Science.gov

Sample records for absorbing boundary layers

  1. Absorbing boundary layers for spin wave micromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat, G.; Fangohr, H.; Prabhakar, A.

    2018-03-01

    Micromagnetic simulations are used to investigate the effects of different absorbing boundary layers (ABLs) on spin waves (SWs) reflected from the edges of a magnetic nano-structure. We define the conditions that a suitable ABL must fulfill and compare the performance of abrupt, linear, polynomial and tan hyperbolic damping profiles in the ABL. We first consider normal incidence in a permalloy stripe and propose a transmission line model to quantify reflections and calculate the loss introduced into the stripe due to the ABL. We find that a parabolic damping profile absorbs the SW energy efficiently and has a low reflection coefficient, thus performing much better than the commonly used abrupt damping profile. We then investigated SWs that are obliquely incident at 26.6 °, 45 ° and 63.4 ° on the edge of a yttrium-iron-garnet film. The parabolic damping profile again performs efficiently by showing a high SW energy transfer to the ABL and a low reflected SW amplitude.

  2. An effective absorbing layer for the boundary condition in acoustic seismic wave simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gang; da Silva, Nuno V.; Wu, Di

    2018-04-01

    Efficient numerical simulation of seismic wavefields generally involves truncating the Earth model in order to keep computing time and memory requirements down. Absorbing boundary conditions, therefore, are applied to remove the boundary reflections caused by this truncation, thereby allowing for accurate modeling of wavefields. In this paper, we derive an effective absorbing boundary condition for both acoustic and elastic wave simulation, through the simplification of the damping term of the split perfectly matched layer (SPML) boundary condition. This new boundary condition is accurate, cost-effective, and easily implemented, especially for high-performance computing. Stability analysis shows that this boundary condition is effectively as stable as normal (non-absorbing) wave equations for explicit time-stepping finite differences. We found that for full-waveform inversion (FWI), the strengths of the effective absorbing layer—a reduction of the computational and memory cost coupled with a simplistic implementation—significantly outweighs the limitation of incomplete absorption of outgoing waves relative to the SPML. More importantly, we demonstrate that this limitation can easily be overcome through the use of two strategies in FWI, namely variable cell size and model extension thereby fully compensating for the imperfectness of the proposed absorbing boundary condition.

  3. An Absorbing Boundary Condition for the Lattice Boltzmann Method Based on the Perfectly Matched Layer

    PubMed Central

    Najafi-Yazdi, A.; Mongeau, L.

    2012-01-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a well established computational tool for fluid flow simulations. This method has been recently utilized for low Mach number computational aeroacoustics. Robust and nonreflective boundary conditions, similar to those used in Navier-Stokes solvers, are needed for LBM-based aeroacoustics simulations. The goal of the present study was to develop an absorbing boundary condition based on the perfectly matched layer (PML) concept for LBM. The derivation of formulations for both two and three dimensional problems are presented. The macroscopic behavior of the new formulation is discussed. The new formulation was tested using benchmark acoustic problems. The perfectly matched layer concept appears to be very well suited for LBM, and yielded very low acoustic reflection factor. PMID:23526050

  4. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width.

    PubMed

    Learn, R; Feigenbaum, E

    2016-06-01

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. The second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  5. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width

    SciTech Connect

    Learn, R.; Feigenbaum, E.

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. Furthermore, the second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  6. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width

    DOE PAGES

    Learn, R.; Feigenbaum, E.

    2016-05-27

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. Furthermore, the second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  7. The Effects of an Absorbing Smoke Layer on MODIS Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Optical Property Retrievals and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Clouds, aerosols, and their interactions are widely considered to be key uncertainty components in our current understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and radiation budget. The work presented here is focused on the quasi-permanent marine boundary layer . (MBL) clouds off the southern Atlantic coast of Africa and the effects on MODIS cloud optical property retrievals (MOD06) of an overlying absorbing smoke layer. During much of August and September, a persistent smoke layer resides over this region, produced from extensive biomass burning throughout the southern African savanna. The resulting absorption, which increases with decreasing wavelength, potentially introduces biases into the MODIS cloud optical property retrievals of the underlying MBL clouds. This effect is more pronounced in the cloud optical thickness retrievals, which over ocean are derived from the wavelength channel centered near 0.86 micron (effective particle size retrievals are derived from the longer-wavelength near-IR channels at 1.6, 2.1, and 3.7 microns). Here, the spatial distributions of the scalar statistics of both the cloud and aerosol layers are first determined from the CALIOP 5 km layer products. Next, the MOD06 look-up tables (LUTs) are adjusted by inserting an absorbing smoke layer of varying optical thickness over the cloud. Retrievals are subsequently performed for a subset of MODIS pixels collocated with the CALIOP ground track, using smoke optical thickness from the CALIOP 5km aerosol layer product to select the appropriate LUT. The resulting differences in cloud optical property retrievals due to the inclusion of the smoke layer in the LUTs will be examined. In addition, the direct radiative forcing of this smoke layer will be investigated from the perspective of the cloud optical property retrieval differences.

  8. Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  9. Frequency domain finite-element and spectral-element acoustic wave modeling using absorbing boundaries and perfectly matched layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi Dalkhani, Amin; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Mahdavi Basir, Hadi

    2018-04-01

    Wave propagation modeling as a vital tool in seismology can be done via several different numerical methods among them are finite-difference, finite-element, and spectral-element methods (FDM, FEM and SEM). Some advanced applications in seismic exploration benefit the frequency domain modeling. Regarding flexibility in complex geological models and dealing with the free surface boundary condition, we studied the frequency domain acoustic wave equation using FEM and SEM. The results demonstrated that the frequency domain FEM and SEM have a good accuracy and numerical efficiency with the second order interpolation polynomials. Furthermore, we developed the second order Clayton and Engquist absorbing boundary condition (CE-ABC2) and compared it with the perfectly matched layer (PML) for the frequency domain FEM and SEM. In spite of PML method, CE-ABC2 does not add any additional computational cost to the modeling except assembling boundary matrices. As a result, considering CE-ABC2 is more efficient than PML for the frequency domain acoustic wave propagation modeling especially when computational cost is high and high-level absorbing performance is unnecessary.

  10. Comparison of artificial absorbing boundaries for acoustic wave equation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yingjie; Song, Hanjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing

    2017-12-01

    Absorbing boundary conditions are necessary in numerical simulation for reducing the artificial reflections from model boundaries. In this paper, we overview the most important and typical absorbing boundary conditions developed throughout history. We first derive the wave equations of similar methods in unified forms; then, we compare their absorbing performance via theoretical analyses and numerical experiments. The Higdon boundary condition is shown to be the best one among the three main absorbing boundary conditions that are based on a one-way wave equation. The Clayton and Engquist boundary is a special case of the Higdon boundary but has difficulty in dealing with the corner points in implementaion. The Reynolds boundary does not have this problem but its absorbing performance is the poorest among these three methods. The sponge boundary has difficulties in determining the optimal parameters in advance and too many layers are required to achieve a good enough absorbing performance. The hybrid absorbing boundary condition (hybrid ABC) has a better absorbing performance than the Higdon boundary does; however, it is still less efficient for absorbing nearly grazing waves since it is based on the one-way wave equation. In contrast, the perfectly matched layer (PML) can perform much better using a few layers. For example, the 10-layer PML would perform well for absorbing most reflected waves except the nearly grazing incident waves. The 20-layer PML is suggested for most practical applications. For nearly grazing incident waves, convolutional PML shows superiority over the PML when the source is close to the boundary for large-scale models. The Higdon boundary and hybrid ABC are preferred when the computational cost is high and high-level absorbing performance is not required, such as migration and migration velocity analyses, since they are not as sensitive to the amplitude errors as the full waveform inversion.

  11. The Perfectly Matched Layer absorbing boundary for fluid-structure interactions using the Immersed Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jubiao; Yu, Feimi; Krane, Michael; Zhang, Lucy T

    2018-01-01

    In this work, a non-reflective boundary condition, the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, is adapted and implemented in a fluid-structure interaction numerical framework to demonstrate that proper boundary conditions are not only necessary to capture correct wave propagations in a flow field, but also its interacted solid behavior and responses. While most research on the topics of the non-reflective boundary conditions are focused on fluids, little effort has been done in a fluid-structure interaction setting. In this study, the effectiveness of the PML is closely examined in both pure fluid and fluid-structure interaction settings upon incorporating the PML algorithm in a fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction framework, the Immersed Finite Element Method. The performance of the PML boundary condition is evaluated and compared to reference solutions with a variety of benchmark test cases including known and expected solutions of aeroacoustic wave propagation as well as vortex shedding and advection. The application of the PML in numerical simulations of fluid-structure interaction is then investigated to demonstrate the efficacy and necessity of such boundary treatment in order to capture the correct solid deformation and flow field without the requirement of a significantly large computational domain.

  12. Boundary layer control device for duct silencers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric H. (Inventor); Soderman, Paul T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A boundary layer control device includes a porous cover plate, an acoustic absorber disposed under the porous cover plate, and a porous flow resistive membrane interposed between the porous cover plate and the acoustic absorber. The porous flow resistive membrane has a flow resistance low enough to permit sound to enter the acoustic absorber and high enough to damp unsteady flow oscillations.

  13. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  14. Towards Perfectly Absorbing Boundary Conditions for Euler Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Hu, Fang Q.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of absorbing layers as non-reflecting computational boundaries for the Euler equations. The absorbing-layer equations are simply obtained by splitting the governing equations in the coordinate directions and introducing absorption coefficients in each split equation. This methodology is similar to that used by Berenger for the numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. Specifically, we apply this methodology to three physical problems shock-vortex interactions, a plane free shear flow and an axisymmetric jet- with emphasis on acoustic wave propagation. Our numerical results indicate that the use of absorbing layers effectively minimizes numerical reflection in all three problems considered.

  15. Estimating the Direct Radiative Effect of Absorbing Aerosols Overlying Marine Boundary Layer Clouds in the Southeast Atlantic Using MODIS and CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2013-01-01

    Absorbing aerosols such as smoke strongly absorb solar radiation, particularly at ultraviolet and visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) wavelengths, and their presence above clouds can have considerable implications. It has been previously shown that they have a positive (i.e., warming) direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) when overlying bright clouds. Additionally, they can cause biased passive instrument satellite retrievals in techniques that rely on VIS/NIR wavelengths for inferring the cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (re) of underlying clouds, which can in turn yield biased above-cloud DARE estimates. Here we investigate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical property retrieval biases due to overlying absorbing aerosols observed by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and examine the impact of these biases on above-cloud DARE estimates. The investigation focuses on a region in the southeast Atlantic Ocean during August and September (2006-2011), where smoke from biomass burning in southern Africa overlies persistent marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds. Adjusting for above-cloud aerosol attenuation yields increases in the regional mean liquid COT (averaged over all ocean-only liquid clouds) by roughly 6%; mean re increases by roughly 2.6%, almost exclusively due to the COT adjustment in the non-orthogonal retrieval space. It is found that these two biases lead to an underestimate of DARE. For liquid cloud Aqua MODIS pixels with CALIOP-observed above-cloud smoke, the regional mean above-cloud radiative forcing efficiency (DARE per unit aerosol optical depth (AOD)) at time of observation (near local noon for Aqua overpass) increases from 50.9Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup-1) to 65.1Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup -1) when using bias-adjusted instead of nonadjusted MODIS cloud retrievals.

  16. Boundary layer relaminarization device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, Theodore R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Relamination of a boundary layer formed in supersonic flow over the leading edge of a swept airfoil is accomplished by means of at least one band, especially a quadrangular band, and most preferably a square band. Each band conforms to the leading edge and the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil as an integral part thereof and extends perpendicularly from the leading edge. Each band has a height of about two times the thickness of the maximum expected boundary layer.

  17. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  18. The Bottom Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, John H.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2018-01-01

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  19. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Schmitz, Craig P.; Nouri, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMPJ) has been identified by the propulsion community as the rigorous boundary layer program in connection with the existing JANNAF reference programs. The improvements made to BLIMPJ and described herein have potential applications in the design of the future Orbit Transfer Vehicle engines. The turbulence model is validated to include the effects of wall roughness and a way is devised to treat multiple smooth-rough surfaces. A prediction of relaminarization regions is examined as is the combined effects of wall cooling and surface roughness on relaminarization. A turbulence model to represent the effects of constant condensed phase loading is given. A procedure is described for thrust decrement calculation in thick boundary layers by coupling the T-D Kinetics Program and BLIMPJ and a way is provided for thrust loss optimization. Potential experimental studies in rocket nozzles are identified along with the required instrumentation to provide accurate measurements in support of the presented new analytical models.

  20. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Schmitz, C.; Frost, C.; Engel, C. D.; Fuller, C. E.; Bender, R. L.; Pond, J.

    1984-01-01

    High chamber pressure expander cycles proposed for orbit transfer vehicles depend primarily on the heat energy transmitted from the combustion products through the thrust wall chamber wall. The heat transfer to the nozzle wall is affected by such variables as wall roughness, relamarization, and the presence of particles in the flow. Motor performance loss for these nozzles with thick boundary layers is inaccurate using the existing procedure coded BLIMPJ. Modifications and innovations to the code are examined. Updated routines are listed.

  1. Superfluid Boundary Layer.

    PubMed

    Stagg, G W; Parker, N G; Barenghi, C F

    2017-03-31

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  2. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1994-05-01

    A comprehensive and lucid account of the physics and dynamics of the lowest one to two kilometers of the Earth's atmosphere in direct contact with the Earth's surface, known as the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Dr. Garratt emphasizes the application of the ABL problems to numerical modeling of the climate, which makes this book unique among recent texts on the subject. He begins with a brief introduction to the ABL before leading to the development of mean and turbulence equations and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modeling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, so chapters four and five deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention given to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The author next treats the structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL, and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter seven then extends this discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is particularly relevant to current research because the extensive stratocumulus regions over the subtropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic have been identified as key players in the climate system. In the final chapters, Dr. Garratt summarizes the book's material by discussing appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes in general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate stimulation.

  3. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  4. Turbulent boundary layers over nonstationary plane boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, A. T.; Gentry, G. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of predicting integral parameters and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers developing over moving ground planes were evaluated. The three methods evaluated were: relative integral parameter method; relative power law method; and modified law of the wall method.

  5. Boundary-Layer & health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  6. Modeling the urban boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A summary and evaluation is given of the Workshop on Modeling the Urban Boundary Layer; held in Las Vegas on May 5, 1975. Edited summaries from each of the session chairpersons are also given. The sessions were: (1) formulation and solution techniques, (2) K-theory versus higher order closure, (3) surface heat and moisture balance, (4) initialization and boundary problems, (5) nocturnal boundary layer, and (6) verification of models.

  7. Sublayer of Prandtl Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Emmanuel; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the stability of Prandtl boundary layers in the vanishing viscosity limit {ν \\to 0} . In Grenier (Commun Pure Appl Math 53(9):1067-1091, 2000), one of the authors proved that there exists no asymptotic expansion involving one of Prandtl's boundary layer, with thickness of order {√{ν}} , which describes the inviscid limit of Navier-Stokes equations. The instability gives rise to a viscous boundary sublayer whose thickness is of order {ν^{3/4}} . In this paper, we point out how the stability of the classical Prandtl's layer is linked to the stability of this sublayer. In particular, we prove that the two layers cannot both be nonlinearly stable in L^∞. That is, either the Prandtl's layer or the boundary sublayer is nonlinearly unstable in the sup norm.

  8. Vortex/boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed and high quality measurements with hot-wires and pressure probes are presented for two different interactions between a vortex pair with common flow down and a turbulent boundary layer. The interactions studied have larger values of the vortex circulation parameter than those studied previously. The results indicate that the boundary layer under the vortex pair is thinned by lateral divergence and that boundary layer fluid is entrained into the vortex. The effect of the interaction on the vortex core (other than the inviscid effect of the image vortices behind the surface) is small.

  9. Absorbing boundary conditions for second-order hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Hong; Wong, Yau Shu

    1989-01-01

    A uniform approach to construct absorbing artificial boundary conditions for second-order linear hyperbolic equations is proposed. The nonlocal boundary condition is given by a pseudodifferential operator that annihilates travelling waves. It is obtained through the dispersion relation of the differential equation by requiring that the initial-boundary value problem admits the wave solutions travelling in one direction only. Local approximation of this global boundary condition yields an nth-order differential operator. It is shown that the best approximations must be in the canonical forms which can be factorized into first-order operators. These boundary conditions are perfectly absorbing for wave packets propagating at certain group velocities. A hierarchy of absorbing boundary conditions is derived for transonic small perturbation equations of unsteady flows. These examples illustrate that the absorbing boundary conditions are easy to derive, and the effectiveness is demonstrated by the numerical experiments.

  10. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  11. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  12. Characteristics of absorbing aerosols during winter foggy period over the National Capital Region of Delhi: Impact of planetary boundary layer dynamics and solar radiation flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, S.; Tiwari, S.; Mishra, A.; Singh, S.; Hopke, Philip K.; Singh, Surender; Attri, S. D.

    2017-05-01

    Severe air pollution in the northern India coupled with the formation of secondary pollutants results in severe fog conditions during the winter. Black carbon (BC) and particulate matter (PM2.5) play a vital role within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) to degrade atmospheric visibility. These species were continuously monitored during the winter of 2014 in the National Capital Region (NCR) of Delhi. The average BC concentration was 8.0 ± 3.1 μg/m3 with the January mean (11.1 ± 5.4 μg/m3) approximately two times higher than February (5.9 ± 2.1 μg/m3). The average PM2.5 concentration was 137 ± 67 μg/m3 with monthly area-average maximum and minima in December and February, respectively. Higher concentrations of BC at 10:00 local standard time LST (8.5 μg/m3) and 22:00 LST (9.7 μg/m3) were consistently observed and assigned to morning and evening rush-hour traffic across Delhi. Daily average solar fluxes, varied between 17.9 and 220.7 W/m2 and had a negative correlation (r = - 0.5) with BC during fog episodes. Ventilation coefficient (VC) reduced from 'no fog' to fog phase over Palam Airport (PLM) (0.49) times and Hindon Airport (HND) (0.28) times and from fog to prolonged fog (> 14 h) phase over PLM (0.35) times and HND (0.41) times, respectively, indicating high pollution over the NCR of Delhi. Ground measurements showed that daily mean aerosol optical depth at 500 nm (AOD500) varied between 0.32 and 1.18 with mean AOD500 nm being highest during the prolonged fog (> 14 h) episodes (0.98 ± 0.08) consistent with variations in PM2.5 and BC. Angstrom exponent (α) and Angstrom turbidity coefficient (β) were found to be > 1 and 0.2, respectively, during fog showing the dominance of fine mode particles in the atmosphere.

  13. Boundary layer control for airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pake, F. A.; Pipitone, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is summarized of the aerodynamic principle of boundary layer control for nonrigid LTA craft. The project included a wind tunnel test on a BLC body of revolution at zero angle of attack. Theoretical analysis is shown to be in excellent agreement with the test data. Methods are evolved for predicting the boundary layer development on a body of revolution and the suction pumping and propulsive power requirements. These methods are used to predict the performance characteristics of a full-scale airship. The analysis indicates that propulsive power reductions of 15 to 25 percent and endurance improvements of 20 to 40 percent may be realized in employing boundary-layer control to nonrigid airships.

  14. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    This final report was concerned with the ideas that: (1) magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere-solar wind system together; and (2) global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding its internal linking mechanisms and those with the solar wind. The research project involved simultaneous research on the global-, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers, which included the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical, and simulation projects were performed on these subjects, as well as comparisons of theoretical results with observational data. Other related activity included in the research included: (1) prediction of geomagnetic activity; (2) global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations; (3) Alfven resonance heating; and (4) Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. In the appendixes are list of personnel involved, list of papers published; and reprints or photocopies of papers produced for this report.

  15. Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    layer edge, We, is seen to increase fast in downstream direction. Near measuring station 9 the wall flow angle exceeds w = 55’, which means that the...leading edge along wing upper and lower surface to the trailing edge. As an excercise , such a boundary layer flow was computed for a simple symmetric...D.I.A. Poll The Development of Intermittent Turbulence on a Swept - Attachment Line Including the Effects of Compressibility. Aero. Qu. (Feb. 1983) 10

  16. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The central ideas of this grant are that the magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere together, and the global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding the linking mechanisms. Accordingly the present grant includes simultaneous research on the global, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers. These boundary layers include the bow shock, magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical and simulation projects have been performed on these subjects, as well as comparison of theoretical results with observational data. Very good progress has been made, with four papers published or in press and two additional papers submitted for publication during the six month period 1 June - 30 November 1993. At least two projects are currently being written up. In addition, members of the group have given papers at scientific meetings. The further structure of this report is as follows: section two contains brief accounts of research completed during the last six months, while section three describes the research projects intended for the grant's final period.

  17. Double absorbing boundaries for finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrone, John, E-mail: jlagrone@smu.edu; Hagstrom, Thomas, E-mail: thagstrom@smu.edu

    We describe the implementation of optimal local radiation boundary condition sequences for second order finite difference approximations to Maxwell's equations and the scalar wave equation using the double absorbing boundary formulation. Numerical experiments are presented which demonstrate that the design accuracy of the boundary conditions is achieved and, for comparable effort, exceeds that of a convolution perfectly matched layer with reasonably chosen parameters. An advantage of the proposed approach is that parameters can be chosen using an accurate a priori error bound.

  18. Absorbing Boundary Conditions For Optical Pulses In Dispersive, Nonlinear Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present results in computational nonlinear optics. An algorithm will be described that provides absorbing boundary conditions for optical pulses in dispersive, nonlinear materials. A new numerical absorber at the boundaries has been developed that is responsive to the spectral content of the pulse. Also, results will be shown of calculations of 2-D electromagnetic nonlinear waves computed by directly integrating in time the nonlinear vector Maxwell's equations. The results will include simulations of "light bullet" like pulses. Here diffraction and dispersion will be counteracted by nonlinear effects. Comparisons will be shown of calculations that use the standard boundary conditions and the new ones.

  19. Unsteady boundary-layer injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telionis, D. P.; Jones, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    The boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional incompressible flow are integrated numerically for the flow over a flat plate and a Howarth body. Injection is introduced either impulsively or periodically along a narrow strip. Results indicate that injection perpendicular to the wall is transmitted instantly across the boundary layer and has little effect on the velocity profile parallel to the wall. The effect is a little more noticeable for flows with adverse pressure gradients. Injection parallel to the wall results in fuller velocity profiles. Parallel and oscillatory injection appears to influence the mean. The amplitude of oscillation decreases with distance from the injection strip but further downstream it increases again in a manner reminiscent of an unstable process.

  20. Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, L.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric boundary layers with weak stratification are relatively well described by similarity theory and numerical models for stationary horizontally homogeneous conditions. With common strong stratification, similarity theory becomes unreliable. The turbulence structure and interactions with the mean flow and small-scale nonturbulent motions assume a variety of scenarios. The turbulence is intermittent and may no longer fully satisfy the usual conditions for the definition of turbulence. Nonturbulent motions include wave-like motions and solitary modes, two-dimensional vortical modes, microfronts, intermittent drainage flows, and a host of more complex structures. The main source of turbulence may not be at the surface, but rather may result from shear above the surface inversion. The turbulence is typically not in equilibrium with the nonturbulent motions, sometimes preventing the formation of an inertial subrange. New observational and analysis techniques are expected to advance our understanding of the very stable boundary layer.

  1. Message-passing-interface-based parallel FDTD investigation on the EM scattering from a 1-D rough sea surface using uniaxial perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Guo, L-X; Zeng, H; Han, X-B

    2009-06-01

    A message-passing-interface (MPI)-based parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for the electromagnetic scattering from a 1-D randomly rough sea surface is presented. The uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) medium is adopted for truncation of FDTD lattices, in which the finite-difference equations can be used for the total computation domain by properly choosing the uniaxial parameters. This makes the parallel FDTD algorithm easier to implement. The parallel performance with different processors is illustrated for one sea surface realization, and the computation time of the parallel FDTD algorithm is dramatically reduced compared to a single-process implementation. Finally, some numerical results are shown, including the backscattering characteristics of sea surface for different polarization and the bistatic scattering from a sea surface with large incident angle and large wind speed.

  2. Stability of Boundary Layer Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    climato- logical frequency of convection in the North Atlantic, and offered recom- U mendations on the modelling of triggered convection. The current ...support of the current investigation we have carried out several additional calculations of the marine boundary layer with SIGMET. These calculations...In a fixed coordinate system x ( positive eastward), y ( positive northward), and z ( positive vertically upward) the equations are au .U +vE + W+-U

  3. Boundary layer temperature measurements of a noctual urban boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Simon; Ricketts, Hugo; Vaughan, Geraint

    2018-04-01

    A low-power lidar system based in Manchester, United Kingdom has been developed to measure temperature profiles in the nocturnal urban boundary layer. The lidar transmitter uses a 355nm diode-pumped solid state Nd:YAG laser and two narrow-band interference filters in the receiver filter out rotational Raman lines that are dependent on temperature. The spectral response of the lidar is calibrated using a monochromator. Temperature profiles measured by the system are calibrated by comparison to co-located radiosondes.

  4. Review: the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1994-10-01

    An overview is given of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over both continental and ocean surfaces, mainly from observational and modelling perspectives. Much is known about ABL structure over homogeneous land surfaces, but relatively little so far as the following are concerned, (i) the cloud-topped ABL (over the sea predominantly); (ii) the strongly nonhomogeneous and nonstationary ABL; (iii) the ABL over complex terrain. These three categories present exciting challenges so far as improved understanding of ABL behaviour and improved representation of the ABL in numerical models of the atmosphere are concerned.

  5. Modelling the transitional boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in the modelling of the transition zone in the boundary layer are reviewed (the zone being defined as extending from the station where intermittency begins to depart from zero to that where it is nearly unity). The value of using a new non-dimensional spot formation rate parameter, and the importance of allowing for so-called subtransitions within the transition zone, are both stressed. Models do reasonably well in constant pressure 2-dimensional flows, but in the presence of strong pressure gradients further improvements are needed. The linear combination approach works surprisingly well in most cases, but would not be so successful in situations where a purely laminar boundary layer would separate but a transitional one would not. Intermittency-weighted eddy viscosity methods do not predict peak surface parameters well without the introduction of an overshooting transition function whose connection with the spot theory of transition is obscure. Suggestions are made for further work that now appears necessary for developing improved models of the transition zone.

  6. Nonequilibrium chemistry boundary layer integral matrix procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, H.; Buckingham, A. C.; Morse, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an analytic procedure for the calculation of nonequilibrium boundary layer flows over surfaces of arbitrary catalycities is described. An existing equilibrium boundary layer integral matrix code was extended to include nonequilibrium chemistry while retaining all of the general boundary condition features built into the original code. For particular application to the pitch-plane of shuttle type vehicles, an approximate procedure was developed to estimate the nonequilibrium and nonisentropic state at the edge of the boundary layer.

  7. A Robust Absorbing Boundary Condition for Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; orgenson, Philip C. E.

    2005-01-01

    An absorbing non-reflecting boundary condition (NRBC) for practical computations in fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics is presented with theoretical proof. This paper is a continuation and improvement of a previous paper by the author. The absorbing NRBC technique is based on a first principle of non reflecting, which contains the essential physics that a plane wave solution of the Euler equations remains intact across the boundary. The technique is theoretically shown to work for a large class of finite volume approaches. When combined with the hyperbolic conservation laws, the NRBC is simple, robust and truly multi-dimensional; no additional implementation is needed except the prescribed physical boundary conditions. Several numerical examples in multi-dimensional spaces using two different finite volume schemes are illustrated to demonstrate its robustness in practical computations. Limitations and remedies of the technique are also discussed.

  8. Radiation-viscous boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arav, Nahum; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1992-01-01

    A viscous boundary layer (BL) is studied which is most likely to occur in astrophysical systems dominated by radiation pressure, in particular compact objects surrounded by a very optically thick envelope and radiating at close to the Eddington limit. Calculations are reported which show that a BL due to radiation viscosity behaves very differently from a 'classical' incompressible BL for flows with Mach number M much greater than unity far from the BL. In these flows the width of the BL is much larger than its incompressible value and scales as M-squared times the width of the imcompressible BL. The density inside the BL is much lower than that in the undisturbed fluid and scales as 1/M-squared with respect to the value far away from the BL. It is concluded that under certain circumstances a cocoon of low-density material will develop between a jet and its surrounding medium.

  9. Vortex boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1986-01-01

    Parametric studies to identify a vortex generator were completed. Data acquisition in the first chosen configuration, in which a longitudinal vortex pair generated by an isolated delta wing starts to merge with a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate fairly close to the leading edge is nearly completed. Work on a delta-wing/flat-plate combination, consisting of a flow visualization and hot wire measurements taken with a computer controlled traverse gear and data logging system were completed. Data taking and analysis have continued, and sample results for another cross stream plane are presented. Available data include all mean velocity components, second order mean products of turbulent fluctuations, and third order mean products. Implementation of a faster data logging system was accomplished.

  10. Outer layer effects in wind-farm boundary layers: Coriolis forces and boundary layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In LES studies of wind-farm boundary layers, scale separation between the inner and outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is frequently assumed, i.e., wind turbines are presumed to fall within the inner layer and are not affected by outer layer effects. However, modern wind turbine and wind farm design tends towards larger rotor diameters and farm sizes, which means that outer layer effects will become more important. In a prior study, it was already shown for fully-developed wind farms that the ABL height influences the power performance. In this study, we use the in-house LES code SP-Wind to investigate the importance of outer layer effects on wind-farm boundary layers. In a suite of LES cases, the ABL height is varied by imposing a capping inversion with varying inversion strengths. Results indicate the growth of an internal boundary layer (IBL), which is limited in cases with low inversion layers. We further find that flow deceleration combined with Coriolis effects causes a change in wind direction throughout the farm. This effect increases with decreasing boundary layer height, and can result in considerable turbine wake deflection near the end of the farm. The authors are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). Computations were performed on VSC infrastructiure (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Government-department EWI.

  11. Microgravity Effects on Plant Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary; Monje, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    The goal of these series of experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity conditions on the developmental boundary layers in roots and leaves and to determine the effects of air flow on boundary layer development. It is hypothesized that microgravity induces larger boundary layers around plant organs because of the absence of buoyancy-driven convection. These larger boundary layers may affect normal metabolic function because they may reduce the fluxes of heat and metabolically active gases (e.g., oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. These experiments are to test whether there is a change in boundary layer associated with microgravity, quantify the change if it exists, and determine influence of air velocity on boundary layer thickness under different gravity conditions.

  12. On the Huygens absorbing boundary conditions for electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Berenger, Jean-Pierre

    A new absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is presented for the solution of Maxwell equations in unbounded spaces. Called the Huygens ABC, this condition is a generalization of two previously published ABCs, namely the multiple absorbing surfaces (MAS) and the re-radiating boundary condition (rRBC). The properties of the Huygens ABC are derived theoretically in continuous spaces and in the finite-difference (FDTD) discretized space. A solution is proposed to render the Huygens ABC effective for the absorption of evanescent waves. Numerical experiments with the FDTD method show that the effectiveness of the Huygens ABC is close to that of the PML ABCmore » in some realistic problems of numerical electromagnetics. It is also shown in the paper that a combination of the Huygens ABC with the PML ABC is very well suited to the solution of some particular problems.« less

  13. Towards Natural Transition in Compressible Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2016-0011 Towards natural transition in compressible boundary layers Marcello Faraco de Medeiros FUNDACAO PARA O INCREMENTO DA...to 29-03-2016 Towards natural transition in compressible boundary layers FA9550-11-1-0354 Marcello A. Faraco de Medeiros Germán Andrés Gaviria...unlimited. 109 Final report Towards natural transition in compressible boundary layers Principal Investigator: Marcello Augusto Faraco de Medeiros

  14. Turbulent boundary layers with secondary flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grushwitz, E.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental analysis of the boundary layer on a plane wall, along which the flow occurs, whose potential flow lines are curved in plane parallel to the wall is discussed. According to the equation frequently applied to boundary layers in a plane flow, which is usually obtained by using the pulse law, a generalization is derived which is valid for boundary layers with spatial flow. The wall shear stresses were calculated with this equation.

  15. Three-dimensional boundary layers approaching separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. C., III

    1976-01-01

    The theory of semi-similar solutions of the laminar boundary layer equations is applied to several flows in which the boundary layer approaches a three-dimensional separation line. The solutions obtained are used to deduce the nature of three-dimensional separation. It is shown that in these cases separation is of the "ordinary" type. A solution is also presented for a case in which a vortex is embedded within the three-dimensional boundary layer.

  16. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  17. Towards Natural Transition in Compressible Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-29

    Behaviour of a natural laminar flow aerofoil in flight through atmospheric turbulence. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 767:394–429, 003 2015. [70] O...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited See report Wave packet, compressible boundary layer, subsonic flow ...Base flow generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 3.1.1 Boundary layer profiles

  18. Optimization of sound absorbing performance for gradient multi-layer-assembled sintered fibrous absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Weiyong; Zhu, Jian

    2012-04-01

    The transfer matrix method, based on plane wave theory, of multi-layer equivalent fluid is employed to evaluate the sound absorbing properties of two-layer-assembled and three-layer-assembled sintered fibrous sheets (generally regarded as a kind of compound absorber or structures). Two objective functions which are more suitable for the optimization of sound absorption properties of multi-layer absorbers within the wider frequency ranges are developed and the optimized results of using two objective functions are also compared with each other. It is found that using the two objective functions, especially the second one, may be more helpful to exert the sound absorbing properties of absorbers at lower frequencies to the best of their abilities. Then the calculation and optimization of sound absorption properties of multi-layer-assembled structures are performed by developing a simulated annealing genetic arithmetic program and using above-mentioned objective functions. Finally, based on the optimization in this work the thoughts of the gradient design over the acoustic parameters- the porosity, the tortuosity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the thickness of each samples- of porous metals are put forth and thereby some useful design criteria upon the acoustic parameters of each layer of porous fibrous metals are given while applying the multi-layer-assembled compound absorbers in noise control engineering.

  19. A nonperturbing boundary-layer transition detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohare, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    A laser interferometer technique is being applied to the characterization of boundary-layer conditions on models in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnels in the von Karman Facility at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC). The Boundary-Layer Transition Detector (BLTD), based on lateral interferometry, is applicable for determining the turbulence frequency spectrum of boundary layers in compressible flow. The turbulence, in terms of air density fluctuations, is detected by monitoring interferometric fringe phase shifts (in real time) formed by one beam which passes through the boundary layer and a reference beam which is outside the boundary layer. This technique is nonintrusive to the flow field unlike other commonly used methods such as pitot tube probing and hot-wire anemometry. Model boundary-layer data are presented at Mach 8 and compared with data recorded using other methods during boundary-layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Spectra from the BLTD reveal the presence of a high-frequency peak during transition, which is characteristic of spectra obtained with hot wires. The BLTD is described along with operational requirements and limitations.

  20. A Nonperturbing Boundary-Layer Transition Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hare, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    A laser interferometer technique is being applied to the characterization of boundary-layer conditions on models in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnels in the von Kaman Facility at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC). The Boundary-Layer Transition Detector (BLTD), based on lateral interferometry, is applicable for determining the turbulence frequency spectrum of boundary layers in compressible flow. The turbulence, in terms of air density fluctuations, is detected by monitoring interferometric fringe phase shifts (in real time) formed by one beam which passes through the boundary layer and a reference beam which is outside the boundary layer. This technique is nonintrusive to the flow field unlike other commonly used methods such as pitot tube probing and hot-wire anemometry. Model boundary-layer data are presented at Mach 8 and compared with data recorded using other methods during boundary-layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Spectra from the BLTD reveal the presence of a high-frequency peak during transition, which is characteristic of spectra obtained with hot wires. The BLTD is described along with operational requirements and limitations.

  1. Planetary Boundary Layer Simulation Using TASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowalter, David G.; DeCroix, David S.; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Boundary conditions to an existing large-eddy simulation model have been changed in order to simulate turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. Several options are now available, including the use of a surface energy balance. In addition, we compare convective boundary layer simulations with the Wangara and Minnesota field experiments as well as with other model results. We find excellent agreement of modelled mean profiles of wind and temperature with observations and good agreement for velocity variances. Neutral boundary simulation results are compared with theory and with previously used models. Agreement with theory is reasonable, while agreement with previous models is excellent.

  2. Measurements in a synthetic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakeri, J. H.; Coles, D. E.

    Some measurements in a synthetic turbulent boundary layer (SBL) are reported. The main diagnostic tool is an X-wire probe. The velocity of the large eddies is determined to be 0.842 times the freestream velocity. The mean properties of the SBL are reasonably close to those of a natural turbulent boundary layer. The large eddy in the SBL appears to be a pair of counterrotating eddies in the stream direction, inclined at a shallow angle and occupying much of the boundary-layer thickness.

  3. Solute boundary layer on a rotating crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povinelli, Michelle L.; Korpela, Seppo A.; Chait, Arnon

    1994-11-01

    A perturbation analysis has been carried out for the solutal boundary layer next to a rotating crystal. Our aim is to extend the classical results of Burton, Prim and Slicher [1] in order to obtain higher order terms in asymptotic expansions for the concentration field and boundary-layer thickness. Expressions for the effective segregation coefficient are directly obtained from the concentration solution in the two limits that correspond to weak and strong rotation.

  4. Molecular Diagnostics of Diffusive Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlings, J. M. C.; Hartquist, T. W.

    1997-10-01

    We have examined the chemistry in thin (<~0.01 pc) boundary layers between dark star-forming cores and warm, shocked T Tauri winds on the assumption that turbulence-driven diffusion occurs within them. The results indicate that emissions from C+, CH, OH, H2O and the J = 6 --> 5 transition of CO, among others, may serve as diagnostics of the boundary layers.

  5. Boundary-layer stability and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeffrey K.

    1986-01-01

    Several different natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils have been analyzed for stability of the laminar boundary layer using linear stability codes. The NLF airfoils analyzed come from three different design conditions: incompressible; compressible with no sweep; and compressible with sweep. Some of the design problems are discussed, concentrating on those problems associated with keeping the boundary layer laminar. Also, there is a discussion on how a linear stability analysis was effectively used to improve the design for some of the airfoils.

  6. Shock-Wave Boundary Layer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    Security Classification of Document UNCLASSIFIED 6. Title TURBULENT SHOCK-WAVE/BOUNDARY-LAYER INTERACTION 7. Presented at 8. Author(s)/Editor(s...contrary effects. The above demonstration puts an emphasis on inertia forces in the sense that the "fullness" for the Incoming boundary-layer profile is...expression "quasi-normal" means that in most transonic streams, the shocks are strong oblique shock, in the sense of the strong solution of the oblique shock

  7. Comments on Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    mechanism by which boundary-layer disturbance growth is generally initiated and establishes the initial distur- banca amplitude at the onset of disturbance...Patankar, S. V., and Spalding, P. B., Heat and Mass Transfer in Boundary Lavers, CRC Press , Cleveland, Ohio, 1968. 87. Neumann, R. D., and Patterson, .J. 1

  8. A nonperturbing boundary-layer transition detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohare, J. E.

    1985-11-01

    A laser interferometer technique is being applied to the characterization of boundary-layer conditions on models in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnels. The boundary-layer transition detector (BLTD), based on lateral interferometry, is applicable for determining the turbulence frequency spectrum of boundary layers in compressible flow. The turbulence, in terms of air density fluctuations, is detected by monitoring interferometric fringe phase shifts (in real time) formed by one beam which passes through the boundary layer and a reference beam which is outside the boundary layer. This technique is nonintrusive to the flow field unlike other commonly used methods such as pitot tube probing and hot-wire anemometry. Data which depict boundary-layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow are presented to provide comparisons of the BLTD with other measurement methods. Spectra from the BLTD reveals the presence of a high-frequency peak during transition which is characteristic of spectra obtained with hot wires. The BLTD is described along with operational requirements and limitations.

  9. Boundary-layer effects in droplet splashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2017-11-01

    A drop falling onto a solid substrate will disintegrate into smaller parts when its impact velocity exceeds the so called critical velocity for splashing. Under these circumstances, the very thin liquid sheet ejected tangentially to the solid after the drop touches the substrate, lifts off as a consequence of the aerodynamic forces exerted on it and finally breaks into smaller droplets, violently ejected radially outwards, provoking the splash. Here, the tangential deceleration experienced by the fluid entering the thin liquid sheet is investigated making use of boundary layer theory. The velocity component tangent to the solid, computed using potential flow theory provides the far field boundary condition as well as the pressure gradient for the boundary layer equations. The structure of the flow permits to find a self similar solution of the boundary layer equations. This solution is then used to calculate the boundary layer thickness at the root of the lamella as well as the shear stress at the wall. The splash model presented in, which is slightly modified to account for the results obtained from the boundary layer analysis, provides a very good agreement between the measurements and the predicted values of the critical velocity for the splash.

  10. Stability of spatially developing boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, Rama

    1993-07-01

    A new formulation of the stability of boundary-layer flows in pressure gradients is presented, taking into account the spatial development of the flow. The formulation assumes that disturbance wavelength and eigenfunction vary downstream no more rapidly than the boundary-layer thickness, and includes all terms of O(1) and O(R(exp -1)) in the boundary-layer Reynolds number R. Although containing the Orr-Sommerfeld operator, the present approach does not yield the Orr-Sommerfeld equation in any rational limit. In Blasius flow, the present stability equation is consistent with that of Bertolotti et al. (1992) to terms of O(R(exp -1)). For the Falkner-Skan similarity solutions neutral boundaries are computed without the necessity of having to march in space. Results show that the effects of spatial growth are striking in flows subjected to adverse pressure gradients.

  11. Studying the Afternoon Transition of the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Lenschow, Donald H.

    2010-07-01

    The planetary boundary layer is the part of the atmosphere that interacts directly with the Earth's surface on a time scale of a few hours or less. In daytime, solar heating of the surface can generate buoyant turbulent eddies that efficiently mix the air through a depth of more than a kilometer. This convective boundary layer (CBL) is a conduit for trace gases such as water vapor and carbon dioxide that are emitted or absorbed by the surface (and surface vegetation) to be transported into or out of the layer nearest the surface. The CBL has been extensively observed and relatively successfully modeled. But the early morning transition—when the CBL emerges from the nocturnal boundary layer—and the late afternoon transition—when the CBL decays to an intermittently turbulent “residual layer” overlying a shallower, stably stratified boundary layer—are difficult to observe and model due to turbulence intermittency and anisotropy, horizontal heterogeneity, and rapid time changes. Even the definition of the boundary layer during these transitional periods is fuzzy; there is no consensus on what criteria to use and no simple scaling laws, as there are for the CBL, that apply during these transitions.

  12. Boundary layers in centrifugal compressors. [application of boundary layer theory to compressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, R. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The utility of boundary-layer theory in the design of centrifugal compressors is demonstrated. Boundary-layer development in the diffuser entry region is shown to be important to stage efficiency. The result of an earnest attempt to analyze this boundary layer with the best tools available is displayed. Acceptable prediction accuracy was not achieved. The inaccuracy of boundary-layer analysis in this case would result in stage efficiency prediction as much as four points low. Fluid dynamic reasons for analysis failure are discussed with support from flow data. Empirical correlations used today to circumnavigate the weakness of the theory are illustrated.

  13. Analysis of single-layer metamaterial absorber with reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Tang, Ming-Chun; Hong, Jing-Song

    2015-04-01

    A reflection theory is employed to analyze a single-layered metamaterial absorber. With the necessary conditions for zero reflection, the permittivity and permeability as functions of absorptivity were obtained, which are suitable for analyzing the absorption properties of single-layered metamaterial absorber at both normal and oblique incidence cases. With the obtained expressions, it not only can explain why the absorption peaks monotonously decrease with increasing of the incident angles but also can explore the relationship between the absorptivity and spacer thickness of the dielectric slab. A Jerusalem cross metamaterial absorber was simulated and verified the validity of this proposed reflection theory. The main contribution of our work is that it can explain the physical mechanism of the various absorption peaks by using the analytical formula and highlights its potential guidance for designing and analyzing metamaterial absorbers in the future.

  14. On buffer layers as non-reflecting computational boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Turkel, Eli L.

    1996-01-01

    We examine an absorbing buffer layer technique for use as a non-reflecting boundary condition in the numerical simulation of flows. One such formulation was by Ta'asan and Nark for the linearized Euler equations. They modified the flow inside the buffer zone to artificially make it supersonic in the layer. We examine how this approach can be extended to the nonlinear Euler equations. We consider both a conservative and a non-conservative form modifying the governing equations in the buffer layer. We compare this with the case that the governing equations in the layer are the same as in the interior domain. We test the effectiveness of these buffer layers by a simulation of an excited axisymmetric jet based on a nonlinear compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  15. Lear jet boundary layer/shear layer laser propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K.

    1980-01-01

    Optical degradations of aircraft turbulent boundary layers with shear layers generated by aerodynamic fences are analyzed. A collimated 2.5 cm diameter helium-neon laser (0.63 microns) traversed the approximate 5 cm thick natural aircraft boundary layer in double pass via a reflective airfoil. In addition, several flights examined shear layer-induced optical degradation. Flight altitudes ranged from 1.5 to 12 km, while Mach numbers were varied from 0.3 to 0.8. Average line spread function (LSF) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) data were obtained by averaging a large number of tilt-removed curves. Fourier transforming the resulting average MTF yields an LSF, thus affording a direct comparison of the two optical measurements. Agreement was good for the aerodynamic fence arrangement, but only fair in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. Values of phase variance inferred from the LSF instrument for a single pass through the random flow and corrected for a large aperture ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 waves (lambda = .63 microns) for the boundary layer. Corresponding values for the fence vary from 0.08 to 0.16 waves. Extrapolation of these values to 10.6 microns suggests negligible degradation for a CO2 laser transmitted through a 5 cm thick, subsonic turbulent boundary layer.

  16. High enthalpy hypersonic boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanow, G.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of an ionizing laminar boundary layer formed by a very high enthalpy flow (in excess of 12 eV per atom or 7000 cal/gm) with allowance for the presence of helium driver gas is described. The theoretical investigation has shown that the use of variable transport properties and their respective derivatives is very important in the solution of equilibrium boundary layer equations of high enthalpy flow. The effect of low level helium contamination on the surface heat transfer rate is minimal. The variation of ionization is much smaller in a chemically frozen boundary layer solution than in an equilibrium boundary layer calculation and consequently, the variation of the transport properties in the case of the former was not essential in the integration. The experiments have been conducted in a free piston shock tunnel, and a detailed study of its nozzle operation, including the effects of low levels of helium driver gas contamination has been made. Neither the extreme solutions of an equilibrium nor of a frozen boundary layer will adequately predict surface heat transfer rate in very high enthalpy flows.

  17. The Kinematics of Turbulent Boundary Layer Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen Kern

    1991-01-01

    The long history of research into the internal structure of turbulent boundary layers has not provided a unified picture of the physics responsible for turbulence production and dissipation. The goals of the present research are to: (1) define the current state of boundary layer structure knowledge; and (2) utilize direct numerical simulation results to help close the unresolved issues identified in part A and to unify the fragmented knowledge of various coherent motions into a consistent kinematic model of boundary layer structure. The results of the current study show that all classes of coherent motion in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer may be related to vortical structures, but that no single form of vortex is representative of the wide variety of vortical structures observed. In particular, ejection and sweep motions, as well as entrainment from the free-streem are shown to have strong spatial and temporal relationships with vortical structures. Disturbances of vortex size, location, and intensity show that quasi-streamwise vortices dominate the buffer region, while transverse vortices and vortical arches dominate the wake region. Both types of vortical structure are common in the log region. The interrelationships between the various structures and the population distributions of vortices are combined into a conceptual kinematic model for the boundary layer. Aspects of vortical structure dynamics are also postulated, based on time-sequence animations of the numerically simulated flow.

  18. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to provide the first demonstration of an active flow control system for a flush-mounted inlet with significant boundary-layer-ingestion in transonic flow conditions. The effectiveness of the flow control in reducing the circumferential distortion at the engine fan-face location was assessed using a 2.5%-scale model of a boundary-layer-ingesting offset diffusing inlet. The inlet was flush mounted to the tunnel wall and ingested a large boundary layer with a boundary-layer-to-inlet height ratio of 35%. Different jet distribution patterns and jet mass flow rates were used in the inlet to control distortion. A vane configuration was also tested. Finally a hybrid vane/jet configuration was tested leveraging strengths of both types of devices. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow rates through the duct and the flow control actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were measured at the aerodynamic interface plane. The data show that control jets and vanes reduce circumferential distortion to acceptable levels. The point-design vane configuration produced higher distortion levels at off-design settings. The hybrid vane/jet flow control configuration reduced the off-design distortion levels to acceptable ones and used less than 0.5% of the inlet mass flow to supply the jets.

  19. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Instability Over a Corner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Zhao, Hong-Wu; McClinton, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A boundary-layer transition study over a compression corner was conducted under a hypersonic flow condition. Due to the discontinuities in boundary layer flow, the full Navier-Stokes equations were solved to simulate the development of disturbance in the boundary layer. A linear stability analysis and PSE method were used to get the initial disturbance for parallel and non-parallel flow respectively. A 2-D code was developed to solve the full Navier-stokes by using WENO(weighted essentially non-oscillating) scheme. The given numerical results show the evolution of the linear disturbance for the most amplified disturbance in supersonic and hypersonic flow over a compression ramp. The nonlinear computations also determined the minimal amplitudes necessary to cause transition at a designed location.

  20. Mechanics of Boundary Layer Transition. Part 5: Boundary Layer Stability theory in incompressible and compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    The fundamentals of stability theory, its chief results, and the physical mechanisms at work are presented. The stability theory of the laminar boundary determines whether a small disturbance introduced into the boundary layer will amplify or damp. If the disturbance damps, the boundary layer remains laminar. If the disturbance amplifies, and by a sufficient amount, then transition to turbulence eventually takes place. The stability theory establishes those states of the boundary layer which are most likely to lead to transition, identifys those frequencies which are the most dangerous, and indicates how the external parameters can best be changed to avoid transition.

  1. An interacting boundary layer model for cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. T.; Rothmayer, A. P.

    1983-01-01

    A laminar, incompressible interacting boundary layer model is developed for two-dimensional cascades. In the limit of large cascade spacing these equations reduce to the interacting boundary layer equations for a single body immersed in an infinite stream. A fully implicit numerical method is used to solve the governing equations, and is found to be at least as efficient as the same technique applied to the single body problem. Solutions are then presented for a cascade of finite flat plates and a cascade of finite sine-waves, with cusped leading and trailing edges.

  2. Stability of an oscillating boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levchenko, V. Y.; Solovyev, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    Levchenko and Solov'ev (1972, 1974) have developed a stability theory for space periodic flows, assuming that the Floquet theory is applicable to partial differential equations. In the present paper, this approach is extended to unsteady periodic flows. A complete unsteady formulation of the stability problem is obtained, and the stability characteristics over an oscillating period are determined from the solution of the problem. Calculations carried out for an oscillating incompressible boundary layer on a plate showed that the boundary layer flow may be regarded as a locally parallel flow.

  3. Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel-Amor, G.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.; Flores, O.

    2015-02-01

    The present work presents a number of parallel and spatially developing simulations of boundary layers to address the question of whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence, and which role they play during transition. In the first part, the parent-offspring regeneration mechanism is investigated in parallel (temporal) simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to either turbulent channels or boundary layers (Reτ ≲ 590). The effect of a turbulent background superimposed on the mean flow is considered by using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are only created shortly after initialization, with all rotational structures decaying for later times. For hairpins in a clean (laminar) environment, the decay is relatively slow, while hairpins in weak turbulent environments (10% of νt) dissipate after a couple of eddy turnover times. In the second part, the role of hairpin vortices in laminar-turbulent transition is studied using simulations of spatial boundary layers tripped by hairpin vortices. These vortices are generated by means of specific volumetric forces representing an ejection event, creating a synthetic turbulent boundary layer initially dominated by hairpin-like vortices. These hairpins are advected towards the wake region of the boundary layer, while a sinusoidal instability of the streaks near the wall results in rapid development of a turbulent boundary layer. For Reθ > 400, the boundary layer is fully developed, with no evidence of hairpin vortices reaching into the wall region. The results from both the parallel and spatial simulations strongly suggest that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background is developed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former direct numerical

  4. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  5. Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-10

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Superhydrophobic ...modified surfaces. This study encompassed the testing of four different surfaces: 1) Teflon SLIP, 2) Aluminum SLIP, 3) Honeycomb Superhydrophobic and 4...Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer (PDMSe) Superhydrophobic . Each of these surfaces uses specific geometrical surface features to modify the original

  6. A Vertically Resolved Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Increase of the vertical resolution of the GLAS Fourth Order General Circulation Model (GCM) near the Earth's surface and installation of a new package of parameterization schemes for subgrid-scale physical processes were sought so that the GLAS Model GCM will predict the resolved vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) for all grid points.

  7. Diagnosis of boundary-layer circulations.

    PubMed

    Beare, Robert J; Cullen, Michael J P

    2013-05-28

    Diagnoses of circulations in the vertical plane provide valuable insights into aspects of the dynamics of the climate system. Dynamical theories based on geostrophic balance have proved useful in deriving diagnostic equations for these circulations. For example, semi-geostrophic theory gives rise to the Sawyer-Eliassen equation (SEE) that predicts, among other things, circulations around mid-latitude fronts. A limitation of the SEE is the absence of a realistic boundary layer. However, the coupling provided by the boundary layer between the atmosphere and the surface is fundamental to the climate system. Here, we use a theory based on Ekman momentum balance to derive an SEE that includes a boundary layer (SEEBL). We consider a case study of a baroclinic low-level jet. The SEEBL solution shows significant benefits over Ekman pumping, including accommodating a boundary-layer depth that varies in space and structure, which accounts for buoyancy and momentum advection. The diagnosed low-level jet is stronger than that determined by Ekman balance. This is due to the inclusion of momentum advection. Momentum advection provides an additional mechanism for enhancement of the low-level jet that is distinct from inertial oscillations.

  8. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  9. Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Wood, William A.; McGinley, Catherine B.; Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    Updates to an analytic tool developed for Shuttle support to predict the onset of boundary layer transition resulting from thermal protection system damage or repair are presented. The boundary layer transition tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the local aerothermodynamic environment to enable informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each d agmea site or repair, the expected time (and thus Mach number) of transition onset is predicted to help define proper environments for use in subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the thermal protection system and structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized within the tool were updated based on new local boundary layer properties obtained from high fidelity computational solutions. Also, new ground-based measurements were obtained to allow for a wider parametric variation with both protuberances and cavities and then the resulting correlations were calibrated against updated flight data. The end result is to provide correlations that allow increased confidence with the resulting transition predictions. Recently, a new approach was adopted to remove conservatism in terms of sustained turbulence along the wing leading edge. Finally, some of the newer flight data are also discussed in terms of how these results reflect back on the updated correlations.

  10. Nonlinear Transient Growth and Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used in a variational approach to study the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in a Mach 3 at plate boundary layer and a Mach 6 circular cone boundary layer. As noted in previous works, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of streamwise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The nonlinear evolution of the linearly optimal stationary perturbations is computed using the nonlinear plane-marching PSE for stationary perturbations. A fully implicit marching technique is used to facilitate the computation of nonlinear streaks with large amplitudes. To assess the effect of the finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane- marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of bypass transition is estimated by using an N- factor criterion based on the amplification of the streak instabilities. Results show that, for both flow configurations of interest, streaks of sufficiently large amplitude can lead to significantly earlier onset of transition than that in an unperturbed boundary layer without any streaks.

  11. Flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Sreedhara V.

    1989-01-01

    The development of boundary layers at high subsonic speeds in the presence of either mass flux fluctuations or acoustic disturbances (the two most important parameters in the unsteadiness environment affecting the aerodynamics of a flight vehicle) was investigated. A high quality database for generating detailed information concerning free-stream flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layer growth and transition in high subsonic and transonic speeds is described. The database will be generated with a two-pronged approach: (1) from a detailed review of existing literature on research and wind tunnel calibration database, and (2) from detailed tests in the Boundary Layer Apparatus for Subsonic and Transonic flow Affected by Noise Environment (BLASTANE). Special instrumentation, including hot wire anemometry, the buried wire gage technique, and laser velocimetry were used to obtain skin friction and turbulent shear stress data along the entire boundary layer for various free stream noise levels, turbulence content, and pressure gradients. This database will be useful for improving the correction methodology of applying wind tunnel test data to flight predictions and will be helpful for making improvements in turbulence modeling laws.

  12. A note on boundary-layer pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. H.

    1981-05-01

    The simple model of strong blowing across an impulsively started rotating disc is considered. The model shows features present in the two basic problems of spin-up in a circular cylinder and the flow between counter-rotating discs. The role of boundary layer pumping appears to be crucial in both situations.

  13. Boundary Layer Transition on X-43A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Wurster, Kathryn; Bittner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the first fully integrated scramjet propulsion systems by the Hyper-X (X-43A) program have provided the means with which to verify the original design methodologies and assumptions. As part of Hyper-X s propulsion-airframe integration, the forebody was designed to include a spanwise array of vortex generators to promote boundary layer transition ahead of the engine. Turbulence at the inlet is thought to provide the most reliable engine design and allows direct scaling of flight results to groundbased data. Pre-flight estimations of boundary layer transition, for both Mach 7 and 10 flight conditions, suggested that forebody boundary layer trips were required to ensure fully turbulent conditions upstream of the inlet. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the thermocouple measurements used to infer the dynamics of the transition process during the trajectories for both flights, on both the lower surface (to assess trip performance) and the upper surface (to assess natural transition). The approach used in the analysis of the thermocouple data is outlined, along with a discussion of the calculated local flow properties that correspond to the transition events as identified in the flight data. The present analysis has confirmed that the boundary layer trips performed as expected for both flights, providing turbulent flow ahead of the inlet during critical portions of the trajectory, while the upper surface was laminar as predicted by the pre-flight analysis.

  14. A magnetic boundary layer at the magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartalev, M. D.; Simeonov, G.

    A new approach in the boundary layer description of the magnetopause is proposed. The magnetopause is considered as a mixing region of two streams of plasma with different parameters. The assumption is made that wave-particle interactions cause the plasma to be resistive. Thus only the magnetic viscosity is supposed to be essential. Other dissipation effects are neglected. The plasma and magnetic field conditions at the outer boundary of the layer can be obtained from the solution of the nondissipative problem for the magnetosheath. The magnetic field is assumed to be known at the inner boundary. No further conditions are needed in our formulation of the problem. The variation of the flow parameters and the magnetic field can be obtained numerically.

  15. Separation behavior of boundary layers on three-dimensional wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, H. W.

    1981-01-01

    An inverse boundary layer procedure for calculating separated, turbulent boundary layers at infinitely long, crabbing wing was developed. The procedure was developed for calculating three dimensional, incompressible turbulent boundary layers was expanded to adiabatic, compressible flows. Example calculations with transsonic wings were made including viscose effects. In this case an approximated calculation method described for areas of separated, turbulent boundary layers, permitting calculation of this displacement thickness. The laminar boundary layer development was calculated with inclined ellipsoids.

  16. Modeling Electrothermal Plasma with Boundary Layer Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlMousa, Nouf Mousa A.

    Electrothermal plasma sources produce high-density (1023-10 28 /m3) and high temperature (1-5 eV) plasmas that are of interest for a variety of applications such as hypervelocity launch devices, fusion reactor pellet injectors, and pulsed thrusters for small satellites. Also, the high heat flux (up to 100 GW/m2) and high pressure (100s MPa) of electrothermal (ET) plasmas allow for the use of such facilities as a source of high heat flux to simulate off-normal events in Tokamak fusion reactors. Off-normal events like disruptions, thermal and current quenches, are the perfect recipes for damage of plasma facing components (PFC). Successful operation of a fusion reactor requires comprehensive understanding of material erosion behavior. The extremely high heat fluxes deposited in PFCs melt and evaporate or directly sublime the exposed surfaces, which results in a thick vapor/melt boundary layer adjacent to the solid wall structure. The accumulating boundary layers provide a self-protecting nature by attenuating the radiant energy transport to the PFCs. The ultimate goal of this study is to develop a reliable tool to adequately simulate the effect of the boundary layers on the formation and flow of the energetic ET plasma and its impact on exposed surfaces erosion under disruption like conditions. This dissertation is a series of published journals/conferences papers. The first paper verified the existence of the vapor shield that evolved at the boundary layer under the typical operational conditions of the NC State University ET plasma facilities PIPE and SIRENS. Upon the verification of the vapor shield, the second paper proposed novel model to simulate the evolution of the boundary layer and its effectiveness in providing a self-protecting nature for the exposed plasma facing surfaces. The developed models simulate the radiant heat flux attenuation through an optically thick boundary layer. The models were validated by comparing the simulation results to experimental

  17. Performance advantages of CPML over UPML absorbing boundary conditions in FDTD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdic, Branko D.; Djurdjevic, Dusan Z.

    2017-01-01

    Implementation of absorbing boundary condition (ABC) has a very important role in simulation performance and accuracy in finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The perfectly matched layer (PML) is the most efficient type of ABC. The aim of this paper is to give detailed insight in and discussion of boundary conditions and hence to simplify the choice of PML used for termination of computational domain in FDTD method. In particular, we demonstrate that using the convolutional PML (CPML) has significant advantages in terms of implementation in FDTD method and reducing computer resources than using uniaxial PML (UPML). An extensive number of numerical experiments has been performed and results have shown that CPML is more efficient in electromagnetic waves absorption. Numerical code is prepared, several problems are analyzed and relative error is calculated and presented.

  18. INDIVIDUAL TURBULENT CELL INTERACTION: BASIS FOR BOUNDARY LAYER ESTABLISHMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boundary layers are important in determining the forces on objects in flowing fluids, mixing characteristics, and other phenomena. For example, benthic boundary layers are frequently active resuspension layers that determine bottom turbidity and transniissivity. Traditionally, bo...

  19. Viscous drag reduction in boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M. (Editor); Hefner, Jerry N. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the development status of stability theory for laminar flow control design, applied aspects of laminar-flow technology, transition delays using compliant walls, the application of CFD to skin friction drag-reduction, active-wave control of boundary-layer transitions, and such passive turbulent-drag reduction methods as outer-layer manipulators and complex-curvature concepts. Also treated are such active turbulent drag-reduction technique applications as those pertinent to MHD flow drag reduction, as well as drag reduction in liquid boundary layers by gas injection, drag reduction by means of polymers and surfactants, drag reduction by particle addition, viscous drag reduction via surface mass injection, and interactive wall-turbulence control.

  20. A modeling study of marine boundary layer clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Shouping; Fitzjarrald, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds are important components of the earth's climate system. These clouds drastically reduce the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the earth, but have little effect on the emitted infrared radiation on top of the atmosphere. In addition, these clouds are intimately involved in regulating boundary layer turbulent fluxes. For these reasons, it is important that general circulation models used for climate studies must realistically simulate the global distribution of the MBL. While the importance of these cloud systems is well recognized, many physical processes involved in these clouds are poorly understood and their representation in large-scale models remains an unresolved problem. The present research aims at the development and improvement of the parameterization of these cloud systems and an understanding of physical processes involved. This goal is addressed in two ways. One is to use regional modeling approach to validate and evaluate two-layer marine boundary layer models using satellite and ground-truth observations; the other is to combine this simple model with a high-order turbulence closure model to study the transition processes from stratocumulus to shallow cumulus clouds. Progress made in this effort is presented.

  1. Wind and boundary layers in Rayleigh-Bénard convection. II. Boundary layer character and scaling.

    PubMed

    van Reeuwijk, Maarten; Jonker, Harm J J; Hanjalić, Kemo

    2008-03-01

    The scaling of the kinematic boundary layer thickness lambda(u) and the friction factor C(f) at the top and bottom walls of Rayleigh-Bénard convection is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS). By a detailed analysis of the friction factor, a new parameterisation for C(f) and lambda(u) is proposed. The simulations were made of an L/H=4 aspect-ratio domain with periodic lateral boundary conditions at Ra=(10(5), 10(6), 10(7), 10(8)) and Pr=1. The continuous spectrum, as well as significant forcing due to Reynolds stresses, clearly indicates a turbulent character of the boundary layer, while viscous effects cannot be neglected, judging from the scaling of classical integral boundary layer parameters with Reynolds number. Using a conceptual wind model, we find that the friction factor C(f) should scale proportionally to the thermal boundary layer thickness as C(f) proportional variant lambda(Theta)/H, while the kinetic boundary layer thickness lambda(u) scales inversely proportionally to the thermal boundary layer thickness and wind Reynolds number lambda(u)/H proportional variant (lambda(Theta)/H)(-1)Re(-1). The predicted trends for C(f) and lambda(u) are in agreement with DNS results.

  2. Enthalpy effects on hypervelocity boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Philippe H.

    Shots with air and carbon dioxide were carried out in the T5 shock tunnel at GALCIT to study enthalpy effects on hypervelocity boundary layers. The model tested was a 1-meter long, 5-deg half-angle cone. It was instrumented with 51 chromel-constantan coaxial thermocouples and the surface heat transfer rate was computed to deduce the state of the boundary layer. Transitional boundary layers obtained confirm the stabilizing effect of enthalpy. As the reservoir enthalpy is increased, the transition Reynolds number evaluated at the reference conditions increases. This stabilizing effect is more rapid in gases with lower dissociation energy and it seems to level off when no further dissociation can be achieved. Normalizing the reservoir enthalpy with the edge enthalpy appears to collapse the data for all gases onto a single curve. A similar collapse is obtained when normalizing both the transition location and the reservoir enthalpy with the maximum temperature conditions obtained with BLIMPK, a nonequilibrium boundary layer code. The observation that reference conditions are more appropriate to normalize high enthalpy transition data was taken a step further by comparing the tunnel data with results from a reentry experiment. When the edge conditions are used, the tunnel and flight data are around an order of magnitude apart. This is commonly attributed to high disturbance levels in tunnels that cause the boundary layer to transition early. However, when the reference conditions are used instead, the tunnel and flight data come within striking distance of one another although the trends with enthalpy are reversed. This difference could be due to the cone bending and nose blunting. Experimental laminar heat transfer levels were compared to numerical results obtained with BLIMPK. Results for air indicate that the reactions are probably in nonequilibrium and that the wall is catalytic. The catalycity is seen to yield higher surface heat transfer rates than the

  3. High sensitivity boundary layer transition detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzazy, M.; Modarress, D.; Hoeft, T.

    1985-01-01

    A high sensitivity differential interferometer has been developed to locate the region where the boundary layer flow changes from laminar to turbulent. Two experimental configurations have been used to evaluate the performance of the interferometer, open shear layer configuration and wind tunnel turbulent spot configuration. In each experiment small temperature fluctuations were introduced as the signal source. Simultaneous cold wire measurements have been compared with the interferometer data. The comparison shows that the interferometer is sensitive to very weak phase variations in the order of .001 the laser wavelength.

  4. Boundary Layer Theory. Part 1; Laminar Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H.

    1949-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to give you a survey of a field of aerodynamics which has for a number of years been attracting an ever growing interest. The subject is the theory of flows with friction, and, within that field, particularly the theory of friction layers, or boundary layers. As you know, a great many considerations of aerodynamics are based on the so-called ideal fluid, that is, the frictionless incompressible fluid. By neglect of compressibility and friction the extensive mathematical theory of the ideal fluid (potential theory) has been made possible.

  5. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  6. Turbulent shear stresses in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.; Demetriades, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements of turbulent shear stresses in a Mach 3 compressible boundary layer were performed in order to investigate the effects of heat transfer on turbulence. Measurements were obtained by an x-probe in a flat plate, zero pressure gradient, two dimensional boundary layer in a wind tunnel with wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.94 and 0.71. The measured shear stress distributions are found to be in good agreement with previous results, supporting the contention that the shear stress distribution is essentially independent of Mach number and heat transfer for Mach numbers from incompressible to hypersonic and wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.4 to 1.0. It is also found that corrections for frequency response limitations of the electronic equipment are necessary to determine the correct shear stress distribution, particularly at the walls.

  7. Turbulent Helicity in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhetiani, Otto G.; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Vazaeva, Natalia V.

    2018-05-01

    We consider the assumption postulated by Deusebio and Lindborg (J Fluid Mech 755:654-671, 2014) that the helicity injected into the Ekman boundary layer undergoes a cascade, with preservation of its sign (right- or alternatively left-handedness), which is a signature of the system rotation, from large to small scales, down to the Kolmogorov microscale of turbulence. At the same time, recent direct field measurements of turbulent helicity in the steppe region of southern Russia near Tsimlyansk Reservoir show the opposite sign of helicity from that expected. A possible explanation for this phenomenon may be the joint action of different scales of atmospheric flows within the boundary layer, including the sea-breeze circulation over the test site. In this regard, we consider a superposition of the classic Ekman spiral solution and Prandtl's jet-like slope-wind profile to describe the planetary boundary-layer wind structure. The latter solution mimics a hydrostatic shallow breeze circulation over a non-uniformly heated surface. A 180°-wide sector on the hodograph plane exists, within which the relative orientation of the Ekman and Prandtl velocity profiles favours the left rotation with height of the resulting wind velocity vector in the lowermost part of the boundary layer. This explains the negative (left-handed) helicity cascade toward small-scale turbulent motions, which agrees with the direct field measurements of turbulent helicity in Tsimlyansk. A simple turbulent relaxation model is proposed that explains the measured positive values of the relatively minor contribution to turbulent helicity from the vertical components of velocity and vorticity.

  8. Boundary Layer Transition Results From STS-114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Cassady, Amy M.; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Wang, K. C.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The tool for predicting the onset of boundary layer transition from damage to and/or repair of the thermal protection system developed in support of Shuttle Return to Flight is compared to the STS-114 flight results. The Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the aerothermodynamic environment of the local thermal protection system to allow informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each damage site or repair, the expected time of transition onset is predicted to help determine the proper aerothermodynamic environment to use in the subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the local structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized for the tool was developed from ground-based measurements to account for the effect of both protuberances and cavities and has been calibrated against flight data. Computed local boundary layer edge conditions provided the means to correlate the experimental results and then to extrapolate to flight. During STS-114, the BLT Tool was utilized and was part of the decision making process to perform an extravehicular activity to remove the large gap fillers. The role of the BLT Tool during this mission, along with the supporting information that was acquired for the on-orbit analysis, is reviewed. Once the large gap fillers were removed, all remaining damage sites were cleared for reentry as is. Post-flight analysis of the transition onset time revealed excellent agreement with BLT Tool predictions.

  9. Progress in modeling hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Otto

    1993-01-01

    A good knowledge of the turbulence structure, wall heat transfer, and friction in turbulent boundary layers (TBL) at high speeds is required for the design of hypersonic air breathing airplanes and reentry space vehicles. This work reports on recent progress in the modeling of high speed TBL flows. The specific research goal described here is the development of a second order closure model for zero pressure gradient TBL's for the range of Mach numbers up to hypersonic speeds with arbitrary wall cooling requirements.

  10. Boundary Layer Control for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive methods for tripping hypersonic boundary layers have been examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels using a Hyper-X model. This investigation assessed several concepts for forcing transition, including passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition (or blowing), in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnels. Heat transfer distributions obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the Hyper-X nominal Mach 7 flight test-point of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For passive roughness, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration, scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness, being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle. For the active blowing study, the manifold pressure was systematically varied (while monitoring the mass flow) for each configuration to determine the jet penetration height, with schlieren, and transition movement, with the phosphor system, for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested, which included various rows of sonic orifices (holes), two- and three-dimensional slots, and random porosity, provided transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model surface static pressure, which is adequate to ensure sonic jets. The present results indicate that the jet penetration height for blowing was roughly half the height required with passive roughness elements for an equivalent amount of transition movement.

  11. Coupled wake boundary layer model of windfarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    We present a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a windfarm. The model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake expansion/superposition approach with a top-down model for the overall windfarm boundary layer structure. Wake models capture the effect of turbine positioning, while the top-down approach represents the interaction between the windturbine wakes and the atmospheric boundary layer. Each portion of the CWBL model requires specification of a parameter that is unknown a-priori. The wake model requires the wake expansion rate, whereas the top-down model requires the effective spanwise turbine spacing within which the model's momentum balance is relevant. The wake expansion rate is obtained by matching the mean velocity at the turbine from both approaches, while the effective spanwise turbine spacing is determined from the wake model. Coupling of the constitutive components of the CWBL model is achieved by iterating these parameters until convergence is reached. We show that the CWBL model predictions compare more favorably with large eddy simulation results than those made with either the wake or top-down model in isolation and that the model can be applied successfully to the Horns Rev and Nysted windfarms. The `Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists' (YES!) of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter supported by NWO, and NSF Grant #1243482.

  12. The role of nonlinear critical layers in boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer', with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus a pair of oblique instability waves - which may or may not be accompanied by an associated plane wave. The amplitudes of these waves, which are completely determined by nonlinear effects within the critical layer, satisfy either a single integro-differential equation or a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities. The physical implications of these equations are discussed.

  13. Convection Cells in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Katherine; Mellado, Juan-Pedro

    2017-04-01

    In dry, shear-free convective boundary layers (CBLs), the turbulent flow of air is known to organise itself on large scales into coherent, cellular patterns, or superstructures, consisting of fast, narrow updraughts and slow, wide downdraughts which together form circulations. Superstructures act as transport mechanisms from the surface to the top of the boundary layer and vice-versa, as opposed to small-scale turbulence, which only modifies conditions locally. This suggests that a thorough investigation into superstructure properties may help us better understand transport across the atmospheric boundary layer as a whole. Whilst their existence has been noted, detailed studies into superstructures in the CBL have been scarce. By applying methods which are known to successfully isolate similar large-scale patterns in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we can assess the efficacy of those detection techniques in the CBL. In addition, through non-dimensional analysis, we can systematically compare superstructures in various convective regimes. We use direct numerical simulation of four different cases for intercomparison: Rayleigh-Bénard convection (steady), Rayleigh-Bénard convection with an adiabatic top lid (quasi-steady), a stably-stratified CBL (quasi-steady) and a neutrally-stratified CBL (unsteady). The first two are non-penetrative and the latter two penetrative. We find that although superstructures clearly emerge from the time-mean flow in the non-penetrative cases, they become obscured by temporal averaging in the CBL. This is because a rigid lid acts to direct the flow into counter-rotating circulation cells whose axis of rotation remains stationary, whereas a boundary layer that grows in time and is able to entrain fluid from above causes the circulations to not only grow in vertical extent, but also to move horizontally and merge with neighbouring circulations. Spatial filtering is a useful comparative technique as it can be performed on boundary

  14. Numerical Simulations of Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowicz, Matthew David

    Numerical schemes for supersonic flows tend to use large amounts of artificial viscosity for stability. This tends to damp out the small scale structures in the flow. Recently some low-dissipation methods have been proposed which selectively eliminate the artificial viscosity in regions which do not require it. This work builds upon the low-dissipation method of Subbareddy and Candler which uses the flux vector splitting method of Steger and Warming but identifies the dissipation portion to eliminate it. Computing accurate fluxes typically relies on large grid stencils or coupled linear systems that become computationally expensive to solve. Unstructured grids allow for CFD solutions to be obtained on complex geometries, unfortunately, it then becomes difficult to create a large stencil or the coupled linear system. Accurate solutions require grids that quickly become too large to be feasible. In this thesis a method is proposed to obtain more accurate solutions using relatively local data, making it suitable for unstructured grids composed of hexahedral elements. Fluxes are reconstructed using local gradients to extend the range of data used. The method is then validated on several test problems. Simulations of boundary layer transition are then performed. An elliptic cone at Mach 8 is simulated based on an experiment at the Princeton Gasdynamics Laboratory. A simulated acoustic noise boundary condition is imposed to model the noisy conditions of the wind tunnel and the transitioning boundary layer observed. A computation of an isolated roughness element is done based on an experiment in Purdue's Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel. The mechanism for transition is identified as an instability in the upstream separation region and a comparison is made to experimental data. In the CFD a fully turbulent boundary layer is observed downstream.

  15. Boundary-Layer Bypass Transition Over Large-Scale Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-16

    shape of the streamwise velocity profile compared to the flat- plate boundary layer. The research showed that the streamwise wavenumber plays a key role...many works on the suppression of the transitional boundary layer. Most of the results in the literature are for the flat- plate boundary layer but the...behaviour of the velocity and pressure changes with the curvature. This work aims to extend the results of the flat- plate boundary layer to a Rankine

  16. The inland boundary layer at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1985-08-01

    Observations from the Koorin boundary-layer experiment in Australia (latitude 16 °S) were analysed in a study of the nocturnal jet development. For geostrophic winds in the range 10 20 m s-1, ageostrophic wind magnitudes of 5 10m s-1 were common above the surface layer near sunset, with cross-isobar flow angles of about 40 °. The jet that then developed by midnight was probably the result of these large ageostrophic winds, strong surface cooling and favourable baroclinity and sloping terrain. The analysis is supported by numerical model calculations with special emphasis on the role of long-wave radiative cooling on turbulent decay. Decay is rapid in the presence of radiation, although there is little influence on stress divergence levels. Evidence of sea-breeze influences on the jet evolution, and on features of deeply penetrating sea breezes in general, will be presented and discussed in part 2 of this study (submitted to Boundary-Layer Meteorol.).

  17. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research study conducted in support of the small-scale demonstration of an active flow control system for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) inlet. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet circumferential distortion was assessed using a 2.5% scale model of a 35% boundary-layer-ingesting flush-mounted, offset, diffusing inlet. This experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at flight Mach numbers with a model inlet specifically designed for this type of testing. High mass flow actuators controlled the flow through distributed control jets providing the active flow control. A vortex generator point design configuration was also tested for comparison purposes and to provide a means to examine a hybrid vortex generator and control jets configuration. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were determined by 40 total pressure measurements on 8 rake arms each separated by 45 degrees and were located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum free-stream Mach number of 0.85 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the flow control jets alone can reduce circumferential distortion (DPCPavg) from 0.055 to about 0.015 using about 2.5% of inlet mass flow. The vortex generators also reduced the circumferential distortion from 0.055 to 0.010 near the inlet mass flow design point. Lower inlet mass flow settings with the vortex generator configuration produced higher distortion levels that were reduced to acceptable levels using a hybrid vortex generator/control jets configuration that required less than 1% of the inlet mass flow.

  18. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research study conducted in support of the small-scale demonstration of an active flow control system for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) inlet. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet circumferential distortion was assessed using a 2.5% scale model of a 35% boundary-layer-ingesting flush-mounted, offset, diffusing inlet. This experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at flight Mach numbers with a model inlet specifically designed for this type of testing. High mass flow actuators controlled the flow through distributed control jets providing the active flow control. A vortex generator point design configuration was also tested for comparison purposes and to provide a means to examine a hybrid vortex generator and control jets configuration. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were determined by 40 total pressure measurements on 8 rake arms each separated by 45 degrees and were located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum free-stream Mach number of 0.85 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the flow control jets alone can reduce circumferential distortion (DPCP(sub avg)) from 0.055 to about 0.015 using about 2.5% of inlet mass flow. The vortex generators also reduced the circumferential distortion from 0.055 to 0.010 near the inlet mass flow design point. Lower inlet mass flow settings with the vortex generator configuration produced higher distortion levels that were reduced to acceptable levels using a hybrid vortex generator/control jets configuration that required less than 1% of the inlet mass flow.

  19. The internal boundary layer — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1990-03-01

    A review is given of relevant work on the internal boundary layer (IBL) associated with: (i) Small-scale flow in neutral conditions across an abrupt change in surface roughness, (ii) Small-scale flow in non-neutral conditions across an abrupt change in surface roughness, temperature or heat/moisture flux, (iii) Mesoscale flow, with emphasis on flow across the coastline for both convective and stably stratified conditions. The major theme in all cases is on the downstream, modified profile form (wind and temperature), and on the growth relations for IBL depth.

  20. Boundary Layer Depth In Coastal Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porson, A.; Schayes, G.

    The results of earlier studies performed about sea breezes simulations have shown that this is a relevant feature of the Planetary Boundary Layer that still requires effort to be diagnosed properly by atmospheric models. Based on the observations made during the ESCOMPTE campaign, over the Mediterranean Sea, different CBL and SBL height estimation processes have been tested with a meso-scale model, TVM. The aim was to compare the critical points of the BL height determination computed using turbulent kinetic energy profile with some other standard evaluations. Moreover, these results have been analysed with different mixing length formulation. The sensitivity of formulation is also analysed with a simple coastal configuration.

  1. Spray CVD for Making Solar-Cell Absorber Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) processes of a special type have been investigated for use in making CuInS2 absorber layers of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells from either of two subclasses of precursor compounds: [(PBu3) 2Cu(SEt)2In(SEt)2] or [(PPh3)2Cu(SEt)2 In(SEt)2]. The CuInS2 films produced in the experiments have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and four-point-probe electrical tests.

  2. Sound radiation due to boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1993-01-01

    This report describes progress made to date towards calculations of noise produced by the laminar-turbulence transition process in a low Mach number boundary layer formed on a rigid wall. The primary objectives of the study are to elucidate the physical mechanisms by which acoustic waves are generated, to clarify the roles of the fluctuating Reynolds stress and the viscous stress in the presence of a solid surface, and to determine the relative efficiency as a noise source of the various transition stages. In particular, we will examine the acoustic characteristics and directivity associated with three-dimensional instability waves, the detached high-shear layer, and turbulent spots following a laminar breakdown. Additionally, attention will be paid to the unsteady surface pressures during the transition, which provide a source of flow noise as well as a forcing function for wall vibration in both aeronautical and marine applications.

  3. Subsidence in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Merrilee A.; Stull, Roland B.

    1986-08-01

    Nights with clear skies and strong radiative cooling that favor the formation of statically stable nocturnal boundary layers (NBL) are also those nights most likely to have subsidence, because of the presence of synoptic high-pressure regions. The divergence associated with subsidence laterally removes some of the chilled nocturnal boundary layer air causing the NBL to not grow as rapidly as would otherwise be expected. An equivalent interpretation is that subsidence-induced heating partially counteracts the radiative and turbulent cooling.A new form of nocturnal integral depth scale, HT, is introduced that incorporates the heating and cooling contributions at night. This scale can be used with a variety of idealized temperature profile shapes, including slab, linear, and exponential. It is shown that observed values of subsidence for two case studies can reduce the NBL growth rate, as measured by HT/t, by 5 to 50% and can cause corresponding errors in the estimation of accumulated cooling unless there is a proper accounting of subsidence.Subsidence plays a very minor role close to the ground, but for the case studies presented here its heating rate increases with height and becomes of comparable magnitude to the cooling rates of turbulence and radiation within the top third of the NBL. Although no adequate measurements of horizontal advective effects were available for the case studies used here, it appears from an energy balance that advection must not be neglected because its magnitude can be as large as turbulence and radiation.

  4. Silent inflow condition for turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloerfelt, X.; Robinet, J.-C.

    2017-12-01

    The generation of a turbulent inflow is a tricky problem. In the framework of aeroacoustics, another important constraint is that the numerical strategy used to reach a turbulent state induces a spurious noise which is lower than the acoustic field of interest. For the study of noise radiated directly by a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate, this constraint is severe since wall turbulence is a very inefficient source. That is why a method based on a transition by modal interaction using a base flow with an inflection point is proposed to cope with that. The base flow must be a solution of the equations so we use a profile behind a backward-facing step representative of experimental trip bands. A triad of resonant waves is selected by a local stability analysis of the linearized compressible equations and is added with a weak amplitude in the inlet plane. The compressible stability calculation allows the specification of the thermodynamic quantities at the inlet, which turns out to be fundamental to ensure a quiet inflow. A smooth transition is achieved with the rapid formation of Λ -shape vortices in a staggered organization as in subharmonic transition. The dominance of oblique waves promotes a rapid breakdown by the liftup mechanism of low-speed streaks. The quality of the fully turbulent state is assessed and the direct noise radiation from a turbulent boundary layer at Mach 0.5 is obtained with a very low level of spurious noise.

  5. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Micklos, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS-128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Endeavour for STS-134. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project with emphasis on the STS-131 and STS-133 results. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that empirically correlated predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted surface temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures. A thermocouple anomaly observed on a number of the missions is discussed as are a number of the mitigation actions that will be taken on the final flight, STS-134, including potential alterations of the flight trajectory and changes to the flight instrumentation.

  6. Optimal Growth in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of the parabolized linear stability equations is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, nonmodal disturbance growth in boundary-layer flows. This paper investigates the optimal growth characteristics in the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high-enthalpy effects. The influence of wall cooling is studied, with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the spanwise wave number that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary-layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous- inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. Using the full Navier-Stokes mean flow is shown to result in further reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on the self-similar approximation to the base flow.

  7. X-33 Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hollis, Brian R.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hamilton, H. Harris, II

    1999-01-01

    Boundary layer and aeroheating characteristics of several X-33 configurations have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on 0.013-scale models at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 6.6 million; and body-flap deflections of 0, 10 and 20-deg. The effects of discrete and distributed roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, location, and distribution, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. The discrete roughness results on centerline were used to provide a transition correlation for the X-33 flight vehicle that was applicable across the range of reentry angles of attack. The attachment line discrete roughness results were shown to be consistent with the centerline results, as no increased sensitivity to roughness along the attachment line was identified. The effect of bowed panels was qualitatively shown to be less effective than the discrete trips; however, the distributed nature of the bowed panels affected a larger percent of the aft-body windward surface than a single discrete trip.

  8. Flow Visualization in Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael Wayne

    This thesis is a collection of novel flow visualizations of two different flat-plate, zero pressure gradient, supersonic, turbulent boundary layers (M = 2.8, Re _theta ~ 82,000, and M = 2.5, Re_ theta ~ 25,000, respectively). The physics of supersonic shear flows has recently drawn increasing attention with the renewed interest in flight at super and hypersonic speeds. This work was driven by the belief that the study of organized, Reynolds -stress producing turbulence structures will lead to improved techniques for the modelling and control of high-speed boundary layers. Although flow-visualization is often thought of as a tool for providing qualitative information about complex flow fields, in this thesis an emphasis is placed on deriving quantitative results from image data whenever possible. Three visualization techniques were applied--'selective cut-off' schlieren, droplet seeding, and Rayleigh scattering. Two experiments employed 'selective cut-off' schlieren. In the first, high-speed movies (40,000 fps) were made of strong density gradient fronts leaning downstream at between 30^circ and 60^ circ and travelling at about 0.9U _infty. In the second experiment, the same fronts were detected with hot-wires and imaged in real time, thus allowing the examination of the density gradient fronts and their associated single-point mass -flux signals. Two experiments employed droplet seeding. In both experiments, the boundary layer was seeded by injecting a stream of acetone through a single point in the wall. The acetone is atomized by the high shear at the wall into a 'fog' of tiny (~3.5mu m) droplets. In the first droplet experiment, the fog was illuminated with copper-vapor laser sheets of various orientations. The copper vapor laser pulses 'froze' the fog motion, revealing a variety of organized turbulence structures, some with characteristic downstream inclinations, others with large-scale roll-up on the scale of delta. In the second droplet experiment, high

  9. Bypass transition in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervegt, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Transition to turbulence in aerospace applications usually occurs in a strongly disturbed environment. For instance, the effects of free-stream turbulence, roughness and obstacles in the boundary layer strongly influence transition. Proper understanding of the mechanisms leading to transition is crucial in the design of aircraft wings and gas turbine blades, because lift, drag and heat transfer strongly depend on the state of the boundary layer, laminar or turbulent. Unfortunately, most of the transition research, both theoretical and experimental, has focused on natural transition. Many practical flows, however, defy any theoretical analysis and are extremely difficult to measure. Morkovin introduced in his review paper the concept of bypass transition as those forms of transition which bypass the known mechanisms of linear and non-linear transition theories and are currently not understood by experiments. In an effort to better understand the mechanisms leading to transition in a disturbed environment, experiments are conducted studying simpler cases, viz. the effects of free stream turbulence on transition on a flat plate. It turns out that these experiments are very difficult to conduct, because generation of free stream turbulence with sufficiently high fluctuation levels and reasonable homogeneity is non trivial. For a discussion see Morkovin. Serious problems also appear due to the fact that at high Reynolds numbers the boundary layers are very thin, especially in the nose region of the plate where the transition occurs, which makes the use of very small probes necessary. The effects of free-stream turbulence on transition are the subject of this research and are especially important in a gas turbine environment, where turbulence intensities are measured between 5 and 20 percent, Wang et al. Due to the fact that the Reynolds number for turbine blades is considerably lower than for aircraft wings, generally a larger portion of the blade will be in a laminar

  10. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R., E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonicmore » vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.« less

  11. Simulations of turbulent asymptotic suction boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobke, Alexandra; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-02-01

    A series of large-eddy simulations of a turbulent asymptotic suction boundary layer (TASBL) was performed in a periodic domain, on which uniform suction was applied over a flat plate. Three Reynolds numbers (defined as ratio of free-stream and suction velocity) of Re = 333, 400 and 500 and a variety of domain sizes were considered in temporal simulations in order to investigate the turbulence statistics, the importance of the computational domain size, the arising flow structures as well as temporal development length required to achieve the asymptotic state. The effect of these two important parameters was assessed in terms of their influence on integral quantities, mean velocity, Reynolds stresses, higher order statistics, amplitude modulation and spectral maps. While the near-wall region up to the buffer region appears to scale irrespective of Re and domain size, the parameters of the logarithmic law (i.e. von Kármán and additive coefficient) decrease with increasing Re, while the wake strength decreases with increasing spanwise domain size and vanishes entirely once the spanwise domain size exceeds approximately two boundary-layer thicknesses irrespective of Re. The wake strength also reduces with increasing simulation time. The asymptotic state of the TASBL is characterised by surprisingly large friction Reynolds numbers and inherits features of wall turbulence at numerically high Re. Compared to a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) or a channel flow without suction, the components of the Reynolds-stress tensor are overall reduced, but exhibit a logarithmic increase with decreasing suction rates, i.e. increasing Re. At the same time, the anisotropy is increased compared to canonical wall-bounded flows without suction. The reduced amplitudes in turbulence quantities are discussed in light of the amplitude modulation due to the weakened larger outer structures. The inner peak in the spectral maps is shifted to higher wavelength and the strength of the outer peak

  12. Lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, S. H.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Palm, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The application of an airborne downward-looking lidar to the study of organized cellular convection in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over the ocean is described. The lidar consisted of a frequency doubled Nd-YAG 530 mm-wavelength laser whose axis was aligned colinearly with the optical axis of an all-reflecting 40 mm-diameter Newtonian telescope. The airborne lidar provided a unique observation of both microscale and mesoscale variations of the PBL top. The lidar data, presented as constant backscatter isopleth soundings, provide a visual indication of the presence of vertically organized convection cells. Comparisons of the lidar-derived PBL structure with both a conceptual model of the PBL and laboratory simulations of Deardorf et al. (1980) of a developing convective PBL showed that the observations are consistent with a model of mixing in the PBL, which involves a field of organized updrafts separated by downdrafts.

  13. Persistent Structures in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Chabalko, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Persistent structures in the turbulent boundary layer are located and analyzed. The data are taken from flight experiments on large commercial aircraft. An interval correlation technique is introduced which is able to locate the structures. The Morlet continuous wavelet is shown to not only locates persistent structures but has the added benefit that the pressure data are decomposed in time and frequency. To better understand how power is apportioned among these structures, a discrete Coiflet wavelet is used to decompose the pressure data into orthogonal frequency bands. Results indicate that some structures persist a great deal longer in the TBL than would be expected. These structure contain significant power and may be a primary source of vibration energy in the airframe.

  14. Geometric invariance of compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wei-Tao; Wu, Bin; She, Zhen-Su; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    A symmetry based approach is applied to analyze the mean velocity and temperature fields of compressible, flat plate turbulent boundary layers (CTBL). A Reynolds stress length scale and a turbulent heat flux length scale are identified to possess the same defect scaling law in the CTBL bulk, which is solely owing to the constraint of the wall to the geometry of the wall-attached eddies, but invariant to compressibility and wall heat transfer. This invariance is called the geometric invariance of CTBL eddies and is likely the origin of the Mach number invariance of Morkovin's hypothesis, as well as the similarity of energy and momentum transports. A closure for the turbulent transport by using the invariant lengths is attainted to predict the mean velocity and temperature profiles in the CTBL bulk- superior to the van Driest transformation and the Reynolds analogy based relations for its sound physics and higher accuracy. Additionally, our approach offers a new understanding of turbulent Prandtl number.

  15. Heat addition to a subsonic boundary layer: A preliminary analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macha, J. M.; Norton, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary analytical study of the effects of heat addition to the subsonic boundary layer flow over a typical airfoil shape is presented. This phenomenon becomes of interest in the space shuttle mission since heat absorbed by the wing structure during re-entry will be rejected to the boundary layer during the subsequent low speed maneuvering and landing phase. A survey of existing literature and analytical solutions for both laminar and turbulent flow indicate that a heated surface generally destabilizes the boundary layer. Specifically, the boundary layer thickness is increased, the skin friction at the surface is decreased and the point of flow separation is moved forward. In addition, limited analytical results predict that the angle of attack at which a heated airfoil will stall is significantly less than the stall angle of an unheated wing. These effects could adversely affect the lift and drag, and thus the maneuvering capabilities of booster and orbiter shuttle vehicles.

  16. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  17. Helicity in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, Michael; Koprov, Boris; Koprov, Victor; Chkhetiani, Otto

    2017-04-01

    An overview is presented of recent direct field measurements at the Tsimlyansk Scientific Station of A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Moscow of turbulent helicity (and potential vorticity) using four acoustic anemometers positioned, within the atmospheric surface-adjacent boundary layer, in the vertices of a rectangular tetrahedron, with an approximate 5 m distance between the anemometers and a 5.5 m elevation of the tetrahedron base above the ground surface (Koprov, Koprov, Kurgansky and Chkhetiani. Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2015, Vol.51, 565-575). The same ideology was applied in a later field experiment in Tsimlyansk with the tetrahedron's size of 0.7 m and variable elevation over the ground from 3.5 to 25 m. It is illustrated with examples of the statistical distribution of instantaneous (both positive and negative) turbulent helicity values. A theory is proposed that explains the measured mean turbulent helicity sign, including the sign of contribution to helicity from the horizontal and vertical velocity & vorticity components, respectively, and the sign of helicity buoyant production term. By considering a superposition of the classic Ekman spiral solution and a jet-like wind profile that mimics a shallow breeze circulation over a non-uniformly heated Earth surface, a possible explanation is provided, why the measured mean turbulent helicity sign is negative. The pronounced breeze circulation over the Tsimlyansk polygon which is located nearby the Tsimlyansk Reservoir was, indeed, observed during the measurements period. Whereas, essentially positive helicity is injected into the boundary layer from the free atmosphere in the Northern Hemisphere.

  18. High order local absorbing boundary conditions for acoustic waves in terms of farfield expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamizar, Vianey; Acosta, Sebastian; Dastrup, Blake

    2017-03-01

    We devise a new high order local absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for radiating problems and scattering of time-harmonic acoustic waves from obstacles of arbitrary shape. By introducing an artificial boundary S enclosing the scatterer, the original unbounded domain Ω is decomposed into a bounded computational domain Ω- and an exterior unbounded domain Ω+. Then, we define interface conditions at the artificial boundary S, from truncated versions of the well-known Wilcox and Karp farfield expansion representations of the exact solution in the exterior region Ω+. As a result, we obtain a new local absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for a bounded problem on Ω-, which effectively accounts for the outgoing behavior of the scattered field. Contrary to the low order absorbing conditions previously defined, the error at the artificial boundary induced by this novel ABC can be easily reduced to reach any accuracy within the limits of the computational resources. We accomplish this by simply adding as many terms as needed to the truncated farfield expansions of Wilcox or Karp. The convergence of these expansions guarantees that the order of approximation of the new ABC can be increased arbitrarily without having to enlarge the radius of the artificial boundary. We include numerical results in two and three dimensions which demonstrate the improved accuracy and simplicity of this new formulation when compared to other absorbing boundary conditions.

  19. Acoustic sounding in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Three case studies are presented involving data from an acoustic radar. The first two cases examine data collected during the passage of a mesoscale cold-air intrusion, probably thunderstorm outflow, and a synoptic-scale cold front. In these studies the radar data are compared to conventional meteorological data obtained from the WKY tower facility for the purpose of radar data interpretation. It is shown that the acoustic radar echoes reveal the boundary between warm and cold air and other areas of turbulent mixing, regions of strong vertical temperature gradients, and areas of weak or no wind shear. The third case study examines the relationship between the nocturnal radiation inversion and the low-level wind maximum or jet in the light of conclusions presented by Blackadar (1957). The low-level jet is seen forming well above the top of the inversion. Sudden rapid growth of the inversion occurs which brings the top of the inversion to a height equal that of the jet. Coincident with the rapid growth of the inversion is a sudden decrease in the intensity of the acoustic radar echoes in the inversion layer. It is suggested that the decrease in echo intensity reveals a decrease in turbulent mixing in the inversion layer as predicted by Blackadar. It is concluded that the acoustic radar can be a valuable tool for study in the lower atmosphere.

  20. Improved Boundary Layer Depth Retrievals from MPLNET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Molod, Andrea M.; Joseph, Everette

    2013-01-01

    Continuous lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth have been made at the Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) site in Greenbelt, MD since April 2001. However, because of issues with the operational PBL depth algorithm, the data is not reliable for determining seasonal and diurnal trends. Therefore, an improved PBL depth algorithm has been developed which uses a combination of the wavelet technique and image processing. The new algorithm is less susceptible to contamination by clouds and residual layers, and in general, produces lower PBL depths. A 2010 comparison shows the operational algorithm overestimates the daily mean PBL depth when compared to the improved algorithm (1.85 and 1.07 km, respectively). The improved MPLNET PBL depths are validated using radiosonde comparisons which suggests the algorithm performs well to determine the depth of a fully developed PBL. A comparison with the Goddard Earth Observing System-version 5 (GEOS-5) model suggests that the model may underestimate the maximum daytime PBL depth by 410 m during the spring and summer. The best agreement between MPLNET and GEOS-5 occurred during the fall and they diered the most in the winter.

  1. Stability of boundary layer flow based on energy gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Xu, Wenqian; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2018-05-01

    The flow of the laminar boundary layer on a flat plate is studied with the simulation of Navier-Stokes equations. The mechanisms of flow instability at external edge of the boundary layer and near the wall are analyzed using the energy gradient theory. The simulation results show that there is an overshoot on the velocity profile at the external edge of the boundary layer. At this overshoot, the energy gradient function is very large which results in instability according to the energy gradient theory. It is found that the transverse gradient of the total mechanical energy is responsible for the instability at the external edge of the boundary layer, which induces the entrainment of external flow into the boundary layer. Within the boundary layer, there is a maximum of the energy gradient function near the wall, which leads to intensive flow instability near the wall and contributes to the generation of turbulence.

  2. A new approach to implement absorbing boundary condition in biomolecular electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Goni, Md Osman

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel approach to employ the absorbing boundary condition in conjunction with the finite-element method (FEM) in biomolecular electrostatics. The introduction of Bayliss-Turkel absorbing boundary operators in electromagnetic scattering problem has been incorporated by few researchers. However, in the area of biomolecular electrostatics, this boundary condition has not been investigated yet. The objective of this paper is twofold. First, to solve nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation using Newton's method and second, to find an efficient and acceptable solution with minimum number of unknowns. In this work, a Galerkin finite-element formulation is used along with a Bayliss-Turkel absorbing boundary operator that explicitly accounts for the open field problem by mapping the Sommerfeld radiation condition from the far field to near field. While the Bayliss-Turkel condition works well when the artificial boundary is far from the scatterer, an acceptable tolerance of error can be achieved with the second order operator. Numerical results on test case with simple sphere show that the treatment is able to reach the same level of accuracy achieved by the analytical method while using a lower grid density. Bayliss-Turkel absorbing boundary condition (BTABC) combined with the FEM converges to the exact solution of scattering problems to within discretization error.

  3. Methods and results of boundary layer measurements on a glider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nes, W. V.

    1978-01-01

    Boundary layer measurements were carried out on a glider under natural conditions. Two effects are investigated: the effect of inconstancy of the development of static pressure within the boundary layer and the effect of the negative pressure difference in a sublaminar boundary layer. The results obtained by means of an ion probe in parallel connection confirm those results obtained by means of a pressure probe. Additional effects which have occurred during these measurements are briefly dealt with.

  4. Incorporation of the planetary boundary layer in atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Wyngaard, John; Pielke, Roger; Krueger, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: perspectives on planetary boundary layer (PBL) measurements; current problems of PBL parameterization in mesoscale models; and convective cloud-PBL interactions.

  5. Comparison of turbulence in a transitional boundary layer to turbulence in a developed boundary layer*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. I.; Wallace, J.; Wu, X.; Moin, P.

    2010-11-01

    Using a recent DNS of a flat-plate boundary layer, statistics of turbulence in transition at Reθ= 500 where spots merge (distributions of the mean velocity, rms velocity and vorticity fluctuations, Reynolds shear stress, kinetic energy production and dissipation rates and enstrophy) have been compared to these statistics for the developed boundary layer turbulence at Reθ= 1850. When the distributions in the transitional region, determined in narrow planes 0.03 Reθ wide, exclude regions and times when the flow is not turbulent, they closely resemble those in the developed turbulent state at the higher Reynolds number, especially in the buffer and sublayers. The skin friction coefficient, determined in this conditional manner in the transitional flow is, of course, much larger than that obtained by including both turbulent and non-turbulent information there, and is consistent with a value obtained by extrapolating from the developed turbulent region. We are attempting to perform this data analysis even further upstream in the transitioning flow at Reθ= 300 where the turbulent spots are individuated. These results add further evidence to support the view that the structure of a developed turbulent boundary layer is little different from its structure in its embryonic form in turbulent spots. *CTR 2010 Summer Program research.

  6. Nonisotropic turbulence: A turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kunlun

    2005-11-01

    The probability density function (PDF) and the two-point correlations of a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer subjected to the zero pressure gradient have been calculated by the direct numerical simulation. It is known that the strong shear force near the wall will deform the vortices and develop some stretched coherent structures like streaks and hairpins, which eventually cause the nonisotropy of wall shear flows. The PDF and the two-point correlations of isotropic flows have been studied for a long time. However, our knowledge about the influence of shear force on the PDF and two-point correlations is still very limited. This study is intended to investigate such influence by using a numerical simulation. Results are presented for a case having a Mach number of M=0.1 and a Reynolds number 2000, based on displacement thickness. The results indicate that the PDF of the streamwise velocity is Lognormal, the PDF of normal velocity is approximately Cauchy, and the PDF of the spanwise velocity is nearly Gaussian. The mean and variance of those PDFs vary according to the distance from the wall. And the two-point correlations are homogenous in the spanwise direction, have a slightly variation in the streamwise direction, but change a lot in the normal direction. Rww or Rvv can be represented as elliptic balls. And the well-chosen normalized system can enable Rww and Rvv to be self-similar.

  7. Helical circulations in the typhoon boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ryan; Businger, Steven

    2010-03-01

    Low-level wind data from the WSR-88D in Guam obtained in Typhoon Dale (1996) and Typhoon Keith (1997) are analyzed for coherent structures. Consistent with the results of previous studies of Atlantic hurricanes, velocity anomalies associated with coherent structures were found in the boundary layer of both storms. A total of 99 cases of coherent structures, also known as roll vortices, were documented during a 6 h evaluation period for each storm. Storm-relative roll location, roll vorticity, asymmetries in the upward and downward momentum fluxes, and signatures of circulations transverse to the mean flow associated with roll circulations were explored. The effects of terrain and convective precipitation systems, such as rainbands, on the occurrence of rolls were investigated. The results support and extend prior findings of roll observations, and can be used to help validate theoretical and numerical models of coherent structures within tropical cyclones. Moreover, the wind variations documented in this study may have application for wave runup and wind damage potential in tropical cyclones.

  8. Predicting Fog in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izett, Jonathan; van de Wiel, Bas; Baas, Peter; van der Linden, Steven; van Hooft, Antoon; Bosveld, Fred

    2017-04-01

    Fog is a global phenomenon that presents a hazard to navigation and human safety, resulting in significant economic impacts for air and shipping industries as well as causing numerous road traffic accidents. Accurate prediction of fog events, however, remains elusive both in terms of timing and occurrence itself. Statistical methods based on set threshold criteria for key variables such as wind speed have been developed, but high rates of correct prediction of fog events still lead to similarly high "false alarms" when the conditions appear favourable, but no fog forms. Using data from the CESAR meteorological observatory in the Netherlands, we analyze specific cases and perform statistical analyses of event climatology, in order to identify the necessary conditions for correct prediction of fog. We also identify potential "missing ingredients" in current analysis that could help to reduce the number of false alarms. New variables considered include the indicators of boundary layer stability, as well as the presence of aerosols conducive to droplet formation. The poster presents initial findings of new research as well as plans for continued research.

  9. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S. (Principal Investigator); Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-travelling, sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2(lambda)(sub TS)/pi, of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D-T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modelling are observed.

  10. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.; Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-traveling sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2 lambda(sub TS)/pi of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations, and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modeling are observed.

  11. Boundary layer streaming in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrani, Seyed Amir; Costalanga, Maxime; Royon, Laurent; Brunet, Philippe; DSHE Team; Energy Team

    2017-11-01

    Oscillations of bodies immersed in fluids are known to generate secondary steady flows (streaming). These flows have strong similarities with acoustic streaming induced by sound and ultrasound waves. A typical situation, investigated here, is that of a cylinder oscillating perpendicular to its axis, generating two pairs of counter-rotating steady vortices due to the transfer of vorticity from an inner boundary layer. While most studies so far investigated the situation of newtonian fluids, here, we consider the situation of a viscoelastic fluid. By using Particle Image Velocimetry, we carry out an experimental study of the flow structure and magnitude over a range of amplitude (A up to 2.5 mm, nearly half the cylinder diameter) and frequency (f between 5 and 100 Hz). We observe unprecedented behaviors at higher frequency (f >50 Hz) : at high enough amplitude, the usual flow with 2 pairs of vortices is replaced by a more complex flow where 4 pairs of vortices are observed. At smaller frequency, we observe reversal large scale vortices that replace the usual inner and outer ones in Newtonian fluids. The main intention of this work is to understand the influence of the complex and nonlinear rheology on the mechanism of streaming flow. In this way, another source of purely rheological nonlinearity is expected, competing with hydrodynamic nonlinearity. We evidence the effect of elasticity in streaming.

  12. Effects of Refractive Index and Diffuse or Specular Boundaries on a Radiating Isothermal Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Equilibrium temperatures of an absorbing-emitting layer were obtained for exposure to incident radiation and with the layer boundaries either specular or diffuse. For high refractive indices the surface condition can influence the radiative heat balance if the layer optical thickness is small. Hence for a spectrally varying absorption coefficient the layer temperature is affected if there is significant radiative energy in the spectral range with a small absorption coefficient. Similar behavior was obtained for transient radiative cooling of a layer where the results are affected by the initial temperature and hence the fraction of energy radiated in the short wavelength region where the absorption coefficient is small. The results are a layer without internal scattering. If internal scattering is significant, the radiation reaching the internal surface of a boundary is diffused and the effect of the two different surface conditions would become small.

  13. Semi-analytical solution for the generalized absorbing boundary condition in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Shuo; Chen, Yan-Yu; Yu, Chi-Hua; Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Chuin-Shan

    2017-07-01

    We present a semi-analytical solution of a time-history kernel for the generalized absorbing boundary condition in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To facilitate the kernel derivation, the concept of virtual atoms in real space that can conform with an arbitrary boundary in an arbitrary lattice is adopted. The generalized Langevin equation is regularized using eigenvalue decomposition and, consequently, an analytical expression of an inverse Laplace transform is obtained. With construction of dynamical matrices in the virtual domain, a semi-analytical form of the time-history kernel functions for an arbitrary boundary in an arbitrary lattice can be found. The time-history kernel functions for different crystal lattices are derived to show the generality of the proposed method. Non-equilibrium MD simulations in a triangular lattice with and without the absorbing boundary condition are conducted to demonstrate the validity of the solution.

  14. Internal and external 2-d boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, M. E.; Kays, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    Computer program computes general two dimensional turbulent boundary-layer flow using finite-difference techniques. Structure allows for user modification to accommodate unique problems. Program should prove useful in many applications where accurate boundary-layer flow calculations are required.

  15. On optical imaging through aircraft turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    Optical resolution quality as affected by aircraft turbulent boundary layers is analyzed. Wind-tunnel data was analyzed to obtained the variation of boundary layer turbulence scale length and mass density rms fluctuations with Mach number. The data gave good agreement with a mass density fluctuation turbulence spectrum that is either isotropic of orthogonally anisotropic. The data did not match an isotropic turbulence velocity spectrum which causes an anisotropic non-orthogonal mass density fluctuation spectrum. The results indicate that the average mass density rms fluctuation is about 10% of the maximum mass density across the boundary layer and that the transverse turbulence scale size is about 10% of the boundary layer thickness. The results indicate that the effect of the turbulent boundary layer is large angle scattering which decreases contrast but not resolution. Using extinction as a criteria the range of acceptable aircraft operating conditions are given.

  16. Dynamic behavior of an unsteady trubulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Reynolds, W. C.; Jayaramen, R.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on an unsteady turbulent boundary layer are reported in which the upstream portion of the flow is steady (in the mean) and in the downstream region, the boundary layer sees a linearly decreasing free stream velocity. This velocity gradient oscillates in time, at frequencies ranging from zero to approximately the bursting frequency. For the small amplitude, the mean velocity and mean turbulence intensity profiles are unaffected by the oscillations. The amplitude of the periodic velocity component, although as much as 70% greater than that in the free stream for very low frequencies, becomes equal to that in the free stream at higher frequencies. At high frequencies, both the boundary layer thickness and the Reynolds stress distribution across the boundary layer become frozen. The behavior at higher amplitude is quite similar. At sufficiently high frequencies, the boundary layer thickness remains frozen at the mean value over the oscillation cycle, even though flow reverses near the wall during a part of the cycle.

  17. Destiny of earthward streaming plasma in the plasmasheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the earth's magnetotail have been investigated, and it has become clear that the plasmasheet boundary layer field lines map into the Region I Field-Aligned Currents (FAC) of the auroral zone. It is pointed out that the role of earthward streaming ions in the plasmasheet boundary layer may be of fundamental importance in the understanding of magnetotail dynamics, auroral zone physics, and especially for ionospheric-magnetospheric interactions. The present paper has the objective to evaluate propagation characteristics for the earthward streaming ions observed in the plasmasheet boundary layer. An investigation is conducted of the propagation characteristics of protons in the plasmasheet boundary layer using independent single particle dynamics, and conclusions are discussed. The density of earthward streaming ions found in the plasmasheet boundary layer should include the ring current as well as the auroral zone precipitaiton and inner plasmasheet regions of the magnetosphere.

  18. Sound-turbulence interaction in transonic boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelostec, Ludovic; Scalo, Carlo; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic wave scattering in a transonic boundary layer is investigated through a novel approach. Instead of simulating directly the interaction of an incoming oblique acoustic wave with a turbulent boundary layer, suitable Dirichlet conditions are imposed at the wall to reproduce only the reflected wave resulting from the interaction of the incident wave with the boundary layer. The method is first validated using the laminar boundary layer profiles in a parallel flow approximation. For this scattering problem an exact inviscid solution can be found in the frequency domain which requires numerical solution of an ODE. The Dirichlet conditions are imposed in a high-fidelity unstructured compressible flow solver for Large Eddy Simulation (LES), CharLESx. The acoustic field of the reflected wave is then solved and the interaction between the boundary layer and sound scattering can be studied.

  19. Pitot-probe displacement in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Eight circular pitot probes ranging in size from 2 to 70 percent of the boundary-layer thickness were tested to provide experimental probe displacement results in a two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 2 and unit Reynolds number of 8 million per meter. The displacement obtained in the study was larger than that reported by previous investigators in either an incompressible turbulent boundary layer or a supersonic laminar boundary layer. The large probes indicated distorted Mach number profiles, probably due to separation. When the probes were small enough to cause no appreciable distortion, the displacement was constant over most of the boundary layer. The displacement in the near-wall region decreased to negative displacement in some cases. This near-wall region was found to extend to about one probe diameter from the test surface.

  20. On an Asymptotically Consistent Unsteady Interacting Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops the asymptotic matching of an unsteady compressible boundary layer to an inviscid flow. Of particular importance is the velocity injection or transpiration boundary condition derived by this theory. It is found that in general the transpiration will contain a slope of the displacement thickness and a time derivative of a density integral. The conditions under which the second term may be neglected, and its consistency with the established results of interacting boundary layer are discussed.

  1. Structure of the low-latitude boundary layer. [in magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sckopke, N.; Paschmann, G.; Haerendel, G.; Sonnerup, B. U. OE.; Bame, S. J.; Forbes, T. G.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    High temporal resolution observations of the frontside magnetopause and plasma boundary layer made with the fast plasma analyzer aboard the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft are reported. The data are found to be compatible with a boundary layer that is always attached to the magnetopause but where the layer thickness has a large-scale spatial modulation pattern which travels tailward past the spacecraft. Periods are included when the thickness is essentially zero and others when it is of the order of 1 earth radius. The duration of these periods is highly variable but is typically in the range of 2-5 min corresponding to a distance along the magnetopuase of approximately 3-8 earth radii. The observed boundary layer features include a steep density gradient at the magnetopause with an approximately constant boundary layer plasma density amounting to about 25% of the magnetosheath density, and a second abrupt density decrease at the inner edge of the layer.

  2. Differential analysis for the turbulent boundary layer on a compressor blade element (including boundary-layer separation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. F.; Todd, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    A two-dimensional differential analysis is developed to approximate the turbulent boundary layer on a compressor blade element with strong adverse pressure gradients, including the separated region with reverse flow. The predicted turbulent boundary layer thicknesses and velocity profiles are in good agreement with experimental data for a cascade blade, even in the separated region.

  3. Large-Eddy Simulation in Planetary Boundary-Layer Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyngaard, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the convective boundary layer are discussed. The vertical transport of a conservative, passive scalar was simulated. Also studied were the statistics by top-down and bottom-up scalar fields. Substantial differences were found between them due, presumably, to the asymmetry in the convective boundary layer. A generalization of mixed-layer scaling was developed which allows one to include the effects of top-down diffusion.

  4. Boundary-Layer Characteristics Over a Coastal Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melecio-Vazquez, D.; Ramamurthy, P.; Arend, M.; Moshary, F.; Gonzalez, J.

    2017-12-01

    Boundary-layer characteristics over New York City are analyzed for various local and synoptic conditions over several seasons. An array of vertical profilers, including a Doppler LiDAR, a micro-pulse LiDAR and a microwave radiometer are used to observe the structure and evolution of the boundary-layer. Additionally, an urbanized Weather Research and Forecasting (uWRF) model coupled to a high resolution landcover/land-use database is used to study the spatial variability in boundary layer characteristics. The summer daytime averaged potential temperature profile from the microwave radiometer shows the presence of a thermal internal boundary layer wherein a superadiabatic layer lies underneath a stable layer instead of a mixed-layer. Both the winter daytime and nighttime seasonal averages show that the atmosphere remains unstable near the surface and does not reach stable conditions during the nighttime. The mixing ratio seasonal averages show peaks in humidity near 200-m and 1100-m, above instrument level, which could result from sea breeze and anthropogenic sources. Ceilometer measurements show a high degree of variability in boundary layer height depending on wind direction. Comparison with uWRF results show that the model tends to overestimate convective efficiency for selected summer and winter cases and therefore shows a much deeper thermal boundary layer than the observed profiles. The model estimates a less humid atmosphere than seen in observations.

  5. Inefficient Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers: Angular Momentum Belt in the Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Quataert, Eliot

    2018-04-01

    We present unstratified 3D MHD simulations of an accretion disk with a boundary layer (BL) that have a duration ˜1000 orbital periods at the inner radius of the accretion disk. We find the surprising result that angular momentum piles up in the boundary layer, which results in a rapidly rotating belt of accreted material at the surface of the star. The angular momentum stored in this belt increases monotonically in time, which implies that angular momentum transport mechanisms in the BL are inefficient and do not couple the accretion disk to the star. This is in spite of the fact that magnetic fields are advected into the BL from the disk and supersonic shear instabilities in the BL excite acoustic waves. In our simulations, these waves only carry a small fraction (˜10%) of the angular momentum required for steady state accretion. Using analytical theory and 2D viscous simulations in the R - ϕ plane, we derive an analytical criterion for belt formation to occur in the BL in terms of the ratio of the viscosity in the accretion disk to the viscosity in the BL. Our MHD simulations have a dimensionless viscosity (α) in the BL that is at least a factor of ˜100 smaller than that in the disk. We discuss the implications of these results for BL dynamics and emission.

  6. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The index of refraction can considerably influence the temperature distribution and radiative heat flow in semitransparent materials such as some ceramics. For external radiant heating, the refractive index influences the amount of energy transmitted into the interior of the material. Emission within a material depends on the square of its refractive index, and hence this emission can be many times that for a biackbody radiating into a vacuum. Since radiation exiting through an interface into a vacuum cannot exceed that of a blackbody, there is extensive reflection at the internal surface of an interface, mostly by total internal reflection. This redistributes energy within the layer and tends to make its temperature distribution more uniform. The purpose of the present analysis is to show that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained very simply from the results for an index of refraction of unity. For the situation studied here, the layer is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces. The material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. For simplicity the index of refraction is unity in the medium surrounding the layer. The surfaces of the layer are assumed diffuse. This is probably a reasonable approximation for a ceramic layer that has not been polished. When transmitted radiation or radiation emitted from the interior reaches the inner surface of an interface, the radiation is diffused and some of it thereby placed into angular directions for which there is total internal reflection. This provides a trapping effect for retaining energy within the layer and tends to equalize its temperature distribution. An analysis of temperature distributions in absorbing-emitting layers, including index of refraction effects, was developed by Gardon (1958) to predict cooling and heat treating of glass plates

  7. Photoluminescence-based quality control for thin film absorber layers of photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Repins, Ingrid L.; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2015-07-07

    A time-resolved photoluminescence-based system providing quality control during manufacture of thin film absorber layers for photovoltaic devices. The system includes a laser generating excitation beams and an optical fiber with an end used both for directing each excitation beam onto a thin film absorber layer and for collecting photoluminescence from the absorber layer. The system includes a processor determining a quality control parameter such as minority carrier lifetime of the thin film absorber layer based on the collected photoluminescence. In some implementations, the laser is a low power, pulsed diode laser having photon energy at least great enough to excite electron hole pairs in the thin film absorber layer. The scattered light may be filterable from the collected photoluminescence, and the system may include a dichroic beam splitter and a filter that transmit the photoluminescence and remove scattered laser light prior to delivery to a photodetector and a digital oscilloscope.

  8. Spatial Linear Instability of Confluent Wake/Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Liu, Feng-Jun; Rumsey, C. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The spatial linear instability of incompressible confluent wake/boundary layers is analyzed. The flow model adopted is a superposition of the Blasius boundary layer and a wake located above the boundary layer. The Orr-Sommerfeld equation is solved using a global numerical method for the resulting eigenvalue problem. The numerical procedure is validated by comparing the present solutions for the instability of the Blasius boundary layer and for the instability of a wake with published results. For the confluent wake/boundary layers, modes associated with the boundary layer and the wake, respectively, are identified. The boundary layer mode is found amplified as the wake approaches the wall. On the other hand, the modes associated with the wake, including a symmetric mode and an antisymmetric mode, are stabilized by the reduced distance between the wall and the wake. An unstable mode switching at low frequency is observed where the antisymmetric mode becomes more unstable than the symmetric mode when the wake velocity defect is high.

  9. Bristled shark skin: a microgeometry for boundary layer control?

    PubMed

    Lang, A W; Motta, P; Hidalgo, P; Westcott, M

    2008-12-01

    There exists evidence that some fast-swimming shark species may have the ability to bristle their scales during fast swimming. Experimental work using a water tunnel facility has been performed to investigate the flow field over and within a bristled shark skin model submerged within a boundary layer to deduce the possible boundary layer control mechanisms being used by these fast-swimming sharks. Fluorescent dye flow visualization provides evidence of the formation of embedded cavity vortices within the scales. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) data, used to evaluate the cavity vortex formation and boundary layer characteristics close to the surface, indicate increased momentum in the slip layer forming above the scales. This increase in flow velocity close to the shark's skin is indicative of boundary layer control mechanisms leading to separation control and possibly transition delay for the bristled shark skin microgeometry.

  10. Coupled-rearrangement-channels calculation of the three-body system under the absorbing boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, M.; Otani, R.; Ito, M.; Kamimura, M.

    2016-05-01

    We formulate the method of the absorbing boundary condition (ABC) in the coupled-rearrangement-channels variational method (CRCMV) for the three-body problem. In the present study, we handle the simple three-boson system, and the absorbing potential is introduced in the Jacobi coordinate in the individual rearrangement channels. The resonance parameters and the strength of the monopole breakup are compared with the complex scaling method (CSM). We have found that the CRCVM + ABC method nicely works in the threebody problem with the rearrangement channels.

  11. The Effects of Rotation on Boundary Layers in Turbomachine Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The boundary layers in turbomachine rotors are subject to Coriolis forces which can (1) contribute directly to the development of secondary flows and (2) indirectly influence the behavior of boundary layers by augmentation and/or suppression of turbulence production in the boundary layers on blades. Both these rotation-induced phenomena are particularly important in the development of understanding of flow and loss mechanisms in centrifugal and mixed flow machines. The primary objective of this paper is to review the information available on these effects.

  12. Understanding Micro-Ramp Control for Shock Boundary Layer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-07

    micro-ramps on a supersonic boundary layer at M=3.0 was investigated using monotone integrated Large Eddy Simulations (MILES) and Reynolds Averaged Navier... Supersonic boundary layer flow with micro-ramp and no shock wave 3.2 SBLI with no micro-ramp 3.3 SBLI with micro-ramp 3.4 Micro-ramp size and location IV . C...ramps on a supersonic boundary layer at M=3.0 was investigated using monotone integrated Large Eddy Simulations (MILES) and Reynolds Averaged Navier

  13. The atmospheric boundary layer — advances in knowledge and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garratt, J. R.; Hess, G. D.; Physick, W. L.; Bougeault, P.

    1996-02-01

    We summarise major activities and advances in boundary-layer knowledge in the 25 years since 1970, with emphasis on the application of this knowledge to surface and boundary-layer parametrisation schemes in numerical models of the atmosphere. Progress in three areas is discussed: (i) the mesoscale modelling of selected phenomena; (ii) numerical weather prediction; and (iii) climate simulations. Future trends are identified, including the incorporation into models of advanced cloud schemes and interactive canopy schemes, and the nesting of high resolution boundary-layer schemes in global climate models.

  14. A novel concept for subsonic inlet boundary-layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    A self-bleeding method for boundary layer control is described and tested for a subsonic inlet designed to operate in the flowfield generated by high angles of attack. Naturally occurring surface static pressure gradients are used to remove the boundary layer from a separation-prone region of the inlet and to reinject it at a less critical location with a net performance gain. The results suggest that this self-bleeding method for boundary-layer control might be successfully applied to other inlets operating at extreme aerodynamic conditions.

  15. Structure of turbulence in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the three dimensional turbulent boundary layer concepts and of the currently available experimental information for their turbulence modeling. It is found that more reliable turbulence data, especially of the Reynolds stress transport terms, is needed to improve the existing modeling capabilities. An experiment is proposed to study the three dimensional boundary layer formed by a 'sink flow' in a fully developed two dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Also, the mean and turbulence field measurement procedure using a three component laser Doppler velocimeter is described.

  16. Numerical simulations of the stratified oceanic bottom boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John R.

    Numerical simulations are used to consider several problems relevant to the turbulent oceanic bottom boundary layer. In the first study, stratified open channel flow is considered with thermal boundary conditions chosen to approximate a shallow sea. Specifically, a constant heat flux is applied at the free surface and the lower wall is assumed to be adiabatic. When the surface heat flux is strong, turbulent upwellings of low speed fluid from near the lower wall are inhibited by the stable stratification. Subsequent studies consider a stratified bottom Ekman layer over a non-sloping lower wall. The influence of the free surface is removed by using an open boundary condition at the top of the computational domain. Particular attention is paid to the influence of the outer layer stratification on the boundary layer structure. When the density field is initialized with a linear profile, a turbulent mixed layer forms near the wall, which is separated from the outer layer by a strongly stable pycnocline. It is found that the bottom stress is not strongly affected by the outer layer stratification. However, stratification reduces turbulent transport to the outer layer and strongly limits the boundary layer height. The mean shear at the top of the boundary layer is enhanced when the outer layer is stratified, and this shear is strong enough to cause intermittent instabilities above the pycnocline. Turbulence-generated internal gravity waves are observed in the outer layer with a relatively narrow frequency range. An explanation for frequency content of these waves is proposed, starting with an observed broad-banded turbulent spectrum and invoking linear viscous decay to explain the preferential damping of low and high frequency waves. During the course of this work, an open-source computational fluid dynamics code has been developed with a number of advanced features including scalar advection, subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation, and distributed memory

  17. Observations of the magnetopause current layer: Cases with no boundary layer and tests of recent models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence for the probable existence of magnetospheric boundary layers was first presented by Hones, et al. (1972), based on VELA satellite plasma observations (no magnetic field measurements were obtained). This magnetotail boundary layer is now known to be the tailward extension of the high-latitude boundary layer or plasma mantle (first uniquely identified using HEOS 2 plasma and field observations by Rosenbauer et al., 1975) and the low-latitude boundary layer (first uniquely identified using IMP 6 plasma and field observations by Eastman et al., 1976). The magnetospheric boundary layer is the region of magnetosheath-like plasma located Earthward of, but generally contiguous with the magnetopause. This boundary layer is typically identified by comparing low-energy (less than 10 keV) ion spectra across the magnetopause. Low-energy electron measurements are also useful for identifying the boundary layer because the shocked solar wind or magnetosheath has a characteristic spectral signature for electrons as well. However, there are magnetopause crossings where low-energy electrons might suggest a depletion layer outside the magnetopause even though the traditional field-rotation signature indicates that this same region is a boundary layer Earthward of the current layer. Our analyses avoided crossings which exhibit such ambiguities. Pristine magnetopause crossings are magnetopause crossings for which the current layer is well defined and for which there is no adjoining magnetospheric boundary layer as defined above. Although most magnetopause models to date apply to such crossings, few comparisons between such theory and observations of pristine magnetopause crossings have been made because most crossings have an associated magnetospheric boundary layer which significantly affects the applicable boundary conditions for the magnetopause current layer. Furthermore, almost no observational studies of magnetopause microstructure have been done even though key

  18. Calculations of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. F.; Patel, V. C.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of a series of computational experiments aimed at studying the characteristics of time-dependent turbulent boundary layers with embedded reversed-flow regions. A calculation method developed earlier was extended to boundary layers with reversed flows for this purpose. The calculations were performed for an idealized family of external velocity distributions, and covered a range of degrees of unsteadiness. The results confirmed those of previous studies in demonstrating that the point of flow reversal is nonsingular in a time-dependent boundary layer. A singularity was observed to develop downstream of reversal, under certain conditions, accompanied by the breakdown of the boundary-layer approximations. A tentative hypothesis was advanced in an attempt to predict the appearance of the singularity, and is shown to be consistent with the calculated results.

  19. Energy efficient engine, low-pressure turbine boundary layer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate development of boundary layers under the influence of velocity distributions simulating the suction side of two state-of-the-art turbine airfoils: a forward loaded airfoil (squared-off design) and an aft loaded airfoil (aft-loaded design). These velocity distributions were simulated in a boundary layer wind tunnel. Detailed measurements of boundary layer mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles were obtained for an inlet turbulence level of 2.4 percent and an exit Reynolds number of 800,000. Flush-mounted hot film probes identified the boundary layer transition regimes in the adverse pressure gradient regions for both velocity distributions. Wall intermittency data showed good agreement with the correlations of Dhawan and Narasimha for the intermittency factor distribution in transitional flow regimes.

  20. Experimental measurements of unsteady turbulent boundary layers near separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations conducted to document the behavior of turbulent boundary layers on flat surfaces that separate due to adverse pressure gradients are reported. Laser and hot wire anemometers measured turbulence and flow structure of a steady free stream separating turbulent boundary layer produced on the flow of a wind tunnel section. The effects of sinusoidal and unsteadiness of the free stream velocity on this separating turbulent boundary layer at a reduced frequency were determined. A friction gage and a thermal tuft were developed and used to measure the surface skin friction and the near wall fraction of time the flow moves downstream for several cases. Abstracts are provided of several articles which discuss the effects of the periodic free stream unsteadiness on the structure or separating turbulent boundary layers.

  1. Boundary-Layer Control to Helicopter Rotor Blades.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1957-01-22

    Experimental investigation of boundary-layer control to helicopter rotor blades to increase forward speed capabilities. 3/4 front view. Shaft angle - 35deg. John Mc.Cloud in picture. He was a good guy.

  2. Observations on streamwise vortices in laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, M. V.

    1979-01-01

    The frequent but often unsuspected presence of streamwise vortices in nominally two dimensional laminar and turbulent boundary layers and some of their consequences are described. Since there is no body of systematic information on streamwise vortices imbedded in boundary layers, a number of issues concerning their occurrence and behavior are discussed in the form of a set of succinct observations. Desirable experimental and numerical research to remedy the current lack of knowledge is recommended.

  3. Shock wave oscillation driven by turbulent boundary layer fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, K. J.

    1972-01-01

    Pressure fluctuations due to the interaction of a shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer were investigated. A simple model is proposed in which the shock wave is convected from its mean position by velocity fluctuations in the turbulent boundary layer. Displacement of the shock is assumed limited by a linear restoring mechanism. Predictions of peak root mean square pressure fluctuation and spectral density are in excellent agreement with available experimental data.

  4. MPLNET V3 Cloud and Planetary Boundary Layer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Haftings, Phillip C.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Micropulse Lidar Network Version 3 algorithms for planetary boundary layer and cloud detection are described and differences relative to the previous Version 2 algorithms are highlighted. A year of data from the Goddard Space Flight Center site in Greenbelt, MD consisting of diurnal and seasonal trends is used to demonstrate the results. Both the planetary boundary layer and cloud algorithms show significant improvement of the previous version.

  5. Computation of Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers Including Separation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    As demonstrated by the 1968 and 1980 -1981 STANFORD Conferences, integral methods remain a valuable engineering tool to calculate the effects of...has been given by WHITFIELD, 1980 , which is valid over the whole thickness of the boundary layer. Another method to generate a velocity profiles...boundary layer equations and inviscid equations. A very clear presentation of the problem is given for example by VELOMAN, 1980 . 6.3. Three-dimensional

  6. Wave phenomena in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    Growth of unstable disturbances in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer is numerically simulated. Localized periodic surface heating and cooling as a means of active control of these disturbances is studied. It is shown that compressibility in itself stabilizes the flow but at a lower Mach number, significant nonlinear distortions are produced. Phase cancellation is shown to be an effective mechanism for active boundary layer control.

  7. Detached-Eddy Simulations of Attached and Detached Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruelle, B.; Ducros, F.

    2003-12-01

    This article presents Detached-Eddy Simulations (DESs) of attached and detached turbulent boundary layers. This hybrid Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) / Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model goes continuously from RANS to LES according to the mesh definition. We propose a parametric study of the model over two "academic" configurations, in order to get information on the influence of the mesh to correctly treat complex flow with attached and detached boundary layers.

  8. Boundary condition for Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconducting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koláček, Jan; Lipavský, Pavel; Morawetz, Klaus; Brandt, Ernst Helmut

    2009-05-01

    Electrostatic charging changes the critical temperature of superconducting thin layers. To understand the basic mechanism, it is possible to use the Ginzburg-Landau theory with the boundary condition derived by de Gennes from the BCS theory. Here we show that a similar boundary condition can be obtained from the principle of minimum free energy. We compare the two boundary conditions and use the Budd-Vannimenus theorem as a test of approximations.

  9. Turbulent boundary layer in high Rayleigh number convection in air.

    PubMed

    du Puits, Ronald; Li, Ling; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André; Willert, Christian

    2014-03-28

    Flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in the boundary layer of a Rayleigh-Bénard experiment are presented for the Rayleigh number Ra=1.4×1010. Our visualizations indicate that the appearance of the flow structures is similar to ordinary (isothermal) turbulent boundary layers. Our particle image velocimetry measurements show that vorticity with both positive and negative sign is generated and that the smallest flow structures are 1 order of magnitude smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Additional local measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry yield turbulence intensities up to I=0.4 as in turbulent atmospheric boundary layers. From our observations, we conclude that the convective boundary layer becomes turbulent locally and temporarily although its Reynolds number Re≈200 is considerably smaller than the value 420 underlying existing phenomenological theories. We think that, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the transition of the boundary layer towards turbulence depends on subtle details of the flow field and is therefore not universal.

  10. Boundary layer effects on liners for aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabard, Gwénaël

    2016-10-01

    The performance of acoustic treatments installed on aircraft engines is strongly influenced by the boundary layer of the grazing flow on the surface of the liner. The parametric study presented in this paper illustrates the extent of this effect and identifies when it is significant. The acoustic modes of a circular duct with flow are calculated using a finite difference method. The parameters are representative of the flow conditions, liners and sound fields found in current turbofan engines. Both the intake and bypass ducts are considered. Results show that there is a complex interplay between the boundary layer thickness, the direction of propagation and the liner impedance and that the boundary layer can have a strong impact on liner performance for typical configurations (including changes of the order of 30 dB on the attenuation of modes associated with tonal fan noise). A modified impedance condition including the effect of a small but finite boundary layer thickness is considered and compared to the standard Myers condition based on an infinitely thin boundary layer. We show how this impedance condition can be implemented in a mode calculation method by introducing auxiliary variables. This condition is able to capture the trends associated with the boundary layer effects and in most cases provides improved predictions of liner performance.

  11. Boundary Layer Flow Over a Moving Wavy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendin, Gali; Toledo, Yaron

    2016-04-01

    Boundary Layer Flow Over a Moving Wavy Surface Gali Hendin(1), Yaron Toledo(1) January 13, 2016 (1)School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Israel Understanding the boundary layer flow over surface gravity waves is of great importance as various atmosphere-ocean processes are essentially coupled through these waves. Nevertheless, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of this complex flow behaviour. The present work investigates the fundamentals of the boundary layer air flow over progressive, small-amplitude waves. It aims to extend the well-known Blasius solution for a boundary layer over a flat plate to one over a moving wavy surface. The current analysis pro- claims the importance of the small curvature and the time-dependency as second order effects, with a meaningful impact on the similarity pattern in the first order. The air flow over the ocean surface is modelled using an outer, inviscid half-infinite flow, overlaying the viscous boundary layer above the wavy surface. The assumption of a uniform flow in the outer layer, used in former studies, is now replaced with a precise analytical solution of the potential flow over a moving wavy surface with a known celerity, wavelength and amplitude. This results in a conceptual change from former models as it shows that the pressure variations within the boundary layer cannot be neglected. In the boundary layer, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are formulated in a curvilinear, orthogonal coordinate system. The formulation is done in an elaborate way that presents additional, formerly neglected first-order effects, resulting from the time-varying coordinate system. The suggested time-dependent curvilinear orthogonal coordinate system introduces a platform that can also support the formulation of turbulent problems for any surface shape. In order to produce a self-similar Blasius-type solution, a small wave-steepness is assumed and a perturbation method is applied. Consequently, a

  12. Analysis and Modeling of Boundary Layer Separation Method (BLSM).

    PubMed

    Pethő, Dóra; Horváth, Géza; Liszi, János; Tóth, Imre; Paor, Dávid

    2010-09-01

    Nowadays rules of environmental protection strictly regulate pollution material emission into environment. To keep the environmental protection laws recycling is one of the useful methods of waste material treatment. We have developed a new method for the treatment of industrial waste water and named it boundary layer separation method (BLSM). We apply the phenomena that ions can be enriched in the boundary layer of the electrically charged electrode surface compared to the bulk liquid phase. The main point of the method is that the boundary layer at correctly chosen movement velocity can be taken out of the waste water without being damaged, and the ion-enriched boundary layer can be recycled. Electrosorption is a surface phenomenon. It can be used with high efficiency in case of large electrochemically active surface of electrodes. During our research work two high surface area nickel electrodes have been prepared. The value of electrochemically active surface area of electrodes has been estimated. The existence of diffusion part of the double layer has been experimentally approved. The electrical double layer capacity has been determined. Ion transport by boundary layer separation has been introduced. Finally we have tried to estimate the relative significance of physical adsorption and electrosorption.

  13. Linking Dynamics of the Near-surface Flow to Deeper Boundary Layer Forcing in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Kaimal and Finnigan (1994), modified) Figure 2.2 illustrates the evolution from unstable CBL to a nocturnal Stable Bound- ary Layer ( SBL ) in the absence...mixed layer acts as a cap for the SBL . The SBL persists through the night until sunrise when surface heating resumes and a new unstable layer begins...to form at the surface, gradually returning to a CBL. 7 2.2.1 Dynamics of the stable boundary layer Because the SBL is stably stratified, buoyancy

  14. Validation of High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layer and Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Computations with the OVERFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. B.; Lillard, R. P.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Lyrintizis, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The capability of the OVERFLOW code to accurately compute high-speed turbulent boundary layers and turbulent shock-boundary layer interactions is being evaluated. Configurations being investigated include a Mach 2.87 flat plate to compare experimental velocity profiles and boundary layer growth, a Mach 6 flat plate to compare experimental surface heat transfer,a direct numerical simulation (DNS) at Mach 2.25 for turbulent quantities, and several Mach 3 compression ramps to compare computations of shock-boundary layer interactions to experimental laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) data and hot-wire data. The present paper describes outlines the study and presents preliminary results for two of the flat plate cases and two small-angle compression corner test cases.

  15. Desert Dust Layers Over Polluted Marine Boundary Layers: ACE-2 Measurements and ACE-Asia Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosols in ACE-Asia are expected to have some commonalties with those in ACE-2, along with important differences. Among the commonalities are occurrences of desert dust layers over polluted marine boundary layers. Differences include the nature of the dust (yellowish in the East Asia desert outflow, vs. reddish-brown in the Sahara Outflow measured in ACE-2) and the composition of boundary-layer aerosols (e.g., more absorbing, soot and organic aerosol in-the Asian plume, caused by coal and biomass burning, with limited controls). In this paper we present ACE-2 measurements and analyses as a guide to our plans for ACE-2 Asia. The measurements include: (1) Vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth and extinction (380-1558 nm), and of water vapor column and concentration, from the surface through the elevated desert dust, measured by the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14); (2) Comparisons of airborne and shipborne sunphotometer optical depths to satellite-retrieved values, with and without desert dust; (3) Comparisons between airborne Sunphotometer optical depth and extinction spectra and those derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption; (4) Comparisons between size distributions measured in situ and retrieved from sunphotometer optical depth spectra; (5) Comparisons between aerosol single scattering albedo values obtained by several techniques, using various combinations of measurements of backscatter, extinction, size distribution, scattering, absorption, and radiative flux. We show how analyses of these data can be used to address questions important to ACE-Asia, such as: (1) How do dust and other absorbing aerosols affect the accuracy of satellite optical depth retrievals? How important are asphericity effects? (2) How important are supermicron dust and seasalt aerosols to overall aerosol optical depth and radiative forcing? How well are these aerosols sampled by aircraft

  16. Multi-domain boundary element method for axi-symmetric layered linear acoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Paul; Ziegelwanger, Harald

    2017-12-01

    Homogeneous porous materials like rock wool or synthetic foam are the main tool for acoustic absorption. The conventional absorbing structure for sound-proofing consists of one or multiple absorbers placed in front of a rigid wall, with or without air-gaps in between. Various models exist to describe these so called multi-layered acoustic systems mathematically for incoming plane waves. However, there is no efficient method to calculate the sound field in a half space above a multi layered acoustic system for an incoming spherical wave. In this work, an axi-symmetric multi-domain boundary element method (BEM) for absorbing multi layered acoustic systems and incoming spherical waves is introduced. In the proposed BEM formulation, a complex wave number is used to model absorbing materials as a fluid and a coordinate transformation is introduced which simplifies singular integrals of the conventional BEM to non-singular radial and angular integrals. The radial and angular part are integrated analytically and numerically, respectively. The output of the method can be interpreted as a numerical half space Green's function for grounds consisting of layered materials.

  17. Design of a Tunable Ultra-Broadband Terahertz Absorber Based on Multiple Layers of Graphene Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zenghui; Wu, Dong; Liu, Yumin; Liu, Chang; Yu, Zhongyuan; Yu, Li; Ye, Han

    2018-05-01

    We propose and numerically demonstrate an ultra-broadband graphene-based metamaterial absorber, which consists of multi-layer graphene/dielectric on the SiO2 layer supported by a metal substrate. The simulated result shows that the proposed absorber can achieve a near-perfect absorption above 90% with a bandwidth of 4.8 Thz. Owing to the flexible tunability of graphene sheet, the state of the absorber can be switched from on (absorption > 90%) to off (reflection > 90%) in the frequencies range of 3-7.8 Thz by controlling the Fermi energy of graphene. Moreover, the absorber is insensitive to the incident angles. The broadband absorption can be maintained over 90% up to 50°. Importantly, the design is scalable to develop broader tunable terahertz absorbers by adding more graphene layers which may have wide applications in imaging, sensors, photodetectors, and modulators.

  18. ON AERODYNAMIC AND BOUNDARY LAYER RESISTANCES WITHIN DRY DEPOSITION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been many empirical parameterizations for the aerodynamic and boundary layer resistances proposed in the literature, e.g. those of the Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model (MLM) used with the nation-wide dry deposition network. Many include arbitrary constants or par...

  19. Re-Innovating Recycling for Turbulent Boundary Layer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Joseph; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2017-11-01

    Historically, turbulent boundary layers along a flat plate have been expensive to simulate numerically, in part due to the difficulty of initializing the inflow with ``realistic'' turbulence, but also due to boundary layer growth. The former has been resolved in several ways, primarily dedicating a region of at least 10 boundary layer thicknesses in width to rescale and recycle flow or by extending the region far enough downstream to allow a laminar flow to develop into turbulence. Both of these methods are relatively costly. We propose a new method to remove the need for an inflow region, thus reducing computational costs significantly. Leveraging the scale similarity of the mean flow profiles, we introduce a coordinate transformation so that the boundary layer problem can be solved as a parallel flow problem with additional source terms. The solutions in the new coordinate system are statistically homogeneous in the downstream direction and so the problem can be solved with periodic boundary conditions. The present study shows the stability of this method, its implementation and its validation for a few laminar and turbulent boundary layer cases.

  20. Coupling of magnetopause-boundary layer to the polar ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, C. Q.; Lee, L. C.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma dynamics in the low-latitude boundary layer and its coupling to the polar ionosphere under boundary conditions at the magnetopause are investigated. In the presence of a driven plasma flow along the magnetopause, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can develop, leading to the formation and growth of plasma vortices in the boundary layer. The finite ionospheric conductivity leads to the decay of these vortices. The competing effect of the formation and decay of vortices leads to the formation of strong vortices only in a limited region. Several enhanced field-aligned power density regions associated with the boundary layer vortices and the upward field-aligned current (FAC) filaments can be found along the postnoon auroral oval. These enhanced field-aligned power density regions may account for the observed auroral bright spots.

  1. Second-mode control in hypersonic boundary layers over assigned complex wall impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Victor; Patel, Danish; Chapelier, Jean-Baptiste; Scalo, Carlo

    2017-11-01

    The durability and aerodynamic performance of hypersonic vehicles greatly relies on the ability to delay transition to turbulence. Passive aerodynamic flow control devices such as porous acoustic absorbers are a very attractive means to damp ultrasonic second-mode waves, which govern transition in hypersonic boundary layers under idealized flow conditions (smooth walls, slender geometries, small angles of attack). The talk will discuss numerical simulations modeling such absorbers via the time-domain impedance boundary condition (TD-IBC) approach by Scalo et al. in a hypersonic boundary layer flow over a 7-degree wedge at freestream Mach numbers M∞ = 7.3 and Reynolds numbers Rem = 1.46 .106 . A three-parameter impedance model tuned to the second-mode waves is tested first with varying resistance, R, and damping ratio, ζ, revealing complete mode attenuation for R < 20. A realistic IBC is then employed, derived via an inverse Helmholtz solver analysis of an ultrasonically absorbing carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon ceramic sample used in recent hypersonic transition experiments by Dr. Wagner and co-workers at DLR-Göttingen.

  2. Implementation of perfectly matched layers in an arbitrary geometrical boundary for elastic wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongwei; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2008-09-01

    The perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition is incorporated into an irregular-grid elastic-wave modelling scheme, thus resulting in an irregular-grid PML method. We develop the irregular-grid PML method using the local coordinate system based PML splitting equations and integral formulation of the PML equations. The irregular-grid PML method is implemented under a discretization of triangular grid cells, which has the ability to absorb incident waves in arbitrary directions. This allows the PML absorbing layer to be imposed along arbitrary geometrical boundaries. As a result, the computational domain can be constructed with smaller nodes, for instance, to represent the 2-D half-space by a semi-circle rather than a rectangle. By using a smooth artificial boundary, the irregular-grid PML method can also avoid the special treatments to the corners, which lead to complex computer implementations in the conventional PML method. We implement the irregular-grid PML method in both 2-D elastic isotropic and anisotropic media. The numerical simulations of a VTI lamb's problem, wave propagation in an isotropic elastic medium with curved surface and in a TTI medium demonstrate the good behaviour of the irregular-grid PML method.

  3. Numerical Studies of Boundary-Layer Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.

    1995-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the acoustic receptivity process on a semi-infinite flat plate with a modified-super-elliptic (MSE) leading edge are performed. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved in stream-function/vorticity form in a general curvilinear coordinate system. The steady basic-state solution is found by solving the governing equations using an alternating direction implicit (ADI) procedure which takes advantage of the parallelism present in line-splitting techniques. Time-harmonic oscillations of the farfield velocity are applied as unsteady boundary conditions to the unsteady disturbance equations. An efficient time-harmonic scheme is used to produce the disturbance solutions. Buffer-zone techniques have been applied to eliminate wave reflection from the outflow boundary. The spatial evolution of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves is analyzed and compared with experiment and theory. The effects of nose-radius, frequency, Reynolds number, angle of attack, and amplitude of the acoustic wave are investigated. This work is being performed in conjunction with the experiments at the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel under the direction of Professor William Saric. The simulations are of the same configuration and parameters used in the wind-tunnel experiments.

  4. An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers along curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mellor, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A curved wall tunnel was designed, and an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer was set up on the straight section preceding the curved test section. Turbulent boundary layer flows with uniform and adverse pressure distributions along convex and concave walls were investigated. Hot-wire measurements along the convex surface indicated that turbulent mixing between fluid layers was very much reduced. However, the law of the wall held and the skin friction, thus determined, correlated well with other measurements. Hot-wire measurements along the concave test wall revealed a system of longitudinal vortices inside the boundary layer and confirmed that concave curvature enhances mixing. A self-consistent set of turbulent boundary layer equations for flows along curved surfaces was derived together with a modified eddy viscosity. Solution of these equations together with the modified eddy viscosity gave results that correlated well with the present data on flows along the convex surface with arbitrary pressure distribution. However, it could only be used to predict the mean characteristics of the flow along concave walls because of the existence of the system of longitudinal vortices inside the boundary layer.

  5. Behavior of turbulent boundary layers on curved convex walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidbauer, Hans

    1936-01-01

    The system of linear differential equations which indicated the approach of separation and the so-called "boundary-layer thickness" by Gruschwitz is extended in this report to include the case where the friction layer is subject to centrifugal forces. Evaluation of the data yields a strong functional dependence of the momentum change and wall drag on the boundary-layer thickness radius of curvature ratio for the wall. It is further shown that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs at somewhat higher Reynolds Numbers at the convex wall than at the flat plate, due to the stabilizing effect of the centrifugal forces.

  6. Sheared boundary layers in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, T. H.; Gollub, J. P.

    1990-05-01

    Thermal boundary layers in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection are studied experimentally using a novel system in which the convecting fluid is sheared from below with a flowing layer of mercury. Oscillatory shear substantially alters the spatial structure and frequency of the eruptions, with minimal effect on the heat flux (less than 5 percent). The temperature probability distribution function (PDF) just above the lower boundary layer changes from Gaussian to exponential without significant changes in the interior PDF. Implications for theories of 'hard' turbulence are discussed.

  7. Shock-like structures in the tropical cyclone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gabriel J.; Taft, Richard K.; McNoldy, Brian D.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents high horizontal resolution solutions of an axisymmetric, constant depth, slab boundary layer model designed to simulate the radial inflow and boundary layer pumping of a hurricane. Shock-like structures of increasing intensity appear for category 1-5 hurricanes. For example, in the category 3 case, the u>(∂u/∂r>) term in the radial equation of motion produces a shock-like structure in the radial wind, i.e., near the radius of maximum tangential wind the boundary layer radial inflow decreases from approximately 22 m s-1 to zero over a radial distance of a few kilometers. Associated with this large convergence is a spike in the radial distribution of boundary layer pumping, with updrafts larger than 22 m s-1 at a height of 1000 m. Based on these model results, it is argued that observed hurricane updrafts of this magnitude so close to the ocean surface are attributable to the dry dynamics of the frictional boundary layer rather than moist convective dynamics. The shock-like structure in the boundary layer radial wind also has important consequences for the evolution of the tangential wind and the vertical component of vorticity. On the inner side of the shock the tangential wind tendency is essentially zero, while on the outer side of the shock the tangential wind tendency is large due to the large radial inflow there. The result is the development of a U-shaped tangential wind profile and the development of a thin region of large vorticity. In many respects, the model solutions resemble the remarkable structures observed in the boundary layer of Hurricane Hugo (1989).

  8. Impacts of solar-absorbing aerosol layers on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann M.; ...

    2017-10-26

    Here, the effects of an initially overlying layer of solar-absorbing aerosol on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds are examined using large-eddy simulations. For lightly drizzling cloud the transition is generally hastened, resulting mainly from increased cloud droplet number concentration ( N c) induced by entrained aerosol. The increased N c slows sedimentation of cloud droplets and shortens their relaxation time for diffusional growth, both of which accelerate entrainment of overlying air and thereby stratocumulus breakup. However, the decrease in albedo from cloud breakup is more than offset by redistributing cloud water over a greater number of droplets,more » such that the diurnal-average shortwave forcing at the top of the atmosphere is negative. The negative radiative forcing is enhanced by sizable longwave contributions, which result from the greater cloud breakup and a reduced boundary layer height associated with aerosol heating. A perturbation of moisture instead of aerosol aloft leads to a greater liquid water path and a more gradual transition. Adding absorbing aerosol to that atmosphere results in substantial reductions in liquid water path (LWP) and cloud cover that lead to positive shortwave and negative longwave forcings on average canceling each other. Only for heavily drizzling clouds is the breakup delayed, as inhibition of precipitation overcomes cloud water loss from enhanced entrainment. Considering these simulations as an imperfect proxy for biomass burning plumes influencing Namibian stratocumulus, we expect regional indirect plus semi-direct forcings to be substantially negative to negligible at the top of the atmosphere, with its magnitude sensitive to background and perturbation properties.« less

  9. Impacts of solar-absorbing aerosol layers on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann M.

    Here, the effects of an initially overlying layer of solar-absorbing aerosol on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds are examined using large-eddy simulations. For lightly drizzling cloud the transition is generally hastened, resulting mainly from increased cloud droplet number concentration ( N c) induced by entrained aerosol. The increased N c slows sedimentation of cloud droplets and shortens their relaxation time for diffusional growth, both of which accelerate entrainment of overlying air and thereby stratocumulus breakup. However, the decrease in albedo from cloud breakup is more than offset by redistributing cloud water over a greater number of droplets,more » such that the diurnal-average shortwave forcing at the top of the atmosphere is negative. The negative radiative forcing is enhanced by sizable longwave contributions, which result from the greater cloud breakup and a reduced boundary layer height associated with aerosol heating. A perturbation of moisture instead of aerosol aloft leads to a greater liquid water path and a more gradual transition. Adding absorbing aerosol to that atmosphere results in substantial reductions in liquid water path (LWP) and cloud cover that lead to positive shortwave and negative longwave forcings on average canceling each other. Only for heavily drizzling clouds is the breakup delayed, as inhibition of precipitation overcomes cloud water loss from enhanced entrainment. Considering these simulations as an imperfect proxy for biomass burning plumes influencing Namibian stratocumulus, we expect regional indirect plus semi-direct forcings to be substantially negative to negligible at the top of the atmosphere, with its magnitude sensitive to background and perturbation properties.« less

  10. Impacts of solar-absorbing aerosol layers on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Wood, Robert; Kollias, Pavlos

    2017-10-01

    The effects of an initially overlying layer of solar-absorbing aerosol on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds are examined using large-eddy simulations. For lightly drizzling cloud the transition is generally hastened, resulting mainly from increased cloud droplet number concentration (Nc) induced by entrained aerosol. The increased Nc slows sedimentation of cloud droplets and shortens their relaxation time for diffusional growth, both of which accelerate entrainment of overlying air and thereby stratocumulus breakup. However, the decrease in albedo from cloud breakup is more than offset by redistributing cloud water over a greater number of droplets, such that the diurnal-average shortwave forcing at the top of the atmosphere is negative. The negative radiative forcing is enhanced by sizable longwave contributions, which result from the greater cloud breakup and a reduced boundary layer height associated with aerosol heating. A perturbation of moisture instead of aerosol aloft leads to a greater liquid water path and a more gradual transition. Adding absorbing aerosol to that atmosphere results in substantial reductions in liquid water path (LWP) and cloud cover that lead to positive shortwave and negative longwave forcings on average canceling each other. Only for heavily drizzling clouds is the breakup delayed, as inhibition of precipitation overcomes cloud water loss from enhanced entrainment. Considering these simulations as an imperfect proxy for biomass burning plumes influencing Namibian stratocumulus, we expect regional indirect plus semi-direct forcings to be substantially negative to negligible at the top of the atmosphere, with its magnitude sensitive to background and perturbation properties.

  11. Impacts of Solar-Absorbing Aerosol Layers on the Transition of Stratocumulus to Trade Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Wood, Robert; Kollias, Pavlos

    2017-01-01

    The effects of an initially overlying layer of solar-absorbing aerosol on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds are examined using large-eddy simulations. For lightly drizzling cloud the transition is generally hastened, resulting mainly from increased cloud droplet number concentration (Nc) induced by entrained aerosol. The increased Nc slows sedimentation of cloud droplets and shortens their relaxation time for diffusional growth, both of which accelerate entrainment of overlying air and thereby stratocumulus breakup. However, the decrease in albedo from cloud breakup is more than offset by redistributing cloud water over a greater number of droplets, such that the diurnal-average shortwave forcing at the top of the atmosphere is negative. The negative radiative forcing is enhanced by sizable longwave contributions, which result from the greater cloud breakup and a reduced boundary layer height associated with aerosol heating. A perturbation of moisture instead of aerosol aloft leads to a greater liquid water path and a more gradual transition. Adding absorbing aerosol to that atmosphere results in substantial reductions in liquid water path (LWP) and cloud cover that lead to positive short-wave and negative longwave forcings on average canceling each other. Only for heavily drizzling clouds is the breakup delayed, as inhibition of precipitation overcomes cloud water loss from enhanced entrainment. Considering these simulations as an imperfect proxy for biomass burning plumes influencing Namibian stratocumulus, we expect regional indirect plus semi-direct forcings to be substantially negative to negligible at the top of the atmosphere, with its magnitude sensitive to background and perturbation properties.

  12. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in

  13. The structure of a three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, A. T.; Smith, F. T.; Walker, J. D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer is shown to have a self-consistent two-layer asymptotic structure in the limit of large Reynolds number. In a streamline coordinate system, the streamwise velocity distribution is similar to that in two-dimensional flows, having a defect-function form in the outer layer which is adjusted to zero at the wall through an inner wall layer. An asymptotic expansion accurate to two orders is required for the cross-stream velocity which is shown to exhibit a logarithmic form in the overlap region. The inner wall-layer flow is collateral to leading order but the influence of the pressure gradient, at large but finite Reynolds numbers, is not negligible and can cause substantial skewing of the velocity profile near the wall. Conditions under which the boundary layer achieves self-similarity and the governing set of ordinary differential equations for the outer layer are derived. The calculated solution of these equations is matched asymptotically to an inner wall-layer solution and the composite profiles so formed describe the flow throughout the entire boundary layer. The effects of Reynolds number and cross-stream pressure gradient on the crossstream velocity profile are discussed and it is shown that the location of the maximum cross-stream velocity is within the overlap region.

  14. Vortex Generators to Control Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babinsky, Holger (Inventor); Loth, Eric (Inventor); Lee, Sang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Devices for generating streamwise vorticity in a boundary includes various forms of vortex generators. One form of a split-ramp vortex generator includes a first ramp element and a second ramp element with front ends and back ends, ramp surfaces extending between the front ends and the back ends, and vertical surfaces extending between the front ends and the back ends adjacent the ramp surfaces. A flow channel is between the first ramp element and the second ramp element. The back ends of the ramp elements have a height greater than a height of the front ends, and the front ends of the ramp elements have a width greater than a width of the back ends.

  15. Thermal boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Penger; Wang, Yin; He, Xiaozhou

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the mean temperature boundary layer profile T(z) and root-mean-square (rms) temperature profile S(z) in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection along the central axis z of a convection cell, which has a thin vertical disk shape with an inner diameter D = 18 cm. The temperature measurements were made at fixed Prandtl numbers Pr = 4.3 and Pr = 7.6 and with the Rayleigh number Ra varied in the range between 1 ×109 and 1 ×1010 . The measured T(z) for different values of Pr and Ra can all be well described by the newly proposed boundary layer model with a parameter c varying from 1 to 2.1. The measured rms temperature profile S(z) is found to be a single-peaked function with the peak position located at z ~= 0 . 8 δ , where δ is the boundary layer thickness. The measured S(z) has two separate scaling lengths. Within the boundary layer, it scales with δ and can be fitted to a power law, S (z) ~(z / δ) α with α ~= 0 . 6 . Outside the boundary layer, it scales with the cell size D and follows a different power law, S (z) ~(z / D) β , with β = - 0 . 42 . This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  16. Highly buoyant bent-over plumes in a boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohidi, Ali; Kaye, Nigel B.

    2016-04-01

    Highly buoyant plumes, such as wildfire plumes, in low to moderate wind speeds have initial trajectories that are steeper than many industrial waste plumes. They will rise further into the atmosphere before bending significantly. In such cases the plume's trajectory will be influenced by the vertical variation in horizontal velocity of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper examined the behavior of a plume in an unstratified environment with a power-law ambient velocity profile. Examination of previously published experimental measurements of plume trajectory show that inclusion of the boundary layer velocity profile in the plume model often provides better predictions of the plume trajectory compared to algebraic expressions developed for uniform flow plumes. However, there are many cases in which uniform velocity profile algebraic expressions are as good as boundary layer models. It is shown that it is only important to model the role of the atmospheric boundary layer velocity profile in cases where either the momentum length (square root of source momentum flux divided by the reference wind speed) or buoyancy length (buoyancy flux divided by the reference wind speed cubed) is significantly greater than the plume release height within the boundary layer. This criteria is rarely met with industrial waste plumes, but it is important in modeling wildfire plumes.

  17. Variation of turbulence in a coastal thermal internal boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.; Raynor, G.S.; Brown, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Internal boundary layers (IBL) form when an air mass encounters a change in surface characteristics. There are essentially two types of internal boundary layers - one caused by the change in surface roughness and the other by the variation in surface heating. The former is known as the aerodynamic internal boundary layer (AIBL) and the latter the thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL). Change in shear stress generally characterizes the AIBL and change in turbulence the TIBL. Results of some observations of the vertical component of turbulence made in a coastal TIBL over Long Island, New York from 1974 to 1978more » are reported. Vertical turbulence measured by a simple sail plane variometer in a thermal internal boundary layer over Long Island with onshore flows indicates the structure to depend significantly on the land-water temperature difference. The position of the vertical velocity fluctuation maximum seems to vary from one test to another but its variation could not be correlated to other parameters due to lack of a sufficient number of tests. The structure of vertical turbulence was found to be different for sea breeze flows as compared to gradient winds.« less

  18. Particle motion in atmospheric boundary layers of Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Iversen, J. D.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To study the eolian mechanics of saltating particles, both an experimental investigation of the flow field around a model crater in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel and numerical solutions of the two- and three-dimensional equations of motion of a single particle under the influence of a turbulent boundary layer were conducted. Two-dimensional particle motion was calculated for flow near the surfaces of both Earth and Mars. For the case of Earth both a turbulent boundary layer with a viscous sublayer and one without were calculated. For the case of Mars it was only necessary to calculate turbulent boundary layer flow with a laminar sublayer because of the low values of friction Reynolds number; however, it was necessary to include the effects of slip flow on a particle caused by the rarefied Martian atmosphere. In the equations of motion the lift force functions were developed to act on a single particle only in the laminar sublayer or a corresponding small region of high shear near the surface for a fully turbulent boundary layer. The lift force functions were developed from the analytical work by Saffman concerning the lift force acting on a particle in simple shear flow.

  19. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    An analytical, parametric study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers or edge effects in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated thin cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize and quantify the effects of laminate orthotropy and laminate anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general and encompassing manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all the laminate constructions considered, the results show that the differences between results that were obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that in some cases neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and in other cases it results in an overestimation.

  20. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all laminates considered, the results show that the differences between results obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that, in some cases, neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and, in other cases, results in an overestimation.

  1. The inner core thermodynamics of the tropical cyclone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gabriel J.

    2016-10-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the inner-core dynamics of the tropical cyclone boundary layer (TCBL), our knowledge of the inner-core thermodynamics of the TCBL remains limited. In this study, the inner-core budgets of potential temperature (θ), specific humidity ( q), and reversible equivalent potential temperature (θ _e) are examined using a high-resolution multilevel boundary layer model. The potential temperature budgets show that the heat energy is dominated by latent heat release in the eyewall, evaporative cooling along the outer edge of the eyewall, and upward surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat from the underlying warm ocean. It is shown that the vertical θ advection overcompensates the sum of radial advective warming from the boundary layer outflow jet and latent heating for the development of cooling in the eyewall within the TCBL. The moisture budgets show the dominant upward transport of moisture in the eyewall updrafts, partly by the boundary-layer outflow jet from the bottom eye region, so that the eyewall remains nearly saturated. The θ _e budgets reveal that the TCBL is maintained thermodynamically by the upward surface flux of higher-θ _e air from the underlying warm ocean, the radial transport of low-θ _e air from the outer regions of the TCBL, and the dry adiabatic cooling associated by eyewall updrafts. These results underscore the significance of vertical motion and the location of the boundary layer outflow jet in maintaining the inner core thermal structure of the TCBL.

  2. An experimental study of the compressor rotor blade boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouagare, M.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Galmes, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer developing on a rotor blade of an axial flow compressor was measured using a miniature 'x' configuration hot-wire probe. The measurements were carried out at nine radial locations on both surfaces of the blade at various chordwise locations. The data derived includes streamwise and radial mean velocities and turbulence intensities. The validity of conventional velocity profiles such as the 'power law profile' for the streamwise profile, and Mager and Eichelbrenner's for the radial profile, is examined. A modification to Mager's crossflow profile is proposed. Away from the blade tip, the streamwise component of the blade boundary layer seems to be mainly influenced by the streamwise pressure gradient. Near the tip of the blade, the behavior of the blade boundary layer is affected by the tip leakage flow and the annulus wall boundary layer. The 'tangential blockage' due to the blade boundary layer is derived from the data. The profile losses are found to be less than that of an equivalent cascade, except in the tip region of the blade.

  3. Structure measurements in a synthetic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    Extensive hot-wire measurements were made to determine the structure of the large eddy in a synthetic turbulent boundary layer on a flat-plate model. The experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel at a nominal free-stream velocity of 12 m/s. The synthetic turbulent boundary layer had a hexagonal pattern of eddies and a ratio of streamwise scale to spanwise scale of 3.2:1. The measured celerity of the large eddy was 84.2 percent of the free-stream velocity. There was some loss of coherence, but very little distortion, as the eddies moved downstream. Several mean properties of the synthetic boundary layer were found to agree quite well with the mean properties of a natural turbulent boundary layer at the same Reynolds number. The large eddy is composed of a pair of primary counter-rotating vortices about five delta long in the steamwise direction and about one delta apart in the spanwise direction, where delta is the mean boundary-layer thickness. Definite signatures are obtained in terms of the mean skin-friction coefficient and the mean wake parameter averaged at constant phase. Velocities induced by the vortices are partly responsible for entrainment of irrotational fluid, for transport of momentum, for generation of Reynolds stresses, and for maintenance of streamwise and normal velocity in the outer flow.

  4. Summary of experimentally determined facts concerning the behavior of the boundary layer and performance of boundary layer measurements. [considering sailing flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanness, W.

    1978-01-01

    A summary report of boundary layer studies is presented. Preliminary results of experimental measurements show that: (1) A very thin layer (approximately 0.4 mm) of the boundary layer seems to be accelerated; (2) the static pressure of the outer flow does not remain exactly constant through the boundary layer; and (3) an oncoming boundary layer which is already turbulent at the suction point can again become laminar behind this point without being completely sucked off.

  5. Interferometric data for a shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Brown, James L.; Miles, John B.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the axisymmetric shock-wave / boundary-layer strong interaction flow generated in the vicinity of a cylinder-cone intersection was conducted. The study data are useful in the documentation and understanding of compressible turbulent strong interaction flows, and are part of a more general effort to improve turbulence modeling for compressible two- and three-dimensional strong viscous/inviscid interactions. The nominal free stream Mach number was 2.85. Tunnel total pressures of 1.7 and 3.4 atm provided Reynolds number values of 18 x 10(6) and 36 x 10(6) based on model length. Three cone angles were studied giving negligible, incipient, and large scale flow separation. The initial cylinder boundary layer upstream of the interaction had a thickness of 1.0 cm. The subsonic layer of the cylinder boundary layer was quite thin, and in all cases, the shock wave penetrated a significant portion of the boundary layer. Owing to the thickness of the cylinder boundary layer, considerable structural detail was resolved for the three shock-wave / boundary-layer interaction cases considered. The primary emphasis was on the application of the holographic interferometry technique. The density field was deduced from an interferometric analysis based on the Able transform. Supporting data were obtained using a 2-D laser velocimeter, as well as mean wall pressure and oil flow measurements. The attached flow case was observed to be steady, while the separated cases exhibited shock unsteadiness. Comparisons with Navier-Stokes computations using a two-equation turbulence model are presented.

  6. Thermal transport processes in stable boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Walter; Araya, Guillermo; Kiliyanpilakkil, Praju; Basu, Sukanta; Ruiz-Columbie, Arquimedes; Castillo, Luciano

    2014-11-01

    Using the 200-m tower data (Reese, Texas), profiler and Mesonet data, and WRF runs, a 4-dim model is introduced which summarizes the main features of the Low Level Jet (LLJ) in stable boundary conditions over the aforementioned region and shows its patterns along the year. We also demonstrate the importance of LLJs for wind energy production. It has been observed that during a LLJ event the level of turbulence intensities and TKE are significantly much lower than those during unstable conditions. The major salient results from this study include: the vertical shears in the LLJ are very large at the current wind turbine heights, causing higher static and cyclical aerodynamic loads. The WRF model has accurately captured the beginning and end of the LLJ event; however, the local maximum wind speed at the LLJ ``nose'' has been under-predicted by approximately 15%, which highlights the difficulties WRF still faces in predicting this phenomenon. Furthermore, power spectra and time-autocorrelations of thermal fluctuations will help us in the understanding of the thermal coherent structures involved in moderate and strong LLJ.

  7. Measurement of argon neutral velocity distribution functions near an absorbing boundary in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Zachary; Thompson, Derek; Good, Timothy; Scime, Earl

    2016-10-01

    Neutral particle distributions are critical to the study of plasma boundary interactions, where ion-neutral collisions, e.g. via charge exchange, may modify energetic particle populations impacting the boundary surface. Neutral particle behavior at absorbing boundaries thus underlies a number of important plasma physics issues, such as wall loading in fusion devices and anomalous erosion in Hall thruster channels. Neutral velocity distribution functions (NVDFs) are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Our LIF scheme excites the 1s4 non-metastable state of neutral argon with 667.913 nm photons. The subsequent decay emission at 750.590 nm is recorded synchronously with injection laser frequency. Measurements are performed near a grounded boundary immersed in a cylindrical helicon plasma, with the boundary plate oriented at an oblique angle to the magnetic field. NVDFs are recorded in multiple velocity dimensions and in a three-dimensional volume, enabling point-to-point comparisons with NVDF predictions from particle-in-cell models as well as comparisons with ion velocity distribution function measurements obtained in the same regions through Ar-II LIF. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation Grant Number PHYS-1360278.

  8. Coupled-rearrangement-channels calculation of the three-body system under the absorbing boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, M.; Otani, R.; Ito, M.; Kamimura, M.

    2016-06-01

    We formulate the absorbing boundary condition (ABC) in the coupled rearrangement-channels variational method (CRCVM) for the three-body problem. The absorbing potential is introduced in the system of the identical three-bosons, on which the boson symmetry is explicitly imposed by considering the rearrangement channels. The resonance parameters and the strength of the monopole breakup are calculated by the CRCVM + ABC method, and the results are compared with the complex scaling method (CSM). We have found that the results of the ABC method are consistent with the CSM results. The effect of the boson symmetry, which is often neglected in the calculation of the triple α reactions, is also discussed.

  9. Secondary instability in boundary-layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Bozatli, A. N.

    1979-01-01

    The stability of a secondary Tollmien-Schlichting wave, whose wavenumber and frequency are nearly one half those of a fundamental Tollmien-Schlichting instability wave is analyzed using the method of multiple scales. Under these conditions, the fundamental wave acts as a parametric exciter for the secondary wave. The results show that the amplitude of the fundamental wave must exceed a critical value to trigger this parametric instability. This value is proportional to a detuning parameter which is the real part of k - 2K, where k and K are the wavenumbers of the fundamental and its subharmonic, respectively. For Blasius flow, the critical amplitude is approximately 29% of the mean flow, and hence many other secondary instabilities take place before this parametric instability becomes significant. For other flows where the detuning parameter is small, such as free-shear layer flows, the critical amplitude can be small, thus the parametric instability might play a greater role.

  10. Stability of the Boundary Layer and the Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, I.

    2007-01-01

    The similarity among turbulent spots observed in various transition experiments, and the rate in which they contaminate the surrounding laminar boundary layer is only cursory. The shape of the spot depends on the Reynolds number of the surrounding boundary layer and on the pressure gradient to which it and the surrounding laminar flow are exposed. The propagation speeds of the spot boundaries depend, in addition, on the location from which the spot originated and do not simply scale with the local free stream velocity. The understanding of the manner in which the turbulent manner in which the turbulent spot destabilizes the surrounding, vortical fluid is a key to the understanding of the transition process. We therefore turned to detailed observations near the spot boundaries in general and near the spanwise tip of the spot in particular.

  11. Nonstationary Deformation of an Elastic Layer with Mixed Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubenko, V. D.

    2016-11-01

    The analytic solution to the plane problem for an elastic layer under a nonstationary surface load is found for mixed boundary conditions: normal stress and tangential displacement are specified on one side of the layer (fourth boundary-value problem of elasticity) and tangential stress and normal displacement are specified on the other side of the layer (second boundary-value problem of elasticity). The Laplace and Fourier integral transforms are applied. The inverse Laplace and Fourier transforms are found exactly using tabulated formulas and convolution theorems for various nonstationary loads. Explicit analytical expressions for stresses and displacements are derived. Loads applied to a constant surface area and to a surface area varying in a prescribed manner are considered. Computations demonstrate the dependence of the normal stress on time and spatial coordinates. Features of wave processes are analyzed

  12. Heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kays, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper contains a summarization of five years work on an investigation on heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer. Experimental results are presented for friction coefficient and Stanton number over a wide range of blowing and suction for the case of constant free-stream velocity, holding certain blowing parameters constant. The problem of the accelerated turbulent boundary layer with transpiration is considered, experimental data are presented and discussed, and theoretical models for solution of the momentum equation under these conditions are presented. Data on turbulent Prandtl number are presented so that solutions to the energy equation may be obtained. Some examples of boundary layer heat transfer and friction coefficient predictions are presented using one of the models discussed, employing a finite difference solution method.

  13. Effects of forebody geometry on subsonic boundary-layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, Simha S.

    1990-01-01

    As part of an effort to develop computational techniques for design of natural laminar flow fuselages, a computational study was made of the effect of forebody geometry on laminar boundary layer stability on axisymmetric body shapes. The effects of nose radius on the stability of the incompressible laminar boundary layer was computationally investigated using linear stability theory for body length Reynolds numbers representative of small and medium-sized airplanes. The steepness of the pressure gradient and the value of the minimum pressure (both functions of fineness ratio) govern the stability of laminar flow possible on an axisymmetric body at a given Reynolds number. It was found that to keep the laminar boundary layer stable for extended lengths, it is important to have a small nose radius. However, nose shapes with extremely small nose radii produce large pressure peaks at off-design angles of attack and can produce vortices which would adversely affect transition.

  14. Simple turbulence models and their application to boundary layer separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadcock, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements in the boundary layer and wake of a stalled airfoil are presented in two coordinate systems, one aligned with the airfoil chord, the other being conventional boundary layer coordinates. The NACA 4412 airfoil is studied at a single angle of attack corresponding to maximum lift, the Reynolds number based on chord being 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power. Turbulent boundary layer separation occurred at the 85 percent chord position. The two-dimensionality of the flow was documented and the momentum integral equation studied to illustrate the importance of turbulence contributions as separation is approached. The assumptions of simple eddy-viscosity and mixing-length turbulence models are checked directly against experiment. Curvature effects are found to be important as separation is approached.

  15. The analysis of a nonsimilar laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalmach, D. D.; Bertin, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code is described which yields accurate solutions for a broad range of laminar, nonsimilar boundary layers, providing the inviscid flow field is known. The boundary layer may be subject to mass injection for perfect-gas, nonreacting flows. If no mass injection is present, the code can be used with either perfect-gas or real-gas thermodynamic models. Solutions, ranging from two-dimensional similarity solutions to solutions for the boundary layer on the Space Shuttle Orbiter during reentry conditions, have been obtained with the code. Comparisons of these solutions, and others, with solutions presented in the literature; and with solutions obtained from other codes, demonstrate the accuracy of the present code.

  16. Rotor blade boundary layer measurement hardware feasibility demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. R.; Lawton, T. D.

    1972-01-01

    A traverse mechanism which allows the measurement of the three dimensional boundary layers on a helicopter rotor blade has been built and tested on a full scale rotor to full scale conditions producing centrifugal accelerations in excess of 400 g and Mach numbers of 0.6 and above. Boundary layer velocity profiles have been measured over a range of rotor speeds and blade collective pitch angles. A pressure scanning switch and transducer were also tested on the full scale rotor and found to be insensitive to centrifugal effects within the normal main rotor operating range. The demonstration of the capability to measure boundary layer behavior on helicopter rotor blades represents the first step toward obtaining, in the rotating system, data of a quality comparable to that already existing for flows in the fixed system.

  17. Effect of Blowing on Boundary Layer of Scarf Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.

    2004-01-01

    When aircraft operate in stationary or low speed conditions, airflow into the engine accelerates around the inlet lip and pockets of turbulence that cause noise and vibration can be ingested. This problem has been encountered with engines equipped with the scarf inlet, both in full scale and in model tests, where the noise produced during the static test makes it difficult to assess the noise reduction performance of the scarf inlet. NASA Langley researchers have implemented boundary layer control in an attempt to reduce the influence of the flow nonuniformity in a 12-in. diameter model of a high bypass fan engine mounted in an anechoic chamber. Static pressures and boundary layer profiles were measured in the inlet and far field acoustic measurements were made to assess the effectiveness of the blowing treatment. The blowing system was found to lack the authority to overcome the inlet distortions. Methods to improve the implementation of boundary layer control to reduce inlet distortion are discussed.

  18. A compilation of unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    An extensive literature search was conducted and those experiments related to unsteady boundary layer behavior were cataloged. In addition, an international survey of industrial, university, and governmental research laboratories was made in which new and ongoing experimental programs associated with unsteady turbulent boundary layer research were identified. Pertinent references were reviewed and classified based on the technical emphasis of the various experiments. Experiments that include instantaneous or ensemble averaged profiles of boundary layer variables are stressed. The experimental apparatus and flow conditions are described and summaries of acquired data and significant conclusions are summarized. Measurements obtained from the experiments which exist in digital form were stored on magnetic tape. Instructions are given for accessing these data sets for further analysis.

  19. Boundary layer integral matrix procedure: Verification of models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnett, W. S.; Evans, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The three turbulent models currently available in the JANNAF version of the Aerotherm Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMP-J) code were studied. The BLIMP-J program is the standard prediction method for boundary layer effects in liquid rocket engine thrust chambers. Experimental data from flow fields with large edge-to-wall temperature ratios are compared to the predictions of the three turbulence models contained in BLIMP-J. In addition, test conditions necessary to generate additional data on a flat plate or in a nozzle are given. It is concluded that the Cebeci-Smith turbulence model be the recommended model for the prediction of boundary layer effects in liquid rocket engines. In addition, the effects of homogeneous chemical reaction kinetics were examined for a hydrogen/oxygen system. Results show that for most flows, kinetics are probably only significant for stoichiometric mixture ratios.

  20. Bypass transition and spot nucleation in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreilos, Tobias; Khapko, Taras; Schlatter, Philipp; Duguet, Yohann; Henningson, Dan S.; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    The spatiotemporal aspects of the transition to turbulence are considered in the case of a boundary-layer flow developing above a flat plate exposed to free-stream turbulence. Combining results on the receptivity to free-stream turbulence with the nonlinear concept of a transition threshold, a physically motivated model suggests a spatial distribution of spot nucleation events. To describe the evolution of turbulent spots a probabilistic cellular automaton is introduced, with all parameters directly obtained from numerical simulations of the boundary layer. The nucleation rates are then combined with the cellular automaton model, yielding excellent quantitative agreement with the statistical characteristics for different free-stream turbulence levels. We thus show how the recent theoretical progress on transitional wall-bounded flows can be extended to the much wider class of spatially developing boundary-layer flows.

  1. Optical measurements of degradation in aircraft boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelsall, D.

    1980-01-01

    Visible wavelength measurements of the degradation of optical beams when transmitted through the thin aerodynamic boundary layers around an aircraft are reviewed. The measured results indicated degradation levels for the KC-135 airplanes between 0.10 to 0.13 lambda increasing to 0.18 lambda (rms wavefront distortion). For the Lear Jet, degradation with a 25 mm diameter optics was roughly 0.07 lambda. The corresponding infinite aperture degradation levels are also calculated. The corresponding measured correlation lengths of roughly 12 mm for the KC-135 aircraft and 6 mm for the Lear Jet scale to roughly 20 and 25 mm, respectively, for infinite apertures. These boundary layer correlation lengths do not appear to reflect the different boundary layer thicknesses on the two different aircraft.

  2. Finite volume solution of the compressible boundary-layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, B.; Murman, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    A box-type finite volume discretization is applied to the integral form of the compressible boundary layer equations. Boundary layer scaling is introduced through the grid construction: streamwise grid lines follow eta = y/h = const., where y is the normal coordinate and h(x) is a scale factor proportional to the boundary layer thickness. With this grid, similarity can be applied explicity to calculate initial conditions. The finite volume method preserves the physical transparency of the integral equations in the discrete approximation. The resulting scheme is accurate, efficient, and conceptually simple. Computations for similar and non-similar flows show excellent agreement with tabulated results, solutions computed with Keller's Box scheme, and experimental data.

  3. Roughness Induced Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Kergerise, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to investigate the transition induced by threedimensional isolated roughness elements in a supersonic boundary layer at a free stream Mach number of 3.5. Simulations are performed for two different configurations: one is a square planform roughness and the other is a diamond planform roughness. The mean-flow calculations show that the roughness induces counter rotating streamwise vortices downstream of the roughness. These vortices persist for a long distance downstream and lift the low momentum fluid from the near wall region and place it near the outer part of the boundary layer. This forms highly inflectional boundary layer profiles. These observations agree with recent experimental observations. The receptivity calculations showed that the amplitudes of the mass-flux fluctuations near the neutral point for the diamond shape roughness are the same as the amplitude of the acoustic disturbances. They are three times smaller for the square shape roughness.

  4. Inverse boundary-layer theory and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Inverse boundary layer computational procedures, which permit nonsingular solutions at separation and reattachment, are presented. In the first technique, which is for incompressible flow, the displacement thickness is prescribed; in the second technique, for compressible flow, a perturbation mass flow is the prescribed condition. The pressure is deduced implicitly along with the solution in each of these techniques. Laminar and turbulent computations, which are typical of separated flow, are presented and comparisons are made with experimental data. In both inverse procedures, finite difference techniques are used along with Newton iteration. The resulting procedure is no more complicated than conventional boundary layer computations. These separated boundary layer techniques appear to be well suited for complete viscous-inviscid interaction computations.

  5. Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer with Localized Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2010-01-01

    A localized 3-D roughness causes boundary-layer separation and (weak) shocks. Most importantly, streamwise vortices occur which induce streamwise (low U, high T) streaks. Immersed boundary method (volume force) suitable to represent roughness element in DNS. Favorable comparison between bi-global stability theory and DNS for a "y-mode" Outlook: Understand the flow physics (investigate "z-modes" in DNS through sinuous spanwise forcing, study origin of the beat in DNS).

  6. A new conformal absorbing boundary condition for finite element meshes and parallelization of FEMATS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, J. L.; Nguyen, J.; Nurnberger, M.; Ross, D.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the progress toward the development and parallelization of an improved version of the finite element code FEMATS is described. This is a finite element code for computing the scattering by arbitrarily shaped three dimensional surfaces composite scatterers. The following tasks were worked on during the report period: (1) new absorbing boundary conditions (ABC's) for truncating the finite element mesh; (2) mixed mesh termination schemes; (3) hierarchical elements and multigridding; (4) parallelization; and (5) various modeling enhancements (antenna feeds, anisotropy, and higher order GIBC).

  7. Unsteady turbulent boundary layers in swimming rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Kazutaka; Saarenrinne, Pentti

    2015-05-01

    The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, swimming at 1.02±0.09 L s(-1) (mean±s.d., N=4), were measured by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique at a Reynolds number of 4×10(5). The boundary layer profile showed unsteadiness, oscillating above and beneath the classical logarithmic law of the wall with body motion. Across the entire surface regions that were measured, local Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, which is the distance that is perpendicular to the fish surface through which the boundary layer momentum flows at free-stream velocity, were greater than the critical value of 320 for the laminar-to-turbulent transition. The skin friction was dampened on the convex surface while the surface was moving towards a free-stream flow and increased on the concave surface while retreating. These observations contradict the result of a previous study using different species swimming by different methods. Boundary layer compression accompanied by an increase in local skin friction was not observed. Thus, the overall results may not support absolutely the Bone-Lighthill boundary layer thinning hypothesis that the undulatory motions of swimming fish cause a large increase in their friction drag because of the compression of the boundary layer. In some cases, marginal flow separation occurred on the convex surface in the relatively anterior surface region, but the separated flow reattached to the fish surface immediately downstream. Therefore, we believe that a severe impact due to induced drag components (i.e. pressure drag) on the swimming performance, an inevitable consequence of flow separation, was avoided. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Numerical Study of Boundary-Layer in Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tom I-P.

    1997-01-01

    The accomplishments made in the following three tasks are described: (1) The first task was to study shock-wave boundary-layer interactions with bleed - this study is relevant to boundary-layer control in external and mixed-compression inlets of supersonic aircraft; (2) The second task was to test RAAKE, a code developed for computing turbulence quantities; and (3) The third task was to compute flow around the Ames ER-2 aircraft that has been retrofitted with containers over its wings and fuselage. The appendices include two reports submitted to AIAA for publication.

  9. Effects of shock on hypersonic boundary layer stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, F.; Rambaud, P.

    2013-06-01

    The design of hypersonic vehicles requires the estimate of the laminar to turbulent transition location for an accurate sizing of the thermal protection system. Linear stability theory is a fast scientific way to study the problem. Recent improvements in computational capabilities allow computing the flow around a full vehicle instead of using only simplified boundary layer equations. In this paper, the effect of the shock is studied on a mean flow provided by steady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computations and simplified boundary layer calculations.

  10. Lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer during FASINEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, S. H.; Boers, R.; Palm, S. P.

    1988-01-01

    Data are presented on the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over the ocean acquired with an airborne downward-looking lidar during the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX) with the purpose of studying the impact of an ocean front on air-sea interactions. No changes in the PBL structure were detected by lidar. Lidar data were then used along with other readily available remotely-sensed data and a one-dimensional boundary-layer-growth model to infer the mean PBL moisture and temperature structure and to estimate the surface fluxes of heat and moisture.

  11. Characteristics of turbulence in boundary layer with zero pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebanoff, P S

    1955-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire anemometer were made of turbulent energy and turbulent shear stress, probability density and flattening factor of u-fluctuation (fluctuation in x-direction), spectra of turbulent energy and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The importance of the region near the wall and the inadequacy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated. Attention is given to the energy balance and the intermittent character of the outer region of the boundary layer. Also several interesting features of the spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are discussed.

  12. An Innovative Flow-Measuring Device: Thermocouple Boundary Layer Rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative flow-measuring device, a thermocouple boundary layer rake, was developed. The sensor detects the flow by using a thin-film thermocouple (TC) array to measure the temperature difference across a heater strip. The heater and TC arrays are microfabricated on a constant-thickness quartz strut with low heat conductivity. The device can measure the velocity profile well into the boundary layer, about 65 gm from the surface, which is almost four times closer to the surface than has been possible with the previously used total pressure tube.

  13. Lagrangian analysis of the laminar flat plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    The flow properties at the leading edge of a flat plate represent a singularity to the Blasius laminar boundary layer equations; by applying the Lagrangian approach, the leading edge velocity profiles of the laminar boundary layer over a flat plate are studied. Experimental observations as well as the theoretical analysis show an exact Gaussian distribution curve as the original starting profile of the laminar flow. Comparisons between the Blasius solution and the Gaussian curve solution are carried out providing a new insight into the physics of the laminar flow.

  14. Interactive boundary-layer calculations of a transonic wing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaups, Kalle; Cebeci, Tuncer; Mehta, Unmeel

    1989-01-01

    Results obtained from iterative solutions of inviscid and boundary-layer equations are presented and compared with experimental values. The calculated results were obtained with an Euler code and a transonic potential code in order to furnish solutions for the inviscid flow; they were interacted with solutions of two-dimensional boundary-layer equations having a strip-theory approximation. Euler code results are found to be in better agreement with the experimental data than with the full potential code, especially in the presence of shock waves, (with the sole exception of the near-tip region).

  15. Electrodynamic properties and height of atmospheric convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, S. V.; Galichenko, S. V.; Mareev, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    We consider the relations between the mixed layer height and atmospheric electric parameters affected by convective mixing. Vertical turbulent transport of radon, its progeny and electrically charged particles is described under Lagrangian stochastic framework, which is the next step to develop a consistent model for the formation of electrical conditions in the atmospheric boundary layer. Using the data from detailed and complex measurements of vertical profiles of the temperature and turbulence statistics as input, we calculated non-stationary vertical profiles of radon and its daughter products concentrations, atmospheric electric conductivity and intensity of electric field in the convective boundary layer from the morning transition through early afternoon quasi-stationary conditions. These profiles demonstrate substantial variability due to the changing turbulent regime in the evolving boundary layer. We obtained quantitative estimates of the atmospheric electric field variability range essentially related to the sunrise and convection development. It is shown that the local change in the electrical conductivity is the only factor that can change the intensity of electric field at the earth's surface more than twice during the transition from night to day. The established relations between electric and turbulent parameters of the boundary layer indicate that the effect of sunrise is more pronounced in the case when development of convection is accompanied by an increase in aerosol concentration and, hence, a decrease in local conductivity.

  16. Turbulent boundary layers subjected to multiple curvatures and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Ahmed, Anwar

    1993-01-01

    The effects of abruptly applied cycles of curvatures and pressure gradients on turbulent boundary layers are examined experimentally. Two two-dimensional curved test surfaces are considered: one has a sequence of concave and convex longitudinal surface curvatures and the other has a sequence of convex and concave curvatures. The choice of the curvature sequences were motivated by a desire to study the asymmetric response of turbulent boundary layers to convex and concave curvatures. The relaxation of a boundary layer from the effects of these two opposite sequences has been compared. The effect of the accompaying sequences of pressure gradient has also been examined but the effect of curvature dominates. The growth of internal layers at the curvature junctions have been studied. Measurements of the Gortler and corner vortex systems have been made. The boundary layer recovering from the sequence of concave to convex curvature has a sustained lower skin friction level than in that recovering from the sequence of convex to concave curvature. The amplification and suppression of turbulence due to the curvature sequences have also been studied.

  17. The turbulent plasmasphere boundary layer and the outer radiation belt boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny; Sotnikov, Vladimir

    2017-12-01

    We report on observations of enhanced plasma turbulence and hot particle distributions in the plasmasphere boundary layer formed by reconnection-injected hot plasma jets entering the plasmasphere. The data confirm that the electron pressure peak is formed just outward of the plasmapause in the premidnight sector. Free energy for plasma wave excitation comes from diamagnetic ion currents near the inner edge of the boundary layer due to the ion pressure gradient, electron diamagnetic currents in the entry layer near the electron plasma sheet boundary, and anisotropic (sometimes ring-like) ion distributions revealed inside, and further inward of, the inner boundary. We also show that nonlinear parametric coupling between lower oblique resonance and fast magnetosonic waves significantly contributes to the VLF whistler wave spectrum in the plasmasphere boundary layer. These emissions represent a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region devoid of substorm injected tens keV electrons and could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms.

  18. A model of the wall boundary layer for ducted propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter; Moehring, Willi

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to include a representation of a wall boundary layer in an existing finite element model of the propeller in the wind tunnel environment. The major consideration is that the new formulation should introduce only modest alterations in the numerical model and should still be capable of producing economical predictions of the radiated acoustic field. This is accomplished by using a stepped approximation in which the velocity profile is piecewise constant in layers. In the limit of infinitesimally thin layers, the velocity profile of the stepped approximation coincides with that of the continuous profile. The approach described here could also be useful in modeling the boundary layer in other duct applications, particularly in the computation of the radiated acoustic field for sources contained in a duct.

  19. Surface influence upon vertical profiles in the nocturnal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1983-05-01

    Near-surface wind profiles in the nocturnal boundary layer, depth h, above relatively flat, tree-covered terrain are described in the context of the analysis of Garratt (1980) for the unstable atmospheric boundary layer. The observations at two sites imply a surface-based transition layer, of depth z *, within which the observed non-dimensional profiles Φ M 0 are a modified form of the inertial sub-layer relation Φ _M ( {{z L}} = ( {{{1 + 5_Z } L}} ) according to Φ _M^{{0}} ˜eq ( {{{1 + 5z} L}} )exp [ { - 0.7( {{{1 - z} z}_ * } )] , where z is height above the zero-plane displacement and L is the Monin-Obukhov length. At both sites the depth z * is significantly smaller than the appropriate neutral value ( z * N ) found from the previous analysis, as might be expected in the presence of a buoyant sink for turbulent kinetic energy.

  20. Interaction of Atmospheric Turbulence with Blade Boundary Layer Dynamics on a 5MW Wind Turbine using Blade-Boundary-Layer-Resolved CFD with hybrid URANS-LES.

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Brasseur, James; Lavely, Adam

    We describe the response of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine blade boundary layer to the passage of atmospheric turbulence using blade-boundary-layer-resolved computational fluid dynamics with hybrid URANS-LES modeling.

  1. An operational large-scale marine planetary boundary layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.; Liu, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    A marine planetary boundary layer (PBL) model is presented and compared with data from sea-based experiments. The PBL model comprises two layers, the outer an Ekman-Taylor layer with stratification-dependent secondary flow, and the logarithmic surface layer corrected for stratification and humidity effects and variable surface roughness. Corrections are noted for air much warmer than water in stable conditions and for low wind speeds. The layers are analytically defined along with similarity relations and a resistance law for inclusion in a program. An additional interfacial layer correction is developed and shown to be significant for heat flux calculations. Experimental data from GOASEX were used to predict the windfield in the Gulf of Alaska, and JASIN data was used for windfields SE of Iceland. The JASIN-derived wind field predictions were accurate to within 1 m/sec and 10 deg in a 200 km triangle.

  2. Boundary Electron and Beta Dosimetry-Quantification of the Effects of Dissimilar Media on Absorbed Dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Josane C.

    1991-02-01

    This work quantifies the changes effected in electron absorbed dose to a soft-tissue equivalent medium when part of this medium is replaced by a material that is not soft -tissue equivalent. That is, heterogeneous dosimetry is addressed. Radionuclides which emit beta particles are the electron sources of primary interest. They are used in brachytherapy and in nuclear medicine: for example, beta -ray applicators made with strontium-90 are employed in certain ophthalmic treatments and iodine-131 is used to test thyroid function. More recent medical procedures under development and which involve beta radionuclides include radioimmunotherapy and radiation synovectomy; the first is a cancer modality and the second deals with the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the possibility of skin surface contamination exists whenever there is handling of radioactive material. Determination of absorbed doses in the examples of the preceding paragraph requires considering boundaries of interfaces. Whilst the Monte Carlo method can be applied to boundary calculations, for routine work such as in clinical situations, or in other circumstances where doses need to be determined quickly, analytical dosimetry would be invaluable. Unfortunately, few analytical methods for boundary beta dosimetry exist. Furthermore, the accuracy of results from both Monte Carlo and analytical methods has to be assessed. Although restricted to one radionuclide, phosphorus -32, the experimental data obtained in this work serve several purposes, one of which is to provide standards against which calculated results can be tested. The experimental data also contribute to the relatively sparse set of published boundary dosimetry data. At the same time, they may be useful in developing analytical boundary dosimetry methodology. The first application of the experimental data is demonstrated. Results from two Monte Carlo codes and two analytical methods, which were developed elsewhere, are compared

  3. Clear-air radar observations of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ince, Turker

    2001-10-01

    This dissertation presents the design and operation of a high-resolution frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM- CW) radar system to study the structure and dynamics of clear-air turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This sensitive radar can image the vertical structure of the ABL with both high spatial and temporal resolutions, and provide both qualitative information about the morphology of clear-air structures and quantitative information on the intensity of fluctuations in refractive-index of air. The principles of operation and the hardware and data acquisition characteristics of the radar are described in the dissertation. In October 1999, the radar participated in the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES'99) Experiment to characterize the temporal structure and evolution of the boundary-layer features in both convective and stable conditions. The observed structures include clear-air convection, boundary layer evolution, gravity waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, stably stratified layers, and clear-air turbulence. Many of the S-band radar images also show high- reflectivity returns from Rayleigh scatterers such as insects. An adaptive median filtering technique based on local statistics has, therefore, been developed to discriminate between Bragg and Rayleigh scattering in clear-air radar observations. The filter is tested on radar observations of clear air convection with comparison to two commonly used image processing techniques. The dissertation also examines the statistical mean of the radar-measured C2n for clear-air convection, and compares it with the theoretical predictions. The study also shows that the inversion height, local thickness of the inversion layer, and the height of the elevated atmospheric layers can be estimated from the radar reflectivity measurements. In addition, comparisons to the radiosonde-based height estimates are made. To examine the temporal and spatial structure of C2n , the dissertation

  4. Fabrication of CIS Absorber Layers with Different Thicknesses Using A Non-Vacuum Spray Coating Method

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Chien-Chen; Kuo, Hsin-Hui; Tzou, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Yen-Lin; Yang, Cheng-Fu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a new thin-film deposition process, spray coating method (SPM), was investigated to deposit the high-densified CuInSe2 absorber layers. The spray coating method developed in this study was a non-vacuum process, based on dispersed nano-scale CuInSe2 precursor and could offer a simple, inexpensive, and alternative formation technology for CuInSe2 absorber layers. After spraying on Mo/glass substrates, the CuInSe2 thin films were annealed at 550 °C by changing the annealing time from 5 min to 30 min in a selenization furnace, using N2 as atmosphere. When the CuInSe2 thin films were annealed, without extra Se or H2Se gas used as the compensation source during the annealing process. The aim of this project was to investigate the influence of annealing time on the densification and crystallization of the CuInSe2 absorber layers to optimize the quality for cost effective solar cell production. The thickness of the CuInSe2 absorber layers could be controlled as the volume of used dispersed CuInSe2-isopropyl alcohol solution was controlled. In this work, X-ray diffraction patterns, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and Hall parameter measurements were performed in order to verify the quality of the CuInSe2 absorber layers obtained by the Spray Coating Method. PMID:28788451

  5. Fabrication of CIS Absorber Layers with Different Thicknesses Using A Non-Vacuum Spray Coating Method.

    PubMed

    Diao, Chien-Chen; Kuo, Hsin-Hui; Tzou, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Yen-Lin; Yang, Cheng-Fu

    2014-01-03

    In this study, a new thin-film deposition process, spray coating method (SPM), was investigated to deposit the high-densified CuInSe₂ absorber layers. The spray coating method developed in this study was a non-vacuum process, based on dispersed nano-scale CuInSe₂ precursor and could offer a simple, inexpensive, and alternative formation technology for CuInSe₂ absorber layers. After spraying on Mo/glass substrates, the CuInSe₂ thin films were annealed at 550 °C by changing the annealing time from 5 min to 30 min in a selenization furnace, using N₂ as atmosphere. When the CuInSe₂ thin films were annealed, without extra Se or H₂Se gas used as the compensation source during the annealing process. The aim of this project was to investigate the influence of annealing time on the densification and crystallization of the CuInSe₂ absorber layers to optimize the quality for cost effective solar cell production. The thickness of the CuInSe₂ absorber layers could be controlled as the volume of used dispersed CuInSe₂-isopropyl alcohol solution was controlled. In this work, X-ray diffraction patterns, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and Hall parameter measurements were performed in order to verify the quality of the CuInSe₂ absorber layers obtained by the Spray Coating Method.

  6. Extreme Vertical Gusts in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    significant effect on the statistics of the rare, extreme gusts. In the lowest 5,000 ft, boundary layer effects make small to moderate vertical...4 2.4 Effects of Gust Shape ............................................................................................... 5... Definitions Adiabatic Lapse Rate The rate of change of temperature with altitude that would occur if a parcel of air was transported sufficiently

  7. Secondary eyewall formation as a progressive boundary layer response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca, S. F.; Montgomery, M. T.; Bell, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    The robust observational (satellite based) evidence that secondary eyewalls are common features in major hurricanes contrasts with the scarce in situ observations of the phenomena and its life cycle. This lack of observations has resulted in an incomplete understanding of the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation (SEF). A wide variety of physical processes have been invoked to explain SEF, but only the recently proposed theory of a progressive boundary layer control in SEF has been supported by a variety of full physics mesoscale numerical integrations. The RAINEX field project provided unique observations of the secondary eyewall of Hurricane Rita (2005) both before and during the time Rita exhibited a clear secondary eyewall structure. These observations have contributed to the advancement of the understanding of the secondary eyewall phenomenon. However, in the RAINEX experiment, there was limited data sampling during the development of the secondary wind maxima, thereby precluding a complete observational investigation of the dynamics of SEF. In this presentation we adopt an azimuthally-averaged perspective of the flow dynamics and we test the newly proposed theory of a progressive boundary layer control on SEF. Specifically, we use both RAINEX data as well as data from high resolution, full physics mesoscale numerical simulations to initialize and force an axisymmetric slab boundary layer model with radial diffusion included. The objective is to investigate whether such a reduced boundary layer model can generate secondary wind maxima as a response to environments like those that result in SEF in nature and in full physics simulations.

  8. Atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions over West Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A systemic analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer behavior during some evening transitions over West Texas was done using the data from an extensive array of instruments which included small and large aperture scintillometers, net radiometers, and meteorological stations. The analysis also comp...

  9. Retinal layer segmentation of macular OCT images using boundary classification

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Hauser, Matthew; Sotirchos, Elias S.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Ying, Howard S.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be an essential imaging modality for ophthalmology and is proving to be very important in neurology. OCT enables high resolution imaging of the retina, both at the optic nerve head and the macula. Macular retinal layer thicknesses provide useful diagnostic information and have been shown to correlate well with measures of disease severity in several diseases. Since manual segmentation of these layers is time consuming and prone to bias, automatic segmentation methods are critical for full utilization of this technology. In this work, we build a random forest classifier to segment eight retinal layers in macular cube images acquired by OCT. The random forest classifier learns the boundary pixels between layers, producing an accurate probability map for each boundary, which is then processed to finalize the boundaries. Using this algorithm, we can accurately segment the entire retina contained in the macular cube to an accuracy of at least 4.3 microns for any of the nine boundaries. Experiments were carried out on both healthy and multiple sclerosis subjects, with no difference in the accuracy of our algorithm found between the groups. PMID:23847738

  10. On the growth of turbulent regions in laminar boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, M.; Riley, J. J.; Blackwelder, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Turbulent spots evolving in a laminar boundary layer on a nominally zero pressure gradient flat plate are investigated. The plate is towed through an 18 m water channel, using a carriage that rides on a continuously replenished oil film giving a vibrationless tow. Turbulent spots are initiated using a solenoid valve that ejects a small amount of fluid through a minute hole on the working surface. A novel visualization technique that utilizes fluorescent dye excited by a sheet of laser light is employed. Some new aspects of the growth and entrainment of turbulent spots, especially with regard to lateral growth, are inferred from the present experiments. To supplement the information on lateral spreading, a turbulent wedge created by placing a roughness element in the laminar boundary layer is also studied both visually and with probe measurements. The present results show that, in addition to entrainment, another mechanism is needed to explain the lateral growth characteristics of a turbulent region in a laminar boundary layer. This mechanism, termed growth by destabilization, appears to be a result of the turbulence destabilizing the unstable laminar boundary layer in its vicinity. To further understand the growth mechanisms, the turbulence in the spot is modulated using drag-reducing additives and salinity stratification.

  11. Propagation of propeller tone noise through a fuselage boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.; Magliozzi, B.

    1984-01-01

    In earlier experimental and analytical studies, it was found that the boundary layer on an aircraft could provide significant shielding from propeller noise at typical transport airplane cruise Mach numbers. In this paper a new three-dimensional theory is described that treats the combined effects of refraction and scattering by the fuselage and boundary layer. The complete wave field is solved by matching analytical expressions for the incident and scattered waves in the outer flow to a numerical solution in the boundary layer flow. The model for the incident waves is a near-field frequency-domain propeller source theory developed previously for free field studies. Calculations for an advanced turboprop (Prop-Fan) model flight test at 0.8 Mach number show a much smaller than expected pressure amplification at the noise directivity peak, strong boundary layer shielding in the forward quadrant, and shadowing around the fuselage. Results are presented showing the difference between fuselage surface and free-space noise predictions as a function of frequency and Mach number. Comparison of calculated and measured effects obtained in a Prop-Fan model flight test show good agreement, particularly near and aft of the plane of rotation at high cruise Mach number.

  12. Determination of Stability and Translation in a Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crepeau, John; Tobak, Murray

    1996-01-01

    Reducing the infinite degrees of freedom inherent in fluid motion into a manageable number of modes to analyze fluid motion is presented. The concepts behind the center manifold technique are used. Study of the Blasius boundary layer and a precise description of stability within the flow field are discussed.

  13. Boundary-Layer Receptivity and Integrated Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan

    2005-01-01

    The adjoint parabold stability equations (PSE) formulation is used to calculate the boundary layer receptivity to localized surface roughness and suction for compressible boundary layers. Receptivity efficiency functions predicted by the adjoint PSE approach agree well with results based on other nonparallel methods including linearized Navier-Stokes equations for both Tollmien-Schlichting waves and crossflow instability in swept wing boundary layers. The receptivity efficiency function can be regarded as the Green's function to the disturbance amplitude evolution in a nonparallel (growing) boundary layer. Given the Fourier transformed geometry factor distribution along the chordwise direction, the linear disturbance amplitude evolution for a finite size, distributed nonuniformity can be computed by evaluating the integral effects of both disturbance generation and linear amplification. The synergistic approach via the linear adjoint PSE for receptivity and nonlinear PSE for disturbance evolution downstream of the leading edge forms the basis for an integrated transition prediction tool. Eventually, such physics-based, high fidelity prediction methods could simulate the transition process from the disturbance generation through the nonlinear breakdown in a holistic manner.

  14. Boundary layer measurements using hot-film sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Carraway, Debra L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements in the aerodynamic boundary layer using heat transfer, hot-film sensors are receiving a significant amount of effort at the Langley Research Center. A description of the basic sensor, the signal conditioning employed, and several manifestations of the sensor are given. Results of a flow reversal sensor development are presented, and future work areas are outlined.

  15. Stability of hypersonic boundary-layer flows with chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.; Stuckert, Gregory K.; Haynes, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of nonequilibrium chemistry and three dimensionality on the stability characteristics of hypersonic flows are discussed. In two-dimensional (2-D) and axisymmetric flows, the inclusion of chemistry causes a shift of the second mode of Mack to lower frequencies. This is found to be due to the increase in size of the region of relative supersonic flow because of the lower speeds of sound in the relatively cooler boundary layers. Although this shift in frequency is present in both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium air results, the equilibrium approximation predicts modes which are not observed in the nonequilibrium calculations (for the flight conditions considered). These modes are superpositions of incoming and outgoing unstable disturbances which travel supersonically relative to the boundary-layer edge velocity. Such solutions are possible because of the finite shock stand-off distance. Their corresponding wall-normal profiles exhibit an oscillatory behavior in the inviscid region between the boundary-layer edge and the bow shock. For the examination of three-dimensional (3-D) effects, a rotating cone is used as a model of a swept wing. An increase of stagnation temperature is found to be only slightly stabilizing. The correlation of transition location (N = 9) with parameters describing the crossflow profile is discussed. Transition location does not correlate with the traditional crossflow Reynolds number. A new parameter that appears to correlate for boundary-layer flow was found. A verification with experiments on a yawed cone is provided.

  16. Towards Adaptive Grids for Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooft, J. Antoon; Popinet, Stéphane; van Heerwaarden, Chiel C.; van der Linden, Steven J. A.; de Roode, Stephan R.; van de Wiel, Bas J. H.

    2018-02-01

    We present a proof-of-concept for the adaptive mesh refinement method applied to atmospheric boundary-layer simulations. Such a method may form an attractive alternative to static grids for studies on atmospheric flows that have a high degree of scale separation in space and/or time. Examples include the diurnal cycle and a convective boundary layer capped by a strong inversion. For such cases, large-eddy simulations using regular grids often have to rely on a subgrid-scale closure for the most challenging regions in the spatial and/or temporal domain. Here we analyze a flow configuration that describes the growth and subsequent decay of a convective boundary layer using direct numerical simulation (DNS). We validate the obtained results and benchmark the performance of the adaptive solver against two runs using fixed regular grids. It appears that the adaptive-mesh algorithm is able to coarsen and refine the grid dynamically whilst maintaining an accurate solution. In particular, during the initial growth of the convective boundary layer a high resolution is required compared to the subsequent stage of decaying turbulence. More specifically, the number of grid cells varies by two orders of magnitude over the course of the simulation. For this specific DNS case, the adaptive solver was not yet more efficient than the more traditional solver that is dedicated to these types of flows. However, the overall analysis shows that the method has a clear potential for numerical investigations of the most challenging atmospheric cases.

  17. Air flow in the boundary layer near a plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L

    1937-01-01

    The published data on the distribution of speed near a thin flat plate with sharp leading edge placed parallel to the flow (skin friction plate) are reviewed and the results of some additional measurements are described. The purpose of the experiments was to study the basic phenomena of boundary-layer flow under simple conditions.

  18. An interpretation of radiosonde errors in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Treesearch

    Bernadette H. Connell; David R. Miller

    1995-01-01

    The authors review sources of error in radiosonde measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer and analyze errors of two radiosonde models manufactured by Atmospheric Instrumentation Research, Inc. The authors focus on temperature and humidity lag errors and wind errors. Errors in measurement of azimuth and elevation angles and pressure over short time intervals and...

  19. Detection of boundary-layer transitions in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, W. R.; Somers, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Accelerometer replaces stethoscope in technique for detection of laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer transitions on wind-tunnel models. Technique allows measurements above or below atmospheric pressure because human operator is not required within tunnel. Data may be taken from accelerometer, and pressure transducer simultaneously, and delivered to systems for analysis.

  20. TURBULENCE PARAMETERS IMPACTING DISPERSION IN AN URBAN CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Turbulence measurements of the three dimensional wind components were collected by an instrumented research aircraft on 7 days in August 1976. These aircraft flights were conducted as part of the Regional Air Pollution Study (RAPS) urban boundary layer field program in St. Louis,...

  1. Towards Adaptive Grids for Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooft, J. Antoon; Popinet, Stéphane; van Heerwaarden, Chiel C.; van der Linden, Steven J. A.; de Roode, Stephan R.; van de Wiel, Bas J. H.

    2018-06-01

    We present a proof-of-concept for the adaptive mesh refinement method applied to atmospheric boundary-layer simulations. Such a method may form an attractive alternative to static grids for studies on atmospheric flows that have a high degree of scale separation in space and/or time. Examples include the diurnal cycle and a convective boundary layer capped by a strong inversion. For such cases, large-eddy simulations using regular grids often have to rely on a subgrid-scale closure for the most challenging regions in the spatial and/or temporal domain. Here we analyze a flow configuration that describes the growth and subsequent decay of a convective boundary layer using direct numerical simulation (DNS). We validate the obtained results and benchmark the performance of the adaptive solver against two runs using fixed regular grids. It appears that the adaptive-mesh algorithm is able to coarsen and refine the grid dynamically whilst maintaining an accurate solution. In particular, during the initial growth of the convective boundary layer a high resolution is required compared to the subsequent stage of decaying turbulence. More specifically, the number of grid cells varies by two orders of magnitude over the course of the simulation. For this specific DNS case, the adaptive solver was not yet more efficient than the more traditional solver that is dedicated to these types of flows. However, the overall analysis shows that the method has a clear potential for numerical investigations of the most challenging atmospheric cases.

  2. FLUID MODELING OF ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION IN THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Study of convective boundary layer (CBL) processes has depended largely upon laboratory analogs for many years. The pioneering work of Willis and Deardorff (1974) and some 35 subsequent papers by the same authors showed that much useful research could be accomplished with a re...

  3. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION IN THE ARCTIC: WINTERTIME BOUNDARY-LAYER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The wintertime arctic atmospheric boundary layer was investigated with micro-meteorological and SF6 tracer measurements collected in Prudhoe Bay, AK. he flat, snow-covered tundra surface at this site generates a very small (0.03 cm) surface roughness. he relatively warm maritime ...

  4. Control of Boundary Layers for Aero-optical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-23

    range of subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers was developed and shown to correctly predict experimentally-observed reductions. Heating the wall allows...40 3.3 Extension to supersonic speeds...boundary layers at supersonic speeds. Comparing the model prediction to the experimental results, it was speculated that while the pressure effects can

  5. Temperature boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Emily S. C.; Emran, Mohammad S.; Horn, Susanne; Shishkina, Olga

    2017-11-01

    Classical boundary-layer theory for steady flows cannot adequately describe the boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection. We have developed a thermal boundary layer equation which takes into account fluctuations in terms of an eddy thermal diffusivity. Based on Prandtl's mixing length ideas, we relate the eddy thermal diffusivity to the stream function. With this proposed relation, we can solve the thermal boundary layer equation and obtain a closed-form expression for the dimensionless mean temperature profile in terms of two independent parameters: θ(ξ) =1/b∫0b ξ [ 1 +3a3/b3(η - arctan(η)) ] - c dη , where ξ is the similarity variable and the parameters a, b, and c are related by the condition θ(∞) = 1 . With a proper choice of the parameters, our predictions of the temperature profile are in excellent agreement with the results of our direct numerical simulations for a wide range of Prandtl numbers (Pr), from Pr=0.01 to Pr=2547.9. OS, ME and SH acknowledge the financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under Grants Sh405/4-2 (Heisenberg fellowship), Sh405/3-2 and Ho 5890/1-1, respectively.

  6. On the Effects of Surface Roughness on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Surface roughness can influence laminar-turbulent transition in many different ways. This paper outlines selected analyses performed at the NASA Langley Research Center, ranging in speed from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers and highlighting the beneficial as well as adverse roles of the surface roughness in technological applications. The first theme pertains to boundary-layer tripping on the forebody of a hypersonic airbreathing configuration via a spanwise periodic array of trip elements, with the goal of understanding the physical mechanisms underlying roughness-induced transition in a high-speed boundary layer. The effect of an isolated, finite amplitude roughness element on a supersonic boundary layer is considered next. The other set of flow configurations examined herein corresponds to roughness based laminar flow control in subsonic and supersonic swept wing boundary layers. A common theme to all of the above configurations is the need to apply higher fidelity, physics based techniques to develop reliable predictions of roughness effects on laminar-turbulent transition.

  7. Fifty Years of Boundary-Layer Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L.

    1955-01-01

    The year 1954 marked the 50th anniversary of the Prandtl boundary-layer theory from which we may date the beginning of man's understanding of the dynamics of real fluids. A backward look at this aspect of the history of the last 50 years may be instructive. This paper (1) attempts to compress the events of those 50 years into a few thousand words, to tell in this brief space the interesting story of the development of a new concept, its slow acceptance and growth, its spread from group to group within its country of origin, and its diffusion to other countries of the world. The original brief paper of Prandtl (2) was presented at the Third International Mathematical Congress at Heidelberg in 1904 and published in the following year. It was an attempt to explain the d'Alembert paradox, namely, that the neglect of the small friction of air in the theory resulted in the prediction of zero resistance to motion. Prandtl set himself the task of computing the motion of a fluid of small friction, so small that its effect could be neglected everywhere except where large velocity differences were present or a cumulative effect of friction occurred This led to the concept of boundary layer, or transition layer, near the wall of a body immersed in a fluid stream in which the velocity rises from zero to the free-stream value. It is interesting that Prandtl used the term Grenzsehicht (boundary layer) only once and the term Ubergangsschicht (transition layer) seven times in the brief article. Later writers also used Reibungsschicht (friction layer), but most writers today use Grenzschicht (boundary layer).

  8. Pressure Fluctuations Induced by a Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by a spatially-developed Mach 5.86 turbulent boundary layer. The unsteady pressure field is analyzed at multiple wall-normal locations, including those at the wall, within the boundary layer (including inner layer, the log layer, and the outer layer), and in the free stream. The statistical and structural variations of pressure fluctuations as a function of wall-normal distance are highlighted. Computational predictions for mean velocity pro les and surface pressure spectrum are in good agreement with experimental measurements, providing a first ever comparison of this type at hypersonic Mach numbers. The simulation shows that the dominant frequency of boundary-layer-induced pressure fluctuations shifts to lower frequencies as the location of interest moves away from the wall. The pressure wave propagates with a speed nearly equal to the local mean velocity within the boundary layer (except in the immediate vicinity of the wall) while the propagation speed deviates from the Taylor's hypothesis in the free stream. Compared with the surface pressure fluctuations, which are primarily vortical, the acoustic pressure fluctuations in the free stream exhibit a significantly lower dominant frequency, a greater spatial extent, and a smaller bulk propagation speed. The freestream pressure structures are found to have similar Lagrangian time and spatial scales as the acoustic sources near the wall. As the Mach number increases, the freestream acoustic fluctuations exhibit increased radiation intensity, enhanced energy content at high frequencies, shallower orientation of wave fronts with respect to the flow direction, and larger propagation velocity.

  9. Modeling Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Gatski, T. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of linear disturbances in boundary-layer flows at various Reynolds numbers is studied through an analysis of the transport equations for the mean disturbance kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate. Effects of adverse and favorable pressure-gradients on the disturbance dynamics are also included in the analysis. Unlike the fully turbulent regime where nonlinear phase scrambling of the fluctuations affects the flow field even in proximity to the wall, the early stage transition regime fluctuations studied here are influenced across the boundary layer by the solid boundary. In addition, the dominating dynamics in the disturbance kinetic energy equation is governed by the energy production, pressure-transport and viscous diffusion - also in contrast to the fully turbulent regime. For the disturbance dissipation rate, a dynamic balance exists between the destruction and diffusion of dissipation.

  10. Linear and nonlinear stability of the Blasius boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertolotti, F. P.; Herbert, TH.; Spalart, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    Two new techniques for the study of the linear and nonlinear instability in growing boundary layers are presented. The first technique employs partial differential equations of parabolic type exploiting the slow change of the mean flow, disturbance velocity profiles, wavelengths, and growth rates in the streamwise direction. The second technique solves the Navier-Stokes equation for spatially evolving disturbances using buffer zones adjacent to the inflow and outflow boundaries. Results of both techniques are in excellent agreement. The linear and nonlinear development of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves in the Blasius boundary layer is investigated with both techniques and with a local procedure based on a system of ordinary differential equations. The results are compared with previous work and the effects of non-parallelism and nonlinearity are clarified. The effect of nonparallelism is confirmed to be weak and, consequently, not responsible for the discrepancies between measurements and theoretical results for parallel flow.

  11. Anomalous plasma diffusion and the magnetopause boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Labelle, James; Haerendel, Gerhard; Pottelette, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the current state of anomalous diffusion research at the magnetopause and its role in the formation of the magnetopause boundary layer is presented. Plasma wave measurements in the boundary layer indicate that most of the relevant unstable wave modes contribute negligibly to the diffusion process at the magnetopause under magnetically undisturbed northward IMF conditions. The most promising instability is the lower hybrid drift instability, which may yield diffusion coefficients of the right order if the highest measured wave intensities are assumed. It is concluded that global stationary diffusion due to wave-particle interactions does not take place at the magnetopause. Microscopic wave-particle interaction and anomalous diffusion may contribute to locally break the MD frozen-in conditions and help in transporting large amounts of magnetosheath plasma across the magnetospheric boundary.

  12. The Effect of Aerosol on Gravity Wave Characteristics above the Boundary Layer over a Tropical Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, G.; Jana, S.; Maitra, A.

    2017-12-01

    The perturbations of temperature profile over a location give an estimate of the potential energy of gravity waves propagating through the atmosphere. Disturbances in the lower atmosphere due to tropical deep convection, orographic effects and various atmospheric disturbances generates of gravity waves. The present study investigates the gravity wave energy estimated from fluctuations in temperature profiles over the tropical location Kolkata (22°34' N, 88°22' E). Gravity waves are most intense during the pre-monsoon period (March-June) at the present location, the potential energy having high values above the boundary layer (2-4 km) as observed from radiosonde profiles. An increase in temperature perturbation, due to high ambient temperature in the presence of heat absorbing aerosols, causes an enhancement in potential energy. As the present study location is an urban metropolitan city experiencing high level of pollution, pollutant aerosols can go much above the normal boundary layer during daytime due to convection causing an extended boundary layer. The Aerosol Index (AAI) obtained from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) on MetOp-A platform at 340 nm and 380 nm confirms the presence of absorbing aerosol particles over the present location. The Hysplit back trajectory analysis shows that the aerosol particles at those heights are of local origin and are responsible for depleting liquid water content due to cloud burning. The aerosol extinction coefficient obtained from CALIPSO data exhibits an increasing trend during 2006-2016 accompanied by a similar pattern of gravity wave energy. Thus the absorbing aerosols have a significant role in increasing the potential energy of gravity wave at an urban location in the tropical region.

  13. The Ascension Island Boundary Layer in the Remote Southeast Atlantic is Often Smoky

    SciTech Connect

    Zuidema, Paquita; Sedlacek, Arthur J.; Flynn, Connor

    Observations from June through October, 2016, from a surface-based ARM Mobile Facility deployment on Ascension Island (8°S, 14.5°W) indicate that refractory black carbon (rBC) is almost always present within the boundary layer. rBC mass concentrations, light absorption coefficients, and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations vary in concert and synoptically, peaking in August. Derived mass absorption cross-sections using light absorptioin coefficients at three wavelengths as a function of rBC mass indirectly indicate the presence of other light-absorbing organic aerosols (e.g., brown carbon), most pronounced in June. A filter-based estimate of single-scattering-albedo increases systematically from August to October, also apparent in 2017. Boundary-layermore » aerosol loadings are only loosely correlated with total aerosol optical depth, with smoke more likely to be present in the boundary layer earlier in the biomass-burning season, evolving to smoke predominantly present in the free-troposphere in September-October, typically resting upon the cloud-top inversion. The time period with the campaign-maximum near-surface light absorption and column aerosol optical depth, on 13-16 August of 2016, is investigated further. Back trajectories indicate the boundary layer transport was directly westward from the African continent, which is unusual in August.« less

  14. Some Basic Aspects of Magnetohydrodynamic Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Robert V.

    1959-01-01

    An appraisal is made of existing solutions of magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equations for stagnation flow and flat-plate flow, and some new solutions are given. Since an exact solution of the equations of magnetohydrodynamics requires complicated simultaneous treatment of the equations of fluid flow and of electromagnetism, certain simplifying assumptions are generally introduced. The full implications of these assumptions have not been brought out properly in several recent papers. It is shown in the present report that for the particular law of deformation which the magnetic lines are assumed to follow in these papers a magnet situated inside the missile nose would not be able to take up any drag forces; to do so it would have to be placed in the flow away from the nose. It is also shown that for the assumption that potential flow is maintained outside the boundary layer, the deformation of the magnetic lines is restricted to small values. The literature contains serious disagreements with regard to reductions in heat-transfer rates due to magnetic action at the nose of a missile, and these disagreements are shown to be mainly due to different interpretations of reentry conditions rather than more complicated effects. In the present paper the magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equation is also expressed in a simple form that is especially convenient for physical interpretation. This is done by adapting methods to magnetic forces which in the past have been used for forces due to gravitational or centrifugal action. The simplified approach is used to develop some new solutions of boundary-layer flow and to reinterpret certain solutions existing in the literature. An asymptotic boundary-layer solution representing a fixed velocity profile and shear is found. Special emphasis is put on estimating skin friction and heat-transfer rates.

  15. Transitional and turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2010-08-01

    We report on our direct numerical simulation of an incompressible, nominally zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layer from momentum thickness Reynolds number 80-1950. Heat transfer between the constant-temperature solid surface and the free-stream is also simulated with molecular Prandtl number Pr=1. Skin-friction coefficient and other boundary layer parameters follow the Blasius solutions prior to the onset of turbulent spots. Throughout the entire flat-plate, the ratio of Stanton number and skin-friction St/Cf deviates from the exact Reynolds analogy value of 0.5 by less than 1.5%. Mean velocity and Reynolds stresses agree with experimental data over an extended turbulent region downstream of transition. Normalized rms wall-pressure fluctuation increases gradually with the streamwise growth of the turbulent boundary layer. Wall shear stress fluctuation, τw,rms'+, on the other hand, remains constant at approximately 0.44 over the range, 800boundary layer edge with no near-wall secondary peak, in good agreement with previous boundary layer heat transfer experiments. In the transitional region, turbulent spots are tightly packed with numerous hairpin vortices. With the advection and merging of turbulent spots, these young isolated hairpin forests develop into the downstream turbulent region. Isosurfaces of temperature up to Reθ=1900 are found to display well-resolved signatures of hairpin vortices, which indicates the persistence of the hairpin forests.

  16. Convective Cold Pool Structure and Boundary Layer Recovery in DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savarin, A.; Chen, S. S.; Kerns, B. W.; Lee, C.; Jorgensen, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key factors controlling convective cloud systems in the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) over the tropical Indian Ocean is the property of the atmospheric boundary layer. Convective downdrafts and precipitation from the cloud systems produce cold pools in the boundary layer, which can inhibit subsequent development of convection. The recovery time is the time it takes for the boundary layer to return to pre convective conditions. It may affect the variability of the convection on various time scales during the initiation of MJO. This study examines the convective cold pool structure and boundary layer recovery using the NOAA WP-3D aircraft observations, include the flight-level, Doppler radar, and GPS dropsonde data, collected during the Dynamics of MJO (DYNAMO) field campaign from November-December 2011. The depth and strength of convective cold pools are defined by the negative buoyancy, which can be computed from the dropsonde data. Convective downdraft can be affected by environmental water vapor due to entrainment. Mid-level dry air observed during the convectively suppressed phase of MJO seems to enhance convective downdraft, making the cold pools stronger and deeper. Recovery of the cold pools in the boundary layer is determined by the strength and depth of the cold pools and also the air-sea heat and moisture fluxes. Given that the water vapor and surface winds are distinct for the convectively active and suppressed phases of MJO over the Indian Ocean, the aircraft data are stratified by the two different large-scale regimes of MJO. Preliminary results show that the strength and depth of the cold pools are inversely correlated with the surrounding mid-level moisture. During the convectively suppressed phase, the recovery time is ~5-20 hours in relative weak wind condition with small air-sea fluxes. The recovery time is generally less than 6 hours during the active phase of MJO with moist mid-levels and stronger surface wind and air-sea fluxes.

  17. Linear segmentation algorithm for detecting layer boundary with lidar.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feiyue; Gong, Wei; Logan, Timothy

    2013-11-04

    The automatic detection of aerosol- and cloud-layer boundary (base and top) is important in atmospheric lidar data processing, because the boundary information is not only useful for environment and climate studies, but can also be used as input for further data processing. Previous methods have demonstrated limitations in defining the base and top, window-size setting, and have neglected the in-layer attenuation. To overcome these limitations, we present a new layer detection scheme for up-looking lidars based on linear segmentation with a reasonable threshold setting, boundary selecting, and false positive removing strategies. Preliminary results from both real and simulated data show that this algorithm cannot only detect the layer-base as accurate as the simple multi-scale method, but can also detect the layer-top more accurately than that of the simple multi-scale method. Our algorithm can be directly applied to uncalibrated data without requiring any additional measurements or window size selections.

  18. Turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of strong convex curvature on boundary layer turbulence were investigated. The data gathered on the behavior of Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Three sets of data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning, and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero - thus avoiding any effects of streamwise acceleration on the wall layers. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature, the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. In contrast, when the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions.

  19. Boundary-layer exchange by bubble: A novel method for generating transient nanofluidic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennissen, Herbert P.

    2005-10-01

    Unstirred layers (i.e., Nernst boundary layers) occur on every dynamic solid-liquid interface, constituting a diffusion barrier, since the velocity of a moving liquid approaches zero at the surface (no slip). If a macromolecule-surface reaction rate is higher than the diffusion rate, the Nernst layer is solute depleted and the reaction rate becomes mass-transport limited. The thickness of a Nernst boundary layer (δN) generally lies between 5 and 50μm. In an evanescent wave rheometer, measuring fibrinogen adsorption to fused silica, we made the fundamental observation that an air bubble preceding the sample through the flow cell abolishes the mass-transport limitation of the Nernst diffusion layer. Instead exponential kinetics are found. Experimental and simulation studies strongly indicate that these results are due to the elimination of the Nernst diffusion layer and its replacement by a dynamic nanofluidic layer (δν) maximally 200-300nm thick. It is suggested that the air bubble leads to a transient boundary-layer separation into a novel nanoboundary layer on the surface and the bulk fluid velocity profile separated by a vortex sheet with an estimated lifetime of 30-60s. A bubble-induced boundary-layer exchange from the Nernst to the nanoboundary layer and back is obtained, giving sufficient time for the measurement of unbiased exponential surface kinetics. Noteworthy is that the nanolayer can exist at all and displays properties such as (i) a long persistence and resistance to dissipation by the bulk liquid (boundary-layer-exchange-hysteresis) and (ii) a lack of solute depletion in spite of boundary-layer separation. The boundary-layer-exchange by bubble (BLEB) method therefore appears ideal for enhancing the rates of all types of diffusion-limited macromolecular reactions on surfaces with contact angles between 0° and 90° and only appears limited by slippage due to nanobubbles or an air gap beneath the nanofluidic layer on very hydrophobic surfaces. The

  20. Investigations on entropy layer along hypersonic hyperboloids using a defect boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazier, J. P.; Aupoix, B.; Cousteix, J.

    1992-01-01

    A defect approach coupled with matched asymptotic expansions is used to derive a new set of boundary layer equations. This method ensures a smooth matching of the boundary layer with the inviscid solution. These equations are solved to calculate boundary layers over hypersonic blunt bodies involving the entropy gradient effect. Systematic comparisons are made for both axisymmetric and plane flows in several cases with different Mach and Reynolds numbers. After a brief survey of the entropy layer characteristics, the defect boundary layer results are compared with standard boundary layer and full Navier-Stokes solutions. The entropy gradient effects are found to be more important in the axisymmetric case than in the plane one. The wall temperature has a great influence on the results through the displacement effect. Good predictions can be obtained with the defect approach over a cold wall in the nose region, with a first order solution. However, the defect approach gives less accurate results far from the nose on axisymmetric bodies because of the thinning of the entropy layer.

  1. A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation for incompressible flow with an application to the calculation of the separation point of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetervin, Neal; Lin, Chia Chiao

    1951-01-01

    A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation, valid for either laminar or turbulent incompressible boundary-layer flow, is derived. By using the experimental finding that all velocity profiles of the turbulent boundary layer form essentially a single-parameter family, the general equation is changed to an equation for the space rate of change of the velocity-profile shape parameter. The lack of precise knowledge concerning the surface shear and the distribution of the shearing stress across turbulent boundary layers prevented the attainment of a reliable method for calculating the behavior of turbulent boundary layers.

  2. Boundary Layer Effect on Behavior of Discrete Models

    PubMed Central

    Eliáš, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The paper studies systems of rigid bodies with randomly generated geometry interconnected by normal and tangential bonds. The stiffness of these bonds determines the macroscopic elastic modulus while the macroscopic Poisson’s ratio of the system is determined solely by the normal/tangential stiffness ratio. Discrete models with no directional bias have the same probability of element orientation for any direction and therefore the same mechanical properties in a statistical sense at any point and direction. However, the layers of elements in the vicinity of the boundary exhibit biased orientation, preferring elements parallel with the boundary. As a consequence, when strain occurs in this direction, the boundary layer becomes stiffer than the interior for the normal/tangential stiffness ratio larger than one, and vice versa. Nonlinear constitutive laws are typically such that the straining of an element in shear results in higher strength and ductility than straining in tension. Since the boundary layer tends, due to the bias in the elemental orientation, to involve more tension than shear at the contacts, it also becomes weaker and less ductile. The paper documents these observations and compares them to the results of theoretical analysis. PMID:28772517

  3. Boundary Layer Effect on Behavior of Discrete Models.

    PubMed

    Eliáš, Jan

    2017-02-10

    The paper studies systems of rigid bodies with randomly generated geometry interconnected by normal and tangential bonds. The stiffness of these bonds determines the macroscopic elastic modulus while the macroscopic Poisson's ratio of the system is determined solely by the normal/tangential stiffness ratio. Discrete models with no directional bias have the same probability of element orientation for any direction and therefore the same mechanical properties in a statistical sense at any point and direction. However, the layers of elements in the vicinity of the boundary exhibit biased orientation, preferring elements parallel with the boundary. As a consequence, when strain occurs in this direction, the boundary layer becomes stiffer than the interior for the normal/tangential stiffness ratio larger than one, and vice versa. Nonlinear constitutive laws are typically such that the straining of an element in shear results in higher strength and ductility than straining in tension. Since the boundary layer tends, due to the bias in the elemental orientation, to involve more tension than shear at the contacts, it also becomes weaker and less ductile. The paper documents these observations and compares them to the results of theoretical analysis.

  4. BLSTA: A boundary layer code for stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1992-01-01

    A computer program is developed to solve the compressible, laminar boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional flow, axisymmetric flow, and quasi-three-dimensional flows including the flow along the plane of symmetry, flow along the leading-edge attachment line, and swept-wing flows with a conical flow approximation. The finite-difference numerical procedure used to solve the governing equations is second-order accurate. The flow over a wide range of speed, from subsonic to hypersonic speed with perfect gas assumption, can be calculated. Various wall boundary conditions, such as wall suction or blowing and hot or cold walls, can be applied. The results indicate that this boundary-layer code gives velocity and temperature profiles which are accurate, smooth, and continuous through the first and second normal derivatives. The code presented herein can be coupled with a stability analysis code and used to predict the onset of the boundary-layer transition which enables the assessment of the laminar flow control techniques. A user's manual is also included.

  5. Numerical Simulation of a Spatially Evolving Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Erlebacher, G.

    2002-01-01

    The results from direct numerical simulations of a spatially evolving, supersonic, flat-plate turbulent boundary-layer flow, with free-stream Mach number of 2.25 are presented. The simulated flow field extends from a transition region, initiated by wall suction and blowing near the inflow boundary, into the fully turbulent regime. Distributions of mean and turbulent flow quantities are obtained and an analysis of these quantities is performed at a downstream station corresponding to Re(sub x)= 5.548 x10(exp 6) based on distance from the leading edge.

  6. Boundary layers at the interface of two different shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick D.; Wang, C. Y.

    2018-05-01

    We present solutions for the boundary layer between two uniform shear flows flowing in the same direction. In the upper layer, the flow has shear strength a, fluid density ρ1, and kinematic viscosity ν1, while the lower layer has shear strength b, fluid density ρ2, and kinematic viscosity ν2. Similarity transformations reduce the boundary-layer equations to a pair of ordinary differential equations governed by three dimensionless parameters: the shear strength ratio γ = b/a, the density ratio ρ = ρ2/ρ1, and the viscosity ratio ν = ν2/ν1. Further analysis shows that an affine transformation reduces this multi-parameter problem to a single ordinary differential equation which may be efficiently integrated as an initial-value problem. Solutions of the original boundary-value problem are shown to agree with the initial-value integrations, but additional dual and quadruple solutions are found using this method. We argue on physical grounds and through bifurcation analysis that these additional solutions are not tenable. The present problem is applicable to the trailing edge flow over a thin airfoil with camber.

  7. Acoustic Radiation From a Mach 14 Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the turbulence statistics and the radiation field generated by a high-speed turbulent boundary layer with a nominal freestream Mach number of 14 and wall temperature of 0:18 times the recovery temperature. The flow conditions fall within the range of nozzle exit conditions of the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Hypervelocity Tunnel No. 9 facility. The streamwise domain size is approximately 200 times the boundary-layer thickness at the inlet, with a useful range of Reynolds number corresponding to Re 450 ?? 650. Consistent with previous studies of turbulent boundary layer at high Mach numbers, the weak compressibility hypothesis for turbulent boundary layers remains applicable under this flow condition and the computational results confirm the validity of both the van Driest transformation and Morkovin's scaling. The Reynolds analogy is valid at the surface; the RMS of fluctuations in the surface pressure, wall shear stress, and heat flux is 24%, 53%, and 67% of the surface mean, respectively. The magnitude and dominant frequency of pressure fluctuations are found to vary dramatically within the inner layer (z/delta 0.< or approx. 0.08 or z+ < or approx. 50). The peak of the pre-multiplied frequency spectrum of the pressure fluctuation is f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 2.1 at the surface and shifts to a lower frequency of f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 0.7 in the free stream where the pressure signal is predominantly acoustic. The dominant frequency of the pressure spectrum shows a significant dependence on the freestream Mach number both at the wall and in the free stream.

  8. Boundary layer turbulence in transitional and developed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Wallace, James M.; Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2012-03-01

    Using the recent direct numerical simulations by Wu and Moin ["Transitional and turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer," Phys. Fluids 22, 85 (2010)] of a flat-plate boundary layer with a passively heated wall, statistical properties of the turbulence in transition at Reθ ≈ 300, from individual turbulent spots, and at Reθ ≈ 500, where the spots merge (distributions of the mean velocity, Reynolds stresses, kinetic energy production, and dissipation rates, enstrophy and its components) have been compared to these statistical properties for the developed boundary layer turbulence at Reθ = 1840. When the distributions in the transitional regions are conditionally averaged so as to exclude locations and times when the flow is not turbulent, they closely resemble the distributions in the developed turbulent state at the higher Reynolds number, especially in the buffer layer. Skin friction coefficients, determined in this conditional manner at the two Reynolds numbers in the transitional flow are, of course, much larger than when their values are obtained by including both turbulent and non-turbulent information there, and the conditional averaged values are consistent with the 1/7th power law approximation. An octant analysis based on the combinations of signs of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, u, v, and θ shows that the momentum and heat fluxes are predominantly of the mean gradient type in both the transitional and developed regions. The fluxes appear to be closely associated with vortices that transport momentum and heat toward and away from the wall in both regions of the flow. The results suggest that there may be little fundamental difference between the nonlinear processes involved in the formation of turbulent spots that appear in transition and those that sustain the turbulence when it is developed. They also support the view that the transport processes and the vortical structures that drive them in developed and transitional boundary

  9. Structure measurements in a synthetic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    1987-09-01

    Extensive hot-wire measurements have been made to determine the structure of the large eddy in a synthejc turbulent boundary layer on a flat-plate model. The experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel at a nominal free-stream velocity of 12 m/s. The synthetic turbulent boundary layer had a hexagonal pattern of eddies and a ratio of streamwise scale to spanwise scale of 3.2:1. The measured celerity of the large eddy was 84.2 percent of the free-stream velocity. There was some loss of coherence, but very little distortion, as the eddies moved downstream. Several mean properties of the synthetic boundary layer were found to agree quite well with the mean properties of a natural turbulent boundary layer at the same Reynolds number. The large eddy is composed of a pair of primary counter-rotating vortices about five [...] long in the streamwise direction and about one [...] apart in the spanwise direction, where [...] is the mean boundary-layer thickness. The sense of the primary pair is such as to pump fluid away from the wall in the region between the vortices. A secondary pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, having a sense opposite to that of the primary pair, is observed outside of and slightly downstream from the primary vortices. Both pairs of vortices extend across the full thickness of the boundary layer and are inclined at a shallow angle to the surface of the flat plate. The data show that the mean vorticity vectors are not tangential to the large-eddy vortices. In fact, the streamwise and normal vorticity components that signal the presence of the eddy are of the same order of magnitude. Definite signatures are obtained in terms of the mean skin-friction coefficient and the mean wake parameter averaged at constant phase. Velocities induced by the vortices are partly responsible for entrainment of irrotational fluid, for transport of momentum, for generation of Reynolds stresses, and for maintenance of streamwise and normal vorticity in the outer

  10. Application of the Extended Completeness Relation to the Absorbing Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Masataka; Otani, Reiji; Ito, Makoto

    The strength function of the linear response by the external field is calculated in the formalism of the absorbing boundary condition (ABC). The dipole excitation of a schematic two-body system is treated in the present study. The extended completeness relation, which is assumed on the analogy of the formulation in the complex scaling method (CSM), is applied to the calculation of the strength function. The calculation of the strength function is successful in the present formalism and hence, the extended completeness relation seems to work well in the ABC formalism. The contributions from the resonance and the non-resonant continuum are also analyzed according to the decomposition of the energy levels in the extended completeness relation.

  11. Compact high order schemes with gradient-direction derivatives for absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Dan; Gordon, Rachel; Turkel, Eli

    2015-09-01

    We consider several compact high order absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs) for the Helmholtz equation in three dimensions. A technique called "the gradient method" (GM) for ABCs is also introduced and combined with the high order ABCs. GM is based on the principle of using directional derivatives in the direction of the wavefront propagation. The new ABCs are used together with the recently introduced compact sixth order finite difference scheme for variable wave numbers. Experiments on problems with known analytic solutions produced very accurate results, demonstrating the efficacy of the high order schemes, particularly when combined with GM. The new ABCs are then applied to the SEG/EAGE Salt model, showing the advantages of the new schemes.

  12. Simulation and optimal control of wind-farm boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Goit, Jay

    2014-05-01

    In large wind farms, the effect of turbine wakes, and their interaction leads to a reduction in farm efficiency, with power generated by turbines in a farm being lower than that of a lone-standing turbine by up to 50%. In very large wind farms or `deep arrays', this efficiency loss is related to interaction of the wind farms with the planetary boundary layer, leading to lower wind speeds at turbine level. Moreover, for these cases it has been demonstrated both in simulations and wind-tunnel experiments that the wind-farm energy extraction is dominated by the vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from higher regions in the boundary layer towards the turbine level. In the current study, we investigate the use of optimal control techniques combined with Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of wind-farm boundary layer interaction for the increase of total energy extraction in very large `infinite' wind farms. We consider the individual wind turbines as flow actuators, whose energy extraction can be dynamically regulated in time so as to optimally influence the turbulent flow field, maximizing the wind farm power. For the simulation of wind-farm boundary layers we use large-eddy simulations in combination with actuator-disk and actuator-line representations of wind turbines. Simulations are performed in our in-house pseudo-spectral code SP-Wind that combines Fourier-spectral discretization in horizontal directions with a fourth-order finite-volume approach in the vertical direction. For the optimal control study, we consider the dynamic control of turbine-thrust coefficients in an actuator-disk model. They represent the effect of turbine blades that can actively pitch in time, changing the lift- and drag coefficients of the turbine blades. Optimal model-predictive control (or optimal receding horizon control) is used, where the model simply consists of the full LES equations, and the time horizon is approximately 280 seconds. The optimization is performed using a

  13. Perturbation theory for fractional Brownian motion in presence of absorbing boundaries.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Kay Jörg; Majumdar, Satya N; Rosso, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    Fractional Brownian motion is a Gaussian process x(t) with zero mean and two-time correlations (x(t(1))x(t(2)))=D(t(1)(2H)+t(2)(2H)-|t(1)-t(2)|(2H)), where H, with 0absorbing boundary at the origin and focus on the probability density P(+)(x,t) for the process to arrive at x at time t, starting near the origin at time 0, given that it has never crossed the origin. It has a scaling form P(+)(x,t)~t(-H)R(+)(x/t(H)). Our objective is to compute the scaling function R(+)(y), which up to now was only known for the Markov case H=1/2. We develop a systematic perturbation theory around this limit, setting H=1/2+ε, to calculate the scaling function R(+)(y) to first order in ε. We find that R(+)(y) behaves as R(+)(y)~y(ϕ) as y→0 (near the absorbing boundary), while R(+)(y)~y(γ)exp(-y(2)/2) as y→∞, with ϕ=1-4ε+O(ε(2)) and γ=1-2ε+O(ε(2)). Our ε-expansion result confirms the scaling relation ϕ=(1-H)/H proposed in Zoia, Rosso, and Majumdar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 120602 (2009)]. We verify our findings via numerical simulations for H=2/3. The tools developed here are versatile, powerful, and adaptable to different situations.

  14. Waveguides with Absorbing Boundaries: Nonlinearity Controlled by an Exceptional Point and Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midya, Bikashkali; Konotop, Vladimir V.

    2017-07-01

    We reveal the existence of continuous families of guided single-mode solitons in planar waveguides with weakly nonlinear active core and absorbing boundaries. Stable propagation of TE and TM-polarized solitons is accompanied by attenuation of all other modes, i.e., the waveguide features properties of conservative and dissipative systems. If the linear spectrum of the waveguide possesses exceptional points, which occurs in the case of TM polarization, an originally focusing (defocusing) material nonlinearity may become effectively defocusing (focusing). This occurs due to the geometric phase of the carried eigenmode when the surface impedance encircles the exceptional point. In its turn, the change of the effective nonlinearity ensures the existence of dark (bright) solitons in spite of focusing (defocusing) Kerr nonlinearity of the core. The existence of an exceptional point can also result in anomalous enhancement of the effective nonlinearity. In terms of practical applications, the nonlinearity of the reported waveguide can be manipulated by controlling the properties of the absorbing cladding.

  15. Response of Non-Linear Shock Absorbers-Boundary Value Problem Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Ahmed, U.; Uddin, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    A nonlinear boundary value problem of two degrees-of-freedom (DOF) untuned vibration damper systems using nonlinear springs and dampers has been numerically studied. As far as untuned damper is concerned, sixteen different combinations of linear and nonlinear springs and dampers have been comprehensively analyzed taking into account transient terms. For different cases, a comparative study is made for response versus time for different spring and damper types at three important frequency ratios: one at r = 1, one at r > 1 and one at r <1. The response of the system is changed because of the spring and damper nonlinearities; the change is different for different cases. Accordingly, an initially stable absorber may become unstable with time and vice versa. The analysis also shows that higher nonlinearity terms make the system more unstable. Numerical simulation includes transient vibrations. Although problems are much more complicated compared to those for a tuned absorber, a comparison of the results generated by the present numerical scheme with the exact one shows quite a reasonable agreement

  16. Boundary layer ozone - An airborne survey above the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Browell, Edward V.; Warren, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    Ozone data obtained over the forest canopy of the Amazon Basin during July and August 1985 in the course of NASA's Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A are discussed, and ozone profiles obtained during flights from Belem to Tabatinga, Brazil, are analyzed to determine any cross-basin effects. The analyses of ozone data indicate that the mixed layer of the Amazon Basin, for the conditions of undisturbed meteorology and in the absence of biomass burning, is a significant sink for tropospheric ozone. As the coast is approached, marine influences are noted at about 300 km inland, and a transition from a forest-controlled mixed layer to a marine-controlled mixed layer is noted.

  17. Initializing a Mesoscale Boundary-Layer Model with Radiosonde Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berri, Guillermo J.; Bertossa, Germán

    2018-01-01

    A mesoscale boundary-layer model is used to simulate low-level regional wind fields over the La Plata River of South America, a region characterized by a strong daily cycle of land-river surface-temperature contrast and low-level circulations of sea-land breeze type. The initial and boundary conditions are defined from a limited number of local observations and the upper boundary condition is taken from the only radiosonde observations available in the region. The study considers 14 different upper boundary conditions defined from the radiosonde data at standard levels, significant levels, level of the inversion base and interpolated levels at fixed heights, all of them within the first 1500 m. The period of analysis is 1994-2008 during which eight daily observations from 13 weather stations of the region are used to validate the 24-h surface-wind forecast. The model errors are defined as the root-mean-square of relative error in wind-direction frequency distribution and mean wind speed per wind sector. Wind-direction errors are greater than wind-speed errors and show significant dispersion among the different upper boundary conditions, not present in wind speed, revealing a sensitivity to the initialization method. The wind-direction errors show a well-defined daily cycle, not evident in wind speed, with the minimum at noon and the maximum at dusk, but no systematic deterioration with time. The errors grow with the height of the upper boundary condition level, in particular wind direction, and double the errors obtained when the upper boundary condition is defined from the lower levels. The conclusion is that defining the model upper boundary condition from radiosonde data closer to the ground minimizes the low-level wind-field errors throughout the region.

  18. Lumley decomposition of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutkun, Murat; George, William K.

    2017-02-01

    The decomposition proposed by Lumley in 1966 is applied to a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. The experimental database was created by a hot-wire rake of 143 probes in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel. The Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness (Reθ) are 9800 and 19 100. Three-dimensional decomposition is performed, namely, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in the inhomogeneous and bounded wall-normal direction, Fourier decomposition in the homogeneous spanwise direction, and Fourier decomposition in time. The first POD modes in both cases carry nearly 50% of turbulence kinetic energy when the energy is integrated over Fourier dimensions. The eigenspectra always peak near zero frequency and most of the large scale, energy carrying features are found at the low end of the spectra. The spanwise Fourier mode which has the largest amount of energy is the first spanwise mode and its symmetrical pair. Pre-multiplied eigenspectra have only one distinct peak and it matches the secondary peak observed in the log-layer of pre-multiplied velocity spectra. Energy carrying modes obtained from the POD scale with outer scaling parameters. Full or partial reconstruction of turbulent velocity signal based only on energetic modes or non-energetic modes revealed the behaviour of urms in distinct regions across the boundary layer. When urms is based on energetic reconstruction, there exists (a) an exponential decay from near wall to log-layer, (b) a constant layer through the log-layer, and (c) another exponential decay in the outer region. The non-energetic reconstruction reveals that urms has (a) an exponential decay from the near-wall to the end of log-layer and (b) a constant layer in the outer region. Scaling of urms using the outer parameters is best when both energetic and non-energetic profiles are combined.

  19. The Ascension Island boundary layer in the remote southeast Atlantic is often smoky

    DOE PAGES

    Zuidema, Paquita; Sedlacek III, Arthur J.; Flynn, Connor; ...

    2018-03-31

    Observations from June through October, 2016, from a surface-based ARM Mobile Facility deployment on Ascension Island (8°S, 14.5°W) indicate that refractory black carbon (rBC) is almost always present within the boundary layer. rBC mass concentrations, light absorption coefficients, and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations vary in concert and synoptically, peaking in August. Light absorption coefficients at three visible wavelengths as a function of rBC mass indirectly indicate the presence of other light-absorbing aerosols (e.g., brown carbon), most pronounced in June. The single-scattering-albedo increases systematically from August to October in both 2016 and 2017, with monthly-means of 0.78±0.02 (August), 0.81±0.03 (September) andmore » 0.83±0.03 (October) at the green wavelength. Boundary-layer aerosol loadings are only loosely correlated with total aerosol optical depth, with smoke more likely to be present in the boundary layer earlier in the biomass-burning season, evolving to smoke predominantly present above the cloud layers in September-October, typically resting upon the cloud-top inversion. The time period with the campaign-maximum near-surface light absorption and column aerosol optical depth, on 13-16 August of 2016, is investigated further. Also, backtrajectories indicate more direct boundary layer transport westward from the African continent is central to explaining the elevated surface aerosol loadings.« less

  20. The Ascension Island boundary layer in the remote southeast Atlantic is often smoky

    SciTech Connect

    Zuidema, Paquita; Sedlacek III, Arthur J.; Flynn, Connor

    Observations from June through October, 2016, from a surface-based ARM Mobile Facility deployment on Ascension Island (8°S, 14.5°W) indicate that refractory black carbon (rBC) is almost always present within the boundary layer. rBC mass concentrations, light absorption coefficients, and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations vary in concert and synoptically, peaking in August. Light absorption coefficients at three visible wavelengths as a function of rBC mass indirectly indicate the presence of other light-absorbing aerosols (e.g., brown carbon), most pronounced in June. The single-scattering-albedo increases systematically from August to October in both 2016 and 2017, with monthly-means of 0.78±0.02 (August), 0.81±0.03 (September) andmore » 0.83±0.03 (October) at the green wavelength. Boundary-layer aerosol loadings are only loosely correlated with total aerosol optical depth, with smoke more likely to be present in the boundary layer earlier in the biomass-burning season, evolving to smoke predominantly present above the cloud layers in September-October, typically resting upon the cloud-top inversion. The time period with the campaign-maximum near-surface light absorption and column aerosol optical depth, on 13-16 August of 2016, is investigated further. Also, backtrajectories indicate more direct boundary layer transport westward from the African continent is central to explaining the elevated surface aerosol loadings.« less

  1. Atmospheric tides on Venus. III - The planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Diurnal solar heating of Venus' surface produces variable temperatures, winds, and pressure gradients within a shallow layer at the bottom of the atmosphere. The corresponding asymmetric mass distribution experiences a tidal torque tending to maintain Venus' slow retrograde rotation. It is shown that including viscosity in the boundary layer does not materially affect the balance of torques. On the other hand, friction between the air and ground can reduce the predicted wind speeds from about 5 to about 1 m/sec in the lower atmosphere, more consistent with the observations from Venus landers and descent probes. Implications for aeolian activity on Venus' surface and for future missions are discussed.

  2. Transport of contaminants in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, I. Y.; Swan, P. R.

    1978-01-01

    A planetary boundary layer model is described and used to simulate PBL phenomena including cloud formation and pollution transport in the San Francisco Bay Area. The effect of events in the PBL on air pollution is considered, and governing equations for the average momentum, potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and air contaminants are presented. These equations are derived by integrating the basic equations vertically through the mixed layer. Characteristics of the day selected for simulation are reported, and the results suggest that the diurnally cyclic features of the mesoscale motion, including clouds and air pollution, can be simulated in a readily interpretable way with the model.

  3. Influence of the electromagnetic parameters on the surface wave attenuation in thin absorbing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinrui; Li, Dongmeng; Wang, Xian; Nie, Yan; Gong, Rongzhou

    2018-05-01

    This paper describes the relationships between the surface wave attenuation properties and the electromagnetic parameters of radar absorbing materials (RAMs). In order to conveniently obtain the attenuation constant of TM surface waves over a wide frequency range, the simplified dispersion equations in thin absorbing materials were firstly deduced. The validity of the proposed method was proved by comparing with the classical dispersion equations. Subsequently, the attenuation constants were calculated separately for the absorbing layers with hypothetical relative permittivity and permeability. It is found that the surface wave attenuation properties can be strongly tuned by the permeability of RAM. Meanwhile, the permittivity should be appropriate so as to maintain high cutoff frequency. The present work provides specific methods and designs to improve the attenuation performances of radar absorbing materials.

  4. A review of unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    The essential results of a comprehensive review of existing unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are presented. Different types of unsteady flow facilities are described, and the related unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are cataloged and discussed. The measurements that were obtained in the various experiments are described, and a complete list of experimental results is presented. All the experiments that measured instantaneous values of velocity, turbulence intensity, or turbulent shear stress are identified, and the availability of digital data is indicated. The results of the experiments are analyzed, and several significant trends are identified. An assessment of the available data is presented, delineating gaps in the existing data, and indicating where new or extended information is needed. Guidelines for future experiments are included. Previously announced in STAR as N81-29382

  5. The Boundary Layer Flows of a Rivlin-Ericksen Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghy, K.; Khabazi, N.; Taghavi, S. M.

    The present work deals with the two-dimensional incompressible, laminar, steady-state boundary layer equations. First, we determine a family of velocity distributions outside the boundary layer such that these problems may have similarity solutions. We study the Falkner-Skan flow of a viscoelastic fluid governed by second order model, as the Reynolds number Re→ ∞. We obtain an ordinary forth order differential equation to obtain the stream function, velocity profile and the stress. The stream function is then governed by a generalized Falkner-Skan equation. In comparison with Newtonian Falkner-Skan equation that has two coefficients this new one has four coefficients that two of them represent elastic properties of the fluid. The effects of the elastic parameter on the velocity filed have been discussed. As it is shown in the figure there is a good agreement between numerical results and previous special cases confirm the validity of the presented algorithm.

  6. Optimal disturbances in boundary layers subject to streamwise pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Tumin, Anatoli

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the optimal non-modal growth of perturbations in a boundary layer in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient is presented. The analysis is based on PSE equations for an incompressible fluid. Examples with Falkner-Scan profiles indicate that a favorable pressure gradient decreases the non-modal growth, while an unfavorable pressure gradient leads to an increase of the amplification. It is suggested that the transient growth mechanism be utilized to choose optimal parameters of tripping elements on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. As an example, a boundary layer flow with a streamwise pressure gradient corresponding to the pressure distribution over a LPT airfoil is considered. It is shown that there is an optimal spacing of the tripping elements and that the transient growth effect depends on the starting point.

  7. Possibilities for drag reduction by boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, I.

    1946-01-01

    The mechanics of laminar boundary layer transition are reviewed. Drag possibilities for boundary layer control are analyzed using assumed conditions of transition Reynolds number, inlet loss, number of slots, blower efficiency, and duct losses. Although the results of such analysis are highly favorable, those obtained by experimental investigations yield conflicting results, showing only small gains, and sometimes losses. Reduction of this data indicates that there is a lower limit to the quantity of air which must be removed at the slot in order to stabilize the laminar flow. The removal of insufficient air permits transition to occur while the removal of excessive amounts of air results in high power costs, with a net drag increases. With the estimated value of flow coefficient and duct losses equal to half the dynamic pressure, drag reductions of 50% may be obtained; with twice this flow coefficient, the drag saving is reduced to 25%.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer under the control of different schemes.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Z X; Zhou, Y; Wu, Z

    2017-06-01

    This work explores experimentally the control of a turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate based on wall perturbation generated by piezo-ceramic actuators. Different schemes are investigated, including the feed-forward, the feedback, and the combined feed-forward and feedback strategies, with a view to suppressing the near-wall high-speed events and hence reducing skin friction drag. While the strategies may achieve a local maximum drag reduction slightly less than their counterpart of the open-loop control, the corresponding duty cycles are substantially reduced when compared with that of the open-loop control. The results suggest a good potential to cut down the input energy under these control strategies. The fluctuating velocity, spectra, Taylor microscale and mean energy dissipation are measured across the boundary layer with and without control and, based on the measurements, the flow mechanism behind the control is proposed.

  9. Additive erosion reduction influences in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, A. C.

    1981-05-01

    Results of a sequence of flow, heat and mass transfer calculations are presented which theoretically characterize the erosive environment at the wall surface of refractory metal coated and uncoated gun barrels. The theoretical results include analysis of the wall surface temperature, heat flux, and shear stress time histories on thin (10 mil.) Cr, Mo, Nb, and Ta plated steel barrel walls as uncoated steel walls. The calculations combine effects of a number of separate processes which were previously (and purposely) studied individually. These include solid particle additive concentrations, gas wall thermochemical influences, and transient turbulent wall boundary layer flow with multicomponent molecular diffusion and reactions from interaction of propellant combustion and the eroding surface. The boundary layer model includes particulate additive concentrations as well as propellant combustion products, considered for the present to be in the local thermochemical equilibrium.

  10. A review of unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    The essential results of a comprehensive review of existing unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are presented. Different types of unsteady flow facilities are described, and the related unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are cataloged and discussed. The measurements that were obtained in the various experiments are described, and a complete list of experimental results is presented. All the experiments that measured instantaneous values of velocity, turbulence intensity, or turbulent shear stress are identified, and the availability of digital data is indicated. The results of the experiments are analyzed, and several significant trends are identified. An assessment of the available data is presented, delineating gaps in the existing data, and indicating where new or extended information is needed. Guidelines for future experiments are included.

  11. 3D LDV Measurements in Oscillatory Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, J. M.; Garcia, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    The oscillatory boundary layer represents a particular case of unsteady wall-bounded flows in which fluid particles follow a periodic sinusoidal motion. Unlike steady boundary layer flows, the oscillatory flow regime and bed roughness character change in time along the period for every cycle, a characteristic that introduces a high degree of complexity in the analysis of these flows. Governing equations can be derived from the general Navier-Stokes equations for the motion of fluids, from which the exact solution for the laminar oscillatory boundary layer is obtained (also known as the 2nd Stokes problem). No exact solution exists for the turbulent case, thus, understanding of the main flow characteristics comes from experimental work. Several researchers have reported experimental work in oscillatory boundary layers since the 1960's; however, larger scale facilities and the development of newer measurement techniques with improved temporal and spatial resolution in recent years provides a unique opportunity to achieve a better understanding about this type of flows. Several experiments were performed in the Large Oscillatory Water and Sediment Tunnel (LOWST) facility at the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, for a range of Reynolds wave numbers between 6x10^4 < Rew < 6x10^6 over a flat and smooth bottom. A 3D Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure instantaneous flow velocities with a temporal resolution up to ~ 1,000 Hz. It was mounted on a 3-axis traverse with a spatial resolution of 0.01 mm in all three directions. The closest point to the bottom was measured at z = 0.2 mm (z+ ≈ 4), which allowed to capture boundary layer features with great detail. In order to achieve true 3D measurements, 2 probes were used on a perpendicular configuration, such that u and w components were measured from a probe on the side of the flume and v component was measured from a probe pointing down through and access window on top of the flume. The top probe

  12. Characteristics of Mach 10 transitional and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the mean flow properties of transitional and turbulent boundary layers in helium on 4 deg and 5 deg wedges were made for flows with edge Mach numbers from 9.5 to 11.3, ratios of wall temperature to total temperature of 0.4 to 0.95, and maximum length Reynolds numbers of one hundred million. The data include pitot and total temperature surveys and measurements of heat transfer and surface shear. In addition, with the assumption of local similarity, turbulence quantities such as the mixing length were derived from the mean flow profiles. Low Reynolds number and precursor transition effects were significant factors at these test conditions and were included in finite difference boundary layer predictions.

  13. Works on theory of flapping wing. [considering boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown mathematically that taking account of the boundary layer is the only way to develop a theory of flapping wings without violating the basic observations and mathematics of hydromechanics. A theory of thrust generation by flapping wings can be developed if the conventional downstream velocity discontinuity surface is replaced with the observed Karman type vortex streets behind a flapping wing. Experiments show that the direction of such vortices is the reverse of that of conventional Karman streets. The streets form by breakdown of the boundary layer. Detailed analysis of the movements of certain birds and insects during flight 'in place' is fully consistent with this theory of the lift, thrust and drag of flapping wings. Further directions for research into flight with flapping wings are indicated.

  14. Flight Experiment Verification of Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Berger, Karen T.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer transition at hypersonic conditions is critical to the design of future high-speed aircraft and spacecraft. Accurate methods to predict transition would directly impact the aerothermodynamic environments used to size a hypersonic vehicle's thermal protection system. A transition prediction tool, based on wind tunnel derived discrete roughness correlations, was developed and implemented for the Space Shuttle return-to-flight program. This tool was also used to design a boundary layer transition flight experiment in order to assess correlation uncertainties, particularly with regard to high Mach-number transition and tunnel-to-flight scaling. A review is provided of the results obtained from the flight experiment in order to evaluate the transition prediction tool implemented for the Shuttle program.

  15. Falkner-Skan Boundary Layer Flow of a Sisko Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Shahzad, Azeem

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the steady boundary layer flow of a non-Newtonian fluid, represented by a Sisko fluid, over a wedge in a moving fluid. The equations of motion are derived for boundary layer flow of an incompressible Sisko fluid using appropriate similarity variables. The governing equations are reduced to a single third-order highly nonlinear ordinary differential equation in the dimensionless stream function, which is then solved analytically using the homotopy analysis method. Some important parameters have been discussed by this study, which include the power law index n, the material parameter A, the wedge shape factor b, and the skin friction coefficient Cf. A comprehensive study is made between the results of the Sisko and the power-law fluids.

  16. Finite-element numerical modeling of atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. N.; Kao, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    A dynamic turbulent boundary-layer model in the neutral atmosphere is constructed, using a dynamic turbulent equation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum derived from the relationship among the turbulent dissipation rate, the turbulent kinetic energy and the eddy viscosity coefficient, with aid of the turbulent second-order closure scheme. A finite-element technique was used for the numerical integration. In preliminary results, the behavior of the neutral planetary boundary layer agrees well with the available data and with the existing elaborate turbulent models, using a finite-difference scheme. The proposed dynamic formulation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum is particularly attractive and can provide a viable alternative approach to study atmospheric turbulence, diffusion and air pollution.

  17. Excitation of Crossflow Instabilities in a Swept Wing Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2010-01-01

    The problem of crossflow receptivity is considered in the context of a canonical 3D boundary layer (viz., the swept Hiemenz boundary layer) and a swept airfoil used recently in the SWIFT flight experiment performed at Texas A&M University. First, Hiemenz flow is used to analyze localized receptivity due to a spanwise periodic array of small amplitude roughness elements, with the goal of quantifying the effects of array size and location. Excitation of crossflow modes via nonlocalized but deterministic distribution of surface nonuniformity is also considered and contrasted with roughness induced acoustic excitation of Tollmien-Schlichting waves. Finally, roughness measurements on the SWIFT model are used to model the effects of random, spatially distributed roughness of sufficiently small amplitude with the eventual goal of enabling predictions of initial crossflow disturbance amplitudes as functions of surface roughness parameters.

  18. Turbulent heat flux measurements in a transitional boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, K. H.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Reshotko, E.

    1992-01-01

    During an experimental investigation of the transitional boundary layer over a heated flat plate, an unexpected result was encountered for the turbulent heat flux (bar-v't'). This quantity, representing the correlation between the fluctuating normal velocity and the temperature, was measured to be negative near the wall under certain conditions. The result was unexpected as it implied a counter-gradient heat transfer by the turbulent fluctuations. Possible reasons for this anomalous result were further investigated. The possible causes considered for this negative bar-v't' were: (1) plausible measurement error and peculiarity of the flow facility, (2) large probe size effect, (3) 'streaky structure' in the near wall boundary layer, and (4) contributions from other terms usually assumed negligible in the energy equation including the Reynolds heat flux in the streamwise direction (bar-u't'). Even though the energy balance has remained inconclusive, none of the items (1) to (3) appear to be contributing directly to the anomaly.

  19. Boundary layer energization by means of optimized vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T. J.; Mounts, J. S.; Mccormick, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multi-block, multi-zone, Euler analysis has been developed and applied to analyze the flow processes induced by a lateral array of low profile vortex generators (VG). These vortex generators have been shown to alleviate boundary layer separation through the generation of streamwise vorticity. The analysis has been applied to help develop improved VG configurations in an efficient manner. Special attention has been paid to determining the accuracy requirements of the solver for calculations in which vortical mechanisms are dominant. The analysis has been used to assess the effectiveness or boundary layer energization capacity of different VG's, including the effect of scale and shape variation. Finally, the analysis has been validated through comparisons with experimental data obtained in a large-scale low-speed wind tunnel.

  20. Turbulent boundary layer under the control of different schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Z. X.; Zhou, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2017-06-01

    This work explores experimentally the control of a turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate based on wall perturbation generated by piezo-ceramic actuators. Different schemes are investigated, including the feed-forward, the feedback, and the combined feed-forward and feedback strategies, with a view to suppressing the near-wall high-speed events and hence reducing skin friction drag. While the strategies may achieve a local maximum drag reduction slightly less than their counterpart of the open-loop control, the corresponding duty cycles are substantially reduced when compared with that of the open-loop control. The results suggest a good potential to cut down the input energy under these control strategies. The fluctuating velocity, spectra, Taylor microscale and mean energy dissipation are measured across the boundary layer with and without control and, based on the measurements, the flow mechanism behind the control is proposed.

  1. Atmospheric boundary layer modification in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Theodore J., Jr.; Hunkins, Kenneth

    1986-01-01

    A case study of the Andreas et al. (1984) data on atmospheric boundary layer modification in the marginal ice zone is made. The model is a two-dimensional, multilevel, linear model with turbulence, lateral and vertical advection, and radiation. Good agreement between observed and modeled temperature cross sections is obtained. In contrast to the hypothesis of Andreas et al., the air flow is found to be stable to secondary circulations. Adiabatic lifting and, at long fetches, cloud top longwave cooling, not an air-to-surface heat flux, dominate the cooling of the boundary layer. The accumulation with fetch over the ice of changes in the surface wind field is shown to have a large effect on estimates of the surface wind stress. It is speculated that the Andreas et al. estimates of the drag coefficient over the compact sea ice are too high.

  2. Acoustic Radiation from a Mach 14 Turbulent Boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by a high-speed turbulent boundary layer with a nominal freestream Mach number of 14 and wall temperature of 0.15 times the recovery temperature. The emphasis is on characterizing the acoustic radiation from the turbulent boundary layer and comparing it with previous simulations at Mach 2.5 and Mach 6 to assess the Mach-number dependence of the freestream pressure fluctuations. In particular, the numerical database is used to provide insights into the pressure disturbance spectrum and amplitude scaling with respect to the freestream Mach number as well as to understand the acoustic source mechanisms at very high Mach numbers. Such information is important for characterizing the freestream disturbance environment in conventional (i.e., noisy) hypersonic wind tunnels. Spectral characteristics of pressure fluctuations at the surface are also investigated. Supported by AFOSR and NASA Langley Research Center.

  3. Turbulence measurements in high Reynolds number boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Measurements are conducted in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers for Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 9,000 to 225,000. The experiments were performed in the High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF) at Princeton University, which uses compressed air as the working fluid. Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) are used to acquire data with very high spatial and temporal precision. These new data are used to study the scaling behavior of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the boundary layer and make comparisons with the scaling of other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  4. Effects of surface wave breaking on the oceanic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hailun; Chen, Dake

    2011-04-01

    Existing laboratory studies suggest that surface wave breaking may exert a significant impact on the formation and evolution of oceanic surface boundary layer, which plays an important role in the ocean-atmosphere coupled system. However, present climate models either neglect the effects of wave breaking or treat them implicitly through some crude parameterization. Here we use a one-dimensional ocean model (General Ocean Turbulence Model, GOTM) to investigate the effects of wave breaking on the oceanic boundary layer on diurnal to seasonal time scales. First a set of idealized experiments are carried out to demonstrate the basic physics and the necessity to include wave breaking. Then the model is applied to simulating observations at the northern North Sea and the Ocean Weather Station Papa, which shows that properly accounting for wave breaking effects can improve model performance and help it to successfully capture the observed upper ocean variability.

  5. Diffusive boundary layers at the bottom of gaps and cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzold, Merlin A.; Landel, Julien R.; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2017-11-01

    This work is motivated by the chemical decontamination of droplets of chemical warfare agents trapped in the gaps and cracks found in most man-made objects. We consider axial laminar flow within gaps with both straight and angled walls. We study the diffusive mass transfer from a source (e.g. a droplet surface) located at the bottom of the gap. This problem is similar to boundary layers and Graetz-type problems (heat transfer in pipe flow) with the added complication of a non-uniform lateral concentration profile due to the lateral variation of the velocity profile. We present 3D solutions for the diffusive boundary layer and demonstrate that a 2D mean-field model, for which we calculate series and similarity solutions, captures the essential physics. We demonstrate the immediate practical relevance of our findings by comparing decontamination of a droplet located in a gap and on an exposed surface.

  6. Turbulent boundary layer under the control of different schemes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2017-01-01

    This work explores experimentally the control of a turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate based on wall perturbation generated by piezo-ceramic actuators. Different schemes are investigated, including the feed-forward, the feedback, and the combined feed-forward and feedback strategies, with a view to suppressing the near-wall high-speed events and hence reducing skin friction drag. While the strategies may achieve a local maximum drag reduction slightly less than their counterpart of the open-loop control, the corresponding duty cycles are substantially reduced when compared with that of the open-loop control. The results suggest a good potential to cut down the input energy under these control strategies. The fluctuating velocity, spectra, Taylor microscale and mean energy dissipation are measured across the boundary layer with and without control and, based on the measurements, the flow mechanism behind the control is proposed. PMID:28690409

  7. Novel halogen chemistry in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, J. M.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Shillito, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    This paper will report the first observations of I2 in the marine boundary layer, made by Differential Optical Absorption (DOAS) spectroscopy during a field campaign at Mace Head (Ireland) in the summer of 2002. Very large I2 concentrations correlating with low tide indicate that the source is emission from macro-algae. Simple scaling suggests that this coastal emission could approach 2 Tg per year, making it a major contribution to the global iodine budget. During the same campaign, DOAS observations were also made of the halogen oxides IO, OIO and BrO. The pulses of IO and BrO that were measured at sunrise are strong evidence for heterogeneous processing on sea-salt aerosol producing high levels of IBr during the night. Simple modelling shows that the observed concentrations of the halogen radicals will play important roles in ozone depletion, the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide, and the formation of new particles in the marine boundary layer.

  8. Vortex Formation During Unsteady Boundary-Layer Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debopam; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    1998-11-01

    Unsteady laminar boundary-layer separation is invariably accompanied by the formation of vortices. The aim of the present work is to study the vortex formation mechanism(s). An adverse pressure gradient causing a separation can be decomposed into a spatial component ( spatial variation of the velocity external to the boundary layer ) and a temporal component ( temporal variation of the external velocity ). Experiments were conducted in a piston driven 2-D water channel, where the spatial component could be be contolled by geometry and the temporal component by the piston motion. We present results for three divergent channel geometries. The piston motion consists of three phases: constant acceleration from start, contant velocity, and constant deceleration to stop. Depending on the geometry and piston motion we observe different types of unsteady separation and vortex formation.

  9. Atmospheric surface and boundary layers of the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Three phases of work were performed: design of and preparation for the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2-A); execution of the ABLE 2-A field program; and analysis of the ABLE 2-A data. Three areas of experiment design were dealt with: surface based meteorological measurements; aircraft missions; and project meteorological support. The primary goal was to obtain a good description of the structure of the atmosphere immediately above the rain forest canopy (top of canopy to a few thousand meters), to describe this region during the growing daytime phase of the boundary layer; and to examine the nighttime stratified state. A secondary objective was to examine the role that deep convective storms play in the vertical transport of heat, water vapor, and other trace gases. While significant progress was made, much of the analysis remains to be done.

  10. Benthic boundary layer processes in the Lower Florida Keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavoie, D.L.; Richardson, M.D.; Holmes, C.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue of Geo-Marine Letters, "Benthic Boundary Layer Processes in the Lower Florida Keys," includes 12 papers that present preliminary results from the Key West Campaign. The Dry Tortugas and Marquesas Keys test sites were selected by a group of 115 scientists and technicians to study benthic boundary layer processes in a carbonate environment controlled by bioturbation and biogeochemical processes. Major activities included remote sediment classification; high-frequency acoustic scattering experiments; sediment sampling for radiological, geotechnical, biological, biogeochemical, physical, and geoacoustic studies; and hydrodynamic studies using an instrumented tetrapod. All these data are being used to improve our understanding of the effects of environmental processes on sediment structure and behavior.

  11. Investigation of Turbulent Boundary-Layer Separation Using Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modarress, D.; Johnson, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Boundary-layer measurements realized by laser velocimetry are presented for a Much 2.9, two-dimensional, shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction containing an extensive region of separated flow. Mean velocity and turbulent intensity profiles were obtained from upstream of the interaction zone to downstream of the mean reattachment point. The superiority of the laser velocimeter technique over pressure sensors in turbulent separated flows is demonstrated by a comparison of the laser velocimeter data with results obtained from local pilot and static pressure measurements for the same flow conditions. The locations of the mean separation and reattachment points as deduced from the mean velocity measurements are compared to oil-now visualization results. Representative velocity probability density functions obtained in the separated now region are also presented. Critical to the success of this investigation were: the use of Bragg cell frequency shifting and artificial seeding of the now with submicron light-scattering particles.

  12. Leading-edge effects on boundary-layer receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, Thomas B.; Kerschen, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical calculations are presented for the incompressible flow over a parabolic cylinder. The computational domain extends from a region upstream of the body downstream to the region where the Blasius boundary-layer solution holds. A steady mean flow solution is computed and the results for the scaled surface vorticity, surface pressure and displacement thickness are compared to previous studies. The unsteady problem is then formulated as a perturbation solution starting with and evolving from the mean flow. The response to irrotational time harmonic pulsation of the free-stream is examined. Results for the initial development of the velocity profile and displacement thickness are presented. These calculations will be extended to later times to investigate the initiation of instability waves within the boundary-layer.

  13. Forward marching procedure for separated boundary-layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.; Wornom, S. F.

    1975-01-01

    A forward-marching procedure for separated boundary-layer flows which permits the rapid and accurate solution of flows of limited extent is presented. The streamwise convection of vorticity in the reversed flow region is neglected, and this approximation is incorporated into a previously developed (Carter, 1974) inverse boundary-layer procedure. The equations are solved by the Crank-Nicolson finite-difference scheme in which column iteration is carried out at each streamwise station. Instabilities encountered in the column iterations are removed by introducing timelike terms in the finite-difference equations. This provides both unconditional diagonal dominance and a column iterative scheme, found to be stable using the von Neumann stability analysis.

  14. Abyssal Upwelling and Downwelling and the role of boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, T. J.; Ferrari, R. M.

    2016-02-01

    The bottom-intensified mixing activity arising from the interaction of internal tides with bottom topography implies that the dianeutral advection in the ocean interior is downwards, rather than upwards as is required by continuity. The upwelling of Bottom Water through density surfaces in the deep ocean is however possible because of the sloping nature of the sea floor. A budget study of the abyss (deeper than 2000m) will be described that shows that while the upwelling of Bottom Water might be 25 Sv, this is achieved by very strong upwelling in the bottom turbulent boundary layer (of thickness 50m) of 100 Sv and strong downwelling in the ocean interior of 75 Sv. This downwelling occurs within 10 degrees of longitude of the continental boundaries. This near-boundary confined strong upwelling and downwelling clearly has implications for the Stommel-Arons circulation.

  15. The curved kinetic boundary layer of active matter.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John F

    2018-01-03

    A body submerged in active matter feels the swim pressure through a kinetic accumulation boundary layer on its surface. The boundary layer results from a balance between translational diffusion and advective swimming and occurs on the microscopic length scale . Here , D T is the Brownian translational diffusivity, τ R is the reorientation time and l = U 0 τ R is the swimmer's run length, with U 0 the swim speed [Yan and Brady, J. Fluid. Mech., 2015, 785, R1]. In this work we analyze the swim pressure on arbitrary shaped bodies by including the effect of local shape curvature in the kinetic boundary layer. When δ ≪ L and l ≪ L, where L is the body size, the leading order effects of curvature on the swim pressure are found analytically to scale as J S λδ 2 /L, where J S is twice the (non-dimensional) mean curvature. Particle-tracking simulations and direct solutions to the Smoluchowski equation governing the probability distribution of the active particles show that λδ 2 /L is a universal scaling parameter not limited to the regime δ, l ≪ L. The net force exerted on the body by the swimmers is found to scale as F net /(n ∞ k s T s L 2 ) = f(λδ 2 /L), where f(x) is a dimensionless function that is quadratic when x ≪ 1 and linear when x ∼ 1. Here, k s T s = ζU 0 2 τ R /6 defines the 'activity' of the swimmers, with ζ the drag coefficient, and n ∞ is the uniform number density of swimmers far from the body. We discuss the connection of this boundary layer to continuum mechanical descriptions of active matter and briefly present how to include hydrodynamics into this purely kinetic study.

  16. Boundary Layer Transition Experiments in Support of the Hypersonics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Chen, Fang-Jenq; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental boundary layer transition studies in support of fundamental hypersonics research are reviewed. The two studies are the HyBoLT flight experiment and a new ballistic range effort. Details are provided of the objectives and approach associated with each experimental program. The establishment of experimental databases from ground and flight are to provide better understanding of high-speed flows and data to validate and guide the development of simulation tools.

  17. Streamline-curvature effect in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.; Lin, Ray-Sing; Petraglia, Media M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of including wall and streamline curvature terms in swept-wing boundary-layer stability calculations is studied. The linear disturbance equations are cast on a fixed, body-intrinsic, curvilinear coordinate system. Those nonparallel terms which contribute mainly to the streamline-curvature effect are retained in this formulation and approximated by their local finite-difference values. Convex-wall curvature has a stabilizing effect, while streamline curvature is destabilizing if the curvature exceeds a critical value.

  18. Simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianvashrad, N.; Knight, D.

    2017-06-01

    The capability of the Navier-Stokes equations with a perfect gas model for simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions is assessed. The configuration is a hollow cylinder flare. The experimental data were obtained by Calspan-University of Buffalo (CUBRC) for total enthalpies ranging from 5.07 to 21.85 MJ/kg. Comparison of the computed and experimental surface pressure and heat transfer is performed and the computed §ow¦eld structure is analyzed.

  19. Vortex/boundary-layer interactions: Data report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAGw-581, Vortex/Boundary Layer Interactions. The experimental methods are discussed in detail and numerical results are presented, but are not fully interpreted. This report should be useful to anyone who wishes to make further use of the data (available on floppy disc or magnetic tape) for the development of turbulence models or the validation of predictive methods. Journal papers are in course of preparation.

  20. Stability and Drag Reduction in a Boundary Layer with Microbubbles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    order accurate. .’ Since the numerical methods are not the object of this % dissertation, we decline from including the finite difference equations...previous appendix must be the special case of zero pressure gradient. Some entries of the matrices of the block tridiagonal system will be different ...of the wall mean velocity gradient was observed to be associated with the migration of the bubbles away from the boundary layer. The time scale of the

  1. Geologic Basin Boundaries (Basins_GHGRP) GIS Layer

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a coverage shapefile of geologic basin boundaries which are used by EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program. For onshore production, the facility includes all emissions associated with wells owned or operated by a single company in a specific hydrocarbon producing basin (as defined by the geologic provinces published by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists). This layer is limited to the contiguous United States.

  2. Linear stability theory and three-dimensional boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of linear stability theory and three dimensional boundary layer transition are provided. The ability to predict, using analytical tools, the location of boundary layer transition over aircraft-type configurations is of great importance to designers interested in laminar flow control (LFC). The e(sup N) method has proven to be fairly effective in predicting, in a consistent manner, the location of the onset of transition for simple geometries in low disturbance environments. This method provides a correlation between the most amplified single normal mode and the experimental location of the onset of transition. Studies indicate that values of N between 8 and 10 correlate well with the onset of transition. For most previous calculations, the mean flows were restricted to two-dimensional or axisymmetric cases, or have employed simple three-dimensional mean flows (e.g., rotating disk, infinite swept wing, or tapered swept wing with straight isobars). Unfortunately, for flows over general wing configurations, and for nearly all flows over fuselage-type bodies at incidence, the analysis of fully three-dimensional flow fields is required. Results obtained for the linear stability of fully three-dimensional boundary layers formed over both wing and fuselage-type geometries, and for both high and low speed flows are discussed. When possible, transition estimates form the e(sup N) method are compared to experimentally determined locations. The stability calculations are made using a modified version of the linear stability code COSAL. Mean flows were computed using both Navier Stokes and boundary-layer codes.

  3. Sulfate and MSA Aerosol Dynamics in the Marine Boundary Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-30

    Kilauea Volcano as they move out over the Pacific Ocean, to understand what happens to marine and continental aerosols when they mix. This dataset will...SULFATE AND MSA AEROSOL DYNAMICS IN THE MARINE BOUNDARY LAYER P.I. - Barry J. Huebert Department of Oceanography University of Hawaii 1000 Pope Rd...6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Hawaii

  4. The double layers in the plasma sheet boundary layer during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Yu, B.

    2014-11-01

    We studied the evolutions of double layers which appear after the magnetic reconnection through two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation. The simulation results show that the double layers are formed in the plasma sheet boundary layer after magnetic reconnection. At first, the double layers which have unipolar structures are formed. And then the double layers turn into bipolar structures, which will couple with another new weak bipolar structure. Thus a new double layer or tripolar structure comes into being. The double layers found in our work are about several ten Debye lengths, which accords with the observation results. It is suggested that the electron beam formed during the magnetic reconnection is responsible for the production of the double layers.

  5. Thermocapillary Bubble Migration: Thermal Boundary Layers for Large Marangoni Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The migration of an isolated gas bubble in an immiscible liquid possessing a temperature gradient is analyzed in the absence of gravity. The driving force for the bubble motion is the shear stress at the interface which is a consequence of the temperature dependence of the surface tension. The analysis is performed under conditions for which the Marangoni number is large, i.e. energy is transferred predominantly by convection. Velocity fields in the limit of both small and large Reynolds numbers are used. The thermal problem is treated by standard boundary layer theory. The outer temperature field is obtained in the vicinity of the bubble. A similarity solution is obtained for the inner temperature field. For both small and large Reynolds numbers, the asymptotic values of the scaled migration velocity of the bubble in the limit of large Marangoni numbers are calculated. The results show that the migration velocity has the same scaling for both low and large Reynolds numbers, but with a different coefficient. Higher order thermal boundary layers are analyzed for the large Reynolds number flow field and the higher order corrections to the migration velocity are obtained. Results are also presented for the momentum boundary layer and the thermal wake behind the bubble, for large Reynolds number conditions.

  6. An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kenji

    2010-03-01

    An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers (BBLs) is proposed using eddy viscosity of a quadratic form. The common definition of friction velocity based on maximum bottom shear stress is found unsatisfactory for BBLs under rotating flows, and a possible extension based on turbulent kinetic energy balance is proposed. The model solutions show that the flow may slip at the top of the boundary layer due to capping by the water surface or stratification, reducing the bottom shear stress, and that the Earth's rotation induces current and bottom shear stress components perpendicular to the interior flow with a phase lag (or lead). Comparisons with field and numerical experiments indicate that the model predicts the essential characteristics of the velocity profiles, although the agreement is rather qualitative due to assumptions of quadratic eddy viscosity with time-independent friction velocity and a well-mixed boundary layer. On the other hand, the predicted linear friction coefficients, phase lead, and veering angle at the bottom agreed with available data with an error of 3%-10%, 5°-10°, and 5°-10°, respectively. As an application of the model, the friction coefficients are used to calculate e-folding decay distances of progressive internal waves with a semidiurnal frequency.

  7. Evidence for renoxification in the tropical marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Chris; Evans, Mathew J.; Crilley, Leigh R.; Bloss, William J.; Sherwen, Tomás; Read, Katie A.; Lee, James D.; Carpenter, Lucy J.

    2017-03-01

    We present 2 years of NOx observations from the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory located in the tropical Atlantic boundary layer. We find that NOx mixing ratios peak around solar noon (at 20-30 pptV depending on season), which is counter to box model simulations that show a midday minimum due to OH conversion of NO2 to HNO3. Production of NOx via decomposition of organic nitrogen species and the photolysis of HNO3 appear insufficient to provide the observed noontime maximum. A rapid photolysis of nitrate aerosol to produce HONO and NO2, however, is able to simulate the observed diurnal cycle. This would make it the dominant source of NOx at this remote marine boundary layer site, overturning the previous paradigm according to which the transport of organic nitrogen species, such as PAN, is the dominant source. We show that observed mixing ratios (November-December 2015) of HONO at Cape Verde (˜ 3.5 pptV peak at solar noon) are consistent with this route for NOx production. Reactions between the nitrate radical and halogen hydroxides which have been postulated in the literature appear to improve the box model simulation of NOx. This rapid conversion of aerosol phase nitrate to NOx changes our perspective of the NOx cycling chemistry in the tropical marine boundary layer, suggesting a more chemically complex environment than previously thought.

  8. Acoustic explorations of the upper ocean boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagle, Svein

    2005-04-01

    The upper ocean boundary layer is an important but difficult to probe part of the ocean. A better understanding of small scale processes at the air-sea interface, including the vertical transfer of gases, heat, mass and momentum, are crucial to improving our understanding of the coupling between atmosphere and ocean. Also, this part of the ocean contains a significant part of the total biomass at all trophic levels and is therefore of great interest to researchers in a range of different fields. Innovative measurement plays a critical role in developing our understanding of the processes involved in the boundary layer, and the availability of low-cost, compact, digital signal processors and sonar technology in self-contained and cabled configurations has led to a number of exciting developments. This talk summarizes some recent explorations of this dynamic boundary layer using both active and passive acoustics. The resonant behavior of upper ocean bubbles combined with single and multi-frequency broad band active and passive devices are now giving us invaluable information on air-sea gas transfer, estimation of biological production, marine mammal behavior, wind speed and precipitation, surface and internal waves, turbulence, and acoustic communication in the surf zone.

  9. Advanced boundary layer transition measurement methods for flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Croom, C. C.; Gail, P. D.; Manuel, G. S.; Carraway, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    In modern laminar flow flight research, it is important to understand the specific cause(s) of laminar to turbulent boundary-layer transition. Such information is crucial to the exploration of the limits of practical application of laminar flow for drag reduction on aircraft. The transition modes of interest in current flight investigations include the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting instability, the inflectional instability at laminar separation, and the crossflow inflectional instability, as well as others. This paper presents the results to date of research on advanced devices and methods used for the study of laminar boundary-layer transition phenomena in the flight environment. Recent advancements in the development of arrayed hot-film devices and of a new flow visualization method are discussed. Arrayed hot-film devices have been designed to detect the presence of laminar separation, and of crossflow vorticity. The advanced flow visualization method utilizes color changes in liquid-crystal coatings to detect boundary-layer transition at high altitude flight conditions. Flight and wind tunnel data are presented to illustrate the design and operation of these advanced methods. These new research tools provide information on disturbance growth and transition mode which is essential to furthering our understanding of practical design limits for applications of laminar flow technology.

  10. Viscous Forces in Velocity Boundary Layers around Planetary Ionospheres.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De-Tejada

    1999-11-01

    A discussion is presented to examine the role of viscous forces in the transport of solar wind momentum to the ionospheric plasma of weakly magnetized planets (Venus and Mars). Observational data are used to make a comparison of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses that are operative in the interaction of the solar wind with local plasma (planetary ionospheres). Measurements show the presence of a velocity boundary layer formed around the flanks of the ionosphere where the shocked solar wind has reached super-Alfvénic speeds. It is found that the Reynolds stresses in the solar wind at that region can be larger than the Maxwell stresses and thus are necessary in the local acceleration of the ionospheric plasma. From an order-of-magnitude calculation of the Reynolds stresses, it is possible to derive values of the kinematic viscosity and the Reynolds number that are suitable to the gyrotropic motion of the solar wind particles across the boundary layer. The value of the kinematic viscosity is comparable to those inferred from studies of the transport of solar wind momentum to the earth's magnetosphere and thus suggest a common property of the solar wind around planetary obstacles. Similar conditions could also be applicable to velocity boundary layers formed in other plasma interaction problems in astrophysics.

  11. Review of Orbiter Flight Boundary Layer Transition Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.; Berry, Scott A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Barnell, maria; Wang, Kuo C.; Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the Shuttle Return to Flight program, a tool was developed to predict when boundary layer transition would occur on the lower surface of the orbiter during reentry due to the presence of protuberances and cavities in the thermal protection system. This predictive tool was developed based on extensive wind tunnel tests conducted after the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Recognizing that wind tunnels cannot simulate the exact conditions an orbiter encounters as it re-enters the atmosphere, a preliminary attempt was made to use the documented flight related damage and the orbiter transition times, as deduced from flight instrumentation, to calibrate the predictive tool. After flight STS-114, the Boundary Layer Transition Team decided that a more in-depth analysis of the historical flight data was needed to better determine the root causes of the occasional early transition times of some of the past shuttle flights. In this paper we discuss our methodology for the analysis, the various sources of shuttle damage information, the analysis of the flight thermocouple data, and how the results compare to the Boundary Layer Transition prediction tool designed for Return to Flight.

  12. Using UAV's to Measure the Urban Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, R. L.; Sankaran, R.; Beckman, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    The urban boundary layer is one of the most poorly studied regions of the atmospheric boundary layer. Since a majority of the world's population now lives in urban areas, it is becoming a more important region to measure and model. The combination of relatively low-cost unmanned aerial vehicles and low-cost sensors can together provide a new instrument for measuring urban and other boundary layers. We have mounted a new sensor and compute platform called Waggle on an off-the-shelf XR8 octo-copter from 3DRobotics. Waggle consists of multiple sensors for measuring pressure, temperature and humidity as well as trace gases such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and ozone. A single board computer running Linux included in Waggle on the UAV allows in-situ processing and data storage. Communication of the data is through WiFi or 3G and the Waggle software can save the data in case communication is lost during flight. The flight pattern is a deliberately simple vertical ascent and descent over a fixed location to provide vertical profiles and so flights can be confined to urban parks, industrial areas or the footprint of a single rooftop. We will present results from test flights in urban and rural areas in and around Chicago.

  13. Boundary-layer equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panaras, Argyris G.

    1987-01-01

    A set of higher-order boundary-layer equations is derived valid for three-dimensional compressible flows. The equations are written in a generalized curvilinear coordinate system, in which the surface coordinates are nonorthogonal; the third axis is restricted to be normal to the surface. Also, higher-order viscous terms which are retained depend on the surface curvature of the body. Thus, the equations are suitable for the calculation of the boundary layer about arbitrary vehicles. As a starting point, the Navier-Stokes equations are derived in a tensorian notation. Then by means of an order-of-magnitude analysis, the boundary-layer equations are developed. To provide an interface between the analytical partial differentiation notation and the compact tensor notation, a brief review of the most essential theorems of the tensor analysis related to the equations of the fluid dynamics is given. Many useful quantities, such as the contravariant and the covariant metrics and the physical velocity components, are written in both notations.

  14. Improving Subtropical Boundary Layer Cloudiness in the 2011 NCEP GFS

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J. K.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Xiao, Heng

    2014-09-23

    The current operational version of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecasting System (GFS) shows significant low cloud bias. These biases also appear in the Coupled Forecast System (CFS), which is developed from the GFS. These low cloud biases degrade seasonal and longer climate forecasts, particularly of short-wave cloud radiative forcing, and affect predicted sea surface temperature. Reducing this bias in the GFS will aid the development of future CFS versions and contributes to NCEP's goal of unified weather and climate modelling. Changes are made to the shallow convection and planetary boundary layer parameterisations to make them more consistentmore » with current knowledge of these processes and to reduce the low cloud bias. These changes are tested in a single-column version of GFS and in global simulations with GFS coupled to a dynamical ocean model. In the single-column model, we focus on changing parameters that set the following: the strength of shallow cumulus lateral entrainment, the conversion of updraught liquid water to precipitation and grid-scale condensate, shallow cumulus cloud top, and the effect of shallow convection in stratocumulus environments. Results show that these changes improve the single-column simulations when compared to large eddy simulations, in particular through decreasing the precipitation efficiency of boundary layer clouds. These changes, combined with a few other model improvements, also reduce boundary layer cloud and albedo biases in global coupled simulations.« less

  15. Manipulation of Turbulent Boundary Layers Using Synthetic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Zachary; Gomit, Guillaume; Lavoie, Philippe; Ganapathisubramani, Bharath

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the application of active flow control, in the form of synthetic jet actuators, of turbulent boundary layers. An array of 2 synthetic jets are oriented in the spanwise direction and located approximately 2.7 meters downstream from the leading edge of a flat plate. Actuation is applied perpendicular to the surface of the flat plate with varying blowing ratios and reduced frequencies (open-loop). Two-component large window particle image velocimetry (PIV) was performed at the University of Southampton, in the streamwise-wall-normal plane. Complementary stereo PIV measurements were performed at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), in the spanwise-wall-normal plane. The freestream Reynolds number is 3x104, based on the boundary layer thickness. The skin friction Reynolds number is 1,200 based on the skin friction velocity. The experiments at Southampton allow for the observation of the control effects as the flow propagates downstream. The experiments at UTIAS allow for the observation of the streamwise vorticity induced from the actuation. Overall the two experiments provide a 3D representation of the flow field with respect to actuation effects. The current work focuses on the comparison of the two experiments, as well as the effects of varying blowing ratios and reduced frequencies on the turbulent boundary layer. Funded Supported by Airbus.

  16. Minnowbrook II 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The volume contains materials presented at the Minnowbrook II - 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines, held at Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, New York, on September 7-10, 1997. The workshop followed the informal format at the 1993 Minnowbrook I workshop, focusing on improving the understanding of late stage (final breakdown) boundary layer transition, with the engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery in mind. Among the physical mechanisms discussed were hydrodynamic instabilities, laminar to turbulent transition, bypass transition, turbulent spots, wake interaction with boundary layers, calmed regions, and separation, all in the context of flow in turbomachinery, particularly in compressors and high and low pressure turbines. Results from experiments, DNS, computation, modeling and theoretical analysis were presented. Abstracts and copies of viewgraphs, a specifically commissioned summation paper prepared after the workshop, and a transcript of the extensive working group reports and discussions are included in this volume. They provide recommendations for future research and clearly highlight the need for continued vigorous research in the technologically important area of transition in turbomachines.

  17. Cloud-Scale Numerical Modeling of the Arctic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Steven K.

    1998-01-01

    The interactions between sea ice, open ocean, atmospheric radiation, and clouds over the Arctic Ocean exert a strong influence on global climate. Uncertainties in the formulation of interactive air-sea-ice processes in global climate models (GCMs) result in large differences between the Arctic, and global, climates simulated by different models. Arctic stratus clouds are not well-simulated by GCMs, yet exert a strong influence on the surface energy budget of the Arctic. Leads (channels of open water in sea ice) have significant impacts on the large-scale budgets during the Arctic winter, when they contribute about 50 percent of the surface fluxes over the Arctic Ocean, but cover only 1 to 2 percent of its area. Convective plumes generated by wide leads may penetrate the surface inversion and produce condensate that spreads up to 250 km downwind of the lead, and may significantly affect the longwave radiative fluxes at the surface and thereby the sea ice thickness. The effects of leads and boundary layer clouds must be accurately represented in climate models to allow possible feedbacks between them and the sea ice thickness. The FIRE III Arctic boundary layer clouds field program, in conjunction with the SHEBA ice camp and the ARM North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean site, will offer an unprecedented opportunity to greatly improve our ability to parameterize the important effects of leads and boundary layer clouds in GCMs.

  18. Pulsating flow and boundary layers in viscous electronic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moessner, Roderich; Surówka, Piotr; Witkowski, Piotr

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by experiments on a hydrodynamic regime in electron transport, we study the effect of an oscillating electric field in such a setting. We consider a long two-dimensional channel of width L , whose geometrical simplicity allows an analytical study as well as hopefully permitting an experimental realization. The response depends on viscosity ν , driving frequency ω , and ohmic heating coefficient γ via the dimensionless complex variable L/2ν (i ω +γ ) =i Ω +Σ . While at small Ω , we recover the static solution, a different regime appears at large Ω with the emergence of a boundary layer. This includes a splitting of the location of maximal flow velocity from the center towards the edges of the boundary layer, an increasingly reactive nature of the response, with the phase shift of the response varying across the channel. The scaling of the total optical conductance with L differs between the two regimes, while its frequency dependence resembles a Drude form throughout, even in the complete absence of ohmic heating, against which, at the same time, our results are stable. Current estimates for transport coefficients in graphene and delafossites suggest that the boundary-layer regime should be experimentally accessible.

  19. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Acoustic and Vortical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakamar, P.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Boundary layer receptivity to two-dimensional acoustic disturbances at different incidence angles and to vortical disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 6 flow over a 7deg half-angle sharp-tipped wedge and a cone. Higher order spatial and temporal schemes are employed to obtain the solution. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves as compared to the fast waves. It is found that the receptivity of the boundary layer on the windward side (with respect to the acoustic forcing) decreases when the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 30 degrees. However, the receptivity coefficient for the leeward side is found to vary relatively weakly with the incidence angle. The maximum receptivity is obtained when the wave incident angle is about 20 degrees. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that for the acoustic waves. Vortical disturbances first generate the fast acoustic modes and they switch to the slow mode near the continuous spectrum.

  20. Dry intrusions: Lagrangian climatology and impact on the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveh-Rubin, Shira; Wernli, Heini

    2017-04-01

    Dry air intrusions (DIs) are large-scale descending airstreams. A DI is typically referred to as a coherent airstream in the cold sector of an extratropical cyclone. Emerging evidence suggests that DIs are linked to severe surface wind gusts. However, there is yet no strict Lagrangian definition of DIs, and so their climatological frequency, dynamical characteristics as well as their seasonal and spatial distributions are unknown. Furthermore, the dynamical interaction between DIs and the planetary boundary layer is not fully understood. Here, we suggest a Lagrangian definition for DI air parcels, namely a minimum pressure increase along a trajectory of 400 hPa in 48 hours. Based on this criterion, the open questions are addressed by: (i) a novel global Lagrangian climatology for the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset for the years 1979-2014; (ii) a case study illustrating the interaction between DIs and the boundary layer. We find that DIs occur predominantly in winter. DIs coherently descend from the upper troposphere (their stratospheric origin is small), to the mid- and low levels, where they mix with their environment and diverge. Different physical characteristics typify DIs in the different regions and seasons. Finally, we demonstrate the different mechanisms by which DIs can destabilize the boundary layer and facilitate the formation of strong surface winds.

  1. Inner-outer interactions in the convective atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, S.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, observational and numerical studies have revealed the existence of so-called large scale motions (LSMs) that populate the logarithmic layer of wall-bounded turbulent shear flows and modulate the amplitude and frequency of turbulence dynamics near the ground. Properties of LSMs are well understood in neutrally stratified flows over smooth and rough walls. However, the implications of previous studies for the convective atmospheric boundary layer (CBL) are not entirely clear, since the morphology of both small-scale and large-scale turbulent structures is known to be strongly affected by buoyancy [e.g. Salesky et al., Bound.-Layer Meteorol. 163:41-68 (2017)]. In the present study, inner-outer interactions in the CBL are investigated using a suite of large eddy simulations spanning neutral to highly convective conditions. Simulation results reveal that, as the atmosphere becomes increasingly unstable, the inclination angle of structures near the ground increases from 12-15° to nearly 90°. Furthermore, the scale separation between the inner and outer peaks in the premultiplied velocity spectra decreases until only a single peak remains (comparable in magnitude to the boundary layer depth). The extent to which the amplitude modulation of surface layer turbulence by outer layer structures changes with increasing instability will be considered, following the decoupling procedure proposed by Mathis et al. [J. Fluid Mech., vol 628, 311-337 (2009)]. Frequency modulation of surface layer turbulence also will be examined, following the wavelet analysis approach of Baars et al. [Exp. Fluids, 56:188, (2015)].

  2. A boundary condition for layer to level ocean model interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mask, A.; O'Brien, J.; Preller, R.

    2003-04-01

    A radiation boundary condition based on vertical normal modes is introduced to allow a physical transition between nested/coupled ocean models that are of differing vertical structure and/or differing physics. In this particular study, a fine resolution regional/coastal sigma-coordinate Naval Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) has been successfully nested to a coarse resolution (in the horizontal and vertical) basin scale NCOM and a coarse resolution basin scale Navy Layered Ocean Model (NLOM). Both of these models were developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) at Stennis Space Center, Mississippi, USA. This new method, which decomposes the vertical structure of the models into barotropic and baroclinic modes, gives improved results in the coastal domain over Orlanski radiation boundary conditions for the test cases. The principle reason for the improvement is that each mode has the radiation boundary condition applied individually; therefore, the packet of information passing through the boundary is allowed to have multiple phase speeds instead of a single-phase speed. Allowing multiple phase speeds reduces boundary reflections, thus improving results.

  3. Computational Study of Hypersonic Boundary Layer Stability on Cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronvall, Joel Edwin

    Due to the complex nature of boundary layer laminar-turbulent transition in hypersonic flows and the resultant effect on the design of re-entry vehicles, there remains considerable interest in developing a deeper understanding of the underlying physics. To that end, the use of experimental observations and computational analysis in a complementary manner will provide the greatest insights. It is the intent of this work to provide such an analysis for two ongoing experimental investigations. The first focuses on the hypersonic boundary layer transition experiments for a slender cone that are being conducted at JAXA's free-piston shock tunnel HIEST facility. Of particular interest are the measurements of disturbance frequencies associated with transition at high enthalpies. The computational analysis provided for these cases included two-dimensional CFD mean flow solutions for use in boundary layer stability analyses. The disturbances in the boundary layer were calculated using the linear parabolized stability equations. Estimates for transition locations, comparisons of measured disturbance frequencies and computed frequencies, and a determination of the type of disturbances present were made. It was found that for the cases where the disturbances were measured at locations where the flow was still laminar but nearly transitional, that the highly amplified disturbances showed reasonable agreement with the computations. Additionally, an investigation of the effects of finite-rate chemistry and vibrational excitation on flows over cones was conducted for a set of theoretical operational conditions at the HIEST facility. The second study focuses on transition in three-dimensional hypersonic boundary layers, and for this the cone at angle of attack experiments being conducted at the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 quiet tunnel at Purdue University were examined. Specifically, the effect of surface roughness on the development of the stationary crossflow instability are investigated

  4. Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant-temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spina, Eric F.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective in the two research investigations performed under NASA Langley sponsorship (Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers) has been to increase the understanding of the physics of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The study began with an extension of constant-temperature thermal anemometry techniques to a Mach 11 helium flow, including careful examinations of hot-wire construction techniques, system response, and system calibration. This was followed by the application of these techniques to the exploration of a Mach 11 helium turbulent boundary layer (To approximately 290 K). The data that was acquired over the course of more than two years consists of instantaneous streamwise mass flux measurements at a frequency response of about 500 kHz. The data are of exceptional quality in both the time and frequency domain and possess a high degree of repeatability. The data analysis that has been performed to date has added significantly to the body of knowledge on hypersonic turbulence, and the data reduction is continuing. An attempt was then made to extend these thermal anemometry techniques to higher enthalpy flows, starting with a Mach 6 air flow with a stagnation temperature just above that needed to prevent liquefaction (To approximately 475 F). Conventional hot-wire anemometry proved to be inadequate for the selected high-temperature, high dynamic pressure flow, with frequent wire breakage and poor system frequency response. The use of hot-film anemometry has since been investigated for these higher-enthalpy, severe environment flows. The difficulty with using hot-film probes for dynamic (turbulence) measurements is associated with construction limitations and conduction of heat into the film substrate. Work continues under a NASA GSRP grant on the development of a hot film probe that overcomes these shortcomings for hypersonic

  5. Turbulence Statistics in the Coastal Ocean Bottom Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. R.; Hackett, E. E.; Luznik, L.; Katz, J.; Osborn, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    A submersible particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was deployed off the coast of New Jersey, near the LEO-15 site, to characterize the flow and turbulence in the inner part of the continental shelf bottom boundary layer. The measurement domain extended from 5 mm at the bottom up to an elevation of 51 cm in different datasets. The flow comprised of a mean current and wave-induced flow with a period of 10 s. The ratio of wave velocity amplitude to mean current magnitude varied over the tidal cycle and with elevation, with a maximum of 2.35. Their relative orientation also varied. Large databases of time-resolved, high resolution, 2D velocity distributions enabled us to calculate the instantaneous spatial velocity gradients, and from them, the statistically converged vertical dissipation rate profiles. Reynolds Stresses were estimated using the Shaw & Trowbridge technique outside of the wave boundary layer (WBL), and directly, using the instantaneous spatial variations in velocity, near the wall. Results were utilized for calculating the shear production profiles. Hilbert Transforms were utilized for calculating the wave phase of each velocity distribution, and performing conditional sampling of data to determine variations in flow and turbulence parameters during a wave cycle. The mean velocity profiles indicated the presence of a wave boundary layer, followed by a transition region, and a log layer above it. The datasets extending to the wall show that there is no clear log layer within the WBL, but, as expected, profiles vary substantially with location relative to the ripples. Phase dependent variations in mean flow and dissipation rate occurred only in the WBL and transition region, but vanished at higher elevations. The dissipation rate typically peaked during acceleration phases of wave-induced motion, especially near the wall, but it sometimes peaked during wave-crest phases. Below the transition region, the dissipation rate increased rapidly as the wall

  6. Interaction between plasma synthetic jet and subsonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Haohua; Kotsonis, Marios

    2017-04-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the interaction between a plasma synthetic jet (PSJ) and a subsonic turbulent boundary layer (TBL) using a hotwire anemometer and phase-locked particle imaging velocimetry. The PSJ is interacting with a fully developed turbulent boundary layer developing on the flat wall of a square wind tunnel section of 1.7 m length. The Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity (U∞ = 20 m/s) and the boundary layer thickness (δ99 = 34.5 mm) at the location of interaction is 44 400. A large-volume (1696 mm3) three-electrode plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) with a round exit orifice (D = 2 mm) is adopted to produce high-speed (92 m/s) and short-duration (Tjet = 1 ms) pulsed jets. The exit velocity variation of the adopted PSJA in a crossflow is shown to remain almost identical to that in quiescent conditions. However, the flow structures emanating from the interaction between the PSJ and the TBL are significantly different from what were observed in quiescent conditions. In the midspan xy plane (z = 0 mm), the erupted jet body initially follows a wall-normal trajectory accompanied by the formation of a distinctive front vortex ring. After three convective time scales the jet bends to the crossflow, thus limiting the peak penetration depth to approximately 0.58δ99. Comparison of the normalized jet trajectories indicates that the penetration ability of the PSJ is less than steady jets with the same momentum flow velocity. Prior to the jet diminishing, a recirculation region is observed in the leeward side of the jet body, experiencing first an expansion and then a contraction in the area. In the cross-stream yz plane, the signature structure of jets in a crossflow, the counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP), transports high-momentum flow from the outer layer to the near-wall region, leading to a fuller velocity profile and a drop in the boundary layer shape factor (1.3 to 1.2). In contrast to steady jets, the CVP produced by the PSJ

  7. A complex-lamellar description of boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolla, Maureen Louise

    Flow transition is important, in both practical and phenomenological terms. However, there is currently no method for identifying the spatial locations associated with transition, such as the start and end of intermittency. The concept of flow stability and experimental correlations have been used, however, flow stability only identifies the location where disturbances begin to grow in the laminar flow and experimental correlations can only give approximations as measuring the start and end of intermittency is difficult. Therefore, the focus of this work is to construct a method to identify the start and end of intermittency, for a natural boundary layer transition and a separated flow transition. We obtain these locations by deriving a complex-lamellar description of the velocity field that exists between a fully laminar and fully turbulent boundary condition. Mathematically, this complex-lamellar decomposition, which is constructed from the classical Darwin-Lighthill-Hawthorne drift function and the transport of enstrophy, describes the flow that exists between the fully laminar Pohlhausen equations and Prandtl's fully turbulent one seventh power law. We approximate the difference in enstrophy density between the boundary conditions using a power series. The slope of the power series is scaled by using the shape of the universal intermittency distribution within the intermittency region. We solve the complex-lamellar decomposition of the velocity field along with the slope of the difference in enstrophy density function to determine the location of the laminar and turbulent boundary conditions. Then from the difference in enstrophy density function we calculate the start and end of intermittency. We perform this calculation on a natural boundary layer transition over a flat plate for zero pressure gradient flow and for separated shear flow over a separation bubble. We compare these results to existing experimental results and verify the accuracy of our transition

  8. Intensity tunable infrared broadband absorbers based on VO2 phase transition using planar layered thin films

    PubMed Central

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Palacios, Edgar; Liu, Zizhuo; Tongay, Sefaattin; Fu, Deyi; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Aydin, Koray

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic and metamaterial based nano/micro-structured materials enable spectrally selective resonant absorption, where the resonant bandwidth and absorption intensity can be engineered by controlling the size and geometry of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a simple, lithography-free approach for obtaining a resonant and dynamically tunable broadband absorber based on vanadium dioxide (VO2) phase transition. Using planar layered thin film structures, where top layer is chosen to be an ultrathin (20 nm) VO2 film, we demonstrate broadband IR light absorption tuning (from ~90% to ~30% in measured absorption) over the entire mid-wavelength infrared spectrum. Our numerical and experimental results indicate that the bandwidth of the absorption bands can be controlled by changing the dielectric spacer layer thickness. Broadband tunable absorbers can find applications in absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaics and sensing. PMID:26294085

  9. Refractive Index Effects on Radiation in an Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Laminated Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    A simple set of equations is derived for predicting temperature radiative energy flow in a two-region semitransparent laminated layer in the limit of zero heat conduction. The composite is heated on its two sides by unequal amounts of incident radiation. The two layers of the composite have different refractive indices, and each material absorbs, emits, and isotropically scatters radiation. The interfaces are diffuse, and all interface reflections are included. To illustrate the thermal behavior that is readily calculated from the equations, typical results an given for various optical thicknesses and refractive indices of the layers. Internal reflections have a substantial effect on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flow.

  10. Boundary-Layer Transition on a Slender Cone in Hypervelocity Flow with Real Gas Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Joseph Stephen

    The laminar to turbulent transition process in boundary layer flows in thermochemical nonequilibrium at high enthalpy is measured and characterized. Experiments are performed in the T5 Hypervelocity Reflected Shock Tunnel at Caltech, using a 1 m length 5-degree half angle axisymmetric cone instrumented with 80 fast-response annular thermocouples, complemented by boundary layer stability computations using the STABL software suite. A new mixing tank is added to the shock tube fill apparatus for premixed freestream gas experiments, and a new cleaning procedure results in more consistent transition measurements. Transition location is nondimensionalized using a scaling with the boundary layer thickness, which is correlated with the acoustic properties of the boundary layer, and compared with parabolized stability equation (PSE) analysis. In these nondimensionalized terms, transition delay with increasing CO2 concentration is observed: tests in 100% and 50% CO2, by mass, transition up to 25% and 15% later, respectively, than air experiments. These results are consistent with previous work indicating that CO2 molecules at elevated temperatures absorb acoustic instabilities in the MHz range, which is the expected frequency of the Mack second-mode instability at these conditions, and also consistent with predictions from PSE analysis. A strong unit Reynolds number effect is observed, which is believed to arise from tunnel noise. NTr for air from 5.4 to 13.2 is computed, substantially higher than previously reported for noisy facilities. Time- and spatially-resolved heat transfer traces are used to track the propagation of turbulent spots, and convection rates at 90%, 76%, and 63% of the boundary layer edge velocity, respectively, are observed for the leading edge, centroid, and trailing edge of the spots. A model constructed with these spot propagation parameters is used to infer spot generation rates from measured transition onset to completion distance. Finally, a novel

  11. Boundary layer control by a fish: Unsteady laminar boundary layers of rainbow trout swimming in turbulent flows

    PubMed Central

    Saarenrinne, Pentti

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss [0.231±0.016 m total body length (L) (mean±s.d.); N=6], swimming at 1.6±0.09 L s−1 (N=6) in an experimental flow channel (Reynolds number, Re=4×105) with medium turbulence (5.6% intensity) were examined using the particle image velocimetry technique. The tangential flow velocity distributions in the pectoral and pelvic surface regions (arc length from the rostrum, lx=71±8 mm, N=3, and lx=110±13 mm, N=4, respectively) were approximated by a laminar boundary layer model, the Falkner−Skan equation. The flow regime over the pectoral and pelvic surfaces was regarded as a laminar flow, which could create less skin-friction drag than would be the case with turbulent flow. Flow separation was postponed until vortex shedding occurred over the posterior surface (lx=163±22 mm, N=3). The ratio of the body-wave velocity to the swimming speed was in the order of 1.2. This was consistent with the condition of the boundary layer laminarization that had been confirmed earlier using a mechanical model. These findings suggest an energy-efficient swimming strategy for rainbow trout in a turbulent environment. PMID:27815242

  12. Boundary layer control by a fish: Unsteady laminar boundary layers of rainbow trout swimming in turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Kazutaka; Saarenrinne, Pentti

    2016-12-15

    The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss [0.231±0.016 m total body length (L) (mean±s.d.); N=6], swimming at 1.6±0.09 L s -1 (N=6) in an experimental flow channel (Reynolds number, Re=4×10 5 ) with medium turbulence (5.6% intensity) were examined using the particle image velocimetry technique. The tangential flow velocity distributions in the pectoral and pelvic surface regions (arc length from the rostrum, l x =71±8 mm, N=3, and l x =110±13 mm, N=4, respectively) were approximated by a laminar boundary layer model, the Falkner-Skan equation. The flow regime over the pectoral and pelvic surfaces was regarded as a laminar flow, which could create less skin-friction drag than would be the case with turbulent flow. Flow separation was postponed until vortex shedding occurred over the posterior surface (l x =163±22 mm, N=3). The ratio of the body-wave velocity to the swimming speed was in the order of 1.2. This was consistent with the condition of the boundary layer laminarization that had been confirmed earlier using a mechanical model. These findings suggest an energy-efficient swimming strategy for rainbow trout in a turbulent environment. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of the Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Electrical Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Sergey V.; Galichenko, Sergey V.; Aphinogenov, Konstantin V.; Prokhorchuk, Aleksandr A.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the chaotic motion of charged particles carried by turbulent eddies, electrical quantities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) have short-term variability superimposed on long-term variability caused by sources from regional to global scales. In this study the influence of radon exhalation rate, aerosol distribution and turbulent transport efficiency on the variability of fair-weather atmospheric electricity is investigated via Lagrangian stochastic modelling. For the mid-latitude lower atmosphere undisturbed by precipitation, electrified clouds, or thunderstorms, the model is capable of reproducing the diurnal variation in atmospheric electrical parameters detected by ground-based measurements. Based on the analysis of field observations and numerical simulation it is found that the development of the convective boundary layer, accompanied by an increase in turbulent kinetic energy, forms the vertical distribution of radon and its decaying short-lived daughters to be approximately coincident with the barometric law for several eddy turnover times. In the daytime ABL the vertical distribution of atmospheric electrical conductivity tends to be uniform except within the surface layer, due to convective mixing of radon and its radioactive decay products. At the same time, a decrease in the conductivity near the ground is usually observed. This effect leads to an enhanced ground-level atmospheric electric field compared to that normally observed in the nocturnal stably-stratified boundary layer. The simulation showed that the variability of atmospheric electric field in the ABL associated with internal origins is significant in comparison to the variability related to changes in global parameters. It is suggested that vertical profiles of electrical quantities can serve as informative parameters on ABL turbulent dynamics and can even more broadly characterize the state of the environment.

  14. Three-dimensional boundary layer calculation by a characteristic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houdeville, R.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the three-dimensional boundary layer equations for bodies of arbitrary shape is presented. In laminar flows, the application domain extends from incompressible to hypersonic flows with the assumption of chemical equilibrium. For turbulent boundary layers, the application domain is limited by the validity of the mixing length model used. In order to respect the hyperbolic nature of the equations reduced to first order partial derivative terms, the momentum equations are discretized along the local streamlines using of the osculator tangent plane at each node of the body fitted coordinate system. With this original approach, it is possible to overcome the use of the generalized coordinates, and therefore, it is not necessary to impose an extra hypothesis about the regularity of the mesh in which the boundary conditions are given. By doing so, it is possible to limit, and sometimes to suppress, the pre-treatment of the data coming from an inviscid calculation. Although the proposed scheme is only semi-implicit, the method remains numerically very efficient.

  15. Vertical ozone characteristics in urban boundary layer in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Xu, Honghui; Meng, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Jing; Liu, Quan; Wang, Yuesi

    2013-07-01

    Vertical ozone and meteorological parameters were measured by tethered balloon in the boundary layer in the summer of 2009 in Beijing, China. A total of 77 tethersonde soundings were taken during the 27-day campaign. The surface ozone concentrations measured by ozonesondes and TEI 49C showed good agreement, albeit with temporal difference between the two instruments. Two case studies of nocturnal secondary ozone maxima are discussed in detail. The development of the low-level jet played a critical role leading to the observed ozone peak concentrations in nocturnal boundary layer (NBL). The maximum of surface ozone was 161.7 ppbv during the campaign, which could be attributed to abundant precursors storage near surface layer at nighttime. Vertical distribution of ozone was also measured utilizing conventional continuous analyzers on 325-m meteorological observation tower. The results showed the NBL height was between 47 and 280 m, which were consistent with the balloon data. Southerly air flow could bring ozone-rich air to Beijing, and the ozone concentrations exceeded the China's hourly ozone standard (approximately 100 ppb) above 600 m for more than 12 h.

  16. Tollmien-Schlichting/vortex interactions in compressible boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackaby, Nicholas D.

    1993-01-01

    The weakly nonlinear interaction of oblique Tollmien-Schlichting waves and longitudinal vortices in compressible, high Reynolds number, boundary-layer flow over a flat plate is considered for all ranges of the Mach number. The interaction equations comprise of equations for the vortex which is indirectly forced by the waves via a boundary condition, whereas a vortex term appears in the amplitude equation for the wave pressure. The downstream solution properties of interaction equations are found to depend on the sign of an interaction coefficient. Compressibility is found to have a significant effect on the interaction properties; principally through its impact on the waves and their governing mechanism, the triple-deck structure. It is found that, in general, the flow quantities will grow slowly with increasing downstream co-ordinate; i.e. in general, solutions do not terminate in abrupt, finite-distance 'break-ups'.

  17. Nonlinear spatial evolution of inviscid instabilities on hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.

    1996-01-01

    The spatial development of an initially linear vorticity-mode instability on a compressible flat-plate boundary layer is considered. The analysis is done in the framework of the hypersonic limit where the free-stream Mach number M approaches infinity. Nonlinearity is shown to become important locally, in a thin critical layer, when sigma, the deviation of the phase speed from unity, becomes o(M(exp -8/7)) and the magnitude of the pressure fluctuations becomes 0(sigma(exp 5/2)M(exp 2)). The unsteady flow outside the critical layer takes the form of a linear instability wave but with its amplitude completely determined by the nonlinear flow within the critical layer. The coupled set of equations which govern the critical-layer dynamics reflect a balance between spatial-evolution, (linear and nonlinear) convection and nonlinear vorticity-generation terms. The numerical solution to these equations shows that nonlinear effects produce a dramatic reduction in the instability-wave amplitude.

  18. Analysis of turbulent free-convection boundary layer on flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Jackson, Thomas W

    1950-01-01

    A calculation was made for the flow and heat transfer in the turbulent free-convection boundary layer on a vertical flat plate. Formulas for the heat-transfer coefficient, boundary layer thickness, and the maximum velocity in the boundary layer were obtained.

  19. Numerical Investigation of a Heated, Sheared Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Yu-Chieng

    1996-01-01

    A planetary boundary layer (PBL) developed on 11 July, 1987 during the First International Satellites Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) is investigated numerically by a two dimensional and a three dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) model. Most of the simulated mean and statistical properties are utilized to compare or verify against the observational results extracted from single Doppler lidar scans conducted by Gal-Chen et al. (1992) on the same day. Through the methods of field measurements and numerical simulations, it is found that this PBL, in contrast to the well-known convective boundary layer (CBL), is driven by not only buoyancy but also wind shear. Large eddies produced by the surface heating, as well as internal gravity waves excited by the convection, are both present in the boundary layer. The most unique feature is that in the stable layer, the momentum flux ({overlinerm u^' w^'}), transported by the gravity waves, is counter-gradient. The occurrence of this phenomenon is interpreted by Gal-Chen et al. (1992) using the theory of critical layer singularity, and is confirmed by the numerical simulations in this study. Qualitative agreements are achieved between the model-generated and lidar-derived results. However, quantitative comparisons are less satisfactory. The most serious discrepancy is that in the stable layer the magnitudes of the observed momentum flux ({overlinerm u^ ' w^'}) and vertical velocity variance ({overlinerm w^'^2}) are much larger than their simulated counterparts. Nevertheless, through the technique of numerical simulation, evidence is collected to show inconsistencies among the observations. Thus, the lidar measurements of {overline rm u^' w^'} and {overlinerm w^ '^2} seem to be doubtful. A Four Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA) experiment is performed in order to connect the evolution of the model integration with the observations. The results indicate that the dynamical relaxation

  20. Interaction of a Boundary Layer with a Turbulent Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this grant was to study the transition mechanisms on a flat-plate boundary layer interacting with the wake of a bluff body. This is a simplified configuration presented and designed to exemplify the phenomena that occur in multi-element airfoils, in which the wake of an upstream element impinges on a downstream one. Some experimental data is available for this configuration at various Reynolds numbers. The first task carried out was the implementation and validation of the immersed-boundary method. This was achieved by performing calculations of the flow over a cylinder at low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The low-Reynolds number results are discussed, which is enclosed as Appendix A. The high-Reynolds number results are presented in a paper in preparation for the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. We performed calculations of the wake-boundary-layer interaction at two Reynolds numbers, Re approximately equal to 385 and 1155. The first case is discussed and a comparison of the two calculations is reported. The simulations indicate that at the lower Reynolds number the boundary layer is buffeted by the unsteady Karman vortex street shed by the cylinder. This is shown: long streaky structures appear in the boundary layer in correspondence of the three-dimensionalities in the rollers. The fluctuations, however, cannot be self-sustained due to the low Reynolds-number, and the flow does not reach a turbulent state within the computational domain. In contrast, in the higher Reynolds-number case, boundary-layer fluctuations persist after the wake has decayed (due, in part, to the higher values of the local Reynolds number Re achieved in this case); some evidence could be observed that a self-sustaining turbulence generation cycle was beginning to be established. A third simulation was subsequently carried out at a higher Reynolds number, Re=3900. This calculation gave results similar to those of the Re=l155 case. Turbulence was established at fairly low

  1. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height over Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Investigating boundary layer climatology in arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzooqi, Mohamed Al; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Armstrong, Peter; Molini, Annalisa

    2014-05-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature in the boundary layer over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main features however, desert ABLs present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as the transport of dust and pollutants, and turbulent fluxes of momentum, heat and water vapor in hyper-arid regions. In this study, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4oN, 54.6o E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013. We compare different methods for the estimation of the ABL height from Ceilometer data such as, classic variance-, gradient-, log gradient- and second derivation-methods as well as recently developed techniques such as the Bayesian Method and Wavelet covariance transform. Our goal is to select the most suited technique for describing the climatology of the ABL in desert environments. Comparison of our results with radiosonde observations collected at the nearby airport of Abu Dhabi indicate that the WCT and the Bayesian method are the most suitable tools to accurately identify the ABL height in all weather conditions. These two methods are used for the definition of diurnal and seasonal climatologies of the boundary layer conditional to different atmospheric stability classes.

  2. Boundary layer polarization and voltage in the 14 MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, R.; Yamauchi, M.; Woch, J.; Marklund, G.

    1995-05-01

    Viking midlatitude observations of ions and electrons in the postnoon auroral region show that field-aligned acceleration of electrons and ions with energies up to a few kiloelectron volts takes place. The characteristics of the upgoing ion beams and the local transverse electric field observed by Viking indicate that parallel ion acceleration is primarily due to a quasi-electrostatic field-aligned acceleration process below Viking altitudes, i.e., below 10,000-13,500 km. A good correlation is found between the maximum upgoing ion beam energy and the depth of the local potential well determined by the Viking electric field experiment within dayside 'ion inverted Vs.' The total transverse potential throughout the entire region near the ion inverted Vs. is generally much higher than the field-aligned potential and may reach well above 10 kV. However, the detailed mapping of the transverse potential out to the boundary layer, a fundamental issue which remains controversial, was not attempted here. An important finding in this study is the strong correlation between the maximum up going ion beam energy of dayside ion inverted Vs and the solar wind velocity. This suggests a direct coupling of the solar wind plasma dynamo/voltage generator to the region of field-aligned particle acceleration. The fact that the center of dayside ion inverted Vs coincide with convection reversals/flow stagnation and upward Birkeland currents on what appears to be closed field lines (Woch et al., 1993), suggests that field-aligned potential structures connect to the inner part of an MHD dyanmo in the low-latitude boundary layer. Thus the Viking observations substantiate the idea of a solar wind induced boundary layer polarization where negatively charged perturbations in the postnoon sector persistently develops along the magnetic field lines, establishing accelerating potential drops along the geomagnetic field lines in the 0.5-10 kV range.

  3. Infrared Imaging of Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J., Jr.; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Anderson, Brian; Campbell, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    The Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurement (HYTHIRM) project is presently focused on near term support to the Shuttle program through the development of an infrared imaging capability of sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to augment existing on-board Orbiter instrumentation. Significant progress has been made with the identification and inventory of relevant existing optical imaging assets and the development, maturation, and validation of simulation and modeling tools for assessment and mission planning purposes, which were intended to lead to the best strategies and assets for successful acquisition of quantitative global surface temperature data on the Shuttle during entry. However, there are longer-term goals of providing global infrared imaging support to other flight projects as well. A status of HYTHIRM from the perspective of how two NASA-sponsored boundary layer transition flight experiments could benefit by infrared measurements is provided. Those two flight projects are the Hypersonic Boundary layer Transition (HyBoLT) flight experiment and the Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE), which are both intended for reducing uncertainties associated with the extrapolation of wind tunnel derived transition correlations for flight application. Thus, the criticality of obtaining high quality flight data along with the impact it would provide to the Shuttle program damage assessment process are discussed. Two recent wind tunnel efforts that were intended as risk mitigation in terms of quantifying the transition process and resulting turbulent wedge locations are briefly reviewed. Progress is being made towards finalizing an imaging strategy in support of the Shuttle BLT FE, however there are no plans currently to image HyBoLT.

  4. Planetary Boundary Layer Dynamics over Reno, Nevada in Summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liming, A.; Sumlin, B.; Loria Salazar, S. M.; Holmes, H.; Arnott, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is important to understand the transport behavior, mixing, and surface concentrations of air pollutants. In Reno, NV, located in complex, mountainous terrain with high desert climate, the daytime boundary layer can rise to an estimated 3km or more on a summer day due to surface heating and convection. The nocturnal boundary layer, conversely, tends to be much lower and highly stable due to radiative cooling from the surface at night and downslope flow of cool air from nearby mountains. With limited availability of radiosonde data, current estimates of the PBL height at any given time or location are potentially over or underestimated. To better quantify the height and characterize the PBL physics, we developed portable, lightweight sensors that measure CO2 concentrations, temperature, pressure, and humidity every 5 seconds. Four of these sensors are used on a tethered balloon system to monitor CO2 concentrations from the surface up to 300m. We will combine this data with Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) data that measures vertical profiles of wind speed, temperature, and humidity from 40m to 400m. This experiment will characterize the diurnal evolution of CO2 concentrations at multiple heights in the PBL, provide insight into PBL physics during stability transition periods at sunrise and sunset, and estimate the nighttime PBL depth during August in Reno. Further, we expect to gain a better understanding of the impact of mixing volume changes (i.e., PBL height) on air quality and pollution concentrations in Reno. The custom portable sensor design will also be presented. It is expected that these instruments can be used for indoor or outdoor air quality studies, where lightness, small size, and battery operation can be of benefit.

  5. Secondary flows in turbulent boundary layers over longitudinal surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyeon Gyu; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2018-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent boundary layers over longitudinal surface roughness are performed to investigate the impact of the surface roughness on the mean flow characteristics related to counter-rotating large-scale secondary flows. By systematically changing the two parameters of the pitch (P) and width (S) for roughness elements in the ranges of 0.57 ≤P /δ ≤2.39 and 0.15 ≤S /δ ≤1.12 , where δ is the boundary layer thickness, we find that the size of the secondary flow in each case is mostly determined by the value of P - S, i.e., the valley width, over the ridge-type roughness. However, the strength of the secondary flows on the cross-stream plane relative to the flow is increased when the value of P increases or when the value of S decreases. In addition to the secondary flows, additional tertiary and quaternary flows are observed both above the roughness crest and in the valley as the values of P and S increase further. Based on an analysis using the turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, it is shown that the secondary flow over the ridge-type roughness is both driven and sustained by the anisotropy of turbulence, consistent with previous observations of a turbulent boundary layer over strip-type roughness [Anderson et al., J. Fluid Mech. 768, 316 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.91]. Careful inspection of the turbulent kinetic energy budget reveals that the opposite rotational sense of the secondary flow between the ridge- and strip-type roughness elements is primarily attributed to the local imbalance of energy budget created by the strong turbulent transport term over the ridge-type roughness. The active transport of the kinetic energy over the ridge-type roughness is closely associated with the upward deflection of spanwise motions in the valley, mostly due to the roughness edge.

  6. Shock Train/Boundary-Layer Interaction in Rectangular Scramjet Isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Jonathan Simon

    Numerous studies of the dual-mode scramjet isolator, a critical component in preventing inlet unstart and/or vehicle loss by containing a collection of flow disturbances called a shock train, have been performed since the dual-mode propulsion cycle was introduced in the 1960s. Low momentum corner flow and other three-dimensional effects inherent to rectangular isolators have, however, been largely ignored in experimental studies of the boundary layer separation driven isolator shock train dynamics. Furthermore, the use of two dimensional diagnostic techniques in past works, be it single-perspective line-of-sight schlieren/shadowgraphy or single axis wall pressure measurements, have been unable to resolve the three-dimensional flow features inside the rectangular isolator. These flow characteristics need to be thoroughly understood if robust dual-mode scramjet designs are to be fielded. The work presented in this thesis is focused on experimentally analyzing shock train/boundary layer interactions from multiple perspectives in aspect ratio 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 rectangular isolators with inflow Mach numbers ranging from 2.4 to 2.7. Secondary steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics studies are performed to compare to the experimental results and to provide additional perspectives of the flow field. Specific issues that remain unresolved after decades of isolator shock train studies that are addressed in this work include the three-dimensional formation of the isolator shock train front, the spatial and temporal low momentum corner flow separation scales, the transient behavior of shock train/boundary layer interaction at specific coordinates along the isolator's lateral axis, and effects of the rectangular geometry on semi-empirical relations for shock train length prediction. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  7. Discussion of boundary-layer characteristics near the casing of an axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Artur; Mahoney, John J; Budinger, Ray E

    1951-01-01

    Boundary-layer velocity profiles on the casing of an axial-flow compressor behind the guide vanes and rotor were measured and resolved into two components: along the streamline of the flow and perpendicular to it. Boundary-layer thickness and the deflection of the boundary layer at the wall were the generalizing parameters. By use of these results and the momentum-integral equations, the characteristics of boundary on the walls of axial-flow compressor are qualitatively discussed. Important parameters concerning secondary flow in the boundary layer appear to be turning of the flow and the product of boundary-layer thickness and streamline curvature outside the boundary layer. Two types of separation are shown to be possible in three dimensional boundary layer.

  8. Orbiter Entry Aeroheating Working Group Viscous CFD Boundary Layer Transition Trailblazer Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Erickson, David W.; Greene, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Boundary layer transition correlations for the Shuttle Orbiter have been previously developed utilizing a two-layer boundary layer prediction technique. The particular two-layer technique that was used is limited to Mach numbers less than 20. To allow assessments at Mach numbers greater than 20, it is proposed to use viscous CFD to the predict boundary layer properties. This report addresses if the existing Orbiter entry aeroheating viscous CFD solutions, which were originally intended to be used for heat transfer rate predictions, adequately resolve boundary layer edge properties and if the existing two-layer results could be leveraged to reduce the number of needed CFD solutions. The boundary layer edge parameters from viscous CFD solutions are extracted along the wind side centerline of the Space Shuttle Orbiter at reentry conditions, and are compared with results from the two-layer boundary layer prediction technique. The differences between the viscous CFD and two-layer prediction techniques vary between Mach 6 and 18 flight conditions and Mach 6 wind tunnel conditions, and there is not a straightforward scaling between the viscous CFD and two-layer values. Therefore: it is not possible to leverage the existing two-layer Orbiter flight boundary layer data set as a substitute for a viscous CFD data set; but viscous CFD solutions at the current grid resolution are sufficient to produce a boundary layer data set suitable for applying edge-based boundary layer transition correlations.

  9. Supersonic and hypersonic shock/boundary-layer interaction database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, Gary S.; Dodson, Lori J.

    1994-01-01

    An assessment is given of existing shock wave/tubulent boundary-layer interaction experiments having sufficient quality to guide turbulence modeling and code validation efforts. Although the focus of this work is hypersonic, experiments at Mach numbers as low as 3 were considered. The principal means of identifying candidate studies was a computerized search of the AIAA Aerospace Database. Several hundred candidate studies were examined and over 100 of these were subjected to a rigorous set of acceptance criteria for inclusion in the data-base. Nineteen experiments were found to meet these criteria, of which only seven were in the hypersonic regime (M is greater than 5).

  10. Numerical Simulation of Transition in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    sile domes. AGARD Report CP 493. Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development. 273 Horvath, T. 2002 Boundary layer transition on slender...reference skin-friction coefficient cp , cv Specific heats at constant pressure and volume, respectively cph Phase speed in propagation direction e...y)) 73 and two-dimensional (W = 0): u = U (y) + u′ , (4.9a) v = v′ , (4.9b) w = w′ , (4.9c) p = 1 + p′ , (4.9d) T = T (y) + T ′ , (4.9e) ρ = 1 T (y

  11. Boundary-layer effects on cold fronts at a coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1986-07-01

    The present note discusses one physical mechanism which may contribute to cold air channelling, manifest as a frontal bulge on a surface-analysis chart, in the coastal region of Victoria in southeast Australia. This involves the modification of boundary-layer air in both offshore (prefrontal) and onshore (postfrontal) flow, and the effect on cross-frontal thermal contrast. The problem is discussed in terms of a north-south-oriented cold front behaving as an atmospheric gravity current, propagating along an east-west-oriented coastline, in the presence of a prefrontal offshore stream.

  12. Turbulent Boundary Layer Drag Reduction by Spanwise Wall Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, S. M.; Bogard, D. G.; Ball, K. S.

    1997-11-01

    Changes in turbulence structure were investigated in a turbulent water boundary layer flow for which wall shear had been reduced 25 percent by spanwise wall oscillations. LDV and hot film measurements were made of streamwise and wall-normal velocities. For all wall oscillations examined, drag reduction was found to scale best with the peak velocity of the wall oscillation. Burst and sweep strength and duration were all reduced by the wall oscillation, with the greatest effects seen for the strongest events. The pdf of the velocity in the near-wall region showed greatly increased periods of low velocities, but little change was observed in the streamwise velocity autocorrelation.

  13. Investigation of Separation of the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubauer, G B; Klebanoff, P S

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a turbulent boundary layer near a smooth surface with pressure gradients sufficient to cause flow separation. The reynolds number was high, but the speeds were entirely within the incompressible flow range. The investigation consisted of measurements of mean flow, three components of turbulence intensity, turbulent shearing stress, and correlations between two fluctuation components at a point and between the same component of different points. The results are given in the form of tables and graphs. The discussion deals first with separation and then with the more fundamental question of basic concepts of turbulent flow.

  14. Supersonic turbulent boundary layers with periodic mechanical non-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekoto, Isaac Wesley

    Previous studies have shown that favorable pressure gradients reduce the turbulence levels and length scales in supersonic flow. Wall roughness has been shown to reduce the large-scales in wall bounded flow. Based on these previous observations new questions have been raised. The fundamental questions this dissertation addressed are: (1) What are the effects of wall topology with sharp versus blunt leading edges? and (2) Is it possible that a further reduction of turbulent scales can occur if surface roughness and favorable pressure gradients are combined? To answer these questions and to enhance the current experimental database, an experimental analysis was performed to provide high fidelity documentation of the mean and turbulent flow properties along with surface and flow visualizations of a high-speed (M = 2.86), high Reynolds number (Retheta ≈ 60,000) supersonic turbulent boundary layer distorted by curvature-induced favorable pressure gradients and large-scale ( k+s ≈ 300) uniform surface roughness. Nine models were tested at three separate locations. Three pressure gradient models strengths (a nominally zero, a weak, and a strong favorable pressure gradient) and three roughness topologies (aerodynamically smooth, square, and diamond shaped roughness elements) were used. Highly resolved planar measurements of mean and fluctuating velocity components were accomplished using particle image velocimetry. Stagnation pressure profiles were acquired with a traversing Pitot probe. Surface pressure distributions were characterized using pressure sensitive paint. Finally flow visualization was accomplished using schlieren photographs. Roughness topology had a significant effect on the boundary layer mean and turbulent properties due to shock boundary layer interactions. Favorable pressure gradients had the expected stabilizing effect on turbulent properties, but the improvements were less significant for models with surface roughness near the wall due to increased

  15. Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer in Transitional Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ting

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of elevated free-stream turbulence and streamwise acceleration on flow and thermal structures in transitional boundary layers. The free-stream turbulence ranges from 0.5 to 6.4% and the streamwise acceleration ranges from K = 0 to 0.8 x 10(exp -6). The onset of transition, transition length and the turbulent spot formation rate are determined. The statistical results and conditionally sampled results of th streamwise and cross-stream velocity fluctuations, temperature fluctuations, Reynolds stress and Reynolds heat fluxes are presented.

  16. Proceedings of the Coastal Benthic Boundary Layer Key West Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-24

    depth are controlled by climatic changes which affect sea level and result in vastly different sedimentary regimes. After several hours of discussion...benthic boundary layer. EOS 75: 201- 206. Tom S.J. and Richardson M.D. (1996) The Key West campaign. Sea Technology 36:17-25. 6 Mi : VA1 I I AI T0. 03 a -1Z...reflectors appear to be unconformable surfaces based on the presence of karst, and probably represent erosion and cementation during sea -level lowstands

  17. Some theoretical aspects of boundary layer stability theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip

    1990-01-01

    Increased understanding in recent years of boundary layer transition has been made possible by the development of strongly nonlinear stability theories. After some twenty or so years when nonlinear stability theory was restricted to the application of the Stuart-Watson method (or less formal amplitude expansion procedures), there now exist strongly nonlinear theories which can describe processes which have an 0(1) effect on the basic state. These strongly nonlinear theories and their possible role in pushing theoretical understanding of transition ever further into the nonlinear regime are discussed.

  18. Fluid-membrane tethers: minimal surfaces and elastic boundary layers.

    PubMed

    Powers, Thomas R; Huber, Greg; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2002-04-01

    Thin cylindrical tethers are common lipid bilayer membrane structures, arising in situations ranging from micromanipulation experiments on artificial vesicles to the dynamic structure of the Golgi apparatus. We study the shape and formation of a tether in terms of the classical soap-film problem, which is applied to the case of a membrane disk under tension subject to a point force. A tether forms from the elastic boundary layer near the point of application of the force, for sufficiently large displacement. Analytic results for various aspects of the membrane shape are given.

  19. Thermal boundary layer due to sudden heating of fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkal, K.R.; Munukutla, S.

    This paper proposes to solve computationally the heat-transfer problems (introduced by Munukutla and Venkataraman, 1988) related to a closed-cycle pulsed high-power laser flow loop. The continuity and the momentum equations as well as the unsteady energy equation are solved using the Keller-Box method. The solutions were compared with the steady-state solutions at large times, and the comparison was found to be excellent. Empirical formulas are proposed for calculating the time-dependent boundary-layer thickness and mass-heat transfer, that can be used by laser flow loop designers. 6 refs.

  20. Thermal boundary layer due to sudden heating of fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkal, K. R.; Munukutla, S.

    1989-10-01

    This paper proposes to solve computationally the heat-transfer problems (introduced by Munukutla and Venkataraman, 1988) related to a closed-cycle pulsed high-power laser flow loop. The continuity and the momentum equations as well as the unsteady energy equation are solved using the Keller-Box method. The solutions were compared with the steady-state solutions at large times, and the comparison was found to be excellent. Empirical formulas are proposed for calculating the time-dependent boundary-layer thickness and mass-heat transfer, that can be used by laser flow loop designers.

  1. Numerical Solutions for Laminar Boundary Layer Behind Blast Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of thle Report) Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 17 . DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract entered in Block 20...Reference I ............. 41 5. Boundary-Layer Functions for Case A, B, C, and D ......... 98 3 NOMENCLATURE A constant, Eqs. (10) and ( 17 ) B...the constant A was chosen as follows to simplify the coefficients of f and g1 A = 2mF CZ(a+i) OPO/pCO ( The ( 17 ) The explicit dependence of the flow

  2. Elastic modelling in tilted transversely isotropic media with convolutional perfectly matched layer boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Byeongho; Seol, Soon Jee; Byun, Joongmoo

    2012-04-01

    To simulate wave propagation in a tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) medium with a tilting symmetry-axis of anisotropy, we develop a 2D elastic forward modelling algorithm. In this algorithm, we use the staggered-grid finite-difference method which has fourth-order accuracy in space and second-order accuracy in time. Since velocity-stress formulations are defined for staggered grids, we include auxiliary grid points in the z-direction to meet the free surface boundary conditions for shear stress. Through comparisons of displacements obtained from our algorithm, not only with analytical solutions but also with finite element solutions, we are able to validate that the free surface conditions operate appropriately and elastic waves propagate correctly. In order to handle the artificial boundary reflections efficiently, we also implement convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundaries in our algorithm. The CPML sufficiently attenuates energy at the grazing incidence by modifying the damping profile of the PML boundary. Numerical experiments indicate that the algorithm accurately expresses elastic wave propagation in the TTI medium. At the free surface, the numerical results show good agreement with analytical solutions not only for body waves but also for the Rayleigh wave which has strong amplitude along the surface. In addition, we demonstrate the efficiency of CPML for a homogeneous TI medium and a dipping layered model. Only using 10 grid points to the CPML regions, the artificial reflections are successfully suppressed and the energy of the boundary reflection back into the effective modelling area is significantly decayed.

  3. Wake characteristics of buildings in disturbed boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Chang, J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements relevant to the effect of buildings on the low level atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Field measurements of velocity and turbulence in the wake of a block building 3.2 m high and 26.8 m long are presented which show an apparent increase in momentum flow above the upwind value. Velocity-deficit and turbulence-excess decay characteristics of the disturbed or nonequilibrium layer are correlated with power law exponents and apparent roughness length at various distances downstream of the disturbance. Model wake profiles from the simulated building are compared at various stations for equilibrium and nonequilibrium upstream profiles. Empirical correlations relating building wake profiles to upstream nonequilibrium parameters are presented. The relationship of the data to the smooth-rough transition is discussed, and a flow model is presented.

  4. Bayesian characterization of micro-perforated panels and multi-layer absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Andrew Alexander Joseph

    First described by the late acoustician Dah-You Maa, micro-perforated panel (MPP) absorbers produce extremely high acoustic absorption coefficients. This is done without the use of conventional fibrous or porous materials that are often used in acoustic treatments, meaning MPP absorbers are capable of being implemented and withstanding critical situations where traditional absorbers do not suffice. The absorption function of a micro-perforated panel yields high yet relatively narrow results at certain frequencies, although wide-band absorption can be designed by stacking multiple MPP absorbers comprised of different characteristic parameters. Using Bayesian analysis, the physical properties of panel thickness, pore diameter, perforation ratio, and air depth are estimated inversely from experimental data of acoustic absorption, based on theoretical models for design of micro-perforated panels. Furthermore, this analysis helps to understand the interdependence and uncertainties of the parameters and how each affects the performance of the panel. Various micro-perforated panels are manufactured and tested in single- and double-layer absorber constructions.

  5. Estimation of evaporation from equilibrium diurnal boundary layer humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, G.; Rigden, A. J.; Li, D.; Gentine, P.

    2017-12-01

    Simplified conceptual models of the convective boundary layer as a well mixed profile of potential temperature (theta) and specific humidity (q) impinging on an initially stably stratified linear potential temperature profile have a long history in atmospheric sciences. These one dimensional representations of complex mixing are useful for gaining insights into land-atmosphere interactions and for prediction when state of the art LES approaches are infeasible. As previously shown (e.g. Betts), if one neglects the role of q in bouyancy, the framework yields a unique relation between mixed layer Theta, mixed layer height (h), and cumulative sensible heat flux (SH) throughout the day. Similarly assuming an initially q profile yields a simple relation between q, h, and cumulative latent heat flux (LH). The diurnal dynamics of theta and q are strongly dependent on SH and the initial lapse rates of theta (gamma_thet) and q (gamma q). In the estimation method proposed here, we further constrain these relations with two more assumptions: 1) The specific humidity is the same at the start of the period of boundary layer growth and at the collapse; and 2) Once the mixed layer reaches the LCL, further drying occurs proportionally to the deardorff convective velocity scale (omega) multiplied by q. Assumption (1) is based on the idea that below the cloud layer, there are no sinks of moisture within the mixed layer (neglecting lateral humidity divergence). Thus the net mixing of dry air aloft with evaporation from the surface must balance. Inclusion of the simple model of moisture loss above the LCL into the bulk-CBL model allows definition of an equilibrium humidity (q) condition at which the diurnal cycle of q repeats (i.e. additions of q from surface balance entrainment of dry air from above). Surprisingly, this framework allows estimation of LH from q, theta, and estimated net radiation by solving for the value of Evaporative Fraction (EF) for which the diurnal cycle of q

  6. Wake Dynamics in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.

    The goal of this research is to advance our understanding of atmospheric boundary layer processes over heterogeneous landscapes and complex terrain. The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is a relatively thin (˜ 1 km) turbulent layer of air near the earth's surface, in which most human activities and engineered systems are concentrated. Its dynamics are crucially important for biosphere-atmosphere couplings and for global atmospheric dynamics, with significant implications on our ability to predict and mitigate adverse impacts of land use and climate change. In models of the ABL, land surface heterogeneity is typically represented, in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, as changes in aerodynamic roughness length and surface heat and moisture fluxes. However, many real landscapes are more complex, often leading to massive boundary layer separation and wake turbulence, for which standard models fail. Trees, building clusters, and steep topography produce extensive wake regions currently not accounted for in models of the ABL. Wind turbines and wind farms also generate wakes that combine in complex ways to modify the ABL. Wind farms are covering an increasingly significant area of the globe and the effects of large wind farms must be included in regional and global scale models. Research presented in this thesis demonstrates that wakes caused by landscape heterogeneity must be included in flux parameterizations for momentum, heat, and mass (water vapor and trace gases, e.g. CO2 and CH4) in ABL simulation and prediction models in order to accurately represent land-atmosphere interactions. Accurate representation of these processes is crucial for the predictions of weather, air quality, lake processes, and ecosystems response to climate change. Objectives of the research reported in this thesis are: 1) to investigate turbulent boundary layer adjustment, turbulent transport and scalar flux in wind farms of varying configurations and develop an improved

  7. Improving impact resistance of ceramic materials by energy absorbing surface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, H. P.; Seretsky, J.

    1974-01-01

    Energy absorbing surface layers were used to improve the impact resistance of silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics. Low elastic modulus materials were used. In some cases, the low elastic modulus was achieved using materials that form localized microcracks as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy, thermal expansion differences between phases, or phase transformations. In other cases, semi-vitreous or vitreous materials were used. Substantial improvements in impact resistance were observed at room and elevated temperatures.

  8. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the index of refraction on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux in semitransparent materials, such as some ceramics, is investigated analytically. In the case considered here, a plane layer of a ceramic material is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces; the material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. It is shown that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained in a simple manner from the results for an index of refraction of unity.

  9. Surface boundary layer turbulence in the Southern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrifield, Sophia; St. Laurent, Louis; Owens, Breck; Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Due to the remote location and harsh conditions, few direct measurements of turbulence have been collected in the Southern Ocean. This region experiences some of the strongest wind forcing of the global ocean, leading to large inertial energy input. While mixed layers are known to have a strong seasonality and reach 500m depth, the depth structure of near-surface turbulent dissipation and diffusivity have not been examined using direct measurements. We present data collected during the Diapycnal and Isopycnal Mixing Experiment in the Southern Ocean (DIMES) field program. In a range of wind conditions, the wave affected surface layer (WASL), where surface wave physics are actively forcing turbulence, is contained to the upper 15-20m. The lag-correlation between wind stress and turbulence shows a strong relationship up to 6 hours (˜1/2 inertial period), with the winds leading the oceanic turbulent response, in the depth range between 20-50m. We find the following characterize the data: i) Profiles that have a well-defined hydrographic mixed layer show that dissipation decays in the mixed layer inversely with depth, ii) WASLs are typically 15 meters deep and 30% of mixed layer depth, iii) Subject to strong winds, the value of dissipation as a function of depth is significantly lower than predicted by theory. Many dynamical processes are known to be missing from upper-ocean parameterizations of mixing in global models. These include surface-wave driven processes such as Langmuir turbulence, submesocale frontal processes, and nonlocal representations of mixing. Using velocity, hydrographic, and turbulence measurements, the existence of coherent structures in the boundary layer are investigated.

  10. Characterization and device performance of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanket, Gregory; Boyle, Jonathan H.; Shafarman, William N.

    The study of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers is of interest in that Ag-chalcopyrites exhibit both wider bandgaps and lower melting points than their Cu counterparts. (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers were deposited over the composition range 0 < Ag/(Ag+Cu) < 1 and 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) < 1.0 using a variety of elemental co-evaporation processes. Films were found to be singlephase over the entire composition range, in contrast to prior studies. Devices with Ga content 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) <0.5 tolerated Ag incorporation up to Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.5 without appreciable performance loss. Ag-containing films with Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 showed improved device characteristics over Cu-only controlmore » samples, in particular a 30-40% increase in short-circuit current. An absorber layer with composition Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.75 and Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 yielded a device with VOC = 890 mV, JSC = 20.5mA/cm2, fill factor = 71.3%, and η = 13.0%.« less

  11. Free-stream disturbance, continuous Eigenfunctions, boundary-layer instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    A rational foundation is presented for the application of the linear shear flows to transition prediction, and an explicit method is given for carrying out the necessary calculations. The expansions used are shown to be complete. Sample calculations show that a typical boundary layer is very sensitive to vorticity disturbances in the inner boundary layer, near the critical layer. Vorticity disturbances three or four boundary layer thicknesses above the boundary are nearly uncoupled from the boundary layer in that the amplitudes of the discrete Tollmien-Schlicting waves are an extremely small fraction of the amplitude of the disturbance.

  12. Modified Back Contact Interface of CZTSe Thin Film Solar Cells: Elimination of Double Layer Distribution in Absorber Layer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaojing; Yao, Liyong; Bi, Jinlian; Gao, Shoushuai; Gao, Qing; Jeng, Ming‐Jer; Sun, Guozhong; Zhou, Zhiqiang; He, Qing; Sun, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Double layer distribution exists in Cu2SnZnSe4 (CZTSe) thin films prepared by selenizing the metallic precursors, which will degrade the back contact of Mo substrate to absorber layer and thus suppressing the performance of solar cell. In this work, the double‐layer distribution of CZTSe film is eliminated entirely and the formation of MoSe2 interfacial layer is inhibited successfully. CZTSe film is prepared by selenizing the precursor deposited by electrodeposition method under Se and SnSex mixed atmosphere. It is found that the insufficient reaction between ZnSe and Cu‐Sn‐Se phases in the bottom of the film is the reason why the double layer distribution of CZTSe film is formed. By increasing Sn content in the metallic precursor, thus making up the loss of Sn because of the decomposition of CZTSe and facilitate the diffusion of liquid Cu2Se, the double layer distribution is eliminated entirely. The crystallization of the formed thin film is dense and the grains go through the entire film without voids. And there is no obvious MoSe2 layer formed between CZTSe and Mo. As a consequence, the series resistance of the solar cell reduces significantly to 0.14 Ω cm2 and a CZTSe solar cell with efficiency of 7.2% is fabricated. PMID:29610727

  13. Modified Back Contact Interface of CZTSe Thin Film Solar Cells: Elimination of Double Layer Distribution in Absorber Layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaojing; Yao, Liyong; Zhang, Yi; Ao, Jianping; Bi, Jinlian; Gao, Shoushuai; Gao, Qing; Jeng, Ming-Jer; Sun, Guozhong; Zhou, Zhiqiang; He, Qing; Sun, Yun

    2018-02-01

    Double layer distribution exists in Cu 2 SnZnSe 4 (CZTSe) thin films prepared by selenizing the metallic precursors, which will degrade the back contact of Mo substrate to absorber layer and thus suppressing the performance of solar cell. In this work, the double-layer distribution of CZTSe film is eliminated entirely and the formation of MoSe 2 interfacial layer is inhibited successfully. CZTSe film is prepared by selenizing the precursor deposited by electrodeposition method under Se and SnSe x mixed atmosphere. It is found that the insufficient reaction between ZnSe and Cu-Sn-Se phases in the bottom of the film is the reason why the double layer distribution of CZTSe film is formed. By increasing Sn content in the metallic precursor, thus making up the loss of Sn because of the decomposition of CZTSe and facilitate the diffusion of liquid Cu 2 Se, the double layer distribution is eliminated entirely. The crystallization of the formed thin film is dense and the grains go through the entire film without voids. And there is no obvious MoSe 2 layer formed between CZTSe and Mo. As a consequence, the series resistance of the solar cell reduces significantly to 0.14 Ω cm 2 and a CZTSe solar cell with efficiency of 7.2% is fabricated.

  14. Adaptive Grid Refinement for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooft, Antoon; van Heerwaarden, Chiel; Popinet, Stephane; van der linden, Steven; de Roode, Stephan; van de Wiel, Bas

    2017-04-01

    We validate and benchmark an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm for numerical simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The AMR technique aims to distribute the computational resources efficiently over a domain by refining and coarsening the numerical grid locally and in time. This can be beneficial for studying cases in which length scales vary significantly in time and space. We present the results for a case describing the growth and decay of a convective boundary layer. The AMR results are benchmarked against two runs using a fixed, fine meshed grid. First, with the same numerical formulation as the AMR-code and second, with a code dedicated to ABL studies. Compared to the fixed and isotropic grid runs, the AMR algorithm can coarsen and refine the grid such that accurate results are obtained whilst using only a fraction of the grid cells. Performance wise, the AMR run was cheaper than the fixed and isotropic grid run with similar numerical formulations. However, for this specific case, the dedicated code outperformed both aforementioned runs.

  15. Experimental Study of Unsteady Separation in a Laminar Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Andrew; Lang, Amy; Wahidi, Redha; Santos, Leo

    2016-11-01

    Separation, caused by an adverse pressure gradient, can be a major problem to aircraft. Reversing flow occurs in separated regions and an investigation of how this backflow forms is of interest due to the fact that this could be used as a means of initiating flow control. Specifically, backflow can bristle shark scales which may be linked to a passive, flow actuated separation control mechanism. An experiment was conducted in a water tunnel to replicate separation, with a focus on the reversing flow development near the wall within a laminar boundary layer. Using a rotating cylinder, an adverse pressure gradient was induced creating a separated region over a flat plate. In this experiment the boundary layer grows to sizes great enough that the scale of the flow is increased, making it more measurable to DPIV. In the future, this research can be utilized to better understand flow control mechanisms such as those enabled by shark skin. Funding from Army Research Office and NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  16. Reversing flow development in a separating turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Leonardo; Lang, Amy; Wahidi, Redha; Bonacci, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Fast swimming sharks have micro-structures on their skin consisting of bristling scales. These scales are hypothesized to bristle in response to backflow generated from the separated turbulent boundary layer (TBL) in regions of adverse pressure gradient (APG) on the shark body. Vortices are trapped in the cavities between the scales, which induce momentum exchange between the higher momentum fluid in the outer flow and that in the separated region. This momentum exchange causes reattachment of the separated TBL, causing the scales to return to the unbristled location, and the cycle continues. The rows of scales have widths that are comparable to the spanwise length scale of the intermittent backflow patches that appear in the region of incipient detachment of TBLs. In this experimental investigation, correlations between the shark scale's width and the spanwise size of the low backflow streaks are examined, as well as details of the incipient detachment region. The experiments are conducted in a water tunnel facility and the flow field is measured using PIV. Turbulent boundary layers are subjected to an APG via a rotating cylinder. Separated TBLs are investigated on a flat plate. The authors would like to greatfully acknowledge the Army Research Office for funding this project.

  17. Optimal Disturbances in Boundary Layers Subject to Streamwise Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Tumin, Anatoli

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the non-modal growth of perturbations in a boundary layer in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient is presented. The analysis is based on PSE equations for an incompressible fluid. Examples with Falkner- Skan profiles indicate that a favorable pressure gradient decreases the non-modal growth while an unfavorable pressure gradient leads to an increase of the amplification. It is suggested that the transient growth mechanism be utilized to choose optimal parameters of tripping elements on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. As an example, a boundary-layer flow with a streamwise pressure gradient corresponding to the pressure distribution over a LPT airfoil is considered. It is shown that there is an optimal spacing of the tripping elements and that the transient growth effect depends on the starting point. The amplification is found to be small at the LPT s very low Reynolds numbers, but there is a possibility to enhance the transient energy growth by means of wall cooling.

  18. Improvements to the George/Castillo Boundary Layer Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, Martin; George, William K.; Castillo, Luciano

    2000-11-01

    George and Castillo (1997)(George WK and Castillo L (1997) Appl.Mech.Rev.), 50, 12/1, 689-729. presented a new theory for Zero Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layers based on an application of Near-Asymptotics to scaling laws derived from equilibrium similarity to the Reynolds-averaged equations. The resulting overlap velocity profiles retained a dependence on local Reynolds number, the parameters for which had to satisfy the following constraint equation: ln \\varepsilon fracdγd ln δ^+ = fracdln [C_o/C_i] d ln δ^+ where γ is the power exponent, Co and Ci are the coefficients in inner and outer variables respectively. GC considered only the first term in an asymptotic expansion of the exact solution, but higher order terms can be considered with no increase in the number of unknowns. The improved theory is tested against new experimental Zero Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer data of Smith (1994), Oesterlund (1999) and Johansson and Castillo (2000). For the friction law, the first order term is sufficient, but for Co and γ the higher order terms improve the fit to the velocity profiles significantly.

  19. Stability and modal analysis of shock/boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Larsson, Johan; Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions is analyzed by mining a large-eddy simulation (LES) database for various strengths of the incoming shock. The flow dynamics is first analyzed by means of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), which highlights the simultaneous occurrence of two types of flow modes, namely a low-frequency type associated with breathing motion of the separation bubble, accompanied by flapping motion of the reflected shock, and a high-frequency type associated with the propagation of instability waves past the interaction zone. Global linear stability analysis performed on the mean LES flow fields yields a single unstable zero-frequency mode, plus a variety of marginally stable low-frequency modes whose stability margin decreases with the strength of the interaction. The least stable linear modes are grouped into two classes, one of which bears striking resemblance to the breathing mode recovered from DMD and another class associated with revolving motion within the separation bubble. The results of the modal and linear stability analysis support the notion that low-frequency dynamics is intrinsic to the interaction zone, but some continuous forcing from the upstream boundary layer may be required to keep the system near a limit cycle. This can be modeled as a weakly damped oscillator with forcing, as in the early empirical model by Plotkin (AIAA J 13:1036-1040, 1975).

  20. Numerical simulation of strong wake/boundary layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Piomelli, Ugo; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2003-11-01

    DNS and LES of the strong interaction between an unsteady cylinder wake and a flat-plate boundary layer are carried out. Of the two Reynolds numbers examined, in the lower Reynolds number case (Re=385 based on cylinder diameter) the boundary layer is buffeted by the vortices shed off the cylinder, but the Reynolds number is too low to trigger transition to turbulence. In contrast, in the higher Reyolds number case (Re=1155) we observe the inception of a self-sustained turbulence-generation mechanism triggered by the Karman vortex street behind the cylinder. In previously performed simulations the computational box was not long enough to extend into the turbulent region; therefore, we have lengthened the streamwise domain using a second computational box in order to capture the transition point. In addition to examining turbulence statistics, we look at the Reynolds stress budgets up to and through the transitional regime to obtain further insights into the physics of bypass transition via wake contamination.

  1. Swept Impinging Oblique Shock/Boundary-Layer Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Jesse; Threadgill, James; Stab, Ilona

    2016-11-01

    Oblique shock waves impinging on boundary layers are common flow features associated with high-speed flows around complex body geometries and through internal channel flows. The increasingly three-dimensional surface geometries of modern vehicles has led to a prevalence of complex shock/boundary-layer interactions. Sweep has been observed to vary the interaction structure, unsteadinesses, and similarity scalings. Sharp-fins and highly-swept ramps have been noted to induce a quasi-conical development of the interaction, in contrast to a quasi-cylindrical scaling observed in low-sweep interactions. However, swept impinging oblique shock cases have largely been overlooked, with evidence of only cylindrical similarities observed in hypersonic conditions. Flow deflection beyond the maximum turning angle has been proposed as the mechanism for conical interaction development but such behavior has not been established for the present configuration. This study examines the effect of sweep on the interaction induced by a 12.5° generator in Mach 2.3 flow using oil-flow, Schlieren and PIV. Results document the development of similarity scalings at various angles of sweep, and highlight the difficulty in replicating a quasi-infinite span conditions in a moderately sized wind tun Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-15-1-0430) and Raytheon Missile Systems.

  2. Aeromechanics Analysis of a Boundary Layer Ingesting Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Herrick, Gregory P.; Shabbir, Aamir; Florea, Razvan V.

    2013-01-01

    Boundary layer ingesting propulsion systems have the potential to significantly reduce fuel burn but these systems must overcome the challe nges related to aeromechanics-fan flutter stability and forced response dynamic stresses. High-fidelity computational analysis of the fan a eromechanics is integral to the ongoing effort to design a boundary layer ingesting inlet and fan for fabrication and wind-tunnel test. A t hree-dimensional, time-accurate, Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes computational fluid dynamics code is used to study aerothermodynamic and a eromechanical behavior of the fan in response to both clean and distorted inflows. The computational aeromechanics analyses performed in th is study show an intermediate design iteration of the fan to be flutter-free at the design conditions analyzed with both clean and distorte d in-flows. Dynamic stresses from forced response have been calculated for the design rotational speed. Additional work is ongoing to expan d the analyses to off-design conditions, and for on-resonance conditions.

  3. Boundary-Layer Control: In Memory of Bill Reynolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, John

    2004-11-01

    Professor Bill Reynolds (1933-2004) inspired many students and colleagues with his never-ending curiosity and thought-provoking ideas. Bill's relentless energy, together with his hallmark can-do character and do-it-yourself attitude, led to many seminal contributions to mechanical engineering in general, and fluid mechanics in particular. He has left a lasting impact on many of us, especially for those who had the privilege of working closely with him. Some of my current work on boundary-layer control, the use of neural networks in particular, were inspired by many discussions with Bill. He was among the first to see the potential of control-theoretic approaches for flow control, which has become the main thrust of my current research. Without his continued encouragement, I would not have been deeply involved in this line of research; and perhaps, we would not have seen the current flurry of research activities in applying modern control theories to flow control. In memory of Bill Reynolds, who himself has contributed much to flow control, an analysis of boundary-layer control from a linear system perspective will be presented.

  4. Nonlinear evolution of Mack modes in a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokani, Ndaona

    2005-01-01

    In hypersonic boundary layer flows the nonlinear disturbance evolution occurs relatively slowly over a very long length scale and has a profound effect on boundary layer transition. In the case of low-level freestream disturbances and negligible surface roughness, the transition is due to the modal growth of exponentially growing Mack modes that are destabilized by wall cooling. Cross-bicoherence measurements, derived from hot-wire data acquired in a quiet hypersonic tunnel, are used to identify and quantify phase-locked, quadratic sum and difference interactions involving the Mack modes. In the early stages of the nonlinear disturbance evolution, cross-bicoherence measurements indicate that the energy exchange between the Mack mode and the mean flow first occurs to broaden the sidebands; this is immediately followed by a sum interaction of the Mack mode to generate the first harmonic. In the next stages of the nonlinear disturbance evolution, there is a difference interaction of the first harmonic, which is also thought to contribute to the mean flow distortion. This difference interaction, in the latter stages, is also accompanied by a difference interaction between Mack mode and first harmonic, and a sum interaction, which forces the second harmonic. Analysis using the digital complex demodulation technique, shows that the low-frequency, phase-locked interaction that is identified in the cross bicoherence when the Mack mode and first harmonic have large amplitudes, arises due to the amplitude modulation of Mack mode and first harmonic.

  5. Tropical Cyclone Boundary Layer Rolls in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lanqing; Li, Xiaofeng; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jun A.; Shen, Dongliang; Zhang, Zenghui; Yu, Wenxian

    2018-04-01

    Marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) roll plays an important role in the turbulent exchange of momentum, sensible heat, and moisture throughout MABL of tropical cyclone (TC). Hence, rolls are believed to be closely related to TC's development, intensification, and decay processes. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides a unique capability to image the sea surface imprints of quasi-linear streaks induced by the MABL rolls within a TC. In this study, sixteen SAR images, including three images acquired during three major hurricanes: Irma, Jose, and Maria in the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, were utilized to systematically map the distribution and wavelength of MABL rolls under the wide range of TC intensities. The images were acquired by SAR onboard RADARSAT-1/2, ENVISAT, and SENTINEL-1 satellites. Our findings are in agreement with the previous one case study of Hurricane Katrina (2005), showing the roll wavelengths are between 600 and 1,600 m. We also find that there exist roll imprints in eyewall and rainbands, although the boundary layer heights are shallower there. Besides, the spatial distribution of roll wavelengths is asymmetrical. The roll wavelengths are found to be the shortest around the storm center, increase and then decrease with distance from storm center, reaching the peak values in the range of d∗-2d∗, where d∗ is defined as the physical location to TC centers normalized by the radius of maximum wind. These MABL roll characteristics cannot be derived using conventional aircraft and land-based Doppler radar observations.

  6. Flow Coefficient Behavior for Boundary Layer Bleed Holes and Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, B. P.; Davis, D. O.; Hingst, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the flow coefficient behavior for nine boundary layer bleed orifice configurations is reported. This test was conducted for the purposes of exploring boundary layer control through mass flow removal and does not address issues of stability bleed. Parametric data consist of bleed region flow coefficient as a function of Mach number, bleed plenum pressure, and bleed orifice geometry. Seven multiple hole configurations and two single slot configurations were tested over a supersonic Mach number range of 1.3 to 2.5 (nominal). Advantages gained by using multiple holes in a bleed region instead of a single spanwise slot are discussed and the issue of modeling an entire array of bleed orifices based on the performance of a single orifice is addressed. Preconditioning the flow approaching a 90 degree inclined (normal) hole configuration resulted in a significant improvement in the performance of the configuration. The same preconditioning caused only subtle changes in performance for a 20 degree inclined (slanted) configuration.

  7. Competing disturbance amplification mechanisms in two-fluid boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sandeep; Page, Jacob; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    The linear stability of boundary layers above a thin wall film of lower viscosity is analyzed. Appropriate choice of the film thickness and viscosity excludes the possibility of interfacial instabilities. Transient amplification of disturbances is therefore the relevant destabilizing influence, and can take place via three different mechanisms in the two-fluid configuration. Each is examined in detail by solving an initial value problem whose initial condition comprises a pair of appropriately chosen eigenmodes from the discrete, continuous and interface modes. Two regimes are driven by the lift-up mechanism: (i) The response to a streamwise vortex and (ii) the normal vorticity generated by a stable Tollmien-Schlichting wave. Both are damped due to the film. The third regime is associated with the wall-normal vorticity that is generated by the interface displacement. It can lead to appreciable streamwise velocity disturbances in the near-wall region at relatively low viscosity ratios. The results demonstrate that a wall film can stabilize the early linear stages of boundary-layer transition, and explain the observations from the recent nonlinear direct numerical simulations of this configuration by Jung & Zaki (J. Fluid Mech., vol 772, 2015, 330-360).

  8. Aircraft Boundary-layer Measurements in the Gulf of Tehuantepec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friehe, Carl; Melville, W. K.

    2005-11-01

    Airborne flux, meteorological, and wave measurements were made from the NSF/NCAR EC130Q aircraft in the Gulf of Tehuantepec under strong boundary-layer gap winds up to 25 m/sec at 33 m height. Statistics of flux estimates were obtained from multiple 33-m tracks flown under reasonably stationary and homogeneous conditions. Flux divergence was obtained from stack patterns flown at various distances from shore. Tracks flown at 33 m between the stacks provided the pressure gradient and advection terms in the momentum balance. Near shore, flux divergence was important and approximately balanced by the pressure gradient and advective terms; off-shore (400 km), divergence was small and again approximately in balance with the other two terms. Data from dropsondes and the Scanning Aerosol Backscatter LIDAR (SABL) revealed that the internal boundary layer initially thins off-shore as the gap wind field spreads horizontally, and then thickens due to turbulent mixing and possible hydraulic effects. Supported by NSF Division of Ocean Sciences.

  9. Transition Delay in Hypersonic Boundary Layers via Optimal Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of nonlinear optimal streaks on disturbance growth in a Mach 6 axisymmetric flow over a 7deg half-angle cone is investigated in an e ort to expand the range of available techniques for transition control. Plane-marching parabolized stability equations are used to characterize the boundary layer instability in the presence of azimuthally periodic streaks. The streaks are observed to stabilize nominally planar Mack mode instabilities, although oblique Mack mode disturbances are destabilized. Experimentally measured transition onset in the absence of any streaks correlates with an amplification factor of N = 6 for the planar Mack modes. For high enough streak amplitudes, the transition threshold of N = 6 is not reached by the Mack mode instabilities within the length of the cone, but subharmonic first mode instabilities, which are destabilized by the presence of the streaks, reach N = 6 near the end of the cone. These results suggest a passive flow control strategy of using micro vortex generators to induce streaks that would delay transition in hypersonic boundary layers.

  10. Characteristics of early winter high Arctic atmospheric boundary layer profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickström, Siiri; Vihma, Timo; Nygård, Tiina; Kramer, Daniel; Palo, Timo; Jonassen, Marius

    2017-04-01

    For a large part of the year, the Arctic climate system is characterised by a stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, with strong temperature inversions isolating the surface from the air aloft. These nversions are typically driven by longwave radiative cooling, warm-air advection aloft, or subsidence. All these mechanisms are affected by the synoptic sate of the atmosphere in the high Arctic. In this study we present data from an intensive measurement campaign in Svalbard in October 2014, when atmospheric profiles were measured with a tethered balloon in Adventdalen and Hornsund. In addition radiosonde soundings from Ny-Ålesund were analysed. A total of 115 individual profiles were analysed, almost all of them showing a surface-based temperature inversion. Our preliminary results show that the strongest and deepest inversions are observed at the beginning of a warm-air advection event, but as the temperature, wind and cloudiness increase the inversion strength and depth decrease rapidly. The inversion curvature parameter seems to be strongly dependent on the longwave radiative balance with the highest curvatures (strongest vertical temperature gradient close to the surface) associated with strong longwave radiative heat loss from the surface. The different processes affecting the stable atmospheric boundary layer during a low-pressure passage are determined, and the effects of the synoptic scale changes are isolated from those caused by local topographic forcing.

  11. Stability Of Oscillatory Rotating-Disk Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Scott; Davies, Christopher

    2017-11-01

    The rotating disk boundary layer has long been considered as an archetypal model for studying the stability of three-dimensional boundary-layer flows. It is one of the few truly three-dimensional configurations for which there is an exact similarity solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Due to a crossflow inflexion point instability, the investigation of strategies for controlling the behaviour of disturbances that develop in the rotating disk flow may prove to be helpful for the identification and assessment of aerodynamical technologies that have the potential to maintain laminar flow over swept wings. We will consider the changes in the stability behaviour which arise when the base-flow is altered by imposing a periodic modulation in the rotation rate of the disk surface. Following similar work by Thomas et al., preliminary results indicate that this modification can lead to significant stabilising effects. Current work encompasses linearised DNS, complemented by a local in time analysis made possible by imposing an artificial frozen flow approximation. This is deployed together with a more exact global treatment based upon Floquet theory, which avoids the need for any simplification of the temporal dependency of the base-flow.

  12. Characteristic Lifelength of Coherent Structure in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    A characteristic lifelength is defined by which a Gaussian distribution is fit to data correlated over a 3 sensor array sampling streamwise sidewall pressure. The data were acquired at subsonic, transonic and supersonic speeds aboard a Tu-144. Lifelengths are estimated using the cross spectrum and are shown to compare favorably with Efimtsov's prediction of correlation space scales. Lifelength distributions are computed in the time/frequency domain using an interval correlation technique on the continuous wavelet transform of the original time data. The median values of the lifelength distributions are found to be very close to the frequency averaged result. The interval correlation technique is shown to allow the retrieval and inspection of the original time data of each event in the lifelength distribution, thus providing a means to locate and study the nature of the coherent structure in the turbulent boundary layer. The lifelength data can be converted to lifetimes using the convection velocity. The lifetime of events in the time/frequency domain are displayed in Lifetime Maps. The primary purpose of the paper is to validate these new analysis techniques so that they can be used with confidence to further characterize coherent structure in the turbulent boundary layer.

  13. Experimental research on crossing shock wave boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, G. S.; Garrison, T. J.

    1994-10-01

    An experimental research effort of the Penn State Gas Dynamics Laboratory on the subject of crossing shock wave boundary layer interactions is reported. This three year study was supported by AFOSR Grant 89-0315. A variety of experimental techniques were employed to study the above phenomena including planar laser scattering flowfield visualization, kerosene lampblack surface flow visualization, laser-interferometer skin friction surveys, wall static pressure measurements, and flowfield five-hole probe surveys. For a model configuration producing two intersecting shock waves, measurements were made for a range of oblique shock strengths at freestream Mach numbers of 3.0 and 3.85. Additionally, measurements were made at Mach 3.85 for a configuration producing three intersecting waves. The combined experimental dataset was used to formulate the first detailed flowfield models of the crossing-shock and triple-shock wave/boundary layer interactions. The structure of these interactions was found to be similar over a broad range of interaction strengths and is dominated by a large, separated, viscous flow region.

  14. Characterization of structural response to hypersonic boundary-layer transition

    DOE PAGES

    Riley, Zachary B.; Deshmukh, Rohit; Miller, Brent A.; ...

    2016-05-24

    The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerodynamic heating, and surface conditions makes the potential for interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important and challenging area of study in high-speed flows. This paper phenomenologically explores this interaction using a fundamental two-dimensional aerothermoelastic model under the assumption of an aluminum panel with simple supports. Specifically, an existing model is extended to examine the impact of transition onset location, transition length, and transitional overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure on the structural response of surface panels. Transitional flow conditions are found to yield significantly increased thermal gradients, and theymore » can result in higher maximum panel temperatures compared to turbulent flow. Results indicate that overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure reduces the flutter onset time and increases the strain energy accumulated in the panel. Furthermore, overshoot occurring near the midchord can yield average temperatures and peak displacements exceeding those experienced by the panel subject to turbulent flow. Lastly, these results suggest that fully turbulent flow does not always conservatively predict the thermo-structural response of surface panels.« less

  15. Analytical Studies of Boundary Layer Generated Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.; Shah, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis is made of the "interior noise" produced by high, subsonic turbulent flow over a thin elastic plate partitioned into "panels" by straight edges transverse to the mean flow direction. This configuration models a section of an aircraft fuselage that may be regarded as locally flat. The analytical problem can be solved in closed form to represent the acoustic radiation in terms of prescribed turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations. Two cases are considered: (i) the production of sound at an isolated panel edge (i.e., in the approximation in which the correlation between sound and vibrations generated at neighboring edges is neglected), and (ii) the sound generated by a periodic arrangement of identical panels. The latter problem is amenable to exact analytical treatment provided the panel edge conditions are the same for all panels. Detailed predictions of the interior noise depend on a knowledge of the turbulent boundary layer wall pressure spectrum, and are given here in terms of an empirical spectrum proposed by Laganelli and Wolfe. It is expected that these analytical representations of the sound generated by simplified models of fluid-structure interactions can used to validate more general numerical schemes.

  16. Space Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Ground Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiment (FE) Project in which a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS- 128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour for STS-134, a significant ground test campaign was completed. The primary goals of the test campaign were to provide ground test data to support the planning and safety certification efforts required to fly the flight experiment as well as validation for the collected flight data. These test included Arcjet testing of the tile protuberance, aerothermal testing to determine the boundary layer transition behavior and resultant surface heating and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) testing in order to gain a better understanding of the flow field characteristics associated with the flight experiment. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project ground testing. High-level overviews of the facilities, models, test techniques and data are presented, along with a summary of the insights gained from each test.

  17. Wintertime Boundary Layer Structure in the Grand Canyon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, C. David; Zhong, Shiyuan; Bian, Xindi

    1999-08-01

    Wintertime temperature profiles in the Grand Canyon exhibit a neutral to isothermal stratification during both daytime and nighttime, with only rare instances of actual temperature inversions. The canyon warms during daytime and cools during nighttime more or less uniformly through the canyon's entire depth. This weak stability and temperature structure evolution differ from other Rocky Mountain valleys, which develop strong nocturnal inversions and exhibit convective and stable boundary layers that grow upward from the valley floor. Mechanisms that may be responsible for the different behavior of the Grand Canyon are discussed, including the possibility that the canyon atmosphere is frequently mixed to near-neutral stratification when cold air drains into the top of the canyon from the nearby snow-covered Kaibab Plateau. Another feature of canyon temperature profiles is the sharp inversions that often form near the canyon rims. These are generally produced when warm air is advected over the canyon in advance of passing synoptic-scale ridges.Wintertime winds in the main canyon are not classical diurnal along-valley wind systems. Rather, they are driven along the canyon axis by the horizontal synoptic-scale pressure gradient that is superimposed along the canyon's axis by passing synoptic-scale weather disturbances. They may thus bring winds into the canyon from either end at any time of day.The implications of the observed canyon boundary layer structure for air pollution dispersion are discussed.

  18. Predictions and Verification of an Isotope Marine Boundary Layer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Posmentier, E. S.; Sonder, L. J.; Fan, N.

    2017-12-01

    A one-dimensional (1D), steady state isotope marine boundary layer (IMBL) model is constructed. The model includes meteorologically important features absent in Craig and Gordon type models, namely height-dependent diffusion/mixing and convergence of subsiding external air. Kinetic isotopic fractionation results from this height-dependent diffusion which starts as pure molecular diffusion at the air-water interface and increases linearly with height due to turbulent mixing. The convergence permits dry, isotopically depleted air subsiding adjacent to the model column to mix into ambient air. In δD-δ18O space, the model results fill a quadrilateral, of which three sides represent 1) vapor in equilibrium with various sea surface temperatures (SSTs) (high d18O boundary of quadrilateral); 2) mixture of vapor in equilibrium with seawater and vapor in the subsiding air (lower boundary depleted in both D and 18O); and 3) vapor that has experienced the maximum possible kinetic fractionation (high δD upper boundary). The results can be plotted in d-excess vs. δ18O space, indicating that these processes all cause variations in d-excess of MBL vapor. In particular, due to relatively high d-excess in the descending air, mixing of this air into the MBL causes an increase in d-excess, even without kinetic isotope fractionation. The model is tested by comparison with seven datasets of marine vapor isotopic ratios, with excellent correspondence; >95% of observational data fall within the quadrilateral area predicted by the model. The distribution of observations also highlights the significant influence of vapor from the nearby converging descending air on isotopic variations in the MBL. At least three factors may explain the <5% of observations that fall slightly outside of the predicted region in both δD-δ18O and d-excess - δ18O space: 1) variations in seawater isotopic ratios, 2) variations in isotopic composition of subsiding air, and 3) influence of sea spray. The model

  19. Seasonal simulations of the planetary boundary layer and boundary-layer stratocumulus clouds with a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.; Abeles, J. A.; Corsetti, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The formulation of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and stratocumulus parametrizations in the UCLA general circulation model (GCM) are briefly summarized, and extensive new results are presented illustrating some aspects of the simulated seasonal changes of the global distributions of PBL depth, stratocumulus cloudiness, cloud-top entrainment instability, the cumulus mass flux, and related fields. Results from three experiments designed to reveal the sensitivity of the GCM results to aspects of the PBL and stratocumulus parametrizations are presented. The GCM results show that the layer cloud instability appears to limit the extent of the marine subtropical stratocumulus regimes, and that instability frequently occurs in association with cumulus convection over land. Cumulus convection acts as a very significant sink of PBL mass throughout the tropics and over the midlatitude continents in winter.

  20. Unsteady transonic viscous-inviscid interaction using Euler and boundary-layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Whitfield, Dave

    1989-01-01

    The Euler code is used extensively for computation of transonic unsteady aerodynamics. The boundary layer code solves the 3-D, compressible, unsteady, mean flow kinetic energy integral boundary layer equations in the direct mode. Inviscid-viscous coupling is handled using porosity boundary conditions. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of using the Euler and boundary layer equations for investigating unsteady viscous-inviscid interaction is examined.

  1. Turbulence in a convective marine atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Atlas, D.; Yeh, E.-N.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and kinetic energy budget of turbulence in the convective marine atmospheric boundary layer as observed by aircraft during a cold air outbreak have been studied using mixed layer scaling. The results are significantly different from those of previous studies under conditions closer to free convection. The normalized turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent transport are about twice those found during the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX). This implies that for a given surface heating the present case is dynamically more active. The difference is mainly due to the greater importance of wind shear in the present case. This case is closer to the roll vortex regime, whereas AMTEX observed mesoscale cellular convection which is closer to free convection. Shear generation is found to provide a significant energy source, in addition to buoyancy production, to maintain a larger normalized turbulent kinetic energy and to balance a larger normalized dissipation. The interaction between turbulent pressure and divergence (i.e., pressure scrambling) is also found to transfer energy from the vertical to the horizontal components, and is expected to be stronger in roll vortices than in m esoscale cells. The sensible heat flux is found to fit well with a linear vertical profile in a clear or subcloud planetary boundary layer (PBL), in good agreement with the results of Lenschow et al., (1980). The heat flux ratio between the PBL top and the surface, derived from the linear fitted curve, is approximately -0.14, in good agreement with that derived from the lidar data for the same case. Near the PBL top, the heat flux profiles are consistent with those of Deardoff (1979) and Deardorff et al. (1980).

  2. Pathways of soil moisture controls on boundary layer dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, M.; Katul, G.; Porporato, A.

    2007-12-01

    Soil moisture controls on precipitation are now receiving significant attention in climate systems because the memory of their variability is much slower than the memory of the fast atmospheric processes. We propose a new model that integrates soil water dynamics, plant hydraulics and stomatal responses to water availability to estimate root water uptake and available energy partitioning, as well as feedbacks to boundary layer dynamics (in terms of water vapor and heat input to the atmospheric system). Using a simplified homogenization technique, the model solves the intrinsically 3-D soil water movement equations by two 1-D coupled Richards' equations. The first resolves the radial water flow from bulk soil to soil-root interface to estimate root uptake (assuming the vertical gradients in moisture persist during the rapid lateral flow), and then it solves vertical water movement through the soil following the radial moisture adjustments. The coupling between these two equations is obtained by area averaging the soil moisture in the radial domain (i.e. homogenization) to calculate the vertical fluxes. For each vertical layer, the domain is discretized in axi-symmetrical grid with constant soil properties. This is deemed to be appropriate given the fact that the root uptake occurs on much shorter time scales closely following diurnal cycles, while the vertical water movement is more relevant to the inter-storm time scale. We show that this approach was able to explicitly simulate known features of root uptake such as diurnal hysteresis of canopy conductance, water redistribution by roots (hydraulic lift) and downward shift of root uptake during drying cycles. The model is then coupled with an atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) growth model thereby permitting us to explore low-dimensional elements of the interaction between soil moisture and ABL states commensurate with the lifting condensation level.

  3. The Physics of Turbulence in the Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Stephen; Cantwell, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The geometry of the velocity field in a numerically simulated incompressible turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate at Re theta=670 has been studied using the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor. These invariants are computed at every grid point in the flow and used to form the discriminant. Of primary interest are those regions in the flow where the discriminant is positive; regions where, according to the characteristic equation, the eigenvalues of the velocity gradient tensor are complex. An observer moving with a frame of reference which is attached to a fluid particle lying within such a region would see a local flow pattern of the type stable-focus-stretching or unstable-focus-compressing. When the flow is visualized this way, continuous, connected, large-scale structures are revealed that extend from the point just below the buffer layer out to the beginning of the wake region. These structures are aligned with the mean shear close to the wall and arch in the cross-stream direction away from the wall. In some cases the structures observed are very similar to to the hairpin eddy vision of boundary layer structure proposed by Theodorsen. That the structure of the flow is revealed more effectively by the discriminant rather than by the vorticity is important and adds support to recent observations of the discriminant in a channel flow simulation. Of particular importance is the fact that the procedure does not require the use of an arbitrary threshold in the discriminant. Further analysis using computer flow visualization shows a high degree of spatial correlation between regions of positive discriminant, extreme negative pressure fluctuations and large instantaneous values of Reynolds shear stress.

  4. Thermodynamic and radiative structure of stratocumulus-topped boundary layers*

    DOE PAGES

    Ghate, Virendra P.; Miller, Mark A.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; ...

    2015-01-05

    Stratocumulus Topped Boundary Layers (STBL) observed in three different regions with distinctive environments are described in the context of their thermodynamic and radiative properties. Here, the primary data set consisted of 131 soundings from the South East Pacific (SEP), 90 soundings from the island of Graciosa (GRW) in the North Atlantic and 83 soundings from the US Southern Great Plains (SGP). A new technique that preserves the depths of the sub-layers within a STBL is proposed for averaging the profiles of thermodynamic and radiative variables. The STBL was deepest over SEP and had the strongest radiative cooling rates near cloudmore » top among the three locations. Although the radiative cooling rates were comparable over GRW and SGP, the STBL was deeper over GRW compared to that over SGP. On average the STBL inversion was strongest over SEP (11.7 k and -5.43 g kg -1) and weakest over the SGP (6.89 k and -0.41 g kg -1). Significantly larger liquid water path, integrated water vapor, and variability in these two properties was found over GRW and evidence presented suggests that conditions at cloud top may play a lesser role in determining the resident cloud structure over GRW than over SEP. A modal analysis revealed ~26% of the STBL to be well-mixed, ~20% of STBL to be stable and ~30% STBL having a stable layer in-between a surface mixed layer and the cloud layer. Over all the three locations, the STBL was shallowest in well-mixed mode and deepest in the stable mode.« less

  5. Relaxation of the accelerating-gas boundary layer to the test-gas boundary layer on a flat plate in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Trimpi, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    An analytic investigation of the relaxation of the accelerating-gas boundary layer to the test-gas boundary layer over a flat plate mounted in an expansion tube has been conducted. In this treatment, nitrogen has been considered as the test gas and helium as the accelerating gas. The problem is analyzed in two conically similar limits: (1) when the time lag between the arrival of the shock and the interface at the leading edge of the plate is very large, and (2) when this time lag is negligible. The transient laminar boundary-layer equations of a perfect binary-gas mixture are taken as the flow governing equations. These coupled equations have been solved numerically by Gauss-Seidel line-relaxation method. The results predict the transient behavior as well as the time required for an all-helium accelerating-gas boundary layer to relax to an all-nitrogen boundary layer.

  6. FOREWORD: International Conference on Planetary Boundary Layer and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djolov, G.; Esau, I.

    2010-05-01

    One of the greatest achievements of climate science has been the establisment of the concept of climate change on a multitude of time scales. The Earth's complex climate system does not allow a straightforward interpretation of dependences between the external parameter perturbation, internal stochastic system dynamics and the long-term system response. The latter is usually referred to as climate change in a narrow sense (IPCC, 2007). The focused international conference "Planetary Boundary Layers and Climate Change" has addressed only time scales and dynamical aspects of climate change with possible links to the turbulent processes in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). Although limited, the conference topic is by no means singular. One should clearly understand that the PBL is the layer where 99% of biosphere and human activity are concentrated. The PBL is the layer where the energy fluxes, which are followed by changes in cryosphere and other known feedbacks, are maximized. At the same time, the PBL processes are of a naturally small scale. What is the averaged long-term effect of the small-scale processes on the long-term climate dynamics? Can this effect be recognized in existing long-term paleo-climate data records? Can it be modeled? What is the current status of our theoretical understanding of this effect? What is the sensitivity of the climate model projections to the representation of small-scale processes? Are there significant indirect effects, e.g. through transport of chemical components, of the PBL processes on climate? These and other linked questions have been addressed during the conference. The Earth's climate has changed many times during the planet's history, with events ranging from ice ages to long periods of warmth. Historically, natural factors such as the amount of energy released from the Sun, volcanic eruptions and changes in the Earth's orbit have affected the Earth's climate. Beginning late in the 18th century, human activities

  7. Embedded function methods for supersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, J.; Kazakia, J. Y.; Walker, J. D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of embedded functions to represent the mean velocity and total enthalpy distributions in the wall layer of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer is considered. The asymptotic scaling laws (in the limit of large Reynolds number) for high speed compressible flows are obtained to facilitate eventual implementation of the embedded functions in a general prediction method. A self-consistent asymptotic structure is derived, as well as a compressible law of the wall in which the velocity and total enthalpy are logarithmic within the overlap zone, but in the Howarth-Dorodnitsyn variable. Simple outer region turbulence models are proposed (some of which are modifications of existing incompressible models) to reflect the effects of compressibility. As a test of the methodology and the new turbulence models, a set of self-similar outer region profiles is obtained for constant pressure flow; these are then coupled with embedded functions in the wall layer. The composite profiles thus obtained are compared directly with experimental data and good agreement is obtained for flows with Mach numbers up to 10.

  8. Modeling marine boundary-layer clouds with a two-layer model: A one-dimensional simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Shouping

    1993-01-01

    A two-layer model of the marine boundary layer is described. The model is used to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in downstream simulations. Over cold sea surfaces, the model predicts a relatively uniform structure in the boundary layer with 90%-100% cloud fraction. Over warm sea surfaces, the model predicts a relatively strong decoupled and conditionally unstable structure with a cloud fraction between 30% and 60%. A strong large-scale divergence considerably limits the height of the boundary layer and decreases relative humidity in the upper part of the cloud layer; thus, a low cloud fraction results. The efffects of drizzle on the boundary-layer structure and cloud fraction are also studied with downstream simulations. It is found that drizzle dries and stabilizes the cloud layer and tends to decouple the cloud from the subcloud layer. Consequently, solid stratocumulus clouds may break up and the cloud fraction may decrease because of drizzle.

  9. A broadband metamaterial absorber based on multi-layer graphene in the terahertz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Pan; Liu, Fei; Ren, Guang Jun; Su, Fei; Li, Dong; Yao, Jian Quan

    2018-06-01

    A broadband metamaterial absorber, composed of the periodic graphene pattern on SiO2 dielectric with the double layer graphene films inserted in it and all of them backed by metal plan, is proposed and investigated. The simulation results reveal that the wide absorption band can be flexibly tuned between the low-frequency band and the high-frequency band by adjusting graphene's Fermi level. The absorption can achieve 90% in 5.50-7.10 THz, with Fermi level of graphene is 0.3 eV, while in 6.98-9.10 THz with Fermi level 0.6 eV. Furthermore, the proposed structure can be switched from reflection (>81%) to absorption (>90%) over the whole operation band, when the Fermi level of graphene varies from 0 to 0.6 eV. Besides, the proposed absorber is insensitive to the polarization and can work over a wide range of incident angle. Compared with the previous broadband absorber, our graphene based wideband terahertz absorber can enable a wide application of high performance terahertz devices, including sensors, imaging devices and electro-optic switches.

  10. Non-linear processes in the Earth atmosphere boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunskaya, Lubov; Valery, Isakevich; Dmitry, Rubay

    2013-04-01

    The work is connected with studying electromagnetic fields in the resonator Earth-Ionosphere. There is studied the interconnection of tide processes of geophysical and astrophysical origin with the Earth electromagnetic fields. On account of non-linear property of the resonator Earth-Ionosphere the tides (moon and astrophysical tides) in the electromagnetic Earth fields are kinds of polyharmonic nature. It is impossible to detect such non-linear processes with the help of the classical spectral analysis. Therefore to extract tide processes in the electromagnetic fields, the method of covariance matrix eigen vectors is used. Experimental investigations of electromagnetic fields in the atmosphere boundary layer are done at the distance spaced stations, situated on Vladimir State University test ground, at Main Geophysical Observatory (St. Petersburg), on Kamchatka pen., on Lake Baikal. In 2012 there was continued to operate the multichannel synchronic monitoring system of electrical and geomagnetic fields at the spaced apart stations: VSU physical experimental proving ground; the station of the Institute of Solar and Terrestrial Physics of Russian Academy of Science (RAS) at Lake Baikal; the station of the Institute of volcanology and seismology of RAS in Paratunka; the station in Obninsk on the base of the scientific and production society "Typhoon". Such investigations turned out to be possible after developing the method of scanning experimental signal of electromagnetic field into non- correlated components. There was used a method of the analysis of the eigen vectors ofthe time series covariance matrix for exposing influence of the moon tides on Ez. The method allows to distribute an experimental signal into non-correlated periodicities. The present method is effective just in the situation when energetical deposit because of possible influence of moon tides upon the electromagnetic fields is little. There have been developed and realized in program components

  11. Mixed convection-radiation interaction in boundary-layer flow over horizontal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, F. S.; Hady, F. M.

    1990-06-01

    The effect of buoyancy forces and thermal radiation on the steady laminar plane flow over an isothermal horizontal flat plate is investigated within the framework of first-order boundary-layer theory, taking into account the hydrostatic pressure variation normal to the plate. The fluid considered is a gray, absorbing-emitting but nonscattering medium, and the Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. Both a hot surface facing upward and a cold surface facing downward are considered in the analysis. Numerical results for the local Nusselt number, the local wall shear stress, the local surface heat flux, as well as the velocity and temperature distributions are presented for gases with a Prandtl number of 0.7 for various values of the radiation-conduction parameter, the buoyancy parameter, and the temperature ratio parameter.

  12. A preliminary assessment of the Titan planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Results of a preliminary assessment of the characteristic features of the Titan planetary boundary are addressed. These were derived from the combined application of a patched Ekman surface layer model and Rossby number similarity theory. Both these models together with Obukhov scaling, surface speed limits and saltation are discussed. A characteristic Akman depth of approximately 0.7 km is anticipated, with an eddy viscosity approximately equal to 1000 sq cm/s, an associated friction velocity approximately 0.01 m/s, and a surface wind typically smaller than 0.6 m/s. Actual values of these parameters probably vary by as much as a factor of two or three, in response to local temporal variations in surface roughness and stability. The saltation threshold for the windblown injection of approximately 50 micrometer particulates into the atmosphere is less than twice the nominal friction velocity, suggesting that dusty breezes might be an occassional feature of the Titan meteorology.

  13. The numerical calculation of laminar boundary-layer separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klineberg, J. M.; Steger, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Iterative finite-difference techniques are developed for integrating the boundary-layer equations, without approximation, through a region of reversed flow. The numerical procedures are used to calculate incompressible laminar separated flows and to investigate the conditions for regular behavior at the point of separation. Regular flows are shown to be characterized by an integrable saddle-type singularity that makes it difficult to obtain numerical solutions which pass continuously into the separated region. The singularity is removed and continuous solutions ensured by specifying the wall shear distribution and computing the pressure gradient as part of the solution. Calculated results are presented for several separated flows and the accuracy of the method is verified. A computer program listing and complete solution case are included.

  14. Buckling transition and boundary layer in non-Euclidean plates.

    PubMed

    Efrati, Efi; Sharon, Eran; Kupferman, Raz

    2009-07-01

    Non-Euclidean plates are thin elastic bodies having no stress-free configuration, hence exhibiting residual stresses in the absence of external constraints. These bodies are endowed with a three-dimensional reference metric, which may not necessarily be immersible in physical space. Here, based on a recently developed theory for such bodies, we characterize the transition from flat to buckled equilibrium configurations at a critical value of the plate thickness. Depending on the reference metric, the buckling transition may be either continuous or discontinuous. In the infinitely thin plate limit, under the assumption that a limiting configuration exists, we show that the limit is a configuration that minimizes the bending content, among all configurations with zero stretching content (isometric immersions of the midsurface). For small but finite plate thickness, we show the formation of a boundary layer, whose size scales with the square root of the plate thickness and whose shape is determined by a balance between stretching and bending energies.

  15. Boundary layers and scaling relations in natural thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga; Lohse, Detlef; Grossmann, Siegfried

    2017-11-01

    We analyse the boundary layer (BL) equations in natural thermal convection, which includes vertical convection (VC), where the fluid is confined between two differently heated vertical walls, horizontal convection (HC), where the fluid is heated at one part of the bottom plate and cooled at some other part, and Rayleigh-Benard convection (RBC). For BL dominated regimes we derive the scaling relations of the Nusselt and Reynolds numbers (Nu, Re) with the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers (Ra, Pr). For VC the scaling relations are obtained directly from the BL equations, while for HC they are derived by applying the Grossmann-Lohse theory to the case of VC. In particular, for RBC with large Pr we derive Nu Pr0Ra1/3 and Re Pr-1Ra2/3. The work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh 405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship.

  16. Computation of the turbulent boundary layer downstream of vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul K.

    1987-12-01

    The approximate analysis of three-dimensional incompressible turbulent boundary layer downstream of vortex generators is presented. Extensive numerical computations are carried out to assess the effectiveness of single-row, counter-rotating vane-type vortex generators to alleviate flow separation lines. Flow separation downstream of the vortex generators on a thick airfoil are determined in terms of size, location, and arrangement of the vortex generators. These lines are compared with the separation line without the vortex generators. High efficiency is obtained with the moderately slender rectangular blade of the generator. The results indicate that separations is alleviated more effectively in the region closer to the symmetry axis of the generator than in the outer region of the symmetry axis. No optimum conditions for the alleviation of flow separation are established in this investigation, and no comparisons are made with other analytical results and experimental data.

  17. Microstructure of Turbulence in the Stably Stratified Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew; Balsley, Ben B.

    2008-11-01

    The microstructure of a stably stratified boundary layer, with a significant low-level nocturnal jet, is investigated based on observations from the CASES-99 campaign in Kansas, U.S.A. The reported, high-resolution vertical profiles of the temperature, wind speed, wind direction, pressure, and the turbulent dissipation rate, were collected under nocturnal conditions on October 14, 1999, using the CIRES Tethered Lifting System. Two methods for evaluating instantaneous (1-sec) background profiles are applied to the raw data. The background potential temperature is calculated using the “bubble sort” algorithm to produce a monotonically increasing potential temperature with increasing height. Other scalar quantities are smoothed using a running vertical average. The behaviour of background flow, buoyant overturns, turbulent fluctuations, and their respective histograms are presented. Ratios of the considered length scales and the Ozmidov scale are nearly constant with height, a fact that can be applied in practice for estimating instantaneous profiles of the dissipation rate.

  18. Control of flow separation in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjeong; Choi, Sangho; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    Towards the development of successful control methods for separation delay in a turbulent boundary layer, we adopt a model flow field, in which a turbulent separation occurs above a flat plate (Na and Moin 1998 JFM), and apply controls to this flow for reducing the size of the separation bubble and investigating the interaction between the forcing and flow near the separation bubble. We provide a single-frequency forcing with zero net mass flow rate at the upstream of the separation bubble. At low forcing frequencies, spanwise vortices are generated and travel downstream, bringing high momentum toward the wall and reducing the size of the separation bubble. Also, these vortices cause the separation and reattachment points to travel downstream. On the other hand, at high forcing frequencies, the size of the separation bubble becomes smaller and larger in time, respectively, due to the pressure gradient alternating favorably and adversely in time. Supported by NRF-2011-0028032 and 2014048162.

  19. Small particle transport across turbulent nonisothermal boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent diffusion, Brownian diffusion, and particle thermophoresis in the limit of vanishing particle inertial effects is quantitatively modeled for applications in gas turbines. The model is initiated with consideration of the particle phase mass conservation equation for a two-dimensional boundary layer, including the thermophoretic flux term directed toward the cold wall. A formalism of a turbulent flow near a flat plate in a heat transfer problem is adopted, and variable property effects are neglected. Attention is given to the limit of very large Schmidt numbers and the particle concentration depletion outside of the Brownian sublayer. It is concluded that, in the parameter range of interest, thermophoresis augments the high Schmidt number mass-transfer coefficient by a factor equal to the product of the outer sink and the thermophoretic suction.

  20. Numerical Simulations of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun Y.; Trumble, Kerry A.; Campbell, Charles H.; Lessard, Victor R.; Wood, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to study the possible effects that the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiments may have on the heating environment of the Space Shuttle during its entry to Earth. To investigate this issue, hypersonic calculations using the Data-Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) and Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation (LAURA) CFD codes were computed for a 0.75 tall protuberance at flight conditions of Mach 15 and 18. These initial results showed high surface heating on the BLT trip and the areas surrounding the protuberance. Since the predicted peak heating rates would exceed the thermal limits of the materials selected to construct the BLT trip, many changes to the geometry were attempted in order to reduce the surface heat flux. The following paper describes the various geometry revisions and the resulting heating environments predicted by the CFD codes.

  1. Modelling Unsteady Wall Pressures Beneath Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, B-K.; Graham, W. R.; Rizzi, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    As a structural entity of turbulence, hairpin vortices are believed to play a major role in developing and sustaining the turbulence process in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers and may be regarded as the simplest conceptual model that can account for the essential features of the wall pressure fluctuations. In this work we focus on fully developed typical hairpin vortices and estimate the associated surface pressure distributions and their corresponding spectra. On the basis of the attached eddy model, we develop a representation of the overall surface pressure spectra in terms of the eddy size distribution. Instantaneous wavenumber spectra and spatial correlations are readily derivable from this representation. The model is validated by comparison of predicted wavenumber spectra and cross-correlations with existing emperical models and experimental data.

  2. Double-diffusive boundary layers along vertical free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, L. G.; Viviani, A.; Savino, R.

    1992-05-01

    This paper deals with double-diffusive (or thermosolutal) combined free convection, i.e., free convection due to buoyant forces (natural convection) and surface tension gradients (Marangoni convection), which are generated by volume differences and surface gradients of temperature and solute concentration. Attention is focused on boundary layers that form along a vertical liquid-gas interface, when the appropriately defined nondimensional characteristic transport numbers are large enough, in problems of thermosolutal natural and Marangoni convection, such as buoyancy and surface tension driven flows in differentially heated open cavities and liquid bridges. Classes of similar solutions are derived for each class of convection on the basis of a rigorous order of magnitude analysis. Velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are reported in the similarity plane; flow and transport properties at the liquid-gas interface (interfacial velocity, heat and mass transfer bulk coefficients) are obtained for a wide range of Prandtl and Schmidt numbers and different values of the similarity parameter.

  3. Boundary-layer-ingesting inlet flow control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R. (Inventor); Allan, Brian G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for reducing distortion at the aerodynamic interface plane of a boundary-layer-ingesting inlet using a combination of active and passive flow control devices is disclosed. Active flow control jets and vortex generating vanes are used in combination to reduce distortion across a range of inlet operating conditions. Together, the vortex generating vanes can reduce most of the inlet distortion and the active flow control jets can be used at a significantly reduced control jet mass flow rate to make sure the inlet distortion stays low as the inlet mass flow rate varies. Overall inlet distortion, measured and described as average SAE circumferential distortion descriptor, was maintained at a value of 0.02 or less. Advantageous arrangements and orientations of the active flow control jets and the vortex generating vanes were developed using computational fluid dynamics simulations and wind tunnel experimentations.

  4. Spatial optimal disturbances in swept-wing boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng

    2018-04-01

    With the use of the adjoint-based optimization method proposed by Tempelmann et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 704, 2012, pp. 251-279), in which the parabolized stability equation (PSE) and so-called adjoint parabolized stability equation (APSE) are solved iteratively, we obtain the spatial optimal disturbance shape and investigate its dependence on the parameters of disturbance wave and wall condition, such as radial frequency ω and wall temperature Twall, in a swept-wing boundary layer flow. Further, the non-modal growth mechanism of this optimal disturbance has been also discussed, regarding its spatial evolution way in the streamwise direction. The results imply that the spanwise wavenumber, disturbance frequency and wall cooling do not change the physical mechanism of perturbation growth, just with a substantial effect on the magnitude of perturbation growth. Further, wall cooling may have enhancing or suppressing effect on spatial optimal disturbance growth, depending on the streamwise location.

  5. Turbulence stress measurements in a nonadiabatic hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulla, V.; Horstman, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress and direct turbulent total heat-flux measurements have been made across a nonadiabatic, zero pressure gradient, hypersonic boundary layer by using specially designed hot-wire probes free of strain-gauging and wire oscillation. Heat-flux measurements were in reasonably good agreement with values obtained by integrating the energy equation using measured profiles of velocity and temperature. The shear-stress values deduced from the measurements, by assuming zero correlation of velocity and pressure fluctuations, were lower than the values obtained by integrating the momentum equation. Statistical properties of the cross-correlations are similar to corresponding incompressible measurements at approximately the same momentum-thickness Reynolds number.

  6. A low-density boundary-layer wind tunnel facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.

    1987-01-01

    This abstract describes a low-density wind-tunnel facility that was established at NASA Ames in order to aid interpretation and understanding of data received from the Mariner and Viking spacecraft through earth-based simulation. The wind tunnel is a boundary-layer type which is capable of operating over a range of air densities ranging from 0.01 to 1.24 kg/cu m, with the lower values being equivalent to the near-surface density of the planet Mars. Although the facility was developed for space and extraterrestrial simulation, it also can serve as a relatively large-scale, low-density aerodynamic test facility. A description of this unique test facility and some Pitot-tube and hot-wire anemometry data acquired in the facility are presented.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of shockwave and turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Minwei

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a shockwave/turbulent boundary layer interaction (STBLI) at Mach number 3 and Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness of 2300 are performed. A 4th-order accurate, bandwidth-optimized weighted-essentially-non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is used and the method is found to be too dissipative for the STBLI simulation due to the over-adaptation properties of this original WENO scheme. In turn, a relative limiter is introduced to mitigate the problem. Tests on the Shu-Osher problem show that the modified WENO scheme decreases the numerical dissipation significantly. By utilizing a combination of the relative limiter and the absolute limiter described by Jiang & Shu [32], the DNS results are improved further. The DNS data agree well with the reference experiments of Bookey et al. [10] in the size of the separation bubble, the separation and reattachment point, the mean wall-pressure distribution, and the velocity profiles both upstream and downstream of the interaction region. The DNS data show that velocity profiles change dramatically along the streamwise direction. Downstream of the interaction, the velocity profiles show a characteristic "dip" in the logarithmic region, as shown by the experiments of Smits & Muck [66] at much higher Reynolds number. In the separation region, the velocity profiles are found to resemble those of a laminar flow, yet the flow does not fully relaminarize. The mass-flux turbulence intensity is amplified by a factor of about 5 throughout the interaction, which is consistent with that found in higher Reynolds experiments of Selig et al. [52]. All Reynolds stress components are greatly amplified by the interaction. Assuming that the ow is still two dimensional downstream of the interaction, the components rhou'u', rhov'v', rho w'w', and rho u'w' are amplified by factors of 6, 6, 12, and 24, respectively, where u is the streamwise and w is the wall-normal velocity. However, analyses of the turbulence

  8. Radiative transfer in a polluted urban planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a polluted urban atmosphere is studied using a dynamic model. The diurnal nature of radiative transfer for summer conditions is simulated for an urban area 40 km in extent and the effects of various parameters arising in the problem are investigated. The results of numerical computations show that air pollution has the potential of playing a major role in the radiative regime of the urban area. Absorption of solar energy by aerosols in realistic models of urban atmosphere are of the same order of magnitude as that due to water vapor. The predicted effect of the air pollution aerosol in the city is to warm the earth-atmosphere system, and the net effect of gaseous pollutant is to warm the surface and cool the planetary boundary layer, particularly near the top.

  9. A cloudiness transition in a marine boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Boers, Reinout

    1990-01-01

    Boundary layer cloudiness plays several important roles in the energy budget of the earth. Low level stratocumulus are highly reflective clouds which reduce the net incoming shortwave radiation at the earth's surface. Climatically, the transition to a small area fraction of scattered cumulus clouds occurs as the air flows over warmer water. Although these clouds reflect less sunlight, they still play an important role in the boundary layer equilibrium by transporting water vapor upwards, and enhancing the surface evaporation. The First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment (FIRE) included a marine stratocumulus experiment off the southern California coast from June 29 to July 19, 1987. The objectives of this experiment were to study the controls on fractional cloudiness, and to assess the role of cloud-top entrainment instability (CTEI) and mesoscale structure in determining cloud type. The focus is one research day, July 7, 1987, when coordinated aircraft missions were flown by four research aircraft, centered on a LANDSAT scene at 1830 UTC. The remarkable feature of this LANDSAT scene is the transition from a clear sky in the west through broken cumulus to solid stratocumulus in the east. The dynamic and thermodynamic structure of this transition in cloudiness is analyzed using data from the NCAR Electra. By averaging the aircraft data, the internal structure of the different cloud regimes is documented, and it is shown that the transition between broken cumulus and stratocumulus is associated with a change in structure with respect to the CTEI condition. However, this results not from sea surface temperature changes, but mostly from a transition in the air above the inversion, and the breakup appears to be at a structure on the unstable side of the wet virtual adiabat.

  10. Convective transport of electric charge within the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, Giles; Silva, Hugo; Silgado, Rui; Melgao, Marta

    2017-04-01

    Turbulent and convective processes within the planetary boundary layer are responsible for the transport of moisture, momentum and particulate matter, but are also of major importance in determining the electrical charge structure of the lower atmosphere. This paper presents rare experimental measurements of vertical profiles of charge measured during fair weather conditions by specially instrumented radiosonde balloons over Alqueva, Portugal during the summer of 2014. Space charge was measured directly using a sensitive electrometer, rather than the conventional method of deriving it from electric field measurements. The high frequency of balloon flights enabled the diurnal variation in the vertical profile of charge within the boundary layer to be examined in detail, with much smaller levels of charge (up to 20pC m-3) observed during stable night time periods than during the day. Following sunrise, the evolution of the charge profile was much more complex, showing a dependence on lofting of surface aerosol due to daytime convection. This produced charge up to 92pC m-3 up to 500m above the surface. The diurnal variation in the integrated column of charge above the measurement site was also found to track closely with the diurnal variation in near surface charge as measured by an electric field mill at the same site, confirming the importance of the link between surface charge generation processes and aloft. Co-located lidar backscatter measurements were also made during the measurement campaign and will be discussed here in the context of the effect of aerosol on the vertical charge profile.

  11. Rapid cycling of reactive nitrogen in the marine boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunxiang; Zhou, Xianliang; Pu, Dennis; Stutz, Jochen; Festa, James; Spolaor, Max; Tsai, Catalina; Cantrell, Christopher; Mauldin, Roy L; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew; Hornbrook, Rebecca S; Apel, Eric C; Guenther, Alex; Kaser, Lisa; Yuan, Bin; Karl, Thomas; Haggerty, Julie; Hall, Samuel; Ullmann, Kirk; Smith, James N; Ortega, John; Knote, Christoph

    2016-04-28

    Nitrogen oxides are essential for the formation of secondary atmospheric aerosols and of atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and the hydroxyl radical, which controls the self-cleansing capacity of the atmosphere. Nitric acid, a major oxidation product of nitrogen oxides, has traditionally been considered to be a permanent sink of nitrogen oxides. However, model studies predict higher ratios of nitric acid to nitrogen oxides in the troposphere than are observed. A 'renoxification' process that recycles nitric acid into nitrogen oxides has been proposed to reconcile observations with model studies, but the mechanisms responsible for this process remain uncertain. Here we present data from an aircraft measurement campaign over the North Atlantic Ocean and find evidence for rapid recycling of nitric acid to nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides in the clean marine boundary layer via particulate nitrate photolysis. Laboratory experiments further demonstrate the photolysis of particulate nitrate collected on filters at a rate more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of gaseous nitric acid, with nitrous acid as the main product. Box model calculations based on the Master Chemical Mechanism suggest that particulate nitrate photolysis mainly sustains the observed levels of nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides at midday under typical marine boundary layer conditions. Given that oceans account for more than 70 per cent of Earth's surface, we propose that particulate nitrate photolysis could be a substantial tropospheric nitrogen oxide source. Recycling of nitrogen oxides in remote oceanic regions with minimal direct nitrogen oxide emissions could increase the formation of tropospheric oxidants and secondary atmospheric aerosols on a global scale.

  12. Numerical Computations of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer over Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Surface irregularities such as protuberances inside a hypersonic boundary layer may lead to premature transition on the vehicle surface. Early transition in turn causes large localized surface heating that could damage the thermal protection system. Experimental measurements as well as numerical computations aimed at building a knowledge base for transition Reynolds numbers with respect to different protuberance sizes and locations have been actively pursued in recent years. This paper computationally investigates the unsteady wake development behind large isolated cylindrical roughness elements and the scaled wind-tunnel model of the trip used in a recent flight measurement during the reentry of space shuttle Discovery. An unstructured mesh, compressible flow solver based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for the flow past a roughness element under several wind-tunnel conditions. For a cylindrical roughness element with a height to the boundary-layer thickness ratio from 0.8 to 2.5, the wake flow is characterized by a mushroom-shaped centerline streak and horse-shoe vortices. While time-accurate solutions converged to a steady-state for a ratio of 0.8, strong flow unsteadiness is present for a ratio of 1.3 and 2.5. Instability waves marked by distinct disturbance frequencies were found in the latter two cases. Both the centerline streak and the horse-shoe vortices become unstable downstream. The oscillatory vortices eventually reach an early breakdown stage for the largest roughness element. Spectral analyses in conjunction with the computed root mean square variations suggest that the source of the unsteadiness and instability waves in the wake region may be traced back to possible absolute instability in the front-side separation region.

  13. Nighttime Chemistry in the Polluted Boundary Layer (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, J.; Wong, K.; Tsai, C.; Pikelnaya, O.

    2009-12-01

    Chemistry in the urban nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has received surprisingly little attention in the past. Surface observations often see low ozone and high NO levels, which lead to low nocturnal radical levels and consequently slow chemistry near the ground. Above the surface, however, ozone and radical levels, for example of NO3, are considerably higher, and more efficient chemical pathways for the removal of gaseous pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, ozone, and hydrocarbons, are active. The influence of nocturnal chemistry on aerosol composition is also largest aloft. These processes are poorly understood due to a lack of observations in the altitude range from 20 - 500m. The strong influence of vertical mixing and transport on the composition of the NBL poses an additional challenge, requiring the measurement of vertical concentration profiles and the use of chemical transport models for their interpretation. In addition, heterogeneous processes on the ground and on aerosol surfaces play an important role in the nocturnal atmosphere. In this presentation we will review our current understanding of nocturnal chemistry in the lowest 300m of the polluted atmosphere, with a focus on nitrogen compounds. A number of field experiments in recent years have given insight into the vertical distribution of some of the most important nocturnal trace gases in urban areas, such as ozone, NO2, NO3, N2O5, and HONO. In particular, two 6-week long experiments in Houston, TX, in 2006 and 2009, have shown the strong and persistent impact of vertical mixing on the distribution of all trace gases, as well as the chemistry in the lowest 300m of the atmosphere. These observations were accompanied by detailed meteorological observations and in-situ measurements of chemical species at 70m above the ground. The observations in Houston were interpreted with a 1D chemical transport model that allows quantification of chemistry and transport at night. Our results identify gaps in our

  14. Active Flow Control on a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Susan Althoff; Owens, Lewis R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Allan, Brian G.; Schuster, Ernest P.

    2004-01-01

    Boundary layer ingestion (BLI) is explored as means to improve overall system performance for Blended Wing Body configuration. The benefits of BLI for vehicle system performance benefit are assessed with a process derived from first principles suitable for highly-integrated propulsion systems. This performance evaluation process provides framework within which to assess the benefits of an integrated BLI inlet and lays the groundwork for higher-fidelity systems studies. The results of the system study show that BLI provides a significant improvement in vehicle performance if the inlet distortion can be controlled, thus encouraging the pursuit of active flow control (AFC) as a BLI enabling technology. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet distortion was assessed using a 6% scale model of a 30% BLI offset, diffusing inlet. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel with a model inlet designed specifically for this type of testing. High mass flow pulsing actuators provided the active flow control. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion was determined by 120 total pressure measurements located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum freestream Mach number of 0.15 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the pulsed actuation can reduce distortion from 29% to 4.6% as measured by the circumferential distortion descriptor DC60 using less than 1% of inlet mass flow. Closed loop control of the actuation was also demonstrated using a sidewall surface static pressure as the response sensor.

  15. Evolution of vortex-surface fields in transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Zhao, Yaomin; Xiong, Shiying

    2016-11-01

    We apply the vortex-surface field (VSF), a Lagrangian-based structure-identification method, to the DNS database of transitional boundary layers. The VSFs are constructed from the vorticity fields within a sliding window at different times and locations using a recently developed boundary-constraint method. The isosurfaces of VSF, representing vortex surfaces consisting of vortex lines with different wall distances in the laminar stage, show different evolutionary geometries in transition. We observe that the vortex surfaces with significant deformation evolve from wall-parallel planar sheets through hairpin-like structures and packets into a turbulent spot with regeneration of small-scale hairpins. From quantitative analysis, we show that a small number of representative or influential vortex surfaces can contribute significantly to the increase of the drag coefficient in transition, which implies a reduced-order model based on VSF. This work has been supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11472015, 11522215 and 11521091), and the Thousand Young Talents Program of China.

  16. The Boundary Layers in Fluids with Little Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, H.

    1950-01-01

    The vortices forming in flowing water behind solid bodies are not represented correctly by the solution of the potential theory nor by Helmholtz's jets. Potential theory is unable to satisfy the condition that the water adheres at the wetted bodies, and its solutions of the fundamental hydrodynamic equations are at variance with the observation that the flow separates from the body at a certain point and sends forth a highly turbulent boundary layer into the free flow. Helmholtz's theory attempts to imitate the latter effect in such a way that it joins two potential flows, jet and still water, nonanalytical along a stream curve. The admissibility of this method is based on the fact that, at zero pressure, which is to prevail at the cited stream curve, the connection of the fluid, and with it the effect of adjacent parts on each other, is canceled. In reality, however, the pressure at these boundaries is definitely not zero, but can even be varied arbitrarily. Besides, Helmholtz's theory with its potential flows does not satisfy the condition of adherence nor explain the origin of the vortices, for in all of these problems, the friction must be taken into account on principle, according to the vortex theorem.

  17. Coherence of simulated atmospheric boundary-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiadong, Zeng; Zhiguo, Li; Mingshui, Li

    2017-12-01

    The coherences in a plane perpendicular to incoming flow are measured in wind tunnel simulations of atmospheric turbulent flow. The measured coherences are compared with analytical expressions tailored to field measurements and with theoretical coherence models which assume homogeneous turbulence and the von Kármán’s spectrum. The comparison indicates that the simulated atmospheric boundary layer flow is approximately horizontally homogeneous turbulence. Based on the above assumption and the systematic analysis of lateral coherence, it can be concluded that the lateral coherences of simulated atmospheric boundary turbulence can be determined accurately using the von Kármán spectrum and the turbulence parameters measured by a few measurement points. The measured results also show that the spatial characteristics of vertical coherences are closely related to the dimensionless parameter {{Δ }}z/({\\bar{z}}0.3{L}ux 0.7). The vertical coherence at two heights can be roughly estimated by the ratio to {{Δ }}z/({\\bar{z}}0.3{L}ux 0.7). The relationship between the phase angles of u-, v- and w-components and the vertical separation distance and the height from the ground is further analyzed. Finally, the roles of the type of land surface roughness, the height from the ground, the turbulence intensity and the integral length scale in lateral and vertical coherences are also discussed in this study.

  18. Comparison of Methods for Determining Boundary Layer Edge Conditions for Transition Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Data previously obtained for the X-33 in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel have been reanalyzed to compare methods for determining boundary layer edge conditions for use in transition correlations. The experimental results were previously obtained utilizing the phosphor thermography technique to monitor the status of the boundary layer downstream of discrete roughness elements via global heat transfer images of the X-33 windward surface. A boundary layer transition correlation was previously developed for this data set using boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach. An algorithm was written in the present study to extract boundary layer edge quantities from higher fidelity viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions to develop transition correlations that account for viscous effects on vehicles of arbitrary complexity. The boundary layer transition correlation developed for the X-33 from the viscous solutions are compared to the previous boundary layer transition correlations. It is shown that the boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach are significantly different than those extracted from viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions. The present results demonstrate the differences obtained in correlating transition data using different computational methods.

  19. Unstable flow structures in the Blasius boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Wedin, H; Bottaro, A; Hanifi, A; Zampogna, G

    2014-04-01

    Finite amplitude coherent structures with a reflection symmetry in the spanwise direction of a parallel boundary layer flow are reported together with a preliminary analysis of their stability. The search for the solutions is based on the self-sustaining process originally described by Waleffe (Phys. Fluids 9, 883 (1997)). This requires adding a body force to the Navier-Stokes equations; to locate a relevant nonlinear solution it is necessary to perform a continuation in the nonlinear regime and parameter space in order to render the body force of vanishing amplitude. Some states computed display a spanwise spacing between streaks of the same length scale as turbulence flow structures observed in experiments (S.K. Robinson, Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech. 23, 601 (1991)), and are found to be situated within the buffer layer. The exact coherent structures are unstable to small amplitude perturbations and thus may be part of a set of unstable nonlinear states of possible use to describe the turbulent transition. The nonlinear solutions survive down to a displacement thickness Reynolds number Re * = 496 , displaying a 4-vortex structure and an amplitude of the streamwise root-mean-square velocity of 6% scaled with the free-stream velocity. At this Re* the exact coherent structure bifurcates supercritically and this is the point where the laminar Blasius flow starts to cohabit the phase space with alternative simple exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M. J.; Raman, S.

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 sq km, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta's Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.