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Sample records for absorbing column density

  1. Effective absorbing column density in the gamma-ray burst afterglow X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Braito, V.; Cusumano, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the scaling relation between the observed amount of absorption in the X-ray spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows and the absorber redshift. Through dedicated numerical simulations of an ideal instrument, we establish that this dependence has a power-law shape with index 2.4. However, for real instruments, this value depends on their low-energy cut-off, spectral resolution and on the detector spectral response in general. We thus provide appropriate scaling laws for specific instruments. Finally, we discuss the possibility to measure the absorber redshift from X-ray data alone. We find that 105-106 counts in the 0.3-10 keV band are needed to constrain the redshift with 10 per cent accuracy. As a test case, we discuss the XMM-Newton observation of GRB 090618 at z = 0.54. We are able to recover the correct redshift of this burst with the expected accuracy.

  2. Fundamental research on oscillating water column wave power absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, H.; Kato, W.; Kinoshita, T.; Masuda, K.

    1985-03-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave power absorber is one of the most promising devices, as well as the Salter Duck and the Clam. This paper presents a simple prediction method, in which the equivalent floating body approximation is used, for absorbing wave power characteristics of an oscillating water column device. The effects of the compressibility of air and inertia of an air turbine and electric generator on absorbed wave power are obtained by using the equivalent electric circuit concept. Both the experimental and theoretical studies are carried out in this paper.

  3. Column densities of interstellar molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, L., Jr.; Cochran, W. D.; Hirshfeld, A.

    1974-01-01

    Equivalent widths of some 50 lines in the 0-0 to 5-0 Lyman bands of H2 are reported in the spectra of 28 stars. Curves of growth are given and column densities for levels from J = 0 to J = 5 are tabulated, with a few values and upper limits for N(6) and N(7), together with values for b, the velocity spread parameter. In three Orion stars and in rho Leo pairs of components are detected, the difference in radial velocity is determined, and column densities are measured or estimated; tentative identifications are made with the components observed by Hobbs (1969) in the Na D-lines. Column densities for HD are given for 13 stars. Upper limits for column densities in the first and second vibrational levels are listed for several stars; the ratio of N(J = 0) in the v double prime = 1 level to that in the ground vibrational level is less than 2.4 x 10 to the minus 8th power in zeta Oph. Values of a rotational excitation temperature for the higher J levels are given for all the stars. Data are presented which show an apparent increase of velocity dispersion with J for a number of stars, as measured both from the curves of growth and from line widths.

  4. DUST EXTINCTION BIAS IN THE COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: HIGH COLUMN DENSITY, LOW-REDSHIFT GRBs ARE MORE HEAVILY OBSCURED

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Darach; Jakobsson, Pall E-mail: pja@raunvis.hi.is

    2012-08-01

    The afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have more soft-X-ray absorption than expected from the foreground gas column in the Galaxy. While the redshift of the absorption can in general not be constrained from current X-ray observations, it has been assumed that the absorption is due to metals in the host galaxy of the GRB. The large sample of X-ray afterglows and redshifts now available allows the construction of statistically meaningful distributions of the metal column densities. We construct such a sample and show, as found in previous studies, that the typical absorbing column density (N{sub H{sub X}}) increases substantially with redshift, with few high column density objects found at low-to-moderate redshifts. We show, however, that when highly extinguished bursts are included in the sample, using redshifts from their host galaxies, high column density sources are also found at low-to-moderate redshift. We infer from individual objects in the sample and from observations of blazars that the increase in column density with redshift is unlikely to be related to metals in the intergalactic medium or intervening absorbers. Instead we show that the origin of the apparent increase with redshift is primarily due to dust extinction bias: GRBs with high X-ray absorption column densities found at z {approx}< 4 typically have very high dust extinction column densities, while those found at the highest redshifts do not. It is unclear how such a strongly evolving N{sub H{sub X}}/A{sub V} ratio would arise, and based on current data, remains a puzzle.

  5. Evidence of Contribution of Intervening Clouds to Gamma-Ray Burst's X-Ray Column Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2013-10-01

    The origin of excess of X-ray column density with respect to optical extinction in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still a puzzle. A proposed explanation of the excess is the photoelectric absorption due to the intervening clouds along a GRB's line of sight. Here, we test this scenario by using the intervening Mg II absorption as a tracer of the neutral hydrogen column density of the intervening clouds. We identify a connection between the large X-ray column density (and large column density ratio of {log (N_{H,X}/N_{H\\,\\scriptsize{I}})}\\sim 0.5) and large neutral hydrogen column density probed by the Mg II doublet ratio (DR). In addition, GRBs with large X-ray column density (and large ratio of {log (N_{H,X}/N_{H\\,\\scriptsize{I}})}\\gt0) tend to have multiple saturated intervening absorbers with DR < 1.2. These results therefore indicate an additional contribution from the intervening system to the observed X-ray column density in some GRBs, although the contribution from the host galaxy alone cannot be excluded based on this study.

  6. Measured acoustic properties of variable and low density bulk absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Rice, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data were taken to determine the acoustic absorbing properties of uniform low density and layered variable density samples using a bulk absober with a perforated plate facing to hold the material in place. In the layered variable density case, the bulk absorber was packed such that the lowest density layer began at the surface of the sample and progressed to higher density layers deeper inside. The samples were placed in a rectangular duct and measurements were taken using the two microphone method. The data were used to calculate specific acoustic impedances and normal incidence absorption coefficients. Results showed that for uniform density samples the absorption coefficient at low frequencies decreased with increasing density and resonances occurred in the absorption coefficient curve at lower densities. These results were confirmed by a model for uniform density bulk absorbers. Results from layered variable density samples showed that low frequency absorption was the highest when the lowest density possible was packed in the first layer near the exposed surface. The layers of increasing density within the sample had the effect of damping the resonances.

  7. Scattering, Thermal Emission and Extinction: Column Density and Dust Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    We compare three different ways to measure the column density of molecular clouds using (1) scat- tered light (cloudshine), (2) thermal emission in the sub-millimeter and (3) extinction of background stars. Our methods for estimating the column density from thermal emission and from extinction of background stars use hierarchical Bayesian models to coherently infer correlations in the dust properties and the column density estimates. In particular, we measure the slope of the extinction law (Rv) from extinction estimates and the deviation from blackbody emission (beta) from the thermal emission estimates. These dust properties are related to the size distribution and compo- sition of dust. The comparison among these three methods therefore tells us about which regimes particular methods work or fail and about the properties of the dust at different depths inside the cloud.

  8. Effects of system densities on distillation column performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fasesan, S.O.; Sanni, S.A.; Taiwo, E.A.

    1998-06-01

    Distillation experiments were carried out on three binary systems (ethanol-butanol, ethanol-propan-2-ol, and propan-2-ol-butanol) in a 0.1-m internal diameter glass column packed with 8 mm diameter Raschig rings. The experiments were performed under total reflux conditions and at atmospheric pressure. The data collected on column performance showed that performance declined with increasing average bulk liquid density. The results also lend credence to earlier reports on the behavior of column performance with respect to component concentration in the feed mixtures. The system densities of the three binary systems were measured at four different temperatures, 30, 40, 50, and 60 C. The data were compared with the predicted data of Yen-Woods and Multifluid models. The accuracy of the predictions of the Yen-Woods model was rather poor while that of the Multifluid model was very encouraging.

  9. Dynamics and column densities of small particles ejected from spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Trajectories and relative motions of small particles ejected from a spacecraft were analyzed, and modifications to the clearing times and column densities because of orbital dynamics were assessed. It was found that despite the fact that such particles are confined by orbital dynamics to move along similar trajectories with the spacecraft rather than to continue their free expansion, the effect is negligible for viewing angles away from the orbital path. Small particles are rapidly swept away by drag and will not contribute significantly to the column density when viewing along the velocity vector in 420-km earth orbit. However, substantial increases in column density can results when viewing in a direction opposite to the velocity vector because of drag effects. In the absence of drag, significant column densities can build up both in front of and behind the spacecraft in earth orbit for particles released at a few meters per second. This effect is much less pronounced in lunar orbit because the same release velocity produces a larger orbital perturbation for the particle.

  10. Molecular column densities in selected model atmospheres. [stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Sneden, C.; Beebe, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Molecular column densities are presented for 35 molecules in a variety of cool stellar model atmospheres. From an examination of the predicted column densities, we draw the following conclusions: (1) OH might be visible in carbon stars which have been generated from triplet-alpha burning, but will be absent from carbon stars generated from the CNO bi-cycle; (2) the TiO/ZrO ratio shows small but interesting variations as C/O is changed and as the effective temperature is changed; (3) the column density of silicon dicarbide (SiC2) is sensitive to abundance, temperature, and gravity; hence, all relationships between the strength of SiC2 and other stellar parameters will show appreciable scatter. There is, however, a substantial luminosity effect present in the SiC2 column densities; (4) unexpectedly, SiC2 is anticorrelated with C2; (5) the presence of SiC2 in a carbon star allows us to eliminate the possibility that these stars are both 'hot' (T sub eff greater than or equal to 3000 K) and have been produced through the CNO bi-cycle (so that C/H is less than solar).

  11. Recent advances of packed column technology for gas dehydration and absorbent regeneration in arctic and off-shore gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    In-depth revamp of dehydration and regeneration trayed columns with proprietary structured packings in arctic gas production will be presented in terms of throughput increase and mass transfer efficiency improvement achieved. Mathematical expressions that relate the column performance to operating variables such as absorbent temperature and concentration, ratio of absorbent to gas, degree of dehydration/regeneration and number of transfer units available are described. Equipment specification and performance between conventional tray design and packed column for off-shore application are also included. Initial capital investment versus subsequent net savings of numerous commercial installations are discussed.

  12. Estimated global nitrogen deposition using NO2 column density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Xuehe; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiuying; Liu, Jinxun; Zhang, Zhen; Jin, Jiaxin; Wang, Ying; Xu, Jianhui; Cheng, Miaomiao

    2013-01-01

    Global nitrogen deposition has increased over the past 100 years. Monitoring and simulation studies of nitrogen deposition have evaluated nitrogen deposition at both the global and regional scale. With the development of remote-sensing instruments, tropospheric NO2 column density retrieved from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) sensors now provides us with a new opportunity to understand changes in reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. The concentration of NO2 in the atmosphere has a significant effect on atmospheric nitrogen deposition. According to the general nitrogen deposition calculation method, we use the principal component regression method to evaluate global nitrogen deposition based on global NO2 column density and meteorological data. From the accuracy of the simulation, about 70% of the land area of the Earth passed a significance test of regression. In addition, NO2 column density has a significant influence on regression results over 44% of global land. The simulated results show that global average nitrogen deposition was 0.34 g m−2 yr−1 from 1996 to 2009 and is increasing at about 1% per year. Our simulated results show that China, Europe, and the USA are the three hotspots of nitrogen deposition according to previous research findings. In this study, Southern Asia was found to be another hotspot of nitrogen deposition (about 1.58 g m−2 yr−1 and maintaining a high growth rate). As nitrogen deposition increases, the number of regions threatened by high nitrogen deposits is also increasing. With N emissions continuing to increase in the future, areas whose ecosystem is affected by high level nitrogen deposition will increase.

  13. 2004: Finite-Difference Time Domain Solution of Light Scattering by an Infinite Dielectric Column Immersed in an Absorbing Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Tanev, S.; Videen, G.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to calculate light scattering and absorption by an arbitrarily shaped infinite column embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used to truncate the computational domain. The single-scattering properties of the infinite column embedded in the absorbing medium, including scattering phase functions, extinction and absorption efficiencies, are derived using an area integration of the internal field. An exact solution for light scattering and absorption by a circular cylinder in an absorbing medium is used to examine the accuracy of the 2-D UPML FDTD code. With use of a cell size of 1/120 incident wavelength in the FDTD calculations, the errors in the extinction and absorption efficiencies and asymmetry factors from the 2-D UPML FDTD are generally smaller than approx .1%. The errors in the scattering phase functions are typically smaller than approx .4%. Using the 2-D UPML FDTD technique, light scattering and absorption by long noncircular columns embedded in absorbing media can be accurately solved.

  14. The dependence of gamma-ray burst X-ray column densities on the model for Galactic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcodia, R.; Campana, S.; Salvaterra, R.

    2016-05-01

    We study the X-ray absorption of a complete sample of 99 bright Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In recent years, a strong correlation has been found between the intrinsic X-ray absorbing column density (NH(z)) and the redshift. This absorption excess in high-z GRBs is now thought to be due to the overlooked contribution of the absorption along the intergalactic medium (IGM), by means of both intervening objects and the diffuse warm-hot intergalactic medium along the line of sight. In this work we neglect the absorption along the IGM, because our purpose is to study the eventual effect of a radical change in the Galactic absorption model on the NH(z) distribution. Therefore, we derive the intrinsic absorbing column densities using two different Galactic absorption models: the Leiden Argentine Bonn HI survey and the more recent model that includes molecular hydrogen. We find that if, on the one hand, the new Galactic model considerably affects the single column density values, on the other hand, there is no drastic change in the distribution as a whole. It becomes clear that the contribution of Galactic column densities alone, no matter how improved, is not sufficient to change the observed general trend and it has to be considered as a second order correction. The cosmological increase of NH(z) as a function of redshift persists and, to explain the observed distribution, it is necessary to include the contribution of both the diffuse intergalactic medium and the intervening systems along the line of sight of the GRBs.

  15. NGC 1365: A low column density state unveiling a low ionization disk wind

    SciTech Connect

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Porquet, D.; Risaliti, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present the time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of NGC 1365 collected during one XMM-Newton observation, which caught this 'changing-look' active galactic nucleus in a high flux state characterized also by a low column density (N {sub H} ∼ 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}) of the X-ray absorber. During this observation, the low-energy photoelectric cut-off is at about ∼1 keV and the primary continuum can be investigated with the XMM-Newton-RGS data, which show strong spectral variability that can be explained as a variable low N {sub H} that decreased from N {sub H} ∼ 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2} to 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} in a 100 ks timescale. The spectral analysis of the last segment of the observation revealed the presence of several absorption features that can be associated with an ionized (log ξ ∼ 2 erg cm s{sup –1}) outflowing wind (v {sub out} ∼ 2000 km s{sup –1}). We detected for the first time a possible P-Cygni profile of the Mg XII Lyα line associated with this mildly ionized absorber indicative of a wide angle outflowing wind. We suggest that this wind is a low ionization zone of the highly ionized wind present in NGC 1365, which is responsible for the iron K absorption lines and is located within the variable X-ray absorber. At the end of the observation, we detected a strong absorption line at E ∼ 0.76 keV most likely associated with a lower ionization zone of the absorber (log ξ ∼ 0.2 erg cm s{sup –1}, N {sub H} ∼ 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}), which suggests that the variable absorber in NGC 1365 could be a low ionization zone of the disk wind.

  16. Density measurement in air with saturable absorbing seed gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.

    1982-01-01

    Approaches which have the potential to make density measurements in a compressible flow, where one or more laser beams are used as probes, were investigated. Saturation in sulfur hexafluoride iodine and a crossed beam technique where one beam acts as a saturating beam and the other is at low intensity and acts as a probe beam are considered. It is shown that a balance between an increase in fluorescence intensity with increasing pressure from line broadening and the normal decrease in intensity with increasing pressure from quenching can be used to develop a linear relation between fluorescence intensity and number density and lead to a new density measurement scheme. The method is used to obtain a density image of the cross section of an iodine seeded underexpanded supersonic jet of nitrogen, by illuminating the cross section by a sheet of laser light.

  17. The column density distribution of hard X-ray radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, F.; Bassani, L.; Landi, R.; Bazzano, A.; Dallacasa, D.; La Franca, F.; Malizia, A.; Venturi, T.; Ubertini, P.

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of absorption in active galactic nuclei (AGN) with jets, we have studied the column density distribution of a hard X-ray selected sample of radio galaxies, derived from the INTEGRAL/Imager on Board the Integral Satellite (IBIS) and Swift/The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) AGN catalogues (˜7-10 per cent of the total AGN population). The 64 radio galaxies have a typical FR II radio morphology and are characterized by high 20-100 keV luminosities (from 1042 to 1046 erg s-1) and high Eddington ratios (log LBol/LEdd typically larger than ˜0.01). The observed fraction of absorbed AGN (NH > 1022 cm-2) is around 40 per cent among the total sample, and ˜75 per cent among type 2 AGN. The majority of obscured AGN are narrow-line objects, while unobscured AGN are broad-line objects, obeying to the zeroth-order predictions of unified models. A significant anti-correlation between the radio core dominance parameter and the X-ray column density is found. The observed fraction of Compton thick AGN is ˜2-3 per cent, in comparison with the 5-7 per cent found in radio-quiet hard X-ray selected AGN. We have estimated the absorption and Compton thick fractions in a hard X-ray sample containing both radio galaxies and non-radio galaxies and therefore affected by the same selection biases. No statistical significant difference was found in the absorption properties of radio galaxies and non-radio galaxies sample. In particular, the Compton thick objects are likely missing in both samples and the fraction of obscured radio galaxies appears to decrease with luminosity as observed in hard X-ray non-radio galaxies.

  18. The 3D heat flux density distribution on a novel parabolic trough wavy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demagh, Yassine; Kabar, Yassine; Bordja, Lyes; Noui, Samira

    2016-05-01

    The non-uniform concentrated solar flux distribution on the outer surface of the absorber pipe can lead to large circumferential gradient temperature and high concentrated temperature of the absorber pipe wall, which is one of the primary causes of parabolic trough solar receiver breakdown. In this study, a novel shape of the parabolic trough absorber pipe is proposed as a solution to well homogenize the solar flux distribution, as well as, the temperature in the absorber wall. The conventional straight absorber located along the focal line of the parabola is replaced by wavy one (invention patent by Y. Demagh [1]) for which the heat flux density distribution on the outer surface varies in both axial and azimuthal directions (3D) while it varies only in the azimuthal direction on the former (2D). As far as we know, there is not previous study which has used a longitudinally wavy pipe as an absorber into the parabolic trough collector unit.

  19. Does the differential photodissociation and chemical fractionation reaction of 13CO affect the column density estimates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szücs, László; Glover, Simon

    2013-07-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and its isotopes are frequently used as a tracer of column density in studies of the dense interstellar medium. The most abundant CO isotope, 12CO, is usually optically thick in intermediate and high density regions and so provides only a lower limit for the column density. In these regions, less abundant isotopes are used, such as 13CO. To relate observations of 13CO to the 12CO column density, a constant 12CO/13CO isotopic ratio is often adopted. In this work, we examine the impact of two effects -- selective photodissociation of 13CO and chemical fractionation -- on the 12CO/13CO isotopic ratio, with the aid of numerical simulations. Our simulations follow the coupled chemical, thermal and dynamical evolution of isolated molecular clouds in several different environments. We post-process our simulation results with line radiative transfer and produce maps of the emergent 13CO emission. We compare emission maps produced assuming a constant isotopic ratio with ones produced using the results from a more self-consistent calculation, and also compare the column density maps derived from the emission maps. We find that at low and high column densities, the column density estimates that we obtain with the approximation of constant isotopic ratio agree well with those derived from the self-consistent model. At intermediate column densities, 10^12 cm^-2 < N(13CO)< 10^15 cm^-2, the approximate model under-predicts the column density by a factor of a few, but we show that we can correct for this, and hence obtain accurate column density estimates, via application of a simple correction factor.

  20. The Bane of Column Density Analysis and What Good It Can Do for Us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How-Huan Chen, Hope; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Burkhart, Blakesley K.; Myers, Philip C.; Collins, David C.; Meisner, Aaron M.; Lee, Katherine I.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that astronomers are inclined to apply statistical tools, from least-square fitting to machine learning, on the big, high-dimensional data, not enough care is often spent on examining the biases that could be introduced by sample selection and observation. The talk focuses on investigating arguably one of the most often applied statistical analyses in clouds and filaments recently--the probability distribution function (PDF) analysis of column density. We look at the correlation between column density PDF and various physical processes including turbulence and star formation as traced by young stellar objects and star forming cores, in both observation and simulation; as well as potential problems in statistically consistent fitting of column density distribution, validating correlation, biased sample selection, and projection effects. Our results show that 1) even though on large scale, the "width" of the column density PDF seems to correlate with turbulence, no clear correlation is found between column density PDF and turbulence in both simulation and observation, and 2) even previous works show that the index of the "power-law tail" correlates with the star formation activity, there is statistical ambiguity in the sampling of column density structures and associating point sources with any of these structures. We further analyze the hierachical structures of column density in molecular clouds and filaments, using the structure extraction algorithm, the dendrogram.

  1. Density measurement in air with a saturable absorbing seed gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.

    1981-01-01

    Resonantly enhanced scattering from the iodine molecule is studied experimentally for the purpose of developing a scheme for the measurement of density in a gas dynamic flow. A study of the spectrum of iodine, the collection of saturation data in iodine, and the development of a mathematical model for correlating saturation effects were pursued for a mixture of 0.3 torr iodine in nitrogen and for mixture pressures up to one atmosphere. For the desired pressure range, saturation effects in iodine were found to be too small to be useful in allowing density measurements to be made. The effects of quenching can be reduced by detuning the exciting laser wavelength from the absorption line center of the iodine line used (resonant Raman scattering). The signal was found to be nearly independent of pressure, for pressures up to one atmosphere, when the excitation beam was detuned 6 GHz from line center for an isolated line in iodine. The signal amplitude was found to be nearly equal to the amplitude for fluorescence at atmospheric pressure, which indicates a density measurement scheme is possible.

  2. Isoelectric focusing of red blood cells in a density gradient stabilized column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Miller, T. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of Ficoll and cell application pH on red blood cell electrophoretic mobility and focusing pH were investigated by focusing cells in a density gradient stabilized column. Sample loading, cell dispersion, column conductivity, resolution of separation, and the effect of Ampholines were examined.

  3. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides in vegetables and fruits using two-layered column with graphitized carbon and water absorbent polymer.

    PubMed

    Obana, H; Akutsu, K; Okihashi, M; Hori, S

    2001-09-01

    A high-throughput multiresidue analysis of pesticides in non-fatty vegetables and fruits was developed. The method consisted of a single extraction and a single clean-up procedure. Food samples were extracted with ethyl acetate and the mixture of extract and food dregs were poured directly into the clean-up column. The clean-up column consisted of two layers of water-absorbent polymer (upper) and graphitized carbon (lower), which were packed in a reservoir (75 ml ) of a cartridge column. The polymer removed water in the extract while the carbon performed clean-up. In a recovery test, 110 pesticides were spiked and average recoveries were more than 95% from spinach and orange. Most pesticides were recovered in the range 70-115% with RSD usually < 10% for five experiments. The residue analyses were performed by the extraction of 12 pesticides from 13 samples. The two methods resulted in similar residue levels except chlorothalonil in celery, for which the result was lower with the proposed method. The results confirmed that the proposed method could be applied to monitoring of pesticide residue in foods.

  4. Evolving molecular cloud structure and the column density probability distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Rachel L.; Wadsley, James; Sills, Alison

    2014-12-01

    The structure of molecular clouds can be characterized with the probability distribution function (PDF) of the mass surface density. In particular, the properties of the distribution can reveal the nature of the turbulence and star formation present inside the molecular cloud. In this paper, we explore how these structural characteristics evolve with time and also how they relate to various cloud properties as measured from a sample of synthetic column density maps of molecular clouds. We find that, as a cloud evolves, the peak of its column density PDF will shift to surface densities below the observational threshold for detection, resulting in an underlying lognormal distribution which has been effectively lost at late times. Our results explain why certain observations of actively star-forming, dynamically older clouds, such as the Orion molecular cloud, do not appear to have any evidence of a lognormal distribution in their column density PDFs. We also study the evolution of the slope and deviation point of the power-law tails for our sample of simulated clouds and show that both properties trend towards constant values, thus linking the column density structure of the molecular cloud to the surface density threshold for star formation.

  5. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the

  6. X-ray shadows of the Draco nebula. A new method to determine total hydrogen column densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, P.; Wennmacher, A.; Herbstmeier, U.; Mebold, U.; Egger, R.; Snowden, S. L.

    1998-08-01

    We have used the ROSAT (1)/(4) keV all-sky survey together with H I observations to derive the total column density of hydrogen nuclei, N(H), of the Draco nebula [= G91+38 (v_LSR = -21 km s(-1) )], which casts a deep shadow in the soft X-ray background. Adopting a two-component model for the X-ray plasma in which one component is located behind the Draco nebula, the other in front of all the absorbing material (the so-called Local Hot Bubble, LHB), we fit the parameters of the radiation transport equation to the observed X-ray count rates. The optical depth in this equation is derived from H I column densities obtained with the 100-m telescope and the appropriate X-ray absorption cross sections. The solutions obtained by this approach are biased since H I column densities underestimate the absorption in regions where molecular hydrogen is abundant. The bias is avoided by excluding regions with strong X-ray shadowing from the fit and by comparing fits which are obtained on the basis of hydrogen column densities derived from IRAS 100 mu m data. We find that the absorbing column densities at the deepest X-ray shadows are up to about 3 10(20) cm(-2) larger than the observed H I column densities. At the edge towards low galactic latitudes and longitudes, up to 70% of the hydrogen is in molecular form. In other parts of the nebula the molecular abundance is la25 %. We also find an approximately constant FIR-emissivity per hydrogen nucleon (H I + 2H_2) of about 1.0 10(-20) MJy sr(-1) cm(2) . This is close to the mean value for the galactic cirrus (0.86 10(-20) MJy sr(-1) cm(2) ). In contrast, the FIR-emissivity per H I atom is varying strongly across the nebula. The xWCO values (equiv N(H_2)/W((12) CO)) found in the Draco nebula are typically in the range 0.34 < xWCO < 0.52 10(20) cm(-2) (K km s(-1) )(-1) , similar to other cirrus clouds. We find a very low xWCO ratio of 0.17 cm(-2) (K km s(-1) )(-1) at the edge of the Draco nebula towards low galactic coordinates where

  7. Far-infrared Dust Temperatures and Column Densities of the MALT90 Molecular Clump Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Contreras, Yanett; Smith, Howard A.; Jackson, James M.; Hoq, Sadia; Rathborne, Jill M.

    2015-12-01

    We present dust column densities and dust temperatures for ˜3000 young, high-mass molecular clumps from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey, derived from adjusting single-temperature dust emission models to the far-infrared intensity maps measured between 160 and 870 μm from the Herschel/Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-Gal) and APEX/APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) surveys. We discuss the methodology employed in analyzing the data, calculating physical parameters, and estimating their uncertainties. The population average dust temperature of the clumps are 16.8 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that do not exhibit mid-infrared signatures of star formation (quiescent clumps), 18.6 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that display mid-infrared signatures of ongoing star formation but have not yet developed an H ii region (protostellar clumps), and 23.7 ± 0.2 and 28.1 ± 0.3 K for clumps associated with H ii and photo-dissociation regions, respectively. These four groups exhibit large overlaps in their temperature distributions, with dispersions ranging between 4 and 6 K. The median of the peak column densities of the protostellar clump population is 0.20 ± 0.02 g cm-2, which is about 50% higher compared to the median of the peak column densities associated with clumps in the other evolutionary stages. We compare the dust temperatures and column densities measured toward the center of the clumps with the mean values of each clump. We find that in the quiescent clumps, the dust temperature increases toward the outer regions and that these clumps are associated with the shallowest column density profiles. In contrast, molecular clumps in the protostellar or H ii region phase have dust temperature gradients more consistent with internal heating and are associated with steeper column density profiles compared with the quiescent clumps.

  8. Inverse estimation of parameters for multidomain flow models in soil columns with different macropore densities

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.

    2013-01-01

    Soil and crop management practices have been found to modify soil structure and alter macropore densities. An ability to accurately determine soil hydraulic parameters and their variation with changes in macropore density is crucial for assessing potential contamination from agricultural chemicals. This study investigates the consequences of using consistent matrix and macropore parameters in simulating preferential flow and bromide transport in soil columns with different macropore densities (no macropore, single macropore, and multiple macropores). As used herein, the term“macropore density” is intended to refer to the number of macropores per unit area. A comparison between continuum-scale models including single-porosity model (SPM), mobile-immobile model (MIM), and dual-permeability model (DPM) that employed these parameters is also conducted. Domain-specific parameters are obtained from inverse modeling of homogeneous (no macropore) and central macropore columns in a deterministic framework and are validated using forward modeling of both low-density (3 macropores) and high-density (19 macropores) multiple-macropore columns. Results indicate that these inversely modeled parameters are successful in describing preferential flow but not tracer transport in both multiple-macropore columns. We believe that lateral exchange between matrix and macropore domains needs better accounting to efficiently simulate preferential transport in the case of dense, closely spaced macropores. Increasing model complexity from SPM to MIM to DPM also improved predictions of preferential flow in the multiple-macropore columns but not in the single-macropore column. This suggests that the use of a more complex model with resolved domain-specific parameters is recommended with an increase in macropore density to generate forecasts with higher accuracy. PMID:24511165

  9. The Column Density Distribution and Continuum Opacity of the Intergalactic and Circumgalactic Medium at Redshift langzrang = 2.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Shapley, Alice E.; Pettini, Max

    2013-06-01

    We present new high-precision measurements of the opacity of the intergalactic and circumgalactic medium (IGM; CGM) at langzrang = 2.4. Using Voigt profile fits to the full Lyα and Lyβ forests in 15 high-resolution high-S/N spectra of hyperluminous QSOs, we make the first statistically robust measurement of the frequency of absorbers with H I column densities 14 \\lesssim log (N_H\\,\\scriptsize{ I}/ {cm}^{-2}) \\lesssim 17.2. We also present the first measurements of the frequency distribution of H I absorbers in the volume surrounding high-z galaxies (the CGM, 300 pkpc), finding that the incidence of absorbers in the CGM is much higher than in the IGM. In agreement with Rudie et al., we find that there are fractionally more high-N H I absorbers than low-N H I absorbers in the CGM compared to the IGM, leading to a shallower power law fit to the CGM frequency distribution. We use these new measurements to calculate the total opacity of the IGM and CGM to hydrogen-ionizing photons, finding significantly higher opacity than most previous studies, especially from absorbers with log (N_H\\,\\scriptsize{ I}/ {cm}^{-2}) < 17.2. Reproducing the opacity measured in our data as well as the incidence of absorbers with log (N_H\\,\\scriptsize{ I}/ {cm}^{-2}) \\gt 17.2 requires a broken power law parameterization of the frequency distribution with a break near N H I ≈1015 cm-2. We compute new estimates of the mean free path (λmfp) to hydrogen-ionizing photons at z em = 2.4, finding λmfp = 147 ± 15 Mpc when considering only IGM opacity. If instead, we consider photons emanating from a high-z star-forming galaxy and account for the local excess opacity due to the surrounding CGM of the galaxy itself, the mean free path is reduced to λmfp = 121 ± 15 Mpc. These λmfp measurements are smaller than recent estimates and should inform future studies of the metagalactic UV background and of ionizing sources at z ≈ 2-3. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory

  10. THE COLUMN DENSITY VARIANCE IN TURBULENT INTERSTELLAR MEDIA: A FRACTAL MODEL APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2012-12-20

    Fractional Brownian motion structures are used to investigate the dependency of column density variance ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN}) in the turbulent interstellar medium on the variance of three-dimensional density ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub ln{rho}}) and the power-law slope of the density power spectrum. We provide quantitative expressions to infer the three-dimensional density variance, which is not directly observable, from the observable column density variance and spectral slope. We also investigate the relationship between the column density variance and sonic Mach number (M{sub s}) in the hydrodynamic (HD) regime by assuming the spectral slope and density variance to be functions of sonic Mach number, as obtained from the HD turbulence simulations. They are related by the expression {sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN} = A{sigma}{sub ln{rho}} {sup 2} = Aln (1 + b {sup 2} M{sup 2}{sub s}), suggested by Burkhart and Lazarian for the magnetohydrodynamic case. The proportional constant A varies from Almost-Equal-To 0.2 to Almost-Equal-To 0.4 in the HD regime as the turbulence forcing parameter b increases from 1/3 (purely solenoidal forcing) to 1 (purely compressive forcing). It is also discussed that the parameter A is lowered in the presence of a magnetic field.

  11. Column-switching high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for determination of asiaticoside in rat plasma and bile with ultraviolet absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Baek, M; Rho, Y S; Kim, D H

    1999-09-24

    A column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method is described for the determination of asiaticoside in rat plasma and bile using column-switching and ultraviolet (UV) absorbance detection. Plasma was simply deproteinated with acetonitrile prior to injection and bile was directly injected onto the HPLC system consisting of a clean-up column, a concentrating column, and an analytical column, which were connected with two six-port switching valves. Detection of asiaticoside was accurate and repeatable, with a limit of quantification of 0.125 microg/ml in plasma and 1 microg/ml in bile. The calibration curves were linear in a concentration range of 0.125-2.5 microg/ml and 1-20 microg/ml for asiaticoside in rat plasma and bile, respectively. This method has been successfully applied to determine the level of asiaticoside in rat plasma and bile samples from pharmacokinetics and biliary excretion studies.

  12. Spatial and temporal variations in the column density distribution of comet Halley's CN coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Rita; Schlosser, W.; Meisser, W.; Koczet, P.; Celnik, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Mean radial column density profiles of comet P/Halley's CN coma were derived by combining photographic and photoelectric observations. The shape of the profiles as well as their temporal variations were analyzed in detail and compared with the results of other CN observations of the comet.

  13. Calibrating Column Density Tracers with Gamma-Ray Observations of the ρ Ophiuchi Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Ryan D.; Teachey, Alex; Paglione, Timothy A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse gamma-ray emission from interstellar clouds results largely from cosmic ray (CR) proton collisions with ambient gas, regardless of the gas state, temperature, or dust properties of the cloud. The interstellar medium is predominantly transparent to both CRs and gamma-rays, so GeV emission is a unique probe of the total gas column density. The gamma-ray emissivity of a cloud of known column density is then a measure of the impinging CR population and may be used to map the k-scale CR distribution in the Galaxy. To this end, we test a number of commonly used column density tracers to evaluate their effectiveness in modeling the GeV emission from the relatively quiescent, nearby ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud. We confirm that both H i and an appropriate {{{H}}}2 tracer are required to reproduce the total gas column densities probed by diffuse gamma-ray emisison. We find that the optical depth at 353 GHz ({τ }353) from Planck best reproduces the gamma-ray data overall, based on the test statistic across the entire region of interest, but near-infrared stellar extinction also performs very well, with smaller spatial residuals in the densest parts of the cloud.

  14. Estimation of high-resolution dust column density maps. Empirical model fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Sub-millimetre dust emission is an important tracer of column density N of dense interstellar clouds. One has to combine surface brightness information at different spatial resolutions, and specific methods are needed to derive N at a resolution higher than the lowest resolution of the observations. Some methods have been discussed in the literature, including a method (in the following, method B) that constructs the N estimate in stages, where the smallest spatial scales being derived only use the shortest wavelength maps. Aims: We propose simple model fitting as a flexible way to estimate high-resolution column density maps. Our goal is to evaluate the accuracy of this procedure and to determine whether it is a viable alternative for making these maps. Methods: The new method consists of model maps of column density (or intensity at a reference wavelength) and colour temperature. The model is fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, comparing model predictions with observations at their native resolution. We analyse simulated surface brightness maps and compare its accuracy with method B and the results that would be obtained using high-resolution observations without noise. Results: The new method is able to produce reliable column density estimates at a resolution significantly higher than the lowest resolution of the input maps. Compared to method B, it is relatively resilient against the effects of noise. The method is computationally more demanding, but is feasible even in the analysis of large Herschel maps. Conclusions: The proposed empirical modelling method E is demonstrated to be a good alternative for calculating high-resolution column density maps, even with considerable super-resolution. Both methods E and B include the potential for further improvements, e.g., in the form of better a priori constraints.

  15. Column densities resulting from shuttle sublimator/evaporator operation. [optical density of nozzle flow containing water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The proposed disposal of H2O from the shuttle fuel cell operation by ejecting it in vapor form through a supersonic nozzle at the rate of 100 lb/day has been investigated from the point of view of the possible interference to astronomical experiments. If the nozzle is located at the tail and directed along the shuttle longitudinal axis, the resulting column density will be less than 10 to th 12th power molecules/sq cm at viewing angles larger than 48 deg above the longitudinal axis. The molecules in the trail will diffuse rapidly. The column density contribution from molecules expelled on the previous orbit is 1.3 x 10 to the 8th power molecules/sq cm. This contribution diminishes by the inverse square root of the number of orbits since the molecules were expelled. The molecular backscatter from atmospheric molecules is also calculated. If the plume is directed into the flight path, the column density along a perpendicular is found to be 1.5 x 10 to the 11th power molecules/sq cm. The return flux is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the 12th power molecules/sq cm/sec at the stagnation point. With reasonable care in design of experiments to protect them from the backscatter flux of water molecules, the expulsion of 100 lb/day does not appear to create an insurmountable difficulty for the shuttle experiments.

  16. FAR-INFRARED DUST TEMPERATURES AND COLUMN DENSITIES OF THE MALT90 MOLECULAR CLUMP SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Smith, Howard A.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Contreras, Yanett; Rathborne, Jill M.; Jackson, James M.; Hoq, Sadia

    2015-12-20

    We present dust column densities and dust temperatures for ∼3000 young, high-mass molecular clumps from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey, derived from adjusting single-temperature dust emission models to the far-infrared intensity maps measured between 160 and 870 μm from the Herschel/Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-Gal) and APEX/APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) surveys. We discuss the methodology employed in analyzing the data, calculating physical parameters, and estimating their uncertainties. The population average dust temperature of the clumps are 16.8 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that do not exhibit mid-infrared signatures of star formation (quiescent clumps), 18.6 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that display mid-infrared signatures of ongoing star formation but have not yet developed an H ii region (protostellar clumps), and 23.7 ± 0.2 and 28.1 ± 0.3 K for clumps associated with H ii and photo-dissociation regions, respectively. These four groups exhibit large overlaps in their temperature distributions, with dispersions ranging between 4 and 6 K. The median of the peak column densities of the protostellar clump population is 0.20 ± 0.02 g cm{sup −2}, which is about 50% higher compared to the median of the peak column densities associated with clumps in the other evolutionary stages. We compare the dust temperatures and column densities measured toward the center of the clumps with the mean values of each clump. We find that in the quiescent clumps, the dust temperature increases toward the outer regions and that these clumps are associated with the shallowest column density profiles. In contrast, molecular clumps in the protostellar or H ii region phase have dust temperature gradients more consistent with internal heating and are associated with steeper column density profiles compared with the quiescent clumps.

  17. Relationship between the column density distribution and evolutionary class of molecular clouds as viewed by ATLASGAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu-Vicente, J.; Kainulainen, J.; Stutz, A.; Henning, Th.; Beuther, H.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first study of the relationship between the column density distribution of molecular clouds within nearby Galactic spiral arms and their evolutionary status as measured from their stellar content. We analyze a sample of 195 molecular clouds located at distances below 5.5 kpc, identified from the ATLASGAL 870 μm data. We define three evolutionary classes within this sample: starless clumps, star-forming clouds with associated young stellar objects, and clouds associated with H ii regions. We find that the N(H2) probability density functions (N-PDFs) of these three classes of objects are clearly different: the N-PDFs of starless clumps are narrowest and close to log-normal in shape, while star-forming clouds and H ii regions exhibit a power-law shape over a wide range of column densities and log-normal-like components only at low column densities. We use the N-PDFs to estimate the evolutionary time-scales of the three classes of objects based on a simple analytic model from literature. Finally, we show that the integral of the N-PDFs, the dense gas mass fraction, depends on the total mass of the regions as measured by ATLASGAL: more massive clouds contain greater relative amounts of dense gas across all evolutionary classes. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Validation of Carbon Monoxide and Methane Vertical Column Densities Retrieved from SCIAMACHY Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstaffl, Philipp; Hamidouche, Mourad; Schreier, Franz; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Carbon monoxide and methane are key species of Earth's atmosphere, highly relevant for climate and air quality. Accordingly, a large number of spaceborne sensors are observing these species in the microwave, thermal and near infrared. For the analysis of short wave infrared spectra measured by SCIAMACHY aboard the ENVISAT satellite and similar instrument(s) we had developed the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm: BIRRA is a separable least squares fit of the measured radiance with respect to molecular column densities and auxiliary parameters (optional: surface albedo, baseline, slit function width, and wavenumber shift). BIRRA has been implemented in the operational SCIAMACHY L1 to 2 processor for the retrieval of CO and CH4 from channel 8 (2.3 mue) and 6 (1.6 mue), respectively. Our tests are based on separate comparisons with existing space or ground-based measurements of carbon monoxide and methane column densities. In this poster intercomparisons of CO and CH4 columns estimated from SCIAMACHY with coincident and co-located retrievals provided by ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are provided. More specifically, we have used data from several NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) and TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) stations. Our strategy for quality check of these products and the selection of specific geographical areas will be discussed.

  19. Ground-based FTIR measurements of vertical column densities of several trace gases above Spitsbergen

    SciTech Connect

    Notholt, J. ); Schrems, O. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors report column density measurements of N[sub 2]O, CH[sub 4], HF, HCl, O[sub 3], NO[sub 2] and HNO[sub 3], made from Ny-Alesund (79[degrees]N), using a ground-based FTIR instrument. The data was collected in March 1992, over a time interval where the site was inside, and then outside the polar vortex.

  20. A minimum column density of 1 g cm(-2) for massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Mark R; McKee, Christopher F

    2008-02-28

    Massive stars are very rare, but their extreme luminosities make them both the only type of young star we can observe in distant galaxies and the dominant energy sources in the Universe today. They form rarely because efficient radiative cooling keeps most star--forming gas clouds close to isothermal as they collapse, and this favours fragmentation into stars of one solar mass or lower. Heating of a cloud by accreting low-mass stars within it can prevent fragmentation and allow formation of massive stars, but the necessary properties for a cloud to form massive stars-and therefore where massive stars form in a galaxy--have not yet been determined. Here we show that only clouds with column densities of at least 1 g cm(-2) can avoid fragmentation and form massive stars. This threshold, and the environmental variation of the stellar initial mass function that it implies, naturally explain the characteristic column densities associated with massive star clusters and the difference between the radial profiles of Halpha and ultraviolet emission in galactic disks. The existence of a threshold also implies that the initial mass function should show detectable variation with environment within the Galaxy, that the characteristic column densities of clusters containing massive stars should vary between galaxies, and that star formation rates in some galactic environments may have been systematically underestimated.

  1. Molecular column densities in selected model atmospheres. [chemical analysis of carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Beebe, R. F.; Sneden, C.

    1974-01-01

    From an examination of predicted column densities, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) The SiO ought to be visible in carbon stars which were generated from triple alpha burning, but absent from carbon stars generated from the CNO bi-cycle. (2) Variation in the observed relative strengths of TiO and ZrO is indicative of real differences in the ratio Ti/Zr. (3) The TiO/ZrO ratio shows a small variation as C/O and effective temperature is changed. (4) Column density of silicon dicarbide (SiC2) is sensitive to abundance, temperature, and gravity; hence all relationships between the strength of SiC2 and other stellar parameters will show appreciable scatter. There is however, a substantial luminosity effect present in the SiC2 column densities. (5) Unexpectedly, SiC2 is anti-correlated with C2. (6) The presence of SiC2 in a carbon star eliminates the possibility of these stars having temperatures greater than or equal to 3000 K, or being produced through the CNO bi-cycle.

  2. Pressure, temperature and density drops along supercritical fluid chromatography columns. I. Experimental results for neat carbon dioxide and columns packed with 3- and 5-micron particles.

    PubMed

    Poe, Donald P; Veit, Devon; Ranger, Megan; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Tarafder, Abhijit; Guiochon, Georges

    2012-08-10

    The pressure drop and temperature drop on columns packed with 3- and 5-micron particles were measured using neat CO(2) at a flow rate of 5 mL/min, at temperatures from 20°C to 100°C, and outlet pressures from 80 to 300 bar. The density drop was calculated based on the temperature and pressure at the column inlet and outlet. The columns were suspended in a circulating air bath either bare or covered with foam insulation. The results show that the pressure drop depends on the outlet pressure, the operating temperature, and the thermal environment. A temperature drop was observed for all conditions studied. The temperature drop was relatively small (less than 3°C) for combinations of low temperature and high pressure. Larger temperature drops and density drops occurred at higher temperatures and low to moderate pressures. Covering the column with thermal insulation resulted in larger temperature drops and corresponding smaller density drops. At 20°C the temperature drop was never more than a few degrees. The largest temperature drops occurred for both columns when insulated at 80°C and 80 bar, reaching a maximum value of 21°C for the 5-micron column, and 26°C for the 3-micron column. For an adiabatic column, the temperature drop depends on the pressure drop, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the density and the heat capacity of the mobile phase fluid, and can be described by a simple mathematical relationship. For a fixed operating temperature and outlet pressure, the temperature drop increases monotonically with the pressure drop.

  3. Accounting for surface reflectance in the derivation of vertical column densities of NO2 from airborne imaging DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Bösch, Tim; Seyler, André; Constantin, Daniel Eduard; Shaiganfar, Reza; Merlaud, Alexis; Ruhtz, Thomas; Wagner, Thomas; van Roozendael, Michel; Burrows, John. P.

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. In addition to their directly harmful effects on the respiratory system of living organisms, they influence the levels of tropospheric ozone and contribute to acid rain and eutrophication of ecosystems. As they are produced in combustion processes, they can serve as an indicator for anthropogenic air pollution. In the late summers of 2014 and 2015, two extensive measurement campaigns were conducted in Romania by several European research institutes, with financial support from ESA. The AROMAT / AROMAT-2 campaigns (Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases) were dedicated to measurements of air quality parameters utilizing newly developed instrumentation at state-of-the-art. The experiences gained will help to calibrate and validate the measurements taken by the upcoming Sentinel-S5p mission scheduled for launch in 2016. The IUP Bremen contributed to these campaigns with its airborne imaging DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument AirMAP (Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution). AirMAP allows retrieving spatial distributions of trace gas columns densities in a stripe below the aircraft. The measurements have a high spatial resolution of approximately 30 x 80 m2 (along x across track) at a typical flight altitude of 3000 m. Supported by the instrumental setup and the large swath, gapless maps of trace gas distributions above a large city, like Bucharest or Berlin, can be acquired within a time window of approximately two hours. These properties make AirMAP a valuable tool for the validation of trace gas measurements from space. DOAS retrievals yield the density of absorbers integrated along the light path of the measurement. The light path is altered with a changing surface reflectance, leading to enhanced / reduced slant column densities of NO2 depending on surface properties. This effect must be considered in

  4. Increase in SO2 and NO2 column density during ozone-hole event at Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshin, S. K.; Chakrabarty, D. K.

    A Brewer spectrophotometer was installed at Maitri 70 7 o S 11 7 o E in the Antarctica in July 1999 by the India Meteorological Department It began taking routine observations of O 3 SO 2 and NO 2 column density and UV-flux at ground from September 1999 We present here the results of analysis of these observations made from September 1999 to December 2003 during ozone-hole event We have chosen two species SO 2 which is below the ozone-depleted region and NO 2 which is above the ozone-depleted region We found an increase in SO 2 column during ozone-hole event An increase in NO 2 column was also found during this event but not identical with that of SO 2 The increase in SO 2 was found to be in phase with the increase in UV-flux at the ground level During ozone-hole event the SO 2 column increased from a value less than 0 5 to sim 2 5 DU NO 2 column increased from a value less than 0 1 to sim 1DU and UV-flux at ground increased from a value less than 40 to sim 200mW m -2 SO 2 lies mainly in the upper troposphere The increase in SO 2 is due to the penetration and increase of UV-B flux in the troposphere under ozone-depleted condition of the stratosphere during ozone-hole event The increase in NO 2 is due to the seasonal variation of NO in the stratosphere

  5. Analysis of Mexico City urban air pollution using nitrogen dioxide column density measurements from UV/Visible spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Payne, D. G.; Grutter, M.; Melamed, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The differential optical absorption spectroscopy method (DOAS) was used to get column densities of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the analysis of zenith sky UV/visible spectra. Since the optical path length provides critical information in interpreting NO2 column densities, in conjunction with NO2 column densities, the oxygen dimer (O4) column density was retrieved to give insight into the optical path length. We report observations of year round NO2 and O4 column densities (from august 2009 to september 2010) from which the mean seasonal levels and the daily evolution, as well as the occurrence of elevated pollution episodes are examined. Surface nitric oxide (NO) and NO2 from the local monitoring network, as well as wind data and the vertical aerosol density from continuous Lidar measurements are used in the analysis to investigate specific events in the context of local emissions from vehicular traffic, photochemical production and transport from industrial emissions. The NO2 column density measurements will enhance the understanding Mexico City urban air pollution. Recent research has begun to unravel the complexity of the air pollution problem in Mexico City and its effects not only locally but on a regional and global scale as well.

  6. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. I. Effects of line-of-sight contamination on the column density structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Ossenkopf, V.; Csengeri, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Federrath, C.; Tremblin, P.; Girichidis, P.; Bontemps, S.; André, Ph.

    2015-03-01

    Column-density maps of molecular clouds are one of the most important observables in the context of molecular cloud- and star-formation (SF) studies. With the Herschel satellite it is now possible to precisely determine the column density from dust emission, which is the best tracer of the bulk of material in molecular clouds. However, line-of-sight (LOS) contamination from fore- or background clouds can lead to overestimating the dust emission of molecular clouds, in particular for distant clouds. This implies values that are too high for column density and mass, which can potentially lead to an incorrect physical interpretation of the column density probability distribution function (PDF). In this paper, we use observations and simulations to demonstrate how LOS contamination affects the PDF. We apply a first-order approximation (removing a constant level) to the molecular clouds of Auriga and Maddalena (low-mass star-forming), and Carina and NGC 3603 (both high-mass SF regions). In perfect agreement with the simulations, we find that the PDFs become broader, the peak shifts to lower column densities, and the power-law tail of the PDF for higher column densities flattens after correction. All corrected PDFs have a lognormal part for low column densities with a peak at Av ~ 2 mag, a deviation point (DP) from the lognormal at Av(DP) ~ 4-5 mag, and a power-law tail for higher column densities. Assuming an equivalent spherical density distribution ρ ∝ r- α, the slopes of the power-law tails correspond to αPDF = 1.8, 1.75, and 2.5 for Auriga, Carina, and NGC 3603. These numbers agree within the uncertainties with the values of α ≈ 1.5,1.8, and 2.5 determined from the slope γ (with α = 1-γ) obtained from the radial column density profiles (N ∝ rγ). While α ~ 1.5-2 is consistent with a structure dominated by collapse (local free-fall collapse of individual cores and clumps and global collapse), the higher value of α > 2 for NGC 3603 requires a physical

  7. The structure of galactic HI in directions of low total column density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockman, F. J.; Jahoda, K.; Mccammon, D.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed 21 cm study of areas of that have the smallest known amount of HI in the northern sky was performed. These observations were corrected for stray radiation. The region of main interest, around alpha = 10(h)45(m), delta = 57 deg 20', has a minimium N(HI) of 4.5 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm. Spectra taken at 21' resolution over a field 4 x 3 deg in this direction show up to four HI line components. Two, near 0 and -50 km/s, are ubiquitous. There is also a narrow component at -10 km/s attributable to a diffuse cloud covering half of the field, and scattered patches of HI at v -100 km/s. the low and intermediate velocity components have a broad line width and are so smoothly distributed across the region that it is unlikely that they contain significant unresolved angular structure. Eight other low column density directions were also observed. Their spectra typically have several components, but the total column density is always 7 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm and changes smoothly along a 2 deg strip. Half of the directions show narrow lines arising from weak diffuse HI clouds that contain 0.5 to 3.0 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm.

  8. Revising the slant column density retrieval of nitrogen dioxide observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, S.; Krotkov, N. A.; Lamsal, L. N.; Celarier, E. A.; Swartz, W. H.; Bucsela, E. J.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen dioxide retrievals from the Aura/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) have been used extensively over the past decade, particularly in the study of tropospheric air quality. Recent comparisons of OMI NO2 with independent data sets and models suggested that the OMI values of slant column density (SCD) and stratospheric vertical column density (VCD) in both the NASA OMNO2 and Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute DOMINO products are too large, by around 10-40%. We describe a substantially revised spectral fitting algorithm, optimized for the OMI visible light spectrometer channel. The most important changes comprise a flexible adjustment of the instrumental wavelength shifts combined with iterative removal of the ring spectral features; the multistep removal of instrumental noise; iterative, sequential estimates of SCDs of the trace gases in the 402-465 nm range. These changes reduce OMI SCD(NO2) by 10-35%, bringing them much closer to SCDs retrieved from independent measurements and models. The revised SCDs, submitted to the stratosphere-troposphere separation algorithm, give tropospheric VCDs ˜10-15% smaller in polluted regions, and up to ˜30% smaller in unpolluted areas. Although the revised algorithm has been optimized specifically for the OMI NO2 retrieval, our approach could be more broadly applicable.

  9. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN DISPERSION MEASURE AND X-RAY COLUMN DENSITY FROM RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    He, C.; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    Pulsars are remarkable objects that emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, providing a powerful probe of the interstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the relation between dispersion measure (DM) and X-ray absorption column density N{sub H} using 68 radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory or XMM-Newton. We find a best-fit empirical linear relation of N{sub H} (10{sup 20} cm{sup -2})= 0.30{sup +0.13}{sub -0.09} DM (pc cm{sup -3}), which corresponds to an average ionization of 10{sup +4}{sub -3}%, confirming the ratio of one free electron per 10 neutral hydrogen atoms commonly assumed in the literature. We also compare different N{sub H} estimates and note that some N{sub H} values obtained from X-ray observations are higher than the total Galactic H I column density along the same line of sight, while the optical extinction generally gives the best N{sub H} predictions.

  10. Transient 3D numerical simulations of column collapse and pyroclastic density current scenarios at Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposti Ongaro, T.; Neri, A.; Menconi, G.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Marianelli, P.; Cavazzoni, C.; Erbacci, G.; Baxter, P. J.

    2008-12-01

    Numerical simulations of column collapse and pyroclastic density current (PDC) scenarios at Vesuvius were carried out using a transient 3D flow model based on multiphase transport laws. The model describes the dynamics of the collapse as well as the effects of the 3D topography of the volcano on PDC propagation. Source conditions refer to a medium-scale sub-Plinian event and consider a pressure-balanced jet. Simulation results provide new insights into the complex dynamics of these phenomena. In particular: 1) column collapse can be characterized by different regimes, from incipient collapse to partial or nearly total collapse, thus confirming the possibility of a transitional field of behaviour of the column characterized by the contemporaneous and/or intermittent occurrence of ash fallout and PDCs; 2) the collapse regime can be characterized by its fraction of eruptive mass reaching the ground and generating PDCs; 3) within the range of the investigated source conditions, the propagation and hazard potential of PDCs appear to be directly correlated with the flow-rate of the mass collapsing to the ground, rather than to the collapse height of the column (this finding is in contrast with predictions based on the energy-line concept, which simply correlates the PDC runout and kinetic energy with the collapse height of the column); 4) first-order values of hazard variables associated with PDCs (i.e., dynamic pressure, temperature, airborne ash concentration) can be derived from simulation results, thereby providing initial estimates for the quantification of damage scenarios; 5) for scenarios assuming a location of the central vent coinciding with that of the present Gran Cono, Mount Somma significantly influences the propagation of PDCs, largely reducing their propagation in the northern sector, and diverting mass toward the west and southeast, accentuating runouts and hazard variables for these sectors; 6) the 2D modelling approximation can force an artificial

  11. Radiation-damped profiles of extremely high column density neutral hydrogen: implications of cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2017-01-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line of sight mainly affects the far off-centre region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line centre can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half-maximum) as an effective line width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N_{H I}≲ 10^{21} { cm^{-2}}, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7 per cent errors. However, as the local column density reaches N_{H I}˜ 10^{22.3} { cm^{-2}}, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10 per cent overestimation in the red wing and a 20 per cent underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  12. The Carina Nebula and Gum 31 molecular complex - I. Molecular gas distribution, column densities, and dust temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo, David; Burton, Michael; Green, Anne; Braiding, Catherine; Molinari, Sergio; Wong, Graeme; Blackwell, Rebecca; Elia, Davide; Schisano, Eugenio

    2016-03-01

    We report high-resolution observations of the 12CO(1-0) and 13CO(1-0) molecular lines in the Carina Nebula and the Gum 31 region obtained with the 22-m Mopra telescope as part of The Mopra Southern Galactic Plane CO Survey. We cover 8 deg2 from l = 285° to 290°, and from b = -1.5° to +0.5°. The molecular gas column density distributions from both tracers have a similar range of values. By fitting a grey-body function to the observed infrared spectral energy distribution from Herschel maps, we derive gas column densities and dust temperatures. The gas column density has values in the range from 6.3 × 1020 to 1.4 × 1023 cm-2, while the dust temperature has values in the range from 17 to 43 K. The gas column density derived from the dust emission is approximately described by a lognormal function for a limited range of column densities. A high-column-density tail is clearly evident for the gas column density distribution, which appears to be a common feature in regions with active star formation. There are regional variations in the fraction of the mass recovered by the CO emission lines with respect to the total mass traced by the dust emission. These variations may be related to changes in the radiation field strength, variation of the atomic to molecular gas fraction across the observed region, differences in the CO molecule abundance with respect to H2, and evolutionary stage differences of the molecular clouds that compose the Carina Nebula-Gum 31 complex.

  13. NO2 Vertical Column Density at the Marambio Antarctic Station as Retrieved by DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raponi, Marcelo M.; Jiménez, Rodrigo; Tocho, Jorge O.; Quel, Eduardo J.

    2009-03-01

    A number of chemical species present in the stratosphere in very small concentrations (parts per billion and even smaller) contribute significantly to its chemical balance. One of the main stratospheric trace gases is nitrogen dioxide (NO2). This species acts as a restrictive agent for stratospheric ozone destruction (due to the chlorine monoxide), hence the importance of its study. We present a preliminary analysis of passive remote sensing measurements carry out at the Marambio Argentinean Antarctic Base (64.233° S; 56.616° W; 197 m amsl) during the months of January—February of 2008. The spectroscopy system consists of an optical fiber (400 μm core diameter and 6 m of longitude) and a portable spectral analyzer (spectrometer HR4000, Ocean Optics). The device analyzes diffuse solar spectral irradiance in the UV-visible range (290-650 nm), collected and transferred by a zenith-pointing optical fiber. The NO2 vertical column density (VCD) is derived from the radiance spectra using the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) technique. The system and technique allow for simultaneous measurements of different species of interest on a variety of meteorological conditions. The vertical columns obtained are compared with co-located measurements performed with EVA, a visible absorption spectrometer operated by the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Spain.

  14. Separation of arginase isoforms by capillary zone electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing in density gradient column.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, M M; Legaz, M E

    1995-04-01

    Four major arginase isoforms, I, II, III and IV, have been detected in Evernia prunastri thallus. They differ in terms of both physical and biochemical properties. The isoelectric point (pI) of these proteins has been determined by both isoelectric focusing in density gradient column and high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE). Isoelectric focusing revealed charge microheterogeneity for isoforms II and IV whereas arginases I and II had the same pI value of 5.8. HPCE separation confirmed this charge microheterogeneity for isoform IV but not for isoform III, and provided evidence of microheterogeneity for isoforms I and II. The effect of various electrolyte buffers and running conditions on the HPCE separation of arginase isoform were investigated. Addition of 0.5 mM spermidine (SPD) to the running buffer reduced the electroosmotic flow (EOF) and permitted discriminating between the native proteins and protein fragments.

  15. NO2 Total and Tropospheric Vertical Column Densities from OMI on EOS Aura: Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, J.F.; Bucsela, E.J.; Celarier, E.A.; Veefkind, J.P.; Kim, S.W.; Frost, G.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), which is on the EOS AURA satellite, retrieves vertical column densities (VCDs) of NO2, along with those of several other trace gases. The relatively high spatial resolution and daily global coverage of the instrument make it particularly well-suited to monitoring tropospheric pollution at scales on the order of 20 km. The OMI NO2 algorithm distinguishes polluted regions from background stratospheric NO2 using a separation algorithm that relies on the smoothly varying stratospheric NO2 and estimations of both stratospheric and tropospheric air mass factors (AMFs). Version 1 of OMI NO2 data has been released for public use. An overview of OMI NO2 data, some recent results and a description of the improvements for version 2 of the algorithm will be presented.

  16. Evaluation of high resolution simulated and OMI retrieved tropospheric NO2 column densities over Southeastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyrichidou, I.; Koukouli, M. E.; Balis, D. S.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Poupkou, A.; Katragkou, E.; Melas, D.; Boersma, K. F.; van Roozendael, M.

    2013-03-01

    High resolution model estimates (10 × 10 km2) of tropospheric NO2 column amounts from the Comprehensive Air Quality Model (CAMx) for the Balkan Peninsula are compared with OMI/Aura measurements (13 × 24 km2 at nadir) for the year April 2009 to March 2010. The Balkan area contributes significantly to the NO2 burden in European air and so numerous urban, industrial and rural regions are studied aiming to investigate the consistency of both satellite retrievals and model predictions at high spatial resolution. It has already been shown that OMI can detect the tropospheric column of NO2 over polluted Balkan cities due to its fine horizontal resolution and instrument sensitivity (Zyrichidou et al., 2009). In this study the improved OMI DOMINO v2.0 satellite retrievals showed that over South-Eastern Europe the monthly mean NO2 tropospheric column density fluctuated between 2.0 and 5.7 ± 1.1 × 1015 molecules/cm2 over urban areas, 1.6-5.0 ± 0.7 × 1015 molecules/cm2 over large industrial complexes and 1.1-2.2 ± 0.4 × 1015 molecules/cm2 over rural areas for the year studied. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) version 4.40 is a publicly available open-source computer modeling system for the integrated assessment of gaseous and particulate air pollution. The anthropogenic emissions used in CAMx for the Greek domain being studied were compiled employing bottom-up approaches (road transport sector, off-road machinery, etc.) as well as other national registries and international databases. The rest of the Balkan domain has natural and anthropogenic emissions based on the TNO emission inventory of 2003. The high-resolution CAMx simulations reveal consistent spatial and temporal patterns with the OMI/Aura data. The annual spatial correlation coefficient between OMI and CAMx computed in this high spatial resolution analysis is of the order of 0.6, somewhat improved over those estimated in Zyrichidou et al. (2009) (R ≈ 0.5). However, in such a

  17. SCDM-k: Localized orbitals for solids via selected columns of the density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Anil; Lin, Lin; Ying, Lexing

    2017-04-01

    The recently developed selected columns of the density matrix (SCDM) method (Damle et al. 2015, [16]) is a simple, robust, efficient and highly parallelizable method for constructing localized orbitals from a set of delocalized Kohn-Sham orbitals for insulators and semiconductors with Γ point sampling of the Brillouin zone. In this work we generalize the SCDM method to Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations with k-point sampling of the Brillouin zone, which is needed for more general electronic structure calculations for solids. We demonstrate that our new method, called SCDM-k, is by construction gauge independent and a natural way to describe localized orbitals. SCDM-k computes localized orbitals without the use of an optimization procedure, and thus does not suffer from the possibility of being trapped in a local minimum. Furthermore, the computational complexity of using SCDM-k to construct orthogonal and localized orbitals scales as O (Nlog ⁡ N) where N is the total number of k-points in the Brillouin zone. SCDM-k is therefore efficient even when a large number of k-points are used for Brillouin zone sampling. We demonstrate the numerical performance of SCDM-k using systems with model potentials in two and three dimensions.

  18. Impact of Spectroscopic Line Parameters on Carbon Monoxide Column Density Retrievals from Shortwave Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Denise; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Gunter

    2015-11-01

    Among the various input data required for the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from infrared remote sensing observations molecular spectroscopy line data have a central role, because their quality is critical for the quality of the final product. Here we discuss the impact of the line parameters on vertical column densities (VCD) estimated from short wave infrared nadir observations. Using BIRRA (the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) comprising a line-by-line radiative transfer code (forward model) and a separable nonlinear least squares solver for inversion we retrieve carbon monoxide from observations of SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat. Retrievals using recent versions of HITRAN und GEISA have been performed and the results are compared in terms of residual norms, molecular density scaling factors, their corresponding errors, and the final VCD product. The retrievals turn out to be quite similar for all three databases, so a definite recommendation in favor of one of these databases is difficult for the considered spectral range around 2.3 μm. Nevertheless, HITRAN 2012 appears to be advantageous when evaluating the different quality criteria.

  19. Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities at surface monitoring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Inoue, G.; Kawasaki, M.; Yoshioka, H.; Minomura, M.; Murata, I.; Nagahama, T.; Matsumi, Y.; Ibuki, T.

    2010-04-01

    Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities were developed in two independent systems: one utilizing a grating-based desktop optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) with a resolution enough to resolve rotational lines of CO2 and CH4 in the region of 1565-1585 and 1674-1682 nm, respectively; the other is an application of an optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) to the CO2 column density. Direct sunlight was collimated via a small telescope installed on a portable sun tracker and then transmitted through an optical fiber into the OSA or the FFPI for optical analysis. The near infrared spectra of the OSA were retrieved by a least squares spectral fitting algorithm. The CO2 and CH4 column densities deduced were in excellent agreement with those measured by a Fourier transform spectrometer with high resolution. The rovibronic lines in the wavelength region of 1570-1575 nm were analyzed by the FFPI. The I0 and I values in the Beer-Lambert law equation to obtain CO2 column density were deduced by modulating temperature of the FFPI, which offered column CO2 with the statistical error less than 0.2% for six hours measurement.

  20. Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities at surface monitoring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Inoue, G.; Kawasaki, M.; Yoshioka, H.; Minomura, M.; Murata, I.; Nagahama, T.; Matsumi, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Morino, I.; Ibuki, T.

    2010-08-01

    Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities were developed in two independent systems: one utilizing a grating-based desktop optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) with a resolution enough to resolve rotational lines of CO2 and CH4 in the regions of 1565-1585 and 1674-1682 nm, respectively; the other is an application of an optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) to obtain the CO2 column density. Direct sunlight was collimated via a small telescope installed on a portable sun tracker and then transmitted through an optical fiber into the OSA or the FFPI for optical analysis. The near infrared spectra of the OSA were retrieved by a least squares spectral fitting algorithm. The CO2 and CH4 column densities deduced were in excellent agreement with those measured by a Fourier transform spectrometer with high resolution. The rovibronic lines in the wavelength region of 1570-1575 nm were analyzed by the FFPI. The I0 and I values in the Beer-Lambert law equation to obtain CO2 column density were deduced by modulating temperature of the FFPI, which offered column CO2 with the statistical error less than 0.2% for six hours measurement.

  1. Comparison of MAX-DOAS NO2 slant column densities and DOAS fit properties during MADCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, Steffen; Remmers, Julia; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The 'Multi Axis Doas - Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases' (MADCAT) took place at MPI-C in Mainz/Germany in summer 2013. MAX-DOAS instruments from ten institutes were operated simultaneously in order to investigate the crucial settings of instrumental properties, calibration, and algorithms, for a) the retrieval of slant column densities (SCDs) of various trace gases (NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O) and O4 as tracer for photon path lengths and b) the retrieval of tropospheric profiles. Here we focus on the first step, i.e. the retrieval of SCDs, for NO2. The DOAS analysis for NO2 was done independently by the different groups, but based on concerted DOAS retrieval setups for the UV and vis spectral ranges. We present intercomparisons of NO2 SCDs for different elevation angles from the different instruments. A statistical analysis of the deviations of each dataset with respect to the ensemble mean was performed. In addition, further DOAS fit results, like intensity offsets, the fit coefficients for water vapour and the ring effect, etc. are compared.

  2. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) vertical column density measurements by Pandora spectrometer over the Canadian oil sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioletov, Vitali E.; McLinden, Chris A.; Cede, Alexander; Davies, Jonathan; Mihele, Cristian; Netcheva, Stoyka; Li, Shao-Meng; O'Brien, Jason

    2016-07-01

    Vertical column densities (VCDs) of SO2 retrieved by a Pandora spectral sun photometer at Fort McKay, Alberta, Canada, from 2013 to 2015 were analysed. The Fort McKay site is located in the Canadian oil sands region, approximately 20 km north of two major SO2 sources (upgraders), with total emission of about 45 kt yr-1. Elevated SO2 VCD values were frequently recorded by the instrument, with the highest values of about 9 Dobson Units (DU; DU = 2.69 × 1016 molecules cm-2). Comparisons with co-located in situ measurements demonstrated that there was a very good correlation between VCDs and surface concentrations in some cases, while in other cases, elevated VCDs did not correspond to high surface concentrations, suggesting the plume was above the ground. Elevated VCDs and surface concentrations were observed when the wind direction was from south to southeast, i.e. from the direction of the two local SO2 sources. The precision of the SO2 measurements, estimated from parallel measurements by two Pandora instruments at Toronto, is 0.17 DU. The total uncertainty of Pandora SO2 VCD, estimated using measurements when the wind direction was away from the sources, is less than 0.26 DU (1σ). Comparisons with integrated SO2 profiles from concurrent aircraft measurements support these estimates.

  3. Hydrogen in diffuse molecular clouds in the Milky Way. Atomic column densities and molecular fraction along prominent lines of sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, B.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Menten, K. M.; Sato, M.; Brunthaler, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Neufeld, D.; Gerin, M.; Indriolo, N.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Recent submillimeter and far-infrared wavelength observations of absorption in the rotational ground-state lines of various simple molecules against distant Galactic continuum sources have opened the possibility of studying the chemistry of diffuse molecular clouds throughout the Milky Way. In order to calculate abundances, the column densities of molecular and atomic hydrogen, H i, must be known. Aims: We aim at determining the atomic hydrogen column densities for diffuse clouds located on the sight lines toward a sample of prominent high-mass star-forming regions that were intensely studied with the HIFI instrument onboard Herschel. Methods: Based on Jansky Very Large Array data, we employ the 21 cm H i absorption-line technique to construct profiles of the H i opacity versus radial velocity toward our target sources. These profiles are combined with lower resolution archival data of extended H i emission to calculate the H i column densities of the individual clouds along the sight lines. We employ Bayesian inference to estimate the uncertainties of the derived quantities. Results: Our study delivers reliable estimates of the atomic hydrogen column density for a large number of diffuse molecular clouds at various Galactocentric distances. Together with column densities of molecular hydrogen derived from its surrogates observed with HIFI, the measurements can be used to characterize the clouds and investigate the dependence of their chemistry on the molecular fraction, for example. The data sets are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A2

  4. Validation of Carbon Monoxide Vertical Column Densities Retrieved from SCIAMACHY InfraRed Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstaffl, P.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Schreier, F.; Hamidouche, M.; Lichtenberg, G.

    2016-08-01

    This validation study examines the accuracy of carbon monoxide (CO) total columns derived from nadir measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY). Therefore, an intercomparison of the CO columns estimated from SCIAMACHY measurements with coincidented and colocated retrievals provided by several ground-based (g-b) stations affiliated to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) had been performed. The study demonstrated that the SCIAMACHY CO total column validation results depend on many aspects. The results indicate particularly the importance of appropriate post- processing of the BIRRA retrievals (esp. filtering). It shows that the CO product is sensitive to settings in retrieval algorithm. Furthermore, the analysis gives evidence of a degrading channel 8 detector in later years. In conclusion, for most cases monthly mean SCIAMACHY CO total columns agree within the standard deviation when compared to g-b measurements.

  5. Analysis of beta-carotene absorbance for studying structural properties of human plasma low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Krisko, Anita; Piantanida, Ivo; Kveder, Marina; Pifat, Greta

    2004-08-01

    A novel spectrophotometric assay for monitoring structural rearrangements of native low-density lipoproteins (LDL) is proposed. The approach is based on the analysis of the visible light absorbance maximum of lipoproteins at approximately 461 nm assigned to beta-carotene situated in the hydrophobic parts of LDL. It offers a direct method to study the surface-interior coupling of the lipoprotein particle under physiological conditions. The detected signal is intrinsic to LDL and responsible for the most of the beta-carotene signal from the whole plasma. The negligible interference of beta-carotene absorbance due to the high-density lipoproteins is experimentally verified. Since beta-carotene absorbance belongs to the visible spectral region, no spectral overlapping/artifacts in plasma are expected. The signal sensitivity has been studied through conformational changes of LDL induced by ionic strength, by temperature, and by ligand binding. The results of caffeine binding to LDL indicate that there could be only one dominant type of binding site for caffeine on LDL particles. It can be concluded that visible spectrum characteristics of beta-carotene molecules offer advantages in LDL ligand binding studies which can possibly be extended to monitor the interactions of LDL directly in plasma.

  6. Green bank telescope observations of low column density H I around NGC 2997 and NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    Observations of ongoing H I accretion in nearby galaxies have only identified about 10% of the fuel necessary to sustain star formation in these galaxies. Most of these observations have been conducted using interferometers and may have missed lower column density, diffuse, H I gas that may trace the missing 90% of gas. Such gas may represent the so-called cold flows predicted by current theories of galaxy formation to have never been heated above the virial temperature of the dark matter halo. As a first attempt to identify such cold flows around nearby galaxies and complete the census of H I down to N {sub H} {sub I} ∼ 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}, I used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to map the circumgalactic (r ≲ 100-200 kpc) H I environment around NGC 2997 and NGC 6946. The resulting GBT observations cover a 4 deg{sup 2} area around each galaxy with a 5σ detection limit of N{sub H} {sub I} ∼ 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2} over a 20 km s{sup –1} line width. This project complements absorption line studies, which are well-suited to the regime of lower N{sub H} {sub I}. Around NGC 2997, the GBT H I data reveal an extended H I disk and all of its surrounding gas-rich satellite galaxies, but no filamentary features. Furthermore, the H I mass as measured with the GBT is only 7% higher than past interferometric measurements. After correcting for resolution differences, the H I extent of the galaxy is 23% larger at the N{sub H} {sub I} = 1.2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2} level as measured by the GBT. On the other hand, the H I observations of NGC 6946 reveal a filamentary feature apparently connecting NGC 6946 with its nearest companions. This H I filament has N{sub H} {sub I} ∼ 5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2} and an FWHM of 55 ± 5 km s{sup –1} and was invisible in past interferometer observations. The properties of this filament are broadly consistent with being a cold flow or debris from a past tidal interaction between NGC 6946 and its satellites.

  7. OMI NO2 column densities over North American urban cities: the effect of satellite footprint resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Pius; Judd, Laura; Pan, Li; Lefer, Barry

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen dioxide vertical column density (NO2 VCD) measurements via satellite are compared with a fine-scale regional chemistry transport model, using a new approach that considers varying satellite footprint sizes. Space-borne NO2 VCD measurement has been used as a proxy for surface nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission, especially for anthropogenic urban emission, so accurate comparison of satellite and modeled NO2 VCD is important in determining the future direction of NOx emission policy. The NASA Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 VCD measurements, retrieved by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), are compared with a 12 km Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) simulation from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We found that the OMI footprint-pixel sizes are too coarse to resolve urban NO2 plumes, resulting in a possible underestimation in the urban core and overestimation outside. In order to quantify this effect of resolution geometry, we have made two estimates. First, we constructed pseudo-OMI data using fine-scale outputs of the model simulation. Assuming the fine-scale model output is a true measurement, we then collected real OMI footprint coverages and performed conservative spatial regridding to generate a set of fake OMI pixels out of fine-scale model outputs. When compared to the original data, the pseudo-OMI data clearly showed smoothed signals over urban locations, resulting in roughly 20-30 % underestimation over major cities. Second, we further conducted conservative downscaling of OMI NO2 VCDs using spatial information from the fine-scale model to adjust the spatial distribution, and also applied averaging kernel (AK) information to adjust the vertical structure. Four-way comparisons were conducted between OMI with and without downscaling and CMAQ with and without AK information. Results show that OMI and CMAQ NO2 VCDs show the best agreement when both downscaling and AK methods are applied, with the correlation

  8. OMI NO2 column densities over North American urban cities: the effect of satellite footprint resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. C.; Lee, P.; Judd, L.; Pan, L.; Lefer, B.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen dioxide vertical column density (NO2 VCD) measurements via satellite are compared with a fine-scale regional chemistry transport model, using a new approach that considers varying satellite footprint sizes. Space-borne NO2 VCD measurement has been used as a proxy for surface nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission, especially for anthropogenic urban emission, so accurate comparison of satellite and modeled NO2 VCD is important in determining the future direction of NOx emission policy. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 VCD measurements, retrieved by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), are compared with a 12 km Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) simulation from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We found that OMI footprint pixel sizes are too coarse to resolve urban NO2 plumes, resulting in a possible underestimation in the urban core and overestimation outside. In order to quantify this effect of resolution geometry, we have made two estimates. First, we constructed pseudo-OMI data using fine-scale outputs of the model simulation. Assuming the fine-scale model output is a true measurement, we then collected real OMI footprint coverages and performed conservative spatial regridding to generate a set of fake OMI pixels out of fine-scale model outputs. When compared to the original data, the pseudo-OMI data clearly showed smoothed signals over urban locations, resulting in roughly 20-30 % underestimation over major cities. Second, we further conducted conservative downscaling of OMI NO2 VCD using spatial information from the fine-scale model to adjust the spatial distribution, and also applied Averaging Kernel (AK) information to adjust the vertical structure. Four-way comparisons were conducted between OMI with and without downscaling and CMAQ with and without AK information. Results show that OMI and CMAQ NO2 VCDs show the best agreement when both downscaling and AK

  9. Observational discrimination between modes of shock propagation in interstellar clouds: Predictions of CH+ and SH+ column densities in diffuse clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. R.; Desforets, G. P.; Roueff, E.; Hartquist, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable effort in recent years has been devoted to the study of shocks in the diffuse interstellar medium. This work has been motivated partly by the observations of rotationally excited states of H2, and partly by the realization that species such as CH(+), OH and H2O might be formed preferentially in hot, post-shock gas. The problem of CH(+) and the difficulties encountered when trying to explain the high column densities, observed along lines of sight to certain hot stars, have been reviewed earlier. The importance of a transverse magnetic field on the structure of an interstellar shock was also demonstrated earlier. Transverse magnetic fields above a critical strength give rise to an acceleration zone or precursor, in which the parameters on the flow vary continuously. Chemical reactions, which change the degree of ionization of the gas, also modify the structure of the shock considerably. Recent work has shown that large column densities of CH(+) can be produced in magnetohydrodynamic shock models. Shock speeds U sub s approx. = 10 km/s and initial magnetic field strengths of a few micro G are sufficient to produce ion-neutral drift velocities which can drive the endothermic C(+)(H2,H)CH(+) reaction. It was also shown that single-fluid hydrodynamic models do not generate sufficiently large column densities of CH(+) unless unacceptably high shock velocities (u sub s approx. 20 km/s) are assumed in the models. Thus, the observed column densities of CH(+) provide a constraint on the mode of shock propagation in diffuse clouds. More precisely, they determine a lower limit to the ion-neutral drift velocity.

  10. A Herschel-SPIRE survey of the Mon R2 giant molecular cloud: analysis of the gas column density probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, R.; Gutermuth, R.; Ali, B.; Megeath, T.; Pipher, J.; Myers, P.; Fischer, W. J.; Henning, T.; Wolk, S. J.; Allen, L.; Tobin, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a far-IR survey of the entire Mon R2 giant molecular cloud (GMC) with Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver cross-calibrated with Planck-High Frequency Instrument data. We fit the spectral energy distributions of each pixel with a greybody function and an optimal beta value of 1.8. We find that mid-range column densities obtained from far-IR dust emission and near-IR extinction are consistent. For the entire GMC, we find that the column density histogram, or column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), is lognormal below ˜1021 cm-2. Above this value, the distribution takes a power law form with an index of -2.15. We analyse the gas geometry, N-PDF shape, and young stellar object (YSO) content of a selection of subregions in the cloud. We find no regions with pure lognormal N-PDFs. The regions with a combination of lognormal and one power-law N-PDF have a YSO cluster and a corresponding centrally concentrated gas clump. The regions with a combination of lognormal and two power-law N-PDF have significant numbers of typically younger YSOs but no prominent YSO cluster. These regions are composed of an aggregate of closely spaced gas filaments with no concentrated dense gas clump. We find that for our fixed scale regions, the YSO count roughly correlates with the N-PDF power-law index. The correlation appears steeper for single power-law regions relative to two power-law regions with a high column density cut-off, as a greater dense gas mass fraction is achieved in the former. A stronger correlation is found between embedded YSO count and the dense gas mass among our regions.

  11. Study of growth of dot and column in porous silicon samples of various thicknesses prepared at a constant current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Fateh Singh; Panwar, Varij; Gupta, Himanshu; Kalra, G. S.; Chawla, Shanta; Kumar, R.; Mehra, R. M.

    2015-09-01

    Porous silicon is considered to be composed either of spherical shaped interconnected silicon quantum dots or combination of quantum dots and columns. This paper presents a study of a series of porous silicon films of various thicknesses, prepared at a 20 mA current density by the electrochemical etching technique. The photoluminescence spectra of the series samples were monitored. Further, we used a photoluminescence fitting model by Singh and John (John-Singh) in its extended form by Elhouichet to estimate the percentage of dots and columns; their average diameters and corresponding variances. The shape of experimental photoluminescence spectra fits well with John-Singh model. As a result, the analytical curves drawn using the fitting parameters showed the decrease in mean crystallite diameter of columns and dot while increase in variance of column and decrease in variance of dots. Hence, more homogenous dots are formed. Thus, it results in the formation of a more ordered nanocrystalline structure with more porosity. It verified the quantum assumptions. The discrepancy in the PL behavior of a sample is well explained by the model.

  12. Heating of a Magnetized High Density Hydrogen Plasma Column Around the ICR Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graswinckel, M. F.; Guadamuz, S.; Koch, R.; Maggiora, R.; Van De Pol, M.; Vietti, G.; Van Rooij, G.

    2011-12-01

    A single and double loop antenna system are investigated in the ICR frequency range (5-25 MHz) to enable control of the plasma temperature in a 1-10 cm diameter, 1020 m-3 hydrogen plasma column in B = 0.8T Wave propagation is evaluated on basis of damping lengths derived from the dispersion relation. The antenna is numerically analyzed with the TOPCYL code. Simulation results are compared with measured loading resistances and good agreement was found for the vacuum and saltwater column cases. Hydrogen plasma loading resistances determined from network analyzer measurements are typically higher than those predicted from simulation. This points to coupling of RF power to additional loss mechanisms. High RF power operation (1 kW) of the antenna increased the power deposited on the plasma endplate and accelerated the plasma, but the plasma temperature near the endplate remained constant.

  13. Simplified method for creating a density-absorbed dose calibration curve for the low dose range from Gafchromic EBT3 film.

    PubMed

    Gotanda, Tatsuhiro; Katsuda, Toshizo; Gotanda, Rumi; Kuwano, Tadao; Akagawa, Takuya; Tanki, Nobuyoshi; Tabuchi, Akihiko; Shimono, Tetsunori; Kawaji, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Radiochromic film dosimeters have a disadvantage in comparison with an ionization chamber in that the dosimetry process is time-consuming for creating a density-absorbed dose calibration curve. The purpose of this study was the development of a simplified method of creating a density-absorbed dose calibration curve from radiochromic film within a short time. This simplified method was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 film with a low energy dependence and step-shaped Al filter. The simplified method was compared with the standard method. The density-absorbed dose calibration curves created using the simplified and standard methods exhibited approximately similar straight lines, and the gradients of the density-absorbed dose calibration curves were -32.336 and -33.746, respectively. The simplified method can obtain calibration curves within a much shorter time compared to the standard method. It is considered that the simplified method for EBT3 film offers a more time-efficient means of determining the density-absorbed dose calibration curve within a low absorbed dose range such as the diagnostic range.

  14. Utilization of O4 Slant Column Density to Derive Aerosol Layer Height from a Space-Borne UV-Visible Hyperspectral Sensor: Sensitivity and Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 10(sup 40) molecules (sup 2) per centimeters(sup -5), to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nanometers, the O4 absorption band at 477 nanometers is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nanometers is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 meters for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80 percent of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 kilometer compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  15. Can formaldehyde column densities be used to estimate near-surface ozone in urban areas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Understanding pollutant exposure for populations in urban areas requires air quality monitoring at a finer scale than can be reasonably provided by surface networks. Satellite measurements of short-lived trace gases could potentially help shape our understanding of the distribution of near-surface ozone throughout entire regions, thus aiding the development of more effective mitigation strategies. In this work, the extensive vertical profiling performed by aircraft in support of NASA's DISCOVER-AQ field campaign is used to examine the relationship between formaldehyde column measurements and near-surface ozone. At large spatial and temporal scales, a fairly strong relationship exists between column formaldehyde and near-surface ozone, but this relationship often weakens at smaller spatial and temporal scales. The cause of these small-scale discrepancies was determined to be an artifact of the difference in lifetimes between ozone and formaldehyde. While ozone has a long lifetime (multiple days) and tends to accumulate throughout the day, formaldehyde has a very short lifetime (a couple hours) and tends to reflect the local hydrocarbon oxidation environment. In Maryland, where biogenic emissions dominate the hydrocarbon mix, a stronger correlation between ozone and formaldehyde was seen than in Texas, where anthropogenic emissions dominated the hydrocarbon mix. This is because in Maryland, while ozone was accumulating throughout the day, formaldehyde was also increasing in conjunction with changes in biogenic emissions. When data are segregated spatially and averaged over the duration of each campaign, a clear trend can be seen between column formaldehyde and surface ozone measurements. While not useful for day-to-day monitoring, this could be useful for long-term exposure estimates and could help facilitate the re-distribution of surface monitoring sites.

  16. BAL PHOSPHORUS ABUNDANCE AND EVIDENCE FOR IMMENSE IONIC COLUMN DENSITIES IN QUASAR OUTFLOWS: VLT/X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF QUASAR SDSS J1512+1119

    SciTech Connect

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Edmonds, Doug; Arav, Nahum; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2012-10-10

    We present spectroscopic analysis of the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow in quasar SDSS J1512+1119. In particular, we focus our attention on a kinematic component in which we identify P V and S IV/S IV* absorption troughs. The shape of the unblended phosphorus doublet troughs and the three S IV/S IV* troughs allow us to obtain reliable column density measurements for these two ions. Photoionization modeling using these column densities and those of He I* constrain the abundance of phosphorus to the range of 0.5-4 times the solar value. The total column density, ionization parameter, and metallicity inferred from the P V and S IV column densities lead to large optical depth values for the common transition observed in BAL outflows. We show that the true C IV optical depth is {approx}1000 times greater in the core of the absorption profile than the value deduced from its apparent optical depth.

  17. Modelling potential photovoltaic absorbers Cu3MCh4(M = V, Nb, Ta; Ch = S, Se, Te) using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Aoife B; Scanlon, David O; Watson, Graeme W

    2016-05-05

    The geometric and electronic properties of a series of potential photovoltaic materials, the sulvanite structured Cu3MCh4(M = V, Nb, Ta; Ch = S, Se, Te), have been computationally examined using both PBEsol+U and HSE06 methods to assess the materials' suitability for solar cell application and to compare the predictions of the two theoretical approaches. The lattice parameters, electronic density of states, and band gaps of the compounds have been calculated to ascertain the experimental agreement obtained by each method and to determine if any of the systems have an optical band gap appropriate for photovoltaic absorber materials. The PBEsol+U results are shown to achieve better agreement with experiment than HSE06 in terms of both lattice constants and band gaps, demonstrating that higher level theoretical methods do not automatically result in a greater level of accuracy than their computationally less expensive counterparts. The PBEsol+U calculated optical band gaps of five materials suggest potential suitability as photovoltaic absorbers, with values of 1.72 eV, 1.49 eV, 1.19 eV, 1.46 eV, and 1.69 eV for Cu3VS4, Cu3VSe4, Cu3VTe4, Cu3NbTe4, and Cu3TaTe4, respectively, although it should be noted that all fundamental band gaps are indirect in nature, which could lower the open-circuit voltage and hence the efficiency of prospective devices.

  18. Formaldehyde Column Density Measurements as a Suitable Pathway to Estimate Near-Surface Ozone Tendencies from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jason R.; Crawford, James A.; Fried, Alan; Walega, James; Weinheimer, Andrew; Wisthaler, Armin; Mueller, Markus; Mikoviny, Tomas; Chen, Gao; Shook, Michael; Blake, Donald R.; Diskin, Glenn; Estes, Mark; Thompson, Anne M.; Lefer, Barry L.; Long, Russell; Matteson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In support of future satellite missions that aim to address the current shortcomings in measuring air quality from space, NASA's Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign was designed to enable exploration of relationships between column measurements of trace species relevant to air quality at high spatial and temporal resolution. In the DISCOVER-AQ data set, a modest correlation (r2 = 0.45) between ozone (O3) and formaldehyde (CH2O) column densities was observed. Further analysis revealed regional variability in the O3-CH2O relationship, with Maryland having a strong relationship when data were viewed temporally and Houston having a strong relationship when data were viewed spatially. These differences in regional behavior are attributed to differences in volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. In Maryland, biogenic VOCs were responsible for approx.28% of CH2O formation within the boundary layer column, causing CH2O to, in general, increase monotonically throughout the day. In Houston, persistent anthropogenic emissions dominated the local hydrocarbon environment, and no discernable diurnal trend in CH2O was observed. Box model simulations suggested that ambient CH2O mixing ratios have a weak diurnal trend (+/-20% throughout the day) due to photochemical effects, and that larger diurnal trends are associated with changes in hydrocarbon precursors. Finally, mathematical relationships were developed from first principles and were able to replicate the different behaviors seen in Maryland and Houston. While studies would be necessary to validate these results and determine the regional applicability of the O3-CH2O relationship, the results presented here provide compelling insight into the ability of future satellite missions to aid in monitoring near-surface air quality.

  19. Formaldehyde column density measurements as a suitable pathway to estimate near-surface ozone tendencies from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Jason R.; Crawford, James H.; Fried, Alan; Walega, James; Weinheimer, Andrew; Wisthaler, Armin; Müller, Markus; Mikoviny, Tomas; Chen, Gao; Shook, Michael; Blake, Donald R.; Diskin, Glenn; Estes, Mark; Thompson, Anne M.; Lefer, Barry L.; Long, Russell; Mattson, Eric

    2016-11-01

    In support of future satellite missions that aim to address the current shortcomings in measuring air quality from space, NASA's Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign was designed to enable exploration of relationships between column measurements of trace species relevant to air quality at high spatial and temporal resolution. In the DISCOVER-AQ data set, a modest correlation (r2 = 0.45) between ozone (O3) and formaldehyde (CH2O) column densities was observed. Further analysis revealed regional variability in the O3-CH2O relationship, with Maryland having a strong relationship when data were viewed temporally and Houston having a strong relationship when data were viewed spatially. These differences in regional behavior are attributed to differences in volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. In Maryland, biogenic VOCs were responsible for 28% of CH2O formation within the boundary layer column, causing CH2O to, in general, increase monotonically throughout the day. In Houston, persistent anthropogenic emissions dominated the local hydrocarbon environment, and no discernable diurnal trend in CH2O was observed. Box model simulations suggested that ambient CH2O mixing ratios have a weak diurnal trend (±20% throughout the day) due to photochemical effects, and that larger diurnal trends are associated with changes in hydrocarbon precursors. Finally, mathematical relationships were developed from first principles and were able to replicate the different behaviors seen in Maryland and Houston. While studies would be necessary to validate these results and determine the regional applicability of the O3-CH2O relationship, the results presented here provide compelling insight into the ability of future satellite missions to aid in monitoring near-surface air quality.

  20. Ground-based FTIR measurements of vertical column densities of several trace gases above Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notholt, J.; Schrems, O.

    During the EASOE campaign ground-based FTIR measurements have been performed in March 1992 at Ny-Ålesund (Spitsbergen, 79°N, 12°E) to derive column amounts of several trace gases. For the first part of the measurement campaign Ny-Ålesund was situated inside the polar vortex. The obtained concentrations of N2O, CH4 and HF inside the vortex are consistent with subsidence. The ratio of HClstrat/HF varied from about 2.0 inside to about 2.8 outside the vortex. Inside the vortex low values for NO2 and high values for HNO3 were found. The O3 concentrations inside the vortex are slightly lower than what was observed outside the vortex.

  1. Column Number Density Expressions Through M = 0 and M = 1 Point Source Plumes Along Any Straight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions for column number density (CND) are developed for optical line of sight paths through a variety of steady free molecule point source models including directionally-constrained effusion (Mach number M = 0) and flow from a sonic orifice (M = 1). Sonic orifice solutions are approximate, developed using a fair simulacrum fitted to the free molecule solution. Expressions are also developed for a spherically-symmetric thermal expansion (M = 0). CND solutions are found for the most general paths relative to these sources and briefly explored. It is determined that the maximum CND from a distant location through directed effusion and sonic orifice cases occurs along the path parallel to the source plane that intersects the plume axis. For the effusive case this value is exactly twice the CND found along the ray originating from that point of intersection and extending to infinity along the plume's axis. For sonic plumes this ratio is reduced to about 4/3. For high Mach number cases the maximum CND will be found along the axial centerline path. Keywords: column number density, plume flows, outgassing, free molecule flow.

  2. Image of Fomalhaut Dust Ring at 350 Microns: The Relative Column Density Map Shows Pericenter-Apocenter Asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, K. A.; Velusamy, T.; Dowell, C. D.; Grogan, K.; Beichman, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    We have imaged the circumstellar disk of Fomalhaut at 350 mm wavelength, using SHARC II (Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The spatial resolution of the raw images (9") has been enhanced by a factor of 3 using the HiRes deconvolution procedure. We find that at this wavelength and signal-to-noise ratio (approx.12), the observed morphology is that of a simple inclined ring (i approx. 70 deg), with little or no other apparent structure--this is the first observation that shows clearly the ring morphology of the disk. We have combined our 350 mm data with Spitzer Space Telescope images at 24, 70, and 160 mm in order to estimate the two-dimensional spatial variation of relative column density ("tau map") using our DISKFIT procedure. The tau map is based on the following physical assumptions: (1) the wavelength variation of opacity is the same throughout the disk, (2) the radial variation of dust temperature is dictated by the energy balance of individual grains in the stellar radiation field, and (3) the vertical scale height of the disk follows a power-law radial variation. The results confirm the ringlike morphology but also show that the geometric center is displaced from the star by about 8 AU and that the ring has an apocentric enhancement of approximately 14% in integrated column density. If we interpret the displacement in terms of elliptical orbital motion due to gravitational perturbation by an unseen planet, then the implied forced eccentricity is 0.06; dynamical modeling then predicts an apocentric density enhancement consistent with that inferred from the tau map.

  3. Effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of hydroxyapatite-collagen composites as artificial bone materials.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Shunji; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Tanaka, Junzo

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of porous hydroxyapatite (HAp)-collagen composites as artificial bone materials. Seven types of porous HAp-collagen composites were prepared from HAp nanocrystals and dense collagen fibrils. Their densities and HAp/collagen weight ratios ranged from 122 to 331 mg cm⁻³ and from 20/80 to 80/20, respectively. The flexural modulus and strength increased with an increase in density, reaching 2.46 ± 0.48 and 0.651 ± 0.103 MPa, respectively. The porous composites with a higher collagen-matrix density exhibited much higher mechanical properties at the same densities, suggesting that increasing the collagen-matrix density is an effective way of improving the mechanical properties. It was also suggested that other structural factors in addition to collagen-matrix density are required to achieve bone-like mechanical properties. The in vivo absorbability of the composites was investigated in bone defects of rabbit femurs, demonstrating that the absorption rate decreased with increases in the composite density. An exhaustive increase in density is probably limited by decreases in absorbability as artificial bones.

  4. HS 1603+3820 and its Warm Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikołajuk, M.; Różańska, A.; Czerny, B.; Dobrzycki, A.

    2009-07-01

    We use photoionization codes CLOUDY and TITAN to obtain physical conditions in the absorbing medium close to the nucleus of a distant quasar (z = 2.54) HS 1603+3820. We found that the total column density of this Warm Absorber is 2 x 1022 cm-2. Due to the softness of the quasars spectrum the modelling allowed us also to determine uniquely the volume hydrogen density of this warm gas (n = 1010 cm-3) which combined with the other quasar parameters leads to a distance determination to the Warm Absorber from the central source which is ~ 1.5 x 1016 cm.

  5. Forward cw CO/sub 2/-laser scattering on a high density plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Lachambre, J.L.; Decoste, R.; Robert, A.; Noel, P.

    1983-09-01

    Wave-number and frequency spectra S(k,..omega..) associated with spontaneous electrostatic fluctuations in a high-density (5 x 10/sup 21/ m/sup -3/) current-driven plasma are measured using forward CO/sub 2/-laser scattering with homodyne detection. Scattering measurements during the quiescent plateau phase of the discharge show fluctuation levels several orders of magnitude above the thermal level with k/sup -4/ and ..omega../sup -2/ spectral amplitude dependences. The fluctuations are found to be isotropic in a plane transverse to the magnetic axis with S(k/sub parallel/,..omega..)<

  6. Pressure, temperature and density drops along supercritical fluid chromatography columns in different thermal environments. III. Mixtures of carbon dioxide and methanol as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Poe, Donald P; Veit, Devon; Ranger, Megan; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Tarafder, Abhijit; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-01-03

    The pressure, temperature and density drops along SFC columns eluted with a CO2/methanol mobile phase were measured and compared with theoretical values. For columns packed with 3- and 5-μm particles the pressure and temperature drops were measured using a mobile phase of 95% CO2 and 5% methanol at a flow rate of 5mL/min, at temperatures from 20 to 100°C, and outlet pressures from 80 to 300bar. The density drop was calculated based on the temperature and pressure at the column inlet and outlet. The columns were suspended in a circulating air bath, either bare or covered with foam insulation. The experimental measurements were compared to theoretical results obtained by numerical simulation. For the convective air condition at outlet pressures above 100bar the average difference between the experimental and calculated temperature drops and pressure drops were 0.1°C and 0.7% for the bare 3-μm column, respectively, and were 0.6°C and 4.1% for the insulated column. The observed temperature drops for the insulated columns are consistent with those predicted by the Joule-Thomson coefficients for isenthalpic expansion. The dependence of the temperature and the pressure drops on the Joule-Thomson coefficient and kinematic viscosity are described for carbon dioxide mobile phases containing up to 20% methanol.

  7. 10B areal density: A novel approach for design and fabrication of B4C/6061Al neutron absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuli; Wang, Wenxian; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Hongsheng; Zhang, Peng

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to evaluate the neutron shielding performance of a boron-containing neutron absorbing material was proposed for the first time through the establishment of a direct relationship between 10B areal density (10BAD) of the material and its neutron absorption ratio. It is found when the 10BAD of a material is greater than 0.034 g/cm2, the material will achieve a good neutron shielding performance. Based on this proposed approach, B4C/6061Al composite plates with different B4C content (10 wt%, 20 wt%, 30 wt%) were successfully fabricated using vacuum hot pressing followed by hot-extrusion. The characteristics of the B4C/Al interface were studied in details using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the effects of B4C particle content on microstructure and mechanical properties of the Al matrix were investigated. Through current studies, B4C/6061Al composite plates possessing good neutron shielding performance and tensile strength are found to be able to be fabricated using either 20 wt% of B4C content with a plate thickness of 4.5 mm or 30 wt% B4C content with a plate thickness of 3 mm.

  8. The effect of high column density systems on the measurement of the Lyman-α forest correlation function

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi E-mail: miralda@icc.ub.edu

    2012-07-01

    We present a study of the effect of High Column Density (HCD) systems on the Lyα forest correlation function on large scales. We study the effect both numerically, by inserting HCD systems on mock spectra for a specific model, and analytically, in the context of two-point correlations and linear theory. We show that the presence of HCDs substantially contributes to the noise of the correlation function measurement, and systematically alters the measured redshift-space correlation function of the Lyα forest, increasing the value of the density bias factor and decreasing the redshift distortion parameter β{sub α} of the Lyα forest. We provide simple formulae for corrections on these derived parameters, as a function of the mean effective optical depth and bias factor of the host halos of the HCDs, and discuss the conditions under which these expressions should be valid. In practice, precise corrections to the measured parameters of the Lyα forest correlation for the HCD effects are more complex than the simple analytical approximations we present, owing to non-linear effects of the damped wings of the HCD systems and the presence of three-point terms. However, we conclude that an accurate correction for these HCD effects can be obtained numerically and calibrated with observations of the HCD-Lyα cross-correlation. We also discuss an analogous formalism to treat and correct for the contaminating effect of metal lines overlapping the Lyα forest spectra.

  9. Fast and Efficient Separation and Determination of UV-absorbing Amino Acids, Nucleobases, and Creatinine Using a Carboxy-functionalized Cation-exchange Column.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Fujishima, Takeru; Kurota, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new HPLC technique for the determination of biogenic cations such as amino acids and nucleobases, using a weak-acid cation-exchange column. Fourteen analytes, five amino acids and seven bases in addition to creatinine and creatine, were separated in 12 min by means of a two-liquid gradient elution with UV detection. The newly released column packed with a carboxy-functionalized polymethacrylate resin could give excellent selectivity to the organic cations of interest, although such a column is in general suitable for the separation of inorganic common cations. The chromatographic intra-day repeatability was very good with RSDs less than 0.4%, and the quantitation precision based on peak area intensities was also good with RSDs less than 5% for all analytes. The linear calibration lines for quantitation ranged between 5 and 500 μM on 20-μL injections with R(2) more than 0.9990. Since the method could provide concentration data of urinary creatinine and some metabolites simultaneously, for example, the urinary phenylalanine/creatinine ratios for phenylketonuria of inborn errors of metabolism were simply determined through one chromatographic run. The ratios for patients were significantly higher than those for controls. We found that the new weak-acid cation-exchange column was suitable for the separation of organic cations as well as inorganic cations.

  10. Column Number Density Expressions Through M = 0 and M = 1 Point Source Plumes Along Any Straight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions for column number density (CND) are developed for optical line of sight paths through a variety of steady free molecule point source models including directionally-constrained effusion (Mach number M = 0) and flow from a sonic orifice (M 1). Sonic orifice solutions are approximate, developed using a fair simulacrum fitted to the free molecule solution. Expressions are also developed for a spherically-symmetric thermal expansion (M = 0). CND solutions are found for the most general paths relative to these sources and briefly explored. It is determined that the maximum CND from a distant location through directed effusion and sonic orifice cases occurs along the path parallel to the source plane that intersects the plume axis. For the effusive case this value is exactly twice the CND found along the ray originating from that point of intersection and extending to infinity along the plumes axis. For sonic plumes this ratio is reduced to about 43. For high Mach number cases the maximum CND will be found along the axial centerline path.

  11. Column number density expressions through M = 0 and M = 1 point source plumes along any straight path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Analytical expressions for column number density (CND) are developed for optical line of sight paths through a variety of steady free molecule point source models including directionally-constrained effusion (Mach number M = 0) and flow from a sonic orifice (M = 1). Sonic orifice solutions are approximate, developed using a fair simulacrum fitted to the free molecule solution. Expressions are also developed for a spherically-symmetric thermal expansion (M = 0). CND solutions are found for the most general paths relative to these sources and briefly explored. It is determined that the maximum CND from a distant location through directed effusion and sonic orifice cases occurs along the path parallel to the source plane that intersects the plume axis. For the effusive case this value is exactly twice the CND found along the ray originating from that point of intersection and extending to infinity along the plume's axis. For sonic plumes this ratio is reduced to about 4/3. For high Mach number cases the maximum CND will be found along the axial centerline path.

  12. Tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Column Density Trends Seen from the 10-year Record of OMI Measurements over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Muto, T.; Itahashi, S.; Kurokawa, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard the Aura satellite recorded the 10-year (2005-2014) of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column density (VCD) data. The data set taken over East Asia was analyzed to estimate linear trends on national and grid bases for two periods of 2005-2011 and 2011-2014. The most striking features are leveling-off or decreasing trends seen in NO2 VCDs over China for 2011-2014 after continuous increases for 2005-2011. In particular, a significant reduction by ~14% occurred from 2013 through 2014, attaining to the level of 2009. The grid-basis trend analysis implies that the turnaround seen in the trends occurred on a province or larger spatial scale and was likely due mainly to the technical improvement such as the widespread use of de-NOx units. Another prominent features are seen in Japan, where NO2 VCDs decreased at a rate of ~4% per year from 2005 to 2011. The rate was almost unchanged between the two periods 2005-2011 and 2011-2014, while the significant power substitution of thermal power generation for the nuclear power generation took place in Japan after 2011, when a massive earthquake occurred off the Pacific coast of northern Japan. This reflects a less contribution of NOx emissions from the power plant sector than that from the transport sector in the Pacific Belt Zone lying over metropolitan areas.

  13. Determining interstellar hydrogen and deuterium column densities by means of the Lyman channel of the SPECTRUM UV Rowland spectrograph: a pre-launch feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, Mariagrazia; Morossi, Carlo; Vladilo, G.

    1996-10-01

    Our current knowledge of production and destruction of light elements in astrophysical processes suggests that deuterium is produced during Big Bang nucleosynthesis and destroyed when cycled through stars. Primordial deuterium abundance can be determined by measuring the D/H ratio in a variety of astrophysical environments with different degrees of chemical evolution: the D/H ratio of unprocessed material directly gives the primordial value, while the ratio in processed material is expected to be lower and consistent with the predictions of galactic chemical evolution models. Here we focus our attention on deuterium abundance determinations of chemically processed material such as the interstellar gas in our Galaxy. Up to now, most of the determinations of deuterium abundance have been performed in the solar system or in local interstellar clouds. However, the overall accuracy of the measurements in local clouds is still insufficient to probe evolutionary trends. New D/H measurements in clouds at different locations in our Galaxy would be necessary to establish this issue, while interstellar measurements in nearby galaxies would give further constraints on the deuterium evolution in different galactic environments. With this goal in mind we have evaluated the capability of the Lyman channel of the SPECTRUM UV Rowland spectrography in determining deuterium column density in distant interstellar clouds. Three packages have been used to obtain realistic predicted spectra and to derive `observed' column densities: (1) the MIDAS package `CLOUD', to generate theoretical interstellar absorption profiles; (2) the `Synth' package developed in the IRAF environment by two of the authors to simulate spectroscopic observations of point sources obtainable with an astronomical spectrograph, (3) the FITLYMAN package inside the Lyman context of MIDAS to derive `observed' column densities from predicted spectra. The minimum exposure times, t(subscript min), required to obtain a

  14. REVERSAL CYCLIC LOADING TEST OF REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN WITH HIGH DENSITY LONGITUDINAL REINFORCEMENT CONFINED BY SPIRAL REINFORCEMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohba, Mitsuaki; Sato, Akiko; Ishibashi, Tadayoshi

    In case of that column diameter is restricted by the narrow construction space, Concrete filled steel tube column is used. Authors developed new arrangement of bars that the range of longitudinal reinforcement ratio is from 14.8% to 24.7% and the longitudinal reinforcements are reinforced by spiral reinforcement. For the confirmation of the damage form and the deformation performance of the column with new bar arrangement at the earthquake, static reversal cyclic loading test was carried out. The parameters are longitudinal reinforcement ratio, shear span ratio and strength ratio. As the result, the damage form showed different trends due to longitudinal reinforcement ratio, shear span ratio and flexural strength and shear strength ratio. And specimens with the new bar arrangement had a good ductility with rotation angle of the column more than 1/10 and no rapid decline of strength. And, it is possible to evaluate ultimate bending capacity by considering the damage situation at maximum load.

  15. THE NATURE OF DAMPED LYMAN-α AND Mg II ABSORBERS EXPLORED THROUGH THEIR DUST CONTENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, Masataka; Ménard, Brice

    2015-02-01

    We estimate the abundance of dust in damped Lyman-α absorbers (DLAs) by statistically measuring the excess reddening they induce on their background quasars. We detect systematic reddening behind DLAs consistent with the SMC-type reddening curve and inconsistent with the Milky Way type. We find that the derived dust-to-gas ratio is, on average, inversely proportional to the column density of neutral hydrogen, implying that the amount of dust is constant, regardless of the column density of hydrogen. It means that the average metallicity is inversely proportional to the column density of hydrogen, unless the average dust-to-metal ratio varies with the hydrogen column density. This indicates that the prime origin of metals seen in DLAs is not by in situ star formation, with which Z∼N{sub H} {sub I}{sup +0.4} is expected from the empirical star formation law, contrary to our observation. We interpret the metals observed in absorbers to be deposited dominantly from nearby galaxies by galactic winds ubiquitous in intergalactic space. When extrapolating the relation between dust-to-gas ratio and H I column density to lower column density, we find a value that is consistent with what is observed for Mg II absorbers.

  16. Two new methods used to simulate the circumferential solar flux density concentrated on the absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Minghuan; Wang, Zhifeng; Sun, Feihu

    2016-05-01

    The optical efficiencies of a solar trough concentrator are important to the whole thermal performance of the solar collector, and the outer surface of the tube absorber is a key interface of energy flux. So it is necessary to simulate and analyze the concentrated solar flux density distributions on the tube absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector for various sun beam incident angles, with main optical errors considered. Since the solar trough concentrators are linear focusing, it is much of interest to investigate the solar flux density distribution on the cross-section profile of the tube absorber, rather than the flux density distribution along the focal line direction. Although a few integral approaches based on the "solar cone" concept were developed to compute the concentrated flux density for some simple trough concentrator geometries, all those integral approaches needed special integration routines, meanwhile, the optical parameters and geometrical properties of collectors also couldn't be changed conveniently. Flexible Monte Carlo ray trace (MCRT) methods are widely used to simulate the more accurate concentrated flux density distribution for compound parabolic solar trough concentrators, while generally they are quite time consuming. In this paper, we first mainly introduce a new backward ray tracing (BRT) method combined with the lumped effective solar cone, to simulate the cross-section flux density on the region of interest of the tube absorber. For BRT, bundles of rays are launched at absorber-surface points of interest, directly go through the glass cover of the absorber, strike on the uniformly sampled mirror segment centers in the close-related surface region of the parabolic reflector, and then direct to the effective solar cone around the incident sun beam direction after the virtual backward reflection. All the optical errors are convoluted into the effective solar cone. The brightness distribution of the effective solar cone is supposed

  17. Propagation of photon-density waves in strongly scattering media containing an absorbing semi-infinite plane bounded by a straight edge

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkin, J.B.; Gratton, E. )

    1993-01-01

    Light propagation in strongly scattering media can be described by the diffusion approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation. The authors have derived analytical expressions based on the diffusion approximation that describe the photon density in a uniform, infinite, strongly scattering medium that contains a sinusoidally intensity-modulated point source of light. These expressions predit that the photon density will propagate outward from the light source as a spherical wave of constant phase velocity with an amplitude that attenuates with distance r from the source as exp([minus]r)/r. The properties of the photon-density wave are given in terms of the spectral properties of the scattering medium. The authors have used the Green's function obtained from the diffusion approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation with a sinusoidally modulated point source to derive analytic expressions describing the diffraction and the reflection of photon-density waves from an absorbing and/or reflecting semi-infinite plane bounded by a straight edge immersed in a strongly scattering medium. The analytic expressions given are in agreement with the results of frequency-domain experiments performed in skim-milk media and with Monte Carlo simulations. These studies provide a basis for the understanding of photon diffusion in strongly scattering media in the presence of absorbing and reflecting objects and allow for a determination of the conditions for obtaining maximum resolution and penetration for applications to optical tomography. 20 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HI4PI spectra and column density maps (HI4PI team+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hi4PI Collaboration; Ben Bekhti, N.; Floeer, L.; Keller, R.; Kerp, J.; Lenz, D.; Winkel, B.; Bailin, J.; Calabretta, M. R.; Dedes, L.; Ford, H. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Haud, U.; Janowiecki, S.; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Lockman, F. J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Nakanishi, H.; Pisano, D. J.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2016-09-01

    The HI4PI data release comprises 21-cm neutral atomic hydrogen data of the Milky Way (-600km/s0°; -470km/scolumn density distribution, both, in a (1) HealPIX-grid binary table (nside=1024, Galactic coordinates, Ring indexing scheme), and (2) Standard FITS 2D images in four map projections, AIT, CAR, MOL, and SFL. Various velocity intervals were applied to calculate NHI. Equatorial and Galactic coordinate systems are provided. (16 data files).

  19. Trend analysis of satellite-observed tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities over East Asia for 2005-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, T.; Irie, H.; Itahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) plays a central role in the troposphere as a toxic substance for the respiratory system and a precursor for ozone and aerosols. Furthermore, the OH concentration is dependent on the NO2 concentration. While trend analysis for tropospheric NO2 concentrations in several specific regions all over the world was made in literature for period until 2011, the latest trends after 2011 have not been reported yet. The time period after 2011 is of interest, because it corresponds to the 12th 5-year-plan regulating NOx emissions in China and the period with the power substitution of thermal power generation for the nuclear power generation in Japan. In this study, we first compared satellite-observed tropospheric NO2 VCDs (Vertical Column Densities) with those observed by ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instruments installed at Chiba University in order to clarify whether or not there is degradation in OMI and GOME-2 NO2 VCDs data after 2011. We concluded that there is no significant degradation in OMI and GOME-2 data, since the comparison results are similar to those reported by previous validation studies. Based on the results, tropospheric NO2 VCD trends over Central Eastern China (CEC; 30-40°N, 110.0-123.0°E) and Japan (JPN; 33.5-37.0°N, 133.0-141.0°E) regions were estimated using the regression analysis for annual mean values. Although an increase in NO2 VCDs occurred at a rate of 6%(8%) per year in OMI (GOME-2) data from 2005(2007) to 2011 over CEC, we found a decrease at a rate of 10%(11%) per year from 2011 to 2014. This reduction may be a result from the regulation of NOx emissions from coal fired power generation, iron foundry, cement plant, etc., and installation of the denitrification units during the period of 12th 5-year-plan. For JPN, both OMI and GOME-2 data sets showed that the NO2 VCDs decreased at a rate of 4% per year before 2011. The decreasing trends continued until 2014, with a

  20. Screening for urinary amphetamine and analogs by capillary electrophoretic immunoassays and confirmation by capillary electrophoresis with on-column multiwavelength absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, A; Caslavska, J; Thormann, W

    1998-11-01

    This paper characterizes competitive binding, electrokinetic capillary-based immunoassays for screening of urinary amphetamine (A) and analogs using reagents which were commercialized for a fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). After incubation of 25 microL urine with the reactants, a small aliquot of the mixture is applied onto a fused-silica capillary and unbound fluorescein-labeled tracer compounds are monitored by capillary electrophoresis with on-column laser-induced fluorescence detection. Configurations in presence and absence of micelles were investigated and found to be capable of recognizing urinary D-(+)-amphetamine at concentrations > about 80 ng/mL. Similar responses were obtained for racemic methamphetamine (MA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The electrokinetic immunoassay data suggest that the FPIA reagent kit includes two immunoassay systems (two antibodies and two tracer molecules), one that recognizes MA and MDMA, and one that is geared towards monitoring of A. For confirmation analysis of urinary amphetamines and ephedrines, capillary electrophoresis in a pH 9.2 buffer and multiwavelength UV detection was employed. The suitability of the electrokinetic methods for screening and confirmation is demonstrated via analysis of patient and external quality control urines.

  1. On the suitability of ultrathin detectors for absorbed dose assessment in the presence of high-density heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno, M. Duch, M. A.; Carrasco, P.; Jornet, N.; Muñoz-Montplet, C.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of several detectors for the determination of absorbed dose in bone. Methods: Three types of ultrathin LiF-based thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs)—two LiF:Mg,Cu,P-based (MCP-Ns and TLD-2000F) and a{sup 7}Li-enriched LiF:Mg,Ti-based (MTS-7s)—as well as EBT2 Gafchromic films were used to measure percentage depth-dose distributions (PDDs) in a water-equivalent phantom with a bone-equivalent heterogeneity for 6 and 18 MV and a set of field sizes ranging from 5×5 cm{sup 2} to 20×20 cm{sup 2}. MCP-Ns, TLD-2000F, MTS-7s, and EBT2 have active layers of 50, 20, 50, and 30 μm, respectively. Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations (PENELOPE code) were used as the reference and helped to understand the experimental results and to evaluate the potential perturbation of the fluence in bone caused by the presence of the detectors. The energy dependence and linearity of the TLDs’ response was evaluated. Results: TLDs exhibited flat energy responses (within 2.5%) and linearity with dose (within 1.1%) within the range of interest for the selected beams. The results revealed that all considered detectors perturb the electron fluence with respect to the energy inside the bone-equivalent material. MCP-Ns and MTS-7s underestimated the absorbed dose in bone by 4%–5%. EBT2 exhibited comparable accuracy to MTS-7s and MCP-Ns. TLD-2000F was able to determine the dose within 2% accuracy. No dependence on the beam energy or field size was observed. The MC calculations showed that a50 μm thick detector can provide reliable dose estimations in bone regardless of whether it is made of LiF, water or EBT’s active layer material. Conclusions: TLD-2000F was found to be suitable for providing reliable absorbed dose measurements in the presence of bone for high-energy x-ray beams.

  2. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  3. Validation of SCIAMACHY Ozone Column Densities and Profiles Using Ground-Based FTIR and Millimeter Wave Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.; Blumenstock, Th.; Brinksma, E.; Eskes, H.; Griesfeller, A.; Hase, F.; Hochschild, G.; Kramer, I.; Mikuteit, S.; Raffalski, U.; van der A, R.

    2004-08-01

    Ground-based FTIR and millimeter wave measurements of the Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, and the Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) are used for validation of SCIAMACHY ozone measurements. FTIR and millimeter wave measurements used for this study were routinely carried out between 2002 and 2004 at IRF at Kiruna, Sweden. In addition IMK carried out millimeter wave measurements on Mount Zugspitze in the Alps in 2003. SCIAMACHY level 2 NRT-products of 2002 are only validated by FTIR data since millimeter wave observations started in late 2002 when SCIAMACHY data were unavailable. For the years 2003 and early 2004 total ozone column abundances retrieved with the TOSOMI algorithm of the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut, KNMI) are validated by the FTIR and microwave measurements. Finally, ozone limb profiles between July and November 2002 taken from the current SCIA Level 2 Off-Line masterset are validated by the FTIR measurements at Kiruna

  4. The physical properties of giant molecular cloud complexes in the outer Galaxy - Implications for the ratio of H2 column density to (C-12)O intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodroski, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The physical properties of 35 giant molecular cloud complexes in the outer Galaxy were derived from the Goddard-Columbia surveys of the Galactic plane region (Dame et al., 1987). The spatial and radial velocity boundaries for the individual cloud complexes were estimated by analyzing the spatial and velocity structure of emission features in the (C-12)O surveys, and the distance to each cmplex was determined kinematically on the assumption of a flat rotation curve. The ratio of the H2 column density to the (C-12)O intensity for the outer Galaxy complexes was found to be about 6.0 x 10 to the 20th molecules/sq cm K per km/sec, which is by a factor of 2-3 greater than the value derived by other auhtors for the inner Galaxy complexes. This increase in the H2 column density/(C-12)O intensity with the distance from with the Galactic center is consistent with predictions of the optically thick cloudlet model of giant molecular cloud complexes.

  5. Measurements of spectrally integrated atmospheric transmittance in the O2 Schumann-Runge bands and derived oxygen column densities - 76-102 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longmire, M. S.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.; Brown, C. M.; Brueckner, G. E.; Tousey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Atmospheric transmittances integrated over wavelength intervals corresponding approximately to the (15-0) through (4-0) Schumann-Runge bands of O2 have been determined from EUV solar spectra (wavelengths between 1768 and 1948 A) photographed at seven altitudes between 102 and 76 km with a rocket-borne spectrograph having a resolution of 0.07 A. The observed transmittances are compared with atmospheric transmittances predicted from three models of the O2 absorption cross section. The predicted transmittances have also been used to derive column densities of atmospheric O2 from the observations. The results are compared with values calculated from the U.S. Standard Atmosphere (1976) and with oxygen column densities determined by Prinz and Brueckner (1977) from EUV solar spectra of the Schumann-Runge continuum (wavelength below 1750 A) and of the H-Lyman alpha line (1216 A) recorded on the same films used in the present research. The comparisons test the utility of the models for studies of atmospheric photochemistry, suggest which models may be best for this purpose, and indicate how the models can be improved.

  6. Comet P/Giacobini-Zinner electron and H2O column densities from ICE and ground-based observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer-Vernet, N.; Strauss, Michael A.; Steinberg, J. L.; Spinrad, Hyron; Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1986-01-01

    An H2O(+) emission profile extracted from an optical CCD spectrogram obtained during the ICE/Giacobini-Zinner encounter is compared to the electron density profile deduced from in-situ measurements by the ratio experiment aboard ICE. It is concluded that the electrons and the H2O(+) ions are distributed similarly 9600 km tailward from the cometary nucleus; that the ratio of number densities of H2O(+) ions to electrons is 1/4 at this point; and that the width of the plasma sheet is 16,000 km.

  7. OVI absorbers in SDSS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan

    begun to quantitatively measure the absorption features for an OVI+CIV selected, mostly uncontaminated subsample of 59 candidates, and compared them with the multiple transitions found in a CIV-only selected sample from the QSOALS database. These measurements will become input for a more detailed modelling of the physical state of the absorbers with codes like CLOUDY. One of the first results is that we are apparently able to probe gas with large OVI column densities that lack many of the lower ionisation lines (like Si II and OI) frequently seen in CIV- selected systems. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  8. Balloon-Borne Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Vela C Molecular Cloud: Systematic Dependence of Polarization Fraction on Column Density and Local Polarization-Angle Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissel, Laura M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2016-06-01

    We present results for Vela C obtained during the 2012 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry. We mapped polarized intensity across almost the entire extent of this giant molecular cloud, in bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 μm. In this initial paper, we show our 500 μm data smoothed to a resolution of 2.‧5 (approximately 0.5 pc). We show that the mean level of the fractional polarization p and most of its spatial variations can be accounted for using an empirical three-parameter power-law fit, p \\propto {{\\boldsymbol{N}}}-0.45 {{\\boldsymbol{S}}}-0.60, where N is the hydrogen column density and S is the polarization-angle dispersion on 0.5 pc scales. The decrease of p with increasing S is expected because changes in the magnetic field direction within the cloud volume sampled by each measurement will lead to cancellation of polarization signals. The decrease of p with increasing N might be caused by the same effect, if magnetic field disorder increases for high column density sightlines. Alternatively, the intrinsic polarization efficiency of the dust grain population might be lower for material along higher density sightlines. We find no significant correlation between N and S. Comparison of observed submillimeter polarization maps with synthetic polarization maps derived from numerical simulations provides a promising method for testing star formation theories. Realistic simulations should allow for the possibility of variable intrinsic polarization efficiency. The measured levels of correlation among p, N, and S provide points of comparison between observations and simulations.

  9. Understanding measured water rotational temperatures and column densities in the very innermost coma of Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.; Rubin, M.; Bonev, B. P.; Mumma, M. J.

    2012-09-01

    Direct sublimation of a comet nucleus surface is usually considered to be the main source of gas in the coma of a comet. However, evidence from a number of comets including the recent spectacular images of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 by the EPOXI mission indicates that the nucleus alone may not be responsible for all, or possibly at times even most, of the total amount of gas seen in the coma. Indeed, the sublimation of icy grains, which have been injected into the coma, appears to constitute an important source. We use the fully-kinetic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo model of Tenishev et al. (Tenishev, V.M., Combi, M.R., Davidsson, B. [2008]. Astrophys. J., 685, 659-677; Tenishev, V.M., Combi, M.R., Rubin, M. [2011]. Astrophys. J., 732) to reproduce the measurements of column density and rotational temperature of water in Comet 73P-B/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 obtained with a very high spatial resolution of ∼30 km using IRCS/Subaru in May 2006 (Bonev, B.P., Mumma, M.J., Kawakita, H., Kobayashi, H., Villanueva, G.L. [2008]. Icarus, 196, 241-248). For gas released solely from the cometary nucleus at a heliocentric distance of 1 AU, modeled rotational temperatures start at 110 K close to the surface and decrease to only several tens of degrees by 10-20 nucleus radii. However, the measured decay of both rotational temperature and column density with distance from the nucleus is much slower than predicted by this simple model. The addition of a substantial (distributed) source of gas from icy grains in the model slows the decay in rotational temperature and provides a more gradual drop in column density profiles. Together with a contribution of rotational heating of water molecules by electrons, the combined effects allow a much better match to the IRCS/Subaru observations. From the spatial distributions of water abundance and temperature measured in 73P/SW3-B, we have identified and quantified multiple mechanisms of release. The application of this tool to other comets may

  10. Evidence for two modes of water release in Comet 103P/Hartley 2: Distributions of column density, rotational temperature, and ortho-para ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Paganini, Lucas; DiSanti, Michael A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Mumma, Michael J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents long-slit spectra of H2O emission from the inner coma of Comet 103P/Hartley 2, acquired with NIRSPEC/Keck 2 during the comet's close approach to Earth in 2010. On UT 19.6 October 2010 the slit was oriented nearly orthogonal to the projected (in the plane of the sky) Sun-comet line, and the H2O rotational temperature and column density showed similar spatial distributions as a function of projected distance from the nucleus. On UT 22.5 October, the slit was oriented along the Sun-comet line, and the rotational temperatures revealed pronounced asymmetry while the column densities were nearly symmetric about the nucleus. We suggest this dichotomy reflects two qualitatively different mechanisms of volatile release, which introduce distinct rotational distributions in the sublimated material. Future modeling can test this hypothesis. We also report new retrievals of water nuclear spin species (ortho, para) in this comet, and we present the ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) for various projected nucleocentric distances. Our most precise individual measurement is OPR = 2.59 ± 0.13, corresponding to a nuclear spin temperature (Tspin) of 31 ± 3 K. A weighted mean of five independent measurements provides OPR = 2.79 ± 0.13 (T=37-4+8K). Hartley 2 is the first comet for which the OPR has been measured in multiple apparitions. Our values (in 2010) are in good agreement with those obtained two apparitions earlier by the Infrared Space Observatory. Since the comet lost a substantial amount of material between 1998 and 2010, we see no evidence for variation of the OPR with depth in the nucleus. Further discussion of the advantages, assumptions, and biases introduced by various approaches when quantifying nuclear spin species (observing techniques, models and model parameters, sources of uncertainty) would likely aid in interpreting the OPRs measured in cometary volatiles.

  11. Synthetic observations of molecular clouds in a galactic centre environment - I. Studying maps of column density and integrated intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Erik; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Ragan, Sarah E.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2016-02-01

    We run numerical simulations of molecular clouds, adopting properties similar to those found in the central molecular zone (CMZ) of the Milky Way. For this, we employ the moving mesh code AREPO and perform simulations which account for a simplified treatment of time-dependent chemistry and the non-isothermal nature of gas and dust. We perform simulations using an initial density of n0 = 103 cm-3 and a mass of 1.3 × 105 M⊙. Furthermore, we vary the virial parameter, defined as the ratio of kinetic and potential energy, α = Ekin/|Epot|, by adjusting the velocity dispersion. We set it to α = 0.5, 2.0 and 8.0, in order to analyse the impact of the kinetic energy on our results. We account for the extreme conditions in the CMZ and increase both the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) and the cosmic ray flux (CRF) by a factor of 1000 compared to the values found in the solar neighbourhood. We use the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D to compute synthetic images in various diagnostic lines. These are [C II] at 158 μm, [O I] (145 μm), [O I] (63 μm), 12CO (J = 1 → 0) and 13CO (J = 1 → 0) at 2600 and 2720 μm, respectively. When α is large, the turbulence disperses much of the gas in the cloud, reducing its mean density and allowing the ISRF to penetrate more deeply into the cloud's interior. This significantly alters the chemical composition of the cloud, leading to the dissociation of a significant amount of the molecular gas. On the other hand, when α is small, the cloud remains compact, allowing more of the molecular gas to survive. We show that in each case the atomic tracers accurately reflect most of the physical properties of both the H2 and the total gas of the cloud and that they provide a useful alternative to molecular lines when studying the interstellar medium in the CMZ.

  12. Quantification of mid and late evoked sinks in laminar current source density profiles of columns in the primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Markus K; Hechavarría, Julio C; Kössl, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Current source density (CSD) analysis assesses spatiotemporal synaptic activations at somatic and/or dendritic levels in the form of depolarizing current sinks. Whereas many studies have focused on the short (<50 ms) latency sinks, associated with thalamocortical projections, sinks with longer latencies have received less attention. Here, we analyzed laminar CSD patterns for the first 600 ms after stimulus onset in the primary auditory cortex of Mongolian gerbils. By applying an algorithm for contour calculation, three distinct mid and four late evoked sinks were identified in layers I, III, Va, VIa, and VIb. Our results further showed that the patterns of intracortical information-flow remained qualitatively similar for low and for high sound pressure level stimuli at the characteristic frequency (CF) as well as for stimuli ± 1 octave from CF. There were, however, differences associated with the strength, vertical extent, onset latency, and duration of the sinks for the four stimulation paradigms used. Stimuli one octave above the most sensitive frequency evoked a new, and quite reliable, sink in layer Va whereas low level stimulation led to the disappearance of the layer VIb sink. These data indicate the presence of input sources specifically activated in response to level and/or frequency parameters. Furthermore, spectral integration above vs. below the CF of neurons is asymmetric as illustrated by CSD profiles. These results are important because synaptic feedback associated with mid and late sinks-beginning at 50 ms post stimulus latency-is likely crucial for response modulation resulting from higher order processes like memory, learning or cognitive control.

  13. Experimental results for propagation of diffuse photon-density waves up to 1 GHz in a tissue-like medium containing an absorbing edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, U. J.; Hielscher, A. H.; Scheel, A. K.; Beuthan, J.

    2006-05-01

    Optical imaging in the near-infrared (NIR) region provides the possibility to detect and determine pathological changes in human tissue without the drawback of ionizing radiation and with little technical and financial effort. Especially in rheumatoid arthritis, imaging by optical tomography to detect early inflammations in joints has the potential to become a supportive tool to common imaging modalities. One way to enhance the resolution and specificity of optical tissue characterization is to use the frequency domain instead of DC intensity measurement. Intensity modulation of a light source leads to propagation of diffuse photon-density waves (PDW) through the tissue. In this study, we report basic experimental results on tissuelike phantoms to determine the optimal parameters for PDW-transillumination of finger joints. We used PDW with modulation frequencies from 100 MHz up to 1 GHz to scan across a tissuelike phantom containing an absorbing plane bounded by an edge. The geometrical extents of the phantoms are similar to human finger joints. We measure the transmitted PDW and show that amplitude and phase behaves at the edge as expected according to theoretical predictions. An increasing modulation frequency leads to increasing slope of the amplitude decay at the edge but decreasing signal-to-noise ratio. Even at 1 GHz, the edge is detectable.

  14. Evidence for Two Modes of Water Release in Comet 103P/Hartley 2: Distributions of Column Density, Rotational Temperature, and Ortho-Para Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, Boncho; Villanueva, G. L.; Paganini, L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Gibb, E. L.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Combi, M. R.; Mumma, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    We acquired high-resolution near-infrared spectra of H2O emission from comet 103P/Hartley-2 using NIRSPEC at Keck 2. Long-slit spectroscopy can directly probe the inner comae of comets via spectrally and spatially resolved measurements. This capability strengthens the quantitative view of conditions within the closest 200 km from the cometary nucleus, thereby providing direct constraints for models of density and temperature distributions in this collisionally dominated region of the coma. The near-Earth approach of comet 103P/Hartley 2 in 2010 presented an especially interesting opportunity to investigate the near-nucleus region of an active comet with substantial extended (vs. nuclear) release of water. We present spatially resolved measurements of rotational temperature and column density and discuss insights into the nature of volatile release. We also present spatially resolved measurements of the H2O ortho-para ratio (OPR). We compare these measurements with OPRs retrieved by various techniques during the 1998 and 2010 apparitions. We gratefully acknowledge support by the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grants Program (PI/co-PI Bonev/Gibb), by the NASA Astrobiology Institute (PI: Meech, PI: Mumma), by the NASA Postdoctoral Program (Fellow: Paganini), and by NASA's Planetary Astronomy (PI: DiSanti; PI: Mumma; PI: Villanueva), Planetary Atmospheres (PI: Combi; PI: DiSanti; PI: Villanueva), and Discovery (PI: Meech) Programs. NOAO (through the Telescope System Instrumentation Program funded by NSF) and the University of Hawaii granted Keck-2 telescope time for this investigation.

  15. On Lunar Exospheric Column Densities and Solar Wind Access Beyond the Terminator from ROSAT Soft X-Ray Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Holmstrom, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the Rontgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19 deg wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 deg off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38 deg wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38 deg wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  16. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  17. Effect of temperature-dependent cross sections on O4 slant column density estimation by a space-borne UV-visible hyperspectral sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Takemura, Toshihiko; Kim, Jhoon

    2017-03-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) were examined by applying temperature-dependent O4 cross sections using the radiative transfer model (RTM) calculation with the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer model. For the sensitivity study, we used a newly developed cross section database in place of the database used in the operational algorithm. Newly investigated O4 cross section databases for 203 K and 293 K were used for the radiance simulation by interpolating temperature for each atmospheric layer based on the vertical profile of standard atmosphere in the RTM. The effect of the temperature-dependent cross sections was a significant O4 SCD increase of 8.3% with dependence on satellite and solar viewing geometries. Furthermore, the O4 SCD generally increased by an estimated 3.9% based on the observation geometries of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument. For the long-term comparison, the O4 SCD estimated from the temperature-dependent cross sections corrects 20% of the total underestimation of O4 SCD between the observation and simulation. Although the surface pressure variation and background aerosol effect also correct the O4 SCD discrepancy, the effect of temperature-dependent cross sections was more important than the effects of surface pressure variation and background aerosols. Therefore, temperature dependence of the cross section in the RTM calculation is essential for the accurate simulation of O4 SCD.

  18. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  19. Imaging of Damped Ly-alpha Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jim, K. T. C.; Roth, K. C.

    1998-05-01

    Intervening H I gas clouds toward QSOs give rise to damped Ly-alpha absorption. Because of the high column density (N(H I)>= 2*E(20) cm(-2) ) these systems have been thought to be galactic disks in some stage of formation. However, because potential optical counterparts have not been identified for most damped Ly-alpha systems, it is possible that some of the absorbing systems could be dwarf irregular galaxies or low surface brightness galaxies, and are thus difficult to image. In any case, the absorbers are expected to have small angular separation from the QSOs, and so high resolution imaging is required to differentiate the absorbers from the QSOs. Because previous studies have not shown any dominant morphological form for the few candidate objects known, our images are obtained with the Hawaii tip-tilt system in order to achieve the best possible morphological classification. By imaging in the NIR and optical bands that bracket the 4000 Angstroms break of these Ly-alpha absorbers, we can more readily select candidate objects by photometrically constraining their redshifts. In our sample of 14 QSOs with abosorbers from 1absorbers (Kolhatkar et al.)

  20. The Multi-Layer Variable Absorbers in NGC 1365 Revealed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, E.; Risaliti, G.; Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F.; Arevalo, P.; Baur, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brenneman, L. W.; Brightman, M.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Between 2012 July and 2013 February, NuSTAR and XMM-Newton performed four long-look joint observations of the type 1.8 Seyfert, NGC 1365. We have analyzed the variable absorption seen in these observations in order to characterize the geometry of the absorbing material. Two of the observations caught NGC 1365 in an unusually low absorption state, revealing complexity in the multi-layer absorber that had previously been hidden. We find the need for three distinct zones of neutral absorption in addition to the two zones of ionized absorption and the Compton-thick torus previously seen in this source. The most prominent absorber is likely associated with broad-line region clouds with column densities of around approximately 10 (sup 23) per square centimeter and a highly clumpy nature as evidenced by an occultation event in 2013 February. We also find evidence of a patchy absorber with a variable column around approximately 10 (sup 22) per square centimeter and a line-of-sight covering fraction of 0.3-0.9, which responds directly to the intrinsic source flux, possibly due to a wind geometry. A full-covering, constant absorber with a low column density of approximately 1 by 10 (sup 22) per square centimeter is also present, though the location of this low density haze is unknown.

  1. The Multi-layer Variable Absorbers in NGC 1365 Revealed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, E.; Risaliti, G.; Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F.; Arévalo, P.; Baur, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brenneman, L. W.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Fürst, F.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R. C.; Marinucci, A.; Reeves, J.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-05-01

    Between 2012 July and 2013 February, NuSTAR and XMM-Newton performed four long-look joint observations of the type 1.8 Seyfert, NGC 1365. We have analyzed the variable absorption seen in these observations in order to characterize the geometry of the absorbing material. Two of the observations caught NGC 1365 in an unusually low absorption state, revealing complexity in the multi-layer absorber that had previously been hidden. We find the need for three distinct zones of neutral absorption in addition to the two zones of ionized absorption and the Compton-thick torus previously seen in this source. The most prominent absorber is likely associated with broad-line region clouds with column densities of around ˜1023 cm-2 and a highly clumpy nature as evidenced by an occultation event in 2013 February. We also find evidence of a patchy absorber with a variable column around ˜1022 cm-2 and a line-of-sight covering fraction of 0.3-0.9, which responds directly to the intrinsic source flux, possibly due to a wind geometry. A full-covering, constant absorber with a low column density of ˜1 × 1022 cm-2 is also present, though the location of this low density haze is unknown.

  2. A study of warm absorbers in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Ceri Ellen

    This thesis explores the 'warm absorber' phenomenon observed in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Warm absorbers are clouds of ionised gas within AGN, that cause absorption at soft X-ray wavelengths. They are observed in half of all Type 1 AGN, hence they play an important part in the framework of our under standing of Active Galactic Nuclei. Observations with the satellite XMM-Newton have given us the highest signal-to-noise data yet. XMM-Newton observations of the quasars PG 1114+445 and PG 1309+355 are studied. Both quasars exhibit evidence for absorption by warm material in the line-of-sight. We define a 'phase' of absorption to have a single ionisation param eter and column density. From fits to the data, the absorption in PG 1114+445 is found to be in two phases, a 'hot' phase with a log ionisation parameter f of 2.57 and a column of 1022 cm-2, and a 'cooler' one with log f of 0.83 and a column of 1021 cm-2. The absorption in PG 1309+355 consists of a single phase, with log f of 1.87 and a column of 1021 cm-2. The absorbing gas lies at distances of 1019 - 1022 cm from the continuum radiation sources in these AGN, suggesting origins in a wind emanating from a molecular torus, according to the 'Standard Model' of AGN. The kinetic luminosities of the outflowing absorbers represent insignificant fractions (< 10 3) of the energy budgets of the AGN. Using data for the Seyfert 1 H 0557 385, the warm absorption is characterised by two phases, a phase with log £ of 0.48 and a column of 1021 cm-2, and a phase with log f of 1.63 and a column of 1022 cm-2. Neutral absorption is also present in the source, and possible origins for this are discussed. For a large sample, observations of warm absorbers are collated and compared with models.

  3. Column Store for GWAC: A High-cadence, High-density, Large-scale Astronomical Light Curve Pipeline and Distributed Shared-nothing Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Meng; Wu, Chao; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Yulei; Xin, Liping; Mullender, Sjoerd; Mühleisen, Hannes; Scheers, Bart; Zhang, Ying; Nes, Niels; Kersten, Martin; Huang, Yongpan; Deng, Jinsong; Wei, Jianyan

    2016-11-01

    The ground-based wide-angle camera array (GWAC), a part of the SVOM space mission, will search for various types of optical transients by continuously imaging a field of view (FOV) of 5000 degrees2 every 15 s. Each exposure consists of 36 × 4k × 4k pixels, typically resulting in 36 × ∼175,600 extracted sources. For a modern time-domain astronomy project like GWAC, which produces massive amounts of data with a high cadence, it is challenging to search for short timescale transients in both real-time and archived data, and to build long-term light curves for variable sources. Here, we develop a high-cadence, high-density light curve pipeline (HCHDLP) to process the GWAC data in real-time, and design a distributed shared-nothing database to manage the massive amount of archived data which will be used to generate a source catalog with more than 100 billion records during 10 years of operation. First, we develop HCHDLP based on the column-store DBMS of MonetDB, taking advantage of MonetDB’s high performance when applied to massive data processing. To realize the real-time functionality of HCHDLP, we optimize the pipeline in its source association function, including both time and space complexity from outside the database (SQL semantic) and inside (RANGE-JOIN implementation), as well as in its strategy of building complex light curves. The optimized source association function is accelerated by three orders of magnitude. Second, we build a distributed database using a two-level time partitioning strategy via the MERGE TABLE and REMOTE TABLE technology of MonetDB. Intensive tests validate that our database architecture is able to achieve both linear scalability in response time and concurrent access by multiple users. In summary, our studies provide guidance for a solution to GWAC in real-time data processing and management of massive data.

  4. Satellite-observed NO2, SO2, and HCHO Vertical Column Densities in East Asia: Recent Changes and Comparisons with Regional Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. C.; Lee, P.; Kim, S.; Mok, J.; Yoo, H. L.; Bae, C.; Kim, B. U.; Lim, Y. K.; Woo, J. H.; Park, R.

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the recent changes in tropospheric NO2, SO2, and HCHO vertical column densities (VCD) in East Asia observed from multiple satellites, highlighting especially the annual trend changes of NO2 and SO2 over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region of China since 2010. Tropospheric VCD data from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and GOME-2, retrieved from the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and OMI National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) standard products, are utilized to investigate the annual trends of NO2, SO2, and HCHO VCDs from 2001 to 2015. They are also compared with simulations from Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) based forecast system by the Integrated Multi-scale Air Quality System for Korea (IMAQS-K) of Ajou University. Until 2011, the changes in NO2 VCD over East Asian countries agree well with the findings of previous research, including the impact of the economic downturn during 2008-2009 and the subsequent quick recovery in China. After peaking in 2011, the NO2 VCD observations from active instruments (OMI and GOME-2) over China started to show a slower decreasing trend, mostly led by the rapid changes in the BTH region in northern China. On the other hand, SO2 started to decline earlier, from 2007, but inclined back from 2010 to 2012, and then back to declining trend since 2012. While satellite observations show dramatic recent changes, the model could not reproduce those changes mostly due to its use of fixed emission inventory. We conclude that rapid update of latest emission inventory is necessary for an accurate forecast of regional air quality in east Asia, especially for upcoming international sports events in PyeongChang (Korea), Tokyo (Japan) and Beijing (China) in 2018, 2020 and 2022, respectively.

  5. Regional modeling of tropospheric NO2 vertical column density over East Asia during the period 2000-2010: comparison with multisatellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itahashi, S.; Uno, I.; Irie, H.; Kurokawa, J.-I.; Ohara, T.

    2014-04-01

    Satellite observations of the tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) are closely correlated to, and thus can be used to estimate, surface NOx emissions. In this study, the NO2 VCD simulated by a regional chemical transport model with emissions data from the updated Regional Emission inventory in ASia (REAS) version 2.1 were validated through comparison with multisatellite observations during the period 2000-2010. Rapid growth in NO2 VCD (~11% year-1) driven by the expansion of anthropogenic NOx emissions was identified above the central eastern China (CEC) region, except for the period during the economic downturn. In contrast, slightly decreasing trends (~2% year-1) were identified above Japan accompanied by a decline in anthropogenic emissions. To systematically compare the modeled NO2 VCD, we estimated sampling bias and the effect of applying the averaging kernel information, with particular focus on the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) data. Using the updated REAS, the modeled NO2 VCD reasonably reproduced annual trends observed by multisatellites, suggesting that the rate of increase of NOx emissions estimated by the updated REAS inventory would be robust. Province-scale revision of emissions above CEC is needed to further refine emission inventories. Based on the close linear relationship between modeled and observed NO2 VCD and anthropogenic NOx emissions, NOx emissions in 2009 and 2010, which were not covered by the updated REAS inventory, were estimated. NOx emissions from anthropogenic sources in China in 2009 and 2010 were determined to be 26.4 and 28.5 Tg year-1, respectively, indicating that NOx emissions increased more than twofold between 2000 and 2010. This increase reflected the strong growth of anthropogenic emissions in China following the rapid recovery from the economic downturn from late 2008 until mid-2009. Our method consists of simple estimations from satellite observations and

  6. Inter-Comparison of Nitrogen Dioxide Column Densities Retrieved by Ground-Based Max-Doas Under Different Instrumental Conditions Over Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchkouski, I.; Dziomin, V.; Ortega, I.; Volkamer, R.; Krasouski, A.

    2013-12-01

    This study is dedicated to the instrumental differences between ground-based MAX-DOAS measurement devices. Our MAX-DOAS instrument, which has been developed at the National Ozone Monitoring Research & Education Center of the Belarusian State University for the purpose of nitrogen dioxide and other atmospheric trace gases monitoring over Belarus, features a rotating mirror and a telescope directly connected to the spectrometer with a two-dimensional CCD detector. Using a mirror instead of an optical fibre makes it possible to change the field of view of the telescope, and the whole instrument is rather compact and all its components are placed outdoors in the open air. However, this makes it quite difficult to ensure a top-quality thermostabilization. In the course of the MAX-DOAS campaign, which took place in the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany in summer of 2013, we had a great opportunity to compare our instrument with other devices of different types. In the present study we make a comparison of nitrogen dioxide slant column densities (SCDs) during several days obtained by our instrument with that measured by the device from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado (Boulder), which has a thermostabilization level of about 0.01 degrees Celsius. We investigate the influence of the spectrometer parts thermostabilization on nitrogen dioxide SCDs retrieval. Furthermore, it was possible to modify the telescope field of view for our instrument from 0.005 to 1.3 degrees, so we performed nitrogen dioxide SCDs retrieval for different fields of view at the same angle of elevation. We analyze these measurement results and obtain an optimal field of view with the aim to achieve the highest possible signal to noise ratio.

  7. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  8. Three intervening galaxy absorbers towards GRB 060418: faint and dusty?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Vreeswijk, Paul; Ledoux, Cédric; Willis, Jon P.; Jaunsen, Andreas; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Smette, Alain; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Møller, Palle; Hjorth, Jens; Kaufer, Andreas

    2006-10-01

    We present an analysis of three strong, intervening Mg II absorption systems (zabs = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107) towards the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060418. From high-resolution Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra we measure metal column densities and find that the highest redshift absorber exhibits a large amount of dust depletion compared with damped Lyman absorbers (DLAs) seen in quasi-stellar object (QSO) spectra. The intervening zabs = 1.107 absorber is also unusual in exhibiting a clear 2175-Å bump, the first time this feature has been definitively detected in a GRB spectrum. The GRB afterglow spectrum is best fitted with a two-component extinction curve: a Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) extinction law at z = 1.49 (the redshift of the host) with E(B - V) = 0.07 +/- 0.01 and a Galactic extinction curve at z ~ 1.1 with E(B - V) = 0.08 +/- 0.01. We also present a moderately deep New Technology Telescope (NTT) R-band image of the GRB 060418 field and spectroscopy of four galaxies within 1 arcmin. None of these objects has a redshift that matches any of the intervening absorbers, and we conclude that the galaxies responsible for the two intervening MgII absorbers at z ~ 0.6 have luminosities .

  9. Relationship Between Column-Density and Surface Mixing Ratio: Statistical Analysis of O3 and NO2 Data from the July 2011 Maryland DISCOVER-AQ Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Clare; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Crawford, James H.; Lamsol, Lok; Krotkov, Nickolay; Herman, Jay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Chen, Gao; Liu, Xiong; Szykman, James; Tsay, Si-Chee; Loughner, Christipher

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the ability of column (or partial column) information to represent surface air quality, results of linear regression analyses between surface mixing ratio data and column abundances for O3 and NO2 are presented for the July 2011 Maryland deployment of the DISCOVER-AQ mission. Data collected by the P-3B aircraft, ground-based Pandora spectrometers, Aura/OMI satellite instrument, and simulations for July 2011 from the CMAQ air quality model during this deployment provide a large and varied data set, allowing this problem to be approached from multiple perspectives. O3 columns typically exhibited a statistically significant and high degree of correlation with surface data (R(sup 2) > 0.64) in the P- 3B data set, a moderate degree of correlation (0.16 < R(sup 2) < 0.64) in the CMAQ data set, and a low degree of correlation (R(sup 2) < 0.16) in the Pandora and OMI data sets. NO2 columns typically exhibited a low to moderate degree of correlation with surface data in each data set. The results of linear regression analyses for O3 exhibited smaller errors relative to the observations than NO2 regressions. These results suggest that O3 partial column observations from future satellite instruments with sufficient sensitivity to the lower troposphere can be meaningful for surface air quality analysis.

  10. Modelling the role of electron attachment rates on column density ratios for C n H-/C n H (n=4,6,8) in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianturco, F. A.; Grassi, T.; Wester, R.

    2016-10-01

    The fairly recent detection of a variety of anions in the interstellar molecular clouds have underlined the importance of realistically modelling the processes governing their abundance. To pursue this task, our earlier calculations for the radiative electron attachment (REA) rates for C4H-, C6H-, and C8H- are employed in the present work, within a broad network of other concurrent reactions, to generate the corresponding column density ratios of anion/neutral (A/N) relative abundances. The latter are then compared with those obtained in recent years from observational measurements. The calculations involved the time-dependent solutions of a large network of chemical processes over an extended time interval and included a series of runs in which the values of REA rates were repeatedly scaled over several orders of magnitude. Macroscopic parameters for the Clouds’ modelling were also varied to cover a broad range of physical environments. It was found that, within the range and quality of the processes included in the present network,and selected from state-of-the-art astrophysical databases, the REA values required to match the observed A/N ratios needed to be reduced by orders of magnitude for C4H- case, while the same rates for C6H- and C8H- only needed to be scaled by much smaller factors. The results suggest that the generally proposed formation of interstellar anions by REA mechanism is overestimated by current models for the C4H- case, for which is likely to be an inefficient path to formation. This path is thus providing a rather marginal contribution to the observed abundances of C4H-, the latter being more likely to originate from other chemical processes in the network, as we discuss in some detail in the present work. Possible physical reasons for the much smaller differences against observations found instead for the values of the (A/N) ratios in two other, longer members of the series are put forward and analysed within the evolutionary modelling

  11. Modeling X-ray Absorbers in AGNs with MHD-Driven Accretion-Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C. R.; Tombesi, F.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2013-04-01

    We have proposed a systematic view of the observed X-ray absorbers, namely warm absorbers (WAs) in soft X-ray and highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind models. While potentially complicated by variability and thermal instability in these energetic outflows, in this simplistic model we have calculated 2D kinematic field as well as density and ionization structure of the wind with density profile of 1/r corresponding to a constant column distribution per decade of ionization parameter. In particular we show semi-analytically that the inner layer of the disk-wind manifests itself as the strongly-ionized fast outflows while the outer layer is identified as the moderately-ionized absorbers. The computed characteristics of these two apparently distinct absorbers are consistent with X-ray data (i.e. a factor of ~100 difference in column and ionization parameters as well as low wind velocity vs. near-relativistic flow). With the predicted contour curves for these wind parameters one can constrain allowed regions for the presence of WAs and UFOs.The model further implies that the UFO's gas pressure is comparable to that of the observed radio jet in 3C111 suggesting that the magnetized disk-wind with density profile of 1/r is a viable agent to help sustain such a self-collimated jet at small radii.

  12. Fast ionized X-ray absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the physics of the X-ray ionized absorbers often identified as warm absorbers (WAs) and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in Seyfert AGNs from spectroscopic studies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind scenario. Launched and accelerated by the action of a global magnetic field anchored to an underlying accretion disk around a black hole, outflowing plasma is irradiated and ionized by an AGN radiation field characterized by its spectral energy density (SED). By numerically solving the Grad-Shafranov equation in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework, the physical property of the magnetized disk-wind is determined by a wind parameter set, which is then incorporated into radiative transfer calculations with xstar photoionization code under heating-cooling equilibrium state to compute the absorber's properties such as column density N_H, line-of-sight (LoS) velocity v, ionization parameter ξ, among others. Assuming that the wind density scales as n ∝ r-1, we calculate theoretical absorption measure distribution (AMD) for various ions seen in AGNs as well as line spectra especially for the Fe Kα absorption feature by focusing on a bright quasar PG 1211+143 as a case study and show the model's plausibility. In this note we demonstrate that the proposed MHD-driven disk-wind scenario is not only consistent with the observed X-ray data, but also help better constrain the underlying nature of the AGN environment in a close proximity to a central engine.

  13. High steady-state column density of I(2P3/2) atoms from I2 photodissociation at 532 nm: Towards parity non-conservation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsoprinakis, G. E.; Chatzidrosos, G.; Kypriotakis, J. A.; Stratakis, E.; Rakitzis, T. P.

    2016-09-01

    Steady-state column densities of 1017 cm‑2 of I(2P3/2) atoms are produced from photodissociation of I2 vapour at 290.5 K using 5 W of 532 nm laser light. Recombination of the I(2P3/2) atoms at the cell walls is minimized by coating the cell surface with a hydrophobic silane (dimethyldichlorosilane/DMDCS). Operation at room temperature, and at an I2 vapour pressure of ~0.2 mbar, without using a buffer gas, allows relatively low Lorentz and Doppler widths of ~2π × 1.5 (FWHM) and ~2π × 150 (HW at 1/e2) Mrad/s, respectively, at the M1 transition of atomic iodine at 1315 nm. These high column densities and low linewidths are favorable for parity nonconservation optical rotation measurements near this M1 transition. Furthermore, as the cell is completely sealed, this method of production of high-density 127I(2P3/2) atoms is also compatible with using iodine radioisotopes, such as for the production of high-density 129I(2P3/2).

  14. High steady-state column density of I(2P3/2) atoms from I2 photodissociation at 532 nm: Towards parity non-conservation measurements

    PubMed Central

    Katsoprinakis, G. E.; Chatzidrosos, G.; Kypriotakis, J. A.; Stratakis, E.; Rakitzis, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state column densities of 1017 cm−2 of I(2P3/2) atoms are produced from photodissociation of I2 vapour at 290.5 K using 5 W of 532 nm laser light. Recombination of the I(2P3/2) atoms at the cell walls is minimized by coating the cell surface with a hydrophobic silane (dimethyldichlorosilane/DMDCS). Operation at room temperature, and at an I2 vapour pressure of ~0.2 mbar, without using a buffer gas, allows relatively low Lorentz and Doppler widths of ~2π × 1.5 (FWHM) and ~2π × 150 (HW at 1/e2) Mrad/s, respectively, at the M1 transition of atomic iodine at 1315 nm. These high column densities and low linewidths are favorable for parity nonconservation optical rotation measurements near this M1 transition. Furthermore, as the cell is completely sealed, this method of production of high-density 127I(2P3/2) atoms is also compatible with using iodine radioisotopes, such as for the production of high-density 129I(2P3/2). PMID:27629914

  15. High steady-state column density of I((2)P3/2) atoms from I2 photodissociation at 532 nm: Towards parity non-conservation measurements.

    PubMed

    Katsoprinakis, G E; Chatzidrosos, G; Kypriotakis, J A; Stratakis, E; Rakitzis, T P

    2016-09-15

    Steady-state column densities of 10(17) cm(-2) of I((2)P3/2) atoms are produced from photodissociation of I2 vapour at 290.5 K using 5 W of 532 nm laser light. Recombination of the I((2)P3/2) atoms at the cell walls is minimized by coating the cell surface with a hydrophobic silane (dimethyldichlorosilane/DMDCS). Operation at room temperature, and at an I2 vapour pressure of ~0.2 mbar, without using a buffer gas, allows relatively low Lorentz and Doppler widths of ~2π × 1.5 (FWHM) and ~2π × 150 (HW at 1/e(2)) Mrad/s, respectively, at the M1 transition of atomic iodine at 1315 nm. These high column densities and low linewidths are favorable for parity nonconservation optical rotation measurements near this M1 transition. Furthermore, as the cell is completely sealed, this method of production of high-density (127)I((2)P3/2) atoms is also compatible with using iodine radioisotopes, such as for the production of high-density (129)I((2)P3/2).

  16. Burdach's column.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2006-01-01

    After the Greek physicians Herophilus and Galen, the major anatomical advances in the anatomy of the spinal cord were made possible by the microtome devised by Benedikt Stilling in January 1842. This enabled him to cut the frozen, thin sections and examine them, unstained,with the microscope. The technique founded future investigation of the cord's anatomy. Brown-Séquard, Türck, Clarke, Lissauer, Goll, and Flechsig all contributed. An important result of these progressing anatomical experiments was the identification of the posterior columns. In 1826, the German physiologist Karl Friedrich Burdach (1776-1847) described, from macroscopic study, the fasciculus cuneatus, known as the tract of Burdach: the lateral portion of the posterior columns of the cord that terminate in the nucleus cuneatus of the medulla.

  17. The neutral gas extent of galaxies as derived from weak intervening Ca ii absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, P.; Krause, F.; Fechner, C.; Charlton, J. C.; Murphy, M. T.

    2011-04-01

    We present a systematic study of weak intervening Ca ii absorbers at low redshift (z < 0.5), based on the analysis of archival high-resolution (R ≥ 45 000) optical spectra of 304 quasars and active galactic nuclei observed with VLT/UVES. Along a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 100 we detected 23 intervening Ca ii absorbers in both the Ca ii H & K lines, with rest frame equivalent widths Wr,3934 = 15-799 mÅ and column densities log N(Ca ii) = 11.25-13.04 (obtained by fitting Voigt-profile components). We obtain a bias-corrected number density of weak intervening Ca ii absorbers of {d{N}/dz=0.117 ± 0.044} at ⟨zabs⟩ = 0.35 for absorbers with log N(Ca ii) ≥ 11.65 (Wr,3934 ≥ 32 mÅ). This is 2.6 times the value obtained for damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) at low redshift. All Ca ii absorbers in our sample show associated absorption by other low ions such as Mg ii and Fe ii; 45 percent of them have associated Na i absorption. From ionization modelling we conclude that intervening Ca ii absorption with log N(Ca ii) ≥ 11.5 arises in DLAs, sub-DLAs and Lyman-limit systems (LLS) at H i column densities of log N(H i) ≥ 17.4. Using supplementary H i information for nine of the absorbers we find that the Ca ii/H i ratio decreases strongly with increasing H i column density, indicating a column-density-dependent dust depletion of Ca. The observed column density distribution function of Ca ii absorption components follows a relatively steep power law, f(N) ∝ N - β, with a slope of - β = -1.68, which again points towards an enhanced dust depletion in high column density systems. The relatively large cross section of these absorbers together with the frequent detection of Ca ii absorption in high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the halo of the Milky Way suggests that a considerable fraction of the intervening Ca ii systems trace (partly) neutral gas structures in the halos and circumgalactic environment of galaxies (i.e., they are HVC analogs). Based on the recently

  18. The Physical Conditions of Intermediate-Redshift Mg II Absorbing Clouds from Voigt Profile Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Vogt, Steven S.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed and statistical analysis of the column densities and Doppler b parameters of Mg II absorbing clouds at redshifts 0.4<=z<=1.2. We draw on the HIRES/Keck data (Δv~=6.6 km s-1) and Voigt profile (VP) fitting results presented by Churchill & Vogt (Paper I). The sample comprises 175 clouds from 23 systems along 18 quasar lines of sight. In order to better understand whether the inferred physical conditions in the absorbing clouds could be ``false'' conditions, which can arise due to the nonuniqueness inherent in parameterizing complex absorption profiles, we performed extensive simulations of the VP analyses presented in this paper. In brief, we find the following: (1) The Fe II and Mg II column densities are correlated at the 9 σ level. There is a 5 σ anticorrelation between the Mg I/Mg II column density ratio and the Mg II column density. (2) Power-law fits to the column density distributions for Mg II, Fe II, and Mg I yielded power-law slopes of approximately -1.6, -1.7, and -2.0, respectively. (3) The observed peaks of the Doppler parameter distributions were ~5 km s-1 for Mg II and Fe II and ~7 km s-1 for Mg I. The clouds are consistent with being thermally broadened, with temperatures in the 30,000-40,000 K range. (4) A two-component Gaussian model to the velocity two-point correlation function yielded velocity dispersions of 54 and 166 km s-1. The narrow component has roughly twice the amplitude of the broader component. The width and amplitude of the broader component decreases as equivalent width increases. (5) From photoionization models we find that the column density ratios are most consistent with being photoionized by the ultraviolet extragalactic ionizing background, as opposed to stellar radiation. Based on the Mg I to Mg II column density ratios, it appears that at least two-phase ionization models are required to explain the data. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated

  19. A Deep Search For Faint Galaxies Associated With Very Low-redshift C IV Absorbers. II. Program Design, Absorption-line Measurements, and Absorber Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.; Tumlinson, Jason; O'Meara, John M.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Katz, Neal; Willmer, C. N. A.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the evolution of metal-enriched gas over recent cosmic epochs as well as to characterize the diffuse, ionized, metal-enriched circumgalactic medium, we have conducted a blind survey for C iv absorption systems in 89 QSO sightlines observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We have identified 42 absorbers at z < 0.16, comprising the largest uniform blind sample size to date in this redshift range. Our measurements indicate an increasing C iv absorber number density per comoving path length (d{N}/{dX}= 7.5 ± 1.1) and modestly increasing mass density relative to the critical density of the universe (ΩC iv = 10.0 ± 1.5 × 10-8) from z ˜ 1.5 to the present epoch, consistent with predictions from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Furthermore, the data support a functional form for the column density distribution function that deviates from a single power law, also consistent with independent theoretical predictions. As the data also probe heavy element ions in addition to C iv at the same redshifts, we identify, measure, and search for correlations between column densities of these species where components appear to be aligned in velocity. Among these ion-ion correlations, we find evidence for tight correlations between C ii and Si ii, C ii and Si iii, and C iv and Si iv, suggesting that these pairs of species arise in similar ionization conditions. However, the evidence for correlations decreases as the difference in ionization potential increases. Finally, when controlling for observational bias, we find only marginal evidence for a correlation (86.8% likelihood) between the Doppler line width b(C iv) and column density N(C iv).

  20. Are there two populations of X-ray absorbers in Seyfert 2 galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbord, J. M.; Weaver, K. A.

    1998-12-01

    The canonical unified model for Seyfert galaxies (Antonucci, 1993, ARA&A 31, 473) posits the existance of a nuclear torus which blocks the direct line of sight to the central engine of type 2 Seyferts. However, another possibility would be that in at least some Seyfert galaxies the obscuring body could be the disk of the host galaxy (Schmitt et al., 1997, ApJ 477, 623). The column densities of the putative tori should be a few orders of magnitude larger than those of the host galaxy planes, so we would expect a bimodal distribution of NH columns if either of these absorbers could be responsible. Starting with the subset of the Schmitt et al. sample for which ASCA data is available, we are measuring the NH column densities using a variety of spectral models. The resulting distribution of column densities is then interpreted with consideration of both optically observed galactic inclinations and possible nuclear torus orientations implied from observed radio elongation axes. This work is being done as a part of a thesis project to examine the emission and absorption features in the X-ray spectra of a large sample of Seyfert galaxies, and to combine this data with observations made in other wavebands in order to put constraints on the unified model of Seyfert galaxies.

  1. Three-dimensional assessment of the effects of high-density embolization material on the absorbed dose in the target for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Sandhu, Divyajot; Warmington, Leighton; Moen, Sean; Tummala, Ramachandra

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an intracranial vascular disorder. Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is used in conjunction with intraarterial embolization to eradicate the nidus of AVMs. Clinical results indicate that patients with prior embolization tend to gain less benefit from GKRS. The authors hypothesized that this was partly caused by dosimetric deficiency. The actual dose delivered to the target may be smaller than the intended dose because of increased photon attenuation by high-density embolic materials. The authors performed a phantom-based study to quantitatively evaluate the 3D dosimetric effect of embolic material on GKRS. METHODS A 16-cm-diameter and 12-cm-long cylindrical phantom with a 16-cm-diameter hemispherical dome was printed by a 3D printer. The phantom was filled with radiologically tissue-equivalent polymer gel. To simulate AVM treatment with embolization, phantoms contained Onyx 18. The material was injected into an AVM model, which was suspended in the polymer gel. The phantom was attached to a Leksell frame by standard GK fixation method, using aluminum screws, for imaging. The phantom was scanned by a Phillips CT scanner with the standard axial-scanning protocol (120 kV and 1.5-mm slice thickness). CT-based treatment planning was performed with the GammaPlan treatment planning system (version 10.1.1). The plan was created to cover a fictitious AVM target volume near the embolization areas with eleven 8-mm shots and a prescription dose of 20 Gy to 50% isodose level. Dose distributions were computed using both tissue maximum ratio (TMR) 10 and convolution dose-calculation algorithms. These two 3D dose distributions were compared using an in-house program. Additionally, the same analysis method was applied to evaluate the dosimetric effects for 2 patients previously treated by GKRS. RESULTS The phantom-based analyses showed that the mean dose difference between TMR 10 and convolution doses of the AVM target was no larger than

  2. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  3. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  4. Simultaneous UV and X-ray Spectroscopy of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 5548. I: Physical Conditions in the UV Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Gabel, J. R.; Kaastra, J. S.; Steenbrugge, K. C.; Brinkman, A. C.; Dunn, J. P.; George, I. M.; Liedahl, D. A.; Paerels, F. B. S.

    2003-01-01

    We present new UV spectra of the nucleus of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548, which we obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph at high spectral resolution, in conjunction with simultaneous Chandra X-ray Observatory spectra. Taking advantage of the low UV continuum and broad emission-line fluxes, we have determined that the deepest UV absorption component covers at least a portion of the inner, high-ionization narrow-line region (NLR). We find nonunity covering factors in the cores of several kinematic components, which increase the column density measurements of N V and C IV by factors of 1.2 to 1.9 over the full-covering case; however, the revised columns have only a minor effect on the parameters derived from our photoionization models. For the first time, we have simultaneous N V and C IV columns for component 1 (at -1040 km/s), and find that this component cannot be an X-ray warm absorber, contrary to our previous claim based on nonsimultaneous observations. We find that models of the absorbers based on solar abundances severely overpredict the O VI columns previously obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectrograph, and present arguments that this is not likely due to variability. However, models that include either enhanced nitrogen (twice solar) or dust, with strong depletion of carbon in either case, are successful in matching all of the observed ionic columns. These models result in substantially lower ionization parameters and total column densities compared to dust-free solar-abundance models, and produce little O VII or O VIII, indicating that none of the UV absorbers are X-ray warm absorbers.

  5. [Development of a new hydrophobic interaction chromatography absorbent and its application to the purification of recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang-Mu; Bi, Jing-Xiu; Zhao, Lan; Zhou, Wei-Bin; Li, Yan; Huang, Yong-Dong; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2006-03-01

    A new hydrophobic absorbent based on homemade highly cross-linked agarose beads was synthesized by immobilizing butyl derivative onto the matrix linkage. The density of ligand was controlled by adjusting the concentration of butanethiol and the synthesis route was optimized by evaluating the purification efficiency of recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) expressed by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. A high performance absorbent was finally screened out with up to 80% of HBsAg recovery and purification-fold (PF) about 20. Furthermore, the column pressure was about 0.06 MPa under the flow rate of 500cm/h, and no leaked butyl were detected after exposing the gel in common buffers, chaotropic agents, high concentrations of denaturing agents such as guanidine hydrochloride, urea and polar organic solvents. These results demonstrated that the absorbent have high physico-chemical stability, so it was available for the downstream process. Finally, after scaled up to 2L wet gel/batch, the absorbent was applied to the integration of three-step chromatography and obtained the purified CHO-HBsAg with 95% purity by SDS-PAGE and HPLC, which meet the requirements of SFDA. The purification efficiency and the reproducible ability of the absorbents were also evaluated from batch-to-batch. The results demonstrated that the absorbent met the requirement of scalable, reproducible, economic effect as well. This absorbent is a promising alternative exported HIC gel for wildly being used in Chinese pharmaceutical industries.

  6. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China): MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory derived NO emission from soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, B.; Behrendt, T.; Badawy, M. M.; Wagner, T.; Qi, Y.; Wu, Z.; Meixner, F. X.

    2014-07-01

    We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW-China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis center, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature of Milan oasis' (iii) different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert) were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol-Transport) was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three dimensional NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution) have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modeled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration) of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical) NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2) to the size of an entire agricultural

  7. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China): MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory-derived NO emission from soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, B.; Behrendt, T.; Badawy, M. M.; Wagner, T.; Qi, Y.; Wu, Z.; Meixner, F. X.

    2015-01-01

    We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis centre, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature of Milan oasis (iii) different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert) were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol Transport) was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three-dimensional (3-D) NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution) have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modelled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration) of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical) NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory-derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2) to the size of an entire agricultural

  8. Damped Lyman-α Absorbers bias: measurement and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Rafòls, I.; Miralda-Escudé, J.; Font-Ribera, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present an update on the measurement of the Damped Lyman-α Absorbers (DLAs) bias from the cross-correlation of DLA and the Lyman-α forest. We also use an upgraded method to deal with the broadband function problems. In our analysis, we use of the final Data Release of BOSS. We find the bias of the DLA to be b_d = 1.90 plusmn;0.11. With the improved statistics, we explore the evolution of the DLA bias with column density and redshift. We find no clear evidence of any evolution in neither of them. This means that the dark matter halos hosting the DLA are essentially the same independently of the properties of the DLA.

  9. AN X-RAY WHIM METAL ABSORBER FROM A Mpc-SCALE EMPTY REGION OF SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    Zappacosta, L.; Nicastro, F.; Krongold, Y.; Maiolino, R.

    2012-07-10

    We report a detection of an absorption line at {approx}44.8 A in a >500 ks Chandra HRC-S/LETG X-ray grating spectrum of the blazar H 2356-309. This line can be identified as intervening C V-K{alpha} absorption, at z Almost-Equal-To 0.112, produced by a warm (log T = 5.1 K) intergalactic absorber. The feature is significant at a 2.9{sigma} level (accounting for the number of independent redshift trials). We estimate an equivalent hydrogen column density of log N{sub H} 19.05(Z/Z{sub Sun }){sup -1} cm{sup -2}. Unlike other previously reported FUV/X-ray metal detections of warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), this C V absorber lies in a region with locally low galaxy density, at {approx}2.2 Mpc from the closest galaxy at that redshift, and therefore is unlikely to be associated with an extended galactic halo. We instead tentatively identify this absorber with an intervening WHIM filament possibly permeating a large-scale, 30 Mpc extended, structure of galaxies whose redshift centroid, within a cylinder of 7.5 Mpc radius centered on the line of sight to H 2356-309, is marginally consistent (at a 1.8{sigma} level) with the redshift of the absorber.

  10. Absorbencies of six different rodent beddings: commercially advertised absorbencies are potentially misleading.

    PubMed

    Burn, C C; Mason, G J

    2005-01-01

    Moisture absorbency is one of the most important characteristics of rodent beddings for controlling bacterial growth and ammonia production. However, bedding manufacturers rarely provide information on the absorbencies of available materials, and even when they do, absorption values are usually expressed per unit mass of bedding. Since beddings are usually placed into cages to reach a required depth rather than a particular mass, their volumetric absorbencies are far more relevant. This study therefore compared the saline absorbencies of sawdust, aspen woodchips, two virgin loose pulp beddings (Alpha-Dri and Omega-Dri), reclaimed wood pulp (Tek-Fresh), and corncob, calculated both by volume and by mass. Absorbency per unit volume correlated positively with bedding density, while absorbency per unit mass correlated negatively. Therefore, the relative absorbencies of the beddings were almost completely reversed depending on how absorbency was calculated. By volume, corncob was the most absorbent bedding, absorbing about twice as much saline as Tek-Fresh, the least absorbent bedding. Conversely, when calculated by mass, Tek-Fresh appeared to absorb almost three times as much saline as the corncob. Thus, in practical terms the most absorbent bedding here was corncob, followed by the loose pulp beddings; and this is generally supported by their relatively low ammonia production as seen in previous studies. Many factors other than absorbency determine whether a material is suitable as a rodent bedding, and they are briefly mentioned here. However, manufacturers should provide details of bedding absorbencies in terms of volume, in order to help predict the relative absorbencies of the beddings in practical situations.

  11. The detection of large amounts of cool, x ray absorbing gas in distant clusters of galaxies. What does this mean?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qingde; Stocke, John T.

    1993-01-01

    We present an x-ray spectral study of 12 distant (z = 0.17-0.54) rich clusters of galaxies observed with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter. These x-ray spectral data show evidence for substantial excess absorptions beyond those expected in the galaxy, indicating the presence of large amounts of x-ray absorbing cool gas in these distant clusters. The mean value of the excess absorptions corresponds to an absorbing gas column density approximately greater than 10(exp 21)/sq cm. We calculate the x-ray luminosities of the clusters with observed fluxes only in the 0.8-3.5 keV band where the fluxes are less effected by the absorptions, and use the temperature-to-luminosity correlation (known only for nearby clusters) to estimate the temperatures of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) in the distant clusters. These temperature estimates, together with the spectral fits, provide further constraints on the column densities in the individual clusters. For the cluster CL 0016+16, the lower limit on the column density is found to be 8 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm at the 99 percent confidence limit. We also show that the ratio of the temperature obtained from the spectral fit to the temperature expected from the correlation tends to decrease with increasing look-back time, indicating possible temperature evolution of the hot ICM in the recent past. The inclusion of this evolutionary effect further increases the absorptions required in fitting the spectra.

  12. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  13. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  14. New concepts for the comparison of tropospheric NO2 column densities derived from car-MAX-DOAS observations, OMI satellite observations and the regional model CHIMERE during two MEGAPOLI campaigns in Paris 2009/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Petetin, H.; Zhang, Q.; Beekmann, M.; Wagner, T.

    2015-07-01

    We compare tropospheric column densities (vertically integrated concentrations) of NO2 from three data sets for the metropolitan area of Paris during two extensive measurement campaigns (25 days in summer 2009 and 29 days in winter 2010) within the European research project MEGAPOLI. The selected data sets comprise a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) as well as two observational data sets: ground-based mobile Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (car-MAX-DOAS) measurements and satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). On most days, car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried out along large circles (diameter ~ 35 km) around Paris. The car-MAX-DOAS results are compared to coincident data from CHIMERE and OMI. All three data sets have their specific strengths and weaknesses, especially with respect to their spatiotemporal resolution and coverage as well as their uncertainties. Thus we compare them in two different ways: first, we simply consider the original data sets. Second, we compare modified versions making synergistic use of the complementary information from different data sets. For example, profile information from the regional model is used to improve the satellite data, observations of the horizontal trace gas distribution are used to adjust the respective spatial patterns of the model simulations, or the model is used as a transfer tool to bridge the spatial scales between car-MAX-DOAS and satellite observations. Using the modified versions of the data sets, the comparison results substantially improve compared to the original versions. In general, good agreement between the data sets is found outside the emission plume, but inside the emission plumes the tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs). are systematically underestimated by the CHIMERE model and the satellite observations (compared to the car-MAX-DOAS observations). One major result from our study is that for satellite validation close to

  15. The Vulture Survey: Analyzing the Evolution of MgII and CIV Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathes, Nigel; Churchill, Christopher W.; Murphy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of an archival VLT/UVES and Keck/HIRES quasar absorption line survey. We examine over 600 quasar lines of sight in order to inventory the cosmic properties of MgII and CIV absorbers. We employ an accurate, automated approach to line detection which consistently detects absorption lines with rest-frame equivalent widths less than 0.02 Å in S/N > 40 spectra. We determine redshift path densities, equivalent width and column density distributions, and cosmic mass densities as a function of redshift. We find that the evolution in the universal distribution of this metal absorbing gas correlates strongly with the cosmic star formation history of galaxies. We measure a significant enhancement in the comoving opacity of strong MgII and CIV absorbers around z=2. We also measure the pixel two-point velocity correlation function and find broader, higher velocity signatures around z=2. We examine possible causes for these trends, and determine that at z=2 galaxies transport significantly higher quantities of metal enriched gas into and out of their halos through star formation than at other times.

  16. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  17. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  18. CPCs with segmented absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Keita, M.; Robertson, H.S. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the most promising means of improving the performance of solar thermal collectors is to reduce the energy lost by the hot absorber. One way to do this, not currently part of the technology, is to recognize that since the absorber is usually not irradiated uniformly, it is therefore possible to construct an absorber of thermally isolated segments, circulate the fluid in sequence from low to high irradiance segments, and reduce loss by improving effective concentration. This procedure works even for ideal concentrators, without violating Winston's theorem. Two equivalent CPC collectors with single and segmented absorber were constructed and compared under actual operating conditions. The results showed that the daily thermal efficiency of the collector with segmented absorber is higher (about 13%) than that of the collector with nonsegmented absorber.

  19. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  20. Fast Ionized X-ray Absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk wind models in an effort to explain the highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) identified as X-ray absorbers recently detected in various sub-classes of Seyfert AGNs. Our primary focus is to show that magnetically-driven outflows are physically plausible candidates to account for the AGN X-ray spectroscopic observations. We calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption line spectra in comparison with an XXM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert AGN, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log(xi[erg cm/s]) = 5-6 and a hydrogen-equivalent column density on the order of 1e23 cm-2, outflowing at a sub-relativistic velocity of v/c = 0.1-0.2. The best-fit model favors its radial location at R = 200 Rs (Rs is the Schwarzschild radius), with a disk inner truncation radius at Rt = 30Rs. The overall K-shell feature in data is suggested to be dominated by Fe XXV with very little contribution from Fe XXVI and weakly-ionized iron, which is in a good agreement with a series of earlier analysis of the UFOs in various AGNs including PG 1211+143.

  1. Absorption features in the quasar HS 1603 + 3820 II. Distance to the absorber obtained from photoionisation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Nikołajuk, M.; Czerny, B.; Dobrzycki, A.; Hryniewicz, K.; Bechtold, J.; Ebeling, H.

    2014-04-01

    We present the photoionisation modelling of the intrinsic absorber in the bright quasar HS 1603 + 3820. We constructed the broad-band spectral energy distribution using the optical/UV/X-ray observations from different instruments as inputs for the photoionisation calculations. The spectra from the Keck telescope show extremely high CIV to HI ratios, for the first absorber in system A, named A1. This value, together with high column density of CIV ion, place strong constraints on the photoionisation model. We used two photoionisation codes to derive the hydrogen number density at the cloud illuminated surface. By estimating bolometric luminosity of HS 1603 + 3820 using the typical formula for quasars, we calculated the distance to A1. We could find one photoionization solution, by assuming either a constant density cloud (which was modelled using CLOUDY), or a stratified cloud (which was modelled using TITAN), as well as the solar abundances. This model explained both the ionic column density of CIV and the high CIV to HI ratio. The location of A1 is 0.1 pc, and it is situated even closer to the nucleus than the possible location of the Broad Line Region in this object. The upper limit of the distance is sensitive to the adopted covering factor and the carbon abundance. Photoionisation modelling always prefers dense clouds with the number density n0 = 1010 - 1012 cm-3, which explains intrinsic absorption in HS 1603 + 3820. This number density is of the same order as that in the disk atmosphere at the implied distance of A1. Therefore, our results show that the disk wind that escapes from the outermost accretion disk atmosphere can build up dense absorber in quasars.

  2. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  3. The X-ray Absorber in the X-ray Transient NLS1 WPVS 007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupe, Dirk

    This proposal is for a funding request for an approved XMM-Newton observations of the X-ray transient Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxy WPVS 007. The request is for 4 month of salary for the PI for one year in order to do the data analysis, publish the results, and attend an international AGN meeting. XMM will observe WPVS 007 in June 2010 simultaneously with HST, Chandra, and Swift. The goal is to establish a tight connection between the UV broad absorption line troughs found in FUSE observations and the strong partial covering absorber feature found by Swift. WPVS 007 showed a dramatic transformation into a Broad Absorption line QSO like AGN between a 1996 HST observation and a 2003 FUSE observation. Several Swift monitoring observations have suggested that the absorber may have started to disappear. Therefore it is crucial for our HST COS UV spectroscopy to know what the status of the X-ray absorber is. The XMM observation will provide a well-exposed X-ray spectrum even if WPVS 007 will be in a low flux state. This spectrum will enable us to put constraints on the absorption column density and covering fraction of the partial covering absorber.

  4. Multispectral metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; McCrindle, I J H; Li, C; Cumming, D R S

    2014-03-01

    We present the simulation, implementation, and measurement of a multispectral metamaterial absorber (MSMMA) and show that we can realize a simple absorber structure that operates in the mid-IR and terahertz (THz) bands. By embedding an IR metamaterial absorber layer into a standard THz metamaterial absorber stack, a narrowband resonance is induced at a wavelength of 4.3 μm. This resonance is in addition to the THz metamaterial absorption resonance at 109 μm (2.75 THz). We demonstrate the inherent scalability and versatility of our MSMMA by describing a second device whereby the MM-induced IR absorption peak frequency is tuned by varying the IR absorber geometry. Such a MSMMA could be coupled with a suitable sensor and formed into a focal plane array, enabling multispectral imaging.

  5. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  6. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  7. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  8. Electromagnetic power absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R. S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A structure is presented with a surface portion of dielectric material which passes electromagnetic radiation and with a portion below the surface which includes material that absorbs the radiation, the face of the structure being formed with numerous steep ridges. The steepness of the dielectric material results in a high proportion of the electromagnetic energy passing through the surface for absorption by the absorbing material under the surface. A backing of aluminum or other highly heat-conductive and reflective material lies under the face and has very steep protuberances supporting the absorbing and dielectric materials.

  9. HST/COS observations of a new population of associated QSO absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzahid, S.; Srianand, R.; Arav, N.; Savage, B. D.; Narayanan, A.

    2013-05-01

    We present a sample of new population of associated absorbers, detected through Ne VIII λλ770, 780 absorption, in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) spectra of intermediate-redshift (0.45 < z < 1.21) quasars (QSOs). Our sample comprised of total 12 associated Ne VIII systems detected towards eight lines of sight (none of them are radio bright). The incidence rate of these absorbers is found to be 40 per cent. Majority of the Ne VIII systems at small ejection velocities (vej) show complete coverage of the background source, but systems with higher vej show lower covering fractions (i.e. fc ≤ 0.8) and systematically higher values of N({Ne VIII}). We detect Mg X λλ609, 624 absorption in seven out of the eight Ne VIII systems where the expected wavelength range is covered by our spectra and is free of any strong blending. We report the detections of Na IX λλ681, 694 absorption, for the first time, in three highest ejection velocity (e.g. |vej| ≳ 7000 km s-1) systems in our sample. All these systems show very high N({Ne VIII}) (i.e. >1015.6 cm-2), high ionization parameter (i.e. log U ≳ 0.5), high metallicity (i.e. Z ≳ Z⊙) and ionization-potential-dependent fc values. The observed column density ratios of different ions are reproduced by multiphase photoionization (PI) and/or collisional ionization (CI) equilibrium models. While solar abundance ratios are adequate in CIE, enhancement of Na relative to Mg is required in PI models to explain our observations. The column density ratios of highly ionized species (i.e. O VI, Ne VIII, Mg X, etc.) show a very narrow spread. Moreover, the measured N({Ne VIII})/N({O VI}) ratio in the associated absorbers is similar to what is seen in the intervening absorbers. All these suggest a narrow range of ionization parameter in the case of PI or a narrow temperature range (i.e. T ˜ 105.9±0.1 K) in the case of CIE models. The present data do not distinguish between these two alternatives

  10. Implications of an updated ultraviolet background for the ionization mechanisms of intervening Ne VIII absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tanvir; Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan; Muzahid, Sowgat; Pathak, Amit

    2017-04-01

    Ne VIII absorbers seen in QSO spectra are useful tracers of warm ionized gas, when collisional ionization is the dominant ionization process. While photoionization by the ultraviolet background (UVB) is a viable option, it tends to predict large line-of-sight thickness for the absorbing gas. Here, we study the implications of the recently updated UVB at low z to understand the ionization mechanisms of intervening Ne VIII absorbers. With the updated UVB, one typically needs higher density and metallicity to reproduce the observed ionic column densities under photoionization. Both reduce the inferred line-of-sight thicknesses of the absorbers. We find a critical density of ≥5 × 10-5 cm-3 above which the observed N({Ne VIII})/N({O VI}) can be reproduced by pure collisional processes. If the gas is of near solar metallicity (as measured for the low ions) then the cooling time-scales will be small (<108 yrs). Therefore, a continuous injection of heat is required in order to enhance the detectability of the collisionally ionized gas. Using photoionization models we find that in almost all Ne VIII systems the inferred low ion metallicity is near solar or supersolar. If we assume the Ne VIII phase to have similar metallicities then photoionization can reproduce the observed N({Ne VIII})/N({O VI}) without the line-of-sight thickness being unreasonably large and avoids cooling issues related to the collisional ionization at these metallicities. However, the indication of broad Lyα absorption in a couple of systems, if true, suggests that the Ne VIII phase is distinct from the low ion phase having much lower metallicity.

  11. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  12. Inelastic column behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, John E; Wilder, Thomas W , III

    1952-01-01

    The significant findings of a theoretical study of column behavior in the plastic stress range are presented. When the behavior of a straight column is regarded as the limiting behavior of an imperfect column as the initial imperfection (lack of straightness) approaches zero, the departure from the straight configuration occurs at the tangent-modulus load. Without such a concept of the behavior of a straight column, one is led to the unrealistic conclusion that lateral deflection of the column can begin at any load between the tangent-modulus value and the Euler load, based on the original elastic modulus. A family of curves showing load against lateral deflection is presented for idealized h-section columns of various lengths and of various materials that have a systematic variation of their stress-strain curves.

  13. Distillation Column Modeling Tools

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    Advanced Computational and Experimental Techniques will Optimize Distillation Column Operation. Distillation is a low thermal efficiency unit operation that currently consumes 4.8 quadrillion BTUs of energy...

  14. Novel shock absorber features varying yield strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geier, D. J.

    1964-01-01

    A shock absorbent webbing of partially drawn synthetic strands is arranged in sections of varying density related to the varying mass of the human body. This is contoured to protect the body at points of contact, when subjected to large acceleration or deceleration forces.

  15. New concepts for the comparison of tropospheric NO2 column densities derived from car-MAX-DOAS observations, OMI satellite observations and the regional model CHIMERE during two MEGAPOLI campaigns in Paris 2009/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Petetin, H.; Zhang, Q.; Beekmann, M.; Wagner, T.

    2015-03-01

    We compare tropospheric column densities (vertically integrated concentrations) of NO2 from three data sets for the metropolitan area of Paris during two extensive measurement campaigns (25 days in summer 2009 and 29 days in winter 2010) within the European research project MEGAPOLI. The selected data sets comprise a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) as well as two observational data sets: ground based mobile Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (car-MAX-DOAS) measurements and satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). On most days, car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried out along large circles (diameter ~35 km) around Paris. The car-MAX-DOAS results are compared to coincident data from CHIMERE and OMI. All three data sets have their specific strengths and weaknesses, especially with respect to their spatio-temporal resolution and coverage as well as their uncertainties. Thus we compare them in two different ways: first, we simply consider the original data sets. Second, we compare modified versions making synergistic use of the complementary information from different data sets. For example, profile information from the regional model is used to improve the satellite data, observations of the horizontal trace gas distribution are used to adjust the respective spatial patterns of the model simulations, or the model is used as a transfer tool to bridge the spatial scales between car-MAX-DOAS and satellite observations. Using the modified versions of the data sets, the comparison results substantially improve compared to the original versions. In general, good agreement between the data sets is found outside the emission plume, but inside the emission plumes the tropospheric NO2 VCDs are systematically underestimated by the CHIMERE model and the satellite observations (compared to the car-MAX-DOAS observations). One major result from our study is that for satellite validation close to strong emission sources (like

  16. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  17. Shock absorber servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepler, Jack L. (Inventor); Hill, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A tool to assist in the servicing of a shock absorber wherein the shock absorber is constructed of a pair of aligned gas and liquid filled chambers. Each of the chambers is separated by a movable separator member. Maximum efficiency of the shock absorber is achieved in the locating of a precise volume of gas within the gas chamber and a precise volume of liquid within the liquid chamber. The servicing tool of this invention employs a rod which is to connect with the separator and by observation of the position of the rod with respect to the gauge body, the location of the separator is ascertained even though it is not directly observable.

  18. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  19. Column flotation '88

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 34 selections. Some of the titles are: Column flotation of ultrafine coal: experience at BHP-Utah Coal Limited's Riverside mine; Measurement of rate data in flotation columns; Factors influencing the structure of a 3-phase coal flotation froth; and Microbubble flotation of fine coal.

  20. Inflatable Column Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight structural member easy to store. Billowing between circumferential loops of fiber inflated column becomes series of cells. Each fiber subjected to same tension along entire length (though tension is different in different fibers). Member is called "isotensoid" column. Serves as jack for automobiles or structures during repairs. Also used as support for temporary bleachers or swimming pools.

  1. Modeling of column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Yoon, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Many investigators believe that column flotation cells offer significant advantages over standard mechanical machines for the flotation of fine particles. However, because of their unique design and operation, conventional techniques for flotation cell scale-up and design cannot be applied to columns. In an attempt to help alleviate this problem, a population balance model based on first principles has been developed for fine particle flotation in a column. Two different terms have been considered in the model, i.e., transport and rate. Transport terms, incorporating fluid flow and buoyancy, are used to describe the movement of air bubbles, unattached particles and bubble-particle aggregates along the length of the column. Rate terms, which describe the bubble-particle attachment process, have been derived from first principle considerations. Because the model is based on first principles, it can be useful for the design, control, optimization and scale-up of column flotation cells. 9 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  3. JCE Feature Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  4. Shock Absorbing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    A lightweight, inexpensive shock-absorbing system, developed by Langley Research Center 20 years ago, is now in service as safety device for an automated railway at Duke University Medical Center. The transportation system travels at about 25 miles per hour, carrying patients, visitors, staff and cargo. At the end of each guideway of the system are "frangible," (breakable) tube "buffers." If a slowing car fails to make a complete stop at the terminal, it would bump and shatter the tubes, absorbing energy that might otherwise jolt the passengers or damage the vehicle.

  5. A HIGH RESOLUTION VIEW OF THE WARM ABSORBER IN THE QUASAR MR 2251-178

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Porquet, D.; Braito, V.; Turner, T. J.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2013-10-20

    High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the warm absorber in a nearby quasar, MR 2251-178 (z = 0.06398), is presented. The observations were carried out in 2011 using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer, with net exposure times of approximately 400 ks each. A multitude of absorption lines from C to Fe are detected, revealing at least three warm absorbing components ranging in ionization parameter from log (ξ/erg cm s{sup –1}) = 1-3 with outflow velocities ∼< 500 km s{sup –1}. The lowest ionization absorber appears to vary between the Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, which implies a radial distance of between 9 and 17 pc from the black hole. Several broad soft X-ray emission lines are strongly detected, most notably from He-like oxygen, with FWHM velocity widths of up to 10,000 km s{sup –1}, consistent with an origin from broad-line region (BLR) clouds. In addition to the warm absorber, gas partially covering the line of sight to the quasar appears to be present, with a typical column density of N{sub H} = 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}. We suggest that the partial covering absorber may arise from the same BLR clouds responsible for the broad soft X-ray emission lines. Finally, the presence of a highly ionized outflow in the iron K band from both the 2002 and 2011 Chandra HETG observations appears to be confirmed, which has an outflow velocity of –15600 ± 2400 km s{sup –1}. However, a partial covering origin for the iron K absorption cannot be excluded, resulting from low ionization material with little or no outflow velocity.

  6. Velocity resolved [C ii], [C i], and CO observations of the N159 star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud: a complex velocity structure and variation of the column densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoko; Requena-Torres, Miguel Angel; Güsten, Rolf; Stutzki, Jürgen; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Pütz, Patrick; Ricken, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    particular between the different species. At most positions the [C ii] emission line profile is substantially wider than that of CO and [C i]. We estimated the fraction of the [C ii] integrated line emission that cannot be fitted by the CO line profile to be 20% around the CO cores, and up to 50% at the area between the cores, indicating a gas component that has a much larger velocity dispersion than the ones probed by the CO and [C i] emission. We derived the relative contribution from C+, C, and CO to the column density in each velocity bin. The result clearly shows that the contribution from C+ dominates the velocity range far from the velocities traced by the dense molecular gas. Spatially, the region located between the CO cores of N159 W and E has a higher fraction of C+ over the whole velocity range. We estimate the contribution of the ionized gas to the [C ii] emission using the ratio to the [N ii] emission, and find that the ionized gas contributes ≤19% to the [C ii] emission at its peak position, and ≤15% over the whole observed region. Using the integrated line intensities, we present the spatial distribution of I[CII]/IFIR. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the [C ii] emission in the LMC N159 region shows significantly different velocity profiles from that of CO and [C i] emissions, emphasizing the importance of velocity resolved observations in order to distinguish different cloud components.

  7. The XMM-Newton Bright Survey sample of absorbed quasars: X-ray and accretion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballo, L.; Severgnini, P.; Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Vignali, C.; Carrera, F. J.; Corral, A.; Mateos, S.

    2014-11-01

    Although absorbed quasars are extremely important for our understanding of the energetics of the Universe, the main physical parameters of their central engines are still poorly known. In this work, we present and study a complete sample of 14 quasars (QSOs) that are absorbed in the X-rays (column density NH > 4 × 1021 cm-2 and X-ray luminosity L 2-10 keV > 1044 ergs-1; XQSO2) belonging to the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey (XBS). From the analysis of their ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution, we can separate the nuclear emission from the host galaxy contribution, obtaining a measurement of the fundamental nuclear parameters, like the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the value of Eddington ratio, λ Edd. Comparing the properties of XQSO2s with those previously obtained for the X-ray unabsorbed QSOs in the XBS, we do not find any evidence that the two samples are drawn from different populations. In particular, the two samples span the same range in Eddington ratios, up to λ Edd ˜ 0.5; this implies that our XQSO2s populate the `forbidden region' in the so-called `effective Eddington limit paradigm'. A combination of low grain abundance, presence of stars inwards of the absorber, and/or anisotropy of the disc emission can explain this result.

  8. Solar concentrator/absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Collector/energy converter, consisting of dual-slope optical concentrator and counterflow thermal energy absorber, is attached to multiaxis support structure. Efficient over wide range of illumination levels, device may be used to generate high temperature steam, serve as solar powered dryer, or power absorption cycle cooler.

  9. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  10. Shock Absorbing Helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a description of helmets used by football players that offer three times the shock-absorbing capacity of earlier types. An interior padding for the helmets, composed of Temper Foam, first used by NASA's Ames Research Center in the design of aircraft seats is described.

  11. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  12. Column continuous transition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangrong

    2007-04-01

    A column continuous transition function is by definition a standard transition function P(t) whose every column is continuous for t[greater-or-equal, slanted]0 in the norm topology of bounded sequence space l[infinity]. We will prove that it has a stable q-matrix and that there exists a one-to-one relationship between column continuous transition functions and increasing integrated semigroups on l[infinity]. Using the theory of integrated semigroups, we give some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the minimal q-function is column continuous, in terms of its generator (of the Markov semigroup) as well as its q-matrix. Furthermore, we will construct all column continuous Q-functions for a conservative, single-exit and column bounded q-matrix Q. As applications, we find that many interesting continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs), say Feller-Reuter-Riley processes, monotone processes, birth-death processes and branching processes, etc., have column continuity.

  13. Diagnostic beam absorber in Mu2e beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Star density, hadron flux, and residual dose distributions are calculated around the {mu}2e diagnostic beam absorber. Corresponding surface and ground water activation, and air activation are presented as well.

  14. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  15. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGES

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; ...

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  16. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  17. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  18. Apollo couch energy absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, C. J.; Drexel, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Load attenuators for the Apollo spacecraft crew couch and its potential applications are described. Energy absorption is achieved through friction and cyclic deformation of material. In one concept, energy absorption is accomplished by rolling a compressed ring of metal between two surfaces. In another concept, energy is absorbed by forcing a plastically deformed washer along a rod. Among the design problems that had to be solved were material selection, fatigue life, ring slippage, lubrication, and friction loading.

  19. Non-variability of intervening absorbers observed in the UVES spectra of the `naked-eye' GRB080319

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, V.; Fiore, F.; Goldoni, P.; D'Odorico, V.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Meurs, E. J. A.; Norci, L.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the properties of the intervening absorbers lying along the line of sight of GRB080319B through the analysis of its optical absorption features. For this purpose, we analyse Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES)/Very Large Telescope multi-epoch, high-resolution spectroscopic observations (R = 40000, corresponding to 7.5 kms-1) of the optical afterglow of GRB080319B (z = 0.937), detected by Swift. Thanks to the rapid response mode (RRM), we observed the afterglow just 8min 30s after the gamma-ray burst (GRB) onset when the magnitude was R ~ 12. This allowed us to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), high-resolution spectrum of a GRB afterglow ever (S/N per resolution element of ~50). Two further RRM and target of opportunity observations were obtained starting 1.0 and 2.4 h after the event, respectively. Four MgII absorption systems lying along the line of sight to the afterglow have been detected in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 0.8, most of them showing a complex structure featuring several components. Absorptions due to FeII, MgI and MnII are also present; they appear in four, two and one intervening absorbers, respectively. One out of four systems show an MgII λ2796 rest-frame-equivalent width larger than 1 Å. This is in agreement with the excess of strong MgII absorbers compared to quasars, with dn/dz = 0.9, approximately four times larger than the value observed along quasar lines of sight. In addition, the analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution spectra allowed us to exclude a significant variability in the column density of the single components of each absorber. In particular, 17 out of 21 MgII components belonging to the four absorbers do not vary at the 3σ confidence level, and the column densities of the remaining four are saturated and cannot be reliably measured. Combining this result with estimates of the size of the emitting region, we can reject the hypothesis that the difference

  20. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    SciTech Connect

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  1. Evidence for a Circum-Nuclear and Ionised Absorber in the X-ray Obscured Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Sambruna, R. M.; Gofford, J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Suzaku observation of the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445. We confirm the results obtained with the previous X-ray observations which unveiled the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines and an overall X-ray emission which strongly resembles a typical Seyfert 2 despite of the optical classification as an unobscured AGN. The broad band spectrum allowed us to measure for the first time the amount of reflection (R approximately 0.9) which together with the relatively strong neutral Fe Ka emission line (EW approximately 100 eV) strongly supports a scenario where a Compton-thick mirror is present. The primary X ray continuum is strongly obscured by an absorber with a column density of NH = 2 - 3 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter. Two possible scenarios are proposed for the absorber: a neutral partial covering or a mildly ionised absorber with an ionisation parameter log xi approximately 1.0 erg centimeter per second. A comparison with the past and more recent X-ray observations of 3C 445 performed with XMM-Newton and Chandra is presented, which provided tentative evidence that the ionised and outflowing absorber varied. We argue that the absorber is probably associated with an equatorial diskwind located within the parsec scale molecular torus.

  2. GRB 070125 and the environments of spectral-line poor afterglow absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cia, A.; Starling, R. L. C.; Wiersema, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Björnsson, G.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A. J.; Rol, E.; Schulze, S.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2011-11-01

    GRB 070125 is among the most energetic bursts detected and the most extensively observed so far. Nevertheless, unresolved issues are still open in the literature on the physics of the afterglow and on the gamma-ray burst (GRB) environment. In particular, GRB 070125 was claimed to have exploded in a galactic halo environment, based on the uniqueness of the optical spectrum and the non-detection of an underlying host galaxy. In this work we collect all publicly available data and address these issues by modelling the near-infrared to X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) and studying the high signal-to-noise ratio Very Large Telescope/FOcal Reducer/low dispersion Spectrograph afterglow spectrum in comparison with a larger sample of GRB absorbers. The SED reveals a synchrotron cooling break in the ultraviolet, low equivalent hydrogen column density and little reddening caused by a Large Magellanic Cloud type or Small Magellanic Cloud type extinction curve. From the weak Mg II absorption at z= 1.5477 in the spectrum, we derived log N(Mg II) = 12.96+0.13- 0.18 and upper limits on the ionic column density of several metals. These suggest that the GRB absorber is most likely a Lyman limit system with a 0.03 < Z < 1.3 Z⊙ metallicity. The comparison with other GRB absorbers places GRB 070125 at the low end of the absorption-line equivalent width distribution, confirming that weak spectral features and spectral-line poor absorbers are not so uncommon in afterglow spectra. Moreover, we show that the effect of photoionization on the gas surrounding the GRB, combined with a low N(H I) along a short segment of the line of sight within the host galaxy, can explain the lack of spectral features in GRB 070125. Finally, the non-detection of an underlying galaxy is consistent with a faint GRB host galaxy, well within the GRB host brightness distribution. Thus, the possibility that GRB 070125 is simply located in the outskirts of a gas-rich, massive star-forming region inside its

  3. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  4. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  5. Eruption column physics

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Timing the warm absorber in NGC 4051

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. V.; Uttley, P.; Costantini, E.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated, using spectral-timing analysis, the characterization of highly ionized outflows in Seyfert galaxies, the so-called warm absorbers. Here, we present our results of the extensive 600 ks of XMM-Newton archival observations of the bright and highly variable Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051 whose spectrum has revealed a complex multicomponent wind. Making use of both RGS and EPIC-pn data, we performed a detailed analysis through a time-dependent photoionization code in combination with spectral and Fourier spectral-timing techniques. The source light curves and the warm absorber parameters obtained from the data were used to simulate the response of the gas to variations in the ionizing flux of the central source. The resulting time variable spectra were employed to predict the effects of the warm absorber on the time lags and coherence of the energy dependent light curves. We have found that, in the absence of any other lag mechanisms, a warm absorber with the characteristics of the one observed in NGC 4051, is able to produce soft lags, up to 100 s, on timescales of hours. The time delay is associated with the response of the gas to changes in the ionizing source, either by photoionization or radiative recombination, which is dependent on its density. The range of radial distances that, under our assumptions, yield longer time delays are distances r 0.3-1.0 × 1016 cm, and hence gas densities n 0.4-3.0 × 107 cm-3. Since these ranges are comparable to the existing estimates of the location of the warm absorber in NGC 4051, we suggest that it is likely that the observed X-ray time lags may carry a signature of the warm absorber response time to changes in the ionizing continuum. Our results show that the warm absorber in NGC 4051 does not introduce lags on the short timescales associated with reverberation, but will likely modify the hard continuum lags seen on longer timescales, which in this source have been measured to be on the order of 50 s. Hence, these

  7. A high-redshift quasar absorber without C IV. A galactic outflow caught in the act?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Anne; Richter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a very unusual sub-damped Lyman α (sub-DLA) system at redshift z = 2.304 towards the quasar Q 0453-423, based on high signal-to-noise (S/N), high-resolution spectral data obtained with VLT/UVES. With a neutral hydrogen column density of log N(H i) = 19.23 and a metallicity of -1.61 as indicated by [O i/H i] the sub-DLA mimics the properties of many other optically thick absorbers at this redshift. A very unusual feature of this system is, however, the lack of any C iv absorption at the redshift of the neutral hydrogen absorption, although the relevant spectral region is free of line blends and has very high S/N. Instead, we find high-ion absorption from C iv and O vi in another metal absorber at a velocity more than 220 km s-1 redwards of the neutral gas component. We explore the physical conditions in the two different absorption systems using Cloudy photoionisation models. We find that the weakly ionised absorber is dense and metal-poor while the highly ionised system is thin and more metal-rich. The absorber pair towards Q 0453-423 mimics the expected features of a galactic outflow with highly ionised material that moves away with high radial velocities from a (proto)galactic gas disk in which star-formation takes place. We discuss our findings in the context of C iv absorption line statistics at high redshift and compare our results to recent galactic-wind and outflow models.

  8. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  9. Revealing the Dusty Warm Absorber in MCG -6-30-15 with the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julia C.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Canizares, Claude R.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Morales, Raquel; Fabian, Andrew C.; Iwasawa, Kazushi

    2001-06-01

    We present detailed evidence for a warm absorber in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG -6-30-15 and dispute earlier claims for relativistic O line emission. The High-Energy Transmission Grating spectra show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM<~200 km s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The O VII edge and the 1s2-1snp resonance line series to n=9 are clearly detected at rest in the active galactic nucleus frame. We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the 1s2-1snp (n>5) O VII resonance lines and a neutral Fe L absorption complex. The shape of the Fe L feature is nearly identical to that seen in the spectra of several X-ray binaries and in laboratory data. The implied dust column density agrees with that obtained from reddening studies and gives the first direct X-ray evidence for dust embedded in a warm absorber. The O VIII resonance lines and the weak edge are also detected, and the spectral rollover below ~2 keV is explained by the superposition of numerous absorption lines and edges. We identify, for the first time, a KLL resonance in the O VI photoabsorption cross section, giving a measure of the O VI column density. The O VII (f) emission detected at the systemic velocity implies a covering fraction of ~5% (depending on the observed vs. time-averaged ionizing flux). Our observations show that a dusty warm absorber model is not only adequate to explain all the spectral features >~0.48 keV (<~26 Å) but that the data require it. This contradicts the interpretation of Branduardi-Raymont and coworkers that this spectral region is dominated by highly relativistic line emission from the vicinity of the black hole.

  10. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  11. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  12. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  13. Mini-columns for Conducting Breakthrough Experiments. Design and Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Reimus, Paul William; Ware, Stuart Douglas

    2015-06-11

    Experiments with moderately and strongly sorbing radionuclides (i.e., U, Cs, Am) have shown that sorption between experimental solutions and traditional column materials must be accounted for to accurately determine stationary phase or porous media sorption properties (i.e., sorption site density, sorption site reaction rate coefficients, and partition coefficients or Kd values). This report details the materials and construction of mini-columns for use in breakthrough columns to allow for accurate measurement and modeling of sorption parameters. Material selection, construction techniques, wet packing of columns, tubing connections, and lessons learned are addressed.

  14. Density Gradients in Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines experiments in which a density gradient might be used to advantage. A density gradient consists of a column of liquid, the composition and density of which varies along its length. The procedure can be used in analysis of solutions and mixtures and in density measures of solids. (Author/TS)

  15. Ferroelectrics based absorbing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jianping; Sadaune, Véronique; Burgnies, Ludovic; Lippens, Didier

    2014-07-01

    We show that ferroelectrics-based periodic structure made of BaSrTiO3 (BST) cubes, arrayed onto a metal plate with a thin dielectric spacer film exhibit a dramatic enhancement of absorbance with value close to unity. The enhancement is found around the Mie magnetic resonance of the Ferroelectrics cubes with the backside metal layer stopping any transmitted waves. It also involves quasi-perfect impedance matching resulting in reflection suppression via simultaneous magnetic and electrical activities. In addition, it was shown numerically the existence of a periodicity optimum, which is explained from surface waves analysis along with trade-off between the resonance damping and the intrinsic loss of ferroelectrics cubes. An experimental verification in a hollow waveguide configuration with a good comparison with full-wave numerical modelling is at last reported by measuring the scattering parameters of single and dual BST cubes schemes pointing out coupling effects for densely packed structures.

  16. Dual broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ju; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-02-23

    We propose polarization-independent and dual-broadband metamaterial absorbers at microwave frequencies. This is a periodic meta-atom array consisting of metal-dielectric-multilayer truncated cones. We demonstrate not only one broadband absorption from the fundamental magnetic resonances but additional broadband absorption in high-frequency range using the third-harmonic resonance, by both simulation and experiment. In simulation, the absorption was over 90% in 3.93-6.05 GHz, and 11.64-14.55 GHz. The corresponding experimental absorption bands over 90% were 3.88-6.08 GHz, 9.95-10.46 GHz and 11.86-13.84 GHz, respectively. The origin of absorption bands was elucidated. Furthermore, it is independent of polarization angle owing to the multilayered circular structures. The design is scalable to smaller size for the infrared and the visible ranges.

  17. THz-metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuong Pham, Van; Park, J. W.; Vu, Dinh Lam; Zheng, H. Y.; Rhee, J. Y.; Kim, K. W.; Lee, Y. P.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrabroad-band metamaterial absorber was investigated in mid-IR regime based on a similar model in previous work. The high absorption of metamaterial was obtained in a band of 8-11.7 THz with energy loss distributed in SiO2, which is appropriate potentially for solar-cell applications. A perfect absorption peak was provided by using a sandwich structure with periodical anti-dot pattern in the IR region, getting closed to visible-band metamaterials. The dimensional parameters were examined for the corresponding fabrication. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  18. A field operational test on valve-regulated lead-acid absorbent-glass-mat batteries in micro-hybrid electric vehicles. Part I. Results based on kernel density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Karspeck, T.; Ott, C.; Weckler, M.; Stoermer, A. O.

    2011-03-01

    In March 2007 the BMW Group has launched the micro-hybrid functions brake energy regeneration (BER) and automatic start and stop function (ASSF). Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology are applied in vehicles with micro-hybrid power system (MHPS). In both part I and part II of this publication vehicles with MHPS and AGM batteries are subject to a field operational test (FOT). Test vehicles with conventional power system (CPS) and flooded batteries were used as a reference. In the FOT sample batteries were mounted several times and electrically tested in the laboratory intermediately. Vehicle- and battery-related diagnosis data were read out for each test run and were matched with laboratory data in a data base. The FOT data were analyzed by the use of two-dimensional, nonparametric kernel estimation for clear data presentation. The data show that capacity loss in the MHPS is comparable to the CPS. However, the influence of mileage performance, which cannot be separated, suggests that battery stress is enhanced in the MHPS although a battery refresh function is applied. Anyway, the FOT demonstrates the unsuitability of flooded batteries for the MHPS because of high early capacity loss due to acid stratification and because of vanishing cranking performance due to increasing internal resistance. Furthermore, the lack of dynamic charge acceptance for high energy regeneration efficiency is illustrated. Under the presented FOT conditions charge acceptance of lead-acid (LA) batteries decreases to less than one third for about half of the sample batteries compared to new battery condition. In part II of this publication FOT data are presented by multiple regression analysis (Schaeck et al., submitted for publication [1]).

  19. Metamaterial Absorber Based Multifunctional Sensor Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Z.; Mamedov, A. M.; Ozbay, E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study metamaterial based (MA) absorber sensor, integrated with an X-band waveguide, is numerically and experimentally suggested for important application including pressure, density sensing and marble type detecting applications based on rectangular split ring resonator, sensor layer and absorber layer that measures of changing in the dielectric constant and/or the thickness of a sensor layer. Changing of physical, chemical or biological parameters in the sensor layer can be detected by measuring the resonant frequency shifting of metamaterial absorber based sensor. Suggested MA based absorber sensor can be used for medical, biological, agricultural and chemical detecting applications in microwave frequency band. We compare the simulation and experimentally obtained results from the fabricated sample which are good agreement. Simulation results show that the proposed structure can detect the changing of the refractive indexes of different materials via special resonance frequencies, thus it could be said that the MA-based sensors have high sensitivity. Additionally due to the simple and tiny structures it could be adapted to other electronic devices in different sizes.

  20. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  1. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  2. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  3. COSMIC DUST IN Mg II ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, Brice; Fukugita, Masataka

    2012-08-01

    Mg II absorbers induce reddening on background quasars. We measure this effect and infer the cosmic density of dust residing in these systems to be {Omega} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, in units of the critical density of the universe, which is comparable to the amount of dust found in galactic disks or about half the amount inferred to exist outside galaxies. We also estimate the neutral hydrogen abundance in Mg II clouds to be {Omega} Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, which is approximately 5% of hydrogen in stars in galaxies. This implies a dust-to-gas mass ratio for Mg II clouds of about 1/100, which is similar to the value for normal galaxies. This would support the hypothesis of the outflow origin of Mg II clouds, which are intrinsically devoid of stars and hence have no sources of dust. Considerations of the dust abundance imply that the presence of Mg II absorbers around galaxies lasts effectively for a few Gyr. High-redshift absorbers allow us to measure the rest-frame extinction curve to 900 A, at which the absorption by the Lyman edge dominates over scattering by dust in the extinction opacity.

  4. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  5. Conditions in the z = 0.692 absorber toward 3CR 286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ross D.; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Lyons, Ronald W.; Smith, Harding E.

    1994-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/Faint Object Spectrograph (HST/FOS) ultraviolet and ground-based optical spectra of the z = 0.692 21 cm absorption system in the quasi-stellar object (QSO) 3CR 286. The strength of the damped Lyman-alpha absorption implies an H I column density, N(H I) approximately 2 x 10(exp 21)/sq cm. We derive a high spin temperature for the H I gas, T(sub s) greater than or approximately equal to 10(exp 3) K, as has been found for other high-redshift 21 cm absorbing systems; at least 80% of the H I is hotter than 1200 K. Curve-of-growth analysis yields Mg(+) and Fe(+) abundances which are approximately 1-2 dex below solar values; the Ca(+) abundance is even lower implying some depletion onto dust grains. The H2 fraction is not high. We speculate that the high inferred T(sub s) for the gas may reflect continuing active star formation at the 5-8 Gyr look-back time to the absorbing galaxy.

  6. Probing the Dusty Warm Absorbers in MCG-6-30-15 & Mrk 766 with the Chandra HETG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, Claude R.; Lee, Julia C.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.

    2001-09-01

    HETG spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM < 200 km s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The initial analysis of these data, presented in Lee et al. (2001), shows that a dusty warm absorber model adequately explains the spectral features > 0.48 keV (< 26 Å ). We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the 1s2-1snp (n > 5) O VII resonance lines, and a neutral Fe L absorption complex. The implied dust column density needed to explain the Fe L feature agrees with that obtained from earlier reddening studies, which had already concluded that the dust should be associated with the ionized absorber (given the relatively lower observed absorption by cold gas). Our findings contradict the interpretation of Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001), based on XMM-Newton RGS spectra, that this spectral region is dominated by highly relativistic soft X-ray line emission originating near the central black hole. Here we review these issues and present more detailed measurements of the absorption lines, constrain the implied range of ionization in the warm absorber, and present the HETG spectrum of the Fe K line region. In addition, we present preliminary results on the HETG spectrum of another reddened Seyfert galaxy, Mrk 766, which Branduardi-Raymont et al. also reported as containing relativistic soft X-ray lines.

  7. Synthesis of Ion Microbeam Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mui, Peter Hon-Fung

    1995-01-01

    Electrostatic lenses have traditionally been designed by analyzing and combining different electrode configurations. Computational complexity typically limits such systems to a few geometrically simple elements, where the component interactions are neglected and not exploited to combat the various aberrations. Recently, Szilagyi and Szep have demonstrated that an axially symmetric column of circular plates, with the electrode potentials optimized for focusing, can surpass the typical conventional designs by many times in performance. Following the footsteps of pioneers like Burfoot and Hawkes, we partition the plates in order to transcend the limitations set by Scherzer's theorem on the chromatic and spherical aberrations of axially symmetric structures. Two algorithms, one based upon integral asymptotics and one upon the Levinson algorithm. for Toeplitz matrix inversion, are developed to complement the charge-density method in analyzing the new column structures. Various optimization schemes are combined to avoid shallow minima at a reasonable computational cost. With each plate partitioned into four sectors, we show that the interactions between the monopole and the quadrupole components can increase the output current density by more than 400% over the axially symmetric structure. By adjusting the sector potentials, we can realize systems capable of both focusing and deflecting the beam. In comparison to some existing designs, our systems excel in both performance and compactness, sometimes by many hundred percents. We then further partition the plates to generate the "octupole" deflectors and correctors. We show that the "octupole" deflectors can drastically slow down the beam degradation with deflection distance and that the correctors can further increase the output current density by more than 300%. Finally, we apply linear system theories to the study of the first-order properties of optical systems with different symmetries. We showed, without resorting to

  8. The Intrinsic Absorber in QSO 2359-1241: Keck and HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arav, Nahum; Brotherton, Michael S.; Becker, Robert H.; Gregg, Michael D.; White, Richard L.; Price, Trevor; Hack, Warren

    2001-01-01

    We present detailed analyses of the absorption spectrum seen in QSO 2359-1241 (NVSS J235953-124148). Keck HIRES data reveal absorption from 20 transitions arising from He I, Mg I, Mg II, Ca II, and Fe II. Hubble Space Telescope data show broad absorption lines (BALs) from Al III λ1857, C IV λ1549, Si IV λ1397, and N V λ1240. Absorption from excited Fe II states constrains the temperature of the absorber to 2000<~T<~10,000 K and puts a lower limit of 105 cm-3 on the electron number density. Saturation diagnostics show that the real column densities of He I and Fe II can be determined, allowing us to derive meaningful constraints on the ionization equilibrium and abundances in the flow. The ionization parameter is constrained by the iron, helium, and magnesium data to -3.0<~log(U)<~-2.5, and the observed column densities can be reproduced without assuming departure from solar abundances. From comparison of the He I and Fe II absorption features, we infer that the outflow seen in QSO 2359-1241 is not shielded by a hydrogen ionization front and therefore that the existence of low-ionization species in the outflow (e.g., Mg II, Al III, Fe II) does not necessitate the existence of such a front. We find that the velocity width of the absorption systematically increases as a function of ionization and to a lesser extent with abundance. Complementary analyses of the radio and polarization properties of the object are discussed in a companion paper (Brotherton et al.).

  9. Tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for damped structures under random load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The classical problem for the application of a tuned vibration absorber is to minimize the response of a structural system, such as displacement, velocity, acceleration or to maximize the energy dissipated by tuned vibration absorber. The development of explicit optimal absorber parameters is challenging for a damped structural system since the fixed points no longer exist in the frequency response curve. This paper aims at deriving a set of simple design formula of tuned vibration absorber with nonlinear viscous damping based on the frequency tuning for harmonic load for a damped structural system under white noise excitation. The vibration absorbers being considered include tuned mass damper (TMD) and liquid column vibration absorber (LCVA). Simple approximate expression for the standard deviation velocity response of tuned vibration absorber for damped primary structure is also derived in this study to facilitate the estimation of the damping coefficient of TMD with nonlinear viscous damping and the head loss coefficient of LCVA. The derived results indicate that the higher the structural inherent damping the smaller the supplementary damping provided by a tuned vibration absorber. Furthermore, the optimal damping of tuned vibration absorber is shown to be independent of structural damping when it is tuned using the frequency tuning for harmonic load. Finally, the derived closed-form expressions are demonstrated to be capable of predicting the optimal parameters of tuned vibration absorbers with sufficient accuracy for preliminary design of tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for a damped primary structure.

  10. Absorbable Antimicrobial Battlefield Hemostat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    hemostatic products are a critical and invaluable tool that will result in saved lives. However, the major drawback of the current hemostatic products is...roll dip coating process, developed for 5 Nanosys non -resorbable nanofiber hemostat, to be effective for the resorbable constructs. Because of its...density of 0.5mg nanofibers per square centimeter of dressing. This is based upon prior work carried out using our product (ATD no defined) that

  11. Energy absorber for the CETA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy absorber that was developed for the CETA (Crew Equipment and Translation Aid) on Space Station Freedom is a metal on metal frictional type and has a load regulating feature that prevents excessive stroking loads from occurring while in operation. This paper highlights some of the design and operating aspects and the testing of this energy absorber.

  12. Improvement Of The Helmholtz Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Duane L.

    1992-01-01

    Helmholtz-resonator system improved to enable it to absorb sound at more than one frequency without appreciable loss of effectiveness at primary frequency. Addition of annular cavities enables absorption of sound at harmonic frequencies in addition to primary frequency. Improved absorber designed for use on structures of high transmission loss. Applied to such machines as fixed-speed engines and fans.

  13. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  14. New Insights into the Spectral Variability and Physical Conditions of the X-Ray Absorbers in NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, J. D.; Kraemer, S. B.; Turner, T. J.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between the long-term X-ray spectral variability in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151 and its intrinsic absorption, by comparing the 2014 simultaneous ultraviolet/X-ray observations taken with Hubble STIS Echelle and Chandra HETGS with archival observations from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku. The observations are divided into “high” and “low” states, with the low states showing strong and unabsorbed extended emission at energies below 2 keV. Our X-ray model consists of a broken powerlaw, neutral reflection, and the two dominant absorption components identified by Kraemer et al. (2005, hereafter KRA2005) X-High and D+Ea, which are present in all epochs. The model fittings suggest that the absorbers are very stable, with the principal changes in the intrinsic absorption resulting from variations in the ionization state of the gas as the ionizing continuum varies. However, the low states show evidence of larger column densities in one or both of the absorbers. Among plausible explanations for the column increase, we discuss the possibility of an expanding/contracting X-ray corona. As suggested by KRA2005, there seem to be contributions from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds to the mass outflow. Along with the ultra-fast outflow absorber identified by Tombesi et al. (2010), X-High is consistent with being magnetically driven. On the other hand, it is unlikely that D+Ea is part of the MHD flow, and it is possible that it is radiatively accelerated. These results suggest that at a sufficiently large radial distance there is a break point between MHD-dominated and radiatively driven outflows.

  15. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  16. Absorption signatures of warm-hot gas at low redshift: broad H I Lyα absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper-García, Thorsten; Richter, Philipp; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C. M.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Theuns, Tom

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the physical state of H I absorbing gas at low redshift (z = 0.25) using a subset of cosmological, hydrodynamic simulations from the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations project, focusing in particular on broad (bH I≥40 km s-1) H I Lyα absorbers (BLAs), which are believed to originate in shock-heated gas in the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). Our fiducial model, which includes radiative cooling by heavy elements and feedback by supernovae and active galactic nuclei, predicts that by z = 0.25 nearly 60 per cent of the gas mass ends up at densities and temperatures characteristic of the WHIM and we find that half of this fraction is due to outflows. The standard H I observables (distribution of H I column densities NH I, distribution of Doppler parameters bH I, bH I-NH I correlation) and the BLA line number density predicted by our simulations are in remarkably good agreement with observations. BLAs arise in gas that is hotter, more highly ionized and more enriched than the gas giving rise to typical Lyα forest absorbers. The majority of the BLAs arise in warm-hot [log (T/ K) ˜ 5] gas at low (log Δ < 1.5) overdensities. On average, thermal broadening accounts for at least 60 per cent of the BLA linewidth, which in turn can be used as a rough indicator of the thermal state of the gas. Detectable BLAs account for only a small fraction of the true baryon content of the WHIM at low redshift. In order to detect the bulk of the mass in this gas phase, a sensitivity at least one order of magnitude better than achieved by current ultraviolet spectrographs is required. We argue that BLAs mostly trace gas that has been shock heated and enriched by outflows and that they therefore provide an important window on a poorly understood feedback process.

  17. Desulfurization of coal by microbial column flotation.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, N; Saiki, H

    1994-06-05

    Twenty-three strains capable of oxidizing iron were isolated from coal and ore storage sites as well as coal and ore mines, volcanic areas, and hot spring. Four strains were found to have high iron-oxidizing activity. One strain (T-4) was selected for this experiment since the strain showed the fastest leaching rate of iron and sulfate from pyrite among the four strains. The T-4 strain was assigned for Thiobacillus ferrooxidans from its cultural and morphological characteristics.Bacterial treatment was applied to column flotation. An increase of cell density in the microbial column flotation resulted in the increase of pyrite removal from a coal-pyrite mixture (high sulfur imitated coal) with corresponding decrease of coal recovery. The addition of kerosene into the microbial column flotation increased the recovery of the imitated coal from 55% (without kerosene) to 81% (with 50 microL/L kerosene) with the reduction of pyrite sulfur content from 11% (feed coal) to 3.9% (product coal). The kerosene addition could reduce the pyritic sulfur content by collecting the coal in the recovery. However, the addition could not enhance separation of pyrite from the coal-pyrite mixture, since pyrite rejection was not affected by the increase of the kerosene addition. An excellent separation was obtained by the microbial flotation using a long column which had a length-diameter (L/D) ratio of 12.7. The long column flotation reduced the pyritic sulfur content from 11% (feed coal) to 1.8% (product coal) when 80% of the feed coal was recovered without the kerosene addition. The long column flotation not only attained an excellent separation but also reduced the amount of cells for desulfurization to as little as one-tenth of the reported amount.

  18. An X-ray variable absorber within the broad line region in Fairall 51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, J.; Beuchert, T.; Guainazzi, M.; Longinotti, A. L.; Piconcelli, E.; Wilms, J.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Fairall 51 is a polar-scattered Seyfert 1 galaxy, a type of active galaxy believed to represent a bridge between unobscured type-1 and obscured type-2 objects. Fairall 51 has shown complex and variable X-ray absorption, but little is known about its origin. Aims: In our research, we observed Fairall 51 with the X-ray satellite Suzaku in order to constrain a characteristic time scale of its variability. Methods: We performed timing and spectral analysis of four observations separated by 1.5, 2, and 5.5 day intervals. Results: We found that the 0.5-50 keV broadband X-ray spectra are dominated by a primary power-law emission (with the photon index ~2). This emission is affected by at least three absorbers with different ionisations (log ξ ≈ 1-4). The spectrum is shaped further by a reprocessed emission, possibly coming from two regions, the accretion disc and a more distant scattering region. The accretion disc emission is smeared by the relativistic effects, from which we measured the spin of the black hole as a ≈ 0.8 ± 0.2. We found that most of the spectral variability can be attributed to the least ionised absorber whose column density changed by a factor of two between the first (highest-flux) and the last (lowest-flux) observation. Conclusions: A week-long scale of the variability indicates that the absorber is located at the distance ≈0.05 pc from the centre, i.e., in the broad line region.

  19. The impact of different physical processes on the statistics of Lyman-limit and damped Lyman α absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C. M.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2013-12-01

    We compute the z = 3 neutral hydrogen column density distribution function f(NHI) for 19 simulations drawn from the Overwhelmingly Large Simulations project using a post-processing correction for self-shielding calculated with full radiative transfer of the ionizing background radiation. We investigate how different physical processes and parameters affect the abundance of Lyman-limit systems (LLSs) and damped Lyman α absorbers including: (i) metal-line cooling; (ii) the efficiency of feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei; (iii) the effective equation of state for the interstellar medium; (iv) cosmological parameters; (v) the assumed star formation law and (vi) the timing of hydrogen reionization. We find that the normalization and slope, D = d log _{10} f /d log _{10} N_{H I}, of f(NHI) in the LLS regime are robust to changes in these physical processes. Among physically plausible models, f(NHI) varies by less than 0.2 dex and D varies by less than 0.18 for LLSs. This is primarily due to the fact that these uncertain physical processes mostly affect star-forming gas which contributes less than 10 per cent to f(NHI) in the LLS column density range. At higher column densities, variations in f(NHI) become larger (approximately 0.5 dex at f(NHI) = 1022 cm-2 and 1.0 dex at f(NHI) = 1022 cm-2) and molecular hydrogen formation also becomes important. Many of these changes can be explained in the context of self-regulated star formation in which the amount of star-forming gas in a galaxy will adjust such that outflows driven by feedback balance inflows due to accretion. Tools to reproduce all figures in this work can be found at the following url: https://bitbucket.org/galtay/hi-cddf-owls-1

  20. The lateral column lengthening and medial column stabilization procedures.

    PubMed

    Chi, T D; Toolan, B C; Sangeorzan, B J; Hansen, S T

    1999-08-01

    The results of medial column stabilization, lateral column lengthening, and combined medial and lateral procedures were reviewed in the treatment of adult acquired flatfoot secondary to posterior tibialis tendon insufficiency. All bony procedures were accompanied by transfer of the flexor digitorum longus tendon to the medial cuneiform or stump of the posterior tibialis tendon and tendoachilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession. Medial column fusion was performed for naviculocuneiform and cuneiform first metatarsal sag; lateral column lengthening was performed for calcaneovalgus deformity with a flat pitch angle; and combined procedures were performed for complex combined deformities. At 1 to 4 year followup of 65 feet, 88% of the feet that had lateral column lengthening, 80% that had medial column stabilization, and 88% of the feet that had medial and lateral procedures had a decrease in pain or were pain free. The lateral talar first metatarsal angle improved by 16 degrees in the patients in the lateral column lengthening group, 20 degrees in the patients in the medial column stabilization group, and 24 degrees in the patients in the combined medial and lateral procedures group. The anteroposterior talonavicular coverage angle improved by 14 degrees in the patients in the lateral column lengthening group, 10 degrees in the patients in the medial column stabilization group, and 14 degrees in the patients in the combined medial and lateral procedures group. These techniques effectively correct deformity without disrupting the essential joints of the hindfoot and midfoot.

  1. Molecules and metals in the distant universe: Sub-mm and optical spectroscopy of quasar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sean Stephen

    In order to gain a complete understanding of galaxy formation and evolution, knowledge of the atomic and molecular gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) is required. Absorption-line spectroscopy of quasars offer a powerful and luminosity independent probe of gas to high redshifts. The sub-Damped Lyman-alpha systems (sub-DLAs; 19.0 < log NHI < 20.3), and Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs; 20.3 < log NHI), are the highest neutral hydrogen column density quasar absorbers contain most of the neutral gas available for star formation in the high-redshift Universe. This thesis presents photometric measurements of 10 quasars absorbers with redshifts 0.652 < zabs < 3.104 taken with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) on Herschel. Of these 10 objects, 3 showed fluxes > 1 Jy. In addition spectra for 5 other quasars with DLAs (0.524 < zabs < 1.173) were taken with SPIRE and Heterodyne Instrument for the far-infrared (HIFI) on Herschel. These observations, in the far-IR and sub-mm bands, were optimized for detection of molecular lines of CO, 13CO, C 18O, H2O, HCO, and the forbidden transitions of [C II] and [N II]. Two targets, the DLA towards PKS0420-014 at z = 0.633 and the DLA towards AO0235+164 at z = 0.524, had a tentative detection of C18O, and another, the DLA towards TXS0827+243 at z = 0.52476, had a tentative detection of HCO. There were a number of other 3 sigma limits, with at least one limit for each of the 5 systems. In addition to the DLAs, 2 super-DLAs (with z = 2.5036 and z = 2.045) were observed using the echellette mode on Keck Echellette Spectrograph and Imager (ESI). These observations, in the optical and ultraviolet wavelengths, were optimized to detect metal lines. Both absorbers show remarkably similar metallicities of ~ -1.3 to ~ -1.4 dex and comparable, definitive depletion levels, as judged from [Fe/Zn] and [Ni/Zn]. One of the absorbers shows supersolar [S/Zn] and [Si/Zn]. Using potential detections of weak Ly-alpha emission at the

  2. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  3. An introduction to absorbent dressings.

    PubMed

    Jones, Menna Lloyd

    2014-12-01

    Exudate bathes the wound bed with a serous fluid that contains essential components that promote wound healing. However, excess exudate is often seen as a challenge for clinicians. Absorbent dressings are often used to aid in the management of exudate, with the aim of providing a moist but unmacerated environment. With so many different types of absorbent dressings available today-alongside making a holistic assessment-it is essential that clinicians also have the knowledge and skill to select the most appropriate absorbent dressing for a given patient.

  4. Self-Regulating Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical shock absorber keeps frictional damping force within tolerable limit. Its damping force does not increase with coefficient of friction between energy-absorbing components; rather, frictional damping force varies only slightly. Relatively insensitive to manufacturing variations and environmental conditions altering friction. Does not exhibit high breakaway friction and consequent sharp increase followed by sharp decrease in damping force at beginning of stroking. Damping force in absorber does not vary appreciably with speed of stroking. In addition, not vulnerable to leakage of hydraulic fluid.

  5. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  6. Desulfurization of coal by microbial column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Naoya; Saiki, Hiroshi . Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-06-05

    Twenty-three strains capable of oxidizing iron were isolated from coal and ore storage sites as well as coal and ore mines, volcanic areas, and hot spring. Four strains were found to have high iron-oxidizing activity. One strain (T-4) was selected for this experiment since the strain showed the fastest leaching rate of iron and sulfate from pyrite among the four strains. The T-4 strain was assigned for Thiobacillus ferrooxidans from its cultural and morphological characteristics. Bacterial treatment was applied to column flotation. An increase of cell density in the microbial column flotation resulted in the increase of pyrite removal from a coal-pyrite mixture with corresponding decrease of coal recovery. The addition of kerosene into the microbial column flotation increased the recovery of the imitated coal from 55% (without kerosene) to 81% (with 50 [mu]L/L kerosene) with the reduction of pyrite sulfur content from11% (feed coal) to 3.9% (product coal). An excellent separation was obtained by the microbial flotation using a long column which had a length-diameter (L/D) ratio of 12.7.

  7. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-09

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  8. Spontaneous emission and absorber theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegg, David T.

    1997-01-01

    One of the long term interests of George Series was the construction of a theory of spontaneous emission which does not involve field quantisation. His approach was written in terms of atomic operators only and he drew a parallel with the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory of radiation. By making a particular extra postulate, he was able to obtain the correct spontaneous emission rate and the Lamb shift reasonably simply and directly. An examination of his approach indicates that this postulate is physically reasonable and the need for it arises because quantisation in his theory occurs after the response of the absorber has been accounted for by means of the radiative reaction field. We review briefly an alternative absorber theory approach to spontaneous emission based on the direct action between the emitting atom and a quantised absorber, and outline some applications to more recent effects of interest in quantum optics.

  9. Guided tissue regeneration. Absorbable barriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; MacNeil, R L

    1998-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, techniques aimed at regeneration of lost periodontal tissue have become widely used and accepted in clinical practice. Among these techniques are those which use the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), wherein barriers (i.e., membranes) are used to control cell and tissue repopulation of the periodontal wound. A variety of non-absorbable and absorbable barriers have been developed and used for this purpose, with a trend in recent years toward increased use of absorbable GTR materials. This article describes the evolution of absorbable barrier materials and overview materials available for clinical use today. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of these materials are discussed, as well as possible new developments in barrier-based GTR therapy.

  10. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  11. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  12. Buckling of a holey column.

    PubMed

    Pihler-Puzović, D; Hazel, A L; Mullin, T

    2016-09-14

    We report the results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of buckling in a novel variant of an elastic column under axial load. We find that including a regular line of centred holes in the column can prevent conventional, global, lateral buckling. Instead, the local microstructure introduced by the holes allows the column to buckle in an entirely different, internal, mode in which the holes are compressed in alternate directions, but the column maintains the lateral reflection symmetry about its centreline. The internal buckling mode can be accommodated within a smaller external space than the global one; and it is the preferred buckling mode over an intermediate range of column lengths for sufficiently large holes. For very short or sufficiently long columns a modification of the classical, global, lateral buckling is dominant.

  13. Perfect selective metamaterial solar absorbers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2013-11-04

    In this work, we numerically investigate the radiative properties of metamaterial nanostructures made of two-dimensional tungsten gratings on a thin dielectric spacer and an opaque tungsten film from UV to mid-infrared region as potential selective solar absorbers. The metamaterial absorber with single-sized tungsten patches exhibits high absorptance in the visible and near-infrared region due to several mechanisms such as surface plasmon polaritons, magnetic polaritons, and intrinsic bandgap absorption of tungsten. Geometric effects on the resonance wavelengths and the absorptance spectra are studied, and the physical mechanisms are elucidated in detail. The absorptance could be further enhanced in a broader spectral range with double-sized metamaterial absorbers. The total solar absorptance of the optimized metamaterial absorbers at normal incidence could be more than 88%, while the total emittance is less than 3% at 100°C, resulting in total photon-to-heat conversion efficiency of 86% without any optical concentration. Moreover, the metamaterial solar absorbers exhibit quasi-diffuse behaviors as well as polarization independence. The results here will facilitate the design of novel highly efficient solar absorbers to enhance the performance of various solar energy conversion systems.

  14. Latching mechanism for deployable/re-stowable columns useful in satellite construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahl, E. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A column longeron latch assembly provides the securing mechanism for the deployable, telescoping column of a hoop/column antenna. The column is an open lattice structure with three longerons disposed 120 deg apart as the principle load bearing member. The column is deployed from a pair of eleven nested bays disposed on opposite sides of a center section under the influence of a motor-cable-pulley system. The longeron latch is a four bar linkage mechanism using the over-center principle for automatically locking the longeron sections into position during deployment. The latch is unlocked when the antenna is to be restowed. A spring pack disposed in the end of each longeron serves to absorb stress forces on the deployed column through the cam head piston and abutting latch from an adjacent longeron.

  15. Exploring the Galactic Damped Lyman alpha Absorber with Antipodal Sight Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danforth, Charles

    2011-10-01

    Damped Lya Absorbers {DLAs} are the highest column density systems seen in the spectra of distant quasars. Some DLAs are thought to represent absorption from gas associated with an intervening galaxy disks, halo, tidal tail, etc., along the line of sight and DLAs are a key method of studying star formation, metal abundances, and kinematics at high redshift. These systems are exceedingly rare at low-z where the intervening galaxies can be studied in detail, so the precise nature of these important diagnostics remains poorly-understood. However, there is one DLA present along every extragalactic sight line which we can study in exhaustive detail: the Milky Way DLA! We propose a study of sight lines through the Galactic DLA using archival far-UV spectra from STIS, COS, and GHRS. We will construct 30-40 full-DLA profiles for the Milky Way DLA by combining the absorption spectra of pairs of nearly-antipodal sight lines {within 20 degrees of antipodal}. This will allow us to sample a realistic distribution of physical conditions in a system exhibiting realistic kinematics. Our DLA profiles will intersect the Galaxy at a range of angles and probe a variety of Galactic structures - high-velocity clouds, tidal tails, possible outflows, etc. - the same features which are inferred but rarely confirmed in some external DLAs. This diversity of sight lines through the same galaxy will let us determine if the wide range of observed properties in external DLAs {column density, velocity dispersion, abundances, etc.} could be an effect of the precise details of the line of sight or is inherent to the population of DLA hosts.

  16. The shocked outflow in NGC 4051 - momentum-driven feedback, ultrafast outflows and warm absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.; King, A. R.

    2013-08-01

    An extended XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051 in 2009 revealed an unusually rich absorption spectrum with outflow velocities, in both Reflection Grating Spectrometers and EPIC spectra, up to ˜9000 km s-1. Evidence was again seen for a fast ionized wind with velocity ˜0.12c. Detailed modelling with the XSTAR photoionization code now confirms the general correlation of velocity and ionization predicted by mass conservation in a Compton-cooled shocked wind. We attribute the strong column density gradient in the model to the addition of strong two-body cooling in the later stages of the flow, causing the ionization (and velocity) to fall more quickly, and confining the lower ionization gas to a narrower region. The column density and recombination time-scale of the highly ionized flow component, seen mainly in Fe K lines, determine the primary shell thickness which, when compared with the theoretical Compton cooling length, determines a shock radius of ˜1017 cm. Variable radiative recombination continua (RRC) provide a key to scaling the lower ionization gas, with the RRC flux then allowing a consistency check on the overall flow geometry. We conclude that the 2009 observation of NGC 4051 gives strong support to the idea that a fast, highly ionized wind, launched from the vicinity of the supermassive black hole, will lose much of its mechanical energy after shocking against the interstellar medium (ISM) at a sufficiently small radius for strong Compton cooling. However, the total flow momentum will be conserved, retaining the potential for a powerful AGN wind to support momentum-driven feedback. We speculate that the `warm absorber' components often seen in AGN spectra result from the accumulation of shocked wind and ejected ISM.

  17. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  18. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  19. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  20. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  1. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  2. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  3. Automatic connector joins structural columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemin, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    Connector snap-locks over toothed bolthead mounted on column end, forming rigid joint that will not bend or twist. Connector is used in conventional construction to install temporary structures or as mechanical coupler. Up to nine receptacles can be clustered in one node to join up to nine converging columns.

  4. An Undergraduate Column Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danot, M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for an experiment designed to introduce undergraduate students to the theoretical and technical aspects of column chromatography. The experiment can also be shortened to serve as a demonstration of the column chromatography technique. (JN)

  5. Miniature Distillation Column for Producing LOX From Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozzi, Jay C.

    2006-01-01

    The figure shows components of a distillation column intended for use as part of a system that produces high-purity liquid oxygen (LOX) from air by distillation. (The column could be easily modified to produce high-purity liquid nitrogen.) Whereas typical industrial distillation columns for producing high-purity liquid oxygen and/or nitrogen are hundreds of feet tall, this distillation column is less than 3 ft (less than about 0.9 m) tall. This column was developed to trickle-charge a LOX-based emergency oxygen system (EOS) for a large commercial aircraft. A description of the industrial production of liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen by distillation is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the present miniaturized distillation column. Typically, such industrial production takes place in a chemical processing plant in which large quantities of high-pressure air are expanded in a turboexpander to (1) recover a portion of the electrical power required to compress the air and (2) partially liquefy the air. The resulting two-phase flow of air is sent to the middle of a distillation column. The liquid phase is oxygen-rich, and its oxygen purity increases as it flows down the column. The vapor phase is nitrogen-rich and its nitrogen purity increases as it flows up the column. A heater or heat exchanger, commonly denoted a reboiler, is at the bottom of the column. The reboiler is so named because its role is to reboil some of the liquid oxygen collected at the bottom of the column to provide a flow of oxygen-rich vapor. As the oxygen-rich vapor flows up the column, it absorbs the nitrogen in the down-flowing liquid by mass transfer. Once the vapor leaves the lower portion of the column, it interacts with down-flowing nitrogen liquid that has been condensed in a heat exchanger, commonly denoted a condenser, at the top of the column. Liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen products are obtained by draining some of the purified product at the bottom and top of the column

  6. Comparison of column flotation cells

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Mohanty, M.K.; Ho, K.

    1995-08-01

    Six commercial column flotation technologies, i.e., Canadian, Flotaire, Jameson, Microcel, Packed-Column, and Turbo-air, were tested for the treatment of Illinois Basin fine coal and the results from each column compared based on separation performance and throughout capacity. The separation performance achieved by each cell approached and, in some cases, exceeded the ultimate performance predicted by release analysis. A comparison of the test results indicates differences in the selectivity obtained by each flotation column on the basis of both ash and sulfur rejection. This finding may be due to variations in cell hydrodynamics and the ability to support a deep froth phase among the different column cells. In addition, throughput capacity of each cell was found to differ, apparently due to the differences in the bubble-particle attachment environment, bubble size, and bubble population. Variations in the operating characteristics, such as reagent additions, aeration rate and wash water rate, were also noted and summarized in this publication.

  7. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  8. Soil column leaching of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this review, I address the practical and theoretical aspects of pesticide soil mobility.I also address the methods used to measure mobility, and the factors that influence it, and I summarize the data that have been published on the column leaching of pesticides.Pesticides that enter the unsaturated soil profile are transported downwards by the water flux, and are adsorbed, desorbed, and/or degraded as they pass through the soil. The rate of passage of a pesticide through the soil depends on the properties of the pesticide, the properties of the soil and the prevailing environmental conditions.Because large amounts of many different pesticides are used around the world, they and their degradates may sometimes contaminate groundwater at unacceptable levels.It is for this reason that assessing the transport behavior and soil mobility of pesticides before they are sold into commerce is important and is one indispensable element that regulators use to assess probable pesticide safety. Both elementary soil column leaching and sophisticated outdoor lysimeter studies are performed to measure the leaching potential for pesticides; the latter approach more reliably reflects probable field behavior, but the former is useful to initially profile a pesticide for soil mobility potential.Soil is physically heterogeneous. The structure of soil varies both vertically and laterally, and this variability affects the complex flow of water through the soil profile, making it difficult to predict with accuracy. In addition, macropores exist in soils and further add to the complexity of how water flow occurs. The degree to which soil is tilled, the density of vegetation on the surface, and the type and amounts of organic soil amendments that are added to soil further affect the movement rate of water through soil, the character of soil adsorption sites and the microbial populations that exist in the soil. Parameters that most influence the rate of pesticide mobility in soil are

  9. Low temperature selective absorber research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzenberg, S. A.; Silberglitt, R.

    1982-04-01

    Research carried out since 1979 on selective absorbers is surveyed, with particular attention given to the low-temperature coatings seen as promising for flat plate and evacuated tube applications. The most thoroughly investigated absorber is black chrome, which is highly selective and is the most durable low-temperature absorber. It is believed that other materials, because of their low cost and lower content of strategic materials, may eventually supplant black chrome. Among these candidates are chemically converted black nickel; anodically oxidized nickel, zinc, and copper composites; and nickel or other low-cost multilayer coatings. In reviewing medium and high-temperature research, black chrome, multilayer coatings and black cobalt are seen as best medium-temperature candidates. For high temperatures, an Al2O3/Pt-Al203 multilayer composite or the zirconium diboride coating is preferred.

  10. Magnetically tunable metamaterial perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Feng, Ningyue; Wang, Qingmin; Hao, Yanan; Huang, Shanguo; Bi, Ke

    2016-06-01

    A magnetically tunable metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) based on ferromagnetic resonance is experimentally and numerically demonstrated. The ferrite-based MPA is composed of an array of ferrite rods and a metallic ground plane. Frequency dependent absorption of the ferrite-based MPA under a series of applied magnetic fields is discussed. An absorption peak induced by ferromagnetic resonance appears in the range of 8-12 GHz under a certain magnetic field. Both the simulated and experimental results demonstrate that the absorption frequency of the ferrite-based MPA can be tuned by the applied magnetic field. This work provides an effective way to fabricate the magnetically tunable metamaterial perfect absorber.

  11. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated.

  12. The nature of intermediate-redshift damped Lyα absorbers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, V.; Bergeron, J.; Boisse, P.; Deharveng, J. M.

    1997-05-01

    We present HST/WFPC2 high-spatial resolution images in the R and B bands of the close environment of the sightlines to seven quasars which spectra show either a damped Lyα absorption line, 21cm absorption, or a very strong MgII/FeII absorption system at intermediate redshifts (0.4<=z<=1). Objects down to about 0.3", or 2.0kpc at z=0.6 (H_0_=50km/s/Mpc, q_0_=0), and to a limiting magnitude m_702, lim_=25.9 could be detected for seven fields comprising eight absorbers (one at higher redshift z=1.78 towards MC 1331+170) with high Hi column densities of at least 1x10^20^cm^-2^. In each case, a candidate absorber with absolute magnitude M_B_=~-19.0 or much brighter has been detected. This small sample of gas-rich galaxies at intermediate redshifts covers a wide range in morphological types. There are three spiral galaxies of various sizes and luminosities (towards 3C 196, Q 1209+107 and MC 1331+170), three compact objects (towards EX 0302-223, PKS 0454+039 and, at high redshift, MC 1331+170), and two amorphous, low surface brightness galaxies (towards PKS 1229-021 and 3C 286). In the fields around 3C 196, PKS 1229-021 and Q 1209+107, there is an excess of galaxies in the PC2 images, suggestive of the presence of a group of galaxies associated with the damped Lyα absorber, or maybe with the quasar itself for the two z_e_<=1.0 cases. For 3C 196 and 3C 286, the quasar host galaxies have also tentatively been discovered. We do not detect any quasar multiple images, implying no large amount of dark matter around the damped Lyα absorbers. This survey also led to the discovery of the first z=~1.0 optical counterpart of a quasar radio jet (PKS 1229-021). As will be reported elsewhere (Boisse et al. 1996), spectroscopy with the HST-FOS of the strong MgII/FeII absorption systems confirms the validity of our selection criterion in predicting the existence of damped Lyα systems.

  13. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  14. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  15. Seismic behavior of lightweight concrete columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbat, B. G.; Daniel, J. I.; Weinmann, T. L.; Hanson, N. W.

    1982-09-01

    Sixteen full-scale, column-beam assemblies, which represented a portion of a frame subjected to simulated seismic loading, were tested. Controlled test parameters included concrete type, column size, amount of main column steel, size and spacing of column confining hoops, and magnitude of column axial load. The columns were subjected to constant axial load and slow moment reversals at increasing inelastic deformations. Test data showed that properly designed lightweight concrete columns maintained ductility and strength when subjected to large inelastic deformations from load reversals. Confinement requirements for normal weight concrete columns were shown to be applicable to lightweight concrete columns up to thirty percent of the design strength.

  16. Metamaterial Absorbers for Microwave Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    a) Depiction of metamaterial array of square resonators atop FR4. (b) Metamaterial dimensions and structure...comparison for varying resonator array dimension sizes. ..............23 Figure 12. Absorption derived from raw reflection data...36 x Figure 23. Metamaterial absorber array where resonator dimensions control the detection frequencies and

  17. Oil and fat absorbing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for forming a solid network polymer having a minimal amount of crosslinking for use in absorbing fats and oils. The polymer remains solid at a swelling ratio in oil or fat of at least ten and provides an oil absorption greater than 900 weight percent.

  18. Automated hydrophobic interaction chromatography column selection for use in protein purification.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Patrick J M; Stone, Orrin J; Anderson, Michelle E

    2011-09-21

    In contrast to other chromatographic methods for purifying proteins (e.g. gel filtration, affinity, and ion exchange), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) commonly requires experimental determination (referred to as screening or "scouting") in order to select the most suitable chromatographic medium for purifying a given protein (1). The method presented here describes an automated approach to scouting for an optimal HIC media to be used in protein purification. HIC separates proteins and other biomolecules from a crude lysate based on differences in hydrophobicity. Similar to affinity chromatography (AC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX), HIC is capable of concentrating the protein of interest as it progresses through the chromatographic process. Proteins best suited for purification by HIC include those with hydrophobic surface regions and able to withstand exposure to salt concentrations in excess of 2 M ammonium sulfate ((NH(4;))(2;)SO(4;)). HIC is often chosen as a purification method for proteins lacking an affinity tag, and thus unsuitable for AC, and when IEX fails to provide adequate purification. Hydrophobic moieties on the protein surface temporarily bind to a nonpolar ligand coupled to an inert, immobile matrix. The interaction between protein and ligand are highly dependent on the salt concentration of the buffer flowing through the chromatography column, with high ionic concentrations strengthening the protein-ligand interaction and making the protein immobile (i.e. bound inside the column) (2). As salt concentrations decrease, the protein-ligand interaction dissipates, the protein again becomes mobile and elutes from the column. Several HIC media are commercially available in pre-packed columns, each containing one of several hydrophobic ligands (e.g. S-butyl, butyl, octyl, and phenyl) cross-linked at varying densities to agarose beads of a specific diameter (3). Automated column scouting allows for an efficient approach for determining

  19. A parametric study of fine coal cleaning using column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.; Groppo, J.G.; Bland, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recovery of fine coal is becoming an important and integral part of coal cleaning plants. Conventional froth flotation, which is commonly used in the coal industry, is inefficient at cleaning fine coal which contains large amounts of ultrafine ash or clays. The Kentucky Center for Energy Research Laboratory (KCERL) has been investigating an alternative method, counter-current column flotation, which is widely used in the mineral industry. Through an advanced cell design and counter-current wash of the froth, column flotation can produce a low-ash, clean coal product without sacrificing combustible recovery. An experimental program was conducted using a 2-inch internal diameter Canadian column flotation cell to examine the effect of various operating parameters on clean coal recovery and quality. The study investigated six operational parameters: feed rate, frother concentration, air flow rate, column height, pulp density and wash water rate.

  20. Single-phase Stefan problem in selectively absorbing medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleptsov, S. D.; Rubtsov, N. A.; Savvinova, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    The thermal state of a translucent selectively absorbing medium was studied by the methods of numerical simulation at different values of the optical properties of boundaries and heat transfer from the left surface in approximation of one-phase Stefan problem. The temperature fields and densities of resultant radiation fluxes as well as the thermal state of the left boundary and dynamics of layer reduction in the melting process were analyzed. The processes of phase transition in a flat layer of selective and gray absorbing media and emitting media were compared, and their fundamental differences were shown.

  1. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Park, W.K.

    1995-05-30

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternating ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multi-function column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multi-function ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins.

  2. A technique using a stellar spectrographic plate to measure terrestrial ozone column depth

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Alec Y.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis examines the feasibility of a technique to extract ozone column depths from photographic stellar spectra in the 5000--7000 Angstrom spectral region. A stellar spectrographic plate is measured to yield the relative intensity distribution of a star`s radiation after transmission through the earth`s atmosphere. The amount of stellar radiation absorbed by the ozone Chappuis band is proportional to the ozone column depth. The measured column depth is within 10% the mean monthly value for latitude 36{degree}N, however the uncertainty is too large to make the measurement useful. This thesis shows that a 10% improvement to the photographic sensitivity uncertainty can decrease the column depth uncertainty to a level acceptable for climatic study use. This technique offers the possibility of measuring past ozone column depths.

  3. On the equivalent width of the Fe Kα line produced by a dusty absorber in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohil, R.; Ballantyne, D. R.

    2015-05-01

    Obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provide an opportunity to study the material surrounding the central engine. Geometric and physical constraints on the absorber can be deduced from the reprocessed AGN emission. In particular, the obscuring gas may reprocess the nuclear X-ray emission producing a narrow Fe Kα line and a Compton reflection hump. In recent years, models of the X-ray reflection from an obscuring torus have been computed; however, although the reflecting gas may be dusty, the models do not yet take into account the effects of dust on the predicted spectrum. We study this problem by analysing two sets of models, with and without the presence of dust, using the one-dimensional photoionization code CLOUDY. The calculations are performed for a range of column densities (22 < log[NH(cm- 2)] < 24.5) and hydrogen densities (6 < log[nH(cm- 3)] < 8). The calculations show the presence of dust can enhance the Fe Kα equivalent width (EW) in the reflected spectrum by factors up to ≈8 for Compton thick (CT) gas and a typical interstellar medium grain size distribution. The enhancement in EW with respect to the reflection continuum is due to the reduction in the reflected continuum intensity caused by the anisotropic scattering behaviour of dust grains. This effect will be most relevant for reflection from distant, predominately neutral gas, and is a possible explanation for AGNs which show a strong Fe Kα EW and a relatively weak reflection continuum. Our results show it is an important to take into account dust while modelling the X-ray reflection spectrum, and that inferring a CT column density from an observed Fe Kα EW may not always be valid. Multidimensional models are needed to fully explore the magnitude of the effect.

  4. Telescoping columns. [parabolic antenna support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazur, J. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An extendable column is described which consists of several axially elongated rigid structural sections nested within one another. Each section includes a number of rotatably attached screws running along its length. The next inner section includes threaded lugs oriented to threadingly engage the screws. The column is extended or retracted upon rotation of the screws. The screws of each section are selectively rotated by a motor and an engagement mechanism.

  5. Microcellular ceramic foams for radar absorbing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Huling, J.; Phillips, D.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to develop a lightweight, semi-structural, radar-absorbing ceramic foam that can be incorporated into aircraft exhaust systems to replace many of the currently used dense ceramic parts and thereby improve the radar cross section. Although the conventional processes for producing ceramic foams have not been able to provide materials that meet the design specifications for high strength at low density, we have developed and demonstrated a novel sol-gel emulsion process for preparing microcellular ceramic foams in which compositional and microstructural control is expected to provide the requisite high-temperature radar-absorption, strength-to-weight ratio, and thermal insulative properties.

  6. Modelling and validation of electromechanical shock absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonoli, Andrea; Amati, Nicola; Girardello Detoni, Joaquim; Galluzzi, Renato; Gasparin, Enrico

    2013-08-01

    Electromechanical vehicle suspension systems represent a promising substitute to conventional hydraulic solutions. However, the design of electromechanical devices that are able to supply high damping forces without exceeding geometric dimension and mass constraints is a difficult task. All these challenges meet in off-road vehicle suspension systems, where the power density of the dampers is a crucial parameter. In this context, the present paper outlines a particular shock absorber configuration where a suitable electric machine and a transmission mechanism are utilised to meet off-road vehicle requirements. A dynamic model is used to represent the device. Subsequently, experimental tests are performed on an actual prototype to verify the functionality of the damper and validate the proposed model.

  7. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  8. Field Results from Three Campaigns to Validate the Performance of the Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (Mini-LHR) for Measuring Carbon Dioxide and Methane in the Atmospheric Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. Houston; Clarke, Greg B.; Melroy, Hilary; Ott, Lesley; Steel, Emily Wilson

    2014-01-01

    In a collaboration between NASA GSFC and GWU, a low-cost, surface instrument is being developed that can continuously monitor key carbon cycle gases in the atmospheric column: carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). The instrument is based on a miniaturized, laser heterodyne radiometer (LHR) using near infrared (NIR) telecom lasers. Despite relatively weak absorption line strengths in this spectral region, spectrallyresolved atmospheric column absorptions for these two molecules fall in the range of 60-80% and thus sensitive and precise measurements of column concentrations are possible. In the last year, the instrument was deployed for field measurements at Park Falls, Wisconsin; Castle Airport near Atwater, California; and at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. For each subsequent campaign, improvement in the figures of merit for the instrument has been observed. In the latest work the absorbance noise is approaching 0.002 optical density (OD) noise on a 1.8 OD signal. An overview of the measurement campaigns and the data retrieval algorithm for the calculation of column concentrations will be presented. For light transmission through the atmosphere, it is necessary to account for variation of pressure, temperature, composition, and refractive index through the atmosphere that are all functions of latitude, longitude, time of day, altitude, etc. For temperature, pressure, and humidity profiles with altitude we use the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data. Spectral simulation is accomplished by integrating short-path segments along the trajectory using the SpecSyn spectral simulation suite developed at GW. Column concentrations are extracted by minimizing residuals between observed and modeled spectrum using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. We will also present an assessment of uncertainty in the reported concentrations from assumptions made in the meteorological data, LHR instrument and tracker noise, and radio

  9. Digital Alloy Absorber for Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the spectral response range and improve the mobility of the photo-generated carriers (e.g. in an nBn photodetector), a digital alloy absorber may be employed by embedding one (or fraction thereof) to several monolayers of a semiconductor material (insert layers) periodically into a different host semiconductor material of the absorber layer. The semiconductor material of the insert layer and the host semiconductor materials may have lattice constants that are substantially mismatched. For example, this may performed by periodically embedding monolayers of InSb into an InAsSb host as the absorption region to extend the cutoff wavelength of InAsSb photodetectors, such as InAsSb based nBn devices. The described technique allows for simultaneous control of alloy composition and net strain, which are both key parameters for the photodetector operation.

  10. Discovery of Rapidly Moving Partial X-Ray Absorbers Within Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Oskinova, L.; Russell, C. M. P.; Petre, R.; Enoto, T.; Morihana, K.; Ishida, M.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Cassiopeiae is an enigmatic Be star with unusually strong hard X-ray emission. The Suzaku observatory detected six rapid X-ray spectral hardening events called "softness dips" in a approx.100 ks observation in 2011. All the softness dip events show symmetric softness-ratio variations, and some of them have flat bottoms apparently due to saturation. The softness dip spectra are best described by either approx.40% or approx.70% partial covering absorption to kT approx.12 keV plasma emission by matter with a neutral hydrogen column density of approx.(2-8) ×10(exp 21)/sq cm, while the spectrum outside these dips is almost free of absorption. This result suggests the presence of two distinct X-ray-emitting spots in the gamma Cas system, perhaps on a white dwarf (WD) companion with dipole mass accretion. The partial covering absorbers may be blobs in the Be stellar wind, the Be disk, or rotating around the WD companion. Weak correlations of the softness ratios to the hard X-ray flux suggest the presence of stable plasmas at kT approx 0.9 and 5 keV, which may originate from the Be or WD winds. The formation of a Be star and WD binary system requires mass transfer between two stars; gamma Cas may have experienced such activity in the past.

  11. Discovery of Rapidly Moving Partial X-ray Absorbers within Gamma Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Oskinova, L.; Russell, C. M. P.; Petre, R.; Enoto, T.; Morihana, K.; Ishida, M.

    2016-12-01

    Gamma Cassiopeiae is an enigmatic Be star with unusually strong hard X-ray emission. The Suzaku observatory detected six rapid X-ray spectral hardening events called “softness dips” in a ˜100 ks observation in 2011. All the softness dip events show symmetric softness-ratio variations, and some of them have flat bottoms apparently due to saturation. The softness dip spectra are best described by either ˜40% or ˜70% partial covering absorption to kT ˜ 12 keV plasma emission by matter with a neutral hydrogen column density of ˜(2-8) × 1021 cm-2, while the spectrum outside these dips is almost free of absorption. This result suggests the presence of two distinct X-ray-emitting spots in the γ Cas system, perhaps on a white dwarf (WD) companion with dipole mass accretion. The partial covering absorbers may be blobs in the Be stellar wind, the Be disk, or rotating around the WD companion. Weak correlations of the softness ratios to the hard X-ray flux suggest the presence of stable plasmas at kT ˜ 0.9 and 5 keV, which may originate from the Be or WD winds. The formation of a Be star and WD binary system requires mass transfer between two stars; γ Cas may have experienced such activity in the past.

  12. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  13. Immobilized chitosan as a selective absorbent for the nickel removal in water sample.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Min; Wang, Yong-Yao

    2003-09-01

    Method for preparation of chitosan immobilized on silica gel (CTS-silica) was described. The CTS-silica was used as absorbent for the absorption of nickel in water. The results showed that this absorbent had relatively high selectivity and strong affinity to nickel. The maximum absorption capacity for nickel can reach 667 mg/g of chitosan. Factors that affect the absorption capacity, such as pH, ion strength and the presence of calcium, EDTA and the mechanism of absorption were discussed in detail. The absorbent can be regenerated with acid and reused for several times. The recovery rate for nickel can reach 99.99%. This absorbent filled in a column can be used in nickel removal from wastewater and drinking water.

  14. Keck and VLT Observations of Super-Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers at z 2- 2.5: Constraints on Chemical Compositions and Physical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; Morrison, Sean; Péroux, Celine; Quiret, Samuel; York, Donald G.

    2015-12-01

    We report Keck/Echellette Spectrograph and Imager and Very Large Telescope/Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph observations of three super-damped Lyα quasar absorbers with H i column densities log NH i ≥ 21.7 at redshifts 2 ≲ z ≲ 2.5. All three absorbers show similar metallicities (˜-1.3 to -1.5 dex), and dust depletion of Fe, Ni, and Mn. Two of the absorbers show supersolar [S/Zn] and [Si/Zn]. We combine our results with those for other damped Lyα a absorbers (DLAs) to examine trends between NH i, metallicity, and dust depletion. A larger fraction of the super-DLAs lie close to or above the line [X/H] = 20.59 - log NH i in the metallicity versus NH i plot, compared to the less gas-rich DLAs, suggesting that super-DLAs are more likely to be rich in molecules. Unfortunately, our data for Q0230-0334 and Q0743+1421 do not cover H2 absorption lines. For Q1418+0718, some H2 lines are covered, but not detected. CO is not detected in any of our absorbers. For DLAs with log NH i < 21.7, we confirm strong correlation between metallicity and Fe depletion, and find a correlation between metallicity and Si depletion. For super-DLAs, these correlations are weaker or absent. The absorbers toward Q0230-0334 and Q1418+0718 show potential detections of weak Lyα emission, implying star formation rates of ˜1.6 and ˜0.7 M⊙ yr-1, respectively (ignoring dust extinction). Upper limits on the electron densities from C ii*/C ii or Si ii*/Si ii are low, but are higher than the median values in less gas-rich DLAs. Finally, systems with log NH i > 21.7 may have somewhat narrower velocity dispersions Δv90 than the less gas-rich DLAs, and may arise in cooler and/or less turbulent gas. Includes observations collected during program ESO 93.A-0422 at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) with the Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on the 8.2 m telescopes operated at the Paranal Observatory, Chile. Some of the data presented herein were

  15. KECK AND VLT OBSERVATIONS OF SUPER-DAMPED Lyα ABSORBERS AT z ∼ 2–2.5: CONSTRAINTS ON CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS AND PHYSICAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; Morrison, Sean; Péroux, Celine; Quiret, Samuel; York, Donald G.

    2015-12-10

    We report Keck/Echellette Spectrograph and Imager and Very Large Telescope/Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph observations of three super-damped Lyα quasar absorbers with H i column densities log N{sub H} {sub i} ≥ 21.7 at redshifts 2 ≲ z ≲ 2.5. All three absorbers show similar metallicities (∼−1.3 to −1.5 dex), and dust depletion of Fe, Ni, and Mn. Two of the absorbers show supersolar [S/Zn] and [Si/Zn]. We combine our results with those for other damped Lyα a absorbers (DLAs) to examine trends between N{sub H} {sub i}, metallicity, and dust depletion. A larger fraction of the super-DLAs lie close to or above the line [X/H] = 20.59 − log N{sub H} {sub i} in the metallicity versus N{sub H} {sub i} plot, compared to the less gas-rich DLAs, suggesting that super-DLAs are more likely to be rich in molecules. Unfortunately, our data for Q0230−0334 and Q0743+1421 do not cover H{sub 2} absorption lines. For Q1418+0718, some H{sub 2} lines are covered, but not detected. CO is not detected in any of our absorbers. For DLAs with log N{sub H} {sub i} < 21.7, we confirm strong correlation between metallicity and Fe depletion, and find a correlation between metallicity and Si depletion. For super-DLAs, these correlations are weaker or absent. The absorbers toward Q0230−0334 and Q1418+0718 show potential detections of weak Lyα emission, implying star formation rates of ∼1.6 and ∼0.7 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, respectively (ignoring dust extinction). Upper limits on the electron densities from C ii*/C ii or Si ii*/Si ii are low, but are higher than the median values in less gas-rich DLAs. Finally, systems with log N{sub H} {sub i} > 21.7 may have somewhat narrower velocity dispersions Δv{sub 90} than the less gas-rich DLAs, and may arise in cooler and/or less turbulent gas.

  16. Warm Absorbers in the ROSAT Spectra of Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio

    1998-01-01

    We present two ROSAT PSPC observations of the radio-loud, lobe-dominated quasar 3C 351, which shows an 'ionized absorber' in its X-ray spectrum. The factor 1.7 change in flux in the approx. 2 years between the observations allows a test of of models for this ionized absorber. The absorption feature at approx. 0.7 keV (quasar frame) is present in both spectra but with a lower optical depth when the source intensity - and hence the ionizing flux at the absorber - is higher, in accordance with a simple, single-zone, equilibrium photoionization model. Detailed modeling confirms this agreement quantitatively. The maximum response time of 2 years allows us to limit the gas density: n(sub e) greater than 2 x 10(exp 4)cm(exp -3); and the distance of the ionized gas from the central source R less than 19 pc. This produces a strong test for a photoionized absorber in 3C 351: a factor 2 flux change in approx. 1 week in this source must show non-equilibrium effects in the ionized absorber.

  17. Shock absorber operates over wide range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creasy, W. K.; Jones, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Piston-type hydraulic shock absorber, with a metered damping system, operates over a wide range of kinetic energy loading rates. It is used for absorbing shock and vibration on mounted machinery and heavy earth-moving equipment.

  18. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... absorber is a device made of paper or cotton intended to absorb moisture from the oral cavity during dental... manufacturing practice requirements of the quality system regulation in part 820 of this chapter, with...

  19. Improving the laboratory monitoring of absorbent oil

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Shved; S.S. Sychev; I.V. Safina; S.A. Klykov

    2009-05-15

    The performance of absorbent coal tar oil is analyzed as a function of the constituent and group composition. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the oil that ensures the required absorbent properties is determined. Operative monitoring may be based on absorbent characteristics that permit regulation of the beginning and end of regeneration.

  20. FRACTIONATING COLUMN PRODUCT COLLECTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Paxson, G.D. Jr.

    1964-03-10

    Means for detecting minute fluid products from a chemical separation column and for advancing a collector tube rack in order to automatically separate and collect successive fractionated products are described. A charge is imposed on the forming drops at the column orifice to create an electric field as the drop falls in the vicinity of a sensing plate. The field is detected by an electrometer tube coupled to the plate causing an output signal to actuate rotation of a collector turntable rack, thereby positioning new collectors under the orifice. The invention provides reliable automatic collection independent of drop size, rate of fall, or chemical composition. (AEC)

  1. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  2. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  3. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  4. Carbon dioxide absorbents for rebreather diving.

    PubMed

    Pennefather, John

    2016-09-01

    Firstly I would like to thank SPUMS members for making me a Life Member of SPUMS; I was surprised and greatly honoured by the award. I also want to confirm and expand on the findings on carbon dioxide absorbents reported by David Harvey et al. For about 35 years, I was the main player in deciding which absorbent went into Australian Navy and Army diving sets. On several occasions, suppliers of absorbents to the anaesthesia market tried to supply the Australian military market. On no occasion did they provide absorbent that came close to the minimum absorbent capacity required, generally being 30-40% less efficient than diving-grade absorbents. Because I regard lives as being more important than any likely dollar saving, the best absorbent was always selected unless two suppliers provided samples with the same absorbent capacity. On almost every occasion, there was a clear winner and cost was never considered. I suggest the same argument for the best absorbent should be used by members and their friends who dive using rebreather sets. I make this point because of my findings on a set that was brought to me after the death of its owner. The absorbent was not the type or grain size recommended by the manufacturer of the set and did not resemble any of the diving grade absorbents I knew of. I suspected by its appearance that it was anaesthetic grade absorbent. When I tested the set, the absorbent system failed very quickly so it is likely that carbon dioxide toxicity contributed to his death. The death was not the subject of an inquest and I have no knowledge of how the man obtained the absorbent. Possibly there was someone from an operating theatre staff who unintentionally caused their friend's death by supplying him with 'borrowed absorbent'. I make this point as I would like to discourage members from making a similar error.

  5. A polarization-independent broadband terahertz absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cheng; Zang, XiaoFei E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn; Wang, YiQiao; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn

    2014-07-21

    A highly efficient broadband terahertz absorber is designed, fabricated, and experimentally as well as theoretically evaluated. The absorber comprises a heavily doped silicon substrate and a well-designed two-dimensional grating. Due to the destructive interference of waves and diffraction, the absorber can achieve over 95% absorption in a broad frequency range from 1 to 2 THz and for angles of incidence from 0° to 60°. Such a terahertz absorber is also polarization-independent due to its symmetrical structure. This omnidirectional and broadband absorber have potential applications in anti-reflection coatings, imaging systems, and so on.

  6. Microparticle column geometry in acoustic stationary fields.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Andrew; Insana, Michael F; Allen, John S

    2003-01-01

    Particles suspended in a fluid will experience forces from stationary acoustic fields. The magnitude of the force depends on the time-averaged energy density of the field and the material properties of the particles and fluid. Forces acting on known particles smaller than 20 microm were studied. Within a 500 kHz acoustic beam generated by a plane-piston circular source, observations were made of the geometry of the particle column that is formed. Varying the acoustic energy altered the column width in a manner predicted by equations for the primary acoustic radiation force from scattering of particles in the long-wavelength limit. The minimum pressures required to trap gas, solid, and liquid particles in a water medium at room temperature were also estimated to within 12%. These results highlight the ability of stationary acoustic fields from a plane-piston radiator to impose nano-Newton-scale forces onto fluid particles with properties similar to biological cells, and suggest that it is possible to accurately quantify these forces.

  7. Chromatographic properties PLOT multicapillary columns.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, O A; Patrushev, Y V; Sidelnikov, V N

    2017-03-10

    Multicapillary columns (MCCs) for gas chromatography make it possible to perform high-speed analysis of the mixtures of gaseous and volatile substances at a relatively large amount of the loaded sample. The study was performed using PLOT MCCs for gas-solid chromatography (GSC) with different stationary phases (SP) based on alumina, silica and poly-(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) polymer as well as porous polymers divinylbenzene-styrene (DVB-St), divinylbenzene-vinylimidazole (DVB-VIm) and divinylbenzene-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (DVB-EGD). These MCCs have the efficiency of 4000-10000 theoretical plates per meter (TP/m) and at a column length of 25-30cm can separate within 10-20s multicomponent mixtures of substances belonging to different classes of chemical compounds. The sample amount not overloading the column is 0.03-1μg and depends on the features of a porous layer. Examples of separations on some of the studied columns are considered.

  8. Suspension of Drops of a Liquid in a Column of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Jamil

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration which creates the illusion of violating Archimedes Principle. The procedure involves two liquids with identical densities and produces drops of one liquid suspended in the middle of a column of the second liquid. (DDR)

  9. Dust-to-metal ratios in damped Lyman-α absorbers. Fresh clues to the origins of dust and optical extinction towards γ-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cia, A.; Ledoux, C.; Savaglio, S.; Schady, P.; Vreeswijk, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by the anomalous dust-to-metal ratios derived in the literature for γ-ray burst (GRB) damped Lyman-α absorbers (DLAs), we measure these ratios using the dust-depletion pattern observed in UV/optical afterglow spectra associated with the interstellar medium (ISM) at the GRB host-galaxy redshifts. Our sample consists of 20 GRB absorbers and a comparison sample of 72 DLAs toward quasars (QSOs) with redshift 1.2 < z < 4.0 and down to Z = 0.002 Z⊙ metallicities. The dust-to-metal ratio in QSO- and GRB-DLAs increases both with metallicity and metal column density, spanning ~10-110% of the Galactic value and pointing to a nonuniversal dust-to-metal ratio. The low values of dust-to-metal ratio suggest that low-metallicity systems have lower dust fractions than typical spiral galaxies and, perhaps, that the dust in these systems is produced inefficiently, i.e. by grain growth in the low-metallicity regime with negligible contribution from supernovae (SNe) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. On the other hand, some GRB- and QSO-DLAs show high dust-to-metal ratio values out to z ~ 4, requiring rapid dust production, such as in SN ejecta, but also in AGB winds and via grain growth for the highest metallicity systems. GRB-DLAs overall follow the dust-to-metal-ratio properties of QSO-DLAs, GRBs probing larger column and volume densities. For comparison, the dust-to-metal ratio that we derive for the SMC and LMC are ~82-100% and ~98% of the Galactic value, respectively. The literature dust-to-metal ratio of the low-metallicity galaxy I Zw 18 (<37%) is consistent with the distribution that we find. The dust extinction AV increases steeply with the column density of iron in dust, N(Fe)dust, calculated from relative metal abundances, confirming that dust extinction is mostly occurring in the host galaxy ISM. Most GRB-DLAs display log N(Fe)dust > 14.7, above which several QSO-DLAs reveal molecular hydrogen, making GRB-DLAs promising candidates for molecular

  10. Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Smoot, Katherine V.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.; Benecke, Mark W.; Chronister, Glen B.

    2012-11-19

    Super-absorbent polymers (SAPs) have the potential to remove water and associated contaminants from unsaturated sediments in the field. Column and flow cell experiment were conducted to test the ability of four types of SAPs to remove water from unsaturated porous media. Column experiments, with emplacement of a layer of polymer on top of unsaturated porous media, showed the ability of the SAPs to extract up to 80% of the initially emplaced water against gravity into the sorbent over periods up to four weeks. In column experiments where the sorbent was emplaced between layers of unsaturated porous media, gel formation was observed at both the sorbent-porous medium interfaces. The extraction percentages over four weeks of contact time were similar for both column configurations and no obvious differences were observed for the four tested SAPs. Two different flow cells were used to test the wicking behavior of SAPs in two dimensions using three configurations. The largest removal percentages occurred for the horizontal sorbent layer configuration which has the largest sorbent-porous medium interfacial area. In a larger flow cell, a woven nylon “sock” was packed with sorbent and subsequently placed between perforated metal plates, mimicking a well configuration. After one week of contact time the sock was removed and replaced by a fresh sock. The results of this experiment showed that the sorbent was able to continuously extract water from the porous media, although the rate decreased over time. The declining yield during both periods is associated with the sharp reduction in water saturation and relative permeability near the sorbent. It was also observed that the capillary pressure continued to increase over the total contact time of 14 days, indicating that the sorbent remained active over that period. This work has demonstrated the potential of soil moisture wicking using SAPs at the proof-of-principle level.

  11. Transition from column to micropinch regime in Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, A.; Lebert, R.; Koshelev, K. N.; Sidelnikov, Yu. V.; Gavrilescu, C.; Neff, W.

    1997-05-05

    Plasma focus and Z-pinches are known to be intensive sources of K-ion radiation. This radiation is observed in two different regimes of compression: column and micropinch. Appearance of these regimes depends on combination of discharge circuit parameter and element composition of plasma. Column regime is typical for low current discharges operating in low Z gases. Micropinch regime, which represents a development of ''neck'' type instabilities in a presence of strong radiation losses, is typical for heavy ion plasma, i.e. vacuum spark or plasma focus with admixture of heavy gases. Transition from column to micropinch mode has been investigated experimentally. It was found that appearance of either regime can be quantitatively described by a distinction parameter depending on pinch current, particle density and used element.

  12. Glycolipid class profiling by packed-column subcritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Frantz S; Lesellier, Eric; Bleton, Jean; Baillet, Arlette; Tchapla, Alain; Chaminade, Pierre

    2004-06-18

    The potential of packed-column subcritical fluid chromatography (SubFC) for the separation of lipid classes has been assessed in this study. Three polar stationary phases were checked: silica, diol, and poly(vinyl alcohol). Carbon dioxide (CO2) with methanol as modifier was used as mobile phase and detection performed by evaporative light scattering detection. The influence of methanol content, temperature, and pressure on the chromatographic behavior of sphingolipids and glycolipids were investigated. A complete separation of lipid classes from a crude wheat lipid extract was achieved using a modifier gradient from 10 to 40% methanol in carbon dioxide. Solute selectivity was improved using coupled silica and diol columns in series. Because the variation of eluotropic strength depending on the fluid density changes, a normalized separation factor product (NSP) was used to select the nature, the number and the order of the columns to reach the optimum glycolipid separation.

  13. Missing baryons traced by the galaxy luminosity density in large-scale WHIM filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevalainen, J.; Tempel, E.; Liivamägi, L. J.; Branchini, E.; Roncarelli, M.; Giocoli, C.; Heinämäki, P.; Saar, E.; Tamm, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Nurmi, P.; Bonamente, M.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new approach to the problem of the missing baryons. Building on the common assumption that the missing baryons are in the form of the warm hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), we also assume here that the galaxy luminosity density can be used as a tracer of the WHIM. This last assumption is supported by our discovery of a significant correlation between the WHIM density and the galaxy luminosity density in recent hydrodynamical simulations. We also found that the percentage of the gas mass in the WHIM phase is substantially higher (by a factor of ~1.6) within large-scale galactic filaments, i.e. ~70%, compared to the average in the full simulation volume of ~0.1 Gpc3. The relation between the WHIM overdensity and the galaxy luminosity overdensity within the galactic filaments is consistent with a linear one: δwhim = 0.7 ± 0.1 × δLD0.9±0.2. We then applied our procedure to the line of sight towards the blazar H2356-309 and found evidence of WHIM that corresponds to the Sculptor Wall (SW) (z ~ 0.03 and log NH = 19.9+ 0.1-0.3) and Pisces-Cetus (PC) superclusters (z ~ 0.06 and log NH = 19.7+ 0.2-0.3), in agreement with the redshifts and column densities of the X-ray absorbers identified recently. This agreement indicates that the galaxy luminosity density and galactic filaments are reliable signposts for the WHIM and that our method is robust for estimating WHIM density. The signal that we detected cannot originate in the halos of nearby galaxies because they cannot account for the high WHIM column densities that our method and X-ray analysis consistently find in the SW and PC superclusters. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Column

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Chemistry, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Articles are included concerning industry and schools, science and mathematics award scheme, teaching and research, safety, inservice training, Ugandan chemistry, plastics, and 19th century Nuffield. (DF)

  15. Removal of persistent organic pollutants from micro-polluted drinking water by triolein embedded absorbent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huijuan; Ru, Jia; Qu, Jiuhui; Dai, Ruihua; Wang, Zijian; Hu, Chun

    2009-06-01

    A new biomimetic absorbent, cellulose acetate (CA) embedded with triolein (CA-triolein), was prepared and applied for the removal of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from micro-polluted aqueous solution. The comparison of CA-triolein, CA and granular activated carbon (GAC) for dieldrin removal was investigated. Results showed that CA-triolein absorbent gave a lowest residual concentration after 24 h although GAC had high removal rate in the first 4 h adsorption. Then the removal efficiency of mixed POPs (e.g. aldrin, dieldrin, endrin and heptachlor epoxide), absorption isotherm, absorbent regeneration and initial column experiments of CA-triolein were studied in detail. The linear absorption isotherm and the independent absorption in binary isotherm indicated that the selected POPs are mainly absorbed onto CA-triolein absorbent by a partition mechanism. The absorption constant, K, was closely related to the hydrophobic property of the compound. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the absorption was spontaneous, with a high affinity and the absorption was an endothermic reaction. Rinsing with hexane the CA-triolein absorbent can be regenerated after absorption of POPs. No significant decrease in the dieldrin removal efficiency was observed even when the absorption-regeneration process was repeated for five times. The results of initial column experiments showed that the CA-triolein absorbent did not reach the breakthrough point at a breakthrough empty-bed volume (BV) of 3200 when the influent concentration was 1-1.5 microg/L and the empty-bed contact time (EBCT) was 20 min.

  16. Liquid crystal tunable metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Shrekenhamer, David; Chen, Wen-Chen; Padilla, Willie J

    2013-04-26

    We present an experimental demonstration of electronically tunable metamaterial absorbers in the terahertz regime. By incorporation of active liquid crystal into strategic locations within the metamaterial unit cell, we are able to modify the absorption by 30% at 2.62 THz, as well as tune the resonant absorption over 4% in bandwidth. Numerical full-wave simulations match well to experiments and clarify the underlying mechanism, i.e., a simultaneous tuning of both the electric and magnetic response that allows for the preservation of the resonant absorption. These results show that fundamental light interactions of surfaces can be dynamically controlled by all-electronic means and provide a path forward for realization of novel applications.

  17. Oxalate: Effect on calcium absorbability

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, R.P.; Weaver, C.M. )

    1989-10-01

    Absorption of calcium from intrinsically labeled Ca oxalate was measured in 18 normal women and compared with absorption of Ca from milk in these same subjects, both when the test substances were ingested in separate meals and when ingested together. Fractional Ca absorption from oxalate averaged 0.100 +/- 0.043 when ingested alone and 0.140 +/- 0.063 when ingested together with milk. Absorption was, as expected, substantially lower than absorption from milk (0.358 +/- 0.113). Nevertheless Ca oxalate absorbability in these women was higher than we had previously found for spinach Ca. When milk and Ca oxalate were ingested together, there was no interference of oxalate in milk Ca absorption and no evidence of tracer exchange between the two labeled Ca species.

  18. Dynamics and bifurcations of a coupled column-pendulum oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, G.; Ertas, A.

    1995-05-01

    This study deals with the dynamics of a large flexible column with a tip mass-pendulum arrangement. The system is a conceptualization of a vibration-absorbing device for flexible structures with tip appendages. The bifurcation diagrams of the averaged system indicate that the system loses stability via two distinct routes; one leading to a saddle-node bifurcation, and the other to the Hopf bifurcation, indicating the existence of an invariant torus. Under the change of forcing amplitude, these bifurcations coalesce. This phenomenon has important global ramifications, in the sense that the periodic modulations associated with the Hopf bifurcation tend to have an infinite period, a strong indicator of existence of homoclinic orbits. The system also possesses isolated solutions (the so-called "isolas") that form isolated loops bounded away from zero. As the forcing amplitude is varied, the isolas appear, disappear or coalesce with the regular solution branches. The response curves indicate that the column amplitude shows saturation and the pendulum acts as a vibration absorber. However, there is also a frequency range over which a reverse flow of energy occurs, where the pendulum shows reduced amplitude at the cost of large amplitudes of the column. The experimental dynamics shows that the periodic motion gives rise to a quasi-periodic response, confirming the existence of tori. Within the quasi-periodic region, there are windows containing intricate webs of mode-locked periodic responses. An increase in the force amplitude causes the tori to break up, a phenomenon similar to the onset of turbulence in hydrodynamics.

  19. Constraining MHD Disk-Winds with X-ray Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, F.; Shrader, C. R.; Kazanas, D.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2014-01-01

    From the state-of-the-art spectroscopic observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) the robust features of absorption lines (e.g. most notably by H/He-like ions), called warm absorbers (WAs), have been often detected in soft X-rays (< 2 keV). While the identified WAs are often mildly blueshifted to yield line-of-sight velocities up to ~100-3,000 km/sec in typical X-ray-bright Seyfert 1 AGNs, a fraction of Seyfert galaxies such as PG 1211+143 exhibits even faster absorbers (v/ 0.1-0.2) called ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) whose physical condition is much more extreme compared with the WAs. Motivated by these recent X-ray data we show that the magnetically- driven accretion-disk wind model is a plausible scenario to explain the characteristic property of these X-ray absorbers. As a preliminary case study we demonstrate that the wind model parameters (e.g. viewing angle and wind density) can be constrained by data from PG 1211+143 at a statistically significant level with chi-squared spectral analysis. Our wind models can thus be implemented into the standard analysis package, XSPEC, as a table spectrum model for general analysis of X-ray absorbers.

  20. Does One Know the Properties of a MICE Solid or Liquid Absorber toBetter than 0.3 Percent?

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2006-02-20

    This report discusses the report discusses whether the MICE absorbers can be characterized to {+-}0.3 percent, so that one predict absorber ionization cooling within the absorber. This report shows that most solid absorbers can be characterized to much better than {+-}0.3 percent. The two issues that dominate the characterization of the liquid cryogen absorbers are the dimensions of the liquid in the vessel and the density of the cryogenic liquid. The thickness of the window also plays a role. This report will show that a liquid hydrogen absorber can be characterized to better than {+-}0.3 percent, but a liquid helium absorber cannot be characterized to better and {+-}1 percent.

  1. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  2. Stability of elastically supported columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Alfred S; Viscovich, Steven J

    1942-01-01

    A criterion is developed for the stiffness required of elastic lateral supports at the ends of a compression member to provide stability. A method based on this criterion is then developed for checking the stability of a continuous beam-column. A related method is also developed for checking the stability of a member of a pin-jointed truss against rotation in the plane of the truss.

  3. Ion collisions and the Z-pinch precursor column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, M.; Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Haines, M. G.

    2004-04-01

    During the early stages of a wire array Z-pinch implosion, low density plasma streams toward the axis by virtue of the Lorentz force. This streaming precursor plasma may initially be highly collisionless with respect to ion-ion collisions and therefore cannot be modeled using standard fluid theory. The hybrid method in this paper models both collisional and collisionless behavior with ions exchanging energy and momentum with other ions via a Monte Carlo algorithm equivalent to a small-angle kinetic solution and with an electron fluid via a frictional force. It is shown that the axial stagnation of the plasma flow occurs once the density becomes sufficiently high to initiate a nonlinear rise in electron-ion energy exchange, resulting in the thermal equilibration between radiatively cooling electrons and hot, thermalized ions. This then gives rise to a dense, long-lived precursor column on axis, as observed experimentally. The column is held in place by the kinetic pressure of the streaming precursor plasma, which is balanced by the thermal pressure of the plasma in the column at the column's edge.

  4. Electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, Brian T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1988-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from pyramidal and wedge absorbers used to line the walls of modern anechoic chambers is measured and compared with theoretically predicted values. The theoretical performance for various angles of incidence is studied. It is shown that a pyramidal absorber scatters electromagnetic energy more as a random rough surface does. The apparent reflection coefficient from an absorber wall illuminated by a plane wave can be much less than the normal absorber specifications quoted by the manufacturer. For angles near grazing incidence, pyramidal absorbers give a large backscattered field from the pyramid side-faces or edges. The wedge absorber was found to give small backscattered fields for near-grazing incidence. Based on this study, some new guidelines for the design of anechoic chambers are advocated because the specular scattering models used at present do not appear valid for pyramids that are large compared to the wavelength.

  5. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  6. The HI Environment of Nearby Lyman-alpha Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanGorkom, J. H.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, John T.; Perlman, Eric S.; Shull, J. Michael

    1996-01-01

    total, we detected H I emission from five galaxies, of which two were previously uncataloged and one did not have a known redshift. No H I emission was detected from the vicinity of the two absorbers, which are located in a void and a region of very low galaxy density; but the limits are somewhat less stringent than for the other sight lines. These results are similar to what has been found in optically unbiased H I surveys. Thus, presence of Ly-alpha absorbers does not significantly alter the H I detection rate in their environment.

  7. Light scattering by absorbing hexagonal ice crystals in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Xu, L

    1995-09-01

    An improved ray-optics theory for single scattering and polarization of hexagonal columns and plates randomly oriented in space has been developed by considering absorption and by using the Chebyshev solution for diffraction integrals. The vector-tracing method and statistics technique of random sampling are employed. The equivalent forms of Snell's law and Fresnel formulas for absorbing ice crystals are derived, and two equivalent optical constants, m' and m″, are obtained. Comparison is made of the computed results of our model and the Takano and Liou model for asymmetry factors, single-scattering albedos, and scattering phase matrix elements. Some characteristics of our model are discussed, and these analyses demonstrate that our ray-optics model is practical and much improved.

  8. Melanin pigmented solar absorbing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gallas, J.M.; Eisner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Selectivity enhancement is shown to result for melanin, a black biopolymer pigment, for sufficiently low sample density. The effect is proposed to follow from a consideration of the evanescent waves associated with the total internal reflection phenomenon. A relationship is discussed among powder density, pH and the paramagnetic properties of melanin; this relationship is shown to be consistent with, and offer support to an amino-acid side group proposed earlier as part of the melanin structure. A brief discussion is also presented on the optical properties of melanin and the relative importance of quinhydrone, a change transfer complex believed to exist in the polymeric structure of melanin.

  9. Method for packed column separations and purifications

    DOEpatents

    Holman, David A.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2006-08-15

    The invention encompasses a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber. A mixture of a fluid and a matrix material are introduced through a column chamber inlet so that the matrix material is packed within a column chamber to form a packed column. The column chamber having the column chamber inlet or first port for receiving the mixture further has an outlet port and an actuator port. The outlet port is partially closed for capturing the matrix material and permitting the fluid to flow therepast by rotating relative one to the other of a rod placed in the actuator port. Further rotation relative one to the other of the rod and the column chamber opens the outlet and permits the matrix material and the fluid to flow therethrough thereby unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber.

  10. Absorbent product and articles made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multilayer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is described. The product has a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, and a first fibrous wicking layer overlaying the water pervious layer. A first container section is defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material in between a first absorbent mass and a second container section defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material between what is disposed a second absorbent mass, and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer overlaying the second fibrous wicking layer.

  11. Nonlinear dynamic vibration absorbers with a saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febbo, M.; Machado, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    The behavior of a new type of nonlinear dynamic vibration absorber is studied. A distinctive characteristic of the proposed absorber is the impossibility to extend the system to infinity. The mathematical formulation is based on a finite extensibility nonlinear elastic potential to model the saturable nonlinearity. The absorber is attached to a single degree-of-freedom linear/nonlinear oscillator subjected to a periodic external excitation. In order to solve the equations of motion and to analyze the frequency-response curves, the method of averaging is used. The performance of the FENE absorber is evaluated considering a variation of the nonlinearity of the primary system, the damping and the linearized frequency of the absorber and the mass ratio. The numerical results show that the proposed absorber has a very good efficiency when the nonlinearity of the primary system increases. When compared with a cubic nonlinear absorber, for a large nonlinearity of the primary system, the FENE absorber shows a better effectiveness for the whole studied frequency range. A complete absence of quasi-periodic oscillations is also found for an appropriate selection of the parameters of the absorber. Finally, direct integrations of the equations of motion are performed to verify the accuracy of the proposed method.

  12. Metamaterial absorber with random dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiren; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-05-01

    The metamaterial absorber composed of random dendritic cells has been investigated at microwave frequencies. It is found that the absorptivities come to be weaker and the resonant frequency get red shift as the disordered states increasing, however, the random metamaterial absorber still presents high absorptivity more than 95%. The disordered structures can help understanding of the metamaterial absorber and may be employed for practical design of infrared metamaterial absorber, which may play important roles in collection of radiative heat energy and directional transfer enhancement.

  13. Constraints on the relative sizes of intervening Mg II-absorbing clouds and quasar emitting regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawther, D.; Paarup, T.; Schmidt, M.; Vestergaard, M.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.

    2012-10-01

    Context. A significantly higher incidence of strong (rest equivalent width Wr > 1 Å) intervening Mg ii absorption is observed along gamma-ray burst (GRB) sight-lines relative to those of quasar sight-lines. A geometrical explanation for this discrepancy has been suggested: the ratio of the beam size of the source to the characteristic size of an Mg ii absorption system can influence the observed Mg ii equivalent width, if these two sizes are comparable. Aims: We investigate whether the differing beam sizes of the continuum source and broad-line region of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars produce a discrepancy between the incidence of strong Mg ii absorbers illuminated by the quasar continuum region and those of absorbers illuminated by both continuum and broad-line region light. Methods: We performed a semi-automated search for strong Mg ii absorbers in the SDSS Data Release 7 quasar sample. The resulting strong Mg ii absorber catalog is available at the CDS. We measured the sight-line number density of strong Mg ii absorbers superimposed on and off the quasar C iv λ 1550 and C iii] λ 1909 emission lines. Results: We see no difference in the sight-line number density of strong Mg ii absorbers superimposed on quasar broad emission lines compared to those superimposed on continuum-dominated spectral regions. This suggests that the Mg ii absorbing clouds typically observed as intervening absorbers in quasar spectra are larger than the beam sizes of both the continuum-emitting regions and broad line-emitting regions in the centers of quasars, corresponding to a lower limit of the order of 1017 cm for the characteristic size of an Mg ii absorbing cloud. Catalog of Mg II absorbers is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/546/A67

  14. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer probes the dusty warm absorber in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Canizares, C. R.; Marshall, H. L.; Morales, R.; Schulz, N. S.; Iwasawa, K.

    The Chandra HETGS spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM ≈< 200 km s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The initial analysis of these data, presented in Lee et al. (2001), shows that a dusty warm absorber model adequately explains the spectral features ≈> 0.48 keV (≈< 26 Å ). We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the neutral Fe L absorption complex and the O VII resonance series (by transitions higher than He γ He α,β,γ are also seen at lower energies). The implied dust column density needed to explain the Fe I L edge feature agrees with that obtained from earlier reddening studies, which had already concluded that the dust should be associated with the ionized absorber (given the relatively lower observed X-ray absorption by cold gas). Our findings contradict the interpretation of Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001), based on XMM RGS spectra, that this spectral region is dominated by highly relativistic soft X-ray line emission originating near the central black hole. Here we review these issues pertaining to the soft X-ray spectral features as addressed by Lee et al., (2001). Details found in Lee et al., 2001, ApJ., 554, L13

  15. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  16. Synthesis of Numerical Methods for Modeling Wave Energy Converter-Point Absorbers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Yu, Y. H.

    2012-05-01

    During the past few decades, wave energy has received significant attention among all ocean energy formats. Industry has proposed hundreds of prototypes such as an oscillating water column, a point absorber, an overtopping system, and a bottom-hinged system. In particular, many researchers have focused on modeling the floating-point absorber as the technology to extract wave energy. Several modeling methods have been used such as the analytical method, the boundary-integral equation method, the Navier-Stokes equations method, and the empirical method. However, no standardized method has been decided. To assist the development of wave energy conversion technologies, this report reviews the methods for modeling the floating-point absorber.

  17. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, C.E.

    1979-08-29

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  18. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  19. Graphene-enabled electrically switchable radar-absorbing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balci, Osman; Polat, Emre O; Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2015-03-20

    Radar-absorbing materials are used in stealth technologies for concealment of an object from radar detection. Resistive and/or magnetic composite materials are used to reduce the backscattered microwave signals. Inability to control electrical properties of these materials, however, hinders the realization of active camouflage systems. Here, using large-area graphene electrodes, we demonstrate active surfaces that enable electrical control of reflection, transmission and absorption of microwaves. Instead of tuning bulk material property, our strategy relies on electrostatic tuning of the charge density on an atomically thin electrode, which operates as a tunable metal in microwave frequencies. Notably, we report large-area adaptive radar-absorbing surfaces with tunable reflection suppression ratio up to 50 dB with operation voltages <5 V. Using the developed surfaces, we demonstrate various device architectures including pixelated and curved surfaces. Our results provide a significant step in realization of active camouflage systems in microwave frequencies.

  20. Graphene-enabled electrically switchable radar-absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Osman; Polat, Emre O.; Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2015-03-01

    Radar-absorbing materials are used in stealth technologies for concealment of an object from radar detection. Resistive and/or magnetic composite materials are used to reduce the backscattered microwave signals. Inability to control electrical properties of these materials, however, hinders the realization of active camouflage systems. Here, using large-area graphene electrodes, we demonstrate active surfaces that enable electrical control of reflection, transmission and absorption of microwaves. Instead of tuning bulk material property, our strategy relies on electrostatic tuning of the charge density on an atomically thin electrode, which operates as a tunable metal in microwave frequencies. Notably, we report large-area adaptive radar-absorbing surfaces with tunable reflection suppression ratio up to 50 dB with operation voltages <5 V. Using the developed surfaces, we demonstrate various device architectures including pixelated and curved surfaces. Our results provide a significant step in realization of active camouflage systems in microwave frequencies.

  1. Propagation of partially coherent twisted anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams in dispersive and absorbing media.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yangjian; Lin, Qiang; Ge, Di

    2002-10-01

    By adopting a new tensor method, we derived an analytical propagation formula for the cross-spectral density of partially coherent twisted anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams through dispersive and absorbing media. Using the derived formula, we studied the evolution properties and spectrum properties of twisted anisotropic GSM beams in dispersive and absorbing media. The results show that the dispersive and absorbing media have strong influences on the propagation properties of twisted anisotropic GSM beams and their spectrum evolution. Our method provides a simple and convenient way to study the propagation of twisted anisotropic GSM beams in media with complex refractive index.

  2. Dry-Column Flash Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusterman, Alan J.; McDougal, Patrick G.; Glasfeld, Arthur

    1997-10-01

    Dry-column flash chromatography is a safe, powerful, yet easily learned preparative chromatography technique. It has proven useful in research, and an adaptation of the technique for use in large teaching laboratories (general chemistry, organic chemistry) is described here. The student version is similar to vacuum filtration, uses the same compact, readily available glassware, and inexpensive and safe solvents (ethyl acetate and hexane) and adsorbent (Merck grade 60 silica gel). The technique is sufficiently simple and powerful that a beginning student can successfully resolve diastereomers on sample scales ranging from 100 mg to >1 g.

  3. GIANT METREWAVE RADIO TELESCOPE DETECTION OF TWO NEW H I 21 cm ABSORBERS AT z ≈ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kanekar, N.

    2014-12-20

    I report the detection of H I 21 cm absorption in two high column density damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at z ≈ 2 using new wide-band 250-500 MHz receivers on board the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. The integrated H I 21 cm optical depths are 0.85 ± 0.16 km s{sup –1} (TXS1755+578) and 2.95 ± 0.15 km s{sup –1} (TXS1850+402). For the z = 1.9698 DLA toward TXS1755+578, the difference in H I 21 cm and C I profiles and the weakness of the radio core suggest that the H I 21cm absorption arises toward radio components in the jet, and that the optical and radio sightlines are not the same. This precludes an estimate of the DLA spin temperature. For the z = 1.9888 DLA toward TXS1850+402, the absorber covering factor is likely to be close to unity, as the background source is extremely compact, with the entire 5 GHz emission arising from a region of ≤ 1.4 mas in size. This yields a DLA spin temperature of T{sub s} = (372 ± 18) × (f/1.0) K, lower than typical T{sub s} values in high-z DLAs. This low spin temperature and the relatively high metallicity of the z = 1.9888 DLA ([Zn/H] =(– 0.68 ± 0.04)) are consistent with the anti-correlation between metallicity and spin temperature that has been found earlier in damped Lyα systems.

  4. An ultrathin dual-band metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Duan, Junping; Zhang, Wendong; Wang, Wanjun; Zhang, Binzhen

    2016-10-01

    The design and preparation of an ultrathin dual-band metamaterial absorber whose resonant frequency located at radar wave (20 GHz-60 GHz) is presented in this paper. The absorber is composed of a 2-D periodic sandwich featured with two concentric annuluses. The influence on the absorber's performance produced by resonant cell's structure size and material parameters was numerically simulated and analyzed based on the standard full wave finite integration technology in CST. Laser ablation process was adopted to prepare the designed absorber on epoxy resin board coated with on double plane of copper with a thickness that is 1/30 and 1/50 of the resonant wavelength at a resonant frequency of 30.51 GHz and 48.15 GHz. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) reached 2.2 GHz and 2.35 GHz and the peak of the absorptance reached 99.977%. The ultrathin absorber is nearly omnidirectional for all polarizations. The test results of prepared sample testify the designed absorber's excellent absorbing performance forcefully. The absorber expands inspirations of radar stealth in military domain due to its flexible design, cost-effective and other outstanding properties.

  5. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A...

  7. Volcanoes in the Classroom: Simulating an Eruption Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpp, K. S.; Geist, D. J.; Koleszar, A. M.

    2005-12-01

    Few students have the opportunity to witness volcanic eruptions first hand. Analog models of eruptive processes provide ways for students to apply basic physical principles when field observations are not feasible. We describe a safe simulation of violent volcanic explosions, one that can be carried out simply and easily as a demonstration for specialized volcanology classes, introductory classes, and science outreach programs. Volcanic eruptions are fundamentally gas-driven phenomena. Depressurization of volatiles dissolved in magma during ascent is the driving force behind most explosive eruptions. We have developed a demonstration whereby the instructor can initiate a gas-driven eruption, which produces a dramatic but safe explosion and eruptive column. First, one pours liquid nitrogen into a weighted, plastic soda bottle, which is then sealed and placed into a trashcan filled with water. As the liquid nitrogen boils, the pressure inside the bottle increases until the seal fails, resulting in an explosion. The expansive force propels a column of water vertically, to 10 or more meters. Students can operate the demonstration themselves and carry out a sequence of self-designed variations, changing the vent size and viscosity of the "magma", for instance. They can also vary the material used as "tephra", studying the effects of projectile density, column height, and wind direction on tephra distribution. The physical measurements that students collect, such as column height and tephra radius, can be used as the basis for problem sets that explore the dynamics of eruption columns. Possible calculations include ejection velocity, the pressure needed to propel the water column, and average vesicularity of the "magma". Students can then compare their results to observations from real volcanic eruptions. We find this to be an exceedingly effective demonstration of gas-driven liquid explosions and one that is safe if done properly. [NOTE: Please do NOT attempt this

  8. [Absorbed doses in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S D; Roccuzzo, M; Albrito, F; Ragona, R; Anglesio, S

    1996-01-01

    The growing use of dento-maxillo-facial radiographic examinations has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies on dosimetry. A thorough review of the literature is presented in this article. Most studies were carried out on tissue equivalent skull phantoms, while only a few were in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vivo absorbed doses during Orthopantomography (OPT). Full Mouth Periapical Examination (FMPE) and Intraoral Tube Panoramic Radiography (ITPR). Measurements were made on 30 patients, reproducing clinical conditions, in 46 anatomical sites, with 24 intra- and 22 extra-oral thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDS). The highest doses were measured, in orthopantomography, at the right mandibular angle (1899 mu Gy) in FMPE on the right naso-labial fold (5640 mu Gy and in ITPR on the palatal surface of the left second upper molar (1936 mu Gy). Intraoral doses ranged from 21 mu Gy, in orthopantomography, to 4494 mu Gy in FMPE. Standard errors ranged from 142% in ITPR to 5% in orthopantomography. The highest rate of standard errors was found in FMPE and ITPR. The data collected in this trial are in agreement with others in major literature reports. Disagreements are probably due to different exam acquisition and data collections. Such differences, presented comparison in several sites, justify lower doses in FMPE and ITPR. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo dosimetry of the maxillary region are discussed, the former being a close resemblance to clinical conditions of examination and the latter the impossibility of collecting values in depth of tissues. Finally, both ITPR and FMPE required lower doses than expected, and can be therefore reconsidered relative to their radiation risk.

  9. Elastic stability of non-uniform columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Kuo, Y. H.

    1991-07-01

    A simple and efficient method is proposed to investigate the elastic stability of three different tapered columns subjected to uniformly distributed follower forces. The influences of the boundary conditions and taper ratio on critical buckling loads are investigated. The critical buckling loads of columns of rectangular cross section with constant depth and linearly varied width ( T1), constant width and linearly varied depth ( T2) and double taper ( T3) are investigated. Among the three different non-uniform columns considered, taper ratio has the greatest influence on the critical buckling load of column T3 and the lowest influence on that of column T1. The types of instability mechanisms for hinged-hinged and cantilever non-uniform columns are divergence and flutter respectively. However, for clamped-hinged and clamped-clamped non-uniform columns, the type of instability mechanism for column T1 is divergence, while that for columns T2 and T3 is divergence only when the taper ratio of the columns is greater than certain critical values and flutter for the rest value of taper ratio. When the type of instability mechanism changes from divergence to flutter, there is a finite jump for the critical buckling load. The influence of taper ratio on the elastic stability of cantilever column T3 is very sensitive for small values of the taper ratio and there also exist some discontinieties in the critical buckling loads of flutter instability. For a hinged-hinged non-uniform column ( T2 or T3) with a rotational spring at the left end of the column, when the taper ratio is less than the critical value the instability mechanism changes from divergence to flutter as the rotational spring constant is increased. For a clamped-elastically supported non-uniform column, when the taper ratio is greater than the critical value the instability mechanism changes from flutter to divergence as the translational spring constant is increased.

  10. Simultaneous FUSE, HST, and Chandra Observations or Intrinsic Absorbers in NGC 7469 and MRK 279

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Kriss, Gerard A.

    2004-01-01

    We obtained FUSE observations of NGC 7469 on 2002 Dec 13 & 14. The two exposures totaled only 7 ks. The observations only have good data in one channel, LiF1, due to channel alignment problems. These observations were obtained simultaneously with high-quality HST/STIS and Chandra HETG spectra. The previously known O VI absorption lines in the FUSE spectrum are detected at good signal to noise ratio, and a wide array of other intrinsic absorption lines are visible in the X-ray spectrum and in the STIS spectrum. Compared to prior FUSE observations, the continuum flux for this observation was 50% lower. We see the effects of this in the lowest-velocity O VI absorber, which we associate with the X-ray absorbing gas also detected in this object. This O VI absorber has only a 50% covering fraction, consistent with its covering only the continuum in this source, and its strength and inferred column density increased as the continuum flux of NGC 7469 decreased. This is consistent with the recombination expected from photoionization models of the highly ionized gas. We obtained FUSE observations of Mrk 279 on 2002 May 18. As for NGC 7469, channel alignment problems led to good data being present only in LiFl. While we obtained a much longer integration on the target than planned (47.4 ks vs. 31 ks requested), the UV flux was down a factor of 10 or more from previous HST and FUSE observations, and our wavelength coverage was restricted due to the channel alignment problems. These data still cover the important O VI emission line and absorption lines in Mrk 279. The FUSE flux also agrees well with the simultaneous HST STIS data, which have good signal to noise. We have also analyzed FUSE observations made at three earlier epochs. We detect the Fe K-alpha emission line in the Chandra spectrum, and its flux is consistent with the low X-ray continuum flux level of Mrk 279 at the time of the observation. Because of low signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) in the Chandra spectrum, no O

  11. EVIDENCE OF A WARM ABSORBER THAT VARIES WITH QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION PHASE IN THE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS RE J1034+396

    SciTech Connect

    Maitra, Dipankar; Miller, Jon M. E-mail: jonmm@umich.ed

    2010-07-20

    A recent observation of the nearby (z = 0.042) narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy RE J1034+396 on 2007 May 31 showed strong quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the 0.3-10 keV X-ray flux. We present phase-resolved spectroscopy of this observation, using data obtained by the EPIC PN detector on board XMM-Newton. The 'low' phase spectrum, associated with the troughs in the light curve, shows (at >4{sigma} confidence level) an absorption edge at 0.86 {+-} 0.05 keV with an absorption depth of 0.3 {+-} 0.1. Ionized oxygen edges are hallmarks of X-ray warm absorbers in Seyfert active galactic nuclei; the observed edge is consistent with H-like O VIII and implies a column density of N{sub OVIII} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. The edge is not seen in the 'high' phase spectrum associated with the crests in the light curve, suggesting the presence of a warm absorber in the immediate vicinity of the supermassive black hole that periodically obscures the continuum emission. If the QPO arises due to Keplerian orbital motion around the central black hole, the periodic appearance of the O VIII edge would imply a radius of {approx}9.4(M/[4x10{sup 6}M{sub sun}]){sup -2/3}(P/[1 hr]){sup 2/3} r{sub g} for the size of the warm absorber.

  12. Design of a nonlinear torsional vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Ammaar Bin

    Tuned mass dampers (TMD) utilizing linear spring mechanisms to mitigate destructive vibrations are commonly used in practice. A TMD is usually tuned for a specific resonant frequency or an operating frequency of a system. Recently, nonlinear vibration absorbers attracted attention of researchers due to some potential advantages they possess over the TMDs. The nonlinear vibration absorber, or the nonlinear energy sink (NES), has an advantage of being effective over a broad range of excitation frequencies, which makes it more suitable for systems with several resonant frequencies, or for a system with varying excitation frequency. Vibration dissipation mechanism in an NES is passive and ensures that there is no energy backflow to the primary system. In this study, an experimental setup of a rotational system has been designed for validation of the concept of nonlinear torsional vibration absorber with geometrically induced cubic stiffness nonlinearity. Dimensions of the primary system have been optimized so as to get the first natural frequency of the system to be fairly low. This was done in order to excite the dynamic system for torsional vibration response by the available motor. Experiments have been performed to obtain the modal parameters of the system. Based on the obtained modal parameters, the design optimization of the nonlinear torsional vibration absorber was carried out using an equivalent 2-DOF modal model. The optimality criterion was chosen to be maximization of energy dissipation in the nonlinear absorber attached to the equivalent 2-DOF system. The optimized design parameters of the nonlinear absorber were tested on the original 5-DOF system numerically. A comparison was made between the performance of linear and nonlinear absorbers using the numerical models. The comparison showed the superiority of the nonlinear absorber over its linear counterpart for the given set of primary system parameters as the vibration energy dissipation in the former is

  13. Dust depletion, chemical uniformity and environment of CaII H&K quasar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zych, Berkeley J.; Murphy, Michael T.; Hewett, Paul C.; Prochaska, Jason X.

    2009-02-01

    CaIIλλ3934, 3969 absorbers, which are likely to be a subset of damped Lyman α systems (DLAs), are the most dusty quasar absorbers known with an order of magnitude more extinction in E(B - V) than other absorption systems. There is also evidence that CaII absorbers trace galaxies with more ongoing star formation than the average quasar absorber. Despite this, relatively little is known in detail about these unusual absorption systems. Here, we present the first high-resolution spectroscopic study of 19 CaII quasar absorbers, in the range 0.6 <= zabs <= 1.2, with CaIIλ3934 equivalent widths, W39340 >= 0.2Å. Their general elemental depletion patterns are found to be similar to measurements in the warm halo phase of the Milky Way (MW) and Magellanic Clouds interstellar medium. Dust depletions and α-enrichments profiles of subsamples of seven and three absorbers, respectively, are measured using a combination of Voigt profile fitting and apparent optical depth techniques. Deviations in [Cr/Zn] ~ 0.3 +/- 0.1 and [Si/Fe] >~ 0.8 +/- 0.1dex are detected across the profile of one absorber, which we attribute to differential dust depletion. The remaining absorbers have <0.3dex (3σ limit) variation in [Cr/Zn], much like the general DLA population, though the dustiest CaII absorbers, those with W39340 > 0.7Å, remain relatively unprobed in our sample. A limit on electron densities in CaII absorbers, ne < 0.1cm-3, is derived using the ratio of neutral and singly ionized species and assuming a MW-like radiation field. These electron densities may imply hydrogen densities sufficient for the presence of molecular hydrogen in the absorbers. The CaII absorber sample comprises a wide range of velocity widths, Δv90 = 50-470kms-1, and velocity structures, thus a range of physical models for their origin, from simple discs to galactic outflows and mergers, would be required to explain the observations.

  14. Warm Absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S.; Guainazzi, M.; Dewangan, G.; Chakravorty, S.; Kembhavi, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broadband 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. We could put a strict lower limit on the detection fraction of 50%. We find a gap in the distribution of the ionisation parameter in the range 0.5absorber flow is probably constituted by a clumpy distribution of discrete clouds. The distribution of the WA column densities for the sources with broad Fe K-alpha lines are similar to those sources which do not have broadened emission lines. Therefore the detected broad Fe K lines are bonafide and not artefacts of ionised absorption in the soft X-rays. The WA parameters show no correlation among themselves, except for one case. The shallow slope of the logξ versus logv_{out} linear regression (0.12± 0.03) is inconsistent with the scaling laws predicted by radiation or magneto-hydrodynamic-driven winds. Our results suggest also that WA and Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) do not represent extreme manifestation of the same astrophysical system.

  15. Axisymmetric collapses of granular columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lube, Gert; Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    2004-06-01

    Experimental observations of the collapse of initially vertical columns of small grains are presented. The experiments were performed mainly with dry grains of salt or sand, with some additional experiments using couscous, sugar or rice. Some of the experimental flows were analysed using high-speed video. There are three different flow regimes, dependent on the value of the aspect ratio a {=} h_i/r_i, where h_i and r_i are the initial height and radius of the granular column respectively. The differing forms of flow behaviour are described for each regime. In all cases a central, conically sided region of angle approximately 59(°) , corresponding to an aspect ratio of 1.7, remains undisturbed throughout the motion. The main experimental results for the final extent of the deposit and the time for emplacement are systematically collapsed in a quantitative way independent of any friction coefficients. Along with the kinematic data for the rate of spread of the front of the collapsing column, this is interpreted as indicating that frictional effects between individual grains in the bulk of the moving flow only play a role in the last instant of the flow, as it comes to an abrupt halt. For a {<} 1.7, the measured final runout radius, r_infty, is related to the initial radius by r_infty {=} r_i(1 {+} 1.24a); while for 1.7 {<} a the corresponding relationship is r_infty {=} r_i(1 {+} 1.6a(1/2) ). The time, t_infty, taken for the grains to reach r_infty is given by t_infty {=} 3(h_i/g)(1/2} {=} 3(r_i/g)({1/2}a^{1/2)) , where g is the gravitational acceleration. The insights and conclusions gained from these experiments can be applied to a wide range of industrial and natural flows of concentrated particles. For example, the observation of the rapid deposition of the grains can help explain details of the emplacement of pyroclastic flows resulting from the explosive eruption of volcanoes.

  16. Thin film absorber for a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, William G.

    1985-01-01

    This invention pertains to energy absorbers for solar collectors, and more particularly to high performance thin film absorbers. The solar collectors comprising the absorber of this invention overcome several problems seen in current systems, such as excessive hardware, high cost and unreliability. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame with a thin film window bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber in accordance with the present invention is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. In a preferred embodiment, thin film layers are formed from a metal/plastic laminate. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. The absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  17. Absorbing metasurface created by diffractionless disordered arrays of nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick Jaeck, Julien; Lauwick, Diane; Kattnig, Alain; Bardou, Nathalie; Pardo, Fabrice; Haïdar, Riad

    2015-12-21

    We study disordered arrays of metal-insulator-metal nanoantenna in order to create a diffractionless metasurface able to absorb light in the 3–5 μm spectral range. This study is conducted with angle-resolved reflectivity measurements obtained with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. A first design is based on a perturbation of a periodic arrangement, leading to a significant reduction of the radiative losses. Then, a random assembly of nanoantennas is built following a Poisson-disk distribution of given density, in order to obtain a nearly perfect cluttered assembly with optical properties of a homogeneous material.

  18. Star formation rate and metallicity of damped Lyman α absorbers in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, K.; Springel, V.; Hernquist, L.

    2004-02-01

    We study the distribution of the star formation rate (SFR) and metallicity of damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) in the redshift range z= 0-4.5 using cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the Λ cold dark matter model. Our simulations include standard radiative cooling and heating with a uniform ultraviolet background, star formation, supernova (SN) feedback, as well as a phenomenological model for feedback by galactic winds. The latter allows us to examine, in particular, the effect of galactic outflows on the distribution of the SFR and metallicity of DLAs. We employ a `conservative entropy' formulation of SPH which alleviates numerical overcooling effects that affected earlier simulations. In addition, we utilize a series of simulations of varying box-size and particle number to investigate the impact of numerical resolution on our results. We find that there is a positive correlation between the projected stellar mass density and the neutral hydrogen column density (NHI) of DLAs for high NHI systems, and that there is a good correspondence in the spatial distribution of stars and DLAs in the simulations. The evolution of typical star-to-gas mass ratios in DLAs can be characterized by an increase from approximately 2 at z= 4.5 to 3 at z= 3, to 10 at z= 1 and finally to 20 at z= 0. We also find that the projected SFR density in DLAs follows the Kennicutt law well at all redshifts, and the simulated values are consistent with the recent observational estimates of this quantity by Wolfe, Prochaska & Gawiser. The rate of evolution in the mean metallicity of simulated DLAs as a function of redshift is mild, and is consistent with the rate estimated from observations. The predicted metallicity of DLAs is generally subsolar in our simulations, and there is a significant scatter in the distribution of DLA metallicity for a given NHI. However, we find that the median metallicity of simulated DLAs is close to that of Lyman-break galaxies, and is

  19. Oscillating water column structural model

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Guild; Bull, Diana L; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Gordon, Margaret Ellen

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  20. Development and characterization of a thinner binary mask absorber for 22-nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Tom; Badger, Karen; Kindt, Louis; Kodera, Yutaka; Komizo, Toru; Kondo, Shinpei; Mizoguchi, Takashi; Nemoto, Satoru; Seki, Kazunori; Senna, Tasuku; Wistrom, Richard; Zweber, Amy; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Inazuki, Yukio; Yoshikawa, Hiroki

    2010-09-01

    The lithography challenges posed by the 22 nm node continue to place stringent requirements on photomasks. The dimensions of the mask features continue to shrink more deeply into the sub-wavelength scale. In this regime residual mask electromagnetic field (EMF) effects due to mask topography can degrade the imaging performance of critical mask patterns by degrading the common lithography process window and by magnifying the impact of mask errors or MEEF. Based on this, an effort to reduce the mask topography effect by decreasing the thickness of the mask absorber was conducted. In this paper, we will describe the results of our effort to develop and characterize a binary mask substrate with an absorber that is approximately 20-25% thinner than the absorber on the current Opaque MoSi on Glass (OMOG) binary mask substrate. For expediency, the thin absorber development effort focused on using existing absorber materials and deposition methods. It was found that significant changes in film composition and structure were needed to obtain a substantially thinner blank while maintaining an optical density of 3.0 at 193 nm. Consequently, numerous studies to assess the mask making performance of the thinner absorber material were required and will be described. During these studies several significant mask making advantages of the thin absorber were discovered. The lower film stress and thickness of the new absorber resulted in improved mask flatness and up to a 60% reduction in process-induced mask pattern placement change. Improved cleaning durability was another benefit. Furthermore, the improved EMF performance of the thinner absorber [1] was found to have the potential to relieve mask manufacturing constraints on minimum opaque assist feature size and opaque corner to corner gap. Based on the results of evaluations performed to date, the thinner absorber has been found to be suitable for use for fabricating masks for the 22 nm node and beyond.

  1. The nonlinear piezoelectric tuned vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, P.; Kerschen, G.

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a piezoelectric vibration absorber, termed the nonlinear piezoelectric tuned vibration absorber (NPTVA), for the mitigation of nonlinear resonances of mechanical systems. The new feature of the NPTVA is that its nonlinear restoring force is designed according to a principle of similarity, i.e., the NPTVA should be an electrical analog of the nonlinear host system. Analytical formulas for the NPTVA parameters are derived using the homotopy perturbation method. Doing so, a nonlinear generalization of Den Hartog’s equal-peak tuning rule is developed for piezoelectric vibration absorbers.

  2. Fixed-bed column study for Cu2+ removal from solution using expanding rice husk.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xuegang; Deng, Zaifang; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chi

    2011-03-15

    This paper deals with removal of copper ions from solution by raw rice husk (RRH) and expanding rice husk (ERH). Different column design parameters like bed depth, flow rate and initial copper concentration were investigated. It was found that the equilibrium uptake (q(eq(exp))) of the ERH and RRH increased with increase in initial copper concentration but decreased with increase in flow rate and bed depth, respectively. The higher adsorption capacity and longer breakthrough time were observed for ERH in comparison with RRH, under the same conditions. Compared to coconut-shell activated carbon (C-AC), ERH was also found more effective in removing Cu(2+). 0.01 mol L(-1) HCl solution was used for desorption of column which was prior to absorb copper ion, and 0.01 mol L(-1) NaOH solution was used for re-activation. Column regeneration and reuse studies were conducted for adsorption-desorption cycle.

  3. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a magnetized plasma column at oblique incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaffari-Oskooei, Sara S.; Aghamir, Farzin M.

    2015-07-14

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a magnetized plasma column is investigated using Maxwell's equations and applying boundary conditions. Backscattering cross section is evaluated by analytic solution of electric fields inside and outside of plasma column. Plots of backscattering cross section versus frequency, for the range up to J band, reveal two main peaks and two sidebands. Effects of plasma density and radius, as main parameters determining the characteristics of plasma column, on backscattering are discussed. Furthermore, the effect of electromagnetic wave incidence angle on backscattering of plasma column is included in the analysis. The influence of wave incidence angle and frequency, as well as, plasma density and radius on scattering pattern, which is an indicator of the distribution of scattered power in different azimuthal angles, is discussed.

  4. Graphene-enabled electrically switchable radar absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Osman; Polat, Emre Ozan; Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2015-03-01

    Radar absorbing materials are used in stealth technologies for concealment of an object from radar detection. Resistive and/or magnetic composite materials are used to reduce the backscattered microwave signals. Inability to control electrical properties of these materials however, hinders the realization of active camouflage systems which require adaptive surfaces operating in microwave frequencies. Here, using large-area graphene electrodes, we demonstrate a new class of active surfaces which enables unprecedented ability to control reflection, transmission and absorption of microwaves by electrical means. Instead of tuning bulk material property, our strategy relies on electrostatic tuning of the charge density on an atomically thin electrode which operates as a tunable metal in microwave frequencies. Notably, we fabricated large area adaptive radar absorbing surfaces with tunable reflection suppression ratio up to 50 dB with operation voltages less than 5 V. These electrically switchable radar absorbing surfaces provide a significant step in realization of active camouflage systems and adaptive cloaking in microwave frequencies, which cannot be realized by conventional materials.

  5. Algorithm for NO2 Vertical Column Retrieval from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucsela, Eric J.; Celarier, Edward A.; Wenig, Mark O.; Gleason, James F.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Boersma, K. Folkert; Brinksma, Ellen J.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the operational algorithm for the retrieval of stratospheric, tropospheric, and total column densities of nitrogen dioxide NO2 from earthshine radiances measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), aboard the EOS-Aura satellite. The algorithm uses the DOAS method for the retrieval of slant column NO densities. Air mass factors (AMFs) calculated from a stratospheric NO2 profile are used to make initial estimates of the vertical column density. Using data collected over a 24-h period, a smooth estimate of the global stratospheric field is constructed. Where the initial vertical column densities exceed the estimated stratospheric field, we infer the presence of tropospheric NO2, and recalculate the vertical column density (VCD) using an AMF calculated from an assumed tropospheric NO2 profile. The parameters that control the operational algorithm were selected with the aid of a set of data assembled from stratospheric and tropospheric chemical transport models. We apply the optimized algorithm to OMI data and present global maps of NO2 VCDs for the first time.

  6. The jet flotation column control system

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiqiang; Ming Shangzhi; Liu Lijian; Huangfu Jinghua; Huo Sen; Zhang Rongzeng; Yang Hongjun

    1998-12-31

    Compared with the conventional mechanical flotation column, the jet flotation column has the advantages of high selectivity of separation, low investment and production cost, low floor space requirement, low dosage of reagent, easy control; it is more suitable to process fine particles. Recently, many new types of flotation columns have been developed with new methods. Mineral Processing Dept., China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing) designed an aerated, double-jet flotation column in the lab and the industrial trial will be put into operation. One of the significant characteristics of the new type of flotation column is high selectivity of separation, fast bubble mineralization speed. As it is sensitive to various factors, a control system for flotation column has been developed to stabilize the working condition, and this set of control system has been operated in the lab experiment.

  7. Stirring a slightly magnetized column of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désangles, Victor; Bousselin, Guillaume; Poyé, Alexandre; Moulin, Marc; de Poucques, Ludovic; Plihon, Nicolas; Physique statistique, Hydrodynamique, Non-Linéarités Team; Département Chimie et Physique des Solides et des Surfaces Team

    2016-10-01

    The von-Kàrmàn plasma experiment (VKP) is a cylindrical, low pressure, high density plasma experiment which confines the plasma thanks to an axial magnetic field. Currents are radially driven between a hot emissive cathode and an anode which apply a Lorentz force on the plasma together with the magnetic field. We demonstrate that current driven radially sets the plasma into rotation. LIF technique at 668.43 nm as well as Mach probes measurements have been developed and used in different regimes in order to measure the velocity of plasma and relate it to the current driven between the electrodes. The LIF signal shows an important widening which corresponds to doppler shift effect due to the velocity of the ions. This widening can be related to the Mach probes signals. In the long term views, each end of the plasma column will be rotating in an opposite direction, such as to create a large shear-layer, resulting in a von-Kàrmàn-type flow.

  8. REDISTRIBUTOR FOR LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.G.

    1957-10-29

    An improved baffle plate construction to intimately mix immiscible liquid solvents for solvent extraction processes in a liquid-liquid pulse column is described. To prevent the light and heavy liquids from forming separate continuous homogeneous vertical channels through sections of the column, a baffle having radially placed rectangular louvers with deflection plates opening upon alternate sides of the baffle is placed in the column, normal to the axis. This improvement substantially completely reduces strippiig losses due to poor mixing.

  9. Attenuation of external Bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaliwal, A.S.; Powar, M.S.; Singh, M. )

    1990-12-01

    In this paper attenuation of bremsstrahlung from {sup 147}Pm and {sup 170}Tm beta emitters has been studied in aluminum, copper, tin, and lead metallic absorbers. Bremsstrahlung spectra and mass attenuation coefficients for monoenergetic gamma rays are used to calculate theoretical attenuation curves. Magnetic deflection and beta stopping techniques are used to measure the integral bremsstrahlung intensities above 30 keV in different target thicknesses. Comparison of measured and calculated attenuation curves shows a good agreement for various absorbers, thus providing a test of this technique, which may be useful in understanding bremsstrahlung intensity buildup and in the design of optimum shielding for bremsstrahlung sources. It is found that the absorption of bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers does not obey an exponential law and that absorbers act as energy filters.

  10. Energy absorber uses expanded coiled tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Mechanical shock mitigating device, based on working material to its failure point, absorbs mechanical energy by bending or twisting tubing. It functions under axial or tangential loading, has no rebound, is area independent, and is easy and inexpensive to build.

  11. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Wright, Richard N.; Swank, William D.; Lister, Tedd E.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2007-10-23

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  12. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  13. Porous absorber for solar air heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, J.A.

    1980-09-10

    A general discussion of the factors affecting solar collector performance is presented. Bench scale tests done to try to determine the heat transfer characteristics of various screen materials are explained. The design, performance, and evaluation of a crude collector with a simple screen stack absorber is treated. The more sophisticated absorber concept, and its first experimental approximation is examined. A short summary of future plans for the collector concept is included. (MHR)

  14. Multilayer Radar Absorbing Non-Woven Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedov, A. V.; Nazarov, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the electrical properties of multilayer radar absorbing materials obtained by adding nonwoven sheets of dielectric fibers with an intermediate layer of electrically conductive carbon fibers. Multilayer materials that absorb electromagnetic radiation in a wide frequency range are obtained by varying the content of the carbon fibers. The carbon-fiber content dependent mechanism of absorption of electromagnetic radiation by sheets and multilayer materials is considered.

  15. Non-absorbed Antibiotics for IBS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-16

    absorbed antibiotic rifaximin for nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This effort adds to the body of literature from other, smaller studies that...have demonstrated clinical efficacy for IBS with rifaximin . Non-absorbed antibiotics have been endorsed by the American College of Gastroenterology... rifaximin 400 mg three times daily for 10 days or placebo. During the initial 2 weeks of therapy and the subsequent 10 weeks of follow-up rifaximin

  16. Structured metal film as a perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Hu, Yu-Hui; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2013-08-07

    A new type of absorber, a four-tined fish-spear-like resonator (FFR), constructed by the two-photon polymerization process, is reported. An absorbance of more than 90% is experimentally realized and the resonance occurs in the space between the tines. Since a continuous layer of metallic thin film covers the structure, it is perfectly thermo- and electroconductive, which is the mostly desired feature for many applications.

  17. Sustenance of inhomogeneous electron temperature in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Karkari, S. K. Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the equilibrium properties of a magnetized plasma column sustained by direct-current (dc) operated hollow cathode discharge in conjunction with a conducting end-plate, acting as the anode. The survey of radial plasma characteristics, performed in argon plasma, shows hotter plasma in the periphery as compared to the central plasma region; whereas the plasma density peaks at the center. The off-centered peak in radial temperature is attributed due to inhomogeneous power deposition in the discharge volume in conjunction with short-circuiting effect by the conducting end plate. A theoretical model based on particle flux and energy balance is given to explain the observed characteristics of the plasma column.

  18. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  19. Absorbance changes of carotenoids in different solvents.

    PubMed

    Zang, L Y; Sommerburg, O; van Kuijk, F J

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoids are typically measured in tissues with the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and quantitation is usually done by calibrating with stock solutions in solvents. Four carotenoids including lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene were dissolved in hexane and methanol respectively, and their absorbance characteristics were compared. Lutein shows absorbance spectra that are almost independent of solvents at various concentrations. Spectra of zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene were found to be more solvent-dependent. The absorbance of zeaxanthin at lambda max is about approximately 2 times larger in methanol than in hexane at the higher concentrations, and increased non-linearly with increasing concentration in hexane. The absorbance of lycopene at lambda max in hexane is approximately 4 fold larger than in methanol, but the absorbance of the methanol sample can be recovered by re-extracting this sample in hexane. The absorbance of beta-carotene in hexane is larger than in methanol, and increased linearly with increasing concentration. But beta-carotene showed a non-linear concentration effect in methanol. There are very small variations in lambda max for all four carotenoids between hexane and methanol, due to differences in molar extinction coefficients. The non-linear concentration effects for these carotenoids are probably due to differences in solubility leading to the formation of microcrystals. Thus, care should be taken with quantitation of tissue carotenoid values, when they depend on measurement of concentrations in stock solutions.

  20. Perfect terahertz absorber using fishnet based metafilm

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu; Chen, Houtong; Taylor, Antoinette; Smirnova, E I; O' Hara, John F

    2009-01-01

    We present a perfect terahertz (THz) absorber working for a broad-angle of incidence. The two fold symmetry of rectangular fishnet structure allows either complete absorption or mirror like reflection depending on the polarization of incident the THz beam. Metamaterials enable the ability to control the electromagnetic wave in a unique fashion by designing the permittivity or permeability of composite materials with desired values. Although the initial idea of metamaterials was to obtain a negative index medium, however, the evolution of metamaterials (MMs) offers a variety of practically applicable devices for controlling electromagnetic wave such as tunable filters, modulators, phase shifters, compact antenna, absorbers, etc. Terahertz regime, a crucial domain of the electromagnetic wave, is suffering from the scarcity of the efficient devices and might take the advantage of metamaterials. Here, we demonstrate design, fabrication, and characterization of a terahertz absorber based on a simple fishnet metallic film separated from a ground mirror plane by a dielectric spacer. Such absorbers are in particular important for bolometric terahertz detectors, high sensitivity imaging, and terahertz anechoic chambers. Recently, split-ring-resonators (SRR) have been employed for metamaterial-based absorbers at microwave and THz frequencies. The experimental demonstration reveals that such absorbers have absorptivity close to unity at resonance frequencies. However, the downside of these designs is that they all employ resonators of rather complicated shape with many fine parts and so they are not easy to fabricate and are sensitive to distortions.

  1. Programmable selectivity for GC with series-coupled columns using pulsed heating of the second column.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Joshua; Sacks, Richard

    2003-05-15

    A series-coupled ensemble of a nonpolar dimethyl polysiloxane column and a polar trifluoropropylmethyl polysiloxane column with independent at-column heating is used to obtain pulsed heating of the second column. For mixture component bands that are separated by the first column but coelute from the column ensemble, a temperature pulse is initiated after the first of the two components has crossed the column junction point and is in the second column, while the other component is still in the first column. This accelerates the band for the first component. If the second column cools sufficiently prior to the second component band crossing the junction, the second band experiences less acceleration, and increased separation is observed for the corresponding peaks in the ensemble chromatogram. High-speed at-column heating is obtained by wrapping the fused-silica capillary column with resistance heater wire and sensor wire. Rapid heating for a temperature pulse is obtained with a short-duration linear heating ramp of 1000 degrees C/min. During a pulse, the second-column temperature increases by 20-100 degrees C in a few seconds. Using a cold gas environment, cooling to a quiescent temperature of 30 degrees C can be obtained in approximately 25 s. The effects of temperature pulse initiation time and amplitude on ensemble peak separation and resolution are described. A series of appropriately timed temperature pulses is used to separate three coeluting pairs of components in a 13-component mixture.

  2. Effect of column dimension on observed column efficiency in very high pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Naijun; Bradley, Ashley C

    2012-10-26

    The effect of extra-column volume on observed linear velocity was investigated for columns of various internal diameters in very high pressure liquid chromatography. The results showed that the observed linear velocities were approximately 4.5, 9.5, 16.8, and 39.5% lower than the linear velocities corrected for the extra-column volume contribution for 4.6, 3.0, 2.1, and 1.0mm internal diameter columns, respectively. An empirical relationship between extra-column band broadening and extra-column volume was obtained using 50 cm long tubings of various internal diameters. The peak variance from the extra-column volume is near linearly proportional to the square of the extra-column volume for tubings with 0.0635-0.178 mm (0.025-0.07 in.) i.d. using a 50/50 acetonitrile/water mobile phase at flow rates greater than 0.3 mL/min. The effect of column internal diameter and column length on observed efficiency was studied using 50mm columns with four different column internal diameters and 2.1mm i.d columns with three different lengths. The results showed that the observed column efficiencies for 3.0, 2.1, and 1.0mm internal diameter columns were 18, 33, and 73% lower than that for a 4.6mm internal diameter column for benzophenone (k=5.5), respectively. An approximate 20% decrease in theoretical plate number was observed for propiophenone (k=3.3) using a 50 mm × 2.1 mm column packed with 1.7 μm particles compared to a 150 mm × 2.1 mm column packed with 5.0 μm particles, while the former column provided 9 fold faster separation. It is the column to extra column volume ratio instead of absolute extra-column volume that determines the degree of extra-column band-broadening in VHPLC.

  3. Neuronal connections of eye-dominance columns in the cat cerebral cortex after monocular deprivation.

    PubMed

    Alekseenko, S V; Toporova, S N; Shkorbatova, P Yu

    2008-09-01

    Plastic changes in intrahemisphere neuronal connections of the eye-dominance columns of cortical fields 17 and 18 were studied in monocularly deprived cats. The methodology consisted of microintophoretic administration of horseradish peroxidase into cortical columns and three-dimensional reconstruction of the areas of retrograde labeled cells. The eye dominance of columns was established, as were their coordinates in the projection of the visual field. In field 17, the horizontal connections of columns receiving inputs from the non-deprived eye via the crossed-over visual tracts were longer than the connections of the "non-crossed" columns of this eye and were longer than in normal conditions; the connections of the columns of the deprived eye were significantly reduced. Changes in the spatial organization of horizontal connections in field 17 were seen for the columns of the non-deprived eye (areas of labeled cells were rounder and the density of labeled cells in these areas were non-uniform). The longest horizontal connections in deprived cats were no longer than the lengths of these connections in cats with strabismus. It is suggested that the axon length of cells giving rise to the horizontal connections of cortical columns has a limit which is independent of visual stimulation during the critical period of development of the visual system.

  4. Characterisation of RPLC columns packed with porous sub-2 microm particles.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Patrik; Euerby, Melvin R

    2007-08-01

    Eight commercially available sub-2 microm octadecyl silane columns (C18 columns) have been characterised by the Tanaka protocol. The columns can be grouped into two groups that display large differences in selectivity and peak shape due to differences in hydrophobicity, degree of surface coverage and silanol activity. Measurements of particle size distributions were made using automated microscopy and electrical sensing zone measurements. Only a weak correlation could be found between efficiency and particle size. Large differences in column backpressure were observed. These differences are not related to particle size distribution. A more likely explanation is differences in packing density. In order to take full advantage of 100-150 mm columns packed with sub-2 microm particles, it is often necessary to employ not only an elevated pressure but also an elevated temperature. A comparison between columns packed with sub-2, 3 and 5 microm versions of the same packing indicates potential method transferability problems for several of the columns due to selectivity differences. Currently, the best alternative for fast high-resolution LC is the use of sub-2 microm particles in combination with elevated pressure and temperature. However, as shown in this study additional efforts are needed to improve transferability as well as column performance.

  5. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-17

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to their emitter/absorber interfaces, especially for high-efficiency cells with improved bulk properties. When interface defect states are located at efficient recombination energies, performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e. defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ..delta..EC, often referred to as a 'spike', creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (..delta..EC >/= 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a 'cliff' (.delta..EC < 0 eV) is likely to allow many holes in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. In addition, a thin and highly-doped emitter can invert the absorber, form a large hole barrier, and decrease device performance losses due to high interface defect density. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. Other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ..delta..EC. These materials are predicted to yield higher

  6. An overview of the development, testing, and application of composite absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Sebesta, F.; John, J.

    1995-02-01

    Although inorganic exchangers offer many advantages for removing selected elements from radioactive waste streams, few of these materials are suitable for use in packed-bed columns. We review various adaptations of inorganic exchangers for use in columns, which include granular forms of the intrinsic absorbers, absorber compounds supported on other materials, and composite absorbers that use organic or inorganic binders. An organic binding polymer of polyacrylonitrile (PAN), developed at the Czech Technical University, has been demonstrated to offer advantages. We describe general methods for preparing inorganic exchange materials, which then are incorporated into PAN-based composites. Such PAN composites have been used to remove selected radionuclides from a variety of liquid waste streams. Sixteen different PAN composites were prepared for testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of an evaluation of potential partitioning agents for remediating the liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site near Richland, Washington. Our collaboration with LANL is expected to continue for another 2 years.

  7. Warm absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high-resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert Galaxies - II. Warm absorber dynamics and feedback to galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Sibasish; Guainazzi, Matteo; Chakravorty, Susmita; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Kembhavi, Ajit K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is a sequel to the extensive study of warm absorber (WA) in X-rays carried out using high-resolution grating spectral data from XMM-Newton satellite (WAX-I). Here we discuss the global dynamical properties as well as the energetics of the WA components detected in the WAX sample. The slope of WA density profile (n ∝ r-α) estimated from the linear regression slope of ionization parameter ξ and column density NH in the WAX sample is α = 1.236 ± 0.034. We find that the WA clouds possibly originate as a result of photoionized evaporation from the inner edge of the torus (torus wind). They can also originate in the cooling front of the shock generated by faster accretion disc outflows, the ultrafast outflows, impinging on to the interstellar medium or the torus. The acceleration mechanism for the WA is complex and neither radiatively driven wind nor MHD-driven wind scenario alone can describe the outflow acceleration. However, we find that radiative forces play a significant role in accelerating the WA through the soft X-ray absorption lines, and also with dust opacity. Given the large uncertainties in the distance and volume filling factor estimates of the WA, we conclude that the kinetic luminosity ĖK of WA may sometimes be large enough to yield significant feedback to the host galaxy. We find that the lowest ionization states carry the maximum mass outflow, and the sources with higher Fe M UTA absorption (15-17 Å) have more mass outflow rates.

  8. An X-ray-absorbed radio-quiet QSO with an intervening strong metal absorption-line system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; Carrera, F. J.

    2000-02-01

    We find evidence for significant X-ray absorption in the QSO RXJ005734.78-272827.4, along with strong absorption lines in its optical spectrum. We propose that the absorption lines are due to an intervening metal-line system at a redshift of z=0.628, and show that this intervening system is also the probable cause of the X-ray absorption. The intervening absorber is inferred to have an X-ray column of ~1022cm-2. This is the first time that an absorption-line system has been identified with an X-ray absorber in a radio-quiet object.

  9. The C IV Mass Density of the Universe at Redshift 5(exp 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettini, Max; Madau, Piero; Bolte, Michael; Prochaska, Jason X.; Ellison, Sara L.; Fan, Xiao-Hui

    2003-01-01

    In order to search for metals in the Ly alpha forest at redshifts z(sub abs) > 4, we have obtained spectra of high signal-to-noise ratio and moderately high resolution of three QSOs at z(sub em) > 5.4 discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These data allow us to probe to metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium at early times with higher sensitivity than previous studies. We find 16 C IV absorption systems with column densities logN(C IV) = 12.50-13.98 over a total redshift path Delta X = 3.29. In the redshift interval z = 4.5-5.0, where our statistics are most reliable, we deduce a comoving mass density of C(3+) ions Omega(sub C IV) = (4.3 +/- 2.5) x 10(exp -8) (90% confidence limits) for absorption systems with log N(C IV) > or = 13.0 (for an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology with h = 0.65). This value of Omega(sub C IV) is entirely consistent with those measured at z < 4; we confirm the earlier finding by Songaila that neither the column density distribution of C IV absorbers nor its integral show significant redshift evolution over a period of time that stretches from approx. 1.25 to approx. 4.5 Gyr after the big bang. This somewhat surprising conclusion may be an indication that the intergalactic medium was enriched in metals at z >> 5, perhaps by the sources responsible for its reionization. Alternatively, the C IV systems we see may be associated with outflows from massive star-forming galaxies at later times, while the truly intergalactic metals may reside in regions of the Ly alpha forest of lower density than those probed up to now.

  10. A polarization insensitive and broadband metamaterial absorber based on three-dimensional structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingyao; Xiao, Zhongyin; Xu, Kaikai; Liu, Dejun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional metamaterial absorber based on tailored resistive film patch array. The numerical results show that a broadband abs orption more than 90% can be achieved from 58.6 to 91.4 GHz for either transverse electric or magnetic polarization wave at normal incidence. And the E-field, surface current and power loss density distributions in the absorber are investigated to explain the physical mechanism of high absorption. In addition, the absorption efficiency of oblique incidence is also elucidated. According to the analysis of the E-field and power loss density distributions, we explain the absorption differences between TE and TM mode at oblique incidence. The proposed metamaterial absorber will pave the way for practical applications, such as sensing, imaging and stealth technology. Importantly, the design idea has the ability to be extended to terahertz, infrared and optical region.

  11. Impact of annealing on electrical properties of Cu2ZnSnSe4 absorber layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Thomas Paul; Redinger, Alex; Rey, Germain; Schwarz, Torsten; Spies, Maria; Cojocura-Mirédin, Oana; Choi, P.-P.; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Reported growth processes for kesterite absorber layers generally rely on a sequential process including a final high temperature annealing step. However, the impact and details for this annealing process vary among literature reports and little is known on its impact on electrical properties of the absorber. We used kesterite absorber layers prepared by a high temperature co-evaporation process to explicitly study the impact of two different annealing processes. From electrical characterization it is found that the annealing process incorporates a detrimental deep defect distribution. On the other hand, the doping density could be reduced leading to a better collection and a higher short circuit current density. The activation energy of the doping acceptor was studied with admittance spectroscopy and showed Meyer-Neldel behaviour. This indicates that the entropy significantly contributes to the activation energy.

  12. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  13. Circulation in gas-slurry column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.; Kuhlman, J.; Celik, I.; Gross, R.; Nebiolo, E.; Wang, Yi-Zun.

    1990-08-15

    Circulation in bubble columns, such as those used in fischer-tropsch synthesis, detracts from their performance in that gas is carried on average more rapidly through the column, and the residence time distribution of the gas in the column is widened. Both of these factors influence mass-transfer operations in bubble columns. Circulation prediction and measurement has been undertaken using probes, one-dimensional models, laser Doppler velocimetry, and numerical modeling. Local void fraction was measured using resistance probes and a newly developed approach to determining air/water threshold voltage for the probe. A tall column of eight inch diameter was constructed of Plexiglas and the distributor plate was manufactured to distribute air evenly through the base of the column. Data were gathered throughout the volume at three different gas throughputs. Bubble velocities proved difficult to measure using twin probes with cross-correlation because of radial bubble movement. A series of three-dimensional mean and RMS bubble and liquid velocity measurements were also obtained for a turbulent flow in a laboratory model of a bubble column. These measurements have been made using a three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV), to determine velocity distributions non-intrusively. Finally, the gas-liquid flow inside a vertically situated circular isothermal column reactor was simulated numerically. 74 refs., 170 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. 29 CFR 1926.755 - Column anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.755 Column anchorage. (a... field-modified without the approval of the project structural engineer of record. (2) Prior to the erection of a column, the controlling contractor shall provide written notification to the steel erector...

  15. Reanalysis of high-resolution XMM-Newton data of V2491 Cygni using models of collisionally ionized hot absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balman, Ş.; Gamsızkan, Ç.

    2017-02-01

    overabundance hints at a C-O WD. We find the equivalent hydrogen column density of the hot collisionally ionized (in equilibrium) absorbers in a range (0.6-18.0) × 1023 cm-2 and (2.0-5.3) × 1023 cm-2 on days 40 and 50 after outburst, respectively. Our fits yield the most adequate χν 2 (range 1.8-2.9) currently obtained for the modeling of high-resolution X-ray data of V2491 Cyg. An additional photoionized absorber (third intrinsic absorber component) originating in the shell or the ejecta improves the model fits with χν 2 in a range 1.7-2.5, but shows only (1-0.1)% of the absorption by the collisionally ionized hot gas. Our analysis reveals a second blackbody component on day 50 with an effective temperature of 120-131 eV and an effective radius of about 10% of the WD, which may indicate the onset of magnetic accretion. Conclusions: Our work on data of the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer yields two main hot collisionally ionized (in equilibrium) absorber components with different temperatures, rms velocities, and equivalent column densities originating in the shocked fast-moving ejecta and/or the wind. These two components may be the reason for the complex absorption spectra of V2491 Cyg, as a result of high- and low-density regions with different turbulent conditions and temperatures in the ejecta and/or the wind, indicating the inhomogeneity (e.g., oxygen-dense regions) and mixed morphology of the outflow.

  16. Density Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiter, Richard L.; Puzey, Whitney L.; Blitz, Erin A.

    2006-01-01

    Metal rods of high purity for many elements are now commercially available and may be used to construct a display of relative densities. We have constructed a display with nine metal rods (Mg, Al, Ti, V, Fe, Cu, Ag, Pb, and W) of equal mass whose densities vary from 1.74 to 19.3 g cm[superscript -3]. The relative densities of the metals may be…

  17. Maintenance of column performance at scale.

    PubMed

    William, Alan; Taylor, Kathy; Dambuleff, Kyril; Persson, Owe; Kennedy, Robert M

    2002-01-25

    Pack-in-place column packing methods were developed for Q Sepharose Big Beads at 40 cm I.D. and scaled up to 200 cm I.D. in Chromaflow columns. The efficiency and asymmetry of the packed bed were evaluated as a function of test velocity and sample volume. The performance of the packed beds at both scales approached the theoretical limits of column performance (Hred =2 and Af=1) expected in small analytical columns. The packing strategy was effective for scale up and the stability of the packed beds, the effectiveness of the column design with respect to the mobile phase distribution system and the stability of the media to the pack-in-place technology, are presented.

  18. Water absorbency by wool fibers: Hofmeister effect.

    PubMed

    Lo Nostro, Pierandrea; Fratoni, Laura; Ninham, Barry W; Baglioni, Piero

    2002-01-01

    Wool is a complex material, composed of cuticle and epicuticle cells, surrounded by a cell membrane complex. Wool fibers absorb moisture from air, and, once immersed in water, they take up considerable amounts of liquid. The water absorbency parameter can be determined from weight gain, according to a standard method, and used to quantify this phenomenon. In this paper we report a study on the water absorbency (or retention) of untreated wool fibers in the presence of aqueous 1 M salt solutions at 29 degrees C and a relative humidity of either 33% or 56%. The effect of anions was determined by selecting a wide range of different sodium salts, while the effect of cations was checked through some chlorides and nitrates. Our results show a significant specific ion and ion pair "Hofmeister" effects, that change the amount of water absorbed by the fibers. To understand this phenomenon, the water absorbency parameter (A(w)) is compared to different physicochemical parameters such as the lyotropic number, free energy of hydration of ions, molar surface tension increment, polarizability, refractive index increment, and molar refractivity. The data indicate that this Hofmeister phenomenon is controlled by dispersion forces that depend on the polarizability of ionic species, their adsorption frequencies, the solvent, and the substrate. These dispersion forces dominate the behavior in concentrated solutions. They are in accord with new developing theories of solutions and molecular interactions in colloidal systems that account for Hofmeister effects.

  19. Oxygen absorbers in food preservation: a review.

    PubMed

    Cichello, Simon Angelo

    2015-04-01

    The preservation of packaged food against oxidative degradation is essential to establish and improve food shelf life, customer acceptability, and increase food security. Oxygen absorbers have an important role in the removal of dissolved oxygen, preserving the colour, texture and aroma of different food products, and importantly inhibition of food spoilage microbes. Active packaging technology in food preservation has improved over decades mostly due to the sealing of foods in oxygen impermeable package material and the quality of oxygen absorber. Ferrous iron oxides are the most reliable and commonly used oxygen absorbers within the food industry. Oxygen absorbers have been transformed from sachets of dried iron-powder to simple self-adhesive patches to accommodate any custom size, capacity and application. Oxygen concentration can be effectively lowered to 100 ppm, with applications spanning a wide range of food products and beverages across the world (i.e. bread, meat, fish, fruit, and cheese). Newer molecules that preserve packaged food materials from all forms of degradation are being developed, however oxygen absorbers remain a staple product for the preservation of food and pharmaceutical products to reduce food wastage in developed nations and increased food security in the developing & third world.

  20. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  1. Non-Absorbable Gas Behavior in the Absorber/Evaporator of a Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nagamoto, Wataru; Sugiyama, Takahide

    A two-dimensional numerical study on non-absorbable gas behavior in the absorber/evaporator of an absorption chiller has been performed. In the present study, the effect of the pitch-to-diameter ratio of a cylinder bundle in the absorber was highlighted. From the results, a sudden decrease of the overall heat transfer coefficient of the absorber was observed at a certain mean concentration of non-absorbable gas for each pitch-to-diameter ratio. Such a critical concentration was also found to decrease as the pitch-to- diameter ratio increased. The sudden decrease occurs due to the sudden disappearance of recirculating region, which is formed between the absorber and the evaporator, and where most of non-absorbable gas stays when it exists. As the pitch-to-diameter ratio increases, the recirculating region becomes weak because the velocity of the high velocity region supporting the recirculating flow decreases. Then, the critical mean concentration of non-absorbable gas is found to decrease as pitch-to-ratio increases.

  2. Optical analysis of solar energy tubular absorbers.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, C; Sokolov, M

    1982-11-15

    The energy absorbed by a solar energy tubular receiver element for a single incident ray is derived. Two types of receiver elements were analyzed: (1) an inner tube with an absorbing coating surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube, and (2) a semitransparent inner tube filled with an absorbing fluid surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube. The formation of ray cascades in the semitransparent tubes is considered. A numerical simulation to investigate the influence of the angle of incidence, sizing, thickness, and coefficient of extinction of the tubes was performed. A comparison was made between receiver elements with and without cover tubes. Ray tracing analyses in which rays were followed within the tubular receiver element as well as throughout the rest of the collector were performed for parabolic and circular trough concentrating collectors.

  3. Interference theory of metamaterial perfect absorbers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hou-Tong

    2012-03-26

    The impedance matching to free space in metamaterial perfect absorbers has been believed to involve and rely on magnetic resonant response, with direct evidence provided by the anti-parallel surface currents in the metal structures. Here I present a different theoretical interpretation based on interference, which shows that the two layers of metal structures in metamaterial absorbers are linked only by multiple reflections with negligible near-field interactions or magnetic resonances. This is further supported by the out-of-phase surface currents derived at the interfaces of resonator array and ground plane through multiple reflections and superpositions. The theory developed here explains all features observed in narrowband metamaterial absorbers and therefore provides a profound understanding of the underlying physics.

  4. Translatory shock absorber for attitude sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.; Morgan, I. T., Jr.; Kirby, C. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A translatory shock absorber is provided for mounting an attitude sensor thereon for isolating a sensor from translatory vibrations. The translatory shock absorber includes a hollow block structure formed as one piece to form a parallelogram. The absorber block structure includes a movable top plate for supporting the attitude sensor and a fixed base plate with opposed side plates interposed between. At the junctions of the side plates, and the base and top plates, there are provided grooves which act as flexible hinges for attenuating translatory vibrations. A damping material is supported on a pedestal which is carried on the base plate between the side plates thereof. The top of the damping material rests against the bottom surface of the top plate for eliminating the resonant peaks of vibration.

  5. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  6. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  7. Column Grid Array Rework for High Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Atul C.; Bodie, Charles C.

    2008-01-01

    Due to requirements for reduced size and weight, use of grid array packages in space applications has become common place. To meet the requirement of high reliability and high number of I/Os, ceramic column grid array packages (CCGA) were selected for major electronic components used in next MARS Rover mission (specifically high density Field Programmable Gate Arrays). ABSTRACT The probability of removal and replacement of these devices on the actual flight printed wiring board assemblies is deemed to be very high because of last minute discoveries in final test which will dictate changes in the firmware. The questions and challenges presented to the manufacturing organizations engaged in the production of high reliability electronic assemblies are, Is the reliability of the PWBA adversely affected by rework (removal and replacement) of the CGA package? and How many times can we rework the same board without destroying a pad or degrading the lifetime of the assembly? To answer these questions, the most complex printed wiring board assembly used by the project was chosen to be used as the test vehicle, the PWB was modified to provide a daisy chain pattern, and a number of bare PWB s were acquired to this modified design. Non-functional 624 pin CGA packages with internal daisy chained matching the pattern on the PWB were procured. The combination of the modified PWB and the daisy chained packages enables continuity measurements of every soldered contact during subsequent testing and thermal cycling. Several test vehicles boards were assembled, reworked and then thermal cycled to assess the reliability of the solder joints and board material including pads and traces near the CGA. The details of rework process and results of thermal cycling are presented in this paper.

  8. Competing Atmospheric and Surface-Driven Impacts of Absorbing Aerosols on the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persad, G.; Paynter, D.; Ming, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols, by attenuating shortwave radiation within the atmosphere and reemitting it as longwave radiation, redistribute energy both vertically within the surface-atmosphere column and horizontally between polluted and unpolluted regions. East Asia has the largest concentrations of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols globally, and these, along with the region's scattering aerosols, have both reduced the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface regionally ("solar dimming") and increased shortwave absorption within the atmosphere, particularly during the peak months of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). We here analyze how atmospheric absorption and surface solar dimming compete in driving the response of EASM circulation to anthropogenic absorbing aerosols, which dominates, and why—issues of particular importance for predicting how the EASM will respond to projected changes in absorbing and scattering aerosol emissions in the future. We probe these questions in a state-of-the-art general circulation model (GCM) using a combination of realistic and idealized aerosol perturbations that allow us to analyze the relative influence of absorbing aerosols' atmospheric and surface-driven impacts on EASM circulation. In combination, our results make clear that, although absorption-driven dimming has a less detrimental effect on EASM circulation than purely scattering-driven dimming, aerosol absorption is still a net impairment to EASM strength when both its atmospheric and surface effects are considered. Because atmospheric heating is not efficiently conveyed to the surface, the surface dimming and associated cooling from even a pure absorber is sufficient to counteract its atmospheric heating, resulting in a net reduction in EASM strength. These findings elevate the current understanding of the impacts of aerosol absorption on the EASM, improving our ability to diagnose EASM responses to current and future regional changes in aerosol emissions.

  9. Optimization and engineering of microwave absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuo-Liang

    1998-12-01

    In this thesis, a concerted effort has been made to study and evaluate the individual electromagnetic properties of the absorbing components including carbon black, conducting fibers, metal flakes, magnetic materials such as carbonyl iron, ferrite and the chiral type of micro- carbon coil. The study of the electromagnetic properties covers functions such as dielectric dissipation, random scattering effect at low and high frequencies, magnetic dissipation at high frequencies and also the effect of chirality for different angles of incidence. The results of these studies have been used in the design, engineering and optimization of the microwave absorbers. The objective of this thesis is to identify the absorption mechanism of each of various type of fillers and to study the synergic effect arising from a combination of these in a non-metallic host medium. This will help us in producing microwave absorbers suitable for broad band application with the advantages of light weight, having high strength and possessing good chemical resistance. The results from experimental measurements of various material combinations have been greatly influenced by the theoretical understanding of the absorption mechanism. Design of microwave absorbers is governed by the requirement of the users as well as the characteristics of the objects (targets) inferred by theoretical understanding and experimental data to arrive at the right formula. Finally a detailed quality control program has to be charted out reflecting both the electromagnetic as well as mechanical properties. This is done by carrying out the tests systematically on small samples and then proceeding to practical absorbers making use of the data compiled earlier on smaller samples. In this thesis, to modify all dielectric absorbing components including micro-carbon chirals to reduce the sensitivity of absorption for different incident angles is unprecedented topic.

  10. Absorber topography dependence of phase edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, Aamod; Sczyrba, Martin; Connolly, Brid; Waller, Laura; Neureuther, Andy

    2015-10-01

    Mask topography contributes to phase at the wafer plane, even for OMOG binary masks currently in use at the 22nm node in deep UV (193nm) lithography. Here, numerical experiments with rigorous FDTD simulation are used to study the impact of mask 3D effects on aerial imaging, by varying the height of the absorber stack and its sidewall angle. Using a thin mask boundary layer model to fit to rigorous simulations it is seen that increasing the absorber thickness, and hence the phase through the middle of a feature (bulk phase) monotonically changes the wafer-plane phase. Absorber height also influences best focus, revealed by an up/down shift in the Bossung plot (linewidth vs. defocus). Bossung plot tilt, however, responsible for process window variability at the wafer, is insensitive to changes in the absorber height (and hence also the bulk phase). It is seen to depend instead on EM edge diffraction from the thick mask edge (edge phase), but stays constant for variations in mask thickness within a 10% range. Both bulk phase and edge phase are also independent of sidewall angle fluctuation, which is seen to linearly affect the CD at the wafer, but does not alter wafer phase or the defocus process window. Notably, as mask topography varies, the effect of edge phase can be replicated by a thin mask model with 8nm wide boundary layers, irrespective of absorber height or sidewall angle. The conclusions are validated with measurements on phase shifting masks having different topographic parameters, confirming the strong dependence of phase variations at the wafer on bulk phase of the mask absorber.

  11. Positive column of the glow discharge in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisovskiy, Valeriy; Artushenko, Ekaterina; Yegorenkov, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    We report the measurements we performed of the reduced electric field strength E / p in the positive column in the range of the gas pressure and tube radius product of 0.01 column of the constant current discharge in noble gases. We consider the case of a balance between the rate of charged particle production due to direct ionization of gas molecules through electron impact and their escape to the discharge tube walls. Simple expressions for the reduced electric field E / p in the positive column in argon are obtained. The second model consists in considering the production and loss of charged particles and metastable atoms and obtaining a simple equation for the reduced electric field E / p depending on the discharge current density, gas pressure and tube radius. These models furnish a good description of experimental data in the whole range of pR values studied. and Scientific Center of Physical Technologies, Svobody Sq.6, Kharkov, 61022, Ukraine.

  12. Quantum walk with one variable absorbing boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feiran; Zhang, Pei; Wang, Yunlong; Liu, Ruifeng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2017-01-01

    Quantum walks constitute a promising ingredient in the research on quantum algorithms; consequently, exploring different types of quantum walks is of great significance for quantum information and quantum computation. In this study, we investigate the progress of quantum walks with a variable absorbing boundary and provide an analytical solution for the escape probability (the probability of a walker that is not absorbed by the boundary). We simulate the behavior of escape probability under different conditions, including the reflection coefficient, boundary location, and initial state. Moreover, it is also meaningful to extend our research to the situation of continuous-time and high-dimensional quantum walks.

  13. OSCEE fan exhaust bulk absorber treatment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Samanich, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    The acoustic suppression capability of bulk absorber material designed for use in the fan exhaust duct walls of the quiet clean short haul experiment engine (OCSEE UTW) was evaluated. The acoustic suppression to the original design for the engine fan duct which consisted of phased single degree-of-freedom wall treatment was tested with a splitter and also with the splitter removed. Peak suppression was about as predicted with the bulk absorber configuration, however, the broadband characteristics were not attained. Post test inspection revealed surface oil contamination on the bulk material which could have caused the loss in bandwidth suppression.

  14. Analysis of Energy-Absorbing Foundations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-15

    1ENN51YVAN&A 5TATL UNIV UNIVERSITY PARK DEPT OF ENGI-CYTC F/S 13/h ANALYSIS OF ENERGY -ABSORBING POUNDATIONS.(U) ECC 78 V H NEUBERT, S Ji YIN DNA01-78...C-0036 UNCLASSIFIED DNA-48OFP NL "M~ENOMOEE MIflfl END ______ 1 32 112.2 MICROCOPY RILSOLUTION TEST CHIART LELL ,NA 480 MIL ANALYSIS OF ENERGY ...8217 REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final Report for Period ANALYSIS OF ENERGY -ABSORBING FOUNDATIONS I Dee 77-1S Dee 78 6. PERFORMING ORG, REPORT NUMBER 7AUTHOR

  15. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  16. Radio-Absorbing Nanocoatings on Corrugated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, V. B.; Potekaev, A. I.; Vorozhtsov, A. B.; Melentyev, S. V.; Tsyganok, Yu. I.

    2016-12-01

    The feasibility of producing protective radio-absorbing shielding materials on the basis of differently shaped surfaces with nanostructured coatings is investigated. Combinations of special nanostructured materials and technical solutions for the shape of the absorbing surface were tested, in order to create efficient nanocoatings. It is shown that the coatings of interest that meet the requirements of low reflection and high attenuation of transmitted radiation combined with low coating thickness can be developed, using corrugated surfaces. Corrugated chicken egg-packing cell samples with nanostructured carbon coatings were examined and found to allow for effective shielding of electromagnetic radiation and to exhibit minimum reflection coefficients as compared to construction materials.

  17. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  18. Carbon dioxide absorber and regeneration assemblies useful for power plant flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang

    2012-11-06

    Disclosed are apparatus and method to treat large amounts of flue gas from a pulverized coal combustion power plant. The flue gas is contacted with solid sorbents to selectively absorb CO.sub.2, which is then released as a nearly pure CO.sub.2 gas stream upon regeneration at higher temperature. The method is capable of handling the necessary sorbent circulation rates of tens of millions of lbs/hr to separate CO.sub.2 from a power plant's flue gas stream. Because pressurizing large amounts of flue gas is cost prohibitive, the method of this invention minimizes the overall pressure drop in the absorption section to less than 25 inches of water column. The internal circulation of sorbent within the absorber assembly in the proposed method not only minimizes temperature increases in the absorber to less than 25.degree. F., but also increases the CO.sub.2 concentration in the sorbent to near saturation levels. Saturating the sorbent with CO.sub.2 in the absorber section minimizes the heat energy needed for sorbent regeneration. The commercial embodiments of the proposed method can be optimized for sorbents with slower or faster absorption kinetics, low or high heat release rates, low or high saturation capacities and slower or faster regeneration kinetics.

  19. Apparent optical density of the scattering medium: influence of scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiseleva, Irina A.; Sinichkin, Yurii P.

    2002-07-01

    Comparative analysis of manifestation of finite absorption in scattering media is carried out for different detection geometries. Reflectance spectra were studied for phantom scattering media containing blood and melanin as absorbers. Apparent optical density spectra of phantom media are compared with similar spectra of water solutions of the blood and melanin for same concentrations of absorbers. The influence of scattering properties on optical density spectra is discussed with use of the model of diffuse light propagation in semi-infinite media.

  20. Preparation of Cu2ZnSnSe4 Absorber Layer by Nonvacuum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang-En; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Hou-Ying

    2013-12-01

    Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) was prepared by a nonvacuum, solution-based method, and used as an absorber layer in CZTSe solar cells. Copper(II) acetate monohydrate, zinc(II) acetate dehydrate, and tin(II) chloride dihydrate were used as the starting materials of the sol-gel method, and 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine were used as the solvent and stabilizer, respectively. The precursor solution was deposited on Mo-coated soda lime glass (SLG) by spin-coating, then annealed at 570 °C in selenium atmosphere to convert it into the CZTSe absorber layer. The synthesized CZTSe absorber layer phase was identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum analyses. By increasing the number of spin-coating/drying cycles, the CZTSe absorber layer thickness was increased and resulted in a current density increase in the current-voltage curve. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were carried out to confirm the absorber layer thickness and metal ratios. The highest efficiency of the solar cell was 1.08% with a 1.45 µm absorber layer.

  1. A Unified View of X-ray Absorbers in AGNs and XRBs with MHD Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris R.; Tombesi, Francesco; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, John

    2016-01-01

    The presence of UV and X-ray absorbers (aka. warm absorbers or WAs) has been long known for decades from extensive spectroscopic studies across diverse AGN populations such as nearby Seyfert galaxies and distant quasars. Furthermore, another class of seemingly distinct type of absorbers, ultra-fast outflows or UFOs, is becoming increasingly known today. Nonetheless, a physical identification of such absorbers, such as geometrical property and physical conditions, is very elusive to date despite the recent state-of-the-art observations. We develop a coherent scenario in which the detected absorbers are driven primarily (if not exclusively) by the action of global magnetic fields originating from a black hole accretion disk. In the context of MHD disk-wind of density profile of n~1/r, it is found that the properties of the observed WAs/UFOs are successfully described assuming a characteristic SED. As a case study, we analyze PG1211+143 and GRO J1655-40 to demonstrate that our wind model can systematically unify apparently diverse absorbers in both AGNs and XRBs in terms of explaining their global behavior as well as individual spectral lines.

  2. Origami-inspired metamaterial absorbers for improving the larger-incident angle absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Pei, Zhibin; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-11-01

    When a folded resistive patch array stands up on a metallic plane, it can exhibit more outstanding absorption performance. Our theoretical investigations and simulations demonstrated that the folded resistive patch arrays can enhance the absorption bandwidth progressively with the increase of the incident angle for the oblique transverse magnetic incidence, which is contrary to the conventional resistive frequency selective surface absorber. On illumination, we achieved a 3D structure metamaterial absorber with the folded resistive patches. The proposed absorber is obtained from the inspiration of the origami, and it has broadband and lager-incident angle absorption. Both the simulations and the measurements indicate that the proposed absorber achieves the larger-incident angle absorption until 75° in the frequency band of 3.6-11.4 GHz. In addition, the absorber is extremely lightweight. The areal density of the fabricated sample is about 0.023 g cm-2. Due to the broadband and lager-incident angle absorption, it is expected that the absorbers may find potential applications such as stealth technologies and electromagnetic interference.

  3. 21 CFR 880.6025 - Absorbent tipped applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absorbent tipped applicator. 880.6025 Section 880... Devices § 880.6025 Absorbent tipped applicator. (a) Identification. An absorbent tipped applicator is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of an absorbent swab on a wooden, paper, or...

  4. Oblique Shock Wave Effects on Impulsively Accelerated Heavy Gas Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmstead, Dell T.

    An experimental study was performed to elucidate the fundamental physics of shock-induced mixing for a simple three-dimensional interface. The interface studied consists of a gravity stabilized SF6-based heavy gas jet that produced a circular column with a diffuse interface into the surrounding air. The effects of density gradient (Atwood number, A), shock strength (Mach number, M), and column inclination angle (theta) were examined. Concentration was measured using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of an acetone vapor tracer mixed with the heavy gas jet and illuminated by a pulsed Nd-YAG laser. Shocks with Mach numbers of 1.13, 1.5, 1.7, and 2.0 were used for inclinations of 0° (planar normal shock wave), 20° and 30°. Columns with Atwood numbers of 0.25, 0.4, and 0.60 were tested at Mach 1.7 for inclinations of 0° and 20°. The oblique shock-accelerated cylindrical interface produced a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) consisting of a primary counter-rotating vortices. The streamwise extent of the vortex pair in the centerline plane (cross-section) images of the column is proportional to √A/√ M, regardless of oblique shock angle for theta < 20. A heretofore unseen manifestation of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) waves on the upstream edge of the column appear for oblique shock acceleration. The upstream edge K-H waves were observed in images from a vertical plane through the center of the column. The wavelength of the upstream edge K-H waves is proportional to theta/M ˙ √A. This upstream edge K-H instability (KHI) caused earlier onset of secondary instabilities in the primary RMI vortices seen in the centerline plane images. The combination of more rapid onset of secondary instabilities in the RMI and upstream edge KHI accelerated transition to turbulence and thus reduced the time to achieve well-mixed flow. Time to reach well-mixed flow was inversely related to Atwood number, and had a weak correlation with Mach number for M>1.13. Transition to

  5. Ultra high pressure liquid chromatography. Column permeability and changes of the eluent properties.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2008-04-11

    The behavior of four similar liquid chromatography columns (2.1mm i.d. x 30, 50, 100, and 150 mm, all packed with fine particles, average d(p) approximately 1.7 microm, of bridged ethylsiloxane/silica hybrid-C(18), named BEH-C(18)) was studied in wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The pressure and the temperature dependencies of the viscosity and the density of the eluent (pure acetonitrile) along the columns were also derived, using the column permeabilities and applying the Kozeny-Carman and the heat balance equations. The heat lost through the external surface area of the chromatographic column was directly derived from the wall temperature of the stainless steel tube measured with a precision of +/-0.2 degrees C in still air and +/-0.1 degrees C in the oven compartment. The variations of the density and viscosity of pure acetonitrile as a function of the temperature and pressure was derived from empirical correlations based on precise experimental data acquired between 298 and 373 K and at pressures up to 1.5 kbar. The measurements were made with the Acquity UPLC chromatograph that can deliver a maximum flow rate of 2 mL/min and apply a maximum column inlet pressure of 1038 bar. The average Kozeny-Carman permeability constant of the columns was 144+/-3.5%. The temperature hence the viscosity and the density profiles of the eluent along the column deviate significantly from linear behavior under high-pressure gradients. For a 1000 bar pressure drop, we measured DeltaT=25-30 K, (Deltaeta/eta) approximately 100%, and (Deltarho/rho) approximately 10%. These results show that the radial temperature profiles are never fully developed within 1% for any of the columns, even under still-air conditions. This represents a practical advantage regarding the apparent column efficiency at high flow rates, since the impact of the differential analyte velocity between the column center and the column wall is not maximum. The interpretation of the peak profiles recorded in

  6. The Cooling of a Liquid Absorber using a Small Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Liggins, N.

    2005-08-24

    This report discusses the use of small cryogenic coolers for cooling the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) liquid cryogen absorbers. Since the absorber must be able contain liquid helium as well liquid hydrogen, the characteristics of the available 4.2 K coolers are used here. The issues associated with connecting two-stage coolers to liquid absorbers are discussed. The projected heat flows into an absorber and the cool-down of the absorbers using the cooler are presented. The warm-up of the absorber is discussed. Special hydrogen safety issues that may result from the use of a cooler on the absorbers are also discussed.

  7. Solid state saturable absorbers for Q-switching at 1 and 1.3μm: investigation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Jan; Arátor, Pavel; Jelínková, Helena; Nejezchleb, Karel; Škoda, Václav; Kokta, Milan R.

    2008-02-01

    Yttrium and Lutecium garnets (YAG and LuAG) doped by Chromium or Vanadium ions (Cr 4+ or V 3+) were investigated as saturable absorbers potentially useful for passive Q-switching at wavelengths 1 μm and/or 1.3 μm. For comparison also color center saturable absorber LiF:F - II and Cobalt doped spinel (Co:MALO) were studied. Firstly, low power absorption spectra were recorded for all samples. Next, absorbers transmission in dependence on incident energy/power density was measured using the z-scan method. Crystals Cr:YAG, Cr:LuAG, V:YAG, and LiF:F - II were tested at wavelength 1064 nm. Therefore Alexandrite laser pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was used as a radiation source (pulse length 6.9 ns, energy up to 1.5 mJ). Crystals V:YAG, V:LuAG, and Co:MALO were tested at wavelength 1338 nm. So diode pumped Nd:YAG/V:YAG microchip laser was used as a radiation source (pulse length 6.2 ns, energy up to 0.1 mJ). Using measured data fitting, and by their comparison with numerical model of a "thick" saturable absorber transmission for Q-switched Gaussian laser beam, following parameters were estimated: saturable absorber initial transmission T 0, saturation energy density w s, ground state absorption cross-section σ GSA, saturated absorber transmission T s, excited state absorption cross-section σ ESA, ratio γ = σ GSA/σ ESA, and absorbing ions density. For V:YAG crystal, a polarization dependence of T s was also investigated. With the help of rate equation numerical solution, an impact of saturable absorber parameters on generated Q-switched pulse properties was studied in plane wave approximation. Selected saturable absorbers were also investigated as a Q-switch and results were compared with the model.

  8. Use of a polar ionic liquid as second column for the comprehensive two-dimensional GC separation of PCBs.

    PubMed

    Zapadlo, Michal; Krupcík, Ján; Májek, Pavel; Armstrong, Daniel W; Sandra, Pat

    2010-09-10

    The orthogonality of three columns coupled in two series was studied for the congener specific comprehensive two-dimensional GC separation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A non-polar capillary column coated with poly(5%-phenyl-95%-methyl)siloxane was used as the first ((1)D) column in both series. A polar capillary column coated with 70% cyanopropyl-polysilphenylene-siloxane or a capillary column coated with the ionic liquid 1,12-di(tripropylphosphonium)dodecane bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide were used as the second ((2)D) columns. Nine multi-congener standard PCB solutions containing subsets of all native 209 PCBs, a mixture of 209 PCBs as well as Aroclor 1242 and 1260 formulations were used to study the orthogonality of both column series. Retention times of the corresponding PCB congeners on (1)D and (2)D columns were used to construct retention time dependences (apex plots) for assessing orthogonality of both columns coupled in series. For a visual assessment of the peak density of PCBs congeners on a retention plane, 2D images were compared. The degree of orthogonality of both column series was, along the visual assessment of distribution of PCBs on the retention plane, evaluated also by Pearson's correlation coefficient, which was found by correlation of retention times t(R,i,2D) and t(R,i,1D) of corresponding PCB congeners on both column series. It was demonstrated that the apolar+ionic liquid column series is almost orthogonal both for the 2D separation of PCBs present in Aroclor 1242 and 1260 formulations as well as for the separation of all of 209 PCBs. All toxic, dioxin-like PCBs, with the exception of PCB 118 that overlaps with PCB 106, were resolved by the apolar/ionic liquid series while on the apolar/polar column series three toxic PCBs overlapped (105+127, 81+148 and 118+106).

  9. Asteroid Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D. T.; Yeomans, D.; Housen, K.; Consolmagno, G.

    2005-01-01

    This data set contains a tabulation of asteroid masses, diameters, and bulk densities compiled by D. T. Britt and published in Table 1 of Britt, et al. (2002) [BRITTETAL2002] in the 'Asteroids III' volume.

  10. Tunable metamaterial dual-band terahertz absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, C. Y.; Li, Z. Z.; Guo, Z. H.; Yue, J.; Luo, Q.; Yao, G.; Ji, J.; Rao, Y. K.; Li, R. K.; Li, D.; Wang, H. X.; Yao, J. Q.; Ling, F. R.

    2015-11-01

    We report a design of a temperature controlled tunable dual band terahertz absorber. The compact single unit cell consists of two nested closed square ring resonators and a layer metallic separated by a substrate strontium titanate (STO) dielectric layer. It is found that the absorber has two distinctive absorption peaks at frequencies 0.096 THz and 0.137 THz, whose peaks are attained 97% and 75%. Cooling the absorber from 400 K to 250 K causes about 25% and 27% shift compared to the resonance frequency of room temperature, when we cooling the temperature to 150 K, we could attained both the two tunabilities exceeding 53%. The frequency tunability is owing to the variation of the dielectric constant of the low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate. The mechanism of the dual band absorber is attributed to the overlapping of dual resonance frequencies, and could be demonstrated by the distributions of the electric field. The method opens up avenues for designing tunable terahertz devices in detection, imaging, and stealth technology.

  11. Methods of calculating radiation absorbed dose.

    PubMed

    Wegst, A V

    1987-01-01

    The new tumoricidal radioactive agents being developed will require a careful estimate of radiation absorbed tumor and critical organ dose for each patient. Clinical methods will need to be developed using standard imaging or counting instruments to determine cumulated organ activities with tracer amounts before the therapeutic administration of the material. Standard MIRD dosimetry methods can then be applied.

  12. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  13. Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Lee, Myung W.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

  14. Shock absorbing mount for electrical components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, R. F., Jr.; Mayne, R. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A shock mount for installing electrical components on circuit boards is described. The shock absorber is made of viscoelastic material which interconnects the electrical components. With this system, shocks imposed on one component of the circuit are not transmitted to other components. A diagram of a typical circuit is provided.

  15. How to build a molecular shock absorber.

    PubMed

    McGough, A

    1999-12-02

    Newly determined structures of the alpha-helical repeats that make up the key 'rod' domains of spectrin and alpha-actinin - which serve as spacers between their actin-binding domains - have provided important insights into how these proteins function as molecular shock absorbers in cells.

  16. Shock absorber protects motive components against overloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Shock absorber with an output shaft, hollow gear, and a pair of springs forming a resilient driving connection between shaft and gear, operates when abnormally high torques are applied. This simple durable frictional device is valuable in rotating mechanisms subject to sudden overloads.

  17. Torus elements used in effective shock absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, P.; Platus, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    Energy absorbing device forces torus elements to revolve annularly between two concentric tubes when a load is applied to one tube. Interference forces can be varied by using torus elements of different thicknesses. The device operates repeatedly in compression or tension, and under problems of large onset rate tolerance or structural overload.

  18. Aldehyde-containing urea-absorbing polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Hsu, G. C.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A novel aldehyde containing polymer (ACP) is prepared by reaction of a polysaccharide with periodate to introduce aldehyde groups onto the C2 - C3 carbon atoms. By introduction of ether and ester groups onto the pendant primary hydroxyl solubility characteristics are modified. The ACP is utilized to absorb nitrogen bases such as urea in vitro or in vivo.

  19. Integrated tuned vibration absorbers: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, Paolo; Zilletti, Michele

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a simulation study on two integrated tuned vibration absorbers (TVAs) designed to control the global flexural vibration of lightly damped thin structures subject to broad frequency band disturbances. The first one consists of a single axial switching TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on variable axial spring and damper elements so that the characteristic damping and natural frequency of the absorber can be switched iteratively to control the resonant response of three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The second one consists of a single three-axes TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on axial and rotational springs and dampers, which are arranged in such a way that the suspended mass is characterized by uncoupled heave and pitch-rolling vibrations. In this case the three damping and natural frequency parameters of the absorber are tuned separately to control three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The simulation study shows that the proposed single-unit absorbers produce, respectively, 5.3 and 8.7 dB reductions of the global flexural vibration of a rectangular plate between 20 and 120 Hz.

  20. Probing the Properties of Distant Galaxies and their Circumgalactic Medium with Damped, Sub-damped, and Super-damped Lyman-alpha Quasar Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; Morrison, Sean; Peroux, Celine; York, Donald G.; Quiret, Samuel; Lauroesch, James Thomas; Khare, Pushpa; Aller, Monique C.

    2016-01-01

    Excellent tools to measure the chemical and physical properties of distant galaxies and their circumgalactic medium are provided by the high H I column density absorbers in quasar spectra. The damped Lyman-alpha absorbers [DLAs; log N(H I) >= 20.3] and the sub-DLA absorbers [19.0 <= log N(H I) < 20.3] dominate the neutral gas reservoir available for star formation. The super-DLAs [DLAs with log N(H I) >= 21.7] provide ideal laboratories to study the most gas-rich and potentially vigorously star-forming galaxies. We report a study of the DLAs (including super-DLAs) and sub-DLAs, based on observations from Keck, VLT, Magellan, and HST. We combine our results with the literature to examine trends between N(H I), metallicity, dust depletion, and gas velocity dispersion. We find that sub-DLAs have higher metallicities than DLAs at all redshifts studied, even after making ionization corrections. We find the super-DLAs have a relatively narrow range of metallicities. A much larger fraction of the super-DLAs lie close to or above the line [X/H] = 20.59 - log N(H I) in the metallicity versus N(H I) plot, compared to less gas-rich DLAs, suggesting that super-DLAs are more likely to be rich in molecules. Relative abundances of Si, S, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn suggest a mixture of dust depletion and alpha-enhancement. We confirm a strong correlation between metallicity and Fe depletion for DLAs, and also find a correlation between metallicity and Si depletion. For sub-DLAs at z < 0.5, we find [N/S] below the level for secondary N production. For some super-DLAs, we estimate star formation rates from potential detections of Lyman-alpha emission. We discuss constraints on electron densities from C II*/C II and Si II*/Si II. The DLAs and sub-DLAs appear to have different metallicity vs. velocity dispersion relations. We also find that the super-DLAs may have somewhat narrower velocity dispersions than the less gas-rich DLAs, and may arise in cooler/ less turbulent gas. We gratefully

  1. Early development of the vertebral column.

    PubMed

    Scaal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The segmental organization of the vertebrate body is most obviously visible in the vertebral column, which consists of a series of vertebral bones and interconnecting joints and ligaments. During embryogenesis, the vertebral column derives from the somites, which are the primary segments of the embryonic paraxial mesoderm. Anatomical, cellular and molecular aspects of vertebral column development have been of interest to developmental biologists for more than 150 years. This review briefly summarizes the present knowledge on early steps of vertebral column development in amniotes, starting from sclerotome formation and leading to the establishment of the anatomical bauplan of the spine composed of vertebral bodies, vertebral arches, intervertebral discs and ribs, and their specific axial identities along the body axis.

  2. Tests on duralumin columns for aircraft construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John G

    1924-01-01

    The following paper is based on the results of tests, upon duralumin columns, contained in two theses presented to the Department of Civil and Sanitary Engineering of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  3. AVIRIS Spectrometer Maps Total Water Vapor Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.; Green, Robert O.; Carrere, Veronique; Margolis, Jack S.; Alley, Ronald E.; Vane, Gregg A.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Gary, Bruce L.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) processes maps of vertical-column abundances of water vapor in atmosphere with good precision and spatial resolution. Maps provide information for meteorology, climatology, and agriculture.

  4. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  5. Axisymmetric Column Collapse in a Rotating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnett, Jay; Thomas, Peter; Dennisenko, Petr

    2012-11-01

    We discuss experimental and computational results of a study investigating the collapse of an initially axisymmetric cylindrical column of granular material within a rotating environment of air or liquids. In industry this type of granular column collapse that is subject to background rotation is encountered, for instance, in the context of the spreading of powders and fertilizers. In comparison to its non-rotating counterpart the physical characteristics of the column collapse in a rotating system are expected to be modified by effects arising from centrifugal forces and Coriolis forces. We compare our new results for the rotating flow to data available in the literature for the collapse of granular columns in non-rotating systems to highlight the differences observed.

  6. Modeling Tropical Precipitation in a Single Column.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Bretherton, Christopher S.

    2000-12-01

    A modified formulation of the traditional single column model for representing a limited area near the equator is proposed. This formulation can also be considered a two-column model in the limit as the area represented by one of the columns becomes very large compared to the other. Only a single column is explicitly modeled, but its free tropospheric temperature, rather than its mean vertical velocity, is prescribed. This allows the precipitation and vertical velocity to be true prognostic variables, as in prior analytical theories of tropical precipitation. Two models developed by other authors are modified according to the proposed formulation. The first is the intermediate atmospheric model of J. D. Neelin and N. Zeng, but with the horizontal connections between columns broken, rendering it a set of disconnected column models. The second is the column model of N. O. Rennó, K. A. Emanuel, and P. H. Stone. In the first model, the set of disconnected column models is run with a fixed temperature that is uniform in the Tropics, and insolation, SST, and surface wind speed taken from a control run of the original model. The column models produce a climatological precipitation field that is grossly similar to that of the control run, despite that the circulation implied by the column models is not required to conserve mass. The addition of horizontal moisture advection by the wind from the control run substantially improves the simulation in dry regions. In the second model the sensitivity of the modeled steady-state precipitation and relative humidity to varying SST and wind speed is examined. The transition from shallow to deep convection is simulated in a `Lagrangian' calculation in which the column model is subjected to an SST that increases in time. In this simulation, the onset of deep convection is delayed to a higher SST than in the steady-state case, due to the effect of horizontal moisture advection (viewed in a Lagrangian reference frame). In both of the

  7. Commander prepares glass columns for electrophoresis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Jack Lousma prepares on of the glass columns for the electrophoresis test in the middeck area of the Columbia. The experiment, deployed in an L-shaped mode in upper right corner, consists of the processing unit with glass columns in which the separation takes place; a camera (partially obscurred by Lousma's face) to document the process; and a cryogenic freezer to freeze and store the samples after separation.

  8. A metamaterial absorber for the terahertz regime: design, fabrication and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Landy, Nathan I; Bingham, Christopher M; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D; Padilla, Willie J

    2008-05-12

    We present a metamaterial that acts as a strongly resonant absorber at terahertz frequencies. Our design consists of a bilayer unit cell which allows for maximization of the absorption through independent tuning of the electrical permittivity and magnetic permeability. An experimental absorptivity of 70% at 1.3 terahertz is demonstrated. We utilize only a single unit cell in the propagation direction, thus achieving an absorption coefficient alpha = 2000 cm(-1). These metamaterials are promising candidates as absorbing elements for thermally based THz imaging, due to their relatively low volume, low density, and narrow band response.

  9. Simulation Analysis of Resonant Frequency of Mix Sucker Rod with absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Mingming; Zhou, Lili; Kaifeng, Xue

    2017-03-01

    Considering the influence of sucker rod absorber (SRA) on longitudinal vibration of sucker rod string (SRS), a new model of mix sucker rod with absorber (MSRWA) in the form of numerical integration is built. In the detail, based on the dynamical theory of continuous systems, the wave equation of instantaneous motion of MSRWA is deduced. The dynamic response is solved out with the mode superposition method. The affecting factors of natural frequency are analyzed, such as the length, diameter, density and elastic modulus of SRS. Then three dimensional curves of natural frequency are obtained. The results are very important for the design and application of SRS.

  10. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Lizio, D.; Baldari, S.

    2011-01-01

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as 90Y and to 131I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  11. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes.

    PubMed

    Amato, E; Lizio, D; Baldari, S

    2011-01-21

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as (90)Y and to (131)I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  12. Electronic properties of perovskite absorbers for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Marina; Giustino, Feliciano

    2015-03-01

    Metal halide perovskite absorbers have captured the attention of the photovoltaics research community in the past 3 years, reaching efficiencies over 19%. Despite this unprecedented progress, the remarkable physical properties of these materials are not yet fully understood. In this work we show an exhaustive computational study of CH3NH3PbI3 within density functional theory and the GW approximation. We show the effect of semicore states and spin-orbit coupling on the quasiparticle band gap of CH3NH3PbI3 and describe a straightforward ``self-consistent scissor'' method to correct the underestimated dielectric screening in the G0W0 approach. Finally, we model the interplay between the structural and electronic properties of lead-iodide perovskites and propose novel lead-iodide peroskite absorbers with different cations at the center of the cuboctahedral cavity facilitating the tunning of the fundamental band gap. This work was supported by the ERC (EU FP7 / ERC 239578), UK EPSRC (EP/J009857/1) and the Leverhulme Trust (RL-2012-001).

  13. Tachyons and the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2001-11-01

    The Proca equation with negative mass-square is studied in a refractive and absorptive spacetime. The generation of superluminal radiation fields by subluminal currents is discussed. The possibility of time-symmetric wave propagation is analysed in the context of the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory; it is shown how advanced modes of the Proca field can be turned into retarded ones in a permeable spacetime capable of producing an absorber field. A microscopic oscillator model for the permeability is suggested. Tachyonic Liénard-Wiechert potentials are studied and strictly causal retarded wave solutions are obtained. Energy transfer by superluminal radiation is discussed, and explicit formulae for the spectral energy density and intensity are derived. Superluminal radiation fields generated by classical damped oscillators carrying tachyonic charge are investigated, including the tachyonic analogue to Thomson and Rayleigh cross sections. The Maxwell equations for negative mass-square are derived, their non-local generalization to frequency-dependent permeabilities, as well as the Poynting theorem for superluminal radiation in an absorptive spacetime.

  14. Stretchable optical device with electrically tunable absorbance and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Cormac A.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.; Frediani, Gabriele; Carpi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    We report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of a quantum dot (QD) doped dielectric elastomer actuator as a new stretchable optical device with electrically tunable optical absorbance and fluorescence. A polyacrylate dielectric elastomer film with carbon grease electrodes was loaded with organic-phase CdSe/CdS luminescent QDs. This study moved from the working hypothesis that electrical actuation of the QD doped elastomer varies the distances among each QD and its neighbours in the structure, modifying the volume and/or surface density of QDs, and thus leading to variable interactions among them, therefore changing the optical spectral properties of the QDs in the elastomer matrix. Experiments revealed that applied voltages increased the UV-vis absorbance, and decreased the photoluminescence (fluorescence) intensity and lifetimes. The former effect proved the working hypothesis, while the latter was not expected. The drop in photoluminescence intensity was found to be caused by the high fringe electric field generated by the actuator. The paper presents characterizations and discusses results, highlighting potentials and challenges of such systems.

  15. Laterally assembled nanowires for ultrathin broadband solar absorbers.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung-Deok; Kempa, Thomas J; Park, Hong-Gyu; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2014-05-05

    We studied optical resonances in laterally oriented Si nanowire arrays by conducting finite-difference time-domain simulations. Localized Fabry-Perot and whispering-gallery modes are supported within the cross section of each nanowire in the array and result in broadband light absorption. Comparison of a nanowire array with a single nanowire shows that the current density (J(SC)) is preserved for a range of nanowire morphologies. The J(SC) of a nanowire array depends on the spacing of its constituent nanowires, which indicates that both diffraction and optical antenna effects contribute to light absorption. Furthermore, a vertically stacked nanowire array exhibits significantly enhanced light absorption because of the emergence of coupled cavity-waveguide modes and the mitigation of a screening effect. With the assumption of unity internal quantum efficiency, the J(SC) of an 800-nm-thick cross-stacked nanowire array is 14.0 mA/cm², which yields a ~60% enhancement compared with an equivalent bulk film absorber. These numerical results underpin a rational design strategy for ultrathin solar absorbers based on assembled nanowire cavities.

  16. Active-absorbing-state phase transition beyond directed percolation: a class of exactly solvable models.

    PubMed

    Basu, Urna; Mohanty, P K

    2009-04-01

    We introduce and solve a model of hardcore particles on a one-dimensional periodic lattice which undergoes an active-absorbing-state phase transition at finite density. In this model, an occupied site is defined to be active if its left neighbor is occupied and the right neighbor is vacant. Particles from such active sites hop stochastically to their right. We show that both the density of active sites and the survival probability vanish as the particle density is decreased below half. The critical exponents and spatial correlations of the model are calculated exactly using the matrix product ansatz. Exact analytical study of several variations of the model reveals that these nonequilibrium phase transitions belong to a new universality class different from the generic active-absorbing-state phase transition, namely, directed percolation.

  17. The handedness of historiated spiral columns.

    PubMed

    Couzin, Robert

    2016-11-17

    Trajan's Column in Rome (AD 113) was the model for a modest number of other spiral columns decorated with figural, narrative imagery from antiquity to the present day. Most of these wind upwards to the right, often with a congruent spiral staircase within. A brief introductory consideration of antique screw direction in mechanical devices and fluted columns suggests that the former may have been affected by the handedness of designers and the latter by a preference for symmetry. However, for the historiated columns that are the main focus of this article, the determining factor was likely script direction. The manner in which this operated is considered, as well as competing mechanisms that might explain exceptions. A related phenomenon is the reversal of the spiral in a non-trivial number of reproductions of the antique columns, from Roman coinage to Renaissance and baroque drawings and engravings. Finally, the consistent inattention in academic literature to the spiral direction of historiated columns and the repeated publication of erroneous earlier reproductions warrants further consideration.

  18. Neutron absorbers and methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, Donna P; Porter, Douglas L; Swank, W David; Erickson, Arnold W

    2014-12-02

    Methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber include combining a first material and a second material to form a compound, reducing the compound into a plurality of particles, mixing the plurality of particles with a third material, and pressing the mixture of the plurality of particles and the third material. One or more components of neutron absorbers may be formed by such methods. Neutron absorbers may include a composite material including an intermetallic compound comprising hafnium aluminide and a matrix material comprising pure aluminum.

  19. Gas Chromatograph Method Optimization Trade Study for RESOLVE: 20-meter Column v. 8-meter Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huz, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    RESOLVE is the payload on a Class D mission, Resource Prospector, which will prospect for water and other volatile resources at a lunar pole. The RESOLVE payload's primary scientific purpose includes determining the presence of water on the moon in the lunar regolith. In order to detect the water, a gas chromatograph (GC) will be used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer (MS). The goal of the experiment was to compare two GC column lengths and recommend which would be best for RESOLVE's purposes. Throughout the experiment, an Inficon Fusion GC and an Inficon Micro GC 3000 were used. The Fusion had a 20m long column with 0.25mm internal diameter (Id). The Micro GC 3000 had an 8m long column with a 0.32mm Id. By varying the column temperature and column pressure while holding all other parameters constant, the ideal conditions for testing with each column length in their individual instrument configurations were determined. The criteria used for determining the optimal method parameters included (in no particular order) (1) quickest run time, (2) peak sharpness, and (3) peak separation. After testing numerous combinations of temperature and pressure, the parameters for each column length that resulted in the most optimal data given my three criteria were selected. The ideal temperature and pressure for the 20m column were 95 C and 50psig. At this temperature and pressure, the peaks were separated and the retention times were shorter compared to other combinations. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 operated better at lower temperature mainly due to the shorter 8m column. The optimal column temperature and pressure were 70 C and 30psig. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 8m column had worse separation than the Inficon Fusion 20m column, but was able to separate water within a shorter run time. Therefore, the most significant tradeoff between the two column lengths was peak separation of the sample versus run time. After performing several tests, it was concluded that better

  20. The Computational Properties of a Simplified Cortical Column Model

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Koch, Christof; Mihalas, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex has a repetitious, laminar structure and performs functions integral to higher cognitive processes, including sensory perception, memory, and coordinated motor output. What computations does this circuitry subserve that link these unique structural elements to their function? Potjans and Diesmann (2014) parameterized a four-layer, two cell type (i.e. excitatory and inhibitory) model of a cortical column with homogeneous populations and cell type dependent connection probabilities. We implement a version of their model using a displacement integro-partial differential equation (DiPDE) population density model. This approach, exact in the limit of large homogeneous populations, provides a fast numerical method to solve equations describing the full probability density distribution of neuronal membrane potentials. It lends itself to quickly analyzing the mean response properties of population-scale firing rate dynamics. We use this strategy to examine the input-output relationship of the Potjans and Diesmann cortical column model to understand its computational properties. When inputs are constrained to jointly and equally target excitatory and inhibitory neurons, we find a large linear regime where the effect of a multi-layer input signal can be reduced to a linear combination of component signals. One of these, a simple subtractive operation, can act as an error signal passed between hierarchical processing stages. PMID:27617444

  1. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-22

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  2. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  3. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  4. Radiative transfer effects on reflected shock waves. II - Absorbing gas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, F. Y.; Olfe, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Radiative cooling effects behind a reflected shock wave are calculated for an absorbing-emitting gas by means of an expansion procedure in the small density ratio across the shock front. For a gray gas shock layer with an optical thickness of order unity or less the absorption integral is simplified by use of the local temperature approximation, whereas for larger optical thicknesses a Rosseland diffusion type of solution is matched with the local temperature approximation solution. The calculations show that the shock wave will attenuate at first and then accelerate to a constant velocity. Under appropriate conditions the gas enthalpy near the wall may increase at intermediate times before ultimately decreasing to zero. A two-band absorption model yields end-wall radiant-heat fluxes which agree well with available shock-tube measurements.

  5. [Evaluation of capillary chromatographic columns packed by electrokinetic packing method].

    PubMed

    Li, Z; You, H; Hu, S; Wei, W; Luo, G

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a method for electrokinetic packing capillary columns is reported. A higher column effeciency was obtained by performing electrochromatography on electrokinetic packing columns. The highest column efficiency in number of theoretical plate per meter was more than 200000, corresponding to reduced plate height less than 2. The reproducibilities of the same column in different intervals and different columns prepared from the same or different batches were compared. The relative standard deviations of the number of theoretical plate and retention time were less than 10% and 8%, respectively. The results indicated that high column efficiency and good reproducibility can be obtained on these new capillary packed columns.

  6. Column selectivity in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. IV. Type-B alkyl-silica columns.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Jonathan J; Dolan, John W; Snyder, Lloyd R

    2003-06-06

    Columns for reversed-phase HPLC (RP-LC) can be characterized by five, retention-related parameters: H (hydrophobicity), S (steric selectivity), A (hydrogen-bond acidity), B (hydrogen-bond basicity), and C (cation-exchange behavior). In the present study, values of the latter parameters have been measured for 92 type-B (low metals content)alkyl-silica columns and compared to column properties such as ligand length,ligand concentration, pore diameter, and the presence or absence of end-capping. With the exception of five columns of unusual design, retention factors, k, for 16 representative test compounds were correlated with values of H, S, etc., within an average +/- 1.2% (1 standard deviation, SD), suggesting that all significant solute-column interactions are recognized by these five column parameters. A single-valued function F(s) is proposed to measure differences in selectivity for any two RP-LC columns whose values of H, S, etc., are known. This allows the easy selection of columns whose selectivity is desired to be either similar to or different from a starting column, for application in either routine analysis or method development.

  7. Evaluating the precision of passive sampling methods using PRCs in the water column.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess these models, four different thicknesses of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers were co-deployed for 28 days in the water column at three sites in New Bedford Harbor, MA, USA. Each sampler was pre-loaded with six PCB performance reference compounds (PRCs) t...

  8. SEPARATION OF OCTYLPHENOL POLYETHER ALCOHOLS SURFACTANTS BY CAPILLARY COLUMN SFC AND HPLC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Separation of nonionic octylphenol polyether alcohols (OPA) by supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and HPLC is described. Using a density programming and a 50-μm i.d. capillary column, a total of 18 group oligomers was separated. The effects of the operating parameters, such...

  9. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  10. Design of a non-traditional dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O

    2009-08-01

    A non-traditional dynamic vibration absorber is proposed for the minimization of maximum vibration velocity response of a vibrating structure. Unlike the traditional damped absorber configuration, the proposed absorber has a linear viscous damper connecting the absorber mass directly to the ground instead of the main mass. Optimum parameters of the proposed absorber are derived based on the fixed-point theory for minimizing the maximum vibration velocity response of a single-degree-of-freedom system under harmonic excitation. The extent of reduction in maximum vibration velocity response of the primary system when using the traditional dynamic absorber is compared with that using the proposed one. Under the optimum tuning condition of the absorbers, it is proved analytically that the proposed absorber provides a greater reduction in maximum vibration velocity response of the primary system than the traditional absorber.

  11. Leaching of heavy metals from E-waste in simulated landfill columns

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yadong Richardson, Jay B.; Mark Bricka, R.; Niu Xiaojun; Yang, Hongbin; Li Lin; Jimenez, Arturo

    2009-07-15

    In recent history the volume of electronic products purchased by consumers has dramatically escalated. As a result this has produced an ever-increasing electronic waste (E-waste) stream, which has generated concerns regarding the E-waste's potential for adversely impacting the environment. The leaching of toxic substances from obsolete personal computers (PCs) and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) of televisions and monitors, which are the most significant components in E-waste stream, was studied using landfill simulation in columns. Five columns were employed. One column served as a control which was filled with municipal solid waste (MSW), two columns were filled with a mixture of MSW and CRTs, and the other two were filled with MSW and computer components including printed wire boards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, CD/DVD drives, and power supply units. The leachate generated from the columns was monitored for toxic materials throughout the two-year duration of the study. Results indicate that lead (Pb) and various other heavy metals that were of environmental and health concern were not detected in the leachate from the simulators. When the samples of the solids were collected from underneath the E-waste in the columns and were analyzed, significant amount of Pb was detected. This indicates that Pb could readily leach from the E-waste, but was absorbed by the solids around the E-waste materials. While Pb was not observed in the leachate in this study, it is likely that the Pb would eventually enter the leachate after a long term transport.

  12. Leaching of heavy metals from E-waste in simulated landfill columns.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Mark Bricka, R; Niu, Xiaojun; Yang, Hongbin; Li, Lin; Jimenez, Arturo

    2009-07-01

    In recent history the volume of electronic products purchased by consumers has dramatically escalated. As a result this has produced an ever-increasing electronic waste (E-waste) stream, which has generated concerns regarding the E-waste's potential for adversely impacting the environment. The leaching of toxic substances from obsolete personal computers (PCs) and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) of televisions and monitors, which are the most significant components in E-waste stream, was studied using landfill simulation in columns. Five columns were employed. One column served as a control which was filled with municipal solid waste (MSW), two columns were filled with a mixture of MSW and CRTs, and the other two were filled with MSW and computer components including printed wire boards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, CD/DVD drives, and power supply units. The leachate generated from the columns was monitored for toxic materials throughout the two-year duration of the study. Results indicate that lead (Pb) and various other heavy metals that were of environmental and health concern were not detected in the leachate from the simulators. When the samples of the solids were collected from underneath the E-waste in the columns and were analyzed, significant amount of Pb was detected. This indicates that Pb could readily leach from the E-waste, but was absorbed by the solids around the E-waste materials. While Pb was not observed in the leachate in this study, it is likely that the Pb would eventually enter the leachate after a long term transport.

  13. Thermally-Resilient, Broadband Optical Absorber from UV-to-IR Derived from Carbon Nanostructures and Method of Making the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor); Coles, James B. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A monolithic optical absorber and methods of making same. The monolithic optical absorber uses an array of mutually aligned carbon nanotubes that are grown using a PECVD growth process and a structure that includes a conductive substrate, a refractory template layer and a nucleation layer. Monolithic optical absorbers made according to the described structure and method exhibit high absorptivity, high site densities (greater than 10.sup.9 nanotubes/cm.sup.2), very low reflectivity (below 1%), and high thermal stability in air (up to at least 400.degree. C.). The PECVD process allows the application of such absorbers in a wide variety of end uses.

  14. Perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition for nonlinear two-fluid plasma equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. F.; Jiang, Z. H.; Hu, X. W.; Zhuang, G.; Jiang, J. F.; Guo, W. X.

    2015-04-01

    Numerical instability occurs when coupled Maxwell equations and nonlinear two-fluid plasma equations are solved using finite difference method through parallel algorithm. Thus, a perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary condition is set to avoid the instability caused by velocity and density gradients between vacuum and plasma. A splitting method is used to first decompose governing equations to time-dependent nonlinear and linear equations. Then, a proper complex variable is used for the spatial derivative terms of the time-dependent nonlinear equation. Finally, with several auxiliary function equations, the governing equations of the absorbing boundary condition are derived by rewriting the frequency domain PML in the original physical space and time coordinates. Numerical examples in one- and two-dimensional domains show that the PML boundary condition is valid and effective. PML stability depends on the absorbing coefficient and thickness of absorbing layers.

  15. On the linear elastic, isotropic modeling of poroelastic distributed vibration absorbers at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harne, R. L.

    2013-07-01

    Several past works have considered a passive vibration absorber device utilizing distributed mass and spring layers. The thickness of the poroelastic foam spring and the area density of the mass layer are modified to achieve a target natural frequency of the device while the foam itself provides adequate dissipation of energy as the mass dynamically compresses it at resonance. A model of the device earlier developed is briefly reviewed and validated by new experiments. The dependence of the absorber natural frequency and damping on the poroelastic spring thickness is observed in detail and is found to be consistent with past work on poroelastic material elastic characteristics outside of the linear dynamic regime. The results set a practical limit on the applicability of linearity assumptions in the present modeling of the distributed poroelastic vibration absorbers and thus determine a design parameter range for which the computationally efficient model is accurate.

  16. Low-frequency and broad band metamaterial absorber: design, fabrication, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liang Kui; Cheng, Hai Feng; Zhou, Yong Jiang; Wang, Jun

    2011-10-01

    We report a metamaterial absorber (MA) with a broad absorption band in the frequency region of 2-4 GHz, whose thickness is not limited to the quarter-wavelength. Theoretical and experimental results show that the absorber has two adjacent absorption apexes at 2.24 and 3.46 GHz, respectively, which are both related to the electric and magnetic resonances of the metamaterial. The absorption is over 68% in the whole wave band of 2-4 GHz provided the thickness of 4 mm. The distributions of the surface currents and the power loss density indicate that the surface currents produced by the electric and magnetic resonances are strongly consumed by the resistive patches. This low-frequency absorber has potential applications in many scientific and martial fields.

  17. Low-metallicity Absorbers Account for Half of the Dense Circumgalactic Gas at z ≲ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotta, Christopher B.; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J. Christopher; O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis of the metallicity distribution of the dense circumgalactic medium (CGM) of galaxies at 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 1.1 as probed by partial Lyman limit systems (pLLSs, 16.1 < log {N}{{H}{{I}}} < 17.2) and LLSs (17.2 ≤ log {N}{{H}{{I}}} < 17.7 in our sample). The new H i-selected sample, drawn from our Hubble Space Telescope COS G140L snapshot survey of 61 QSOs, has 20 pLLSs and 10 LLSs. Combined with our previous survey, we have a total of 44 pLLSs and 11 LLSs. We find that the metallicity distribution of the pLLSs is bimodal at z ≲ 1, with a minimum at [X/H] = -1. The low-metallicity peak comprises (57 ± 8)% of the pLLSs and is centered at [X/H] ≃ -1.87(1.3% solar metallicity), while the high-metallicity peak is centered at [X/H] ≃ -0.32 (48% solar metallicity). Although the sample of LLSs is still small, there is some evidence that the metallicity distributions of the LLSs and pLLSs are different, with a far lower fraction of very metal-poor ([X/H] < -1.4) LLSs than pLLSs. The fraction of LLSs with [X/H] < -1 is similar to that found in pLLSs (˜56%). However, higher H i column density absorbers (log {N}{{H}{{I}}} > 19.0) show a much lower fraction of metal-poor gas; therefore, the metallicity distribution of gas in and around galaxies depends sensitively on N H i at z ≲ 1. We interpret the high-metallicity ([X/H] ≥ -1) pLLSs and LLSs as arising in outflows, recycling winds, and tidally stripped gas around galaxies. The low-metallicity pLLSs and LLSs imply that the CGM of z ≲ 1 galaxies hosts a substantial mass of cool, dense, low-metallicity gas that may ultimately accrete onto the galaxies.

  18. Imaging highly absorbing nanoparticles using photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Simon-Alexandre; Moradi, Hamid; Price, Alain; Murugkar, Sangeeta

    2015-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have tremendous potential in biomedicine. They can be used as absorbing labels inside living cells for the purpose of biomedical imaging, biosensing as well as for photothermal therapy. We demonstrate photothermal imaging of highly-absorbing particles using a pump-probe setup. The photothermal signal is recovered by heterodyne detection, where the excitation pump laser is at 532 nm and the probe laser is at 638 nm. The sample is moved by a scanning stage. Proof of concept images of red polystyrene microspheres and gold nanoparticles are obtained with this home-built multimodal microscope. The increase in temperature at the surface of the gold NPs, due to the pump laser beam, can be directly measured by means of this photothermal microscope and then compared with the results from theoretical predictions. This technique will be useful for characterization of nanoparticles of different shapes, sizes and materials that are used in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  20. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing

    PubMed Central

    Mattiucci, N.; Bloemer, M. J.; Aközbek, N.; D'Aguanno, G.

    2013-01-01

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others. PMID:24220284

  1. A sound absorbing metasurface with coupled resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfei; Wang, Wenqi; Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-08-01

    An impedance matched surface is able, in principle, to totally absorb the incident sound and yield no reflection, and this is desired in many acoustic applications. Here we demonstrate a design of impedance matched sound absorbing surface with a simple construction. By coupling different resonators and generating a hybrid resonance mode, we designed and fabricated a metasurface that is impedance-matched to airborne sound at tunable frequencies with subwavelength scale unit cells. With careful design of the coupled resonators, over 99% energy absorption at central frequency of 511 Hz with a 50% absorption bandwidth of 140 Hz is achieved experimentally. The proposed design can be easily fabricated, and is mechanically stable. The proposed metasurface can be used in many sound absorption applications such as loudspeaker design and architectural acoustics.

  2. Absorbing Software Testing into the Scrum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomikoski, Janne; Tervonen, Ilkka

    In this paper we study, how to absorb software testing into the Scrum method. We conducted the research as an action research during the years 2007-2008 with three iterations. The result showed that testing can and even should be absorbed to the Scrum method. The testing team was merged into the Scrum teams. The teams can now deliver better working software in a shorter time, because testing keeps track of the progress of the development. Also the team spirit is higher, because the Scrum team members are committed to the same goal. The biggest change from test manager’s point of view was the organized Product Owner Team. Test manager don’t have testing team anymore, and in the future all the testing tasks have to be assigned through the Product Backlog.

  3. The ultimate chrome absorber in photomask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Masahiro; Iwashita, Hiroyuki; Kominato, Atsushi; Shishido, Hiroaki; Ushida, Masao; Mitsui, Hideaki

    2008-05-01

    193nm-immersion lithography is the most promising technology for 32nm-node device fabrication. A new Cr absorber (TFC) for 193-nm attenuated phase-shift blanks was developed to meet the photomask requirements without any additional process step, such as hardmask etching. TFC was introduced with a design concept of the vertical profile for shorter etching time, the over etching time reduction. As a result, the dry-etching time was dramatically improved by more than 20% shorter than the conventional Cr absorber (TF11) without any process changes. We confirmed that 150nm-resist thickness was possible by TFC. The 32nm technology-node requirement is fully supported by TFC with thinner CAR, such as resolution and CD performance.

  4. Accelerated life testing of solar absorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Bo; Moeller, K.; Frei, Ulrich; Koehl, Michael

    1994-09-01

    Results from a comprehensive case study on accelerated life testing of some selective solar collector absorber coatings for DHW systems are reviewed. The study was conducted within Task X `Solar Materials Research and Development' of the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program from 1987 to 1992 and is unique due to its quantitative and systematic approach for durability assessment. The work of case study involved the development of both experimental and theoretical tools to aid the assessment of service life or absorber coatings. This entailed performance analysis, failure analysis, microclimate characterization, environmental resistance testing and life date analysis. Predicted in-service degradation of coatings from accelerated life testing was found to be in fairly good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively with what was actually observed on coatings installed and tested for three years in solar collectors working under typical DHW conditions.

  5. Fault Detection for Automotive Shock Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Alcantara, Diana; Morales-Menendez, Ruben; Amezquita-Brooks, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Fault detection for automotive semi-active shock absorbers is a challenge due to the non-linear dynamics and the strong influence of the disturbances such as the road profile. First obstacle for this task, is the modeling of the fault, which has been shown to be of multiplicative nature. Many of the most widespread fault detection schemes consider additive faults. Two model-based fault algorithms for semiactive shock absorber are compared: an observer-based approach and a parameter identification approach. The performance of these schemes is validated and compared using a commercial vehicle model that was experimentally validated. Early results shows that a parameter identification approach is more accurate, whereas an observer-based approach is less sensible to parametric uncertainty.

  6. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variations from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.

  7. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  8. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Yong W.; Wiedermann, Arne H.; Ockert, Carl E.

    1985-01-01

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  9. Vibration absorber modeling for handheld machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd Azman; Mustafa, Mohd Muhyiddin; Jamil, Jazli Firdaus; Salim, Mohd Azli; Ramli, Faiz Redza

    2015-05-01

    Handheld machine tools produce continuous vibration to the users during operation. This vibration causes harmful effects to the health of users for repeated operations in a long period of time. In this paper, a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) is designed and modeled to reduce the vibration generated by the handheld machine tool. Several designs and models of vibration absorbers with various stiffness properties are simulated, tested and optimized in order to diminish the vibration. Ordinary differential equation is used to derive and formulate the vibration phenomena in the machine tool with and without the DVA. The final transfer function of the DVA is later analyzed using commercial available mathematical software. The DVA with optimum properties of mass and stiffness is developed and applied on the actual handheld machine tool. The performance of the DVA is experimentally tested and validated by the final result of vibration reduction.

  10. Disposable Diaper Absorbency: Improvements via Advanced Designs.

    PubMed

    Helmes, C Tucker; O'Connor, Robert; Sawyer, Larry; Young, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    Absorbency effectiveness in diapers has improved significantly in recent years with the advent of new ingredient combinations and advanced design features. With these features, many leading products maintain their dryness performance overnight. Considering the importance of holding liquid away from the skin, ongoing research in diaper construction focuses on strategies to increase the effectiveness to capture liquid and help avoid rewetting of infant skin. The layout and design of a disposable diaper allows for distribution of absorbency features where they can provide the optimal benefit. Clinical evidence indicates materials can keep moisture away from the skin in the diapered area, helping maintain proper skin hydration, minimizing irritation, and contributing to reduced rates of diaper rash.

  11. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides in vegetables and fruits using a high capacity absorbent polymer for water.

    PubMed

    Obana, H; Akutsu, K; Okihashi, M; Kakimoto, S; Hori, S

    1999-08-01

    A single extraction and a single clean-up procedure was developed for multi-residue analysis of pesticides in non-fatty vegetables and fruits. The method involves the use of a high capacity absorbent polymer for water as a drying agent in extraction from wet food samples and of a graphitized carbon column for clean-up. A homogeneously chopped food sample (20 g) and polymer (3 g) were mixed to absorb water from the sample and then 10 min later the mixture was vigorously extracted with ethyl acetate (100 ml). The extract (50 ml), separated by filtration, was loaded on a graphitized carbon column without concentration. Additional ethyl acetate (50 ml) was also eluted and both eluates were concentrated to 5 ml for analysis. The procedure for sample preparation was completed within 2 h. In a recovery test, 107 pesticides were spiked and average recoveries were more than 80% from asparagus, orange, potato and strawberry. Most pesticides were recovered in the range 70-120% with usually less than a 10% RSD for six experiments. The results indicated that a single extraction with ethyl acetate in the presence of polymer can be applied to the monitoring of pesticide residues in foods.

  12. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, I.E.

    1992-05-12

    An absorber waveguide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the waveguide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the waveguide. 11 figs.

  13. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Isidoro E.

    1992-01-01

    An absorber wave guide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the wave guide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the wave guide.

  14. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2016-07-12

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  15. Metamaterial Resonant Absorbers for Terahertz Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    and their periodic nature , finite element (FE) modeling is the preferable means of designing metamaterials. In order to use metamaterials in sensors ...will incorporate the metamaterial absorber design of this research into a more efficient, cost effective, bi-material THz sensor that can be employed...in a variety of naval applications. 14. SUBJECT TERMS terahertz sensors , metamaterials, uncooled detectors 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 73 16

  16. Lightweight Energy Absorbers for Blast Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balles, Donald L.; Ingram, Thomas M.; Novak, Howard L.; Schricker, Albert F.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic-energy-absorbing liners made of aluminum foam have been developed to replace solid lead liners in blast containers on the aft skirt of the solid rocket booster of the space shuttle. The blast containers are used to safely trap the debris from small explosions that are initiated at liftoff to sever frangible nuts on hold-down studs that secure the spacecraft to a mobile launch platform until liftoff.

  17. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2016-07-12

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  18. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-06-17

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  19. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-28

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  20. Discovery of a Damped Lyα Absorber at z = 3.3 along a Galaxy Sight-line in the SSA22 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawatari, K.; Inoue, A. K.; Kousai, K.; Hayashino, T.; Cooke, R.; Prochaska, J. X.; Yamada, T.; Matsuda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Using galaxies as background light sources to map the Lyα absorption lines is a novel approach to study Damped Lyα Absorbers (DLAs). We report the discovery of an intervening z = 3.335 ± 0.007 DLA along a galaxy sight-line identified among 80 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) spectra obtained with our Very Large Telescope/Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph survey in the SSA22 field. The measured DLA neutral hydrogen (H i) column density is log(NH i/cm-2) = 21.68 ± 0.17. The DLA covering fraction over the extended background LBG is >70% (2σ), yielding a conservative constraint on the DLA area of ≳1 kpc2. Our search for a counterpart galaxy hosting this DLA concludes that there is no counterpart galaxy with star formation rate larger than a few M⊙ yr-1, ruling out an unobscured violent star formation in the DLA gas cloud. We also rule out the possibility that the host galaxy of the DLA is a passive galaxy with M* ≳ 5 × 1010M⊙ or a heavily dust-obscured galaxy with E(B - V) ≳ 2. The DLA may coincide with a large-scale overdensity of the spectroscopic LBGs. The occurrence rate of the DLA is compatible with that of DLAs found in QSO sight-lines.