of just two simple carbon black/polymer composites. PMID:18855459

  17. Low-Wind and Other Microclimatic Factors in Near-road Black Carbon Variability: A Case Study and Assessment Implications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne black carbon from urban traffic is a climate forcing agent and has been associated with health risk to near-road populations. In this paper, we describe a case study of black carbon concentration and compositional variability at and near a traffic-laden multi-lane highw...

  18. Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S E

    2012-05-30

    Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

  19. Laboratory differential simulation design method of pressure absorbers for carbonization of phenolate solution by carbon dioxide in coal-tar processing

    SciTech Connect

    Linek, V.; Sinkule, J.; Moucha, T.; Rejl, J.F.

    2009-01-15

    A laboratory differential simulation method is used for the design of carbonization columns at coal-tar processing in which phenols are regenerated from phenolate solution by carbon dioxide absorption. The design method is based on integration of local absorption rates of carbon dioxide along the column. The local absorption rates into industrial phenolate mixture are measured in a laboratory model contactor for various compositions of the gas and liquid phases under the conditions that ensure the absorption rates in the laboratory absorber simulate the local rates in the industrial column. On the bases of the calculations, two-step carbonization columns were designed for 30000 t/year of the phenolate solution treatment by carbon dioxide. The absorption proceeds at higher pressure of 500 kPa and temperatures from 50 to 65 C, pure carbon dioxide is used and toluene is added. These conditions have the following favourable effects: (I) significant size reduction of the columns, (ii) it is possible to process more concentrated solutions without danger of silting the columns by crystallization of NaHCO{sub 3} on the packing. (iii) small amount of inert gas is released, (iv) lower alkalinity and better separability of the organic phase (phenols with toluene) from water phase (soda or bicarbonate solution) in separators.

  20. Multi-layered black phosphorus as saturable absorber for pulsed Cr:ZnSe laser at 2.4 μm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaowei; Zhao, Ruwei; He, Jingliang; Zhang, Baitao; Ning, Jian; Wang, Yiran; Su, Xiancui; Hou, Jia; Lou, Fei; Yang, Kejian; Fan, Yisong; Bian, Jintian; Nie, Jinsong

    2016-01-25

    A high-quality black phosphorus (BP) saturable-absorber mirror (SAM) was successfully fabricated with the multi-layered BP, prepared by liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) method. The modulation depth and saturation power intensity of BP absorber were measured to be 10.7% and 0.96 MW/cm2, respectively. Using the BP-SAM, we experimentally demonstrated the mid-infrared (mid-IR) pulse generation from a BP Q-switched Cr:ZnSe laser for the first time to our best knowledge. Stable Q-switched pulse as short as 189 ns with an average output power of 36 mW was realized at 2.4 μm, corresponding to a repetition rate of 176 kHz and a single pulse energy of 205 nJ. Our work sufficiently validated that multi-layer BP could be used as an optical modulator for mid-IR pulse laser sources. PMID:26832537

  1. Black Ink of Activated Carbon Derived From Palm Kernel Cake (PKC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamat, M. H.; Ahmad, A. H.

    2009-06-01

    Recycling the waste from natural plant to produce useful end products will benefit many industries and help preserve the environment. The research reported in this paper is an investigation on the use of the natural waste of palm kernel cake (PKC) to produce carbon residue as a black carbon for pigment source by using pyrolysis process. The activated carbons (AC) is produced in powder form using ball milling process. Rheological spectra in ink is one of quality control process in determining its performance properties. Findings from this study will help expand the scientific knowledge-base for black ink production and formulation base on PKC. Various inks with different weight percentage compositions of AC will be made and tested against its respective rheological properties in order to determine ideal ink printing system. The items in the formulation used comprised of organic and bio-waste materials with added additive to improve the quality of the black ink. Modified Polyurethane was used as binder. The binder's properties highlighted an ideal vehicle to be applied for good black ink opacity performance. The rheological behaviour is a general foundation for ink characterization where the wt% of AC-PKC resulted in different pseudoplastic behaviors, including the Newtonian behavior. The result found that Newtonian field was located in between 2 wt% and 10 wt% of AC-PKC composition with binder. Mass spectroscopy results shown that the carbon content in PKC is high and very suitable for black performance. In the ageing test, the pigment of PKC perform fairly according to the standard pigment of Black carbon (CB) of ferum oxide pigment. The contact angle for substrate's wettability of the ink system shown a good angle proven to be a water resistive coating on paper subtrates; an advantage of the PKC ink pigment performance.

  2. Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, P. M.; Berntsen, T.; Deangelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, S.; KäRcher, B.; Koch, D.; Kinne, S.; Kondo, Y.; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, M. C.; Schultz, M. G.; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, J. P.; Shindell, D.; Storelvmo, T.; Warren, S. G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-06-01

    carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth's climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption; influence on liquid, mixed phase, and ice clouds; and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with climate models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Predominant sources are combustion related, namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. However, global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models and should be increased by a factor of almost 3. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of atmospheric black carbon is +0.71 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.08, +1.27) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources, without subtracting the preindustrial background, is estimated as +0.88 (+0.17, +1.48) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings, including rapid adjustments. The best estimate of industrial-era climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms, including clouds and cryosphere forcing, is +1.1 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +0.17 to +2.1 W m-2. Thus, there is a very high probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm

  3. Contribution of Black Carbon, Brown Carbon and Lensing Effect to Total Aerosol Absorption in Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamjad, Pm; Tripathi, Sachchida; Bergin, Mike; Vreeland, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    This study reports the optical and physical properties of atmospheric and denuded (heated at 300°C) aerosols from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) during 20 December 2014 to 28 February 2015. A Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) and High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) were used to measure black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) in real time respectively. During experiments large scale carbonaceous aerosol loading is observed in IGP. Multiple biomass burning events are observed with varying intensity and duration. Refractive index of brown carbon (BrC) is derived from filter extracts using Liquid Core Wave Capillary Cell (LWCC). Refractive index of BrC at 405 is 4 times higher in IGP when compared to studies conducted in USA. Through Mie modelling we identified the percentage contribution of black carbon, BrC and lensing effect to total aerosol absorption. On average 75% of absorption is from black carbon alone, while rest is contributed from volatile components. Within the volatile component contribution, at 405 nm BrC contributes around 20% and rest from lensing effect. But at 781 nm lensing contributed more than BrC. Overall results indicate the special characteristics on BrC aerosols in IGP and the importance of considering spectral absorption in global aerosol modelling studies.

  4. Comparative inhalation toxicity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low surface carbon black

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and carbon black are seemingly chemically identical carbon-based nano-materials with broad technological applications. Carbon nanotubes and carbon black possess different inhalation toxicities, whereas little is known about graphene and graphite nanoplatelets. Methods In order to compare the inhalation toxicity of the mentioned carbon-based nanomaterials, male Wistar rats were exposed head-nose to atmospheres of the respective materials for 6 hours per day on 5 consecutive days. Target concentrations were 0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 0.5, 2.5, or 10 mg/m3 for graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low-surface carbon black. Toxicity was determined after end of exposure and after three-week recovery using broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and microscopic examinations of the entire respiratory tract. Results No adverse effects were observed after inhalation exposure to 10 mg/m3 graphite nanoplatelets or relatively low specific surface area carbon black. Increases of lavage markers indicative for inflammatory processes started at exposure concentration of 0.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 for graphene. Consistent with the changes in lavage fluid, microgranulomas were observed at 2.5 mg/m3 multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 graphene. In order to evaluate volumetric loading of the lung as the key parameter driving the toxicity, deposited particle volume was calculated, taking into account different methods to determine the agglomerate density. However, the calculated volumetric load did not correlate to the toxicity, nor did the particle surface burden of the lung. Conclusions The inhalation toxicity of the investigated carbon-based materials is likely to be a complex interaction of several parameters. Until the properties which govern the toxicity are identified, testing by short-term inhalation is the best option to identify hazardous properties in

  5. Sectorial and geographical contributions to summertime black carbon spatial distributions over the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, G. R.; Huang, M.; Kulkarni, S.; Streets, D. G.; Zhang, Q.

    2011-12-01

    Primary and secondary aerosols from local and distant sources in various emission sectors cause both direct and indirect effects on the climate system, and adversely affect human health and public welfare. Black carbon (BC), mainly generated from fossil-fuel combustion and biomass burning, absorbs light and warms the atmosphere. Its short lifetime and geographical/temporal variability indicate that the climate benefits of reduction in its emissions will be much faster than those reductions in carbon dioxide. In this study, we evaluate the ARCTAS global BC sector emission inventories using a regional chemical transport modeling system STEM and quantify sector (biomass burning, shipping, industrial, power, transportation and residential) contributions from local and distant sources to the BC spatial distributions (surface and vertical distributions, and total column amounts) over the continental US in summer 2008. The sector contributions are further summarized for ten EPA regions for comparison and contrast. Due to the increasing trend of BC emissions from outside of the North America in the past decade, we focus on western US regions that are sensitive to extra-regional pollutions. The estimated amount of transported BC is compared with previous studies and correlated with the tracer CO calculations to help study uncertainties. The increasing BC trend during 1990-2004 summer over the mountain regions was observed, opposite to the trend over the Pacific regions [Murphy et al., 2011]. To better understand these trends, statistical analysis is used to contrast the role of transported BC on these regions. Furthermore, the seasonal variations of the impacts of transported BC over the US are discussed regarding the transported amounts and pathways. Mitigation policies are suggested to consider the absolute concentrations for BC as well as its relative relationship with cooling aerosols (such as sulfate (SO4), nitrate (NO3), and organics), with special focus on

  6. Continuous measurement of carbon black in a densely populated area of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Oscar; Ortinez, Abraham; Castro, Telma; Espinosa, Maria; Saavedra, Isabel; Alvarez, Harry; Basaldud, Roberto; Paramo, Víctor; Martínez, Amparo

    2015-04-01

    The black carbon (BC) is a byproduct of burning fossil fuels and is an important short-lived climate forcer because it absorbs solar radiation altering the Earth's radiative budget and climate. It is also an atmospheric pollutant that promotes reactions of other compounds in the atmosphere. Despite its importance for health and climate, in Mexico there are very few studies on ambient concentrations of BC in urban areas and virtually no information of continuous measurements over long periods (more than a month of measurements). So, in order to develop more efficient local and regional mitigation strategies and policies that allow reducing ambient concentrations of BC, it is necessary to know BC seasonal evolution, contribution to radiative budget and impacts on health. This study shows continuous measurements (from July 2013 to July 2014) of BC to perform an analysis of seasonal variations. The selected monitoring site is located at Iztapalapa, a densely populated area with high traffic on the southeastern part of Mexico City. BC concentrations were obtained by two aethalometers (Magee Scientific Company, models AET31 and AET42) placed 15 meters above the ground. The aethalometers operate in the wavelength range of 370-950 nm and use a standard value of mass absorption coefficient MAC = 10.8 m2/g to calculate BC environmental concentration. To correct the aethalometers readings to the conditions of Mexico City, it was employed MAC = to 6.7 m2/g, which was determined for PM2.5 with a carbon analyzer (UIC, Inc.) and represents the mass absorption coefficient of soot emitted in Mexico City. The average value of the corrected concentration of BC in Mexico City during the period from July 2013 to July 2014 was 5.39 ± 1.89 μg/m3 (1.6 higher than readings recorded by aethalometers), which is greater than that measured in Shanghai in 2014 (annual average 2.33 μg/m3) and those reported for some U.S. cities; the value implies a potential danger to the health of

  7. Continuous measurement of carbon black in a densely populated area of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, O.; Ortinez, A.; Castro, T.; Espinoza, M. D. L. L.; Saavedra, I.; Carabali-Sandoval, G. A., Sr.; Páramo, V. H.; Gavilán, A.; Martínez-Arroyo, A.

    2014-12-01

    The black carbon (BC) is a byproduct of burning fossil fuels and is an important short-lived climate forcer because it absorbs solar radiation altering the Earth's radiative budget and climate. It is also an atmospheric pollutant that promotes reactions of other compounds in the atmosphere. Despite its importance for health and climate, in Mexico there are very few studies on ambient concentrations of BC in urban areas and virtually no information of continuous measurements over long periods (more than a month of measurements). So, in order to develop more efficient local and regional mitigation strategies and policies that allow reducing ambient concentrations of BC, it is necessary to know BC seasonal evolution, contribution to radiative budget and impacts on health. This study shows continuous measurements (from July 2013 to July 2014) of BC to perform an analysis of seasonal variations. The selected monitoring site is located at Iztapalapa, a densely populated area with high traffic on the southeastern part of Mexico City. BC concentrations were obtained by two aethalometers (Magee Scientific Company, models AET31 and AET42) placed 15 meters above the ground. The aethalometers operate in the wavelength range of 370-950 nm and use a standard value of mass absorption coefficient MAC = 10.8 m2/g to calculate BC environmental concentration. To correct the aethalometers readings to the conditions of Mexico City, it was employed MAC = to 6.7 m2/g, which was determined for PM2.5 with a carbon analyzer (UIC, Inc.) and represents the mass absorption coefficient of soot emitted in Mexico City. The average value of the corrected concentration of BC in Mexico City during the period from July 2013 to July 2014 was 5.39 ± 1.89 μg/m3 (1.6 higher than readings recorded by aethalometers), which is greater than that measured in Shanghai in 2014 (annual average 2.33 μg/m3) and those reported for some U.S. cities; the value implies a potential danger to the health of

  8. Black Carbon Flux Across the Himalaya through the Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Mahata, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Significant increases in black carbon concentration have been observed in the recent years over the Indo-Gangetic plain, the foothills of the Himalaya, as well as the high Himalaya and the Tibetan Plateau. The concentration of increased black carbon can be significantly correlated to the albedo effect and the warming of atmosphere at high altitudes due to the deposition of black carbon in the snow clad mountains. It is hypothesized that this deposition contributes to increased melting of Himalayan glaciers and snowfields. Satellite images show increasing amounts of aerosol haze over the Indo-Gangetic plains which penetrate into the Himalayan valleys. But how does it reach the high altitude of the Himalayan cryosphere? To date, mechanisms of transport upwind of the valley from the Indo-Gangetic plains up to the Himalaya have not been thoroughly investigated. We hypothesize that wind systems in the deep river valleys that cut across the Himalaya, such as the Arun valley and Kali Gandaki valley, serve as important pathways for pollutant transport. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.). The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Here we use our observations in Jomsom to present an estimate of the annual flux of black carbon from the Indo-Gangetic plains to the Tibetan Plateau through the Kali Gandaki valley. In this way, we gain insight into the significance of deep valleys and their role as pathways for pollutant transport.

  9. Remote sensing of soot carbon - Part 1: Distinguishing different absorbing aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a method of using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) size distributions and complex refractive indices to retrieve the relative proportion of carbonaceous aerosols and free iron minerals (hematite and goethite). We assume that soot carbon has a spectrally flat refractive index and enhanced imaginary indices at the 440 nm wavelength are caused by brown carbon or hematite. Carbonaceous aerosols can be separated from dust in imaginary refractive index space because 95 % of biomass burning aerosols have imaginary indices greater than 0.0042 at the 675-1020 nm wavelengths, and 95 % of dust has imaginary refractive indices of less than 0.0042 at those wavelengths. However, mixtures of these two types of particles can not be unambiguously partitioned on the basis of optical properties alone, so we also separate these particles by size. Regional and seasonal results are consistent with expectations. Monthly climatologies of fine mode soot carbon are less than 1.0 % by volume for West Africa and the Middle East, but the southern African and South American biomass burning sites have peak values of 3.0 and 1.7 %. Monthly averaged fine mode brown carbon volume fractions have a peak value of 5.8 % for West Africa, 2.1 % for the Middle East, 3.7 % for southern Africa, and 5.7 % for South America. Monthly climatologies of free iron volume fractions show little seasonal variability, and range from about 1.1 to 1.7 % for coarse mode aerosols in all four study regions. Finally, our sensitivity study indicates that the soot carbon retrieval is not sensitive to the component refractive indices or densities assumed for carbonaceous and free iron aerosols, and the retrieval differs by only 15.4 % when these parameters are altered from our chosen baseline values. The total uncertainty of retrieving soot carbon mass is ˜ 50 % (when uncertainty in the AERONET product and mixing state is included in the analysis).

  10. Black carbon and carbon monoxide over Bay of Bengal during W_ICARB: Source characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girach, I. A.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Babu, S. Suresh; Nair, Prabha R.

    2014-09-01

    The ship borne measurements of near-surface black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO) were carried out over Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the winter period of 2009 under W_ICARB, the second phase of ‘Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)'. The CO mixing ratio and BC mass concentration varied in the ranges of 80-480 ppbv and 75-10,000 ng m-3, respectively over this marine region. The BC and CO showed similar variations over northern BoB where airmass from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) region prevailed during the observations period leading to a very strong positive correlation. The association of BC and CO was poor over the eastern and southern part of BoB could be due to the removal of BC aerosols by rain and/or processes of dilution and mixing while transported over to BoB. The highest value of CO observed over eastern BoB was partially due to biomass burning over East Asia. The BC/CO ratio for IGP airmass found to be 20.3 ng m-3 ppb-1 and ∼16 ng m-3 ppb-1 during winter and pre-monsoon, respectively which indicate the role of biomass burning as the source of BC over the region. Based on the emission flux of CO from various inventories and observed BC/CO ratios during pre-monsoon and winter, the BC emission for India is estimated to be in the range of 0.78-1.23 Tg year-1. The analysis of scavenging of BC revealed the loss rate of BC due to relative humidity 0.39 ± 0.08 ng m-3 ppb-1 RH (%)-1 over northern BoB and 0.53 ± 0.04 ng m-3 ppb-1 RH (%)-1 over the southern-BoB during winter.

  11. Fingerprinting Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) Sources with Specific UV Absorbance (SUVA) and Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Verseveld, W. J.; Lajtha, K.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    DOC is an important water quality constituent because it is an important food source for stream biota, it plays a significant role in metal toxicity and transport, and protects aquatic organisms by absorbing visible and UV light. However, sources of stream DOC and changes in DOC quality at storm and seasonal scales remain poorly understood. We characterized DOC concentrations and SUVA (as an indicator of aromaticity) at the plot, hillslope and catchment scale during and between five storm events over the period Fall 2004 until Spring 2005, in WS10, H.J. Andrews, Oregon, USA. This study site has hillslopes that issue directly into the stream. This enabled us to compare a trenched hillslope response to the stream response without the influence of a riparian zone. The main result of this study was that SUVA in addition to DOC was needed to fingerprint sources of DOC. Stream water and lateral subsurface flow showed a clockwise DOC and SUVA hysteresis pattern. Both organic horizon water and transient groundwater were characterized by high DOC concentrations and SUVA values, while DOC concentrations and SUVA values in soil water decreased with depth in the soil profile. This indicates transient groundwater was an important contributor to high DOC concentrations and SUVA values during storm events. During the falling limb of the hydrograph deep soil water and seepage groundwater based on SUVA values contributed significantly to lateral subsurface flow and stream water. Preliminary results showed that fluorescence of stream water and lateral subsurface flow continuously measured with a fluorometer was significantly related to UV-absorbance during a December storm event. Finally, SUVA of lateral subsurface flow was lower than SUVA of stream water at the seasonal scale, indicating a difference in mixing of water sources at the hillslope and catchment scale. Overall, our results show that SUVA and fluorescence are useful tracers for fingerprinting DOC sources.

  12. Nanoscale Interactions between Engineered Nanomaterials and Black Carbon (Biochar) in Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the interactions between engineered nanomaterials (NMs) and soil constituents, and a comprehension of how these interactions may affect biological uptake and toxicity are currently lacking. Charcoal black carbon is a normal constituent of soils due to fire history, and can be pre...

  13. On-road black carbon instrument intercomparison and aerosol characteristics by driving environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large spatial variations of black carbon (BC) concentrations in the on-road and near-road environments necessitate measurements with high spatial resolution to assess exposure accurately. A series of measurements was made comparing the performance of several different BC instrume...

  14. MEASUREMENTS OF BLACK CARBON IN CHICAGO: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTROLS ON DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Black carbon measurements were made in Chicago from the roof of the Hinds Laboratory at the University of Chicago, in the southern part of the city. The BC content of fine aerosols was measured by using a seven-channel aethalometer with a sample inlet designed to admit aerosol...

  15. CARBON BLACK DISPERSION PRE-PLATING TECHNOLOGY FOR PRINTED WIRE BOARD MANUFACTURING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in replacing electroless copper with a carbon black dispersion technology. McCurdy Circuits of Orange County, California, currently has both processes in operation. McCurdy has found that...

  16. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY OF SYNTHETIC AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES CONTAINING METAL SULFATES COMPARED TO CARBON BLACK AND DIESEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY TOXICITY OF SYNTHETIC AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES CONTAINING METAL SULFATES COMPARED TO CARBON BLACK AND DIESEL.

    M Daniels, A Ranade* & MJ Selgrade & MI Gilmour.
    Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. * Particle Technology, College Par...

  17. MULTIYEAR REAL-TIME MONITORING OF PARTICLES, PAH, AND BLACK CARBON IN AN OCCUPIED HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of ultrafine, fine, and coarse particles, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and black carbon have been measured continuously (every 1 to 5 minutes) in an occupied townhouse for 2-3 years. Also, since the summer of 1999, temperature (outdoors...

  18. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 4. CARBON BLACK INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The carbon black ...

  19. Domestic airborne black carbon and exhaled nitric oxide in children in NYC

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Alexandra G.; Chillrud, Steven N.; Mellins, Robert B.; Acosta, Luis M.; Miller, Rachel L.; Quinn, James W.; Yan, Beizhan; Divjan, Adnan; Olmedo, Omar E.; Lopez-Pintado, Sara; Kinney, Patrick L.; Perera, Frederica P.; Jacobson, Judith S.; Goldstein, Inge F.; Rundle, Andrew G.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    Differential exposure to combustion by-products and allergens may partially explain the marked disparity in asthma prevalence (3%–18%) among New York City neighborhoods. Subclinical changes in airway inflammation can be measured by fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). FeNO could be used to test independent effects of these environmental exposures on airway inflammation. Seven and eight year-old children from neighborhoods with lower (range 3–9%, n=119) and higher (range 11–18%, n=121) asthma prevalence participated in an asthma case-control study. During home visits, FeNO was measured, and samples of bed dust (allergens) and air (black carbon) were collected. Neighborhood built-environment characteristics were assessed for the 500m surrounding participants’ homes. Airborne black carbon concentrations in homes correlated with neighborhood asthma prevalence (P<0.001) and neighborhood densities of truck routes (P<0.001) and buildings burning residual oil (P<0.001). FeNO concentrations were higher among asthmatics with compared to asthmatics without frequent wheeze (≥4 times/year) (P=0.002). FeNO concentrations correlated with domestic black carbon among children without seroatopy (P=0.012) and with dust mite allergen among children with seroatopy (P=0.020). The association between airborne black carbon in homes and both neighborhood asthma prevalence and FeNO suggest that further public health interventions on truck emissions standards and residual oil use are warranted. PMID:22377682

  20. Evaluating Renewable Cornstarch/biochar Fillers as Potential Substitutes for Carbon Black in SBR Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continually growing demand for fossil fuels coupled with the potential risk of relying on foreign sources for these fuels strengthens the need to find renewable substitutes for petroleum products. Carbon black is a petroleum product that dominates the rubber composite filler market. Agricultur...

  1. Integrated chemiresistor and work function microsensor array with carbon black/polymer composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Domansky, K.; Zapf, V.S.; Grate, J.W.; Ricco, A.J.; Yelton, W.G.; Janata, J.

    1998-05-01

    An array of chemically-sensitive field-effect transistors (CHEMFETs) that measure both work function and bulk resistance changes in thin films was used to detect volatile organic compounds. Carbon black/organic polymer composite films were deposited onto the CHEMFETs using an automated microdispensing method.

  2. Utilization of low-ash biochar to partially replace carbon black in SBR composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A biochar made from woody waste feedstock with low ash content was blended with carbon black as filler for styrene-butadiene rubber. At 10% total filler concentration (w/w), composites made from 25 or 50% biochar showed improved tensile strength, elongation, and toughness compared to similar composi...

  3. Surface-oxidized carbon black as a catalyst for the water oxidation and alcohol oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Suryanto, Bryan H R; Zhao, Chuan

    2016-05-11

    Carbon black (CB) is popularly used as a catalyst support for metal/metal oxide nanoparticles due to its large surface area, excellent conductivity and stability. Herein, we show that surface oxidized CB itself, after acidic treatment and electrochemical oxidation, exhibits significant catalytic activity for the electrochemical oxidation of water and alcohols. PMID:27097802

  4. Evaluation of Methods for the Determination of Black Carbon Emissions from an Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines consist of nanometer size black carbon (BC) particles plus gas-phase sulfur and organic compounds which undergo gas-to-particle conversion downstream of the engine as the plume cools and dilutes. In this study, four BC measurement ...

  5. Chemical characteristics and light-absorbing property of water-soluble organic carbon in Beijing: Biomass burning contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Caiqing; Zheng, Mei; Sullivan, Amy P.; Bosch, Carme; Desyaterik, Yury; Andersson, August; Li, Xiaoying; Guo, Xiaoshuang; Zhou, Tian; Gustafsson, Örjan; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-11-01

    Emissions from biomass burning contribute significantly to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon). Ambient atmospheric samples were collected at an urban site in Beijing during winter and summer, along with source samples from residential crop straw burning. Carbonaceous aerosol species, including organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), WSOC and multiple saccharides as well as water-soluble potassium (K+) in PM2.5 (fine particulate matter with size less than 2.5 μm) were measured. Chemical signatures of atmospheric aerosols in Beijing during winter and summer days with significant biomass burning influence were identified. Meanwhile, light absorption by WSOC was measured and quantitatively compared to EC at ground level. The results from this study indicated that levoglucosan exhibited consistently high concentrations (209 ± 145 ng m-3) in winter. Ratios of levoglucosan/mannosan (L/M) and levoglucosan/galacosan (L/G) indicated that residential biofuel use is an important source of biomass burning aerosol in winter in Beijing. Light absorption coefficient per unit ambient WSOC mass calculated at 365 nm is approximately 1.54 ± 0.16 m2 g-1 in winter and 0.73 ± 0.15 m2 g-1 in summer. Biomass burning derived WSOC accounted for 23 ± 7% and 16 ± 7% of total WSOC mass, and contributed to 17 ± 4% and 19 ± 5% of total WSOC light absorption in winter and summer, respectively. It is noteworthy that, up to 30% of total WSOC light absorption was attributed to biomass burning in significant biomass-burning-impacted summer day. Near-surface light absorption (over the range 300-400 nm) by WSOC was about ∼40% of that by EC in winter and ∼25% in summer.

  6. Impact of Radiative Absorption by Black Carbon on Meteorology over the Eastern United States in July 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S. H.; McKeen, S. A.; Fast, J. D.; Zaveri, R. A.; Barnard, J. C.; Grell, G. A.; Peckham, S. E.

    2006-12-01

    The increase in atmospheric abundance of aerosols since the preindustrial period has perturbed the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system and may be contributing significantly to anthropogenic climate change. The radiative energy perturbation referred to as direct radiative forcing is due to aerosols' ability to scatter and absorb radiation. Global climate studies indicate that light-absorbing aerosol such as soot, often called black carbon (BC), exerts a warming influence that may be second only to that of carbon dioxide and may cause even larger perturbations on a regional scale. Atmospheric heating due to the absorption of solar radiation by BC is coincident with a reduction of solar radiation reaching the surface. This vertical redistribution of radiation directly affects static stability, boundary layer dynamics, and cloud evaporation. Each of these is an important factor in the transport and atmospheric distribution of aerosols and other chemical species, potentially resulting in complex feedbacks that occur at spatial scales smaller than typical resolutions of global climate models. This study examines the impact on meteorology of radiative absorption by BC. The mesoscale Weather Research and Forecast/Chemistry model (WRF/Chem) is used to simulate meteorology and air quality in the eastern United States for July 14-30, 2004. The Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) is coupled to WRF/Chem so that all aerosol processes and radiative calculations are simulated online with meteorological calculations. Simulation results show that a reduction of solar radiation due to scattering of aerosols has relatively small impact on surface temperature, whereas absorption of solar radiation by BC can cancel the cooling effect of scattering aerosols and induce a surface warming that is often correlated with reduction in low level clouds.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10080 - Carbon black, 4-[(17-substituted-3,6,9,12,15-pentaazaheptadec-1-yl) substituted] phenyl-modified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10080 Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (generic). (a... generically as carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (PMN P-06-8) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10080 - Carbon black, 4-[(17-substituted-3,6,9,12,15-pentaazaheptadec-1-yl) substituted] phenyl-modified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10080 Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (generic). (a... generically as carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (PMN P-06-8) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10080 - Carbon black, 4-[(17-substituted-3,6,9,12,15-pentaazaheptadec-1-yl) substituted] phenyl-modified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10080 Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (generic). (a... generically as carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (PMN P-06-8) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10080 - Carbon black, 4-[(17-substituted-3,6,9,12,15-pentaazaheptadec-1-yl) substituted] phenyl-modified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10080 Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (generic). (a... generically as carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (PMN P-06-8) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10080 - Carbon black, 4-[(17-substituted-3,6,9,12,15-pentaazaheptadec-1-yl) substituted] phenyl-modified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10080 Carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (generic). (a... generically as carbon black, 4- phenyl-modified, hydrochlorides (PMN P-06-8) is subject to reporting...

  12. Application of high-resolution spectral absorbance measurements to determine dissolved organic carbon concentration in remote areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagyan, Armine; Runkle, Benjamin R. K.; Kutzbach, Lars

    2014-09-01

    Accurate quantification of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface and soil pore waters is crucial for understanding changes in water resources under the influence of climate and land use changes. Sampling and laboratory analysis of DOC content at a sufficient temporal frequency are especially difficult to achieve for natural DOC sources like the extensive boreal and arctic mire landscapes due to their remoteness. Therefore, the goals of this paper are (1) to investigate the performance of a portable, high-resolution ultraviolet-visible light spectroscopic method for determining the DOC content of surface and soil pore water samples from a boreal mire complex and (2) to compare the spectroscopic method with other DOC measurement techniques, e.g., the wet heated persulfate oxidation method and a laboratory, expulsion-based spectrophotometric method and (3) to assess different multivariate models that relate absorbance measurements with DOC contents. The study indicates that high-resolution spectroscopic measurements provide a simple, robust and non-destructive method for measuring DOC content. These measurements are of short duration (<1 min) and the sample analysis is portable, rendering this method particularly advantageous for in situ investigations at remote field locations. The study also demonstrates that if absorbances at specific wavelengths are used as proxies for DOC concentration, it is recommended to create site-specific calibration models that include more than one wavelength to achieve the optimal accuracy of the proxy-based DOC quantification.

  13. Dual-wavelength synchronous mode-locked Yb:LSO laser using a double-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Hou, Wei; Yang, Jimin; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Lihe; Su, Liangbi; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yonggang

    2016-05-01

    A dual-wavelength, passively mode-locked Yb:LSO laser was demonstrated using a double-walled carbon nanotube as a saturable absorber. The maximum average output power of the laser was 1.34 W at the incident pump power of 9.94 W. The two central wavelengths were 1057 and 1058 nm. The corresponding pulse duration of the autocorrelation interference pattern was about 15 ps, while the beat pulse repetition rate was 0.17 THz and the width of one beat pulse about 2 ps. When the incident pump power was above 10.25 W, a multiwavelength mode-locked oscillation phenomenon was observed. After employing a pair of SF10 prisms, a 1058.7 nm single-wavelength mode-locked laser was obtained with a pulse width of 7 ps. PMID:27140382

  14. All-polarization-maintaining Er-doped ultrashort-pulse fiber laser using carbon nanotube saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, N; Seno, Y; Sumimura, K; Sakakibara, Y; Itoga, E; Kataura, H; Itoh, K

    2008-06-23

    We present an all-polarization-maintaining Er-doped ultrashort-pulse fiber laser using a single-wall carbon nanotube polyimide nanocomposite saturable absorber. The maximum average power for single-pulse operation is 4.8 mW, and the repetition frequency is 41.3 MHz. Self-start and stable mode-locking operation is achieved. The RF amplitude noise is also examined and it is confirmed that the noise figure is as low as that of a solid-state laser. Using a polarization-maintaining anomalous dispersive fiber, a 314 fs output pulse is compressed to 107 fs via higher-order soliton compression. The peak power of the compressed pulse is up to 1.1 kW. PMID:18575508

  15. A comparison between physical properties of carbon black-polymer and carbon nanotubes-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adohi, B. J.-P.; Mdarhri, A.; Prunier, C.; Haidar, B.; Brosseau, C.

    2010-10-01

    Multiple-walled carbon nanotube (CNT)-and carbon black (CB)-polymer composites have been fabricated by mechanical mixing with different loadings, the polymeric matrix being identical between the two series of samples. The main focus of this work is to report measurements of physical properties of these mixtures in ambient conditions and to discuss the origin of similarities and differences among them according the kind of carbonaceous filler. The uniform dispersion of the carbonaceous phase in the dielectric matrix was probed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The good dispersibility of the filler particle is also reflected in the much lower conduction threshold observed for CNT-containing samples than in the CB composites. This is likely due to the high aspect ratio of the CNTs. Mechanical properties show that the storage modulus of the two kinds of samples is close to the modulus value of the neat styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), independent of filler content over a wide range of compositions (ϕ <0.1) encompassing the percolation threshold. Microwave measurements show that the real part of the effective permittivity exhibits a flat frequency response, with the exception of the sample containing 30 vol % CB for which an inverse-power law is observed revealing a behavior that has been seen for many random heterogeneous soft materials. No resonant dielectric absorption is evidenced within the frequency range explored and for the filler concentrations investigated. The results were also compared with analytical effective (mean-field) models. The symmetric Bruggeman model is in very good agreement with the microwave effective permittivity once account is taken of the depolarization factor which is close to the value found for a three-dimensional (3D) random dispersion of monodisperse spherical conductive inclusions within a dielectric matrix. By combining microwave frequency-domain spectroscopy with uniaxial tension, we obtain the effective

  16. Morphology and Optical Properties of Black-Carbon Particles Relevant to Engine Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Dansson, M. A.; Schrader, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Black-carbon particles are believed to have a large influence on climate through direct radiative forcing, reduction of surface albedo of snow and ice in the cryosphere, and interaction with clouds. The optical properties and morphology of atmospheric particles containing black carbon are uncertain, and characterization of black carbon resulting from engines emissions is needed. Refractory black-carbon particles found in the atmosphere are often coated with unburned fuel, sulfuric acid, water, ash, and other combustion by-products and atmospheric constituents. Coatings can alter the optical and physical properties of the particles and therefore change their optical properties and cloud interactions. Details of particle morphology and coating state can also have important effects on the interpretation of optical diagnostics. A more complete understanding of how coatings affect extinction, absorption, and incandescence measurements is needed before these techniques can be applied reliably to a wide range of particles. We have investigated the effects of coatings on the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated black-carbon particles using a range of standard particle diagnostics, extinction, and time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements. Particles were generated in a co-flow diffusion flame, extracted, cooled, and coated with oleic acid. The diffusion flame produces highly dendritic soot aggregates with similar properties to those produced in diesel engines, diffusion flames, and most natural combustion processes. A thermodenuder was used to remove the coating. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to monitor aggregate sizes; a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) was used to measure coating mass fractions, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize particle morphologies. The results demonstrate important differences in optical measurements between coated and uncoated particles.

  17. Hierarchical meso-macro structure porous carbon black as electrode materials in Li-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jun; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2014-09-01

    A new class of hierarchical structure porous carbon black, carbon nanoballs (CNBs), was generated by solution plasma process (SPP) with benzene. The structural characterization revealed that CNBs have excellent meso-macro hierarchical pore structure, with an averaged diameter size of 14.5 nm and a total pore volume of 1.13 cm3 g-1. The CNBs are aggregated forming inter-connected pore channels in different directions on both the meso- and macrometer length scales. The discharge capacity of CNBs reached 3600 mAh g-1, which exceeded the capacity of Ketjen Black EC-600JD (a commercial carbon black with highest cell performance) by 30-40%. The excellent discharge capacity was contributed by the co-existence of high pore volume and meso-macro hierarchical porous structure. This new class carbon material exhibited higher discharge capacity compared to commercial porous carbon materials, and is possible to apply as the next generation of electrode materials in lithium-air (Li-air) battery. The structural and electrochemical properties accompanied with the synthesis mechanism of CNBs were discussed in details.

  18. Quantifying immediate radiative forcing by black carbon and organic matter with the Specific Forcing Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, T. C.; Zarzycki, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Koch, D. M.

    2010-06-01

    We propose a measure to quantify climate warming or cooling by pollutants with atmospheric lifetimes of less than one year: the Specific Forcing Pulse (SFP). SFP is the amount of energy added to the Earth system per mass of pollutant emitted. Global average SFP for black carbon, including atmosphere and cryosphere, is 1.12 GJ g-1 and that for organic matter is -0.061 GJ g-1. We provide regional values for black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM) emitted from 23 source-region combinations, divided between atmosphere and cryosphere impacts and identifying forcing by latitude. Regional SFP varies by about 40% for black carbon. This variation is relatively small because of compensating effects; particles from regions that affect ice albedo typically have shorter atmospheric lifetimes because of lower convection. The ratio between BC and OM SFP implies that, for direct forcing, an OM:BC mass ratio of 15 has a neutral effect on top-of-atmosphere direct forcing for any region, and any lower ratio induces direct warming. However, important processes, particularly cloud changes that tend toward cooling, have not been included here. We demonstrate ensemble adjustment, in which we produce a "best estimate" by combining a suite of diverse but simple models and enhanced models of greater complexity. Adjustments for black carbon internal mixing and for regional variability are discussed; regions with convection are implicated in greater model diversity. SFP expresses scientific uncertainty and separates it from policy uncertainty; the latter is caused by disagreements about the relevant time horizon, impact, or spatial scale of interest. However, metrics used in policy discussions, such as global warming potentials, are easily derived from SFP. Global-average SFP for biofuel and fossil fuel emissions translates to a 100-year GWP of about 760 for black carbon and -40 for organic matter when snow forcing is included. Ensemble-adjusted estimates of atmospheric radiative impact by

  19. A Study of the Optical Properties of Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Arienti, Marco; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Kopacz, Adrian M; Geier, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The report focu ses on the modification of the optical properties of ice crystals due to atmospheric black car bon (BC) contamination : the objective is to advance the predictive capabilities of climate models through an improved understanding of the radiative properties of compound particles . The shape of the ice crystal (as commonly found in cirrus clouds and cont rails) , the volume fraction of the BC inclusion , and its location inside the crystal are the three factors examined in this study. In the multiscale description of this problem, where a small absorbing inclusion modifies the optical properties of a much la rger non - absorbing particle, state - of - the - art discretization techniques are combined to provide the best compromise of flexibility and accuracy over a broad range of sizes .

  20. Joseph Black, carbon dioxide, latent heat, and the beginnings of the discovery of the respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-06-15

    The discovery of carbon dioxide by Joseph Black (1728-1799) marked a new era of research on the respiratory gases. His initial interest was in alkalis such as limewater that were thought to be useful in the treatment of renal stone. When he studied magnesium carbonate, he found that when this was heated or exposed to acid, a gas was evolved that he called "fixed air" because it had been combined with a solid material. He showed that the new gas extinguished a flame, that it could not support life, and that it was present in gas exhaled from the lung. Within a few years of his discovery, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen were also isolated. Thus arguably Black's work started the avalanche of research on the respiratory gases carried out by Priestley, Scheele, Lavoisier, and Cavendish. Black then turned his attention to heat and he was the first person to describe latent heat, that is the heat added or lost when a liquid changes its state, for example when water changes to ice or steam. Latent heat is a key concept in thermal physiology because of the heat lost when sweat evaporates. Black was a friend of the young James Watt (1736-1819) who was responsible for the development of early steam engines. Watt was puzzled why so much cooling was necessary to condense steam into water, and Black realized that the answer was the latent heat. The resulting improvements in steam engines ushered in the Industrial Revolution. PMID:24682452