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Sample records for absorbing galaxies imaging

  1. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF SIX METAL-RICH QUASAR ABSORBER GALAXY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Straka, Lorrie A.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.

    2011-06-15

    Absorption lines in quasar spectra allow us to locate and study intervening galaxies. In order to obtain a clearer picture of these absorber galaxies, we have used the Near-Infrared Camera Fabry-Perot System at Apache Point Observatory to obtain near-infrared broadband images in one or more filters (J and K{sub s} ) of six quasar fields containing metal-rich low-z damped or sub-damped Ly{alpha} systems. These data allow us to search for the galaxies and constrain their luminosities. Candidate absorber galaxies are detected at 2.''01-7.''38 separation from the quasar in three out of six fields in the J and K{sub s} bands at >3{sigma} level with luminosities ranging from log(L/L{sub sun}) = 10.44-10.36 in the J band (for E-Sc type galaxies) and log(L/L{sub sun}) = 11.59-10.03 in the K{sub s} band for our detections. We place limits on the remaining fields with no detections of log(L/L{sub sun}) <10.83-9.75 for the J band and log(L/L{sub sun}) <10.43-10.05 for the K{sub s} band. We are also able to utilize Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra for each field to calculate optical fluxes and limits as well as limits on star formation rate via [O II]{lambda}3727 emission in spectra. Our data, combined with other recent imaging results for metal-rich absorbers, suggest a possible positive correlation between absorber metallicity and galaxy luminosity, although the samples are still small.

  2. From Exoplanets to Quasars: Detection of Potential Damped Lyα Absorbing Galaxies Using Angular Differential Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Groh, Mara; Marois, Christian; Ellison, Sara L.

    2016-11-01

    The advantages of angular differential imaging (ADI) have been previously untested in imaging the host galaxies of damped Lyα (DLA) systems. In this pilot study, we present the first application of ADI to directly image the host galaxy of the DLA seen toward the quasar J1431+3952. K-band imaging of the field surrounding J1431+3952 was obtained on the Gemini North telescope with an adaptive optics system and a laser guide star. We computed a sensitivity curve that demonstrates the sensitivity of our observations as a function of K-band magnitude, impact parameter and DLA angular size. For an impact parameter of 0.″5 (3.4 kpc at the redshift of the absorber) our mass sensitivity is log (M {}\\star /M {}⊙ ) ˜ 9.2 and drops to ˜9.0 at separations beyond ˜6 kpc for the smallest size model galaxy. Three candidate galaxies are identified within 5″. Stellar masses were computed from the K-band photometry yielding values of log (M {}\\star /M {}⊙ ) ˜ 9.9, 9.7 and 11.1 respectively. The likely identification of the absorbing galaxy is discussed, and we conclude that the galaxy with the largest impact parameter and highest stellar mass is unlikely to be the host, based on its inconsistency with the N(HI) impact parameter relation and inconsistent photometric redshift. While we cannot distinguish between the remaining two candidates as the DLA host, we note that, despite the low spin temperature and relatively high metallicity of the DLA, the host does not appear to be a particularly luminous (high-mass) galaxy.

  3. BROADBAND IMAGING SEGREGATION OF z approx 3 Lyalpha EMITTING AND Lyalpha ABSORBING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Jeff

    2009-10-10

    The spectral properties of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) offer a means to isolate pure samples displaying either dominant Lyalpha in absorption or Lyalpha in emission using broadband information alone. We present criteria developed using a large z approx 3 LBG spectroscopic sample from the literature that enables large numbers of each spectral type to be gathered in photometric data, providing good statistics for multiple applications. In addition, we find that the truncated faint, blue-end tail of z approx 3 LBG population overlaps and leads directly into an expected Lyalpha emitter (LAE) population. As a result, we present simple criteria to cleanly select large numbers of z approx 3 LAEs in deep broadband surveys. We present the spectroscopic results of 32r' approx< 25.5 LBGs and r' approx< 27.0 LAEs at z approx 3 preselected in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey that confirm these criteria.

  4. Three intervening galaxy absorbers towards GRB 060418: faint and dusty?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Vreeswijk, Paul; Ledoux, Cédric; Willis, Jon P.; Jaunsen, Andreas; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Smette, Alain; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Møller, Palle; Hjorth, Jens; Kaufer, Andreas

    2006-10-01

    We present an analysis of three strong, intervening Mg II absorption systems (zabs = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107) towards the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060418. From high-resolution Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra we measure metal column densities and find that the highest redshift absorber exhibits a large amount of dust depletion compared with damped Lyman absorbers (DLAs) seen in quasi-stellar object (QSO) spectra. The intervening zabs = 1.107 absorber is also unusual in exhibiting a clear 2175-Å bump, the first time this feature has been definitively detected in a GRB spectrum. The GRB afterglow spectrum is best fitted with a two-component extinction curve: a Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) extinction law at z = 1.49 (the redshift of the host) with E(B - V) = 0.07 +/- 0.01 and a Galactic extinction curve at z ~ 1.1 with E(B - V) = 0.08 +/- 0.01. We also present a moderately deep New Technology Telescope (NTT) R-band image of the GRB 060418 field and spectroscopy of four galaxies within 1 arcmin. None of these objects has a redshift that matches any of the intervening absorbers, and we conclude that the galaxies responsible for the two intervening MgII absorbers at z ~ 0.6 have luminosities .

  5. Imaging of Damped Ly-alpha Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jim, K. T. C.; Roth, K. C.

    1998-05-01

    Intervening H I gas clouds toward QSOs give rise to damped Ly-alpha absorption. Because of the high column density (N(H I)>= 2*E(20) cm(-2) ) these systems have been thought to be galactic disks in some stage of formation. However, because potential optical counterparts have not been identified for most damped Ly-alpha systems, it is possible that some of the absorbing systems could be dwarf irregular galaxies or low surface brightness galaxies, and are thus difficult to image. In any case, the absorbers are expected to have small angular separation from the QSOs, and so high resolution imaging is required to differentiate the absorbers from the QSOs. Because previous studies have not shown any dominant morphological form for the few candidate objects known, our images are obtained with the Hawaii tip-tilt system in order to achieve the best possible morphological classification. By imaging in the NIR and optical bands that bracket the 4000 Angstroms break of these Ly-alpha absorbers, we can more readily select candidate objects by photometrically constraining their redshifts. In our sample of 14 QSOs with abosorbers from 1absorbers (Kolhatkar et al.)

  6. MAGIICAT I. The Mg II Absorber-Galaxy Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Nikole M.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2013-10-01

    We describe the Mg II Absorber-Galaxy Catalog, MAGIICAT, a compilation of 182 spectroscopically identified intermediate redshift (0.07 <= z <= 1.1) galaxies with measurements of Mg II λλ2796, 2803 absorption from their circumgalactic medium within projected distances of 200 kpc from background quasars. In this work, we present "isolated" galaxies, which are defined as having no spectroscopically identified galaxy within a projected distance of 100 kpc and a line of sight velocity separation of 500 km s-1. We standardized all galaxy properties to the ΛCDM cosmology and galaxy luminosities, absolute magnitudes, and rest-frame colors to the B- and K-band on the AB system. We present galaxy properties and rest-frame Mg II equivalent width, Wr (2796), versus galaxy redshift. The well-known anti-correlation between Wr (2796) and quasar-galaxy impact parameter, D, is significant to the 8σ level. The mean color of MAGIICAT galaxies is consistent with an Sbc galaxy for all redshifts. We also present B- and K-band luminosity functions for different Wr (2796) and redshift subsamples: "weak absorbing" [Wr (2796) < 0.3 Å], "strong absorbing" [Wr (2796) >= 0.3 Å], low redshift (z < langzrang), and high redshift (z >= langzrang), where langzrang = 0.359 is the median galaxy redshift. Rest-frame color B - K correlates with MK at the 8σ level for the whole sample but is driven by the strong absorbing, high-redshift subsample (6σ). Using MK as a proxy for stellar mass and examining the luminosity functions, we infer that in lower stellar mass galaxies, Mg II absorption is preferentially detected in blue galaxies and the absorption is more likely to be weak.

  7. MAGIICAT I. THE Mg II ABSORBER-GALAXY CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Nikole M.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2013-10-20

    We describe the Mg II Absorber-Galaxy Catalog, MAGIICAT, a compilation of 182 spectroscopically identified intermediate redshift (0.07 ≤ z ≤ 1.1) galaxies with measurements of Mg II λλ2796, 2803 absorption from their circumgalactic medium within projected distances of 200 kpc from background quasars. In this work, we present 'isolated' galaxies, which are defined as having no spectroscopically identified galaxy within a projected distance of 100 kpc and a line of sight velocity separation of 500 km s{sup –1}. We standardized all galaxy properties to the ΛCDM cosmology and galaxy luminosities, absolute magnitudes, and rest-frame colors to the B- and K-band on the AB system. We present galaxy properties and rest-frame Mg II equivalent width, W{sub r} (2796), versus galaxy redshift. The well-known anti-correlation between W{sub r} (2796) and quasar-galaxy impact parameter, D, is significant to the 8σ level. The mean color of MAGIICAT galaxies is consistent with an Sbc galaxy for all redshifts. We also present B- and K-band luminosity functions for different W{sub r} (2796) and redshift subsamples: 'weak absorbing' [W{sub r} (2796) < 0.3 Å], 'strong absorbing' [W{sub r} (2796) ≥ 0.3 Å], low redshift (z < (z)), and high redshift (z ≥ (z)), where (z) = 0.359 is the median galaxy redshift. Rest-frame color B – K correlates with M{sub K} at the 8σ level for the whole sample but is driven by the strong absorbing, high-redshift subsample (6σ). Using M{sub K} as a proxy for stellar mass and examining the luminosity functions, we infer that in lower stellar mass galaxies, Mg II absorption is preferentially detected in blue galaxies and the absorption is more likely to be weak.

  8. An extended cold gas absorber in a central cluster galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Russell J.; Edge, Alastair C.

    2017-10-01

    We present the serendipitous discovery of an extended cold gas structure projected close to the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) of the z=0.045 cluster Abell 3716, from archival integral field spectroscopy. The gas is revealed through narrow Na D line absorption, seen against the stellar light of the BCG, which can be traced for $\\sim$25 kpc, with a width of 2-4 kpc. The gas is offset to higher velocity than the BCG (by $\\sim$100 km/s), showing that it is infalling rather than outflowing; the intrinsic linewidth is $\\sim$80 km/s (FWHM). Very weak H$\\alpha$ line emission is detected from the structure, and a weak dust absorption feature is suggested from optical imaging, but no stellar counterpart has been identified. We discuss some possible interpretations for the absorber: as a projected low-surface-brightness galaxy, as a stream of gas that was stripped from an infalling cluster galaxy, or as a "retired" cool-core nebula filament.

  9. Featured Image: Interacting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    This beautiful image shows two galaxies, IC 2163 and NGC 2207, as they undergo a grazing collision 114 million light-years away. The image is composite, constructed from Hubble (blue), Spitzer (green), and ALMA (red) data. In a recent study, Debra Elmegreen (Vassar College) and collaborators used this ALMA data to trace the individual molecular clouds in the two interacting galaxies, identifying a total of over 200 clouds that each contain a mass of over a million solar masses. These clouds represent roughly half the molecular gas in the two galaxies total. Elmegreen and collaborators track the properties of these clouds and their relation to star-forming regions observed with Hubble. For more information about their observations, check out the paper linked below.A closer look at the ALMA observations for these galaxies, with the different emission regions labeled. Most of the molecular gas emission comes from the eyelids of IC 2163, and the nuclear ring and Feature i in NGC 2207. [Elmegreen et al. 2017]CitationDebra Meloy Elmegreen et al 2017 ApJ 841 43. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa6ba5

  10. Featured Image: Identifying Weird Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    Hoags Object, an example of a ring galaxy. [NASA/Hubble Heritage Team/Ray A. Lucas (STScI/AURA)]The above image (click for the full view) shows PanSTARRSobservationsof some of the 185 galaxies identified in a recent study as ring galaxies bizarre and rare irregular galaxies that exhibit stars and gas in a ring around a central nucleus. Ring galaxies could be formed in a number of ways; one theory is that some might form in a galaxy collision when a smaller galaxy punches through the center of a larger one, triggering star formation around the center. In a recent study, Ian Timmis and Lior Shamir of Lawrence Technological University in Michigan explore ways that we may be able to identify ring galaxies in the overwhelming number of images expected from large upcoming surveys. They develop a computer analysis method that automatically finds ring galaxy candidates based on their visual appearance, and they test their approach on the 3 million galaxy images from the first PanSTARRS data release. To see more of the remarkable galaxies the authors found and to learn more about their identification method, check out the paper below.CitationIan Timmis and Lior Shamir 2017 ApJS 231 2. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/aa78a3

  11. Constraining Stellar Properties of Intervening Damped Lyα and Mg II Absorbing Galaxies toward GRB 050730

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minowa, Y.; Okoshi, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Takami, H.

    2012-09-01

    We performed multiband deep imaging of the field around GRB 050730 to identify the host galaxies of intervening absorbers, which consist of a damped Lyα absorption (DLA) system at z abs = 3.564, a sub-DLA system at z abs = 3.022, and strong Mg II absorption systems at z abs = 1.773 and 2.253. Our observations were performed after the gamma-ray burst afterglow had disappeared. Thus, our imaging survey has a higher sensitivity to the host galaxies of the intervening absorbers than the normal imaging surveys in the direction of QSOs, for which the QSO glare tends to hide the foreground galaxies. In this deep imaging survey, we could not detect any unambiguous candidates for the host galaxies of the intervening absorbers. Using the 3σ upper limit of the flux in the optical to mid-infrared observing bands, which corresponds to the UV to optical bands in the rest frame of the intervening absorbers, we constrained the star formation rates and stellar masses of the hosts. We estimated the star formation rates for the intervening absorbers to be <~ 2.5 M ⊙ yr-1 for z > 3 DLAs and <~ 1.0 M ⊙ yr-1 for z ~ 2 Mg II systems. Their stellar masses are estimated to be several times 109 M ⊙ or smaller for all intervening galaxies. These properties are comparable to dwarf galaxies, rather than the massive star-forming galaxies commonly seen in the z > 2 galaxy surveys based on emission-line selection or color selection.

  12. Enhancement classification of galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkinson, John

    With the advent of astronomical imaging technology developments, and the increased capacity of digital storage, the production of photographic atlases of the night sky have begun to generate volumes of data which need to be processed autonomously. As part of the Tonantzintla Digital Sky Survey construction, the present work involves software development for the digital image processing of astronomical images, in particular operations that preface feature extraction and classification. Recognition of galaxies in these images is the primary objective of the present work. Many galaxy images have poor resolution or contain faint galaxy features, resulting in the misclassification of galaxies. An enhancement of these images by the method of the Heap transform is proposed, and experimental results are provided which demonstrate the image enhancement to improve the presence of faint galaxy features thereby improving classification accuracy. The feature extraction was performed using morphological features that have been widely used in previous automated galaxy investigations. Principal component analysis was applied to the original and enhanced data sets for a performance comparison between the original and reduced features spaces. Classification was performed by the Support Vector Machine learning algorithm.

  13. Modeling the distribution of Mg II absorbers around galaxies using background galaxies and quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Bordoloi, R.; Lilly, S. J.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Churchill, C. W.

    2014-04-01

    We present joint constraints on the distribution of Mg II absorption around high redshift galaxies obtained by combining two orthogonal probes, the integrated Mg II absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of parent galaxies of individual strong Mg II systems as seen in the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that can be used to predict, for different two- and three-dimensional distributions, how the projected Mg II absorption will depend on a galaxy's apparent inclination, the impact parameter b and the azimuthal angle between the projected vector to the line of sight and the projected minor axis. In general, we find that variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the Mg II absorption than the dependence on the inclination of the galaxies. In addition to the clear azimuthal dependence in the integrated Mg II absorption that we reported earlier in Bordoloi et al., we show that strong equivalent width Mg II absorbers (W{sub r} (2796) ≥ 0.3 Å) are also asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies: 72% of the absorbers in Kacprzak et al., and 100% of the close-in absorbers within 35 kpc of the center of their host galaxies, are located within 50° of the host galaxy's projected semi minor axis. It is shown that either composite models consisting of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can well represent the azimuthal dependencies observed in both the stacked spectrum and quasar absorption-line data sets within 40 kpc. Simultaneously fitting both data sets, we find that in the composite model the bipolar cone has an opening angle of ∼100° (i.e., confined to within 50° of the disk axis) and contains about two-thirds of the total Mg II absorption in the system. The single softened cone model has an exponential fall off with azimuthal

  14. Infrared images of merging galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, G. S.; James, P. A.; Joseph, R. D.; Mclean, I. S.; Doyon, R.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared imaging of interacting galaxies is especially interesting because their optical appearance is often so chaotic due to extinction by dust and emission from star formation regions, that it is impossible to locate the nuclei or determine the true stellar distribution. However, at near-infrared wavelengths extinction is considerably reduced, and most of the flux from galaxies originates from red giant stars that comprise the dominant stellar component by mass. Thus near infrared images offer the opportunity to study directly components of galactic structure which are otherwise inaccessible. Such images may ultimately provide the framework in which to understand the activity taking place in many of the mergers with high Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) luminosities. Infrared images have been useful in identifying double structures in the nuclei of interacting galaxies which have not even been hinted at by optical observations. A striking example of this is given by the K images of Arp 220. Graham et al. (1990) have used high resolution imaging to show that it has a double nucleus coincident with the radio sources in the middle of the dust lane. The results suggest that caution should be applied in the identification of optical bright spots as multiple nuclei in the absence of other evidence. They also illustrate the advantages of using infrared imaging to study the underlying structure in merging galaxies. The authors have begun a program to take near infrared images of galaxies which are believed to be mergers of disk galaxies because they have tidal tails and filaments. In many of these the merger is thought to have induced exceptionally luminous infrared emission (cf. Joseph and Wright 1985, Sanders et al. 1988). Although the optical images of the galaxies show spectacular dust lanes and filaments, the K images all have a very smooth distribution of light with an apparently single nucleus.

  15. Ly alpha and IR galaxy companions of high redshift damped Ly alpha QSO absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caulet, Adeline; Mccaughrean, Mark

    1993-01-01

    We have used a Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS3) HgCdTe 256x256 array detector with the Infrared (IR) camera on the 2.3m telescope at Steward Observatory to image several Quasi-Stellar Object (QSO) fields. The limiting magnitude is K'(2.1 microns) = 21.0 - 21.5 mag per square arcsec for a 3 sigma detection in 3 hours of in-field chopping observations. Each QSO line-of-sight samples several known absorbers with Mg2(lambda)2796-2803 A and/or C4(lambda)1548-1551 A absorption doublets. The equivalent width distributions of the low and high ionization absorption lines of the absorber sample are identical to those of the parent population of all absorbers. This selection process, used already for a spectroscopic survey of Mg2 absorption lines in C4-selected absorption systems at high z, gives a methodical approach to observing, reduces the observer biases, and makes a more efficient use of telescope time. This selection guarantees that imaging of the sample of QSO fields will provide complete sampling of the whole population of high z QSO absorbers. Follow-up optical and IR spectroscopy of these objects is scheduled for redshift measurement and confirmation of the absorbing galaxies and the cluster members.

  16. The unusual field of the quasar 3C 336 - Identification of three foreground Mg II absorbing galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Dickinson, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Imaging and spectroscopic observations of the field of the QSO 3C 336 (z = 0.927), whose absorption spectrum exhibits at least three Mg II 2796, 2803-A absorption systems with z sub abs less than z sub em, making it the richest low-redshift absorption spectrum observed in a recently completed absorption line survey. The most intrinsically faint Mg II absorbing galaxy yet discovered is tentatively identified. With z equal to 0.472 and B greater than 24, its properties strongly resemble those of the so-called faint blue galaxies found in deep imaging and spectroscopic surveys for field galaxies. The implications of this very complex field for the general properties of galaxies producing heavy element absorption systems in the spectra of QSOs are discussed.

  17. Imaging highly absorbing nanoparticles using photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Simon-Alexandre; Moradi, Hamid; Price, Alain; Murugkar, Sangeeta

    2015-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have tremendous potential in biomedicine. They can be used as absorbing labels inside living cells for the purpose of biomedical imaging, biosensing as well as for photothermal therapy. We demonstrate photothermal imaging of highly-absorbing particles using a pump-probe setup. The photothermal signal is recovered by heterodyne detection, where the excitation pump laser is at 532 nm and the probe laser is at 638 nm. The sample is moved by a scanning stage. Proof of concept images of red polystyrene microspheres and gold nanoparticles are obtained with this home-built multimodal microscope. The increase in temperature at the surface of the gold NPs, due to the pump laser beam, can be directly measured by means of this photothermal microscope and then compared with the results from theoretical predictions. This technique will be useful for characterization of nanoparticles of different shapes, sizes and materials that are used in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  18. IRAC Imaging of LSB Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, James; McGaugh, Stacy; Lelli, Federico

    2017-04-01

    We propose a program to observe a large sample of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies. Large galaxy surveys conducted with Spitzer suffer from the unavoidable selection bias against LSB systems (e.g., the S4G survey). Even those programs thathave specifically targeted LSB galaxies have usually been restricted objects of intermediate surface brightness (between 22 and 23 B mag/ []). Our sample is selected to be of a more extreme LSB nature (with central surface brightness fainter than 23 Bmag/[]). Even warm, Spitzer is the ideal instrument to image these low contrast targets in the near infrared: our sample goes a considerable way towards remedying this hole in the Spitzer legacy archive, also increasing coverage in terms of stellar mass, gas mass, and SFR. The sample will be used to address the newly discovered radial acceleration relation (RAR) in disk galaxies. While issues involving the connection between baryons and dark matter have been known since the development of the global baryonic Tully-Fisher (bTF) relation, it is only in the last six months that the particle physics and theoretical communities have recognized and responded to the local coupling between dark and baryonic matter represented by the RAR. This important new correlation is effectively a new natural law for galaxies. Spitzer photometry has been at the forefront of resolving the stellar mass component in galaxies that make-up the RAR and is the primary reason for the discovery of this new kinematic law.

  19. Automatic morphological classification of galaxy images

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Lior

    2009-01-01

    We describe an image analysis supervised learning algorithm that can automatically classify galaxy images. The algorithm is first trained using a manually classified images of elliptical, spiral, and edge-on galaxies. A large set of image features is extracted from each image, and the most informative features are selected using Fisher scores. Test images can then be classified using a simple Weighted Nearest Neighbor rule such that the Fisher scores are used as the feature weights. Experimental results show that galaxy images from Galaxy Zoo can be classified automatically to spiral, elliptical and edge-on galaxies with accuracy of ~90% compared to classifications carried out by the author. Full compilable source code of the algorithm is available for free download, and its general-purpose nature makes it suitable for other uses that involve automatic image analysis of celestial objects. PMID:20161594

  20. Automatic morphological classification of galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Lior

    2009-11-01

    We describe an image analysis supervised learning algorithm that can automatically classify galaxy images. The algorithm is first trained using manually classified images of elliptical, spiral and edge-on galaxies. A large set of image features is extracted from each image, and the most informative features are selected using Fisher scores. Test images can then be classified using a simple Weighted Nearest Neighbour rule such that the Fisher scores are used as the feature weights. Experimental results show that galaxy images from Galaxy Zoo can be classified automatically to spiral, elliptical and edge-on galaxies with an accuracy of ~90 per cent compared to classifications carried out by the author. Full compilable source code of the algorithm is available for free download, and its general-purpose nature makes it suitable for other uses that involve automatic image analysis of celestial objects.

  1. Image processing of galaxy photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arp, H.; Lorre, J.

    1976-01-01

    New computer techniques for analyzing and processing photographic images of galaxies are presented, with interesting scientific findings gleaned from the processed photographic data. Discovery and enhancement of very faint and low-contrast nebulous features, improved resolution of near-limit detail in nebulous and stellar images, and relative colors of a group of nebulosities in the field are attained by the methods. Digital algorithms, nonlinear pattern-recognition filters, linear convolution filters, plate averaging and contrast enhancement techniques, and an atmospheric deconvolution technique are described. New detail is revealed in images of NGC 7331, Stephan's Quintet, Seyfert's Sextet, and the jet in M87, via processes of addition of plates, star removal, contrast enhancement, standard deviation filtering, and computer ratioing to bring out qualitative color differences.

  2. Image processing of galaxy photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arp, H.; Lorre, J.

    1976-01-01

    New computer techniques for analyzing and processing photographic images of galaxies are presented, with interesting scientific findings gleaned from the processed photographic data. Discovery and enhancement of very faint and low-contrast nebulous features, improved resolution of near-limit detail in nebulous and stellar images, and relative colors of a group of nebulosities in the field are attained by the methods. Digital algorithms, nonlinear pattern-recognition filters, linear convolution filters, plate averaging and contrast enhancement techniques, and an atmospheric deconvolution technique are described. New detail is revealed in images of NGC 7331, Stephan's Quintet, Seyfert's Sextet, and the jet in M87, via processes of addition of plates, star removal, contrast enhancement, standard deviation filtering, and computer ratioing to bring out qualitative color differences.

  3. Galaxy counterparts of intervening high-z sub-DLAs/DLAs and Mg ii absorbers towards gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Rossi, A.; Jakobsson, P.; Ledoux, C.; De Cia, A.; Krühler, T.; Mehner, A.; Björnsson, G.; Chen, H.-W.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Perley, D. A.; Hjorth, J.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Ellison, S.; Møller, P.; Worseck, G.; Chapman, R.; Dall'Aglio, A.; Letawe, G.

    2012-10-01

    We present the first search for galaxy counterparts of intervening high-z (2 < z < 3.6) sub-damped Lyα absorbers (sub-DLAs) and DLAs towards gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Our final sample comprises five intervening sub-DLAs and DLAs in four GRB fields. To identify candidate galaxy counterparts of the absorbers we used deep optical- and near-infrared imaging, and low-, mid- and high-resolution spectroscopy acquired with 6-m to 10-m class telescopes, the Hubble and the Spitzer Space Telescopes. Furthermore, we used the spectroscopic information and spectral-energy-distribution fitting techniques to study them in detail. Our main result is the detection and spectroscopic confirmation of the galaxy counterpart of the intervening DLA at z = 3.096 in the field of GRB 070721B (zGRB = 3.6298) as proposed by other authors. We also identify good candidates for the galaxy counterparts of the two strong Mg ii absorbers at z = 0.6915 and 1.4288 towards GRB 050820A (zGRB = 2.615). The properties of the detected DLA galaxy are typical for Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at similar redshifts; a young, highly star-forming galaxy that shows evidence for a galactic outflow. This supports thehypothesis that a DLA can be the gaseous halo of an LBG. In addition, we report a redshift coincidence of different objects associated with metal lines in the same field, separated by 130-161 kpc. The high detection rate of three correlated structures on a length scale as short as ~150 kpc in two pairs of lines of sight is intriguing. The absorbers in each of these are most likely not part of the same gravitationally bound structure. They more likely represent groups of galaxies. Based in part on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, as part of the programs 075.A-0603, 075.A-0385, 077.A-0312, 084.A-0303, 177.A-0591 and 275.D-5022. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space

  4. DECA: Decomposition of images of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenkov, A. V.; Savchenko, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    DECA performs photometric analysis of images of disk and elliptical galaxies having a regular structure. It is written in Python and combines the capabilities of several widely used packages for astronomical data processing such as IRAF, SExtractor, and the GALFIT code to perform two-dimensional decomposition of galaxy images into several photometric components (bulge+disk). DECA can be applied to large samples of galaxies with different orientations with respect to the line of sight (including edge-on galaxies) and requires minimum human intervention.

  5. Space variant deconvolution of galaxy survey images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrens, S.; Ngolè Mboula, F. M.; Starck, J.-L.

    2017-05-01

    Removing the aberrations introduced by the point spread function (PSF) is a fundamental aspect of astronomical image processing. The presence of noise in observed images makes deconvolution a nontrivial task that necessitates the use of regularisation. This task is particularly difficult when the PSF varies spatially as is the case for the Euclid telescope. New surveys will provide images containing thousand of galaxies and the deconvolution regularisation problem can be considered from a completely new perspective. In fact, one can assume that galaxies belong to a low-rank dimensional space. This work introduces the use of the low-rank matrix approximation as a regularisation prior for galaxy image deconvolution and compares its performance with a standard sparse regularisation technique. This new approach leads to a natural way to handle a space variant PSF. Deconvolution is performed using a Python code that implements a primal-dual splitting algorithm. The data set considered is a sample of 10 000 space-based galaxy images convolved with a known spatially varying Euclid-like PSF and including various levels of Gaussian additive noise. Performance is assessed by examining the deconvolved galaxy image pixels and shapes. The results demonstrate that for small samples of galaxies sparsity performs better in terms of pixel and shape recovery, while for larger samples of galaxies it is possible to obtain more accurate estimates of the galaxy shapes using the low-rank approximation.

  6. HST Infrared Imaging of MASSIVE Survey Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Joseph B.; Goullaud, Charles; Blakeslee, John; Mitchiner, Casey; Ma, Chung-Pei; Greene, Jenny E.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Thomas, Jens

    2017-01-01

    We have recently obtained high-resolution HST WFC3/IR F110W (J-band) images of 34 early-type galaxies in the MASSIVE study sample. These galaxies are among the most massive in the local universe, and were chosen to study the connection between supermassive central black holes and their host galaxies. To determine accurate masses for the black holes, we are measuring high-precision surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) distances to the galaxies. The WFC3/IR data also allow us to measure high spatial resolution central surface brightness profiles to understand better the nuclear structure and dynamics of the galaxies. We present a first look at the IR images, profiles, and SBF magnitudes for 34 galaxies in the MASSIVE sample.

  7. Enhancement of features in galaxy images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.

    1986-01-01

    Several image-enhancement techniques useful for morphological analysis of galactic or cometary images are described and compared. Such techniques can be used to search for, and investigate the properties of dust lanes, stellar disks or rings, jets, shells, tidal distortions, etc. Applications of the techniques are illustrated on CCD images of the peculiar galaxy Arp 230; this object has a rich morphology, indicative of a merger of two disk galaxies.

  8. The MUSE QSO Blind Survey: A Census of Absorber Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Lorrie A.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the distribution of gas in galaxies and its interaction with the IGM is crucial to complete the picture of galaxy evolution. At all redshifts, absorption features seen in QSO spectra serve as a unique probe of the gaseous content of foreground galaxies and the IGM, extending out to 200 kpc. Studies show that star formation history is intimately related to the co-evolution of galaxies and the IGM. In order to study the environments traced by absorption systems and the role of inflows and outflows, it is critical to measure the emission properties of host galaxies and their halos. We overcome the challenge of detecting absorption host galaxies with the MUSE integral field spectrograph on VLT. MUSE's large field of view and sensitivity to emission lines has allowed a never-before seen match between the number density of absorbers along QSO sightlines and the number density of emission line galaxies within 200 kpc of the QSO. These galaxies represent a sample for which previously elusive connections can be made between mass, metallicity, SFR, and absorption.

  9. A DEEP SEARCH FOR FAINT GALAXIES ASSOCIATED WITH VERY LOW-REDSHIFT C IV ABSORBERS: A CASE WITH COLD-ACCRETION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ford, Amanda Brady; Davé, Romeel

    2013-12-20

    Studies of QSO absorber-galaxy connections are often hindered by inadequate information on whether faint/dwarf galaxies are located near the QSO sight lines. To investigate the contribution of faint galaxies to QSO absorber populations, we are conducting a deep galaxy redshift survey near low-z C IV absorbers. Here we report a blindly detected C IV absorption system (z {sub abs} = 0.00348) in the spectrum of PG1148+549 that appears to be associated either with an edge-on dwarf galaxy with an obvious disk (UGC 6894, z {sub gal} = 0.00283) at an impact parameter of ρ = 190 kpc or with a very faint dwarf irregular galaxy at ρ = 23 kpc, which is closer to the sightline but has a larger redshift difference (z {sub gal} = 0.00107, i.e., δv = 724 km s{sup –1}). We consider various gas/galaxy associations, including infall and outflows. Based on current theoretical models, we conclude that the absorber is most likely tracing (1) the remnants of an outflow from a previous epoch, a so-called {sup a}ncient outflow{sup ,} or (2) intergalactic gas accreting onto UGC 6894, ''cold mode'' accretion. The latter scenario is supported by H I synthesis imaging data that shows the rotation curve of the disk being codirectional with the velocity offset between UGC 6894 and the absorber, which is located almost directly along the major axis of the edge-on disk.

  10. GRAVITATIONAL LENS CAPTURES IMAGE OF PRIMEVAL GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Hubble Space Telescope image shows several blue, loop-shaped objects that actually are multiple images of the same galaxy. They have been duplicated by the gravitational lens of the cluster of yellow, elliptical and spiral galaxies - called 0024+1654 - near the photograph's center. The gravitational lens is produced by the cluster's tremendous gravitational field that bends light to magnify, brighten and distort the image of a more distant object. How distorted the image becomes and how many copies are made depends on the alignment between the foreground cluster and the more distant galaxy, which is behind the cluster. In this photograph, light from the distant galaxy bends as it passes through the cluster, dividing the galaxy into five separate images. One image is near the center of the photograph; the others are at 6, 7, 8, and 2 o'clock. The light also has distorted the galaxy's image from a normal spiral shape into a more arc-shaped object. Astronomers are certain the blue-shaped objects are copies of the same galaxy because the shapes are similar. The cluster is 5 billion light-years away in the constellation Pisces, and the blue-shaped galaxy is about 2 times farther away. Though the gravitational light-bending process is not new, Hubble's high resolution image reveals structures within the blue-shaped galaxy that astronomers have never seen before. Some of the structures are as small as 300 light-years across. The bits of white imbedded in the blue galaxy represent young stars; the dark core inside the ring is dust, the material used to make stars. This information, together with the blue color and unusual 'lumpy' appearance, suggests a young, star-making galaxy. The picture was taken October 14, 1994 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2. Separate exposures in blue and red wavelengths were taken to construct this color picture. CREDIT: W.N. Colley and E. Turner (Princeton University), J.A. Tyson (Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies) and NASA Image files

  11. Abundance Profiles and Kinematics of Damped Lyα Absorbing Galaxies at z < 0.651,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Rauch, Michael

    2005-02-01

    We present a spectroscopic study of six damped Lyα absorption (DLA) systems at z<0.65, based on moderate- to high-resolution spectra of the galaxies responsible for the absorbers. Combining known metallicity measurements of the absorbers with known optical properties of the absorbing galaxies, we confirm that the low metal content of the DLA population can arise naturally as a combination of gas cross section selection and the metallicity gradients commonly observed in local disk galaxies. We also study the Tully-Fisher relation of the DLA-selected galaxies and find little detectable evidence for evolution in the disk population between z=0 and ~0.5. Additional results of our analysis are as follows: (1) The DLA galaxies exhibit a range of spectral properties, from poststarburst, to normal disks, to starburst systems, supporting the idea that DLA galaxies are drawn from the typical field population. (2) Large rotating H I disks of radius 30 h-1 kpc and of dynamic mass Mdyn>1011 h-1 Msolar appear to be common at intermediate redshifts. (3) Using an ensemble of six galaxy-DLA pairs, we derive an abundance profile that is characterized by a radial gradient of -0.041+/-0.012 dex kpc-1 (or, equivalently, a scale length of 10.6 h-1 kpc) from the galactic center to a 30 h-1 kpc radius. (4) Adopting known N(H I) profiles of nearby galaxies and the best-fit radial gradient, we further derive an N(H I)-weighted mean metallicity N(HI)=-0.50+/-0.07 for the DLA population over 100 random lines of sight, consistent with N(HI)=-0.64+0.40-0.86 observed for z~1 DLA systems from Prochaska et al. Our analysis demonstrates that the low metal content of DLA systems does not rule out the possibility that the DLA population traces the field galaxy population. Observations reported here were obtained in part with the Magellan telescopes, a collaboration between the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, University of Arizona, Harvard University, University of

  12. Extracting Structural information from Galaxy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.; Davis, D.

    2010-05-01

    The amount of data from sky images is large and growing. About 1 million galaxies can be discerned in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is being built and will scan the entire sky repeatedly, providing images of millions of galaxies and petabytes of data every night. The Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) is a proposed orbiting satellite that will repeatedly map the entire sky from orbit, providing images of perhaps billions of galaxies. Unfortunately, given an image of a spiral galaxy, there does not exist an automated vision algorithm that can even tell us which direction the spiral arms wind, much less count them or provide any other quantitative information about them. To wit, the largest galaxy classification project is the Galaxy Zoo, in which thousands of human volunteers classify images by eye over the web. Although valuable, such human classifications will provide only limited objective quantitative measurements, and will soon be overwhelmed with more data than humans can handle. However, such information would prove an invaluable source for astronomers and cosmologists to test current theories of galaxy formation and cosmic evolution (which can now be simulated with high accuracy on large computers, producing copious predictions that cannot be tested due to a lack of objective, quantitative observational data). In this talk, I will report on preliminary results from dynamical grammars and other machine learning and vision techniques to "parse" images of galaxies, starting us on the road towards producing quantitative data that will be useful for astronomers to test theories.

  13. AN IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF FOUR STRONG Mg II ABSORBERS REVEALED BY GRB 060418

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L. K.; Prochaska, J. X.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.

    2009-08-20

    We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic study of four strong Mg II absorbers of W(2796) {approx}> 1 A revealed by the afterglow of GRB 060418 at z{sub GRB} = 1.491. These absorbers, at z = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107, and z {sub GRB}, exhibit large ion abundances that suggest neutral gas columns characteristic of damped Ly{alpha} systems. The imaging data include optical images obtained using Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I telescope and using Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope, and near-infrared H-band images obtained using Persson's Auxiliary Nasmyth Infrared Camera on the Magellan Baade Telescope and K'-band images obtained using NIRC2 with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. These images reveal six distinct objects at {delta} {theta} {approx}< 3.''5 of the afterglow's position, two of which exhibit well-resolved mature disk morphology, one shows red colors, and three are blue compact sources. Follow-up spectroscopic observations using LRIS confirm that one of the disk galaxies coincides with the Mg II absorber at z = 0.656. The observed broadband spectral energy distributions of the second disk galaxy and the red source indicate that they are associated with the absorbers at z = 0.603 and z = 1.107, respectively. These results show that strong Mg II absorbers identified in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra are associated with typical galaxies of luminosity {approx}0.1 - 1 L{sub *} at impact parameter of {rho} {approx}< 10 h {sup -1} kpc. The close angular separation would preclude easy detections toward a bright quasar. Finally, we associate the remaining three blue compact sources with the GRB host galaxy, noting that they are likely star-forming knots located at projected distances of {rho} = 2 - 12 h {sup -1} kpc from the afterglow. At the afterglow's position, we derive a 2{sigma} upper limit to the underlying star-formation rate intensity of 0.0074 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc

  14. Automatic Detection of Galaxy Type From Datasets of Galaxies Image Based on Image Retrieval Approach.

    PubMed

    Abd El Aziz, Mohamed; Selim, I M; Xiong, Shengwu

    2017-06-30

    This paper presents a new approach for the automatic detection of galaxy morphology from datasets based on an image-retrieval approach. Currently, there are several classification methods proposed to detect galaxy types within an image. However, in some situations, the aim is not only to determine the type of galaxy within the queried image, but also to determine the most similar images for query image. Therefore, this paper proposes an image-retrieval method to detect the type of galaxies within an image and return with the most similar image. The proposed method consists of two stages, in the first stage, a set of features is extracted based on shape, color and texture descriptors, then a binary sine cosine algorithm selects the most relevant features. In the second stage, the similarity between the features of the queried galaxy image and the features of other galaxy images is computed. Our experiments were performed using the EFIGI catalogue, which contains about 5000 galaxies images with different types (edge-on spiral, spiral, elliptical and irregular). We demonstrate that our proposed approach has better performance compared with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) methods.

  15. A Deep Survey of Low-Redshift Absorbers and Their Connections with Galaxies: Probing the Roles of Dwarfs, Satellites, and Large-Scale Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    In the not-too-distant past, the study of galaxy evolution neglected the vast interface between the stars in a galaxy and intergalactic space except for the dynamical effects of dark matter. Thanks to QSO absorption line spectroscopy and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph {COS}, the circumgalactic medium {CGM} has come into sharp focus as a rich ecosystem playing a vital role in the evolution of the host galaxy. However, attributing the gas detected in absorption with host dwarf galaxies detected in optical surveys around the sightline becomes very difficult very quickly with increasing redshift. In addition, both targeted UV spectroscopy and ground-based galaxy surveys are resource intensive, which complicates compiling large, statistically robust samples of very-low-redshift absorber/galaxy pairs. We propose a CGM study of unprecedented statistical power by exploiting the vast number of sightlines in the HST/COS archive located within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey {SDSS} footprint to compile an estimated sample of 586 absorbers at z<0.015. This very-low-redshift criterion enables spectroscopic completeness down to L<0.01 L* galaxies in publicly available optical imaging and spectroscopy.Our survey is uniquely poised to address the following questions: {1} What is the role of dwarf galaxies that would be undetectable at higher redshift in giving rise to the gas detected in QSO spectroscopy? {2} How does galaxy environment and large-scale structure affect the CGM and what are the implications for environmental quenching of star formation? {3} How efficiently do feedback mechanisms expel metal-enriched gas to great distances into the galaxy halo and into the IGM?

  16. Are there two populations of X-ray absorbers in Seyfert 2 galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbord, J. M.; Weaver, K. A.

    1998-12-01

    The canonical unified model for Seyfert galaxies (Antonucci, 1993, ARA&A 31, 473) posits the existance of a nuclear torus which blocks the direct line of sight to the central engine of type 2 Seyferts. However, another possibility would be that in at least some Seyfert galaxies the obscuring body could be the disk of the host galaxy (Schmitt et al., 1997, ApJ 477, 623). The column densities of the putative tori should be a few orders of magnitude larger than those of the host galaxy planes, so we would expect a bimodal distribution of NH columns if either of these absorbers could be responsible. Starting with the subset of the Schmitt et al. sample for which ASCA data is available, we are measuring the NH column densities using a variety of spectral models. The resulting distribution of column densities is then interpreted with consideration of both optically observed galactic inclinations and possible nuclear torus orientations implied from observed radio elongation axes. This work is being done as a part of a thesis project to examine the emission and absorption features in the X-ray spectra of a large sample of Seyfert galaxies, and to combine this data with observations made in other wavebands in order to put constraints on the unified model of Seyfert galaxies.

  17. Measuring Structural Parameters Through Stacking Galaxy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yubin; Zheng, Xian Zhong; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Peng; Wen, Zhang Zheng; Guo, Kexin; An, Fang Xia

    2016-12-01

    It remains challenging to detect the low surface brightness structures of faint high-z galaxies, which are key to understanding the structural evolution of galaxies. The technique of image stacking allows us to measure the averaged light profile beneath the detection limit and probe the extended structure of a group of galaxies. We carry out simulations to examine the recovery of the averaged surface brightness profile through stacking model Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys images of a set of galaxies as functions of the Sérsic index (n), effective radius (R e) and axis ratio (AR). The Sérsic profile best fitting the radial profile of the stacked image is taken as the recovered profile, in comparison with the intrinsic mean profile of the model galaxies. Our results show that, in general, the structural parameters of the mean profile can be properly determined through stacking, though systematic biases need to be corrected when spreads of R e and AR are counted. We find that the Sérsic index is slightly overestimated and R e is underestimated at {AR}\\lt 0.5 because the stacked image appears to be more compact due to the presence of inclined galaxies; the spread of R e biases the stacked profile to have a higher Sérsic index. We stress that the measurements of structural parameters through stacking should take these biases into account. We estimate the biases in the recovered structural parameters from stacks of galaxies when the samples have distributions of {R}{{e}}, AR and n seen in local galaxies.

  18. The detection of large amounts of cool, x ray absorbing gas in distant clusters of galaxies. What does this mean?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qingde; Stocke, John T.

    1993-01-01

    We present an x-ray spectral study of 12 distant (z = 0.17-0.54) rich clusters of galaxies observed with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter. These x-ray spectral data show evidence for substantial excess absorptions beyond those expected in the galaxy, indicating the presence of large amounts of x-ray absorbing cool gas in these distant clusters. The mean value of the excess absorptions corresponds to an absorbing gas column density approximately greater than 10(exp 21)/sq cm. We calculate the x-ray luminosities of the clusters with observed fluxes only in the 0.8-3.5 keV band where the fluxes are less effected by the absorptions, and use the temperature-to-luminosity correlation (known only for nearby clusters) to estimate the temperatures of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) in the distant clusters. These temperature estimates, together with the spectral fits, provide further constraints on the column densities in the individual clusters. For the cluster CL 0016+16, the lower limit on the column density is found to be 8 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm at the 99 percent confidence limit. We also show that the ratio of the temperature obtained from the spectral fit to the temperature expected from the correlation tends to decrease with increasing look-back time, indicating possible temperature evolution of the hot ICM in the recent past. The inclusion of this evolutionary effect further increases the absorptions required in fitting the spectra.

  19. XMM-Newton Observations of the Heavily Absorbed Seyfert 1 Galaxy IC 4329A

    SciTech Connect

    Steenbrugge, K.

    2005-01-05

    We detect seven distinct absorbing systems in the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy IC 4329A, taken with XMM-Newton. Firstly we detect absorption due to cold gas in our own Galaxy and warm gas in the Galactic halo or the Local Group. This local warm gas is only detected through O VII absorption, from which we deduce a temperature between 0.03 and 0.2 keV. In IC 4329A we detect absorption from the host galaxy as well as from a warm absorber, close to the nucleus, which has 4 components. The absorption from the host galaxy is well modeled by neutral material. The warm absorber detected in IC 4329A is photoionized and has an ionization range between log {xi} = -1.37 and log {xi} = 2.7. A broad excess is measured at the O VIII Ly{alpha} and N VII Ly{alpha} emission lines, which can be modeled by either disklines or multiple Gaussians. From the lightcurve we find that the source changed luminosity by about 20 % over the 140 ks observation, while the spectral shape, i.e. the softness ratio did not vary. In the EPIC spectra a narrow Fe K{alpha} and Fe XXVI Ly{alpha} emission line are detected. The narrowness of the Fe K{alpha} line and the fact that there is no evidence for flux variability between different observations leads us to conclude that the Fe K{alpha} line is formed at a large distance from the central black hole.

  20. High resolution in galaxy photometry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, J.-L.; Lelievre, G.

    Techniques for increasing the resolution of ground-based photometric observations of galaxies are discussed. The theoretical limitations on resolution and their implications for choosing telescope size at a given site considered, with an emphasis on the importance of the Fried (1966) parameter r0. The techniques recommended are shortening exposure time, selection of the highest-resolution images, and a posteriori digital image processing (as opposed to active-mirror image stabilization or the cine-CCD system of Fort et al., 1984). The value of the increased resolution (by a factor of 2) achieved at Pic du Midi observatory for studies of detailed structure in extragalactic objects, for determining the distance to galaxies, and for probing the central cores of galaxies is indicated.

  1. The z = 0.8596 damped Ly-alpha absorbing galaxy toward PKS 0454+039

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Bowen, David V.; Blades, J. Chris; Dickenson, Mark

    1995-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based data on the Z(sub abs) = 0.8596 metal-line absorption system along the line of sight to PKS 0454+0356. The system is a moderate-redshift damped Ly-alpha system, with N(H I) = (5.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp 20)/sq cm as measured from the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) spectrum. We also present ground-based images which we use to identify the galaxy which most probably gives rise to the damped system; the most likely candidate is relatively underluminous by QSO absorber standards M(sub B) approximately -19.0 for A(sub 0) = 0.5 and H(sub 0) = 50 km/s/Mpc) and lies approximately 8.5/h kpc in projection from the QSO sight line. Ground-based measurements of Zn II, Cr II, and Fe II absorption lines from this system allow us to infer abundances of (Zn/H) = -1.1, (Cr/H) = -1.2, and (Fe/H) = -1.2 indicating overall metallicity similar to damped systems at z is greater than 2, and that the depletion of Cr and Fe onto dust grains may be even less important than in many of the high-redshift systems of comparable metallicity. Limits previously placed on the 21 cm optical depth in the z = 0.8596 system, together with our new N(H I) measurement, suggest a very high spin temperature for the H I, T(sub s) is greater than 580 K.

  2. Imaging Radio Galaxies with Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, W. H.; van Breugel, W. J. M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Roberts, J.; Fidkowski, K.

    2000-12-01

    We present 42 milli-arcsecond resolution Adaptive Optics near-infrared images of 3C 452 and 3C 294, two powerful radio galaxies at z=0.081 and z=1.79 respectively, obtained with the NIRSPEC/SCAM+AO instrument on the Keck telescope. The observations provide unprecedented morphological detail of radio galaxy components like nuclear dust-lanes, off-centered or binary nuclei, and merger induced starforming structures; all of which are key features in understanding galaxy formation and the onset of powerful radio emission. Complementary optical HST imaging data are used to construct high resolution color images, which, for the first time, have matching optical and near-IR resolutions. Based on these maps, the extra-nuclear structural morphologies and compositions of both galaxies are discussed. Furthermore, detailed brightness profile analysis of 3C 452 allows a direct comparison to a large literature sample of nearby ellipticals, all of which have been observed in the optical and near-IR by HST. Both the imaging data and the profile information on 3C 452 are consistent with it being a relative diminutive and well-evolved elliptical, in stark contrast to 3C 294 which seems to be in its initial formation throes with an active AGN off-centered from the main body of the galaxy. These results are discussed further within the framework of radio galaxy triggering and the formation of massive ellipticals. The work of WdV and WvB was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. The work at UCSD has been supported by the NSF Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, under agreement No. AST-98-76783.

  3. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) observations of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet images of several galaxies were obtained during the ASTRO-1 shuttle mission in December, 1990. The images have a FWHM angular resolution of approximately 3 arcsecond and are of circular fields approximately 40 arcminutes in diameter. Most galaxies were observed in at least two and sometimes as many as four broad bands. A very few fields were observed with narrower band filters. The most basic result of these observations is that most systems look dramatically different in the UV from their well-known optical appearances. Preliminary results of these studies will be presented. Information will be available on fields observed by the UTI during the ASTRO 1 mission; when that data becomes public it can be obtained from the NSSDC. The ASTRO observatory is expected to fly again in 1994 with approximately half of the observing time from that mission devoted to guest observers. The Ultraviolet Imaging telescope is extremely well suited for galaxy studies, and the UIT term is interested in encouraging a wide range of scientific studies by guest observers. Ultraviolet Imaging telescope is extremely well suited for galaxy studies, and the UIT team is interested in encouraging a wide range of scientific studies by guest observers.

  4. Image Processing for Galaxy Ellipticity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankus, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Shape analysis of statistically large samples of galaxy images can be used to reveal the imprint of weak gravitational lensing by dark matter distributions. As new, large-scale surveys expand the potential catalog, galaxy shape analysis suffers the (coupled) problems of high noise and uncertainty in the prior morphology. We investigate a new image processing technique to help mitigate these problems, in which repeated auto-correlations and auto-convolutions are employed to push the true shape toward a universal (Gaussian) attractor while relatively suppressing uncorrelated pixel noise. The goal is reliable reconstruction of original image moments, independent of image shape. First test evaluations of the technique on small control samples will be presented, and future applicability discussed. Supported by the US-DOE.

  5. The neutral gas extent of galaxies as derived from weak intervening Ca ii absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, P.; Krause, F.; Fechner, C.; Charlton, J. C.; Murphy, M. T.

    2011-04-01

    We present a systematic study of weak intervening Ca ii absorbers at low redshift (z < 0.5), based on the analysis of archival high-resolution (R ≥ 45 000) optical spectra of 304 quasars and active galactic nuclei observed with VLT/UVES. Along a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 100 we detected 23 intervening Ca ii absorbers in both the Ca ii H & K lines, with rest frame equivalent widths Wr,3934 = 15-799 mÅ and column densities log N(Ca ii) = 11.25-13.04 (obtained by fitting Voigt-profile components). We obtain a bias-corrected number density of weak intervening Ca ii absorbers of {d{N}/dz=0.117 ± 0.044} at ⟨zabs⟩ = 0.35 for absorbers with log N(Ca ii) ≥ 11.65 (Wr,3934 ≥ 32 mÅ). This is 2.6 times the value obtained for damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) at low redshift. All Ca ii absorbers in our sample show associated absorption by other low ions such as Mg ii and Fe ii; 45 percent of them have associated Na i absorption. From ionization modelling we conclude that intervening Ca ii absorption with log N(Ca ii) ≥ 11.5 arises in DLAs, sub-DLAs and Lyman-limit systems (LLS) at H i column densities of log N(H i) ≥ 17.4. Using supplementary H i information for nine of the absorbers we find that the Ca ii/H i ratio decreases strongly with increasing H i column density, indicating a column-density-dependent dust depletion of Ca. The observed column density distribution function of Ca ii absorption components follows a relatively steep power law, f(N) ∝ N - β, with a slope of - β = -1.68, which again points towards an enhanced dust depletion in high column density systems. The relatively large cross section of these absorbers together with the frequent detection of Ca ii absorption in high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the halo of the Milky Way suggests that a considerable fraction of the intervening Ca ii systems trace (partly) neutral gas structures in the halos and circumgalactic environment of galaxies (i.e., they are HVC analogs). Based on the recently

  6. Discovery of a Ly-alpha galaxy near a damped Ly-alpha absorber at z = 2.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenthal, James D.; Hogan, Craig J.; Green, Richard F.; Caulet, Adeline; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Brown, Larry; Foltz, Craig B.

    1991-01-01

    The detection of a galaxy associated with the damped Ly-alpha absorbing cloud seen at z = 2.309 toward the QSO PHL 957 is reported. In addition to a strong but narrow Ly-alpha emission line and weaker C IV and He II lines, the object shows continuum at V about 24, with a slope rising slightly toward the red. This is similar to what is seen in high-redshift radio galaxies, but this galaxy does not correspond to any known radio source. The detected emission lines and continuum are most easily interpreted as light from hot, recently formed stars, implying a sizable star formation rate and a scarcity of dust. The spatial correlation of the absorbing cloud and the companion galaxy supports the interpretation of damped Ly-alpha clouds as objects fundamentally different from the lower column density Ly-alpha forest clouds, which show weak or no clustering.

  7. SPECTRAL IMAGING OF GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH PLANCK

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Rasia, E.

    2015-12-20

    The Sunyaev–Zeldovich (SZ) effect is a promising tool for detecting the presence of hot gas out to the galaxy cluster peripheries. We developed a spectral imaging algorithm dedicated to the SZ observations of nearby galaxy clusters with Planck, with the aim of revealing gas density anisotropies related to the filamentary accretion of materials, or pressure discontinuities induced by the propagation of shock fronts. To optimize an unavoidable trade-off between angular resolution and precision of the SZ flux measurements, the algorithm performs a multi-scale analysis of the SZ maps as well as of other extended components, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and the Galactic thermal dust. The demixing of the SZ signal is tackled through kernel-weighted likelihood maximizations. The CMB anisotropies are further analyzed through a wavelet analysis, while the Galactic foregrounds and SZ maps are analyzed via a curvelet analysis that best preserves their anisotropic details. The algorithm performance has been tested against mock observations of galaxy clusters obtained by simulating the Planck High Frequency Instrument and by pointing at a few characteristic positions in the sky. These tests suggest that Planck should easily allow us to detect filaments in the cluster peripheries and detect large-scale shocks in colliding galaxy clusters that feature favorable geometry.

  8. Spectral Imaging of Galaxy Clusters with Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Rasia, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect is a promising tool for detecting the presence of hot gas out to the galaxy cluster peripheries. We developed a spectral imaging algorithm dedicated to the SZ observations of nearby galaxy clusters with Planck, with the aim of revealing gas density anisotropies related to the filamentary accretion of materials, or pressure discontinuities induced by the propagation of shock fronts. To optimize an unavoidable trade-off between angular resolution and precision of the SZ flux measurements, the algorithm performs a multi-scale analysis of the SZ maps as well as of other extended components, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and the Galactic thermal dust. The demixing of the SZ signal is tackled through kernel-weighted likelihood maximizations. The CMB anisotropies are further analyzed through a wavelet analysis, while the Galactic foregrounds and SZ maps are analyzed via a curvelet analysis that best preserves their anisotropic details. The algorithm performance has been tested against mock observations of galaxy clusters obtained by simulating the Planck High Frequency Instrument and by pointing at a few characteristic positions in the sky. These tests suggest that Planck should easily allow us to detect filaments in the cluster peripheries and detect large-scale shocks in colliding galaxy clusters that feature favorable geometry.

  9. Simulated optical images of galaxies at z about 1 using ultraviolet images of nearby galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlin, Ralph C.; Cornett, Robert H.; Hill, Jesse K.; Hill, Robert S.; Landsman, Wayne B.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Neff, Susan G.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1991-01-01

    Ultraviolet sounding rocket images of several nearby galaxies are used to simulate the appearance in optical bandpasses of similar systems at redshifts z = 0.5-2.67, as observed by the WFPC on HST and by ground-based instruments. Since the morphology of galaxies is a strong function of the wavelength, the appearance of galaxies at large redshifts is subjected to a large k-correction effect. The strong dependence of monochromatic surface brightness on redshift also implies that observed morphology of distant systems will be crucially dependent on the limiting surface brightness set by the sky background. Although the angle subtended by sources depends only weakly on z, the fraction of a galaxy whose surface brightness is above the detection threshold varies strongly with z. Morphological distinctions of spiral from elliptical, spiral from irregular, and barred from unbarred types become more difficult, as does accurate evaluation of interactions or of the local environment.

  10. GALSIM: The modular galaxy image simulation toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, B. T. P.; Jarvis, M.; Mandelbaum, R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bosch, J.; Simet, M.; Meyers, J. E.; Kacprzak, T.; Nakajima, R.; Zuntz, J.; Miyatake, H.; Dietrich, J. P.; Armstrong, R.; Melchior, P.; Gill, M. S. S.

    2015-04-01

    GALSIM is a collaborative, open-source project aimed at providing an image simulation tool of enduring benefit to the astronomical community. It provides a software library for generating images of astronomical objects such as stars and galaxies in a variety of ways, efficiently handling image transformations and operations such as convolution and rendering at high precision. We describe the GALSIM software and its capabilities, including necessary theoretical background. We demonstrate that the performance of GALSIM meets the stringent requirements of high precision image analysis applications such as weak gravitational lensing, for current datasets and for the Stage IV dark energy surveys of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, ESA's Euclid mission, and NASA's WFIRST-AFTA mission. The GALSIM project repository is public and includes the full code history, all open and closed issues, installation instructions, documentation, and wiki pages (including a Frequently Asked Questions section). The GALSIM repository can be found at https://github.com/GalSim-developers/GalSim.

  11. 22 GHz water maser search in 37 nearby galaxies. Four new water megamasers in Seyfert 2 and OH maser/absorber galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We report four new 22 GHz H2O water masers found in a Green Bank Telescope search toward 37 nearby objects. Our goal was to find new maser galaxies, active galactic nucleus (AGN) disk masers, and objects where hydroxyl and water maser species coexist. Methods: We observed 37 sources within 250 Mpc that were selected by high X-ray luminosity (LX > 1040 W) and high absorbing column density (NH ≳ 1022 cm-2). Sources included dual or triple AGN and interacting systems. We also searched objects detected in hydroxyl (OH). A catalog of 4038 known H2O (non)detections was assembled to avoid unnecessary reobservations. The final selection consisted of 16 new sources, 13 nondetections to follow up with a factor 10 higher sensitivity, 10 OH masers and 1 deep OH absorber, of which 37 were observed. Results: Water megamasers were detected towards the Sy 2 galaxy 2MFGC 13581, towards the 6 GHz OH absorber NGC 4261 and towards the two 1.6 GHz OH maser sources IRAS 17526+3253 and IRAS 20550+1656. We set upper limits on 33 nondetections. The detection rate was 25% in OH galaxies and 11% overall. The mean sensitivity was 4 mJy over 24.4 kHz (0.31 km s-1) or between 0.1 L⊙ and 1.0 L⊙ rms for the distances covered by the source sample. Combined with other searches, a total of 95 objects have now been searched for both OH and H2O masers. Conclusions: The maser features in 2MFGC 13581 are typical of a sub-parsec accretion disk, whereas NGC 4261 likely has jet masers in a masing torus. The NGC 4261 galaxy (3C 270; dusty torus, twin jet) and its masers appear similar to NGC 1052, where continuum seed emission by a twin jet supports masers in the torus. Imaging with very long baseline interferometry is required to determine the masing regions in NGC 4261 and 2MFGC 13581. IRAS 17526+3253 has narrow 350 L⊙ systemic masers, and the tentative 5σ detection in IRAS 20550+1656 (II Zw 96) strongly resembles massive star formation kilomasers in NGC 2146. The latter two detections

  12. Morphology-based Query for Galaxy Image Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Lior

    2017-02-01

    Galaxies of rare morphology are of paramount scientific interest, as they carry important information about the past, present, and future Universe. Once a rare galaxy is identified, studying it more effectively requires a set of galaxies of similar morphology, allowing generalization and statistical analysis that cannot be done when N=1. Databases generated by digital sky surveys can contain a very large number of galaxy images, and therefore once a rare galaxy of interest is identified it is possible that more instances of the same morphology are also present in the database. However, when a researcher identifies a certain galaxy of rare morphology in the database, it is virtually impossible to mine the database manually in the search for galaxies of similar morphology. Here we propose a computer method that can automatically search databases of galaxy images and identify galaxies that are morphologically similar to a certain user-defined query galaxy. That is, the researcher provides an image of a galaxy of interest, and the pattern recognition system automatically returns a list of galaxies that are visually similar to the target galaxy. The algorithm uses a comprehensive set of descriptors, allowing it to support different types of galaxies, and it is not limited to a finite set of known morphologies. While the list of returned galaxies is neither clean nor complete, it contains a far higher frequency of galaxies of the morphology of interest, providing a substantial reduction of the data. Such algorithms can be integrated into data management systems of autonomous digital sky surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), where the number of galaxies in the database is extremely large. The source code of the method is available at http://vfacstaff.ltu.edu/lshamir/downloads/udat.

  13. Imaging Absorbing Structures Embedded in Thick Diffusing Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilworth, David Saunders

    Linear systems models and confocal imaging techniques are applied to the problem of imaging absorbing structures embedded in thick diffusing media. At the microscopic level, the model is linear in complex field and space variant; at the macroscopic level where spatial averaging processes are considered the model is linear in irradiance and space variant, thereby becoming mathematically more tractable. We describe the planar confocal imager, in which a small spot of light scans the front surface of a diffuser, and the light distribution on the back surface is sampled for each position of the scanning spot. A composite image is then formed by selection of one pixel from each of the 25,600 images, viz., a pixel from a spot opposite or nearly opposite from the scanning spot. The overall process is effectively a confocal imaging process. The planar system can be modified to create 3-D confocal imaging, where many stereo image pairs are created of the absorbing structures within a thick diffuser. Techniques for both planar and exfoliative deconvolution are investigated. Planar deconvolution sharpens images affected by space invariant processes in which the image point spread function is always the same. Exfoliatative deconvolution is a systematic method for sharpening images formed by space variant processes in which the point spread function varies in accordance with the depth of the embedded object. Results from planar and 3-D confocal scanning verify the linear systems model and demonstrate that the broad beam point spread function width (the point spread function formed by conventional, non-confocal imaging) can be reduced by a factor of 2. Results from planar and exfoliative deconvolution demonstrate that the confocal point spread function width can be reduced by a factor of 1.5. Preliminary optical and data processing techniques are discussed for developing a coherent confocal scanner. The image resolution from this type of scanner will be determined by the

  14. THE PROPERTIES OF TWO LOW-REDSHIFT O VI ABSORBERS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED GALAXIES TOWARD 3C 263 ,

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, B. D.; Kim, T.-S.; Wakker, B. P.; Keeney, B.; Stocke, J.; Syphers, D.; Narayanan, A.

    2012-07-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the QSO 3C 263 (z{sub em} = 0.652) with Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and FUSE reveal O VI absorption systems at z = 0.06342 and 0.14072. WIYN multi-object spectrograph observations provide information about the galaxies associated with the absorbers. The multi-phase system at z = 0.06342 traces cool photoionized gas and warm collisionally ionized gas associated with an L {approx} 0.31 L* compact spiral emission line galaxy with an impact parameter of 63 kpc. The cool photoionized gas in the absorber is well modeled, with log U {approx} -2.6, log N(H) {approx} 17.8, log n(H) {approx} -3.3 and [Si/H] = -0.14 {+-} 0.23. The collisionally ionized gas containing C IV and O VI probably arises in cooling shock-heated transition temperature gas with log T {approx} 5.5. The absorber is likely tracing circumgalactic gas enriched by gas ejected from the spiral emission line galaxy. The simple system at z = 0.14072 only contains O VI and broad and narrow H I. The O VI with b = 33.4 {+-} 11.9 km s{sup -1} is likely associated with the broad H I {lambda}1215 absorption, with b = 86.7 {+-} 15.4 km s{sup -1}. The difference in Doppler parameters implies the detection of a very large column of warm gas with log T = 5.61(+0.16, -0.25), log N(H) = 19.54(+0.26, -0.44), and [O/H] = -1.48 (+0.46, -0.26). This absorber is possibly associated with a 1.6 L* absorption line galaxy with an impact parameter of 617 kpc, although an origin in warm filament gas or in the halo of a fainter galaxy is more likely.

  15. PROFIT: Bayesian profile fitting of galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotham, A. S. G.; Taranu, D. S.; Tobar, R.; Moffett, A.; Driver, S. P.

    2017-04-01

    We present PROFIT, a new code for Bayesian two-dimensional photometric galaxy profile modelling. PROFIT consists of a low-level C++ library (libprofit), accessible via a command-line interface and documented API, along with high-level R (PROFIT) and PYTHON (PyProFit) interfaces (available at github.com/ICRAR/libprofit, github.com/ICRAR/ProFit, and github.com/ICRAR/pyprofit, respectively). R PROFIT is also available pre-built from CRAN; however, this version will be slightly behind the latest GitHub version. libprofit offers fast and accurate two-dimensional integration for a useful number of profiles, including Sérsic, Core-Sérsic, broken-exponential, Ferrer, Moffat, empirical King, point-source, and sky, with a simple mechanism for adding new profiles. We show detailed comparisons between libprofit and GALFIT. libprofit is both faster and more accurate than GALFIT at integrating the ubiquitous Sérsic profile for the most common values of the Sérsic index n (0.5 < n < 8). The high-level fitting code PROFIT is tested on a sample of galaxies with both SDSS and deeper KiDS imaging. We find good agreement in the fit parameters, with larger scatter in best-fitting parameters from fitting images from different sources (SDSS versus KiDS) than from using different codes (PROFIT versus GALFIT). A large suite of Monte Carlo-simulated images are used to assess prospects for automated bulge-disc decomposition with PROFIT on SDSS, KiDS, and future LSST imaging. We find that the biggest increases in fit quality come from moving from SDSS- to KiDS-quality data, with less significant gains moving from KiDS to LSST.

  16. A Unique View of AGN-driven Molecular Outflows: The Discovery of a Massive Galaxy Counterpart to a Z = 2.4 High-metallicity Damped Lyα Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Newman, Andrew B.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2017-07-01

    We report the discovery of a massive {log}(M/{M}⊙ )={10.74}-0.16+0.18 galaxy at the same redshift as a carbon-monoxide-bearing sub-damped Lyα absorber (sub-DLA) seen in the spectrum of QSO J1439+1117. The galaxy, J1439B, is located 4.″7 from the QSO sightline, a projected distance of 38 physical kpc at z = 2.4189, and exhibits broad optical emission lines ({σ }[{{O}{{III}}]}=303+/- 12 {km} {{{s}}}-1) with ratios characteristic of excitation by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The galaxy has a factor of ˜9 lower star formation than is typical of star-forming galaxies of the same mass and redshift. The nearby sub-DLA is highly enriched, suggesting its galactic counterpart must be massive if it follows the z˜ 2 mass-metallicity relationship. Metallic absorption within the circumgalactic medium of the sub-DLA and J1439B is spread over a velocity range {{Δ }}v> 1000 {km} {{{s}}}-1, suggesting an energetic origin. We explore the possibility that a different galaxy could be responsible for the rare absorber, and conclude that it is unlikely based on imaging, integral-field spectroscopy, and high-z massive galaxy pair statistics. We argue that the gas seen in absorption against the QSO was likely ejected from the galaxy J1439B and therefore provides a unique observational probe of AGN feedback in the distant universe.

  17. Nature of the absorbing gas associated with a galaxy group at z˜0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péroux, Céline; Rahmani, Hadi; Quiret, Samuel; Pettini, Max; Kulkarni, Varsha; York, Donald G.; Straka, Lorrie; Husemann, Bernd; Milliard, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    We present new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer observations of quasar field Q2131-1207 with a log N(H I} = 19.50 ± 0.15 sub-damped Lyman α at zabs = 0.42980. We detect four galaxies at a redshift consistent with that of the absorber where only one was known before this study. Two of these are star-forming galaxies, while the ones further away from the quasar (>140 kpc) are passive galaxies. We report the metallicities of the H II regions of the closest objects (12 + log(O/H) = 8.98 ± 0.02 and 8.32 ± 0.16) to be higher or equivalent within the errors to the metallicity measured in absorption in the neutral phase of the gas (8.15 ± 0.20). For the closest object, a detailed morphokinematic analysis indicates that it is an inclined large rotating disc with Vmax = 200 ± 3 km s-1. We measure the masses to be Mdyn = 7.4 ± 0.4 × 1010 M⊙ and Mhalo = 2.9 ± 0.2 × 1012 M⊙. Some of the gas seen in absorption is likely to be corotating with the halo of that object, possibly due to a warped disc. The azimuthal angle between the quasar line-of-sight and the projected major axis of the galaxy on the sky is 12° ± 1° which indicates that some other fraction of the absorbing gas might be associated with accreting gas. This is further supported by the galaxy to gas metallicity difference. Based on the same arguments, we exclude outflows as a possibility to explain the gas in absorption. The four galaxies form a large structure (at least 200 kpc wide) consistent with a filament or a galaxy group so that a fraction of the absorption could be related to intragroup gas.

  18. Galaxy Zoo: morphological classifications for 120 000 galaxies in HST legacy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle W.; Galloway, Melanie A.; Bamford, Steven P.; Lintott, Chris J.; Masters, Karen L.; Scarlata, Claudia; Simmons, B. D.; Beck, Melanie; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Cheung, Edmond; Edmondson, Edward M.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Griffith, Roger L.; Häußler, Boris; Han, Anna; Hart, Ross; Melvin, Thomas; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Smethurst, R. J.; Smith, Arfon M.

    2017-02-01

    We present the data release paper for the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) project. This is the third phase in a large effort to measure reliable, detailed morphologies of galaxies by using crowdsourced visual classifications of colour-composite images. Images in GZH were selected from various publicly released Hubble Space Telescope legacy programmes conducted with the Advanced Camera for Surveys, with filters that probe the rest-frame optical emission from galaxies out to z ˜ 1. The bulk of the sample is selected to have mI814W < 23.5, but goes as faint as mI814W < 26.8 for deep images combined over five epochs. The median redshift of the combined samples is = 0.9 ± 0.6, with a tail extending out to z ≃ 4. The GZH morphological data include measurements of both bulge- and disc-dominated galaxies, details on spiral disc structure that relate to the Hubble type, bar identification, and numerous measurements of clump identification and geometry. This paper also describes a new method for calibrating morphologies for galaxies of different luminosities and at different redshifts by using artificially redshifted galaxy images as a baseline. The GZH catalogue contains both raw and calibrated morphological vote fractions for 119 849 galaxies, providing the largest data set to date suitable for large-scale studies of galaxy evolution out to z ˜ 1.

  19. High resolution imaging of galaxy cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, P.; Stiavelli, M.; King, I. R.; Deharveng, J. M.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Surface photometry data obtained with the Faint Object Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope in the cores of ten galaxies is presented. The major results are: (1) none of the galaxies show truly 'isothermal' cores, (2) galaxies with nuclear activity show very similar light profiles, (3) all objects show central mass densities above 10 exp 3 solar masses/cu pc3, and (4) four of the galaxies (M87, NGC 3862, NGC 4594, NGC 6251) show evidence for exceptional nuclear mass concentrations.

  20. GANALYZER: A TOOL FOR AUTOMATIC GALAXY IMAGE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Shamir, Lior

    2011-08-01

    We describe Ganalyzer, a model-based tool that can automatically analyze and classify galaxy images. Ganalyzer works by separating the galaxy pixels from the background pixels, finding the center and radius of the galaxy, generating the radial intensity plot, and then computing the slopes of the peaks detected in the radial intensity plot to measure the spirality of the galaxy and determine its morphological class. Unlike algorithms that are based on machine learning, Ganalyzer is based on measuring the spirality of the galaxy, a task that is difficult to perform manually, and in many cases can provide a more accurate analysis compared to manual observation. Ganalyzer is simple to use, and can be easily embedded into other image analysis applications. Another advantage is its speed, which allows it to analyze {approx}10,000,000 galaxy images in five days using a standard modern desktop computer. These capabilities can make Ganalyzer a useful tool in analyzing large data sets of galaxy images collected by autonomous sky surveys such as SDSS, LSST, or DES. The software is available for free download at http://vfacstaff.ltu.edu/lshamir/downloads/ganalyzer, and the data used in the experiment are available at http://vfacstaff.ltu.edu/lshamir/downloads/ganalyzer/GalaxyImages.zip.

  1. Imaging the Heart of Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    New radio images of the center of the Milky Way are providing an unprecedented view of the structure and processes occurring in the Galactic center.JVLA images of Sgr A at 5.5 GHz. The large-scale, bright ring structure is Sgr A East, a supernova remnant. The mini-spiral structure along the lower-right edge of the ring is Sgr A West, and Sgr A* is located near the center of the mini-spiral structure. Click for a closer look! [Zhao et al. 2016]Improved Radio ViewA recent study led by Jun-Hui Zhao (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) presents new images of the Galactic center using the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 5.5 GHz. The images center on the radio-bright zone at the core of our galaxy, with the field of view covering the central 13 of the Milky Way equivalent to a physical size of ~100 light-years.Due to recent hardware and software improvements in the VLA, these images are much deeper than any previously obtained of the Galactic center, reaching an unprecedented 100,000:1 dynamic range. Not only do these observations provide a detailed view of previously known structures within the Sagittarius A radio complex in the Milky Ways heart, but they also reveal new features that can help us understand the processes that formed this bright complex.Features in Sagittarius ASgr A consists of three main components nested within each other: the supernova remnant Sgr A East, the mini-spiral structure Sgr A West (located off-center within the Sgr A East structure), and the compact radio source Sgr A* (located near the center of the mini-spiral). Sgr A* is the supermassive black hole that resides at the very center of the Milky Way.The newest JVLA images reveal numerous filamentary sources that trace out two radio lobes, oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane and ~50 light-years in size. These are smaller radio counterparts to the enormous (on the scale of 30,000 light-years!) gamma-ray Fermi bubbles that have been observed to extend from the

  2. Probing highly obscured, self-absorbed galaxy nuclei with vibrationally excited HCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, S.; Martín, S.; Costagliola, F.; González-Alfonso, E.; Muller, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Fuller, G. A.; García-Burillo, S.; van der Werf, P.; Neri, R.; Spaans, M.; Combes, F.; Viti, S.; Mühle, S.; Armus, L.; Evans, A.; Sturm, E.; Cernicharo, J.; Henkel, C.; Greve, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution (0.̋4) IRAM PdBI and ALMA mm and submm observations of the (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) IRAS 17208-0014, Arp220, IC 860 and Zw049.057 that reveal intense line emission from vibrationally excited (ν2 = 1) J = 3-2 and 4-3 HCN. The emission is emerging from buried, compact (r< 17-70 pc) nuclei that have very high implied mid-infrared surface brightness > 5 × 1013 L⊙ kpc-2. These nuclei are likely powered by accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and/or hot (>200 K) extreme starbursts. Vibrational, ν2 = 1, lines of HCN are excited by intense 14 μm mid-infrared emission and are excellent probes of the dynamics, masses, and physical conditions of (U)LIRG nuclei when H2 column densities exceed 1024 cm-2. It is clear that these lines open up a new interesting avenue to gain access to the most obscured AGNs and starbursts. Vibrationally excited HCN acts as a proxy for the absorbed mid-infrared emission from the embedded nuclei, which allows for reconstruction of the intrinsic, hotter dust SED. In contrast, we show strong evidence that the ground vibrational state (ν = 0), J = 3-2and 4-3 rotational lines of HCN and HCO+ fail to probe the highly enshrouded, compact nuclear regions owing to strong self- and continuum absorption. The HCN and HCO+ line profiles are double-peaked because of the absorption and show evidence of non-circular motions - possibly in the form of in- or outflows. Detections of vibrationally excited HCN in external galaxies are so far limited to ULIRGs and early-type spiral LIRGs, and we discuss possible causes for this. We tentatively suggest that the peak of vibrationally excited HCN emission is connected to a rapid stage of nuclear growth, before the phase of strong feedback. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure and ALMA Interferometers. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states

  3. ONLY THE LONELY: H I IMAGING OF VOID GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kreckel, K.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Platen, E.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van der Hulst, J. M.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; Yip, C.-W.; Kovac, K.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2011-01-15

    Void galaxies, residing within the deepest underdensities of the Cosmic Web, present an ideal population for the study of galaxy formation and evolution in an environment undisturbed by the complex processes modifying galaxies in clusters and groups, as well as provide an observational test for theories of cosmological structure formation. We have completed a pilot survey for the H I imaging aspects of a new Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), imaging 15 void galaxies in H I in local (d < 100 Mpc) voids. H I masses range from 3.5 x 10{sup 8} to 3.8 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}, with one nondetection with an upper limit of 2.1 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}. Our galaxies were selected using a structural and geometric technique to produce a sample that is purely environmentally selected and uniformly represents the void galaxy population. In addition, we use a powerful new backend of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope that allows us to probe a large volume around each targeted galaxy, simultaneously providing an environmentally constrained sample of fore- and background control samples of galaxies while still resolving individual galaxy kinematics and detecting faint companions in H I. This small sample makes up a surprisingly interesting collection of perturbed and interacting galaxies, all with small stellar disks. Four galaxies have significantly perturbed H I disks, five have previously unidentified companions at distances ranging from 50 to 200 kpc, two are in interacting systems, and one was found to have a polar H I disk. Our initial findings suggest void galaxies are a gas-rich, dynamic population which present evidence of ongoing gas accretion, major and minor interactions, and filamentary alignment despite the surrounding underdense environment.

  4. An infrared imaging study of galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Albert D.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Mcleod, Kim K.

    1995-01-01

    This poster was a preliminary report on a survey of galaxies in the local universe at J and K using a NICMOS3 256 x 256 infrared photometric camera attached to the 61 inch telescope on Mt. Bigelow. Deep images are being obtained for a representative sample of galaxies in the Uppsala General Catalogue. Structural and color parameters are determined for a wide variety of galactic types. These data should prove to be valuable in characterizing stellar populations within disks and bulges, determining if IR-active galaxies have unusual global as well as- nuclear properties, and understanding the effects of evolution and redshift dimming in distant galaxies.

  5. Featured Image: A Galaxy Plunges Into a Cluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    The galaxy that takes up most of the frame in this stunning image (click for the full view!) is NGC 1427A. This is a dwarf irregular galaxy (unlike the fortuitously-located background spiral galaxy in the lower right corner of the image), and its currently in the process of plunging into the center of the Fornax galaxy cluster. Marcelo Mora (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) and collaborators have analyzed observations of this galaxy made by both the Very Large Telescope in Chile and the Hubble Advanced Camera for Surveys, which produced the image shown here as a color composite in three channels. The team worked to characterize the clusters of star formation within NGC 1427A identifiable in the image as bright knots within the galaxy and determine how the interactions of this galaxy with its cluster environment affect the star formation within it. For more information and the original image, see the paper below.Citation:Marcelo D. Mora et al 2015 AJ 150 93. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/93

  6. Near-infrared imaging of CfA Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, K. K.; Rieke, G. H.

    1995-03-01

    We present near-IR images of 43 Seyfert galaxies from the CfA Seyfert sample. The near-IR luminosity is a good tracer of luminous mass in these galaxies. Most of the Seyfert nuclei are found in hosts of mass similar to that of L* galaxies and ranging in type from S0 to Sc. In addition, there is a population of low-mass host galaxies with very low luminosity Seyfert nuclei. We have examined our images for signs of perturbations that could drive fuel toward the galaxy nucleus, but there are none we can identify at a significant level. The critical element for fueling is evidently not reflected clearly in the large-scale distribution of luminous mass in the galaxy. The Seyfert hosts are compared with a sample of 50 low-redshift quasar host galaxies we have also imaged. The radio-quiet quasars and the Seyfert nuclei lie in similar kinds of galaxies spanning the same range of mass centered around L*. However, for the most luminous quasars, there is a correlation between the minimum host-galaxy mass and the luminosity of the active nucleus. Radio-loud quasars are generally found in hosts more massive than an L* galaxy. The low-luminosity quasars and the Seyfert nuclei both tend to lie in host galaxies seen preferentially face-on, which suggests that there is a substantial amount of obscuration coplanar with the galaxian disk. The obscuration must be geometrically thick (thickness-to-radius ratio approximately 1) and must cover a significant fraction of the narrow-line region (r greater than 100 pc).

  7. The Properties of Two Low-redshift O VI Absorbers and Their Associated Galaxies toward 3c 263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B. D.; Kim, T.-S.; Keeney, B.; Narayanan, A.; Stocke, J.; Syphers, D.; Wakker, B. P.

    2012-07-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the QSO 3C 263 (z em = 0.652) with Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and FUSE reveal O VI absorption systems at z = 0.06342 and 0.14072. WIYN multi-object spectrograph observations provide information about the galaxies associated with the absorbers. The multi-phase system at z = 0.06342 traces cool photoionized gas and warm collisionally ionized gas associated with an L ~ 0.31 L* compact spiral emission line galaxy with an impact parameter of 63 kpc. The cool photoionized gas in the absorber is well modeled, with log U ~ -2.6, log N(H) ~ 17.8, log n(H) ~ -3.3 and [Si/H] = -0.14 ± 0.23. The collisionally ionized gas containing C IV and O VI probably arises in cooling shock-heated transition temperature gas with log T ~ 5.5. The absorber is likely tracing circumgalactic gas enriched by gas ejected from the spiral emission line galaxy. The simple system at z = 0.14072 only contains O VI and broad and narrow H I. The O VI with b = 33.4 ± 11.9 km s-1 is likely associated with the broad H I λ1215 absorption, with b = 86.7 ± 15.4 km s-1. The difference in Doppler parameters implies the detection of a very large column of warm gas with log T = 5.61(+0.16, -0.25), log N(H) = 19.54(+0.26, -0.44), and [O/H] = -1.48 (+0.46, -0.26). This absorber is possibly associated with a 1.6 L* absorption line galaxy with an impact parameter of 617 kpc, although an origin in warm filament gas or in the halo of a fainter galaxy is more likely. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555, and the NASA-CNES/ESA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer mission operated by Johns Hopkins University, supported by NASA contract NAS 05-32985. Based on observations obtained with the WIYN Observatory which is jointly operated by the

  8. Unification of X-ray Winds in Seyfert Galaxies: From Ultra-fast Outflows to Warm Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J.; Nemmen, R.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60%, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34%, >67% of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. The absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. This strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The observed parameters and correlations are consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and MHD processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, have a sufficiently high mechanical power to significantly contribute to the AGN feedback.

  9. Measuring photometric redshifts using galaxy images and Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, B.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new method to estimate the photometric redshift of galaxies by using the full galaxy image in each measured band. This method draws from the latest techniques and advances in machine learning, in particular Deep Neural Networks. We pass the entire multi-band galaxy image into the machine learning architecture to obtain a redshift estimate that is competitive, in terms of the measured point prediction metrics, with the best existing standard machine learning techniques. The standard techniques estimate redshifts using post-processed features, such as magnitudes and colours, which are extracted from the galaxy images and are deemed to be salient by the user. This new method removes the user from the photometric redshift estimation pipeline. However we do note that Deep Neural Networks require many orders of magnitude more computing resources than standard machine learning architectures, and as such are only tractable for making predictions on datasets of size ≤50k before implementing parallelisation techniques.

  10. Imaging the Hot Stellar Content of Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertola, Francesco

    1991-07-01

    WE PROPOSE TO IMAGE WITH THE FOC IN THE F/96 CONFIGURATION FIVE EARLY TYPE GALAXIES IN FOUR PASSBANDS CENTERED AT 1500 A, 2200 A, 2800 A AND 3400 A. WHEN COUPLED WITH PHOTOMETRY OBTAINED FROM THE GROUND OUR OBSERVATIONS WILL ALLOW US TO DERIVE COMPLETE SED OF THESE GALAXIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE FROM THE CENTER. THIS IS A KEY STEP TOWARDS THE UNDERSTANDING OF STELLAR POPULATIONS - IN PARTICULAR THE ONE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE UV EMISSION - IN EARLY TYPE GALAXIES AND WILL PROVIDE IMPORTANT INSIGHT IN THEIR FORMATION AND EVOLUTION. WE PLAN TO OBSERVE NGC 1399, NGC 2681, NGC 4552, NGC 5018 AND NGC 4627 WHICH SAMPLE A WIDE RANGE OF INTRINSIC PROPERTIES AS INDICATED BY PREVIOUS IUE OBSERVATIONS. FOR NGC 4627 THERE IS EVIDENCE OF ONGOING STAR FORMATION AND THE HST WILL BE ABLE TO SHOW THE CHARACTERISTIC CLUMPINESS. NGC 2681 HAD A STARBUST OF AGE GREATER THAN 1 GYR. NGC 4552 IS ONE OF THE MOST METAL RICH GALAXY KNOWN. NGC 1399 HAS THE SAME METALLICITY AND LUMINOSITY OF THE PREVIOUS GALAXY BUT IS A MUCH STRONGER X-RAY EMITTER. NGC 5018 IS A VERY GOOD CANDIDATE FOR ONGOING STAR FORMATION. WE BELIEVE IN THIS WAY WE CAN OBTAIN SED FOR THE TWO-DIMENSIONAL IMAGES OF EARLY TYPE GALAXIES FROM BROAD BAND IMAGING ALONE. THE CALIBRATION OF OUR FILTER SYSTEM WILL ALLOW US TO APPLY IT TO THE BIDIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE GENERAL SAMPLE OF EARLY TYPE GALAXIES.

  11. High-z QSO Absorption Systems: Metal-Poor Cold Flows and Mg II Absorber Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Thomas; Simcoe, R. A.; Cooksey, K.; O'Meara, J.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmological simulations have suggested a new model for gas accretion in young galaxies, in which baryons flow into the star-forming disk along filamentary streams without shock heating at the dark matter halo virial radius. Observationally, these cold flows manifest as Lyman Limit Systems with low heavy element abundances. To search for cold flows in the early Universe, we have obtained echellette-resolution spectra of an HI-selected sample of LLS at z>3.5 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The sightlines were selected to exhibit no heavy element absorption at the resolution afforded by SDSS, and the higher resolution data provides metallicity measurements precise enough to determine if they exhibit cold flow accretion characteristics. In a parallel program, we use the Magellan Telescopes and HST/WFC-3 to investigate the connection between Mg II absorbers and proximate galaxies at 3, extending fruitful studies of the circumgalactic medium to larger redshift.

  12. Unification of X-ray winds in Seyfert galaxies: from ultra-fast outflows to warm absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Nemmen, R. S.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60 per cent, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34 per cent, >67 per cent of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together, spanning several orders of magnitude in ionization, column, velocity and distance allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. In all the cases, the absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. These evidence strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The UFOs are likely launched from the inner accretion disc and the WAs at larger distances, such as the outer disc and/or torus. We argue that the observed parameters and correlations are, to date, consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and magnetohydrodynamic processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, show

  13. Unification of X-ray Winds in Seyfert Galaxies: From Ultra-fast Outflows to Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Nemmen, R. S.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60 per cent, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34 per cent, >67 per cent of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together, spanning several orders of magnitude in ionization, column, velocity and distance allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. In all the cases, the absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. These evidence strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The UFOs are likely launched from the inner accretion disc and the WAs at larger distances, such as the outer disc and/or torus. We argue that the observed parameters and correlations are, to date, consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and magnetohydrodynamic processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, show

  14. Distance determinations to shield galaxies from Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Cannon, John M.; Cave, Ian; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Salzer, John J.; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Elson, Ed C.; Ott, Juërgen; Saintonge, Amélie

    2014-04-10

    The Survey of H I in Extremely Low-mass Dwarf (SHIELD) galaxies is an ongoing multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies. The galaxies were selected from the first ∼10% of the H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey based on their inferred low H I mass and low baryonic mass, and all systems have recent star formation. Thus, the SHIELD sample probes the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function for star-forming galaxies. Here, we measure the distances to the 12 SHIELD galaxies to be between 5 and 12 Mpc by applying the tip of the red giant method to the resolved stellar populations imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. Based on these distances, the H I masses in the sample range from 4 × 10{sup 6} to 6 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, with a median H I mass of 1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. The tip of the red giant branch distances are up to 73% farther than flow-model estimates in the ALFALFA catalog. Because of the relatively large uncertainties of flow-model distances, we are biased toward selecting galaxies from the ALFALFA catalog where the flow model underestimates the true distances. The measured distances allow for an assessment of the native environments around the sample members. Five of the galaxies are part of the NGC 672 and NGC 784 groups, which together constitute a single structure. One galaxy is part of a larger linear ensemble of nine systems that stretches 1.6 Mpc from end to end. Three galaxies reside in regions with 1-9 neighbors, and four galaxies are truly isolated with no known system identified within a radius of 1 Mpc.

  15. High Resolution Echelle Spectroscopy of Low Redshift Intervening O VI Absorbers with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripp, T. M.; Bowen, D. V.; Jenkins, E. B.; Savage, B. D.

    1999-12-01

    We present high resolution FUV echelle spectroscopy of several low z intervening O VI absorbers (z < 0.3) in the spectra of H1821+643 and PG0953+415. The data were obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph at a resolution of 45,000 (7 km/s FWHM). We also present selected new measurements of galaxy redshifts in the 10' field centered on H1821+643. The observations provide several clues about the nature of these absorbers: (1) In the case of the strong O VI system at z = 0.2250 in the spectrum of H1821+643, we detect multicomponent Si II and Si III absorption as well as O VI and several Lyman series lines of H I. Multiple components are evident in the O VI profiles, but the components have different velocities than the Si III and Si II lines. Furthermore, the Si II and Si III lines are quite narrow, and the O VI lines are broader and spread over a larger velocity range. This evidence strongly indicates that this is a multiphase absorber. (2) We also detect `high velocity' O VI in the z = 0.2250 system. High velocity H I is also seen in the Lyα profile, but substantially offset in velocity from the O VI. This high velocity O VI may be analogous to the highly ionized high velocity clouds seen near the Milky Way. (3) We also present systems at other redshifts including very weak O VI absorption lines accompanied by weak and narrow H I absorption. (4) In all cases, several galaxies are close to the sight lines at the redshift of the O VI systems. We examine whether the O VI absorption can be attributed to the ISM of a single galaxy or the intragroup medium.

  16. Galaxy Image Processing and Morphological Classification Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian

    2012-03-01

    This work uses data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Galaxy Zoo Project for classification of galaxy morphologies via machine learning. SDSS imaging data together with reliable human classifications from Galaxy Zoo provide the training set and test set for the machine learning architectures. Classification is performed with hand-picked, pre-computed features from SDSS as well as with the raw imaging data from SDSS that was available to humans in the Galaxy Zoo project. With the hand-picked features and a logistic regression classifier, 95.21% classification accuracy and an area under the ROC curve of 0.986 are attained. In the case of the raw imaging data, the images are first processed to remove background noise, image artifacts, and celestial objects other than the galaxy of interest. They are then rotated onto their principle axis of variance to guarantee rotational invariance. The processed images are used to compute color information, up to 4^th order central normalized moments, and radial intensity profiles. These features are used to train a support vector machine with a 3^rd degree polynomial kernel, which achieves a classification accuracy of 95.89% with an ROC area of 0.943.

  17. Image-based query-by-example for big databases of galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Lior; Kuminski, Evan

    2017-01-01

    Very large astronomical databases containing millions or even billions of galaxy images have been becoming increasingly important tools in astronomy research. However, in many cases the very large size makes it more difficult to analyze these data manually, reinforcing the need for computer algorithms that can automate the data analysis process. An example of such task is the identification of galaxies of a certain morphology of interest. For instance, if a rare galaxy is identified it is reasonable to expect that more galaxies of similar morphology exist in the database, but it is virtually impossible to manually search these databases to identify such galaxies. Here we describe computer vision and pattern recognition methodology that receives a galaxy image as an input, and searches automatically a large dataset of galaxies to return a list of galaxies that are visually similar to the query galaxy. The returned list is not necessarily complete or clean, but it provides a substantial reduction of the original database into a smaller dataset, in which the frequency of objects visually similar to the query galaxy is much higher. Experimental results show that the algorithm can identify rare galaxies such as ring galaxies among datasets of 10,000 astronomical objects.

  18. Experimental approach to EUV imaging enhancement by mask absorber height optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, Natalia; de Kruif, Robert; Rolff, Haiko; Connolly, Brid; van Setten, Eelco; Lammers, Ad; Oorschot, Dorothe; Fukugami, Norihito; Kodera, Yutaka

    2013-10-01

    EUV lithography performance is improved significantly by optimizing and fine-tuning of the EUV mask. The EUV mask is an active element of the scanner optical system influencing main lithographic figure of merits such as image contrast, critical dimension uniformity (CDU), focus and overlay. The mask stack consists of Mo/Si multilayer acting as a bright field and a patterned absorber stack. In this work we will concentrate on investigation of EUV absorber. Absorber topography that is pronounced compared to the imaging wavelength of 13.5 nm, will give rise to various mask 3d effects such as shadowing or dependence of CD on feature orientation, best focus shift of different resolution structures, etc. Light interference in the absorber layer results in swinging behavior of various lithography metrics as function of the absorber height. Optimization of the mask absorber allows mitigating mask 3d effects and improving imaging performance. In particular, reduction of the absorber height mitigates the shadowing effect and relaxes requirements on Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), but can result in smaller Process Window due to lower imaging contrast and larger best focus shifts. In this work we will show results of an experimental approach to absorber height optimization. A special mask with 27 different absorber heights in the range 40-70 nm is manufactured by Toppan Photomasks. EUV reflectivity spectra are measured for the different absorber heights and an experimental swing curve is constructed. For each absorber height various resolution features are present on the mask. Lines of 27 nm and 22 nm are imaged on the wafer using the ASML EUV scanner NXE:3300B with an NA of 0.33. The experimental CD swing curve is constructed as well as HV change as a function of absorber height. The impact of the absorber height on Exposure Latitude (EL) and Dose to Size (D2S) is investigated. EL improves with increasing absorber height in some cases, however there is no clear EL gain

  19. Deep JH Imaging of the LITTLE THINGS Galaxies: Stellar Mass Assembly in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre; Herrmann, Kim; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2011-02-01

    We propose to obtain deep broadband JH images for 6 dwarf irregular galaxies (dIm) which are part of a larger sample assembled by the LITTLE THINGS project (a VLA Large Proposal). Using the NIR data requested here and other multi-band data we have collected, we will, for the first time, construct high-quality spectral energy distributions (SEDs) covering the whole spectral range of stellar emission for a representative sample of dIm galaxies. dIm galaxies numerically dominate the local Universe, yet our understanding of the star formation processes in dIm galaxies is very poor. For example, the star formation rate profile often correlates closely with the stellar surface brightness profile of the older stars, but not with the gas, and we do not know why. Also, abrupt changes in the slope of the stellar exponential profile imply a change in the star formation process at the surface brightness breaks according to some models, but this has not been shown observationally. With the SEDs constructed as a function of radius within each galaxy and our stellar population synthesis technique, we will answer the questions: 1) How is the stellar mass across the disks assembled throughout the lifetime of dwarf irregular galaxies? 2) Are there corresponding surface mass density breaks at the surface brightness breaks seen in many dIm galaxies? And is there any difference in the stellar populations before and beyond the surface brightness breaks?

  20. Deep JH Imaging of the LITTLE THINGS Galaxies: Stellar Mass Assembly in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre; Herrmann, Kim; Little Things Team

    2011-08-01

    We propose to obtain deep broadband JH images for 2 dwarf irregular galaxies (dIm) which are part of a larger sample assembled by the LITTLE THINGS project (a VLA Large Proposal). Using the NIR data requested here and other multi-band data we have collected, we will, for the first time, construct high-quality spectral energy distributions (SEDs) covering the whole spectral range of stellar emission for a representative sample of dIm galaxies. dIm galaxies numerically dominate the local universe, yet our understanding of the star formation processes in dIm galaxies is very poor. For example, the star formation rate profile often correlates closely with the stellar surface brightness profile of the older stars, but not with the gas, and we do not know why. Also, abrupt changes in the slope of the stellar exponential profile imply a change in the star formation process at the surface brightness breaks according to some models, but this has not been shown observationally. With the SEDs constructed as a function of radius within each galaxy and our stellar population synthesis technique, we will answer the questions: 1) How is the stellar mass across the disks assembled throughout the lifetime of dwarf irregular galaxies? 2) Are there corresponding surface mass density breaks at the surface brightness breaks seen in many dIm galaxies? 3) Is there any difference in the stellar populations before and beyond the surface brightness breaks?

  1. GMRT HI Imaging of Selected LARS+eLARS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Sarmiento, Karen; Mendoza Davila, Cesar I.; Cannon, John M.; Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Pardy, Stephen; LARS Team

    2017-01-01

    The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS) and its extension (eLARS) form the most comprehensive effort to date to study the details of Lyman Alpha radiative transfer in galaxies. Direct imaging of Lyman Alpha emission from the Hubble Space Telescope is supplemented by a wealth of multi-wavelength observations designed to probe the complex processes that contribute to the escape or destruction of Lyman Alpha photons as they resonantly scatter in the neutral ISM. The 42 LARS+eLARS galaxies span a range of physical properties, including mass and star formation rate. In this work, we present new GMRT HI imaging of selected LARS+eLARS galaxies designed to study the detailed morphology and kinematics of the HI gas. HI column density images and velocity fields are compared to SDSS imaging.

  2. Evolution of luminous IRAS galaxies: Radio imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Hutchings, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    In a recent study of IRAS galaxies' optical morphologies, we found that luminous IR sources lie in the IR color-luminosity plane in groups which separate out by optical spectroscopic type and also by degree of tidal disturbance. We found that the most luminous steep-IR-spectrum sources are generally galaxies in the initial stages of a major tidal interaction. Galaxies with active nuclei were generally found to have flatter IR spectra, to cover a range of IR luminosity, and to be in the later stages of a tidal interaction. We proposed a sequence of events by which luminous IR sources evolve: they start as interacting or merging galaxies, some develop active nuclei, and most undergo extensive star-formation in their central regions. Another way to study these objects and their individual evolution is to study their radio morphologies. Radio emission may arise at a detectable level from supernovae in star-forming regions and/or the appearance of an active nucleus can be accompanied by a nuclear radio source (which may develop extended structure). Therefore, the compact radio structure may trace the evolution of the inner regions of IRAS-luminous sources. If the radio sources are triggered by the interactions, we would expect to find the radio morphology related to the optical 'interactivity' of the systems. Here, we explore using the radio emission of IRAS galaxies as a possible tracer of galaxy evolution. We present and discuss observations of the compact radio morphology of 111 luminous IRAS-selected active galaxies covering a wide range of IR and optical properties.

  3. Uncooled CMOS terahertz imager using a metamaterial absorber and pn diode.

    PubMed

    Escorcia, Ivonne; Grant, James; Gough, John; Cumming, David R S

    2016-07-15

    We demonstrate a low-cost uncooled terahertz (THz) imager fabricated in a standard 180 nm CMOS process. The imager is composed of a broadband THz metamaterial absorber coupled with a diode microbolometer sensor where the pn junction is used as a temperature sensitive device. The metamaterial absorber array is integrated in the top metallic layers of a six metal layer process allowing for complete monolithic integration of the metamaterial absorber and sensor. We demonstrate the capability of the detector for stand-off imaging applications by using it to form transmission and reflection images of a metallic object hidden in a manila envelope.

  4. Simultaneous UV and X-ray Spectroscopy of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 5548. I: Physical Conditions in the UV Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Gabel, J. R.; Kaastra, J. S.; Steenbrugge, K. C.; Brinkman, A. C.; Dunn, J. P.; George, I. M.; Liedahl, D. A.; Paerels, F. B. S.

    2003-01-01

    We present new UV spectra of the nucleus of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548, which we obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph at high spectral resolution, in conjunction with simultaneous Chandra X-ray Observatory spectra. Taking advantage of the low UV continuum and broad emission-line fluxes, we have determined that the deepest UV absorption component covers at least a portion of the inner, high-ionization narrow-line region (NLR). We find nonunity covering factors in the cores of several kinematic components, which increase the column density measurements of N V and C IV by factors of 1.2 to 1.9 over the full-covering case; however, the revised columns have only a minor effect on the parameters derived from our photoionization models. For the first time, we have simultaneous N V and C IV columns for component 1 (at -1040 km/s), and find that this component cannot be an X-ray warm absorber, contrary to our previous claim based on nonsimultaneous observations. We find that models of the absorbers based on solar abundances severely overpredict the O VI columns previously obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectrograph, and present arguments that this is not likely due to variability. However, models that include either enhanced nitrogen (twice solar) or dust, with strong depletion of carbon in either case, are successful in matching all of the observed ionic columns. These models result in substantially lower ionization parameters and total column densities compared to dust-free solar-abundance models, and produce little O VII or O VIII, indicating that none of the UV absorbers are X-ray warm absorbers.

  5. New Images Show Unprecedented Detail of Neighbor Galaxy's Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    Using radio telescopes in the United States and Europe, astronomers have made the most detailed images ever of Hydrogen gas in a spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. The scientists used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) in the Netherlands to produce an image of the galaxy M33, known to amateur astronomers as the Pinwheel Galaxy. Doppler-Shift Image of M33's Gas "An image with the level of detail we have achieved opens the door to learning fundamental new facts about the relationship between massive stars and the galaxy's complicated gaseous environment. This, in turn, will help us better understand how galaxies age," said David Thilker, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Thilker worked with Robert Braun of the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy and Rene Walterbos of New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. The scientists reported their findings today at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA. The VLA and WSRT received radio waves at a wavelength of 21 centimeters that are naturally emitted by Hydrogen atoms. Using this data, the astronomers produced images showing the distribution of neutral atomic Hydrogen in M33. In addition, because the atoms emit at a very specific wavelength, the scientists could detect the galaxy's rotation by tuning the telescopes' radio receivers to receive radio waves whose length has been changed by Doppler shifting. The new images show details of the galaxy smaller than 130 light-years. "With more computer processing, we will be able to see features as small as 65 light-years," Thilker said. "This, we believe, will allow us to see 'bubbles' in the galaxy's gas that have been inflated as the result of one or more supernova explosions," Thilker added. At a distance from Earth of about 2.7 million light-years, M33 is a member of the Local Group of galaxies, which

  6. ASKAP H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Koribalski, B.; Kilborn, V.; Allison, J. R.; Amy, S. W.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Bowen, M.; Boyle, B.; Broadhurst, S.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Bunton, J. D.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Hampson, G. A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Johnston, S.; Joseph, J.; Kamphuis, P.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; Lensson, E.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Meyer, M.; Mirtschin, P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R. P.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shaw, R.; Shimwell, T. W.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, A. W.; Troup, E.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M.; Wilson, C.; Wong, O. I.; Wu, X.

    2015-09-01

    We present H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459 carried out with six antennas of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder equipped with phased-array feeds. We detect and resolve H I in 11 galaxies down to a column density of ˜1020 cm-2 inside a ˜6 deg2 field and with a resolution of ˜1 arcmin on the sky and ˜8 km s-1 in velocity. We present H I images, velocity fields and integrated spectra of all detections, and highlight the discovery of three H I clouds - two in the proximity of the galaxy IC 5270 and one close to NGC 7418. Each cloud has an H I mass of ˜109 M⊙ and accounts for ˜15 per cent of the H I associated with its host galaxy. Available images at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths do not reveal any clear stellar counterpart of any of the clouds, suggesting that they are not gas-rich dwarf neighbours of IC 5270 and NGC 7418. Using Parkes data, we find evidence of additional extended, low-column-density H I emission around IC 5270, indicating that the clouds are the tip of the iceberg of a larger system of gas surrounding this galaxy. This result adds to the body of evidence on the presence of intragroup gas within the IC 1459 group. Altogether, the H I found outside galaxies in this group amounts to several times 109 M⊙, at least 10 per cent of the H I contained inside galaxies. This suggests a substantial flow of gas in and out of galaxies during the several billion years of the group's evolution.

  7. Lyα-emitting galaxies as a probe of reionization: large-scale bubble morphology and small-scale absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiichi, Koki; Dijkstra, Mark; Ciardi, Benedetta; Graziani, Luca

    2016-12-01

    The visibility of Lyα-emitting galaxies during the Epoch of Reionization is controlled by both diffuse H I patches in large-scale bubble morphology and small-scale absorbers. To investigate their impacts on Lyα transfer, we apply a novel combination of analytic modelling and cosmological hydrodynamical, radiative transfer simulations to three reionization models: (i) the `bubble' model, where only diffuse H I outside ionized bubbles is present; (ii) the `web' model, where H I exists only in overdense self-shielded gas; and (iii) the hybrid `web-bubble' model. The three models can explain the observed Lyα luminosity function equally well, but with very different H I fractions. This confirms a degeneracy between the ionization topology of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the H I fraction inferred from Lyα surveys. We highlight the importance of the clustering of small-scale absorbers around galaxies. A combined analysis of the Lyα luminosity function and the Lyα fraction can break this degeneracy and provide constraints on the reionization history and its topology. Constraints can be improved by analysing the full MUV-dependent redshift evolution of the Lyα fraction of Lyman break galaxies. We find that the IGM-transmission probability distribution function is unimodal for bubble models and bimodal in web models. Comparing our models to observations, we infer that the neutral fraction at z ˜ 7 is likely to be of the order of tens of per cent when interpreted with bubble or web-bubble models, with a conservative lower limit ˜1 per cent when interpreted with web models.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Seppo; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Lauer, Tod R.; Postman, Marc; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.

    2003-02-01

    We used the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 to obtain I-band images of the centers of 81 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), drawn from a volume-limited sample of nearby BCGs. The images show a rich variety of morphological features, including multiple or double nuclei, dust, stellar disks, point-source nuclei, and central surface brightness depressions. High-resolution surface brightness profiles could be inferred for 60 galaxies. Of those, 88% have well-resolved cores. The relationship between core size and galaxy luminosity for BCGs is indistinguishable from that of Faber et al. (published in 1997, hereafter F97) for galaxies within the same luminosity range. However, the core sizes of the most luminous BCGs fall below the extrapolation of the F97 relationship rb~L1.15V. A shallower relationship, rb~L0.72V, fits both the BCGs and the core galaxies presented in F97. Twelve percent of the BCG sample lacks a well-resolved core; all but one of these BCGs have ``power law'' profiles. Some of these galaxies have higher luminosities than any power-law galaxy identified by F97 and have physical upper limits on rb well below the values observed for core galaxies of the same luminosity. These results support the idea that the central structure of early-type galaxies is bimodal in its physical properties but also suggest that there exist high-luminosity galaxies with power-law profiles (or unusually small cores). The BCGs in the latter category tend to fall at the low end of the BCG luminosity function and tend to have low values of the quantity α (the logarithmic slope of the metric luminosity as a function of radius, at 10 kpc). Since theoretical calculations have shown that the luminosities and α-values of BCGs grow with time as a result of accretion, this suggests a scenario in which elliptical galaxies evolve from power-law profiles to core profiles through accretion and merging. This is consistent with theoretical scenarios that invoke the

  9. DETAILED DECOMPOSITION OF GALAXY IMAGES. II. BEYOND AXISYMMETRIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Chien Y.; Ho, Luis C.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter E-mail: lho@obs.carnegiescience.ed E-mail: rix@mpia-hd.mpg.d

    2010-06-15

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) fitting algorithm (GALFIT, ver. 3) with new capabilities to study the structural components of galaxies and other astronomical objects in digital images. Our technique improves on previous 2D fitting algorithms by allowing for irregular, curved, logarithmic and power-law spirals, ring, and truncated shapes in otherwise traditional parametric functions like the Sersic, Moffat, King, Ferrer, etc., profiles. One can mix and match these new shape features freely, with or without constraints, and apply them to an arbitrary number of model components of numerous profile types, so as to produce realistic-looking galaxy model images. Yet, despite the potential for extreme complexity, the meaning of the key parameters like the Sersic index, effective radius, or luminosity remains intuitive and essentially unchanged. The new features have an interesting potential for use to quantify the degree of asymmetry of galaxies, to quantify low surface brightness tidal features beneath and beyond luminous galaxies, to allow more realistic decompositions of galaxy subcomponents in the presence of strong rings and spiral arms, and to enable ways to gauge the uncertainties when decomposing galaxy subcomponents. We illustrate these new features by way of several case studies that display various levels of complexity.

  10. Featured Image: Central Black Holes in Late-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    The images above show just 8 of 51 different nearby, late-type galaxies found to host X-ray cores near their centers. The main images are optical views and the insets show Chandra X-ray images of the same galaxies. The cross marks identify the near-infrared/optical nucleus of each galaxy, and the green ellipses show the source regions for the X-rays. A recent publication led by Rui She (Tsinghua University, China) presents a search for low-mass (106 solar masses) black holes lurking in the centers of nearby late-type, low-mass galaxies. Many of the 51 X-ray cores discovered represent such hidden black holes. The authors use the statistics of this sample to estimate that at least 21% of late-type galaxies likethose studied here host low-mass black holes at their centers. You can view the full set of X-ray core hosts below; for more information, check out the paper linked at the bottom of the page.All 51 X-ray cores (displayed in 3 sets); see the article below for the originals.CitationRui She et al 2017 ApJ 842 131. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa7634

  11. Phantoms for diffuse optical imaging based on totally absorbing objects, part 2: experimental implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Ninni, Paola Di; Zaccanti, Giovanni; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Mazurenka, Mikhail; Macdonald, Rainer; Sassaroli, Angelo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    We present the experimental implementation and validation of a phantom for diffuse optical imaging based on totally absorbing objects for which, in the previous paper [J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 066014, (2013)], we have provided the basic theory. Totally absorbing objects have been manufactured as black polyvinyl chloride (PVC) cylinders and the phantom is a water dilution of intralipid-20% as the diffusive medium and India ink as the absorber, filled into a black scattering cell made of PVC. By means of time-domain measurements and of Monte Carlo simulations, we have shown the reliability, the accuracy, and the robustness of such a phantom in mimicking typical absorbing perturbations of diffuse optical imaging. In particular, we show that such a phantom can be used to generate any absorption perturbation by changing the volume and position of the totally absorbing inclusion.

  12. Weak Radio Galaxies. I. Broad-Band Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, R.; Cruz-González, I.; Guichard, J.

    1997-04-01

    We report on a study of the optical properties of weak radio galaxies (WRGs) from the B2 survey, to obtain the broad-band photometric properties and morphology information crucial for our narrow-band imaging at Hα and [O III] study (Carrillo et al. 1997). This paper contains optical CCD images of 30 radio galaxies obtained at V, R and I. We present the morphological and photometric results and discuss their relationship to the radio structure and environmental properties. We find that most WRGs are E galaxies, have peculiar morphologies and are located in high galaxy density environments. Optical colors of WRGs are unusual if compared to colors of normal ellipticals, but similar to AGN colors. The surface brightness profiles of most WRGs follow the de Vaucouleurs law expected for ellipticals at most radii, but in all cases a turnover or flatness is observed in the innermost portion of the profiles, possibly produced by an additional nuclear emission source. The tidal effects produced by galaxy companions described by Kormendy (1977) for ellipticals, are clearly evident in the outer parts of the WRGs profiles and can be associated to interaction effects.

  13. Fast radio burst tied to distant dwarf galaxy (Image 2)

    NSF Multimedia

    2017-06-07

    Radio telescope at Arecibo only localized the fast radio burst to the area inside the two circles in this image, but the Very Large Array was able to pinpoint it as a dwarf galaxy within the square (shown at intersection of cross hairs in enlarged box)

  14. Frankenstein Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-11

    The galaxy UGC 1382 has been revealed to be far larger and stranger than previously thought. Astronomers relied on a combination of ground-based and space telescopes to uncover the true nature of this "Frankenstein galaxy." The composite image shows the same galaxy as viewed with different instruments. The component images are also available. In the image at left, UGC 1382 appears to be a simple elliptical galaxy, based on optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). But spiral arms emerged when astronomers incorporated ultraviolet data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and deep optical data from SDSS, as seen in the middle image. Combining that with a view of low-density hydrogen gas (shown in green), detected at radio wavelengths by the Very Large Array, scientists discovered that UGC 1382 is a giant, and one of the largest isolated galaxies known. GALEX in particular was able detect very faint features because it operated from space, which is necessary for UV observations because ultraviolet light is absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere. Astronomers also used Stripe 82 of SDSS, a small region of sky where SDSS imaged the sky 80 times longer than the original standard SDSS survey. This enabled optical detection of much fainter features as well. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20695

  15. Deep IR imaging of two gas-rich radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal

    1997-07-01

    We propose deep, high resolution continuum, line and polarization imaging of the two best candidates for recent mergers amongst the low-redshift radio galaxies: 3C 305 and 3C 293. Our primary aim is to obtain a deep IR image to locate the true nuclei and clarify the structure of the galaxies in order to test merger models, since our optical view is confused by dense dust lanes, scattering, and strong emission lines associated with the kpc-scale radio jets. The results will help assess popular models in which mergers trigger AGN activity. Our secondary aim is to image the shock-excited 1.64 micron Fe ii line to trace fast shocks and hence help understand the relationship between the radio jets and the {possibly collimated} ionizing continuum. These two galaxies provide a very rare opportunity to study the impact of the jets on their environment, because they are interacting directly with the cold interstellar medium {absent in normal elliptical radio galaxies}. The extended optical emission lines are already well studied, but interpretation has been hampered by confusion between shock- and photo-ionization. Our tertiary aim is to obtain 2 micron polarimetry to trace regions of electron scattering, to check the apparent 90degrees misalignment between the jet axis and that of the scattering ``cone'' in 3C 305, and to ensure location of even deeply-buried nuclei, either by picking up direct long- wavelength emission, or by locating the centre of the scattering pattern.

  16. Discovery of a Damped Lyα Absorber at z = 3.3 along a Galaxy Sight-line in the SSA22 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawatari, K.; Inoue, A. K.; Kousai, K.; Hayashino, T.; Cooke, R.; Prochaska, J. X.; Yamada, T.; Matsuda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Using galaxies as background light sources to map the Lyα absorption lines is a novel approach to study Damped Lyα Absorbers (DLAs). We report the discovery of an intervening z = 3.335 ± 0.007 DLA along a galaxy sight-line identified among 80 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) spectra obtained with our Very Large Telescope/Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph survey in the SSA22 field. The measured DLA neutral hydrogen (H i) column density is log(NH i/cm-2) = 21.68 ± 0.17. The DLA covering fraction over the extended background LBG is >70% (2σ), yielding a conservative constraint on the DLA area of ≳1 kpc2. Our search for a counterpart galaxy hosting this DLA concludes that there is no counterpart galaxy with star formation rate larger than a few M⊙ yr-1, ruling out an unobscured violent star formation in the DLA gas cloud. We also rule out the possibility that the host galaxy of the DLA is a passive galaxy with M* ≳ 5 × 1010M⊙ or a heavily dust-obscured galaxy with E(B - V) ≳ 2. The DLA may coincide with a large-scale overdensity of the spectroscopic LBGs. The occurrence rate of the DLA is compatible with that of DLAs found in QSO sight-lines.

  17. Deep HST imaging of distant weak radio and field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, R. A.; Gordon, J. M.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Schmidtke, P. C.; Keel, W. C.; Burkey, J. M.; Dunlop, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera (WFC) V- and I-band images of three distant weak radio galaxies with z = 0.311-2.390 and seven field galaxies with z = 0.131-0.58. The images were deconvolved with both the Lucy and multiresolution CLEAN methods, which yield a restoring Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of less than or equal to 0.2 sec, (nearly) preserve photons and signal-to-noise ratio at low spatial frequencies, and produce consistent light profiles down to our 2 sigma surface brightness sensitivity limit of V approximately 27.2 and I approximately 25.9 mag/sq arcsec. Multi-component image modeling was used to provide deconvolution-independent estimates of structural parameters for symmetric galaxies. We present 12-band (m(sub 2750) UBVRIgriJHK) photometry for a subset of the galaxies and bootstrap the unknown FOC/48 zero point at 2750 A in three independent ways (yielding m(sub 2750) = 21.34 +/- 0.09 mag for 1.0 e(-)/s). Two radio galaxies with z = 0.311 and 0.528, as well as one field galaxy with z = 0.58, have the colors and spectra of early-type galaxies, and a(exp 1/4)-like light profiles in the HST images. The two at z greater than 0.5 have little or no color gradients in V - I and are likely giant ellipticals, while the z = 0.311 radio galaxy has a dim exponential disk and is likely an S0. Six of the seven field galaxies have light profiles that indicate (small) inner bulges following a(exp 1/4) laws and outer exponential disks, both with little or no color gradients. These are (early-type) spiral galaxies with z = 0.131-0.528. About half have faint companions or bars. One shows lumpy structure, possibly a merger. The compact narrow-line galaxy 53W002 at z = 2.390 has less than or = 30% +/- 10% of its HST V and I flux in the central kiloparsec (due to its weak Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN)). Most of its light (V approximately equal to 23.3) occurs in a symmetric envelope with a regular a(exp 1/4)-like profile of effective

  18. Fermi Gamma-Ray Imaging of a Radio Galaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2010-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the γ-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved γ-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy γ-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The γ-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton–scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. In conclusion, these measurements provide γ-raymore » constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields.« less

  19. Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, Ł; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

    2010-05-07

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields.

  20. Featured Image: H I Gas in the Triangulum Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    These spectacular images are of M33, otherwise known as the Triangulum Galaxy a spiral galaxy roughly 3 million light-years away. The views on the left and in the center are different Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) filters, and the view on the right is a full-resolution look at the H I gas distribution in M33s inner disk, made with data from the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) Synthesis Telescope and Arecibo. In a new study, a team of authors led by Zacharie Sie Kam (University of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; University of Montreal, Canada) uses the H I gas observations to explore how the mass is distributed throughout M33 and how the gas moves as the galaxys disk rotates. To read more about what they learned, check out the paper below.CitationS. Z. Kam et al 2017 AJ 154 41. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aa79f3

  1. Fermi Gamma-Ray Imaging of a Radio Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Celik, O.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, x. J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, x. S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Georganopoulos, M.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knodlseder, J.; Kocian, x. M. L.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. W.; Sambruna, R.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Parkinson, P. M. S.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J. L.; Stawarz, L.; Strickman, x. M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Kazanas, D.

    2010-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the γ-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved γ-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy γ-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The γ-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton–scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. In conclusion, these measurements provide γ-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields.

  2. Investigating merging galaxies by using Pan-STARRS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Fan; Yu, Po-Chieh; Huang, Jen-Chao; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan; Chen, Wen-Ping; Kaiser, Nick; Metcalfe, Nigel; Waters, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Aims: We studied the r'-, z'-, and y'-band images of merging galaxies from the observations of the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS). The merging galaxies were selected from our merging catalog that was created by checking the images of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey 2 from the observations of the Canada France Hawaii Telescope. Methods: By using the homomorphic-aperture, we determined the photometric results of these merging systems. To obtain accurate photometry, we calibrated the Pan-STARRS r'-, z'-, and y'-band data to match the results of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 9. We also investigated the stellar masses of the merging galaxies by comparing the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer 3.4 μm emission with the calibrated y'-band data. Results: We present a catalog of the r'-, z'-, and y'-band photometric results for 4698 merging galaxies. For extended sources, our results suggest that the homomorphic-aperture method can obtain more reasonable results than the Desktop Virtual Observatory photometry. We derived new relations between the Pan-STARRS y'-band luminosities and the stellar masses of the merging galaxies. Our results show that the stellar masses of the merging galaxies range from 108 to 1013M⊙; some of the dry mergers could be as massive as 1013M⊙. The catalog is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A28

  3. VLA+WSRT HI Imaging of Two "Almost Dark" Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Catie; Singer, Quinton; Cannon, John M.; Leisman, Luke; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Bernal Neira, David; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Janesh, William; Janowiecki, Steven; Jozsa, Gyula; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John Joseph

    2017-01-01

    We present sensitive HI imaging of the "Almost Dark" galaxies AGC229385 and AGC229101. Selected from the ALFALFA survey, "Almost Dark" galaxies have significant HI reservoirs but lack an obvious stellar counterpart in survey-depth ground-based optical imaging. Deeper ground- and space-based imaging reveals very low surface brightness optical counterparts in both systems. The resulting M_HI/L_B ratios are among the highest ever measured for individual galaxies. Here we combine VLA and WSRT imaging of these two systems, allowing us to preserve surface brightness sensitivity while working at high angular resolution. The resulting maps of HI mass surface density, velocity field, and velocity dispersion are compared to deep optical and ultraviolet imaging. In both systems the highest column density HI gas is clumpy and resolved into multiple components. In the case of AGC229385, the kinematics are inconsistent with a simple rotating disk and may be the result of either an infall episode or an interaction between two HI-rich disks.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant 1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  4. Optical imaging for the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Data release and notes on interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, Johan H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Roa, Javier; Bakos, Judit; Cisternas, Mauricio; Leaman, Ryan; Szymanek, Nik

    2014-09-01

    Context. The Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) and its more recently approved extension will lead to a set of 3.6 and 4.5 μm images for 2829 galaxies, which can be used to study many different aspects of the structure and evolution of local galaxies. Aims: We have collected and re-reduced optical images of 1768 of the survey galaxies, aiming to make these available to the community as ready-to-use FITS files to be used in conjunction with the mid-IR images. Our sky-subtraction and mosaicking procedures were optimised for imaging large galaxies. We also produce false-colour images of some of these galaxies to be used for illustrative and public outreach purposes. Methods: We collected and re-processed images in five bands from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for 1657 galaxies, which are publicly released with the publication of this paper. We observed, in only the g-band, an additional 111 S4G galaxies in the northern hemisphere with the 2.5 m Liverpool Telescope, so that optical imaging is released for 1768 galaxies, or for 62% of the S4G sample. We visually checked all images. We noted interactions and close companions in our optical data set and in the S4G sample, confirming them by determining the galaxies' radial velocities and magnitudes in the NASA-IPAC Extragalactic Database. Results: We find that 17% of the S4G galaxies (21% of those brighter than 13.5 mag) have a close companion (within a radius of five times the diameter of the sample galaxy, a recession velocity within ± 200 km s-1 and not more than 3 mag fainter) and that around 5% of the bright part of the S4G sample show significant morphological evidence of an ongoing interaction. This confirms and further supports previous estimates of these fractions. Conclusions: The over 8000 science images described in this paper, the re-processed Sloan Digital Sky Survey ones, the new Liverpool Telescope images, the set of 29 false-colour pictures, and the catalogue of companion and

  5. IRAC Snapshot Imaging of Red Herschel Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Wardlow, Julie; Ivison, Rob; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Riechers, Dominik; Clements, David; Oliver, Seb; Oteo, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Wide-field submillimeter surveys with Herschel have produced large samples of rare populations, which provide some of the most stringent constraints on galaxy formation theories. In this proposal we request IRAC observations of 'red' Herschel sources, which are the most extreme DSFGs at z>4. The proposed snapshot IRAC 3.6 and 4.5um data will probe the stellar emission from these systems - complementary data to the far-infrared dust emission that led to their identification. We will use these data to extend the SEDs into the near-IR regime and measure more reliable stellar masses than otherwise available. They will be combined with existing survey data and dedicated follow-up programs to map the evolution of DSFGs as a function of redshift, stellar mass and far-IR luminosity.

  6. Adaptive Optics Imaging Survey of Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Laag, E A; Canalizo, G; van Breugel, W; Gates, E L; de Vries, W; Stanford, S A

    2006-03-13

    We present high resolution imaging observations of a sample of previously unidentified far-infrared galaxies at z < 0.3. The objects were selected by cross-correlating the IRAS Faint Source Catalog with the VLA FIRST catalog and the HST Guide Star Catalog to allow for adaptive optics observations. We found two new ULIGs (with L{sub FIR} {ge} 10{sup 12} L{sub {circle_dot}}) and 19 new LIGs (with L{sub FIR} {ge} 10{sup 11} L{sub {circle_dot}}). Twenty of the galaxies in the sample were imaged with either the Lick or Keck adaptive optics systems in H or K{prime}. Galaxy morphologies were determined using the two dimensional fitting program GALFIT and the residuals examined to look for interesting structure. The morphologies reveal that at least 30% are involved in tidal interactions, with 20% being clear mergers. An additional 50% show signs of possible interaction. Line ratios were used to determine powering mechanism; of the 17 objects in the sample showing clear emission lines--four are active galactic nuclei and seven are starburst galaxies. The rest exhibit a combination of both phenomena.

  7. Ultraviolet imaging of the AGN+starburst galaxy NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, Susan G.; Fanelli, Michael N.; Roberts, Laura J.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Bohlin, Ralph; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1994-01-01

    Images of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 were obtained at two ultraviolet wavelengths by the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT). These data represent the first detailed UV imagery of a composite (active galactic nucleus + starburst) disk galaxy. NGC 1068 cotains multiple components at UV wavelengths: the central active galactic nucleus; a population of very luminous starburst knots; a bright oval inner disk; and a fainter, more circular halo. The most luminous knot, which is located approximately 750 pc from the nucleus at PA 315 deg, is approximately 80 times the luminosity of 30 Doradus and gives NGC 1068 a 'double nucleus' appearance in the UV. Significant extended emission is observed throughout the disk, unlike other disk galaxies so far observed in the UV. The radial brightness profile in both UV bandpasses generally follows an exponential decline to approximately 5 kpc. A faint halo extending to approximately 13 kpc is likely to be a galaxian-sized reflection nebula where ambient dust scatters the intense UV continuum from the inner galaxy. UV colors show a striking asymmetric morphology, which is correlated with the observed molecular CO emission.

  8. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  9. Imaging of Early-type(Sa-Sab) Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, S.; Devereux, N.

    1997-12-01

    imaging of Early-type (Sa-Sab) Spirals A recent analysis of the IRAS database indicates that the massive star formation rates in early-type(Sa-Sab) spirals are comparable to the massive star formation rates in late-type spirals. We are conducting an Hα imaging survey of a complete sample of nearby (D <= 40Mpc), bright (m(B) <= 12.1), early-type spirals to confirm the results obtained by IRAS. Our preliminary results indicate that a majority of these galaxies show either signs of interaction, and/or host nuclear starbursts. The occurence of nuclear starbursts in early-type spirals may be related to the propensity for such galaxies to also host Seyfert nuclei. The evidence for interactions suggests that early-type spirals are evolving in the current epoch.

  10. Applying galactic archeology to massive galaxies using deep imaging surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2015-04-01

    Various programs aimed at exploring the still largely unknown low surface brightness Universe with deep imaging optical surveys have recently started. They open a new window for studies of galaxy evolution, pushing the technique of galactic archeology outside the Local Group (LG). The method, based on the detection and analysis of the diffuse light emitted by collisional debris or extended stellar halos (rather than on stellar counts as done for LG systems), faces however a number of technical difficulties, like the contamination of the images by reflection halos and Galactic cirrus. I review here the on-going efforts to address them and highlight the preliminary promising results obtained with a systematic survey with MegaCam on the CFHT of nearby massive early-type galaxies done as part of the ATLAS3D, NGVS and MATLAS collaborations.

  11. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-10

    This image is from NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer is an observation of the large galaxy in Andromeda, Messier 31. The Andromeda galaxy is the most massive in the local group of galaxies that includes our Milky Way.

  12. Chandra Images the Seething Cauldron of Starburst Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged the core of the nearest starburst galaxy, Messier 82 (M82). The observatory has revealed a seething cauldron of exploding stars, neutron stars, black holes, 100 million degree gas, and a powerful galactic wind. The discovery will be presented by a team of scientists from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Penn., Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, on January 14 at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society. "In the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, stars form and die in a relatively calm fashion like burning embers in a campfire," said Richard Griffiths, Professor of Astrophysics at Carnegie Mellon University. "But in a starburst galaxy, star birth and death are more like explosions in a fireworks factory." Short-lived massive stars in a starburst galaxy produce supernova explosions, which heat the interstellar gas to millions of degrees, and leave behind neutron stars and black holes. These explosions emit light in the X rays rather than in visible light. Because the superhot components inside starburst galaxies are complex and sometimes confusing, astronomers need an X-ray-detecting telescope with the highest focusing power (spatial resolution) to clearly discriminate the various structures. "NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is the perfect tool for studying starburst galaxies since it has the critical combination of high-resolution optics and good sensitivity to penetrating X rays," said Gordon Garmire, the Evan Pugh Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University, and head of the team that conceived and built Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrograph (ACIS) X-ray camera, which acquired the data. Many intricate structures missed by earlier satellite observatories are now visible in the ACIS image, including more than twenty powerful X-ray binary systems that contain a normal star in a close orbit around a neutron star

  13. A Deep Search for Faint Galaxies Associated with Very Low Redshift C iv Absorbers. III. The Mass- and Environment-dependent Circumgalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tumlinson, Jason; Willmer, C. N. A.; O'Meara, John; Katz, Neal

    2016-12-01

    Using Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of 89 QSO sightlines through the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint, we study the relationships between C iv absorption systems and the properties of nearby galaxies, as well as the large-scale environment. To maintain sensitivity to very faint galaxies, we restrict our sample to 0.0015\\lt z\\lt 0.015, which defines a complete galaxy survey to L≳ 0.01 L\\ast or stellar mass {M}* ≳ {10}8 {M}⊙ . We report two principal findings. First, for galaxies with impact parameter ρ \\lt 1 {r}{vir}, C iv detection strongly depends on the luminosity/stellar mass of the nearby galaxy. C iv is preferentially associated with galaxies with {M}* \\gt {10}9.5 {M}⊙ ; lower-mass galaxies rarely exhibit significant C iv absorption (covering fraction {f}C={9}-6+12 % for 11 galaxies with {M}* \\lt {10}9.5 {M}⊙ ). Second, C iv detection within the {M}* \\gt {10}9.5 {M}⊙ population depends on environment. Using a fixed-aperture environmental density metric for galaxies with ρ < 160 kpc at z\\lt 0.055, we find that {57}-13+12 % (8/14) of galaxies in low-density regions (regions with fewer than seven L\\gt 0.15 L\\ast galaxies within 1.5 Mpc) have affiliated C iv absorption; however, none (0/7) of the galaxies in denser regions show C iv. Similarly, the C iv detection rate is lower for galaxies residing in groups with dark matter halo masses of {M}{halo}\\gt {10}12.5 {M}⊙ . In contrast to C iv, H i is pervasive in the circumgalactic medium without regard to mass or environment. These results indicate that C iv absorbers with {log} N({{C}} {{IV}})≳ 13.5 {{cm}}-2 trace the halos of {M}* \\gt {10}9.5 {M}⊙ galaxies but also reflect larger-scale environmental conditions.

  14. Uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose from a brain receptor imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, B.; Miller, L.F.; Sparks, R.B.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Absorbed dose estimates are known to contain uncertainties. A recent literature search indicates that prior to this study no rigorous investigation of uncertainty associated with absorbed dose has been undertaken. A method of uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose calculations has been developed and implemented for the brain receptor imaging agent {sup 123}I-IPT. The two major sources of uncertainty considered were the uncertainty associated with the determination of residence time and that associated with the determination of the S values. There are many sources of uncertainty in the determination of the S values, but only the inter-patient organ mass variation was considered in this work. The absorbed dose uncertainties were determined for lung, liver, heart and brain. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the organ absorbed dose distributions for each patient and for a seven-patient population group were determined by the ``Latin Hypercube Sampling`` method. For an individual patient, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose was found to be about 2.5 times larger than the estimated mean absorbed dose. For the seven-patient population the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose distribution was around 45% more than the estimated population mean. For example, the 95% confidence interval of the population liver dose distribution was found to be between 1.49E+0.7 Gy/MBq and 4.65E+07 Gy/MBq with a mean of 2.52E+07 Gy/MBq. This study concluded that patients in a population receiving {sup 123}I-IPT could receive absorbed doses as much as twice as large as the standard estimated absorbed dose due to these uncertainties.

  15. Deep Imaging of Extremely Metal-Poor Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding whether the most metal-poor and actively star-forming galaxies in the local universe such as I Zw 18 contain evolved stars. We propose to help settle this issue by obtaining deep ACS/HRC U, narrow-V, I, and H-alpha images of nine nearby {z < 0.01} extremely metal-poor {12 + O/H < 7.65} galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These objects are only marginally resolved from the ground and appear uniformly blue, strongly motivating HST imaging. The continuum images will establish: 1.} If underlying populations of evolved stars are present, by revealing the objects' colors on scales 10 pc, and 2.} The presence of any faint tidal features, dust lanes, and globular or super star clusters, all of which constrain the objects' evolutionary states. The H-alpha images, in combination with ground-based echelle spectroscopy, will reveal 1.} Whether the objects are producing "superwinds" that are depleting them of their metals; ground-based images of some of them indeed show large halos of ionized gas, and 2.} The correspondence of their nebular and stellar emission on scales of a few parsecs, which is important for understanding the "feedback" process by which supernovae and stellar winds regulate star formation. One of the sample objects, CGCG 269-049, lies only 2 Mpc away, allowing the detection of individual red giant stars in it if any are present. We have recently obtained Spitzer images and spectra of this galaxy to determine its dust content and star formation history, which will complement the proposed HST observations. [NOTE: THIS PROPOSAL WAS REDUCED TO FIVE ORBITS, AND ONLY ONE OF THE ORIGINAL TARGETS, CGCG 269-049, AFTER THE PHASE I REVIEW

  16. Warm Absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S.; Guainazzi, M.; Dewangan, G.; Chakravorty, S.; Kembhavi, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broadband 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. We could put a strict lower limit on the detection fraction of 50%. We find a gap in the distribution of the ionisation parameter in the range 0.5absorber flow is probably constituted by a clumpy distribution of discrete clouds. The distribution of the WA column densities for the sources with broad Fe K-alpha lines are similar to those sources which do not have broadened emission lines. Therefore the detected broad Fe K lines are bonafide and not artefacts of ionised absorption in the soft X-rays. The WA parameters show no correlation among themselves, except for one case. The shallow slope of the logξ versus logv_{out} linear regression (0.12± 0.03) is inconsistent with the scaling laws predicted by radiation or magneto-hydrodynamic-driven winds. Our results suggest also that WA and Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) do not represent extreme manifestation of the same astrophysical system.

  17. Scan-Free Absorbance Spectral Imaging A(x, y, λ) of Single Live Algal Cells for Quantifying Absorbance of Cell Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Isono, Takumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Momose, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kanda, Hiroaki; Kudo, Ayane; Okada, Norihide; Yagi, Takafumi; Nakata, Kazuaki; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Label-free, non-invasive, rapid absorbance spectral imaging A(x,y,λ) microscopy of single live cells at 1.2 μm × 1.2 μm resolution with an NA = 0.85 objective was developed and applied to unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. By introducing the fiber assembly to rearrange a two-dimensional image to the one-dimensional array to fit the slit of an imaging spectrograph equipped with a CCD detector, scan-free acquisition of three-dimensional information of A(x,y,λ) was realized. The space-resolved absorbance spectra of the eyespot, an orange organelle about 1 μm, were extracted from the green-color background in a chlorophyll-rich single live cell absorbance image. Characteristic absorbance change in the cell suspension after hydrogen photoproduction in C. reinhardtii was investigated to find a single 715-nm absorption peak was locally distributed within single cells. The formula to calculate the absorbance of cell suspensions from that of single cells was presented to obtain a quantitative, parameter-free agreement with the experiment. It is quantitatively shown that the average number of chlorophylls per cell is significantly underestimated when it is evaluated from the absorbance of the cell suspensions due to the package effect.

  18. Scan-Free Absorbance Spectral Imaging A(x, y, λ) of Single Live Algal Cells for Quantifying Absorbance of Cell Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Isono, Takumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Momose, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kanda, Hiroaki; Kudo, Ayane; Okada, Norihide; Yagi, Takafumi; Nakata, Kazuaki; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Label-free, non-invasive, rapid absorbance spectral imaging A(x,y,λ) microscopy of single live cells at 1.2 μm × 1.2 μm resolution with an NA = 0.85 objective was developed and applied to unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. By introducing the fiber assembly to rearrange a two-dimensional image to the one-dimensional array to fit the slit of an imaging spectrograph equipped with a CCD detector, scan-free acquisition of three-dimensional information of A(x,y,λ) was realized. The space-resolved absorbance spectra of the eyespot, an orange organelle about 1 μm, were extracted from the green-color background in a chlorophyll-rich single live cell absorbance image. Characteristic absorbance change in the cell suspension after hydrogen photoproduction in C. reinhardtii was investigated to find a single 715-nm absorption peak was locally distributed within single cells. The formula to calculate the absorbance of cell suspensions from that of single cells was presented to obtain a quantitative, parameter-free agreement with the experiment. It is quantitatively shown that the average number of chlorophylls per cell is significantly underestimated when it is evaluated from the absorbance of the cell suspensions due to the package effect. PMID:26061268

  19. PROPERTIES OF QSO METAL-LINE ABSORPTION SYSTEMS AT HIGH REDSHIFTS: NATURE AND EVOLUTION OF THE ABSORBERS AND NEW EVIDENCE ON ESCAPE OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Boksenberg, Alec; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    2015-05-15

    Using Voigt-profile-fitting procedures on Keck High Resolution Spectrograph spectra of nine QSOs, we identify 1099 C IV absorber components clumped in 201 systems outside the Lyman forest over 1.6 ≲ z ≲ 4.4. With associated Si IV, C II, Si II  and N V where available, we investigate the bulk statistical and ionization properties of the components and systems and find no significant change in redshift for C IV and Si IV while C II, Si II  and N V change substantially. The C IV components exhibit strong clustering, but no clustering is detected for systems on scales from 150 km s{sup –1} out to 50,000 km s{sup –1}. We conclude that the clustering is due entirely to the peculiar velocities of gas present in the circumgalactic media of galaxies. Using specific combinations of ionic ratios, we compare our observations with model ionization predictions for absorbers exposed to the metagalactic ionizing radiation background augmented by proximity radiation from their associated galaxies and find that the generally accepted means of radiative escape by transparent channels from the internal star-forming sites is spectrally not viable for our stronger absorbers. We develop an active scenario based on runaway stars with resulting changes in the efflux of radiation that naturally enable the needed spectral convergence, and in turn provide empirical indicators of morphological evolution in the associated galaxies. Together with a coexisting population of relatively compact galaxies indicated by the weaker absorbers in our sample, the collective escape of radiation is sufficient to maintain the intergalactic medium ionized over the full range 1.9 < z ≲ 4.4.

  20. Properties of QSO Metal-line Absorption Systems at High Redshifts: Nature and Evolution of the Absorbers and New Evidence on Escape of Ionizing Radiation from Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boksenberg, Alec; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    2015-05-01

    Using Voigt-profile-fitting procedures on Keck High Resolution Spectrograph spectra of nine QSOs, we identify 1099 C IV absorber components clumped in 201 systems outside the Lyman forest over 1.6 <~ z <~ 4.4. With associated Si IV, C II, Si II and N V where available, we investigate the bulk statistical and ionization properties of the components and systems and find no significant change in redshift for C IV and Si IV while C II, Si II and N V change substantially. The C IV components exhibit strong clustering, but no clustering is detected for systems on scales from 150 km s-1 out to 50,000 km s-1. We conclude that the clustering is due entirely to the peculiar velocities of gas present in the circumgalactic media of galaxies. Using specific combinations of ionic ratios, we compare our observations with model ionization predictions for absorbers exposed to the metagalactic ionizing radiation background augmented by proximity radiation from their associated galaxies and find that the generally accepted means of radiative escape by transparent channels from the internal star-forming sites is spectrally not viable for our stronger absorbers. We develop an active scenario based on runaway stars with resulting changes in the efflux of radiation that naturally enable the needed spectral convergence, and in turn provide empirical indicators of morphological evolution in the associated galaxies. Together with a coexisting population of relatively compact galaxies indicated by the weaker absorbers in our sample, the collective escape of radiation is sufficient to maintain the intergalactic medium ionized over the full range 1.9 < z <~ 4.4. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck

  1. Effects of rubber shock absorber on the flywheel micro vibration in the satellite imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Changcheng; Mu, Deqiang; Jia, Xuezhi; Li, Zongxuan

    2016-12-01

    When a satellite is in orbit, its flywheel will generate micro vibration and affect the imaging quality of the camera. In order to reduce this effect, a rubber shock absorber is used, and a numerical model and an experimental setup are developed to investigate its effect on the micro vibration in the study. An integrated model is developed for the system, and a ray tracing method is used in the modeling. The spot coordinates and displacements of the image plane are obtained, and the modulate transfer function (MTF) of the system is calculated. A satellite including a rubber shock absorber is designed, and the experiments are carried out. Both simulation and experiments results show that the MTF increases almost 10 %, suggesting the rubber shock absorber is useful to decrease the flywheel vibration.

  2. Spitzer Imaging of Herschel Lensed Sub-mm Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha; Wardlow, Julie; Kim, Sam; Khostovan, Ali; Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Barton, Elizabeth; Gong, Yan; Amblard, Alexandre; Serra, Paolo; Cooke, Jeff; Riechers, Dominik; Dominic, Benford; Frayer, David; Gardner, Jonathan; Fu, Hai; Bussmann, Shane; Gurwell, Mark; Leeuw, Lerothodi; Pasquale, Temi; Conley, Alex; Bock, Jamie; Vieira, Joaquin; Bridge, Carrie; Glenn, Jason; Zemcov, Michael; Schulz, Bernhard; Shupe, David; Hopwood, Ros; Negrello, Mattia; Andreani, Paola; Clements, David; Dannerbauer, Helmut; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Dunne, Loretta; Dunlop, James; Eales, Steve; Farrah, Duncan; Ivison, Rob; Jarvis, Matt; Maddox, Steve; Michalowski, Michal; Omont, Alain; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Serjeant, Stephen; Smail, Ian; Thompson, Mark; Vaccari, Mattia; Verma, Aprajita; Coppin, Kirsten; Oliver, Seb; Wang, Lingyu

    2011-05-01

    Sub-millimeter surveys have, in the last decade, revealed an unexpected population of high-redshift dust-obscured sub-mm galaxies (SMGs) which are forming stars at a tremendous rate. Due to steep number counts and the negative k-correction at sub-mm wavelengths sub-mm surveys are effective at finding intrinsically faint, gravitationally lensed galaxies. We have now produced a reliable list of about 150 bright lensed SMGs in 200 sq. deg of the Herschel-ATLAS and HerMES (the GTO program of the SPIRE Instrument team) surveys with Herschel-SPIRE. We propose Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging of 122 of these gravitationally lensed SMGs. The target SMGs are selected to maximally overlap with existing and planned multi-wavelength followup programs, without duplicating existing deep IRAC data. Using the proposed Spitzer data we will: (a) Extend the SEDs of z~ 1 to 5 lensed SMGs into the near-IR regime, where derived stellar masses are more reliable than those estimated at other wavelengths alone; (b) Combine with lens models from existing and planned high-resolution sub-mm imaging (SMA, CARMA, PdBI) to map the evolution of stellar mass as a function of redshift and star-formation rate (SFR); (c) Combine with existing and planned CO and CII molecular line measurements to map the evolution of dust-to-gas and stellar-to-gas mass ratios as a function of redshift and SFR; (d) Obtain snapshot statistics on the sub-mm galaxy evolution from z of 1 to 5 as a function of stellar, dust, and gas mass to study the role of mergers and AGN contribution that may regulate the starburst phenomenon; (e) Compare our results to those from numerical simulations of high-redshift starburst galaxies to investigate the physical conditions in SMGs, and their evolutionary pathways.

  3. DISCOVERY OF A DAMPED Lyα ABSORBER AT z = 3.3 ALONG A GALAXY SIGHT-LINE IN THE SSA22 FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Mawatari, K.; Inoue, A. K.; Kousai, K.; Hayashino, T.; Cooke, R.; Prochaska, J. X.; Matsuda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Using galaxies as background light sources to map the Lyα absorption lines is a novel approach to study Damped Lyα Absorbers (DLAs). We report the discovery of an intervening z = 3.335 ± 0.007 DLA along a galaxy sight-line identified among 80 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) spectra obtained with our Very Large Telescope/Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph survey in the SSA22 field. The measured DLA neutral hydrogen (H i) column density is log(N{sub H} {sub i}/cm{sup −2}) = 21.68 ± 0.17. The DLA covering fraction over the extended background LBG is >70% (2σ), yielding a conservative constraint on the DLA area of ≳1 kpc{sup 2}. Our search for a counterpart galaxy hosting this DLA concludes that there is no counterpart galaxy with star formation rate larger than a few M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, ruling out an unobscured violent star formation in the DLA gas cloud. We also rule out the possibility that the host galaxy of the DLA is a passive galaxy with M{sub *} ≳ 5 × 10{sup 10}M{sub ⊙} or a heavily dust-obscured galaxy with E(B − V) ≳ 2. The DLA may coincide with a large-scale overdensity of the spectroscopic LBGs. The occurrence rate of the DLA is compatible with that of DLAs found in QSO sight-lines.

  4. Warm absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high-resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert Galaxies - II. Warm absorber dynamics and feedback to galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Sibasish; Guainazzi, Matteo; Chakravorty, Susmita; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Kembhavi, Ajit K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is a sequel to the extensive study of warm absorber (WA) in X-rays carried out using high-resolution grating spectral data from XMM-Newton satellite (WAX-I). Here we discuss the global dynamical properties as well as the energetics of the WA components detected in the WAX sample. The slope of WA density profile (n ∝ r-α) estimated from the linear regression slope of ionization parameter ξ and column density NH in the WAX sample is α = 1.236 ± 0.034. We find that the WA clouds possibly originate as a result of photoionized evaporation from the inner edge of the torus (torus wind). They can also originate in the cooling front of the shock generated by faster accretion disc outflows, the ultrafast outflows, impinging on to the interstellar medium or the torus. The acceleration mechanism for the WA is complex and neither radiatively driven wind nor MHD-driven wind scenario alone can describe the outflow acceleration. However, we find that radiative forces play a significant role in accelerating the WA through the soft X-ray absorption lines, and also with dust opacity. Given the large uncertainties in the distance and volume filling factor estimates of the WA, we conclude that the kinetic luminosity ĖK of WA may sometimes be large enough to yield significant feedback to the host galaxy. We find that the lowest ionization states carry the maximum mass outflow, and the sources with higher Fe M UTA absorption (15-17 Å) have more mass outflow rates.

  5. High Resolution SZE Imaging of Galaxy Clusters with MUSTANG-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian S.; Romero, Charles; Dicker, Simon; Mroczkowski, Tony; Stanchfield, Sara; Sayers, Jack; Czakon, Nicole G.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Golwala, Sunil R.; Devlin, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years the 3.3mm MUSTANG bolometer camera on the GBT has been making pioneering, 10" resolution images of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) in galaxy clusters. These measurements, focusing mainly on the CLASH sample, provide a view of the ICM state and dynamics which complements that provided by other common probes (x-ray imaging and spectroscopy and lower resolution SZE imaging). We present results from this survey, including ICM pressure profile measurements obtained by combining MUSTANG and BOLOCAM data, and discuss work that is underway. In early 2015, MUSTANG's next-generation successor (MUSTANG-2) achieved first light in an engineering run on the GBT. In early 2016 the fully populated 215-feedhorn MUSTANG-2 camera will be installed for an early science run. We present an overview of key SZ science that this instrument aims to address.

  6. Classification of galaxy type from images using Microsoft R Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Andrie

    2017-06-01

    Many astronomers working in the field of AstroInformatics write code as part of their work. Although the programming language of choice is Python, a small number (8%) use R. R has its specific strengths in the domain of statistics, and is often viewed as limited in the size of data it can handle. However, Microsoft R Server is a product that removes these limitations by being able to process much larger amounts of data. I present some highlights of R Server, by illustrating how to fit a convolutional neural network using R. The specific task is to classify galaxies, using only images extracted from the Sloan Digital Skyserver.

  7. KPNO 0.9m H(alpha) Imaging Survey of ``Transforming Galaxies'' in Local Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Raychaudhury, Somak; Egami, Eiichi; Campusano, Luis

    2012-08-01

    We propose to use the KPNO 0.9-m telescope to obtain panoramic H(alpha) imaging of ~135 galaxies in ten nearby galaxy groups (60- 80 Mpc) from the Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample (CLoGS). In rich clusters ram-pressure stripping has been shown to be very effective at removing the gas contents and quenching star formation in infalling spiral galaxies. It is much less clear how galaxies are affected by the much lower ram pressures found in galaxy groups, or if other environmental processes begin to dominate. Given that >50% of galaxies in the local volume reside in groups, it is vital that we gain new insights into which mechanisms drive the SFR-density relation in groups. The proposed H(alpha) imaging will allow us to resolve where star-formation is occurring in each galaxy. This can effectively discriminate between ram-pressure stripping characterized by truncated H(alpha) disks, the much gentler starvation mechanism which produces anemic spirals, and nuclear starbursts triggered by low-velocity encounters and mergers which should be most frequent in groups.

  8. KPNO 0.9m H(alpha) Imaging Survey of ``Transforming Galaxies" in Local Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Raychaudhury, Somak; Gargiulo, Adriana; Campusano, Luis

    2012-02-01

    We propose to use the KPNO 0.9-m telescope to obtain panoramic H(alpha) imaging of ~200 galaxies in two nearby (32, 35 Mpc) galaxy groups NGC 4261 and NGC 5353 from the CLoGS local group survey. In rich clusters ram-pressure stripping has been shown to be very effective at removing the gas contents and quenching star formation in infalling spiral galaxies. It is much less clear how galaxies are affected by the much lower ram pressures found in galaxy groups, or if other environmental processes begin to dominate. Given that >50% of galaxies in the local volume reside in groups, it is vital we gain new insights into which mechanisms drive the SFR-density relation in groups. The proposed H(alpha) imaging will allow us to resolve where star-formation is occuring in each galaxy. This can effectively discriminate between ram-pressure stripping characterized by truncated H(alpha) disks, the much gentler starvation mechanism which produces anemic spirals, and nuclear star-bursts triggered by low-velocity encounters which should be most frequent in groups.

  9. Near-IR imaging of moderate redshift galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, S. A.; Dickinson, M. E.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained near-IR imaging of 3 moderate-z clusters on the 1.3 m at KPNO with SQIID, a new camera offering wide-field (5.5 arcmin) simultaneous JHK band imaging. Our photometry on a sample of approximately 100 likely member galaxies in one of the clusters, Abell 370 at z = 0.37, shows that we can obtain magnitudes good to 20 percent down to K = 18, considerably below the estimated K* = 16.5 at this redshift. These data indicate that there are no systematic problems in obtaining photometry at faint levels with SQIID. With the development of larger arrays, the field is open to progress. The resulting J, H, and K data for three clusters are combined with previously obtained multiband optical photometry. We present an investigation of the spectral properties and evolution of the dominant cold stellar populations by comparing optical-to-IR colors and color-magnitude diagrams to predictions from population synthesis models and galaxy spectral evolution codes.

  10. Deep X-ray spectroscopy and imaging of the Seyfert 2 galaxy, ESO 138-G001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cicco, M.; Marinucci, A.; Bianchi, S.; Piconcelli, E.; Violino, G.; Vignali, C.; Nicastro, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a spectral and imaging analysis of the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy ESO138-G001, with the aim of characterizing the circumnuclear material responsible for the soft (0.3-2.0 keV) and hard (5-10 keV) X-ray emission. We confirm that the source is absorbed by Compton-thick gas. However, if a self-consistent model of reprocessing from cold toroidal material is used (MYTORUS), a possible scenario requires the absorber to be inhomogenous, its column density along the line of sight being larger than the average column density integrated over all lines of sight through the torus. The iron emission line may be produced by moderately ionized iron (Fe XII-Fe XIII), as suggested by the shifted centroid energy and the low K β/K α flux ratio. The soft X-ray emission is dominated by emission features, whose main excitation mechanism appears to be photoionization, as confirmed by line diagnostics and the use of self-consistent models (CLOUDY).

  11. Far infrared structure of spiral galaxies from the IRAS CPC images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainscoat, Richard J.; Chokshi, Arati; Doyle, Laurance R.

    1989-01-01

    Significant extended far infrared (50 micron and 100 micron) structure was found for five face-on spiral galaxies (NGC2403, M51, M83, NGC6946, and IC342) from fourteen galaxies searched in the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) chopped photometric channel (CPC) catalogue. Images were initially processed to remove instrumental and background artifacts, the isophotal centroids of each image determined, and multiple images of each galaxy (for each wavelength) superimposed and averaged to improve signal-to-noise. Calibration of these images was performed using IRAS survey array data. Infrared isophotes were then superimposed on optical (blue) images so that direct structural comparisons could be made.

  12. Absorbed doses behind bones with MR image-based dose calculations for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Juha; Kapanen, Mika; Keyrilainen, Jani; Seppala, Tiina; Tuomikoski, Laura; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images are used increasingly in external radiotherapy target delineation because of their superior soft tissue contrast compared to computed tomography (CT) images. Nevertheless, radiotherapy treatment planning has traditionally been based on the use of CT images, due to the restrictive features of MR images such as lack of electron density information. This research aimed to measure absorbed radiation doses in material behind different bone parts, and to evaluate dose calculation errors in two pseudo-CT images; first, by assuming a single electron density value for the bones, and second, by converting the electron density values inside bones from T(1)∕T(2)∗-weighted MR image intensity values. A dedicated phantom was constructed using fresh deer bones and gelatine. The effect of different bone parts to the absorbed dose behind them was investigated with a single open field at 6 and 15 MV, and measuring clinically detectable dose deviations by an ionization chamber matrix. Dose calculation deviations in a conversion-based pseudo-CT image and in a bulk density pseudo-CT image, where the relative electron density to water for the bones was set as 1.3, were quantified by comparing the calculation results with those obtained in a standard CT image by superposition and Monte Carlo algorithms. The calculations revealed that the applied bulk density pseudo-CT image causes deviations up to 2.7% (6 MV) and 2.0% (15 MV) to the dose behind the examined bones. The corresponding values in the conversion-based pseudo-CT image were 1.3% (6 MV) and 1.0% (15 MV). The examinations illustrated that the representation of the heterogeneous femoral bone (cortex denser compared to core) by using a bulk density for the whole bone causes dose deviations up to 2% both behind the bone edge and the middle part of the bone (diameter <2.5 cm), but in the opposite directions. The measured doses and the calculated ones in the standard CT image were within 0.4% (through

  13. Evidence for a Circum-Nuclear and Ionised Absorber in the X-ray Obscured Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Sambruna, R. M.; Gofford, J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Suzaku observation of the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445. We confirm the results obtained with the previous X-ray observations which unveiled the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines and an overall X-ray emission which strongly resembles a typical Seyfert 2 despite of the optical classification as an unobscured AGN. The broad band spectrum allowed us to measure for the first time the amount of reflection (R approximately 0.9) which together with the relatively strong neutral Fe Ka emission line (EW approximately 100 eV) strongly supports a scenario where a Compton-thick mirror is present. The primary X ray continuum is strongly obscured by an absorber with a column density of NH = 2 - 3 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter. Two possible scenarios are proposed for the absorber: a neutral partial covering or a mildly ionised absorber with an ionisation parameter log xi approximately 1.0 erg centimeter per second. A comparison with the past and more recent X-ray observations of 3C 445 performed with XMM-Newton and Chandra is presented, which provided tentative evidence that the ionised and outflowing absorber varied. We argue that the absorber is probably associated with an equatorial diskwind located within the parsec scale molecular torus.

  14. VLA HI Imaging of the LARS+eLARS Galaxies: Global HI Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Brian Andrew; Reilly, Bridget; Cannon, John M.; Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Pardy, Stephen; LARS Team

    2017-01-01

    The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS) and its extension (eLARS) form the most comprehensive effort to date to study the details of Lyman Alpha radiative transfer in galaxies. Direct imaging of Lyman Alpha emission from the Hubble Space Telescope is supplemented by a wealth of multi-wavelength observations designed to probe the complex processes that contribute to the escape or destruction of Lyman Alpha photons as they resonantly scatter in the neutral ISM. The 42 LARS+eLARS galaxies span a range of physical properties, including mass and star formation rate. In this work, we present new VLA D-configuration HI imaging of 32 LARS+eLARS galaxies designed to localize the HI gas and to measure the total HI mass. HI column density images and velocity fields are compared to SDSS imaging. Most galaxies are unresolved at this angular resolution; a companion poster presents imaging of interacting galaxies that are well-resolved.

  15. An Optical Characterization Technique for Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors Using Images of the Absorber Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owkes, Jeanmarie Kathleen

    As the concentrating solar power industry competes to develop a less-expensive parabolic trough collector, assurance is needed that new parabolic trough collectors maintain accurate optical alignment. Previous optical characterization techniques are either too slow, ill-suited for field testing, or do not allow the collector to be tested in realistic orientations. The Observer method presented here enables the rapid optical characterization of parabolic trough collectors in any orientation in the field. The Observer method directly measures the combined optical angular errors in the reflector surface shape and the absorber position, which can be separated into its two components: reflector surface slope and absorber misalignment. The data acquisition requires the placement of photogrammetry targets on and around the collector. Multiple photographs of the absorber and its reflection are taken with a digital camera from different angles with respect to the collector. The images are processed to determine the camera location of each image using photogrammetry bundle analysis. The absorber and its reflection are found in the photographs using image-processing techniques. A Monte Carlo uncertainty model was developed to determine the uncertainty in the Observer measurements. The uncertainty was estimated for a wide array of measurement test scenarios to demonstrate the user's control over the measurement uncertainty. To validate the Observer method, the absorber alignment technique was compared to traditional photogrammetry; the absorber position measured with the two methods compared with a root-mean-square difference of 1.5 mm in the transverse direction and 0.86 mm along the optical axis. The reflector surface slope error measurement was compared to both VSHOT and SOFAST, two well-established optical characterization tools, by measuring a single reflector panel in the laboratory. The VSHOT and SOFAST measurements agreed with the Observer with a root

  16. UVES/VLT high resolution absorption spectroscopy of the GRB 080330 afterglow: a study of the GRB host galaxy and intervening absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, V.; Fiore, F.; Perna, R.; Krongold, Y.; Vergani, S. D.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Fugazza, D.; Goldoni, P.; Guidorzi, C.; Meurs, E. J. A.; Norci, L.; Piranomonte, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ward, P.

    2009-08-01

    Aims: We study the gamma-ray burst (GRB) environment and intervening absorbers by analyzing the optical absorption features produced by gas surrounding the GRB or along its line of sight. Methods: We analyzed high resolution spectroscopic observations (R = 40 000, S/N = 3-6) of the optical afterglow of GRB 080330, taken with UVES at the VLT ~ 1.5 h after the GRB trigger. Results: The spectrum illustrates the complexity of the ISM of the GRB host galaxy at z = 1.51 which has at least four components in the main absorption system. We detect strong FeII, SiII, and NiII excited absorption lines associated with the bluemost component only. In addition to the host galaxy, at least two more absorbers lying along the line of sight to the afterglow have been detected in the redshift range 0.8 < z < 1.1, each exhibiting MgII absorption. For the bluemost component in the host galaxy, we derive information about its distance from the site of the GRB explosion. We do so by assuming that the excited absorption lines are produced by indirect UV pumping, and compare the data with a time dependent photo-excitation code. The distance of this component is found to be ˜ 280+40-50 pc, which is lower than found for other GRBs (1-6 kpc). We identify two additional MgII absorbers, one of them with a rest frame equivalent width larger than 1 Å. Conclusions: The distance between the GRB and the absorber measured in this paper confirms that the power of the GRB radiation can influence the conditions of the interstellar medium up to a distance of at least several hundred pc. For the intervening absorbers, we confirm the trend that on average one strong intervening system is found per afterglow, as has been noted in studies exhibiting an excess of strong MgII absorbers along GRB sightlines compared to quasars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, ESO, the VLT/Kueyen telescope, Paranal, Chile, in the framework of programs 080.A-0398.

  17. A Switchable Mid-Infrared Plasmonic Perfect Absorber with Multispectral Thermal Imaging Capability.

    PubMed

    Tittl, Andreas; Michel, Ann-Katrin U; Schäferling, Martin; Yin, Xinghui; Gholipour, Behrad; Cui, Long; Wuttig, Matthias; Taubner, Thomas; Neubrech, Frank; Giessen, Harald

    2015-08-19

    A switchable perfect absorber with multispectral thermal imaging capability is presented. Aluminum nanoantenna arrays above a germanium antimony telluride (GST) spacer layer and aluminum mirror provide efficient wavelength-tunable absorption in the mid-infrared. Utilizing the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition in GST, this device offers switchable absorption with strong reflectance contrast at resonance and large phase-change-induced spectral shifts.

  18. A SINFONI integral field spectroscopy survey for galaxy counterparts to damped Lyman α systems - I. New detections and limits for intervening and associated absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péroux, Céline; Bouché, Nicolas; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2011-02-01

    Detailed studies of damped and sub-damped Lyman α systems (DLAs), the galaxies probed by the absorption they produce in the spectra of background quasars, rely on identifying the galaxy responsible for the absorber with more traditional methods. Integral field spectroscopy provides an efficient way of detecting faint galaxies near bright quasars, further providing immediate redshift confirmation. Here, we report the detection of Hα emission from a DLA and a sub-DLA galaxy among a sample of six intervening quasar absorbers targeted. We derive F(Hα) = 7.7 ± 2.7 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 (SFR = 1.8 ± 0.6 M⊙ yr-1) at impact parameter b= 25 kpc towards quasar Q0302 - 223 for the DLA at zabs= 1.009 and F(Hα) = 17.1 ± 6.0 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 (SFR = 2.9 ± 1.0 M⊙ yr-1) at b= 39 kpc towards Q1009 - 0026 for the sub-DLA at zabs= 0.887. These results are in line with low star formation rates previously reported in the literature for quasar absorbers. We use the [N II]λ 6585/Hα ratio to derive the H II emission metallicities and compare them with the neutral gas H I absorption metallicities derived from high-resolution spectra. In one case, the absorption metallicity is actually found to be higher than the emission line metallicity. For the remaining objects, we achieve 3σ limiting fluxes of the order F(Hα) ˜ 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 (corresponding to SFR ˜ 0.1 M⊙ yr-1 at z˜ 1 and ˜1 M⊙ yr-1 at z˜ 2), i.e. among the lowest that have been possible with ground-based observations. We also present two other galaxies associated with C IV systems and serendipitously discovered in our data. Based on observations collected during programmes ESO 79.A-0673 and 80.A-0742 at the European Southern Observatory with SINFONI on the 8.2-m YEPUN telescope operated at the Paranal Observatory, Chile.

  19. ELECTRON ABSORBED FRACTIONS IN AN IMAGE-BASED MICROSCOPIC SKELETAL DOSIMETRY MODEL OF CHINESE ADULT MALE.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shenshen; Ren, Li; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Li, Junli

    2017-01-10

    Based on the Chinese reference adult male voxel model, a set of microscopic skeletal models of Chinese adult male is constructed through the processes of computed tomography (CT) imaging, bone coring, micro-CT imaging, image segmentation, merging into macroscopic bone model and implementation in Geant4. At the step of image segmentation, a new bone endosteum (BE) segmentation method is realized by sampling. The set of model contains 32 spongiosa samples with voxel size of 19 μm cubes. The microscopic spongiosa bone data for Chinese adult male are provided. Electron absorbed fractions in red bone marrow (RBM) and BE are calculated. Source tissues include the bone marrow (red and yellow), trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes) and cortical bone (surfaces and volumes). Target tissues include RBM and BE. Electron energies range from 10 keV to 10 MeV. Additionally, comparison of the result with other investigations is provided.

  20. Fetal and maternal absorbed dose estimates for positron-emitting molecular imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-09-01

    PET and hybrid (PET/CT and PET/MR) imaging currently play a pivotal role in clinical diagnosis, staging and restaging, treatment, and surveillance of several diseases. As such, limiting the radiation exposure of special patients, such as pregnant women, from PET procedures is an important challenge that needs to be appropriately addressed because of the high sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to ionizing radiation. Therefore, accurate radiation dose calculation for the embryo/fetus and pregnant patient from common positron-emitting radiotracers is highly desired. To obtain representative estimates of radiation dose to the human body, realistic biologic and physical models should be used. In this work, we evaluate the S values of 9 positron-emitting radionuclides ((11)C, (13)N, (15)O, (18)F, (64)Cu, (68)Ga, (82)Rb, (86)Y, and (124)I) and the absorbed and effective doses for 21 positron-emitting labeled radiotracers using realistic anthropomorphic computational phantoms of early pregnancy and at 3-, 6-, and 9-mo of gestation and the most recent biokinetic data available. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended general-purpose Monte Carlo code was used for radiation transport simulation. The absorbed dose to the pregnant model is less influenced by the gestation for most organs or tissues, but the anatomic changes of the maternal body increases the effective dose for some radiotracers. For (18)F-FDG, the estimated absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus are 3.05E-02, 2.27E-02, 1.50E-02, and 1.33E-02 mGy/MBq at early pregnancy and 3-, 6-, and 9-mo gestation, respectively. The absorbed dose is nonuniformly distributed in the fetus and would be 1.03-2 times higher in the fetal brain than in other fetal soft tissues. The generated S values can be exploited to estimate the radiation dose delivered to pregnant patients and the embryo/fetus from various PET radiotracers used in clinical and research settings. The generated dosimetric database of radiotracers using new

  1. Mid-UV Imaging of Nearby Early to Mid-Type Galaxies as Templates for High Redshift Galaxy Classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarenza, C. A. T.; Windhorst, R. A.; Taylor, V. A.; Odewahn, S. C.; Conselice, C. J.; MacKenty, J.; de Jong, R. S.; de Grijs, R.; Eskridge, P. B.; Frogel, J. A.; Gallagher, J. S.; Kobulnicky, H.; Hibbard, J. E.; Matthews, L. D.; O'Connell, R. W.

    2000-12-01

    Current samples of high redshift galaxies are primarily observed in their restframe mid-UV. They often resemble nearby late type galaxies, but are they really physically similar classes of objects? To explore this question we did a systematic imaging survey with the HST/WFPC2 of 37 nearby galaxies in two mid-UV bands. Our sample is carefully selected for size and surface brightness over a wide range of Hubble types and inclinations. All objects (will) have ground based UBVRIJ(H)K images, and 15 have far UV UIT images. The mid-UV is the missing keystone. With it we can examine the distribution of star formation and its history, dust, the SED's of star forming regions, and differentiate between age and metallicity. Our first results from this Cycle 9 project are: (1) Early type galaxies can show significant changes from the mid-UV to the red. Some are quite dim in the UV, reflecting their old stellar population. Others become point sources in the mid-UV (LINER's, Seyferts). This raises the question to what extent the apparently strong cosmological evolution of weak AGN in early type galaxies is due to ``morphological K-correction.'' (2) Mid type spirals and star forming galaxies can appear as later or different types in the mid-UV. Dust lanes are well traceable comparing F300W to F814W. We see a considerable range in scale and surface brightness of individual star-forming regions. We acknowledge NASA ADP grant NAG-6740, ASU NASA Space Grants, and NASA grants GO-8645.01-99A and AR-8765.01-99A from STScI. Based on observations with the VATT: the Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  2. A Deep Search For Faint Galaxies Associated With Very Low-redshift C IV Absorbers. II. Program Design, Absorption-line Measurements, and Absorber Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.; Tumlinson, Jason; O'Meara, John M.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Katz, Neal; Willmer, C. N. A.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the evolution of metal-enriched gas over recent cosmic epochs as well as to characterize the diffuse, ionized, metal-enriched circumgalactic medium, we have conducted a blind survey for C iv absorption systems in 89 QSO sightlines observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We have identified 42 absorbers at z < 0.16, comprising the largest uniform blind sample size to date in this redshift range. Our measurements indicate an increasing C iv absorber number density per comoving path length (d{N}/{dX}= 7.5 ± 1.1) and modestly increasing mass density relative to the critical density of the universe (ΩC iv = 10.0 ± 1.5 × 10-8) from z ˜ 1.5 to the present epoch, consistent with predictions from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Furthermore, the data support a functional form for the column density distribution function that deviates from a single power law, also consistent with independent theoretical predictions. As the data also probe heavy element ions in addition to C iv at the same redshifts, we identify, measure, and search for correlations between column densities of these species where components appear to be aligned in velocity. Among these ion-ion correlations, we find evidence for tight correlations between C ii and Si ii, C ii and Si iii, and C iv and Si iv, suggesting that these pairs of species arise in similar ionization conditions. However, the evidence for correlations decreases as the difference in ionization potential increases. Finally, when controlling for observational bias, we find only marginal evidence for a correlation (86.8% likelihood) between the Doppler line width b(C iv) and column density N(C iv).

  3. Photoacoustic contrast imaging of biological tissues with nanodiamonds fabricated for high near-infrared absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Su, Long-Jyun; Ren, Shenqiang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Yang, Xinmai

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Radiation-damaged nanodiamonds (DNDs) are potentially ideal optical contrast agents for photoacoustic (PA) imaging in biological tissues due to their low toxicity and high optical absorbance. PA imaging contrast agents have been limited to quantum dots and gold particles, since most existing carbon-based nanoparticles, including fluorescent nanodiamonds, do not have sufficient optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) range. A new DND by He+ ion beam irradiation with very high NIR absorption was synthesized. These DNDs produced a 71-fold higher PA signal on a molar basis than similarly dimensioned gold nanorods, and 7.1 fmol of DNDs injected into rodents could be clearly imaged 3 mm below the skin surface with PA signal enhancement of 567% using an 820-nm laser wavelength. PMID:23400417

  4. H I Imaging Observations of Superthin Galaxies. I. UGC 7321

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uson, Juan M.; Matthews, L. D.

    2003-05-01

    We have used the Very Large Array to image the isolated ``superthin'' galaxy UGC 7321 in the H I line with a spatial resolution of 16" and a spectral resolution of 24 kHz (5.2 km s-1). We have reached a sensitivity of (0.36-0.40) mJy beam-1 channel-1, which correspond to a column density of (8-9)×1018 atoms cm-2 (1 σ). UGC 7321 has a gas-rich disk, with MHI=(1.06+/-0.01)×109 d210 Msolar and MHI/LB=1.0 (d10 is the distance to UGC 7321 in units of 10 Mpc, the value adopted in this paper), and no detectable radio continuum emission (FCONT=0.41+/-0.25 mJy). The global H I distribution of UGC 7321 is rather symmetric and extends to ~1.5 times the optical radius (DHI=8.65‧+/-0.15‧ at nHI=3×1019 atoms cm-2). An ``integral sign'' warp is observed in the H I disk, commencing near the edge of the stellar distribution and twisting back toward the equatorial plane in the outermost regions. In addition, the position-velocity diagram suggests the presence of a bar or inner arm within ~40" from the center. The rotation curve of UGC 7321 is slowly rising; it reaches its asymptotic velocity of ~110 km s-1 at ~2.5‧ from the center (about 0.9 optical radii) and declines near the edge of the H I disk. The ratio of the inferred dynamical mass to the mass in gas and stars is ~12d-110, implying that UGC 7321 is a highly dark-matter-dominated galaxy.

  5. Absorbed and effective doses from cone beam volumetric imaging for implant planning.

    PubMed

    Okano, T; Harata, Y; Sugihara, Y; Sakaino, R; Tsuchida, R; Iwai, K; Seki, K; Araki, K

    2009-02-01

    Volumetric CT using a cone beam has been developed by several manufacturers for dentomaxillofacial imaging. The purpose of this study was to measure doses for implant planning with cone beam volumetric imaging (CBVI) in comparison with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT). The two CBVI systems used were a 3D Accuitomo (J. Morita), including an image-intensifier type (II) and a flat-panel type (FPD), and a CB MercuRay (Hitachi). The 3D Accuitomo operated at 80 kV, 5 mA and 18 s. The CB MercuRay operated at 120 kV, 15 mA, 9.8 s. The MDCT used was a HiSpeed QX/i (GE), operated at 120 kV, 100 mA and 0.7 s, and its scan length was 77 mm for both jaws. Measurement of the absorbed tissue and organ doses was performed with an Alderson phantom, embedding the radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeter into the organs/tissues. The values obtained were converted into the absorbed dose. The effective dose as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection was then calculated. The absorbed doses of the 3D Accuitomo of the organs in the primary beam ranged from 1-5 mGy, and were several to ten times lower than other doses. The effective dose of the 3D Accuitomo ranged from 18 muSv to 66 muSv, and was an order of magnitude smaller than the others. In conclusion, these results show that the dose in the 3D Accuitomo is lower than the CB MercuRay and much less than MDCT.

  6. The Hubble Space Telescope Survey of BL Lacertae Objects. IV. Infrared Imaging of Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Urry, C. Megan; Padovani, Paolo; Calzetti, Daniela; O'Dowd, Matthew

    2000-11-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Camera 2 was used for H-band imaging of 12 BL Lacertae objects taken from the larger sample observed with the WFPC2 in the R band by Urry and coworkers and Scarpa and coworkers. Ten of the 12 BL Lacs are clearly resolved, and the detected host galaxies are large, bright ellipticals with average absolute magnitude =-26.2+/-0.45 mag and effective radius =10+/-5 kpc. The rest-frame integrated color of the host galaxies is on average =2.3+/-0.3, consistent with the value for both radio galaxies and normal, nonactive elliptical galaxies and indicating that the dominant stellar population is old. The host galaxies tend to be bluer in their outer regions than in their cores, with average color gradient Δ(R-H)/Δlogr=-0.2 mag, again consistent with results for normal nonactive elliptical galaxies. The infrared Kormendy relation, derived for the first time for BL Lac host galaxies, is μe=3.8logre+14.8, fully in agreement with the relation for normal ellipticals. The close similarity between BL Lac host galaxies and normal ellipticals suggests that the active nucleus has surprisingly little effect on the host galaxy. This supports a picture in which all elliptical galaxies harbor black holes that can be actively accreting for some fraction of their lifetime.

  7. The morphology of faint galaxies in Medium Deep Survey images using WFPC2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Casertano, S.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G. F.; Glazebrook, K.; Santiago, B.; Huchra, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    First results from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey images taken with Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) demonstrate that galaxy classifications can be reliably performed to magnitudes I814 approximately less than 22.0 in the F815W band. Published spectroscopic surveys to this depth indicate a mean redshift of bar-z approximately 0.5. We have classified over 200 galaxies in nine WFPC2 fields according to a basic morphological scheme. The majority of these faint galaxies appear to be similar to regular Hubble-sequence examples observed at low redshift. To the precision of our classification scheme, the relative proportion of spheroidal and disk systems of normal appearance is as expected from nearby samples, indicating that the bulk of the local galaxy population was in place at half the Hubble time. However, the most intriguing result is the relatively high proportion (approximately 40%) of objects which are in some way anomalous, and which may be of relevance in understanding the origin of the familiar excess population of faint galaxies established by others. These diverse objects include apparently interacting pairs whose multiple structure is only revealed with HST's angular resolution, galaxies with superluminous star-forming regions, diffuse low surface brightness galaxies of various forms, and compact galaxies. These anomalous galaxies contribute a substantial fraction of the excess counts at our limiting magnitude, and may provide insights into the 'faint blue galaxy' problem.

  8. Phantoms for diffuse optical imaging based on totally absorbing objects, part 1: Basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Macdonald, Rainer; Sassaroli, Angelo; Zaccanti, Giovanni

    2013-06-01

    The design of inhomogeneous phantoms for diffuse optical imaging purposes using totally absorbing objects embedded in a diffusive medium is proposed and validated. From time-resolved and continuous-wave Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that a given or desired perturbation strength caused by a realistic absorbing inhomogeneity of a certain absorption and volume can be approximately mimicked by a small totally absorbing object of a so-called equivalent black volume (equivalence relation). This concept can be useful in two ways. First, it can be exploited to design realistic inhomogeneous phantoms with different perturbation strengths simply using a set of black objects with different volumes. Further, it permits one to grade physiological or pathological changes on a reproducible scale of perturbation strengths given as equivalent black volumes, thus facilitating the performance assessment of clinical instruments. A set of plots and interpolating functions to derive the equivalent black volume corresponding to a given absorption change is provided. The application of the equivalent black volume concept for grading different optical perturbations is demonstrated for some examples.

  9. imaging survey of Wolf-Rayet galaxies: morphologies and star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Omar, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Hα and optical broad-band images of 25 nearby Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies are presented. The WR galaxies are known to have a recent (≤10 Myr) and massive star formation episode. The photometric Hα fluxes are estimated and corrected for extinction and line contamination in the filter pass-bands. The star formation rates (SFRs) are estimated using Hα images and from archival data in the far-ultraviolet (FUV), far-infrared (FIR) and 1.4-GHz radio continuum wavebands. A comparison of SFRs estimated from different wavebands is made after including similar data available in the literature for other WR galaxies. The Hα-based SFRs are found to be tightly correlated with SFRs estimated from the FUV data. The correlations also exist with SFR estimates based on the radio and FIR data. The WR galaxies also follow the radio-FIR correlation known for normal star-forming galaxies, although it is seen here that the majority of dwarf WR galaxies have a radio deficiency. An analysis using the ratio of non-thermal to thermal radio continuum and the ratio of the FUV to Hα SFRs indicates that WR galaxies have lower non-thermal radio emission compared to normal galaxies, most likely due to a lack of supernovae in the very young star formation episode in the WR galaxies. The morphologies of 16 galaxies in our sample are highly suggestive of an ongoing tidal interaction or a past merger in these galaxies. This survey strengthens the conclusions obtained from previous similar studies indicating the importance of tidal interactions in triggering star-formation in WR galaxies.

  10. Galaxy pairs in deep HST images: Evidence for evolution in the galaxy merger rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkey, Jordan M.; Keel, William C.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Franklin, Barbara E.

    1994-01-01

    We use four deep serendipitous fields observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera to constrain the rate of galaxy merging between the current epoch and z approximately equals 0.7. Since most mergers occur between members of bound pairs, the merger rate is given to a good approximation by (half) the rate of disappearance of galaxies in pairs. An objective criterion for pair membership shows that 34% +/- 9% of our HST galaxies with I = 18-22 belong to pairs, compared to 7% locally. This means that about 13% of the galaxy population has disappeared due to merging in the cosmic epoch corresponding to this magnitude interval (or 0.1 approximately less than z approximately less than 0.7). Our pair fraction is a lower limit: correction for pair members falling below our detection threshold might raise the fraction to approximately 50%. Since we address only two-galaxy merging, these values do not include physical systems of higher multiplicity. Incorporating I-band field-galaxy redshift distributions, the pair fraction grows with redshift as alpha(1 + z)(exp 3.5 +/- 0.5) and the merger rate as (1 + z)(exp 2.5 +/- 0.5). This may have significant implications for the interpretation of galaxy counts (disappearance of faint blue galaxies), the cosmological evolution of faint radio sources and quasars (which evolve approximately as (1 + z)(exp 3), the similarity in the power law is necessary but not sufficient evidence for a causal relation), statistics of QSO companions, the galaxy content in distant clusters, and the merging history of a 'typical' galaxy.

  11. Galaxy pairs in deep HST images: Evidence for evolution in the galaxy merger rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkey, Jordan M.; Keel, William C.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Franklin, Barbara E.

    1994-01-01

    We use four deep serendipitous fields observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera to constrain the rate of galaxy merging between the current epoch and z approximately equals 0.7. Since most mergers occur between members of bound pairs, the merger rate is given to a good approximation by (half) the rate of disappearance of galaxies in pairs. An objective criterion for pair membership shows that 34% +/- 9% of our HST galaxies with I = 18-22 belong to pairs, compared to 7% locally. This means that about 13% of the galaxy population has disappeared due to merging in the cosmic epoch corresponding to this magnitude interval (or 0.1 approximately less than z approximately less than 0.7). Our pair fraction is a lower limit: correction for pair members falling below our detection threshold might raise the fraction to approximately 50%. Since we address only two-galaxy merging, these values do not include physical systems of higher multiplicity. Incorporating I-band field-galaxy redshift distributions, the pair fraction grows with redshift as alpha(1 + z)(exp 3.5 +/- 0.5) and the merger rate as (1 + z)(exp 2.5 +/- 0.5). This may have significant implications for the interpretation of galaxy counts (disappearance of faint blue galaxies), the cosmological evolution of faint radio sources and quasars (which evolve approximately as (1 + z)(exp 3), the similarity in the power law is necessary but not sufficient evidence for a causal relation), statistics of QSO companions, the galaxy content in distant clusters, and the merging history of a 'typical' galaxy.

  12. Unveiling the structure of the farthest galaxy protocluster: WFC3 imaging of a z~8 galaxy overdensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenti, Michele

    2012-10-01

    Our pure-parallel WFC3/BoRG survey identified the highest redshift {z 8} protocluster candidate, presenting the unique opportunity for follow-up observations that will unveil the nature and properties of star formation at the earliest stages of galaxy cluster assembly. We found a rare overdensity of 5 Y-dropout galaxies, with m_AB=26-27, all brighter than m_*{z=8} and strongly clustered in a region of about 1 arcmin diameter { 2 Mpc/h comoving}. The existing data establish at 99.9% confidence that the overdensity is physical and not a line-of-sight effect, but only show a glimpse of the protocluster structure and properties. Not only is the protocluster center near the edge of the imaged field but theoretical modeling predicts the presence of dozens of fainter galaxies. We propose follow-up multi-band WFC3 observations centered on the protocluster and reaching m_AB=27.5 to image the only known galaxy overdensity at z>7, missing in legacy surveys such as CANDELS because of cosmic variance. From the new dataset we will detect 5-10 new protocluster members, tighten redshift uncertainty to +/-0.1, and double the S/N of current detections to characterize their stellar population properties. The new data, combined with, and compared to detailed numerical and theoretical modeling will characterize the earliest stages of galaxy and cluster formation, shedding light on the processes that drove cosmic reionization in overdense environments. Because of a one order of magnitude boost in the number density of galaxies with m_AB

  13. Target extraction from blurred trace infrared images with a superstring galaxy template algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Fu, Dongmei

    2014-05-01

    Accurate and efficient targets extraction from blurred trace infrared images has very important meaning for latent trace evidence collection in crime scene. Based on the superstring theory, a superstring galaxy template extraction algorithm for infrared trace target is presented. First, all of the pixels are divided into three classes: target pixels, background pixels and blurred pixels. Next, the superstring template characteristics for every pixel in a blurred infrared image are calculated as the features of each pixel. Finally, a galaxy covering algorithm is proposed, target pixels and background pixels are used for training the galaxy covering domain of every galaxy classifiers, and these classifiers will divide each blurred pixel into two classes: a target pixel or a background pixel. Experimental results indicate that the superstring galaxy template algorithm can improve the target extraction rate and reduce the extraction error rate.

  14. IRTF Observations of Lensed Star-Forming Galaxies Identified in the SDSS Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allyn Smith, J.; Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; Lin, H.; SDSS Bright Arcs Search Team

    2009-12-01

    The SDSS Bright Arcs Search Team (see poster by H. Lin et al. #478.02) has been carrying out an ongoing systematic search for bright, strongly-lensed, high-redshift galaxies in samples of SDSS luminous red galaxies, clusters, and interacting/merging galaxy pairs. So far we have spectroscopically confirmed a dozen lensing systems, with source galaxy redshifts z = 0.4 - 2.7, with 6 of these among the brightest known z > 2 lensed galaxies, including the 8 O'Clock Arc (Allam et al. 2007) and the Clone (Lin et al. 2008). Here, we report on our JHK imaging of several of these confirmed lensed systems based upon observations taken with the SpeX and NSFCAM2 on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Further, we discuss our future plans for NIR imaging of this sample.

  15. H(alpha) and Optical Imaging of Local Volume Galaxies in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shoko; van Zee, Liese; Lee, Janice C.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Funes, Jose G.

    2010-02-01

    We propose H(alpha) and B,R imaging observations of 33 galaxies in the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey to measure current star formation activity and derive emission-line corrected optical colors throughout the stellar disk. The proposed imaging observations will be combined with existing UV and IR observations, and will serve to nearly complete the optical imaging coverage of the full LVL sample of 258 galaxies. The observed surface photometry and radial trace of the star formation activity will allow us to study the photometric properties, the morphology, and spatial distributions of different stellar populations in these nearby galaxies. These images will also form the basis for a definitive multiwavelength dataset for studies of star formation in nearby galaxies.

  16. The core of the nearby S0 galaxy NGC 7457 imaged with the HST planetary camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Tod R.; Faber, S. M.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Baum, William A.; Currie, Douglas G.; Ewald, S. P.; Groth, Edward J.; Hester, J. Jeff; Kelsall, T.

    1991-01-01

    A brief analysis is presented of images of the nearby S0 galaxy NGC 7457 obtained with the HST Planetary Camera. While the galaxy remains unresolved with the HST, the images reveal that any core most likely has r(c) less than 0.052 arcsec. The light distribution is consistent with a gamma = -1.0 power law inward to the resolution limit, with a possible stellar nucleus with luminosity of 10 million solar. This result represents the first observation outside the Local Group of a galaxy nucleus at this spatial resolution, and it suggests that such small, high surface brightness cores may be common.

  17. Imaging of Early-Type (SA-SAB) Spiral Galaxies. I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Salman; Devereux, Nick

    1999-08-01

    Hα and continuum images are presented for 27 nearby early-type (Sa-Sab) spiral galaxies. Contrary to popular perception, the images reveal copious massive star formation in some of these galaxies. A determination of the Hα morphology and a measure of the Hα luminosity suggest that early-type spirals can be classified into two broad categories based on the luminosity of the largest H II region in the disk. The first category includes galaxies for which the individual H II regions have L_Hα<10^39 ergs s^-1. Most of the category 1 galaxies appear to be morphologically undisturbed but show a wide diversity in nuclear Hα properties. The second category includes galaxies that have at least one H II region in the disk with L_Hα>=10^39 ergs s^-1. All category 2 galaxies show either prominent dust lanes or other morphological peculiarities such as tidal tails, which suggests that the anomalously luminous H II regions in category 2 galaxies may have formed as a result of a recent interaction. The observations, which are part of an ongoing Hα survey, reveal early-type spirals to be a heterogeneous class of galaxies that are evolving in the current epoch. We have also identified some systematic differences between the classifications of spiral galaxies in the Second General Catalog and the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog that may be traced to subtle variations in the application of the criteria used for classifying spiral galaxies. An examination of earlier studies suggests that perceptions concerning the Hubble-type dependence of star formation rates among spiral galaxies depends on the choice of catalog.

  18. Circumnuclear Regions In Barred Spiral Galaxies. 1; Near-Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Ramirez, D.; Knapen, J. H.; Peletier, R. F.; Laine, S.; Doyon, R.; Nadeau, D.

    2000-01-01

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution ground-based near-infrared images of the central regions of a sample of twelve barred galaxies with circumnuclear star formation activity, which is organized in ring-like regions typically one kiloparsec in diameter. We also present Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared images of ten of our sample galaxies, and compare them with our ground-based data. Although our sample galaxies were selected for the presence of circumnuclear star formation activity, our broad-band near-infrared images are heterogeneous, showing a substantial amount of small-scale structure in some galaxies, and practically none in others. We argue that, where it exists, this structure is caused by young stars, which also cause the characteristic bumps or changes in slope in the radial profiles of ellipticity, major axis position angle, surface brightness and colour at the radius of the circumnuclear ring in most of our sample galaxies. In 7 out of 10 HST images, star formation in the nuclear ring is clearly visible as a large number of small emitting regions, organised into spiral arm fragments, which are accompanied by dust lanes. NIR colour index maps show much more clearly the location of dust lanes and, in certain cases, regions of star formation than single broad-band images. Circumnuclear spiral structure thus outlined appears to be common in barred spiral galaxies with circumnuclear star formation.

  19. VIVA: VLA imaging of Virgo galaxies in atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Aeree

    In this thesis I present high resolution HI maps and kinematics of 53 carefully selected galaxies in the Virgo cluster. The goal is to study details of the cluster environmental effect on galaxy evolution, i.e. in which density regions and by which processes do galaxies feel the impact of the cluster. Studying HI content is essential to achieve this goal as it is often a useful probe of both gas-gas and tidal interactions and also a reservoir of star formation. Virgo as a dynamically young and nearby cluster, it contains many candidates for various mechanisms at work (e.g. ram-pressure or turbulent/viscous stripping, thermal evaporation, and tidal interactions) and allows us to see the details. We have sampled 48 spirals and 5 irregular/dwarf systems which show a wide range of star formation properties from anemic to starburst. The galaxies in the sample are spread throughout the cluster from near the dense cluster core to the outskirts (0.3--3.3 Mpc in projection). The result has revealed a whole spectrum of gas stripping stages from severely HI stripped galaxies to the HI as it is leaving the disk. Most HI stripped but optically undisturbed galaxies are found within 0.5 Mpc radius in projection from the cluster center. These galaxies show signatures of ongoing interactions with the hot cluster gas. Galaxies with truncated HI disks are also found at lower density regions. Some of those might have gone through the cluster core a while ago and currently be in their way out. Some however show gas stripping epochs that is inconsistent with their locations within the cluster which requires more than a simple interaction with static cluster gas; such as tidal interactions with other galaxies or locally enhanced ram-pressure due to subclusters' falling in. Beyond this region, most galaxies show normal (.08 < or = [Special characters omitted.] < 1.2) to extended ([Special characters omitted.] > or = 1.2) HI disks. Especially, 7 galaxies were found with one-sided long Hi

  20. STIS parallel archive proposal - Nearby Galaxies - Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    1997-07-01

    Using parallel opportunities with STIS which were not allocated by the TAC, we propose to obtain deep STIS imagery with both the Clear {50CCD} and Long-Pass {F28X50LP} filters in order to make color-magnitude diagrams and luminosity functions for nearby galaxies. For local group galaxies, we also include G750L slitless spectroscopy to search for e.g., Carbon stars, late M giants and S-type stars. This survey will be useful to study the star formation histories, chemical evolution, and distances to these galaxies. These data will be placed immediately into the Hubble Data Archive.

  1. STIS parallel archive proposal - Nearby Galaxies - Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2002-07-01

    Using parallel opportunities with STIS which were not allocated by the TAC, we propose to obtain deep STIS imagery with both the Clear {50CCD} and Long-Pass {F28X50LP} filters in order to make color-magnitude diagrams and luminosity functions for nearby galaxies. For local group galaxies, we also include G750L slitless spectroscopy to search for e.g., Carbon stars, late M giants and S-type stars. This survey will be useful to study the star formation histories, chemical evolution, and distances to these galaxies. These data will be placed immediately into the Hubble Data Archive.

  2. Far-infrared line images of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poglitsch, A.; Geis, N.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.; Genzel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Irregular dwarf galaxies are about ten times more widespread in the universe than regular spiral galaxies. They are characterized by a relatively low metallicity, i.e., lower abundance of the heavier elements (metals) with respect to hydrogen than in the solar neighborhood. These heavier elements in the form of molecules, atoms, or ions, which have radiative transitions in the infrared play a decisive role in the energy balance of the ISM and thereby for the formation of stars. Dwarf galaxies are thus model cases for the physical conditions in the early phase of the universe. Large Magellanic Cloud: 30 Doradus. The two nearest dwarf galaxies are the Magellanic clouds at a distance approximately 50 kpc. The LMC contains 30 Dor, a region with young, extremely massive stars which strongly interact with the surrounding ISM on account of their stellar winds and intense UV radiation. 30 Dor is the brightest object in the LMC at almost all wavelengths.

  3. Imaging spectroscopy of albedo and radiative forcing by light-absorbing impurities in mountain snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Thomas H.; Seidel, Felix C.; Bryant, Ann C.; McKenzie Skiles, S.; Rittger, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies show that deposition of dust and black carbon to snow and ice accelerates snowmelt and perturbs regional climate and hydrologic cycles. Radiative forcing by aerosols is often neglected in climate and hydrological models in part due to scarcity of observations. Here we describe and validate an algorithm suite (Imaging Spectrometer-Snow Albedo and Radiative Forcing (IS-SnARF)) that provides quantitative retrievals of snow grain size, snow albedo, and radiative forcing by light-absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected on 15 June 2011 in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA), SW Colorado, USA. Radiative forcing by LAISI is retrieved by the integral of the convolution of spectral irradiance with spectral differences between the spectral albedo (scaled from the observed hemispherical-directional reflectance factor (HDRF)) and modeled clean snow spectral albedo. The modeled surface irradiance at time of acquisition at test sites was 1052 W m-2 compared to 1048 W m-2 measured with the field spectroradiometer measurements, a relative difference of 0.4%. HDRF retrievals at snow and bare soil sites had mean errors relative to in situ measurements of -0.4 ± 0.1% reflectance averaged across the spectrum and root-mean-square errors of 1.5 ± 0.1%. Comparisons of snow albedo and radiative forcing retrievals from AVIRIS with in situ measurements in SBBSA showed errors of 0.001-0.004 and 2.1 ± 5.1 W m-2, respectively. A counterintuitive result was that, in the presence of light absorbing impurities, near-surface snow grain size increased with elevation, whereas we generally expect that at lower elevation the grain size would be larger.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A GALEX UV imaging survey of nearby galaxies (Lee+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Gil de Paz, A.; Kennicutt, R. C. Jr; Bothwell, M.; Dalcanton, J.; Funes, S. J. J. G.; Johnson, B. D.; Sakai, S.; Skillman, E.; Tremonti, C.; van Zee, L.

    2011-03-01

    The Local Volume galaxies that were targeted for GALEX imaging were mainly selected from the sample given in Kennicutt et al. (Paper I, 2008, Cat. J/ApJS/178/247). The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) program (Dalcanton et al. 2009ApJS..183...67D), which has obtained HST ACS and WFPC2 imaging for a ~4Mpc volume-limited sample, contains about 20 low-luminosity and/or early-type galaxies that were not already included in Paper I, and GALEX data were also obtained for these objects. Observations of the 11HUGS GALEX Legacy program (GI1047, GI4095) galaxies have also been extended into the infrared using the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the Local Volume Legacy survey (Dale et al. 2009ApJ...703..517D). (3 data files).

  5. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. II. OPTICAL IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Van Sistine, Angela; Young, Michael D.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Cannon, John M.; Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W. E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu

    2013-06-15

    We present results from ground-based optical imaging of a low-mass dwarf galaxy discovered by the ALFALFA 21 cm H I survey. Broadband (BVR) data obtained with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) are used to construct color-magnitude diagrams of the galaxy's stellar population down to V{sub o} {approx} 25. We also use narrowband H{alpha} imaging from the KPNO 2.1 m telescope to identify a H II region in the galaxy. We use these data to constrain the distance to the galaxy to be between 1.5 and 2.0 Mpc. This places Leo P within the Local Volume but beyond the Local Group. Its properties are extreme: it is the lowest-mass system known that contains significant amounts of gas and is currently forming stars.

  6. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer probes the dusty warm absorber in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Canizares, C. R.; Marshall, H. L.; Morales, R.; Schulz, N. S.; Iwasawa, K.

    The Chandra HETGS spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM ≈< 200 km s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The initial analysis of these data, presented in Lee et al. (2001), shows that a dusty warm absorber model adequately explains the spectral features ≈> 0.48 keV (≈< 26 Å ). We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the neutral Fe L absorption complex and the O VII resonance series (by transitions higher than He γ He α,β,γ are also seen at lower energies). The implied dust column density needed to explain the Fe I L edge feature agrees with that obtained from earlier reddening studies, which had already concluded that the dust should be associated with the ionized absorber (given the relatively lower observed X-ray absorption by cold gas). Our findings contradict the interpretation of Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001), based on XMM RGS spectra, that this spectral region is dominated by highly relativistic soft X-ray line emission originating near the central black hole. Here we review these issues pertaining to the soft X-ray spectral features as addressed by Lee et al., (2001). Details found in Lee et al., 2001, ApJ., 554, L13

  7. High-performance mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers for infrared polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Kuboyama, Takafumi; Kimata, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    Infrared (IR) polarimetric imaging is a promising approach to enhance object recognition with conventional IR imaging for applications such as artificial object recognition from the natural environment and facial recognition. However, typical infrared polarimetric imaging requires the attachment of polarizers to an IR camera or sensor, which leads to high cost and lower performance caused by their own IR radiation. We have developed asymmetric mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (A-MPMAs) to address this challenge. The A-MPMAs have an all-Al construction that consists of micropatches and a reflector layer connected with hollow rectangular posts. The asymmetric-shaped micropatches lead to strong polarization-selective IR absorption due to localized surface plasmon resonance at the micropatches. The operating wavelength region can be controlled mainly by the micropatch and the hollow rectangular post size. AMPMAs are complicated three-dimensional structures, the fabrication of which is challenging. Hollow rectangular post structures are introduced to enable simple fabrication using conventional surface micromachining techniques, such as sacrificial layer etching, with no degradation of the optical properties. The A-MPMAs have a smaller thermal mass than metal-insulator-metal based metamaterials and no influence of the strong non-linear dispersion relation of the insulator materials constant, which produces a gap in the wavelength region and additional absorption insensitive to polarization. A-MPMAs are therefore promising candidates for uncooled IR polarimetric image sensors in terms of both their optical properties and ease of fabrication. The results presented here are expected to contribute to the development of highperformance polarimetric uncooled IR image sensors that do not require polarizers.

  8. Studying low-redshift universe through observation of Damped Lyman-alpha quasar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharanfoli, Soheila

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, an extremely successful method to study galaxy formation and evolution, has been provided by observation of quasar absorbers. Quasar absorbers are systems intercepting our line-of-sight to a given quasar and thus produce a feature in the quasar spectrum, the so-called absorption lines. The Damped Lyman-a (DLA) and sub-Damped Lyman-a (sub-DLA) absorption features in quasar spectra are believed to be produced by intervening galaxies. However, the connection of quasar absorbers to galaxies is not well-understood, since attempts to image the absorbing galaxies have often failed. DLAs and sub-DLAs were originally thought to be the precursors of present day disk galaxies, but there is evidence that they may be dominated by gas-rich, proto-dwarf galaxies representing the basic building blocks of hierarchical growth of structure. While most DLAs appear to be metal-poor, a population of metal-rich absorbers, mostly sub-DLAs, has been discovered in recent spectroscopic studies. It is of great interest to image these metal-rich absorbers, especially with high spatial resolution, to understand the connection between the stellar and interstellar content of the underlying galaxies. This dissertation consists of several projects designed to further our understanding of galaxies and galactic structures associated with intervening quasar absorption lines. Two projects were completed that involved the imaging of 13 DLA/sub-DLA galaxies at z < 1. High angular resolution near-infrared images were obtained, using the Hokupa'a Adaptive Optics system with the QUIRC near-infrared camera on the 8-m Gemini-North telescope, and the Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system on the 10-m Keck telescope. Detailed properties of the identified absorber galaxies are described. They are shown to be drawn from a variety of morphological types with a range of luminosities, sizes, and impact parameters. In the other set of projects, follow-up spectroscopy was performed to confirm the

  9. Probing the Properties of Distant Galaxies and their Circumgalactic Medium with Damped, Sub-damped, and Super-damped Lyman-alpha Quasar Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; Morrison, Sean; Peroux, Celine; York, Donald G.; Quiret, Samuel; Lauroesch, James Thomas; Khare, Pushpa; Aller, Monique C.

    2016-01-01

    Excellent tools to measure the chemical and physical properties of distant galaxies and their circumgalactic medium are provided by the high H I column density absorbers in quasar spectra. The damped Lyman-alpha absorbers [DLAs; log N(H I) >= 20.3] and the sub-DLA absorbers [19.0 <= log N(H I) < 20.3] dominate the neutral gas reservoir available for star formation. The super-DLAs [DLAs with log N(H I) >= 21.7] provide ideal laboratories to study the most gas-rich and potentially vigorously star-forming galaxies. We report a study of the DLAs (including super-DLAs) and sub-DLAs, based on observations from Keck, VLT, Magellan, and HST. We combine our results with the literature to examine trends between N(H I), metallicity, dust depletion, and gas velocity dispersion. We find that sub-DLAs have higher metallicities than DLAs at all redshifts studied, even after making ionization corrections. We find the super-DLAs have a relatively narrow range of metallicities. A much larger fraction of the super-DLAs lie close to or above the line [X/H] = 20.59 - log N(H I) in the metallicity versus N(H I) plot, compared to less gas-rich DLAs, suggesting that super-DLAs are more likely to be rich in molecules. Relative abundances of Si, S, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn suggest a mixture of dust depletion and alpha-enhancement. We confirm a strong correlation between metallicity and Fe depletion for DLAs, and also find a correlation between metallicity and Si depletion. For sub-DLAs at z < 0.5, we find [N/S] below the level for secondary N production. For some super-DLAs, we estimate star formation rates from potential detections of Lyman-alpha emission. We discuss constraints on electron densities from C II*/C II and Si II*/Si II. The DLAs and sub-DLAs appear to have different metallicity vs. velocity dispersion relations. We also find that the super-DLAs may have somewhat narrower velocity dispersions than the less gas-rich DLAs, and may arise in cooler/ less turbulent gas. We gratefully

  10. VLA HI Imaging of the LARS+eLARS Galaxies: Tidally Interacting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Bridget; Eisner, Brian Andrew; Cannon, John M.; Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Pardy, Stephen; LARS Team

    2017-01-01

    The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS) and its extension (eLARS) form the most comprehensive effort to date to study the details of Lyman Alpha radiative transfer in galaxies. Direct imaging of Lyman Alpha emission from the Hubble Space Telescope is supplemented by a wealth of multi-wavelength observations designed to probe the complex processes that contribute to the escape or destruction of Lyman Alpha photons as they resonantly scatter in the neutral ISM. The 42 LARS+eLARS galaxies span a range of physical properties, including mass and star formation rate. A companion poster presents VLA HI imaging of 32 LARS+eLARS galaxies. In this work, we present new VLA D-configuration HI imaging of selected LARS+eLARS galaxies that are well-resolved or tidally interacting. HI column density and velocity field images are compared to SDSS imaging. We interpret the results in the context of tidal interactions shifting the HI gas out of resonance and increasing the likelihood of Lyman Alpha photons escaping the galaxy.

  11. A Phosphorus Phthalocyanine Formulation with Intense Absorbance at 1000 nm for Deep Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Depeng; Zhang, Yumiao; Chitgupi, Upendra; Geng, Jumin; Wang, Yuehang; Zhang, Yuzhen; Cook, Timothy R; Xia, Jun; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2016-01-01

    Although photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) operates with high spatial resolution in biological tissues deeper than other optical modalities, light scattering is a limiting factor. The use of longer near infrared wavelengths reduces scattering. Recently, the rational design of a stable phosphorus phthalocyanine (P-Pc) with a long wavelength absorption band beyond 1000 nm has been reported. Here, we show that when dissolved in liquid surfactants, P-Pc can give rise to formulations with absorbance of greater than 1000 (calculated for a 1 cm path length) at wavelengths beyond 1000 nm. Using the broadly accessible Nd:YAG pulse laser emission output of 1064 nm, P-Pc could be imaged through 11.6 cm of chicken breast with PACT. P-Pc accumulated passively in tumors following intravenous injection in mice as observed by PACT. Following oral administration, P-Pc passed through the intestine harmlessly, and PACT could be used to non-invasively observe intestine function. When the contrast agent placed under the arm of a healthy adult human, a PACT transducer on the top of the arm could readily detect P-Pc through the entire 5 cm limb. Thus, the approach of using contrast media with extreme absorption at 1064 nm readily enables high quality optical imaging in vitro and in vivo in humans at exceptional depths.

  12. A Phosphorus Phthalocyanine Formulation with Intense Absorbance at 1000 nm for Deep Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Depeng; Zhang, Yumiao; Chitgupi, Upendra; Geng, Jumin; Wang, Yuehang; Zhang, Yuzhen; Cook, Timothy R.; Xia, Jun; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Although photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) operates with high spatial resolution in biological tissues deeper than other optical modalities, light scattering is a limiting factor. The use of longer near infrared wavelengths reduces scattering. Recently, the rational design of a stable phosphorus phthalocyanine (P-Pc) with a long wavelength absorption band beyond 1000 nm has been reported. Here, we show that when dissolved in liquid surfactants, P-Pc can give rise to formulations with absorbance of greater than 1000 (calculated for a 1 cm path length) at wavelengths beyond 1000 nm. Using the broadly accessible Nd:YAG pulse laser emission output of 1064 nm, P-Pc could be imaged through 11.6 cm of chicken breast with PACT. P-Pc accumulated passively in tumors following intravenous injection in mice as observed by PACT. Following oral administration, P-Pc passed through the intestine harmlessly, and PACT could be used to non-invasively observe intestine function. When the contrast agent placed under the arm of a healthy adult human, a PACT transducer on the top of the arm could readily detect P-Pc through the entire 5 cm limb. Thus, the approach of using contrast media with extreme absorption at 1064 nm readily enables high quality optical imaging in vitro and in vivo in humans at exceptional depths. PMID:27022416

  13. STAR-GALAXY CLASSIFICATION IN MULTI-BAND OPTICAL IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Fadely, Ross; Willman, Beth; Hogg, David W.

    2012-11-20

    Ground-based optical surveys such as PanSTARRS, DES, and LSST will produce large catalogs to limiting magnitudes of r {approx}> 24. Star-galaxy separation poses a major challenge to such surveys because galaxies-even very compact galaxies-outnumber halo stars at these depths. We investigate photometric classification techniques on stars and galaxies with intrinsic FWHM <0.2 arcsec. We consider unsupervised spectral energy distribution template fitting and supervised, data-driven support vector machines (SVMs). For template fitting, we use a maximum likelihood (ML) method and a new hierarchical Bayesian (HB) method, which learns the prior distribution of template probabilities from the data. SVM requires training data to classify unknown sources; ML and HB do not. We consider (1) a best-case scenario (SVM{sub best}) where the training data are (unrealistically) a random sampling of the data in both signal-to-noise and demographics and (2) a more realistic scenario where training is done on higher signal-to-noise data (SVM{sub real}) at brighter apparent magnitudes. Testing with COSMOS ugriz data, we find that HB outperforms ML, delivering {approx}80% completeness, with purity of {approx}60%-90% for both stars and galaxies. We find that no algorithm delivers perfect performance and that studies of metal-poor main-sequence turnoff stars may be challenged by poor star-galaxy separation. Using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve, we find a best-to-worst ranking of SVM{sub best}, HB, ML, and SVM{sub real}. We conclude, therefore, that a well-trained SVM will outperform template-fitting methods. However, a normally trained SVM performs worse. Thus, HB template fitting may prove to be the optimal classification method in future surveys.

  14. The Spitzer Local Volume Legacy Survey: Infrared Imaging and Photometry for 258 Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Daniel A.; LVL Team

    2009-01-01

    Near-, mid-, and far-infrared flux properties are presented for the Local Volume Legacy survey, a Spitzer Space Telescope legacy program built upon a foundation of GALEX ultraviolet and ground-based Hα imaging of 258 galaxies within 11 Mpc. The Local Volume Legacy survey covers an unbiased, representative, and statistically robust sample of nearby star-forming galaxies, exploiting the faintest absolute depth and highest extragalactic spatial resolution achievable with Spitzer. As a result of its approximately volume-limited nature, LVL augments previous Spitzer observations of present-day galaxies (such as from SINGS, the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey) with improved sampling of the low-luminosity dwarf galaxy population. LVL's unique sample selection results in a large spread in mid-infrared colors, likely due to the conspicuous deficiency of PAH emission from low-metallicity galaxies. Conversely, the LVL sample shows a tighter correlation in the infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio versus ultraviolet spectral slope, due in large part to the lack of luminous early-type galaxies in the Local Volume.

  15. GMRT HI Imaging of the Ly-α Emitting Starburst Galaxy Tololo 1924-416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Davila, Cesar I.; Perez Sarmiento, Karen; Cannon, John M.; Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Pardy, Stephen; LARS Team

    2017-01-01

    The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS) and its extension (eLARS) form the most comprehensive effort to date to study the details of Lyman Alpha radiative transfer in galaxies. Direct imaging of Lyman Alpha emission from the Hubble Space Telescope is supplemented by a wealth of multi-wavelength observations designed to probe the complex processes that contribute to the escape or destruction of Lyman Alpha photons as they resonantly scatter in the neutral ISM. The 42 LARS+eLARS galaxies span a range of physical properties, including mass and star formation rate. In companion posters, we present results of HI imaging programs using the VLA and the GMRT. In this work, we present new HI imaging of the Lya-emitting starburst galaxy Tololo 1924-416; this source has a similar complement of HST imaging and spectroscopy as the LARS+eLARS galaxies. Tololo 1924-416 is known to be dramatically tidally interacting with ESO 338-IG04B; HI gas is strewn between the galaxies on scales of ~70 kpc. Our new data provide information on scales of ~2-10 kpc at the adopted distance of Tololo 1924-416 (37.5 Mpc). We study the HI morphology and dynamics of this interacting system.

  16. An accurate and practical method for inference of weak gravitational lensing from galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Armstrong, Robert; Krawiec, Christina; March, Marisa C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate highly accurate recovery of weak gravitational lensing shear using an implementation of the Bayesian Fourier Domain (BFD) method proposed by Bernstein & Armstrong, extended to correct for selection biases. The BFD formalism is rigorously correct for Nyquist-sampled, background-limited, uncrowded images of background galaxies. BFD does not assign shapes to galaxies, instead compressing the pixel data D into a vector of moments M, such that we have an analytic expression for the probability P(M|g) of obtaining the observations with gravitational lensing distortion g along the line of sight. We implement an algorithm for conducting BFD's integrations over the population of unlensed source galaxies which measures ≈10 galaxies s-1 core-1 with good scaling properties. Initial tests of this code on ≈109 simulated lensed galaxy images recover the simulated shear to a fractional accuracy of m = (2.1 ± 0.4) × 10-3, substantially more accurate than has been demonstrated previously for any generally applicable method. Deep sky exposures generate a sufficiently accurate approximation to the noiseless, unlensed galaxy population distribution assumed as input to BFD. Potential extensions of the method include simultaneous measurement of magnification and shear; multiple-exposure, multiband observations; and joint inference of photometric redshifts and lensing tomography.

  17. The morphology of nine radio-selected faint galaxies from deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Nathan D.; Lowenthal, James D.; Koo, David C.

    2002-12-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 we perform deep I-band imaging of nine radio-selected [F(8.5 GHz) >=14 μJy] faint galaxies from the Roche, Lowenthal & Koo (2002) sample. Two are also observed in V using HST STIS. Six of the galaxies have known redshifts, in the range 0.4 < z < 1.0. Radial intensity profiles indicate that seven are disc galaxies and two are bulge-dominated. Four of the six with redshifts have a high optical surface brightness in comparison with previous studies of disc galaxies at similar redshifts (e.g. Lilly et al. 1998). The HST imaging reveals that two of the nine galaxies are in close interacting pairs and another five show morphological evidence of recent interactions - two are very asymmetric (Aasym~ 0.4) and three have large, luminous rings resembling the collisional starburst rings in the Cartwheel galaxy. For the two ring galaxies with redshifts, we measure ring radii of 7.05 and 10.0 h-150 kpc, which suggest post-collision ages 0.1-0.2 Gyr. One has a fainter inner ring, like the original Cartwheel. The remaining two appear to be late-type barred galaxies and relatively undisturbed. Our HST imaging confirms the high incidence of interactions and dynamical disturbance in faint radio-selected galaxies, as reported by Windhorst et al. and Serjeant et al., for example. In the great majority of these galaxies the high radio luminosities are probably the result of interaction-triggered starbursts. However, one interacting galaxy is a very radio-luminous giant elliptical, with red V-I colours, a normal surface brightness and no evidence of star-forming regions, so its radio source is probably an obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). The mixture of observed morphologies suggests that enhanced radio luminosities often persist to a late stage of interaction, i.e. at least ~0.2 Gyr after the perigalactic encounter.

  18. VLA and ALMA Imaging of Intense Galaxy-wide Star Formation in z ˜ 2 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rujopakarn, W.; Dunlop, J. S.; Rieke, G. H.; Ivison, R. J.; Cibinel, A.; Nyland, K.; Jagannathan, P.; Silverman, J. D.; Alexander, D. M.; Biggs, A. D.; Bhatnagar, S.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Dickinson, M.; Elbaz, D.; Geach, J. E.; Hayward, C. C.; Kirkpatrick, A.; McLure, R. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Miller, N. A.; Narayanan, D.; Owen, F. N.; Pannella, M.; Papovich, C.; Pope, A.; Rau, U.; Robertson, B. E.; Scott, D.; Swinbank, A. M.; van der Werf, P.; van Kampen, E.; Weiner, B. J.; Windhorst, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    We present ≃0.″4 resolution extinction-independent distributions of star formation and dust in 11 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z = 1.3-3.0. These galaxies are selected from sensitive blank-field surveys of the 2‧ × 2‧ Hubble Ultra-Deep Field at λ = 5 cm and 1.3 mm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. They have star formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and dust properties representative of massive main-sequence SFGs at z ˜ 2. Morphological classification performed on spatially resolved stellar mass maps indicates a mixture of disk and morphologically disturbed systems; half of the sample harbor X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs), thereby representing a diversity of z ˜ 2 SFGs undergoing vigorous mass assembly. We find that their intense star formation most frequently occurs at the location of stellar-mass concentration and extends over an area comparable to their stellar-mass distribution, with a median diameter of 4.2 ± 1.8 kpc. This provides direct evidence of galaxy-wide star formation in distant blank-field-selected main-sequence SFGs. The typical galactic-average SFR surface density is 2.5 M ⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, sufficiently high to drive outflows. In X-ray-selected AGN where radio emission is enhanced over the level associated with star formation, the radio excess pinpoints the AGNs, which are found to be cospatial with star formation. The median extinction-independent size of main-sequence SFGs is two times larger than those of bright submillimeter galaxies, whose SFRs are 3-8 times larger, providing a constraint on the characteristic SFR (˜300 M ⊙ yr-1) above which a significant population of more compact SFGs appears to emerge.

  19. A redshift limit for the faint blue galaxy population from deep U band imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Guhathakurta, P.; Tyson, J.A.; Majewski, S.R. AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, WI )

    1990-07-01

    A definitive upper limit for the redshift of the population of faint blue galaxies found in deep imaging surveys is obtained. The U-B(j), and particularly the B(j)-R, colors of these objects show a blueing trend toward fainter magnitudes. A typical galaxy at R = 26 has colors that are only slightly redder than a flat spectrum. For any reasonable Lyman limit break, this constrains 93 percent or more of the galaxies to under z about 3, beyond which the break gets redshifted through the U band. The galaxies appear to be undergoing relatively recent evolution with rest frame spectra that are approximately flat down to the Lyman limit. 23 refs.

  20. Infrared imaging of MG 0414 + 0534 - The red gravitational lens systems as lensed radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, James; Luppino, Gerard A.

    1993-01-01

    We present an IR image of the gravitational lens system MG 0414 + 0534, and IR photometry of PG 1115 + 080, H1413 + 117, and Q1429 - 008. The IR of MG 0414 + 0534 shows a morphology that is similar to the radio and optical morphologies. The object is bright (K-prime = 13.7) and extremely red (I-K-prime = 5.7). MG 0414 + 0534 thus becomes the second radio-selected lens system to have very red optical IR colors. When plotted on a color-magnitude diagram of objects from a radio survey, MG 0414 + 0534 and the other very red system, MG 1131 + 0456, lie near the locus of radio galaxies. We therefore suggest that these systems are lensed high-redshift radio galaxies. In general, lensed radio galaxies should be common among lens systems selected from radio surveys, since a high proportion of radio sources are radio galaxies.

  1. Submillimeter Imaging of the Luminous Infrared Galaxy Pair VV114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frayer, D.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, I.; Yun, M. S.; Armus, L.

    1999-01-01

    We report on 450 and 850 mue observations of the interacting galaxy pair, VV114E+W (IC 1623), taken with the SCUBA camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, and near-infrared observations taken with UFTI on the UK Infrared Telescope.

  2. Imaging the host galaxies of high-redshift radio-quiet QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenthal, James D.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lehnert, Matthew, D.; Elias, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    We present new deep K-band and optical images of four radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 1 and six radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 2.5, as well as optical images only of six more at z approximately = 2.5. We have examined the images carefully for evidence of extended 'fuzz' from any putative QSO host galaxy. None of the z approximately = 2.5 QSOs shows any extended emission, and only two of the z approximately = 1 QSOs show marginal evidence for extended emission. Our 3 sigma detection limits in the K images, m(sub K) approximately = 21 for an isolated source, would correspond approximately to an unevolved L(sup star) elliptical galaxy at z = 2.5 or 2-3 mag fainter than an L(sup star) elliptical at z = 1, although our limits on host galaxy light are weaker than this due to the difficulty of separating galaxy light from QSO light. We simulate simple models of disk and elliptical host galaxies, and find that the marginal emission around the two z approximately = 1 QSOs can be explained by disks or bulges that are approximately 1-2 mag brighter than an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy in one case and approximately 1.5-2.5 mag brighter than L(sub star) in the other. For two other z approximately = 1 QSOs, we have only upper limits (L approximately = L(sup star)). The hosts of the high-redshift sample must be no brighter than about 3 mag above an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy, and are at least 1 magnitude fainter than the hosts of radio-loud QSOs at the same redshift. If the easily detected K-band light surrounding a previous sample of otherwise similar but radio-loud QSOs is starlight, then it must evolve on timescales of greater than or approximately equal to 10(exp 8) yr (e.g., Chambers & Charlot 1990); therefore our non-detection of host galaxy fuzz around radio-quiet QSOs supports the view that high-redshift radio-quiet and radio-loud QSOs inhabit different host objects, rather than being single types of objects that turn their radio emission on and off over

  3. Deep Imaging of the HCG 95 Field. I. Ultra-diffuse Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Dong Dong; Zheng, Xian Zhong; Zhao, Hai Bin; Pan, Zhi Zheng; Li, Bin; Zou, Hu; Zhou, Xu; Guo, KeXin; An, Fang Xia; Li, Yu Bin

    2017-09-01

    We present a detection of 89 candidates of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in a 4.9 degree2 field centered on the Hickson Compact Group 95 (HCG 95) using deep g- and r-band images taken with the Chinese Near Object Survey Telescope. This field contains one rich galaxy cluster (Abell 2588 at z = 0.199) and two poor clusters (Pegasus I at z = 0.013 and Pegasus II at z = 0.040). The 89 candidates are likely associated with the two poor clusters, giving about 50–60 true UDGs with a half-light radius {r}{{e}}> 1.5 {kpc} and a central surface brightness μ (g,0)> 24.0 mag arcsec‑2. Deep z\\prime -band images are available for 84 of the 89 galaxies from the Dark Energy Camera Legacy Survey (DECaLS), confirming that these galaxies have an extremely low central surface brightness. Moreover, our UDG candidates are spread over a wide range in g ‑ r color, and ∼26% are as blue as normal star-forming galaxies, which is suggestive of young UDGs that are still in formation. Interestingly, we find that one UDG linked with HCG 95 is a gas-rich galaxy with H i mass 1.1× {10}9 M ⊙ detected by the Very Large Array, and has a stellar mass of {M}\\star ∼ 1.8× {10}8 M ⊙. This indicates that UDGs at least partially overlap with the population of nearly dark galaxies found in deep H i surveys. Our results show that the high abundance of blue UDGs in the HCG 95 field is favored by the environment of poor galaxy clusters residing in H i-rich large-scale structures.

  4. Whole organ and islet of Langerhans dosimetry for calculation of absorbed doses resulting from imaging with radiolabeled exendin

    PubMed Central

    van der Kroon, Inge; Woliner-van der Weg, Wietske; Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; Visser, Eric P.; Gotthardt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Radiolabeled exendin is used for non-invasive quantification of beta cells in the islets of Langerhans in vivo. High accumulation of radiolabeled exendin in the islets raised concerns about possible radiation-induced damage to these islets in man. In this work, islet absorbed doses resulting from exendin-imaging were calculated by combining whole organ dosimetry with small scale dosimetry for the islets. Our model contains the tissues with high accumulation of radiolabeled exendin: kidneys, pancreas and islets. As input for the model, data from a clinical study (radiolabeled exendin distribution in the human body) and from a preclinical study with Biobreeding Diabetes Prone (BBDP) rats (islet-to-exocrine uptake ratio, beta cell mass) were used. We simulated 111In-exendin and 68Ga-exendin absorbed doses in patients with differences in gender, islet size, beta cell mass and radiopharmaceutical uptake in the kidneys. In all simulated cases the islet absorbed dose was small, maximum 1.38 mGy for 68Ga and 66.0 mGy for 111In. The two sources mainly contributing to the islet absorbed dose are the kidneys (33–61%) and the islet self-dose (7.5–57%). In conclusion, all islet absorbed doses are low (<70 mGy), so even repeated imaging will hardly increase the risk on diabetes. PMID:28067253

  5. The Mid-Infrared Morphology of Normal Galaxies: ISOCAM images at 7 and 15 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbermann, N. A.; Helou, G.; Beichman, C. A.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Hunter, D. A.; Lo, K. Y.; Lord, S.; Lu, N.; Malhotra, S.; Rubin, R. H.; Stacey, G.; Thronson, H.; Werner, M. W.

    1996-12-01

    We report on ISO-CAM observations and display images for about 20 galaxies at 7 and 15 mu m, with 7" resolution on a grid with 3" pixels. The images look similar at the two wavelengths, and generally similar to the visible light images from the POSS plates, though star forming regions are highlighted in the mid-IR. The calibration of ISO-CAM data is uncertain at the 20% level, so colors are comparable across the sample. There are significant variations in the 7-to-15 mu m colors: within galaxies, especially between central regions and disk emission, and from galaxy to galaxy. The global 7-to-15mu m colors in these galaxies are well correlated with their 60-to-100mu m colors. This is consistent with the interpertation that the 7mu m emission is dominated by PAHs, whereas the 15mu m emission is mostly due to hot dust, and the 7-to-15 mu m ratio reflects the mean heating intensity. ISO (The Infrared Space Observatory) is an ESA mission with participation by NASA and ISAS. The CAM instrument was built by Cesarsky et al. (1996, A&AL, Nov 10).

  6. Galaxy mergers as a function of environment. Using the structuralparameters of residual images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, C.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Gray, M.; Maltby, D.

    2011-11-01

    We present a new way to estimate the merger fraction of galaxies usingthe morphological parameters of galaxies.The merger fraction is the fraction of galaxies involved in a mergerepisode in some parent population, whichis usually a mass limited sample obtained via deep images of the sky.The sample we use is a mass limited sample (log M/M_⊙ > 9.0)obtained from the STAGES(Space Telescope A901/02 Galaxy EvolutionSurvey) HST/ACS F606W images of the A901/02 supercluster (z=0.165).This sample includes 719 galaxies in the cluster and 453 galaxiesin the field, of all morphological types.The main contribution from this work is that this is the first time inwhich the structural parameters of the residualimages, after the subtraction of a smooth Sérsic model of the moreluminous actor in the merger are explored.It results that the structural parameters of the residuals can indeedproduce a good merger sample, witha better statistical quality than samples obtained using themorphological properties of the direct images.In particular, the Gini index of the residuals is a very reliable mergerdiagnostic.The merger fraction is lowest in the very central regions of thecluster, and is very similarboth in the field and in the outskirts regions of the cluster.

  7. Suzaku View of X-Ray Spectral Variability of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus A: Partial Covering Absorber, Reflector, and Possible Jet Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hiragi, Kazuyoshi; Yamazaki, Syoko; Mizuno, Motohiro; Hayashi, Kazuma; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishino, Sho; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Ohno, Masanori

    2011-12-01

    We observed a nearby radio galaxy, Centaurus A (Cen A), three times with Suzaku in 2009 and measured the wide-band X-ray spectral variability more accurately than previous measurements. The Cen A was in an active phase in 2009, and the flux became higher by a factor of 1.5-2.0 and the spectrum became harder than that in 2005. The Fe-K line intensity increased by 20%-30% from 2005 to 2009. The correlation of the count rate between the XIS 3-8 keV and PIN 15-40 keV band showed a complex behavior with a deviation from a linear relation. The wide-band X-ray continuum in 2-200 keV can be fitted with an absorbed power-law model plus a reflection component, or a power law with a partial covering Compton-thick absorption. The difference spectra between high and low flux periods in each observation were reproduced by a power law with a partial covering Compton-thick absorption. Such a Compton-thick partial covering absorber was observed for the first time in Cen A. The power-law photon index of the difference spectra in 2009 is almost the same as that of the time-averaged spectra in 2005, but steeper by ~0.2 than that of the time-averaged spectra in 2009. This suggests an additional hard power-law component with a photon index of <1.6 in 2009. This hard component could be a lower part of the inverse-Compton-scattered component from the jet, whose gamma-ray emission has recently been detected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  8. Galaxy–Galaxy Weak-lensing Measurements from SDSS. I. Image Processing and Lensing Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wentao; Yang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Jun; Tweed, Dylan; Fu, Liping; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Shu, Chenggang; Li, Ran; Li, Nan; Liu, Xiangkun; Pan, Chuzhong; Wang, Yiran; Radovich, Mario

    2017-02-01

    We present our image processing pipeline that corrects the systematics introduced by the point-spread function (PSF). Using this pipeline, we processed Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 imaging data in r band and generated a galaxy catalog containing the shape information. Based on our shape measurements of the galaxy images from SDSS DR7, we extract the galaxy–galaxy (GG) lensing signals around foreground spectroscopic galaxies binned in different luminosities and stellar masses. We estimated the systematics, e.g., selection bias, PSF reconstruction bias, PSF dilution bias, shear responsivity bias, and noise rectification bias, which in total is between ‑9.1% and 20.8% at 2σ levels. The overall GG lensing signals we measured are in good agreement with Mandelbaum et al. The reduced χ 2 between the two measurements in different luminosity bins are from 0.43 to 0.83. Larger reduced χ 2 from 0.60 to 1.87 are seen for different stellar mass bins, which is mainly caused by the different stellar mass estimator. The results in this paper with higher signal-to-noise ratio are due to the larger survey area than SDSS DR4, confirming that more luminous/massive galaxies bear stronger GG lensing signals. We divide the foreground galaxies into red/blue and star-forming/quenched subsamples and measure their GG lensing signals. We find that, at a specific stellar mass/luminosity, the red/quenched galaxies have stronger GG lensing signals than their counterparts, especially at large radii. These GG lensing signals can be used to probe the galaxy–halo mass relations and their environmental dependences in the halo occupation or conditional luminosity function framework.

  9. Smoothing based model for images of buried EUV multilayer defects near absorber features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Chris H.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2008-10-01

    A modification has been made to the fast simulator RADICAL which allows it to simulate the reflected field from an EUV mask with a buried defect 15,000 times faster than the finite difference time domain method (FDTD). This new version uses an advanced single surface approximation (SSA) instead of ray tracing to model the defective multilayer stack. RADICAL with SSA can simulate a 32nm line space pattern with a buried defect in 4.0s. The accuracy of this method is verified with comparisons to FDTD simulations and good agreement is shown. The ability of this method to simulate large layouts with arbitrary defects is demonstrated. A 1.5μm x 1.5μm layout with an arbitrary buried defect and multilayer surface roughness is simulated in 75s. An alternative algebraic fast model for buried defects near absorber lines is also investigated based on the linear relationship between the surface height of isolated buried defects and the aerial image dip strength. However, the interaction is shown to be too complicated for accurate representation with the model proposed.

  10. Generative adversarial networks recover features in astrophysical images of galaxies beyond the deconvolution limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Zhang, Ce; Zhang, Hantian; Fowler, Lucas; Santhanam, Gokula Krishnan

    2017-05-01

    Observations of astrophysical objects such as galaxies are limited by various sources of random and systematic noise from the sky background, the optical system of the telescope and the detector used to record the data. Conventional deconvolution techniques are limited in their ability to recover features in imaging data by the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem. Here, we train a generative adversarial network (GAN) on a sample of 4550 images of nearby galaxies at 0.01 < z < 0.02 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and conduct 10× cross-validation to evaluate the results. We present a method using a GAN trained on galaxy images that can recover features from artificially degraded images with worse seeing and higher noise than the original with a performance that far exceeds simple deconvolution. The ability to better recover detailed features such as galaxy morphology from low signal to noise and low angular resolution imaging data significantly increases our ability to study existing data sets of astrophysical objects as well as future observations with observatories such as the Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and the Hubble and James Webb space telescopes.

  11. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope Detected Seyfert 1 Galaxies: X-Ray Broadband Properties and Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Lisa M.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McKernan, Barry; Kallman, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of the broadband, 0.3-195 keV, X-ray spectra of 48 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources detected in the very hard X-rays with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). This sample is selected in an all-sky survey conducted in the 14-195 keV band. Therefore, our sources are largely unbiased toward both obscuration and host galaxy properties. Our detailed and uniform model fits to Suzaku/BAT and XMM-Newton/BAT spectra include the neutral absorption, direct power-law, reflected emission, soft excess, warm absorption, and narrow Fe I K[alpha] emission properties for the entire sample. We significantly detect O VII and O VIII edges in 52% of our sample. The strength of these detections is strongly correlated with the neutral column density measured in the spectrum. Among the strongest detections, X-ray grating and UV observations, where available, indicate outflowing material. The ionized column densities of sources with O VII and O VIII detections are clustered in a narrow range with Nwarm [approx] 1021 cm-2, while sources without strong detections have column densities of ionized gas an order of magnitude lower. Therefore, we note that sources without strong detections likely have warm ionized outflows present but at low column densities that are not easily probed with current X-ray observations. Sources with strong complex absorption have a strong soft excess, which may or may not be due to difficulties in modeling the complex spectra of these sources. Still, the detection of a flat [Gamma] [approx] 1 and a strong soft excess may allow us to infer the presence of strong absorption in low signal-to-noise active galactic nucleus spectra. Additionally, we include a useful correction from the Swift BAT luminosity to bolometric luminosity, based on a comparison of our spectral fitting results with published spectral energy distribution fits from 33 of our sources.

  12. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope Detected Seyfert 1 Galaxies: X-Ray Broadband Properties and Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Lisa M.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McKernan, Barry; Kallman, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of the broadband, 0.3-195 keV, X-ray spectra of 48 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources detected in the very hard X-rays with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). This sample is selected in an all-sky survey conducted in the 14-195 keV band. Therefore, our sources are largely unbiased toward both obscuration and host galaxy properties. Our detailed and uniform model fits to Suzaku/BAT and XMM-Newton/BAT spectra include the neutral absorption, direct power-law, reflected emission, soft excess, warm absorption, and narrow Fe I K[alpha] emission properties for the entire sample. We significantly detect O VII and O VIII edges in 52% of our sample. The strength of these detections is strongly correlated with the neutral column density measured in the spectrum. Among the strongest detections, X-ray grating and UV observations, where available, indicate outflowing material. The ionized column densities of sources with O VII and O VIII detections are clustered in a narrow range with Nwarm [approx] 1021 cm-2, while sources without strong detections have column densities of ionized gas an order of magnitude lower. Therefore, we note that sources without strong detections likely have warm ionized outflows present but at low column densities that are not easily probed with current X-ray observations. Sources with strong complex absorption have a strong soft excess, which may or may not be due to difficulties in modeling the complex spectra of these sources. Still, the detection of a flat [Gamma] [approx] 1 and a strong soft excess may allow us to infer the presence of strong absorption in low signal-to-noise active galactic nucleus spectra. Additionally, we include a useful correction from the Swift BAT luminosity to bolometric luminosity, based on a comparison of our spectral fitting results with published spectral energy distribution fits from 33 of our sources.

  13. Imaging of Three Possible Low-redshift Analogs to High-redshift Compact Red Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2011-05-01

    As part of a larger program to identify and characterize possible low-redshift analogs to massive compact red galaxies found at high redshift, we have examined the morphologies of three low-redshift compact galaxies drawn from the sample of Trujillo et al. Using deeper and higher resolution images, we have found faint and relatively extensive outer structures in addition to the compact cores identified in the earlier measurements. One object appears to have a small companion that may be involved in an ongoing minor merger of the sort that could be responsible for building up the outer parts of these galaxies. The ages of the dominant stellar populations in these objects are found to be around 2-4 Gyr, in good agreement with the previous estimates. The presence of diffuse outer structures in these galaxies indicates that truly compact and massive red galaxies are exceedingly rare at low redshift. The relatively young stellar populations suggest that the accretion of the extensive outer material must occur essentially universally on relatively short timescales of a few billion years or less. These results confirm and extend previous suggestions that the driving mechanism behind the size evolution of high-redshift compact galaxies cannot be highly stochastic processes such as major mergers, which would inevitably leave a non-negligible fraction of survivors at low redshift.

  14. The Elaboration of Spiral Galaxies: Morpho-Kinematics Analyses of their Progenitors with IMAGES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, F.; Images Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    The IMAGES (Intermediate MAss Galaxy Evolution Sequence) project aims at measuring the velocity fields of a representative sample of 100 massive galaxies at z=0.4-0.75, selected in the CDFS, the CFRS and the HDFS fields. It uses the world-unique mode of multiple integral field units of FLAMES/ GIRAFFE at VLT. The resolved-kinematics data allow us to sample the large scale motions at ˜ few kpc scale for each galaxy. They have been combined with the deepest HST/ACS, Spitzer (MIPS and IRAC) and VLT/FORS2 ever achieved observations. Most intermediate redshift galaxies show anomalous velocity fields: 6 Gyrs ago, half of the present day spirals were out of equilibrium and had peculiar morphologies. The wealth of the data in these fields allow us to modelize the physical processes in each galaxy with an accuracy almost similar to what is done in the local Universe. These detailed analyses reveal the importance of merger processes, including their remnant phases. Together with the large evolution of spiral properties, this points out the importance of disk survival and strengthens the disk rebuilding scenario. This suggests that the hierarchical scenario may apply to the elaboration of disk galaxies as it does for ellipticals.

  15. Spitzer Imaging of Strongly lensed Herschel-selected Dusty Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Brian; Cooray, Asantha; Calanog, J. A.; Nayyeri, H.; Timmons, N.; Casey, C.; Baes, M.; Chapman, S.; Dannerbauer, H.; da Cunha, E.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Farrah, D.; Fu, Hai; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Magdis, G.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Riechers, D. A.; Scott, D.; Smith, M. W. L.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Vaccari, M.; Viaene, S.; Vieira, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    We present the rest-frame optical spectral energy distribution (SED) and stellar masses of six Herschel-selected gravitationally lensed dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at 1 < z < 3. These galaxies were first identified with Herschel/SPIRE imaging data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). The targets were observed with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. Due to the spatial resolution of the IRAC observations at the level of 2″, the lensing features of a background DSFG in the near-infrared are blended with the flux from the foreground lensing galaxy in the IRAC imaging data. We make use of higher resolution Hubble/WFC3 or Keck/NIRC2 Adaptive Optics imaging data to fit light profiles of the foreground lensing galaxy (or galaxies) as a way to model the foreground components, in order to successfully disentangle the foreground lens and background source flux densities in the IRAC images. The flux density measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, once combined with Hubble/WFC3 and Keck/NIRC2 data, provide important constraints on the rest-frame optical SED of the Herschel-selected lensed DSFGs. We model the combined UV- to millimeter-wavelength SEDs to establish the stellar mass, dust mass, star formation rate, visual extinction, and other parameters for each of these Herschel-selected DSFGs. These systems have inferred stellar masses in the range 8 × 1010-4 × 1011 M⊙ and star formation rates of around 100 M⊙ yr-1. This puts these lensed submillimeter systems well above the SFR-M* relation observed for normal star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The high values of SFR inferred for these systems are consistent with a major merger-driven scenario for star formation.

  16. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Imaging of the Host Galaxies of High-RedshiftRadio-loud Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Matthew D.; van Breugel, Wil J. M.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Miley, George K.

    1999-09-01

    We present rest-frame UV and Lyα images of spatially resolved structures (``hosts'') around five high-redshift radio-loud quasars obtained with the WFPC2 camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The quasars were imaged with the PC1 through the F555W (``V''-band) filter, which at the redshifts of the quasars (2.1imaging surveys. Those had shown that many radio-loud quasars at high redshift have prominent host galaxies that appeared to have properties similar to those of high-redshift radio galaxies. Our HST observations allow a more detailed investigation of quasar host morphologies and a comparison with similar HST studies of radio galaxies by others. Using several methods to measure and quantify the host properties we find that all five quasars are extended and that this ``fuzz'' contains ~5%-40% of the total continuum flux and 15%-65% of the Lyα flux within a radius of about 1.5". The rest-frame UV luminosities of the hosts are log λPλ~11.9-12.5 Lsolar (assuming no internal dust extinction), comparable to the luminous radio galaxies at similar redshifts and a factor 10 higher than both radio-quiet field galaxies at z~2-3 and the most UV-luminous low-redshift starburst galaxies. The Lyα luminosities of the hosts are log LLyα~44.3-44.9 ergs s-1, which are also similar to the those of luminous high-redshift radio galaxies and considerably larger than the Lyα luminosities of high-redshift field galaxies. To generate the Lyα luminosities of the hosts would require roughly a few percent of the total observed ionizing luminosity of the quasar. The UV continuum morphologies of the hosts appear complex and knotty at the relatively high surface brightness levels of our exposures (about 24 V mag arcsec-2). In two quasars we find evidence for foreground galaxies that confuse the

  17. Evaluation of Absorbed Dose for CBCT in Image-guided Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Each Devices and Facilities.

    PubMed

    Kitazato, Yumiko; Kuga, Noriyuki; Shirieda, Katsutoshi; Enzaki, Masahiro; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Kawasaki, Toshihisa; Toyoda, Masahiko; Kawahara, Daisuke; Araki, Fujio; Kawamura, Shinji

    Recently, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used worldwide, highly accurate verification of the location using image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has become critical. However, the use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to ascertain the location each time raises concerns about its influence on radiotherapy dosage and increased radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to measure the absorbed dose using nine kilovoltage (kV) devices and two megavoltage (MV) devices (total 11 devices) at eight facilities, compare the absorbed dose among the devices, and assess the characteristics of the respective devices to ensure optimal clinical operation. For the measurement of the absorbed dose, a farmer-type ionization chamber dosimeter, calibrated using a (60)Co and an IMRT dose verification phantom manufactured from water-equivalent material RW3, was used to measure the absorbed dose at nine points in the phantom for two regions, the pelvic and cephalic region. The average absorbed dose of the pelvic region was 3.09±0.21 cGy in kV-CBCT (OBI), 1.16±0.16 cGy in kV-CBCT (XVI), 5.64±1.48 cGy in MV-CBCT (4 MV), and 6.33±1.54 cGy in MV-CBCT (6 MV). The average absorbed dose of the cephalic region was 0.38±0.03 cGy in kV-CBCT (OBI), 0.23±0.06 cGy in kV-CBCT (XVI), 4.02±0.72 cGy in MV-CBCT (4 MV), and 4.46±0.77 cGy in MV-CBCT (6 MV). There was a difference in the absorbed dose at the measured points as well as in the dose distribution in the phantom cross section. No major difference was observed in the absorbed dose among identical devices, but a difference was identified among the devices installed at multiple facilities. Therefore, the angle of rotation should be paid attention to when CBCT is taken, and the image-taking conditions should be determined. In addition, it is important to handle the devices only after ascertaining the absorbed dose of each device.

  18. THE SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE DETECTED SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES: X-RAY BROADBAND PROPERTIES AND WARM ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Lisa M.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McKernan, Barry; Kallman, T. R.

    2012-02-01

    We present results from an analysis of the broadband, 0.3-195 keV, X-ray spectra of 48 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources detected in the very hard X-rays with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). This sample is selected in an all-sky survey conducted in the 14-195 keV band. Therefore, our sources are largely unbiased toward both obscuration and host galaxy properties. Our detailed and uniform model fits to Suzaku/BAT and XMM-Newton/BAT spectra include the neutral absorption, direct power-law, reflected emission, soft excess, warm absorption, and narrow Fe I K{alpha} emission properties for the entire sample. We significantly detect O VII and O VIII edges in 52% of our sample. The strength of these detections is strongly correlated with the neutral column density measured in the spectrum. Among the strongest detections, X-ray grating and UV observations, where available, indicate outflowing material. The ionized column densities of sources with O VII and O VIII detections are clustered in a narrow range with N{sub warm} {approx} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, while sources without strong detections have column densities of ionized gas an order of magnitude lower. Therefore, we note that sources without strong detections likely have warm ionized outflows present but at low column densities that are not easily probed with current X-ray observations. Sources with strong complex absorption have a strong soft excess, which may or may not be due to difficulties in modeling the complex spectra of these sources. Still, the detection of a flat {Gamma} {approx} 1 and a strong soft excess may allow us to infer the presence of strong absorption in low signal-to-noise active galactic nucleus spectra. Additionally, we include a useful correction from the Swift BAT luminosity to bolometric luminosity, based on a comparison of our spectral fitting results with published spectral energy distribution fits from 33 of our sources.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of globular cluster candidates in low surface brightness dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharina, M. E.; Puzia, T. H.; Makarov, D. I.

    2005-10-01

    Fifty-seven nearby low surface brightness dwarf galaxies (-10⪆ MV⪆ -16) were searched for globular cluster candidates (GCCs) using Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 imaging in V and I. The sample consists of 18 dwarf spheroidal (dSph), 36 irregular (dIrr), and 3 "transition" type (dIrr/dSph) galaxies with angular sizes less than 3.7 kpc situated at distances 2{-}6 Mpc in the field and in the nearby groups: M 81, Centaurus A, Sculptor, Canes Venatici I cloud. We find that 50% of dSph, dIrr/dSph, and dIrr galaxies contain GCCs. The fraction of GCCs located near the center of dwarf spheroidal galaxies is ⪆2 times higher than for dIrrs. The mean integral color of GCCs in dSphs, (V-I)_0=1.04±0.16 mag, coincides with the corresponding value for Galactic globular clusters and is similar to the blue globular cluster sub-populations in massive early-type galaxies. The color distribution for GCCs in dIrrs shows a clear bimodality with peaks near (V-I)0 = 0.5 and 1.0 mag. Blue GCCs are presumably young with ages t⪉1 Gyr, while the red GCC population is likely to be older. The detected GCCs have absolute visual magnitudes between MV=-10 and -5 mag. We find indications for an excess population of faint GCCs with MV⪆-6.5 mag in both dSph and dIrr galaxies, reminiscent of excess populations of faint globular clusters in nearby Local Group spiral galaxies. The measurement of structural parameters using King-profile fitting reveals that most GCCs have structural parameters similar to extended outer halo globular clusters in the Milky Way and M 31, as well as the recently discovered population of "faint fuzzy" clusters in nearby lenticular galaxies.

  20. Cloning Hubble Deep Fields. II. Models for Evolution by Bright Galaxy Image Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwens, Rychard; Broadhurst, Tom; Silk, Joseph

    1998-10-01

    In a companion paper, we outlined a methodology for generating parameter-free, model-independent ``no-evolution'' fields of faint galaxy images, demonstrating the need for significant evolution in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) at faint magnitudes. Here we incorporate evolution into our procedure, by transforming the input bright galaxy images with redshift, for comparison with the HDF at faint magnitudes. Pure luminosity evolution is explored with the assumption that galaxy surface brightness evolves uniformly, at a rate chosen to reproduce the I-band counts. This form of evolution exacerbates the size discrepancy identified by our no-evolution simulations by increasing the area of a galaxy visible to a fixed isophote. Reasonable dwarf-augmented models are unable to generate the count excess invoking moderate rates of stellar evolution. A plausible fit to the counts and sizes is provided by ``mass-conserving'' density-evolution, consistent with small-scale hierarchical growth, in which the product of disk area and space density is conserved with redshift. Here the increased surface brightness generated by stellar evolution is accommodated by the reduced average galaxy size, for a wide range of geometries. These models are useful for calculating the rates of incompleteness and the degree of overcounting. Finally we demonstrate the potential for improvement in quantifying evolution at fainter magnitudes using the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera, with its superior UV and optical performance.

  1. Investigating the Merger Origin of Early-type Galaxies using Ultra-deep Optical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, P.-A.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Alatalo, K.; Blitz, L.; Bois, M.; Bournaud, F.; Bureau, M.; Cappellari, M.; Côté, P.; Davies, R. L.; Davis, T. A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, E.; Ferrarese, L.; Ferriere, E.; Gwyn, S.; Khochfar, S.; Krajnovic, D.; Kuntschner, H.; Lablanche, P.-Y.; MacArthur, L.; McDermid, R. M.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Morganti, R.; Naab, T.; Oosterloo, T.; Sarzi, M.; Scott, N.; Serra, P.; Weijmans, A.; Young, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    The mass assembly of galaxies leaves various imprints on their surroundings, such as shells, streams and tidal tails. The frequency and properties of these fine structures depend on the mechanism driving the mass assembly: e.g. a monolithic collapse, rapid cold-gas accretion followed by violent disk instabilities, minor mergers or major dry/wet mergers. Therefore, by studying the outskirts of galaxies, one can learn about their main formation mechanism. I present here our on-going work to characterize the outskirts of Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs), which are powerful probes at low redshift of the hierarchical mass assembly of galaxies. This work relies on ultra-deep optical images obtained at CFHT with the wide-field of view MegaCam camera of field and cluster ETGs obtained as part of the ATLAS3D and NGVS projects. State of the art numerical simulations are used to interpret the data. The images reveal a wealth of unknown faint structures at levels as faint as 29 mag arcsec-2 in the g-band. Initial results for two galaxies are presented here.

  2. A UV Imaging Survey of IR-Bright Star- Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, Daniela

    2000-07-01

    We propose to carry out a UV{ 1, 600 Angstrom} snapshot imaging survey with STIS of all the actively star-forming galaxies detected by ISO at Lambda>170 Mum and closer than cz=9000 km/s. The sample covers a large region in the parameter's space of morphology, luminosity, metallicity, and star formation intensity. The multiwavelength {UV/far-IR} information will be exploited to address open issues on low- and high-redshift star formation and on the dust/star- formation interconnection. The ISO galaxies will be used as low-redshift benchmarks to explore the relationship between the Lyman-break galaxies at z 3 and the SCUBA sources. The conditions for the escape of UV light from a `dusty' galaxy will be investigated as a function of the sample parameters. UV-bright structures will be measured and used to quantify the fractions of nuclear and disk emission, the fraction of star formation in massive clusters and the properties of those star clusters, the structural properties of star forming bars, rings, and tidally-driven star formation in IR-bright galaxies. Given the breadth of scientific applications and the relevance of this unique dataset for upcoming instruments and missions, including mid/far-IR ones like SIRTF, we propose this project as a Service to the Community and will release immediately the UV images in the public domain.

  3. THE GINI COEFFICIENT AS A MORPHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT OF STRONGLY LENSED GALAXIES IN THE IMAGE PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nan; Florian, Michael K.; Gladders, Michael D.

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of the morphology of strongly lensed galaxies is challenging because images of such galaxies are typically highly distorted. Lens modeling and source plane reconstruction is one approach that can provide reasonably undistorted images from which morphological measurements can be made, though at the expense of a highly spatially variable telescope point-spread function (PSF) when mapped back to the source plane. Unfortunately, modeling the lensing mass is a time-and resource-intensive process, and in many cases there are too few constraints to precisely model the lensing mass. If, however, useful morphological measurements could be made in the image plane rather than the source plane, it would bypass this issue and obviate the need for a source reconstruction process for some applications. We examine the use of the Gini coefficient as one such measurement. Because it depends on the cumulative distribution of the light of a galaxy, but not the relative spatial positions, the fact that surface brightness is conserved by lensing means that the Gini coefficient may be well preserved by strong gravitational lensing. Through simulations, we test the extent to which the Gini coefficient is conserved, including by effects due to PSF convolution and pixelization, to determine whether it is invariant enough under lensing to be used as a measurement of galaxy morphology that can be made in the image plane.

  4. The Gini Coefficient as a Morphological Measurement of Strongly Lensed Galaxies in the Image Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, Michael K.; Li, Nan; Gladders, Michael D.

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of the morphology of strongly lensed galaxies is challenging because images of such galaxies are typically highly distorted. Lens modeling and source plane reconstruction is one approach that can provide reasonably undistorted images from which morphological measurements can be made, though at the expense of a highly spatially variable telescope point-spread function (PSF) when mapped back to the source plane. Unfortunately, modeling the lensing mass is a time- and resource-intensive process, and in many cases there are too few constraints to precisely model the lensing mass. If, however, useful morphological measurements could be made in the image plane rather than the source plane, it would bypass this issue and obviate the need for a source reconstruction process for some applications. We examine the use of the Gini coefficient as one such measurement. Because it depends on the cumulative distribution of the light of a galaxy, but not the relative spatial positions, the fact that surface brightness is conserved by lensing means that the Gini coefficient may be well preserved by strong gravitational lensing. Through simulations, we test the extent to which the Gini coefficient is conserved, including by effects due to PSF convolution and pixelization, to determine whether it is invariant enough under lensing to be used as a measurement of galaxy morphology that can be made in the image plane.

  5. The Surface Brightness of the Cores of Elliptical Galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope High Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarese, L.; Ford, H. C.; Jaffe, W.; van den Bosch, F.; O'Connell, R. W.

    1993-12-01

    High resolution studies of the cores of elliptical galaxies are needed in order to understand the mechanisms of galaxy formation and evolution. Because ground based imaging is severely impaired by atmopheric seeing, we have undertaken a program of high resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of a magnitude-limited sample of 12 elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster. The data has been obtained using the Planetary Camera (PC) and the F555W filter (very close to the Johnson V band). The plate scale of the PC is 0.043 arcsec/pixel = 3.1 pc/pixel at an assumed distance of 14.7 Mpc to the Virgo cluster. In spite of the spherical aberration affecting the HST primary mirror, our modelling shows that deconvolution techniques allow us to recover to surface brightness parameters up to 0.3 arcsec from the centre of the galaxy, an order of magnitude improvement with respect to ground based data. For each galaxy we have determined the ellipticity, position angle of the major axis, deviations of the isophotes from pure ellipses, and the brightness profile inside a 15 arcsec radius, by iteratively fitting the isophotes. All of the galaxies studied show a unique morphology in the inner 10 arcsec. Five galaxies are found to harbour dust, in agreement with previous estimates (e.g. Lauer 1985b, Ebner et al. 1988), seven of the galaxies have isophotes deviating from pure ellipses more than 1% (cfr Peletier et al. 1990). For three galaxies, NGC4342, NGC4570, and NGC4623, we find the presence of a thin (less than 10 parsecs) elongated (~150 parsecs) nuclear structure, resembling an edge-on disk, although kinematic data is needed to confirm the presence of a separate disk component. None of the galaxies shows an isothermal core. This may be the due to the presence of a large nuclear mass concentrations, such as a nuclear black hole, the occurence of merging processes, or anisotropies in the velocity distribution.

  6. Chandra X-Ray Spectroscopic Imaging of Sagittarius A* and the Central Parsec of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baganoff, F. K.; Maeda, Y.; Morris, M.; Bautz, M. W.; Brandt, W. N.; Cui, W.; Doty, J. P.; Feigelson, E. D.; Garmire, G. P.; Pravdo, S. H.; Ricker, G. R.; Townsley, L. K.

    2003-07-01

    We report the results of the first-epoch observation with the ACIS-I instrument on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the compact radio source associated with the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the dynamical center of the Milky Way. This observation produced the first X-ray (0.5-7 keV) spectroscopic image with arcsecond resolution of the central 17'×17' (40pc×40pc) of the Galaxy. We report the discovery of an X-ray source, CXOGC J174540.0-290027, coincident with Sgr A* within 0.27"+/-0.18". The probability of a false match is estimated to be <~0.5%. The spectrum is well fitted either by an absorbed power law with photon index Γ~2.7 or by an absorbed optically thin thermal plasma with kT~1.9 keV and column density NH~1×1023 cm-2. The observed flux in the 2-10 keV band is ~1.3×10-13 ergs cm-2 s-1, and the absorption-corrected luminosity is ~2.4×1033 ergs s-1. The X-ray emission at the position of Sgr A* is extended, with an intrinsic size of ~1.4" (FWHM), consistent with the Bondi accretion radius for a 2.6×106 Msolar black hole. A compact component within the source flared by up to a factor of 3 over a period of ~1 hr at the start of the observation. The search for Kα line emission from iron was inconclusive, yielding an upper limit on the equivalent width of 2.2 keV. Several potential stellar origins for the X-ray emission at Sgr A* are considered, but we conclude that the various properties of the source favor accretion onto the SMBH as the origin for the bulk of the emission. These data are inconsistent with ``standard'' advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) models or Bondi models, unless the accretion rate from stellar winds is much lower than anticipated. The central parsec of the Galaxy contains an ~1.3 keV plasma with electron density ne~26η-1/2fcm-3, where ηf is the filling factor. This plasma should supply ~10-6 Msolar yr-1 of material to the accretion flow at the Bondi radius, whereas measurements of linear

  7. MISSING LENSED IMAGES AND THE GALAXY DISK MASS IN CXOCY J220132.8-320144

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jacqueline; Lee, Samuel K.; Schechter, Paul L.; Castander, Francisco-Javier; Maza, Jose

    2013-05-20

    The CXOCY J220132.8-320144 system consists of an edge-on spiral galaxy lensing a background quasar into two bright images. Previous efforts to constrain the mass distribution in the galaxy have suggested that at least one additional image must be present. These extra images may be hidden behind the disk which features a prominent dust lane. We present and analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of the system. We do not detect any extra images, but the observations further narrow the observable parameters of the lens system. We explore a range of models to describe the mass distribution in the system and find that a variety of acceptable model fits exist. All plausible models require 2 mag of dust extinction in order to obscure extra images from detection, and some models may require an offset between the center of the galaxy and the center of the dark matter halo of 1 kpc. Currently unobserved images will be detectable by future James Webb Space Telescope observations and will provide strict constraints on the fraction of mass in the disk.

  8. Clustering properties of luminous red galaxies with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil

    We study the 3D spatial clustering properties of luminous red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data, and discuss their cosmological implications. The need to control systematics leads us to propose a new algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide-field imaging surveys. Applying this to the SDSS, we achieve a 1% relative photometric calibration over 8500 square degrees, an improvement of a factor of ~2 over current calibrations. We then calibrate distances, derived from only the SDSS imaging data, to a class of galaxies with very regular colours, the luminous red galaxies (LRGs). Measuring their 2-point correlation function allows us to detect the non-random clustering of galaxies on gigaparsec scales for the first time. We also detect the imprint of acoustic oscillations in the plasma of the early Universe on the clustering of the LRGs. We finally discuss cross-correlating the LRGs with the cosmic microwave background, detecting the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect and providing further evidence for a late-time acceleration in the expansion of the Universe.

  9. Surprising Image Revises Understanding Of Dwarf Galaxies -- Building Blocks of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    An intensive study of a neighboring dwarf galaxy has surprised astronomers by showing that most of its molecular gas -- the raw material for new stars -- is scattered among clumps in the galaxy's outskirts, not near its center as they expected. Composite view of galaxy Composite view of the galaxy IC 10. Optical view in blue; Ionized hydrogen (H-alpha) in red; and molecular gas (CO) in green. CREDIT: OVRO, Caltech, NOAO, KPNO "This tells us that the galaxies we call dwarf irregulars are even more irregular than we thought," said Fabian Walter, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. "Our new work also shows that these galaxies probably are useful 'laboratories' for studying how stars were formed when the Universe was young," Walter added. Walter worked with Christopher Taylor of the University of Massachusetts and Nick Scoville of Caltech. The scientists presented their results at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Seattle, WA. Using the millimeter-wave interferometer at Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory, the astronomers combined 15 smaller images into a single mosaic to produce an image showing the location of Carbon Monoxide (CO) gas throughout a galaxy called IC 10, some 2.5 million light-years away. IC 10 is one of the Local Group of galaxies of which our own Milky Way is part. The telescope system was tuned to a frequency near 115 GigaHertz, where the CO molecule naturally emits radio waves. "We found the clumps of CO gas far from the galaxy's center, and not near the regions of current star formation," Walter said. "This tells us that stars may, in fact, form way out there in the outskirts of the galaxy, where we didn't expect," he added. Most of the galaxy's gas is atomic Hydrogen, composed of single Hydrogen atoms. Most of the galaxy's molecular gas is composed of Hydrogen molecules with two atoms each. Atomic Hydrogen can be seen with radio telescopes because it naturally emits at a radio frequency of 1420 Mega

  10. Using deep images and simulations to trace collisional debris around massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2017-03-01

    Deep imaging programs, such as MATLAS which has just been completed at the CFHT, allows us to study with their diffuse light the outer stellar populations around large number of galaxies. We have carried out a systematic census of their fine structures, i.e. the collisional debris from past mergers. We have identified among them stellar streams from minor mergers, tidal tails from gas-rich major mergers, plumes from gas-poor major mergers, and shells from intermediate mass mergers. Having estimated the visibility and life time of each of these structures with numerical simulations, we can reconstruct the past mass assembly of the host galaxy. Preliminary statistical results based on a sample of 360 massive nearby galaxies are presented.

  11. Classifying bent radio galaxies from a mixture of point-like/extended images with Machine Learning.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, David; Oozeer, Nadeem; Somanah, Radhakrishna

    2017-05-01

    The hypothesis that bent radio sources are supposed to be found in rich, massive galaxy clusters and the avalibility of huge amount of data from radio surveys have fueled our motivation to use Machine Learning (ML) to identify bent radio sources and as such use them as tracers for galaxy clusters. The shapelet analysis allowed us to decompose radio images into 256 features that could be fed into the ML algorithm. Additionally, ideas from the field of neuro-psychology helped us to consider training the machine to identify bent galaxies at different orientations. From our analysis, we found that the Random Forest algorithm was the most effective with an accuracy rate of 92% for a classification of point and extended sources as well as an accuracy of 80% for bent and unbent classification.

  12. Imaging the environment of a z = 6.3 submillimeter galaxy with SCUBA-2

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, E. I.; Holland, W. S.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, Ian; Geach, J. E.; Gibb, A. G.; Riechers, D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bintley, D.; Bock, J.; Chapin, E. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Cooray, A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Farrah, D.; and others

    2014-09-20

    We describe a search for submillimeter emission in the vicinity of one of the most distant, luminous galaxies known, HerMES FLS3, at z = 6.34, exploiting it as a signpost to a potentially biased region of the early universe, as might be expected in hierarchical structure formation models. Imaging to the confusion limit with the innovative, wide-field submillimeter bolometer camera, SCUBA-2, we are sensitive to colder and/or less luminous galaxies in the surroundings of HFLS3. We use the Millennium Simulation to illustrate that HFLS3 may be expected to have companions if it is as massive as claimed, but find no significant evidence from the surface density of SCUBA-2 galaxies in its vicinity, or their colors, that HFLS3 marks an overdensity of dusty, star-forming galaxies. We cannot rule out the presence of dusty neighbors with confidence, but deeper 450 μm imaging has the potential to more tightly constrain the redshifts of nearby galaxies, at least one of which likely lies at z ≳ 5. If associations with HFLS3 can be ruled out, this could be taken as evidence that HFLS3 is less biased than a simple extrapolation of the Millennium Simulation may imply. This could suggest either that it represents a rare short-lived, but highly luminous, phase in the evolution of an otherwise typical galaxy, or that this system has suffered amplification due to a foreground gravitational lens and so is not as intrinsically luminous as claimed.

  13. Semi-Automatic Removal of Foreground Stars from Images of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Zsolt

    1996-07-01

    A new procedure, designed to remove foreground stars from galaxy proviles is presented here. Although several programs exist for stellar and faint object photometry, none of them treat star removal from the images very carefully. I present my attempt to develop such a system, and briefly compare the performance of my software to one of the well-known stellar photometry packages, DAOPhot (Stetson 1987). Major steps in my procedure are: (1) automatic construction of an empirical 2D point spread function from well separated stars that are situated off the galaxy; (2) automatic identification of those peaks that are likely to be foreground stars, scaling the PSF and removing these stars, and patching residuals (in the automatically determined smallest possible area where residuals are truly significant); and (3) cosmetic fix of remaining degradations in the image. The algorithm and software presented here is significantly better for automatic removal of foreground stars from images of galaxies than DAOPhot or similar packages, since: (a) the most suitable stars are selected automatically from the image for the PSF fit; (b) after star-removal an intelligent and automatic procedure removes any possible residuals; (c) unlimited number of images can be cleaned in one run without any user interaction whatsoever. (SECTION: Computing and Data Analysis)

  14. Galaxy-scale Gravitational Lens Candidates from the Hyper Suprime-Cam Imaging Survey and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, James H. H.; Suyu, Sherry H.; More, Anupreeta; Oguri, Masamune; Chiueh, Tzihong; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Komiyama, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Price, Paul; Tait, Philip J.; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Utsumi, Yousuke; Wang, Shiang-Yu

    2016-12-01

    We present a list of galaxy-scale lens candidates including a highly probable interacting galaxy-scale lens in the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) imaging survey. We combine HSC imaging with the blended-spectra catalog from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to identify lens candidates, and use lens mass modeling to confirm the candidates. There are 45 matches between the HSC S14A_0b imaging data release and the GAMA catalog. We separate lens and lensed arcs using color information, and exclude those candidates with small image separations (<1.″0, estimated with the lens/source redshifts from the GAMA survey) that are not easily resolved with ground-based imaging. After excluding these, we find 10 probable lens systems. There is one system with an interacting galaxy pair, HSC J084928+000949, that has a valid mass model. We predict the total mass enclosed by the Einstein radius of ˜0.″72 (˜1.65 kpc) for this new expected lens system to be ˜ {10}10.59 {M}⊙ . Using the photometry in the grizy bands of the HSC survey and stellar population synthesis modeling with a Salpeter stellar initial mass function, we estimate the stellar mass within the Einstein radius to be ˜ {10}10.46 {M}⊙ . We thus find a dark matter mass fraction within the Einstein radius of ˜ 25 % . Further spectroscopy or high-resolution imaging would allow confirmation of the nature of these lens candidates. The particular system with the interacting galaxy pair, if confirmed, would provide an opportunity to study the interplay between dark matter and stars as galaxies build up through hierarchical mergers.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Circumnuclear Environments of the CfA Seyfert Galaxies: Nuclear Spirals and Fueling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogge, Richard W.; Martini, Paul

    2002-01-01

    We present archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the nuclear regions of 43 of the 46 Seyfert galaxies found in the volume limited,spectroscopically complete CfA Redshift Survey sample. Using an improved method of image contrast enhancement, we created detailed high-quality " structure maps " that allow us to study the distributions of dust, star clusters, and emission-line gas in the circumnuclear regions (100-1000 pc scales) and in the associated host galaxy. Essentially all of these Seyfert galaxies have circumnuclear dust structures with morphologies ranging from grand-design two-armed spirals to chaotic dusty disks. In most Seyfert galaxies there is a clear physical connection between the nuclear dust spirals on hundreds of parsec scales and large-scale bars and spiral arms in the host galaxies proper. These connections are particularly striking in the interacting and barred galaxies. Such structures are predicted by numerical simulations of gas flows in barred and interacting galaxies and may be related to the fueling of active galactic nuclei by matter inflow from the host galaxy disks. We see no significant differences in the circumnuclear dust morphologies of Seyfert 1s and 2s, and very few Seyfert 2 nuclei are obscured by large-scale dust structures in the host galaxies. If Sevfert 2s are obscured Sevfert Is, then the obscuration must occur on smaller scales than those probed by HST.

  16. HST images of very compact blue galaxies at z approximately 0.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, David C.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Stanford, S. Adam; Majewski, Steven R.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera (WFC) imaging of seven very compact, very blue galaxies with B less than or equal to 21 and redshifts z approximately 0.1 to 0.35. Based on deconvolved images, we estimate typical half-light diameters of approximately 0.65 sec, corresponding to approximately 1.4 h(exp -1) kpc at redshifts z approximately 0.2. The average rest frame surface brightness within this diameter is mu(sub v) approximately 20.5 mag arcsec(exp -2), approximately 1 mag brighter than that of typical late-type blue galaxies. Ground-based spectra show strong, narrow emission lines indicating high ionization; their very blue colors suggest recent bursts of star-formation; their typical luminosities are approximately 4 times fainter than that of field galaxies. These characteristics suggest H II galaxies as likely local counterparts of our sample, though our most luminous targets appear to be unusually compact for their luminosities.

  17. Deep WIYN Imaging of the Globular Cluster System of the Lenticular Galaxy NGC 3607

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Derrick; Rhode, Katherine L.; Jorgenson, Regina

    2017-01-01

    Globular clusters serve as relics of a galaxy’s past history, because they are thought to be among the first objects to form in a galaxy. Measuring the properties of the globular cluster population of a galaxy — in particular the total number, spatial distribution, and color distribution of the clusters — can provide important clues about the formation and evolution of that galaxy. Here we present results from the analysis of the globular cluster population of NGC 3607, an S0 galaxy with M_V = -21.9 that is ~23 Mpc away and is the brightest member of the Leo II group. We used images from the Minimosaic camera on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope with total exposure times of 6300, 6000, and 5400 seconds in the B, V, and R filters, respectively, to image the globular cluster system of NGC 3607 well past its apparent radial extent of 6.3’ (41 kpc). Point-source globular clusters are selected with three-filter photometry to help eliminate foreground stars and background galaxies. The excellent seeing in our WIYN images (0.6” to 0.9”) also helped reduce contamination in the globular cluster candidate sample. Artificial star tests yielded 50% completeness levels of B = 25.4, V=25.2, and R=24.1 and we observed approximately 41% of the galaxy’s Globular Cluster Luminosity Function. We estimate the total number of globular clusters in NGC 3607 is 1000+/-50, which translates to specific frequency values of S_N = 1.7+/-0.3 and T = 2.6+/-0.3 for this galaxy’s luminosity and stellar mass. This research was supported in part by NSF REU grant AST-1358980 and the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  18. A GREEN BANK TELESCOPE SURVEY FOR H I 21 cm ABSORPTION IN THE DISKS AND HALOS OF LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Tripp, Todd M.; Yun, Min S.; Meiring, Joseph D.; Bowen, David V.; York, Donald G.; Momjian, Emmanuel

    2011-01-20

    We present an H I 21 cm absorption survey with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of galaxy-quasar pairs selected by combining galaxy data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) survey. Our sample consists of 23 sight lines through 15 low-redshift foreground galaxy-background quasar pairs with impact parameters ranging from 1.7 kpc up to 86.7 kpc. We detected one absorber in the GBT survey from the foreground dwarf galaxy, GQ1042+0747, at an impact parameter of 1.7 kpc and another possible absorber in our follow-up Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of the nearby foreground galaxy UGC 7408. The line widths of both absorbers are narrow (FWHM of 3.6 and 4.8km s{sup -1}). The absorbers have sub-damped Ly{alpha} column densities, and most likely originate in the disk gas of the foreground galaxies. We also detected H I emission from three foreground galaxies including UGC 7408. Although our sample contains both blue and red galaxies, the two H I absorbers as well as the H I emissions are associated with blue galaxies. We discuss the physical conditions in the 21 cm absorbers and some drawbacks of the large GBT beam for this type of survey.

  19. The SLUGGS survey: the globular cluster systems of three early-type galaxies using wide-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartha, Sreeja S.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Spitler, Lee R.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Brodie, Jean P.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results from a wide-field imaging study of globular cluster (GC) systems in three early-type galaxies. Combinations of Subaru/Suprime-Cam, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam and Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2/Advanced Camera for Surveys data were used to determine the GC system properties of three highly flattened galaxies NGC 720, NGC 1023 and NGC 2768. This work is the first investigation of the GC system in NGC 720 and NGC 2768 to very large galactocentric radius (˜100 kpc). The three galaxies have clear blue and red GC subpopulations. The radial surface densities of the GC systems are fitted with Sérsic profiles, and detected out to 15, 8 and 10 galaxy effective radii, respectively. The total number of GCs and specific frequency are determined for each GC system. The ellipticity of the red subpopulation is in better agreement with the host galaxy properties than is the blue subpopulation, supporting the traditional view that metal-rich GCs are closely associated with the bulk of their host galaxies' field stars, while metal-poor GCs reflect a distinct stellar halo. With the addition of another 37 literature studied galaxies, we present a new correlation of GC system extent with host galaxy effective radius. We find a dependence of the relative fraction of blue to red GCs on host galaxy environmental density for lenticular galaxies (but not for elliptical or spiral galaxies). We propose that tidal interactions between galaxies in cluster environments might be the reason behind the observed trend for lenticular galaxies.

  20. Dosimetry software Hermes Internal Radiation Dosimetry: from quantitative image reconstruction to voxel-level absorbed dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Hippeläinen, Eero T; Tenhunen, Mikko J; Mäenpää, Hanna O; Heikkonen, Jorma J; Sohlberg, Antti O

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to validate a software package called Hermes Internal Radiation Dosimetry (HIRD) for internal dose assessment tailored for clinical practice. The software includes all the necessary steps to perform voxel-level absorbed dose calculations including quantitative reconstruction, image coregistration and volume of interest tools. The basics of voxel-level dosimetry methods and implementations to HIRD software are reviewed. Then, HIRD is validated using simulated SPECT/CT data and data from Lu-DOTATATE-treated patients by comparing absorbed kidney doses with OLINDA/EXM-based dosimetry. In addition, electron and photon dose components are studied separately in an example patient case. The simulation study showed that HIRD can reproduce time-activity curves accurately and produce absorbed doses with less than 10% error for the kidneys, liver and spleen. From the patient data, the absorbed kidney doses calculated using HIRD and using OLINDA/EXM were highly correlated (Pearson's correlation coefficient, r=0.98). From Bland-Altman plot analysis, an average absorbed dose difference of -2% was found between the methods. In addition, we found that in Lu-DOTATATE-treated patients, photons can contribute over 10% of the kidney's total dose and is partly because of cross-irradiation from high-uptake lesions close to the kidneys. HIRD is a straightforward voxel-level internal dosimetry software. Its clinical utility was verified with simulated and clinical Lu-DOTATATE-treated patient data. Patient studies also showed that photon contribution towards the total dose can be relatively high and voxel-level dose calculations can be valuable in cases where the target organ is in close proximity to high-uptake organs.

  1. Smokin Hot Galaxy animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-03-16

    This infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows a galaxy that appears to be sizzling hot, with huge plumes of smoke swirling around it. The galaxy is known as Messier 82 or the Cigar galaxy.

  2. Galaxy NGC5962

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-25

    NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer took this ultraviolet color image of the galaxy NGC5962 on June 7, 2003. This spiral galaxy is located 90 million light-years from Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04635

  3. A Super Special Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    There something special going on in the nearby Circinus galaxy, as revealed by this image from NASA WISE telescope. The Circinus galaxy is located in the constellation of Circinus and is obscured by the plane of our Milky Way galaxy.

  4. Optical theory of partially coherent thin-film energy-absorbing structures for power detectors and imaging arrays.

    PubMed

    Withington, Stafford; Thomas, Christopher N

    2009-06-01

    Free-space power detectors often have energy absorbing structures comprising multilayer systems of patterned thin films. We show that for any system of interacting resistive films, the expectation value of the absorbed power is given by the contraction of two tensor fields: one describes the spatial state of coherence of the incoming radiation, the other the state of coherence to which the detector is sensitive. Equivalently, the natural modes of the optical field scatter power into the natural modes of the detector. We describe a procedure for determining the amplitude, phase, and polarization patterns of a detector's optical modes and their relative responsivities. The procedure gives the state of coherence of the currents flowing in the system and leads to important conceptual insights into the way the pixels of an imaging array interact and extract information from an optical field.

  5. Using optoacoustic imaging for measuring the temperature dependence of Grüneisen parameter in optically absorbing solutions

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Elena; Ermilov, Sergey; Su, Richard; Nadvoretskiy, Vyacheslav; Conjusteau, André; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Grüneisen parameter is a key temperature-dependent physical characteristic responsible for thermoelastic efficiency of materials. We propose a new methodology for accurate measurements of temperature dependence of Grüneisen parameter in optically absorbing solutions. We use two-dimensional optoacoustic (OA) imaging to improve accuracy of measurements. Our approach eliminates contribution of local optical fluence and absorbance. To validate the proposed methodology, we studied temperature dependence of aqueous cupric sulfate solutions in the range from 22 to 4°C. Our results for the most diluted salt perfectly matched known temperature dependence for the Grüneisen parameter of water. We also found that Grüneisen-temperature relationship for cupric sulfate exhibits linear trend with respect to the concentration. In addition to accurate measurements of Grüneisen changes with temperature, the developed technique provides a basis for future high precision OA temperature monitoring in live tissues. PMID:24150350

  6. Images From Hubbles's ACS Tell A Tale Of Two Record-Breaking Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Baltimore, Md. Optical Image of RDCS 1252.9-2927 HST Optical Image of RDCS 1252.9-2927 The second Hubble study uncovered, for the first time, a proto-cluster of "infant galaxies" that existed more than 12 billion years ago (at redshift 4.1). These galaxies are so young that astronomers can still see a flurry of stars forming within them. The galaxies are grouped around one large galaxy. These results will be published in the Jan. 1, 2004 issue of Nature. The paper's lead author is George Miley of Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands. "Until recently people didn't think that clusters existed when the universe was only about 5 billion years old," Blakeslee explained. "Even if there were such clusters," Miley added, "until recently astronomers thought it was almost impossible to find clusters that existed 8 billion years ago. In fact, no one really knew when clustering began. Now we can witness it." Both studies led the astronomers to conclude that these systems are the progenitors of the galaxy clusters seen today. "The cluster RDCS 1252 looks like a present-day cluster," said Marc Postman of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., and co-author of both research papers. "In fact, if you were to put it next to a present-day cluster, you wouldn't know which is which." A Tale of Two Clusters How can galaxies grow so fast after the big bang? "It is a case of the rich getting richer," Blakeslee said. "These clusters grew quickly because they are located in very dense regions, so there is enough material to build up the member galaxies very fast." This idea is strengthened by X-ray observations of the massive cluster RDCS 1252. Chandra and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton provided astronomers with the most accurate measurements to date of the properties of an enormous cloud of hot gas that pervades the massive cluster. This 160-million-degree Fahrenheit (70-million-degree Celsius) gas is a reservoir of most of the heavy elements in the cluster and an

  7. Ultra-deep imaging of nearby galaxy outskirts from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ignacio

    2017-03-01

    We show how present-day 10 meter class telescopes can provide broadband imaging 1.5-2 mag deeper than most previous results within a reasonable amount of time ( ~ 8h on source integration). We illustrate the ability of the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio de Canarias (GTC) telescope to produce imaging with a limiting surface brightness of 31.5 mag/arcsec2 (3σ in 10 × 10 arcsec boxes). We explore the stellar halos of nearby galaxies obtaining surface brightness radial profiles down to μ r ~ 33 mag/arcsec2. This depth is similar to that obtained using star counts techniques of Local Group galaxies, but is achieved at a distance where this technique is unfeasible.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Radiation-Absorbed Dose Estimation of {sup 166}Ho Microspheres in Liver Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Seevinck, Peter R.; Maat, Gerrit H. van de; Wit, Tim C. de; Vente, Maarten A.D.; Nijsen, Johannes F.W.; Bakker, Chris J.G.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for accurate assessment of the three-dimensional {sup 166}Ho activity distribution to estimate radiation-absorbed dose distributions in {sup 166}Ho-loaded poly (L-lactic acid) microsphere ({sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS) liver radioembolization. Methods and Materials: MRI, computed tomography (CT), and single photon emission CT (SPECT) experiments were conducted on an anthropomorphic gel phantom with tumor-simulating gel samples and on an excised human tumor-bearing liver, both containing known amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS. Three-dimensional radiation-absorbed dose distributions were estimated at the voxel level by convolving the {sup 166}Ho activity distribution, derived from quantitative MRI data, with a {sup 166}Ho dose point-kernel generated by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code) and from Medical Internal Radiation Dose Pamphlet 17. MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions were qualitatively compared with CT and autoradiography images and quantitatively compared with SPECT-based dose distributions. Both MRI- and SPECT-based activity estimations were validated against dose calibrator measurements. Results: Evaluation on an anthropomorphic phantom showed that MRI enables accurate assessment of local {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS mass and activity distributions, as supported by a regression coefficient of 1.05 and a correlation coefficient of 0.99, relating local MRI-based mass and activity calculations to reference values obtained with a dose calibrator. Estimated MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS in an ex vivo human liver visually showed high correspondence to SPECT-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions. Quantitative analysis revealed that the differences in local and total amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS estimated by MRI, SPECT, and the dose calibrator were within 10%. Excellent agreement was observed between MRI- and SPECT-based dose

  9. Ultracompact Blue Dwarf Galaxies: Hubble Space Telescope Imaging and Stellar Population Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael R.; Vacca, William D.; Cid Fernandes, Roberto; Hibbard, John E.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2006-11-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Channel U-, narrow-V-, and I-band images of nine ``ultracompact'' blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We define UCBDs as local (z<0.01) star-forming galaxies having angular diameters less than 6" and physical diameters <1 kpc. They are also among the most metal-poor galaxies known, including objects having 12+log(O/H)<7.65, and are found to reside within voids. Both the HST images and the objects' SDSS optical spectra reveal that they are composites of young (~1-10 Myr) populations that dominate their light and older (~10 Gyr) populations that dominate their stellar masses, which we estimate to be ~107-108 Msolar. An intermediate-age (~107-109 yr) population is also indicated in most objects. The objects do not appear to be as dynamically disturbed as the prototype UCBD, POX 186, but the structure of several of them suggests that their current star formation has been triggered by the collisions/mergers of smaller clumps of stars. In one case, HS 0822+3542, the images resolve what may be two small (~100 pc) components that have recently collided, supporting this interpretation. In six of the objects much of the star formation is concentrated in young massive clusters, contributing to their compactness in ground-based images. The evidence that the galaxies consist mainly of ~10 Gyr old stars establishes that they are not protogalaxies, forming their first generation of stars. Their low metallicities are more likely to be the result of the escape of supernova ejecta, rather than youth.

  10. The Hubble Heritage Image of the Polar-Ring Galaxy NGC 4650A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, A. L.; Gallagher, J.; Matthews, L.; Sparke, L.; Bond, H. E.; Christian, C. A.; English, J.; Frattare, L.; Hamilton, F.; Levay, Z.; Noll, K.; Hubble Heritage Team

    1999-05-01

    The Hubble Heritage Project has the aim of providing the public with pictorially striking images of celestial objects obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. As part of the Heritage Project, we have used HST to obtain a multi-color image of the peculiar galaxy NGC 4650A. This was the first Heritage observation for which the public joined in the target selection. NGC 4650A was chosen in the winter of 1998-99 from among several candidate objects by over 8,000 members of the public, who used the Heritage web site (heritage.stsci.edu) to register their votes. The WFPC2 observations were obtained in April 1999, in the wide B (F450W), wide V (F606W), and I (F814W) bands. The resulting full-color image will be presented at the AAS meeting and on our web site, and the actual data frames are available publicly in the HST archive for use by interested scientists. NGC 4650A, located at a distance of about 40 Mpc, is the best-known and most spectacular example of the rare class of ``polar-ring'' galaxies. These objects are probably the remnants of collisions, in which the debris from a disrupted, gas-rich smaller galaxy has gone into orbit around a larger galaxy. The HST image of NGC 4650A shows a rotating, almost edge-on inner disk of old red stars, around which orbits a younger ring of dust, gas, and stars, in a plane that is nearly perpendicular to that of the old disk. Numerous young blue star clusters reveal that active star formation is occurring within the polar ring, triggered by the collision process. Polar rings are particularly useful for probing the distribution of dark matter in galactic halos.

  11. GALAXIES IN THE YOUNG UNIVERSE [left

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of a small region of the constellation Sculptor, taken with a ground-based photographic sky survey camera, illustrates the extremely small angular size of a distant galaxy cluster in the night sky. Though this picture encompasses a piece of the sky about the width of the bowl of the Big Dipper, the cluster is so far away it fills a sky area only 1/10th the diameter of the Full Moon. The cluster members are not visible because they are so much fainter than foreground stars. [center] A NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of the farthest cluster of galaxies in the universe, located at a distance of 12 billion light-years. Because the light from these remote galaxies has taken 12 billion years to reach us, this image is a remarkable glimpse of the primeval universe, at it looked about two billion years after the Big Bang. The cluster contains 14 galaxies, the other objects are largely foreground galaxies. The galaxy cluster lies in front of quasar Q0000-263 in the constellation Sculptor. Presumably the brilliant core of an active galaxy, the quasar provides a beacon for searching for primordial galaxy clusters. The image is the full field view of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera-2, taken on September 6, 1994. The 4.7-hour exposure reveals objects down to 28.5 magnitude. [right] This enlargement shows one of the farthest normal galaxies yet detected, (blob at center right) at a distance of 12 billion light-years (redshift of z=3.330). The galaxy lies 300 million light-years in front of the quasar Q0000-263 (z=4.11, large white blob and spike on left side of frame) and was detected because it absorbs some light from the quasar. The galaxy's spectrum reveals that vigorous star formation is taking place. Credit: Duccio Macchetto (ESA/STScI), Mauro Giavalisco (STScI), and NASA

  12. A deconvolution technique to correct deep images of galaxies from instrumental scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabal, E.; Duc, P.-A.; Kuntschner, H.; Chanial, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Gwyn, S.

    2017-05-01

    Deep imaging of the diffuse light that is emitted by stellar fine structures and outer halos around galaxies is often now used to probe their past mass assembly. Because the extended halos survive longer than the relatively fragile tidal features, they trace more ancient mergers. We use images that reach surface brightness limits as low as 28.5-29 mag arcsec-2 (g-band) to obtain light and color profiles up to 5-10 effective radii of a sample of nearby early-type galaxies. These were acquired with MegaCam as part of the CFHT MATLAS large programme. These profiles may be compared to those produced using simulations of galaxy formation and evolution, once corrected for instrumental effects. Indeed they can be heavily contaminated by the scattered light caused by internal reflections within the instrument. In particular, the nucleus of galaxies generates artificial flux in the outer halo, which has to be precisely subtracted. We present a deconvolution technique to remove the artificial halos that makes use of very large kernels. The technique, which is based on PyOperators, is more time efficient than the model-convolution methods that are also used for that purpose. This is especially the case for galaxies with complex structures that are hard to model. Having a good knowledge of the point spread function (PSF), including its outer wings, is critical for the method. A database of MegaCam PSF models corresponding to different seeing conditions and bands was generated directly from the deep images. We show that the difference in the PSFs in different bands causes artificial changes in the color profiles, in particular a reddening of the outskirts of galaxies having a bright nucleus. The method is validated with a set of simulated images and applied to three representative test cases: NGC 3599, NGC 3489, and NGC 4274, which exhibits a prominent ghost halo for two of them. This method successfully removes this. The library of PSFs (FITS files) is only available at the

  13. SPITZER IMAGING OF STRONGLY LENSED HERSCHEL-SELECTED DUSTY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Brian; Cooray, Asantha; Calanog, J. A.; Nayyeri, H.; Timmons, N.; Casey, C.; Baes, M.; Chapman, S.; Dannerbauer, H.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Farrah, D.; Fu, Hai; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Riechers, D. A.; Scott, D.; and others

    2015-11-20

    We present the rest-frame optical spectral energy distribution (SED) and stellar masses of six Herschel-selected gravitationally lensed dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at 1 < z < 3. These galaxies were first identified with Herschel/SPIRE imaging data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). The targets were observed with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. Due to the spatial resolution of the IRAC observations at the level of 2″, the lensing features of a background DSFG in the near-infrared are blended with the flux from the foreground lensing galaxy in the IRAC imaging data. We make use of higher resolution Hubble/WFC3 or Keck/NIRC2 Adaptive Optics imaging data to fit light profiles of the foreground lensing galaxy (or galaxies) as a way to model the foreground components, in order to successfully disentangle the foreground lens and background source flux densities in the IRAC images. The flux density measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, once combined with Hubble/WFC3 and Keck/NIRC2 data, provide important constraints on the rest-frame optical SED of the Herschel-selected lensed DSFGs. We model the combined UV- to millimeter-wavelength SEDs to establish the stellar mass, dust mass, star formation rate, visual extinction, and other parameters for each of these Herschel-selected DSFGs. These systems have inferred stellar masses in the range 8 × 10{sup 10}–4 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙} and star formation rates of around 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. This puts these lensed submillimeter systems well above the SFR-M* relation observed for normal star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The high values of SFR inferred for these systems are consistent with a major merger-driven scenario for star formation.

  14. ISOCAM Mid-Infrared Imaging of the Quiescent Spiral Galaxy NGC 7331

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Beverly J.

    1998-06-01

    Using the mid-infrared camera (ISOCAM) on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), the Sb LINER galaxy NGC 7331 has been imaged in two broadband and four narrowband filters between 6.75 and 15 μm. These maps show a prominent circumnuclear ring of radius 0.25 arcmin × 0.75 arcmin (1.1 × 3.3 kpc) encircling an extended central source. The 7.7 and 11.3 μm dust emission features are strong in this galaxy, contributing approximately one-third of the total IRAS 12 μm broadband flux. In contrast to starburst galaxies, the 15 μm continuum is weak in NGC 7331. The mid-infrared spectrum does not vary dramatically with position in this quiescent galaxy, showing neither large-scale destruction of the carriers of the emission bands nor a large increase in the 15 μm continuum in the star-forming ring. In the bulge there is some enhancement of the LW2 (6.75 μm) flux, probably because of contributions from photospheric light; however, the 11.3 μm dust feature is also seen, showing additional emission from interstellar or circumstellar dust. Based on observations made with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESAMember States and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  15. Proper Motions of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope Imaging. 3; Measurement for URSA Minor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piatek, Slawomir; Pryor, Carlton; Bristow, Paul; Olszewski, Edward W.; Harris, Hugh C.; Mateo, Mario; Minniti, Dante; Tinney, Christopher G.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a measurement of the proper motion of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy determined from images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in two distinct fields. Each field contains a quasi-stellar object that serves as the "reference point". Integrating the motion of Ursa Minor in a realistic potential for the Milky Way produces orbital elements. The perigalacticon and apogalacticon are 40 (10, 76) and 89 (78, 160) kpc, respectively, where the values in the parentheses represent the 95% confidence intervals derived from Monte Carlo experiments. The eccentricity of the orbit is 0.39 (0.09, 0.79), and the orbital period is 1.5 (1.1, 2.7) Gyr. The orbit is retrograde and inclined by 124 degrees (94 deg, 36 deg ) to the Galactic plane. Ursa Minor is not a likely member of a proposed stream of galaxies on similar orbits around the Milky Way, nor is the plane of its orbit coincident with a recently proposed planar alignment of galaxies around the Milky Way. Comparing the orbits of Ursa Minor and Carina shows no reason for the different star formation histories of these two galaxies. Ursa Minor must contain dark matter to have a high probability of having survived disruption by the Galactic tidal force until the present.

  16. H-alpha images of early type galaxies with hot gas

    SciTech Connect

    Trinchieri, G.; Di serego alighieri, S. European Southern Observatory, Garching )

    1991-05-01

    H-alpha imaging observations of 13 early type galaxies with known X-ray fluxes are presented from the Einstein Observatory data, and long-slit spectroscopy of nine of these. H-alpha emission is detected in the central regions of ten objects. The line emission appears extended over a radius of 5-10 kpc, is generally peaked on the nucleus with regular elliptical isophotes, similar to the red continuum, although with a steeper radial distribution. Low surface brightness filamentary structure is also seen in a few cases (NGC 4406 and NGC 5846). To study the different phases of the interstellar medium in early type galaxies, the emissions due to hot (X-ray) and warm (H-alpha) gas are compared. On average, galaxies with a larger content of hot gas also show a more powerful line emission. However, the scatter in the relation is significant, and suggests that other parameters must play a role. The depth of the gravitational potential and/or the shape of the objects are probably important in determining the amount of gas present in early type galaxies. 50 refs.

  17. IMAGE RELEASE: New Hydrogen Clouds in the M81 Group of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    A composite radio-optical image shows five new clouds of hydrogen gas discovered using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The spiral galaxy M81 and its satellite, M82, are seen in visible light (white); intergalactic hydrogen gas revealed by the GBT is shown in red; and additional hydrogen gas earlier detected by the Very Large Array is shown in green. The M81 Group of galaxies, 11.8 million light-years from Earth, are interacting gravitationally with each other, as shown clearly by the gas streaming among them. The newly-discovered gas clouds, each containing from 14 to 57 million times the mass of our Sun, are similar to gas clouds also found near our own Milky Way Galaxy. Astronomers analyzing these M81 Group clouds conclude that they are likely remnants of earlier interactions among the galaxies and that this indicates that their analogs near the Milky Way had a similar origin. The research team is: Katie Chynoweth, a graduate student at Vanderbilt University; Glen Langston of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO); Min Yun of the University of Massachusetts; Felix J. Lockman of NRAO; Kate Rubin of Lick Observatory; and Sarah Scoles of Cornell University. The astronomers presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, Texas. Credit: Chynoweth et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF, Digital Sky Survey. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  18. Homogeneous UGRIZ Photometry for ACS Virgo Cluster Survey Galaxies: A Non-parametric Analysis from SDSS Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chin-Wei; Côté, Patrick; West, Andrew A.; Peng, Eric W.; Ferrarese, Laura

    2010-11-01

    We present photometric and structural parameters for 100 ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) galaxies based on homogeneous, multi-wavelength (ugriz), wide-field SDSS (DR5) imaging. These early-type galaxies, which trace out the red sequence in the Virgo Cluster, span a factor of nearly ~103 in g-band luminosity. We describe an automated pipeline that generates background-subtracted mosaic images, masks field sources and measures mean shapes, total magnitudes, effective radii, and effective surface brightnesses using a model-independent approach. A parametric analysis of the surface brightness profiles is also carried out to obtain Sérsic-based structural parameters and mean galaxy colors. We compare the galaxy parameters to those in the literature, including those from the ACSVCS, finding good agreement in most cases, although the sizes of the brightest, and most extended, galaxies are found to be most uncertain and model dependent. Our photometry provides an external measurement of the random errors on total magnitudes from the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog, which we estimate to be σ(BT )≈ 0.13 mag for the brightest galaxies, rising to ≈ 0.3 mag for galaxies at the faint end of our sample (BT ≈ 16). The distribution of axial ratios of low-mass ("dwarf") galaxies bears a strong resemblance to the one observed for the higher-mass ("giant") galaxies. The global structural parameters for the full galaxy sample—profile shape, effective radius, and mean surface brightness—are found to vary smoothly and systematically as a function of luminosity, with unmistakable evidence for changes in structural homology along the red sequence. As noted in previous studies, the ugriz galaxy colors show a nonlinear but smooth variation over a ~7 mag range in absolute magnitude, with an enhanced scatter for the faintest systems that is likely the signature of their more diverse star formation histories.

  19. HOMOGENEOUS UGRIZ PHOTOMETRY FOR ACS VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY GALAXIES: A NON-PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS FROM SDSS IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chin-Wei; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; West, Andrew A.; Peng, Eric W.

    2010-11-15

    We present photometric and structural parameters for 100 ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) galaxies based on homogeneous, multi-wavelength (ugriz), wide-field SDSS (DR5) imaging. These early-type galaxies, which trace out the red sequence in the Virgo Cluster, span a factor of nearly {approx}10{sup 3} in g-band luminosity. We describe an automated pipeline that generates background-subtracted mosaic images, masks field sources and measures mean shapes, total magnitudes, effective radii, and effective surface brightnesses using a model-independent approach. A parametric analysis of the surface brightness profiles is also carried out to obtain Sersic-based structural parameters and mean galaxy colors. We compare the galaxy parameters to those in the literature, including those from the ACSVCS, finding good agreement in most cases, although the sizes of the brightest, and most extended, galaxies are found to be most uncertain and model dependent. Our photometry provides an external measurement of the random errors on total magnitudes from the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog, which we estimate to be {sigma}(B{sub T}){approx} 0.13 mag for the brightest galaxies, rising to {approx} 0.3 mag for galaxies at the faint end of our sample (B{sub T} {approx} 16). The distribution of axial ratios of low-mass ('dwarf') galaxies bears a strong resemblance to the one observed for the higher-mass ('giant') galaxies. The global structural parameters for the full galaxy sample-profile shape, effective radius, and mean surface brightness-are found to vary smoothly and systematically as a function of luminosity, with unmistakable evidence for changes in structural homology along the red sequence. As noted in previous studies, the ugriz galaxy colors show a nonlinear but smooth variation over a {approx}7 mag range in absolute magnitude, with an enhanced scatter for the faintest systems that is likely the signature of their more diverse star formation histories.

  20. Interacting Galaxies

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-04-24

    This beautiful pair of interacting galaxies consists of NGC 5754, the large spiral on the right, and NGC 5752, the smaller companion in the bottom left corner of the image. This image is from NASA Hubble Space Telescope.

  1. High-Resolution X-Ray Imaging of Colliding Radio-Jet Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, Kirk D.; Whitmore, Brad

    1996-01-01

    We received ROSAT data for four program objects:3C31,3C278,3C449,and NGC1044. The first three sources were observed with the ROSAT HRI instrument. Our plan was to use the HRI to image the hot gas distribution in a few pairs of strongly disturbed interacting elliptical galaxies which are also strong radio sources having a bent-jet source morphology. The PSPC was used for NGC1044 in order to obtain a flux measurement to use in planning future High Resolution Imager (HRI) observations of that source. Though we never requested such HRI observations of NGC1044, others have used those archival PSPC data from our project for other research projects and analyses. The goal of the program was to elucidate the detailed distribution of hot gas into which the jets flow. The X-ray data were consequently analyzed in conjunction with existing VLA radio maps, optical broad-band and H-alpha Charge Couple device (CCD) images, and optical kinematic data to constrain models for the propagation of ballistic jets in interacting galaxies. We were able to test and validate the claimed causal connection between tidal interaction, the presence of gas, and the onset of activity in galaxies. The full multi-wavelength multi-observatory analyses described here are still on-going and will be published in the future. Because of the relevance of this research to on-going work in the field of active galaxies, the grant was used to support travel to several scientific meetings where our x-ray analysis, numerical modeling, and related radio results were presented and discussed.

  2. Inferring the photometric and size evolution of galaxies from image simulations. I. Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carassou, Sébastien; de Lapparent, Valérie; Bertin, Emmanuel; Le Borgne, Damien

    2017-09-01

    Context. Current constraints on models of galaxy evolution rely on morphometric catalogs extracted from multi-band photometric surveys. However, these catalogs are altered by selection effects that are difficult to model, that correlate in non trivial ways, and that can lead to contradictory predictions if not taken into account carefully. Aims: To address this issue, we have developed a new approach combining parametric Bayesian indirect likelihood (pBIL) techniques and empirical modeling with realistic image simulations that reproduce a large fraction of these selection effects. This allows us to perform a direct comparison between observed and simulated images and to infer robust constraints on model parameters. Methods: We use a semi-empirical forward model to generate a distribution of mock galaxies from a set of physical parameters. These galaxies are passed through an image simulator reproducing the instrumental characteristics of any survey and are then extracted in the same way as the observed data. The discrepancy between the simulated and observed data is quantified, and minimized with a custom sampling process based on adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Results: Using synthetic data matching most of the properties of a Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Deep field, we demonstrate the robustness and internal consistency of our approach by inferring the parameters governing the size and luminosity functions and their evolutions for different realistic populations of galaxies. We also compare the results of our approach with those obtained from the classical spectral energy distribution fitting and photometric redshift approach. Conclusions: Our pipeline infers efficiently the luminosity and size distribution and evolution parameters with a very limited number of observables (three photometric bands). When compared to SED fitting based on the same set of observables, our method yields results that are more accurate and free from

  3. A new gel using super absorbent polymer for mapping the spatial dose distributions of electron beams by MR imager.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, T; Hoshino, K; Kawashima, K; Kato, H; Tateno, Y

    1993-01-01

    A technique for mapping the spatial dose distribution with a magnetic resonance imager is presented. A ferrous sulphate solution with sulfuric acid was used as the detecting medium for radiation dose. To make a gel of the solution for filling up a cubic phantom, we developed a new gel component that is combined with a super absorbent polymer (Sumikagel N-100) and a cross-linked dextran gel (Sephadex G-200). In order to make the application for radiation treatment planning, mapping of the dose distribution was carried out using a Unix computer.

  4. Galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-10

    This image of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 55 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer on September 14, 2003, during 2 orbits. This galaxy lies 5.4 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy and is a member of the "local group" of galaxies that also includes the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the Magellanic clouds, and 40 other galaxies. The spiral disk of NGC 55 is inclined to our line of sight by approximately 80 degrees and so this galaxy looks cigar-shaped. This picture is a combination of Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken with the far ultraviolet (colored blue) and near ultraviolet detectors, (colored red). The bright blue regions in this image are areas of active star formation detected in the ultraviolet by Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The red stars in this image are foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04923

  5. Mid-UV HST Imaging of Nearby Late-Type, Irregular, and Peculiar Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, V. A.; Windhorst, R. A.; Chiarenza, C. A. T.; Odewahn, S. C.; Conselice, C. J.; MacKenty, J.; de Jong, R. S.; de Grijs, R.; Eskridge, P. B.; Frogel, J. A.; Gallagher, J. S.; Kobulnicky, H.; Hibbard, J. E.; Matthews, L. D.; O'Connell, R. W.

    2000-12-01

    Distant galaxies observed by HST appear to have primarily late-type, irregular, or peculiar morphologies. However, because of their high redshift they are observed in their restframe mid-UV. Nearby galaxies can look dramatically different in the rest-frame mid- and far-UV. We must therefore ask if these high redshift morphologies are due to real evolutionary effects or band-pass shifting and surface brightness dimming at high redshift. To address this, we have conducted a survey with HST of 37 nearby galaxies of various Hubble types and inclinations in two mid-UV bands. Most of these galaxies have supporting ground based data in UBVRJHK. A comparison of the photometric properties of these galaxies in these different band-passes will lead to a better ability to separate true evolutionary effects from the morphological K-correction. We will present and discuss preliminary results from the HST survey and ground-based observations in UBVR. Our preliminary results suggest that the late-types imaged so far are a heterogeneous mixture. More than half of the few irregulars/peculiars/mergers show a mid-UV F300W morphology that is similar to I-band F814W, but with important differences due to recognizable dust-lanes blocking out UV light, star-formation ``ridges,'' and hot stars or star-clusters that are mostly visible in F300W but not in F814W. Others yield significantly different classifications in F300W and F814W. We acknowledge NASA grant GO-8645.01-99A from STScI and the NASA Space Grant. This project is based on observations with the VATT: the Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  6. Imaging and Demography of the Host Galaxies of High-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Hogan, Craig J.; Barris, Brian; Candia, Pablo; Challis, Peter; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Coil, Alison L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Garnavich, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Holland, Stephen T.; Jha, Saurabh; Krisciunas, Kevin; Leibundgut, Bruno; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Maza, Jose; Phillips, Mark M.; Riess, Adam G.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Schommer, Robert A.; Smith, R. Chris; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Stubbs, Christopher; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Tonry, John L.

    2003-12-01

    We present the results of a study of the host galaxies of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We provide a catalog of 18 hosts of SNe Ia observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by the High-z Supernova Search Team, including images, scale lengths, measurements of integrated (Hubble-equivalent) BVRIZ photometry in bands where the galaxies are brighter than m~25 mag, and galactocentric distances of the supernovae. We compare the residuals of SN Ia distance measurements from cosmological fits with measurable properties of the supernova host galaxies that might be expected to correlate with variable properties of the progenitor population, such as host-galaxy color and position of the supernova. We find mostly null results; the current data are generally consistent with no correlations of the distance residuals with host-galaxy properties in the redshift range 0.42

  7. Determination of Disk Thickness of Face-on Spiral Galaxies and Its Image Processing Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, T.; Peng, Q. H.

    2014-11-01

    It is uneasy to obtain the disk thickness of face-on spiral galaxies by measuring the galactic light distributions. Here we obtain the spiral galactic disk thickness based on an asymptotic expression of Poisson's equation for a logarithmic perturbation of matter density in spiral galaxies. For measuring the key parameter of the innermost position of the spiral arm (forbidden radius r_0) freed from the contamination by the light of bulge, an improved image processing method is used in this study by subtracting a decomposition brightness model from the galactic observed image. On the basis of measuring some fundamental parameters of spiral structures, we obtain the disk thickness and some other parameters of two (types S and SB) face-on spiral galaxies, and their ratio parameters (r_{b}/r_{d} and r_{d}/H) are also derived. By using this improved subtracted-method, it is easy to measure the forbidden radius r_0, which is smaller than that obtained from unsubtracted-method.

  8. The Wasilewski sample of emission-line galaxies - Follow-up CCD imaging and spectroscopic and IRAS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Schmitz, Mark; Halpern, Jules P.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Impey, Chris

    1989-01-01

    The results of an extensive imaging and spectroscopic follow-up of the objective prism-selected emission line galaxy (ELG) sample of Wasilewski (1982) are presented. Fluxes at 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns were also obtained from the coadded IRAS survey data. ELGs found by objective prism surveys are found to be generally small and underluminous galaxies which usually have higher than average optical surface brightness. The Seyfert detection rate in objective prism surveys is roughly 10 percent and the ratio of the space densities of Seyfert 2 to Seyfert 1 galaxies is significantly larger than unity. Most of the galaxies selected by objective prism surveys are star-forming, late-type spirals which often show disturbed morphology. About 25 percent of the galaxies detected by the surveys are faint, high-excitation metal-poor compact H II regions.

  9. BREAKS IN THIN AND THICK DISKS OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES IMAGED IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Comeron, Sebastien; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Laine, Jarkko; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Hinz, Joannah L.; Regan, Michael W.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C.; Mizusawa, Trisha; Holwerda, Benne

    2012-11-10

    Breaks in the radial luminosity profiles of galaxies have until now been mostly studied averaged over disks. Here, we study separately breaks in thin and thick disks in 70 edge-on galaxies using imaging from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We built luminosity profiles of the thin and thick disks parallel to midplanes and we found that thin disks often truncate (77%). Thick disks truncate less often (31%), but when they do, their break radius is comparable with that in the thin disk. This suggests either two different truncation mechanisms-one of dynamical origin affecting both disks simultaneously and another one only affecting the thin disk-or a single mechanism that creates a truncation in one disk or in both depending on some galaxy property. Thin disks apparently antitruncate in around 40% of galaxies. However, in many cases, these antitruncations are an artifact caused by the superposition of a thin disk and a thick disk, with the latter having a longer scale length. We estimate the real thin disk antitruncation fraction to be less than 15%. We found that the ratio of the thick and thin stellar disk mass is roughly constant (0.2 < M{sub T} /M{sub t} < 0.7) for circular velocities v{sub c} > 120 km s{sup -1}, but becomes much larger at smaller velocities. We hypothesize that this is due to a combination of a high efficiency of supernova feedback and a slower dynamical evolution in lower-mass galaxies causing stellar thin disks to be younger and less massive than in higher-mass galaxies.

  10. Narrowband Lyman-continuum imaging of galaxies at z ∼ 2.85

    SciTech Connect

    Mostardi, R. E.; Shapley, A. E.; Nestor, D. B.; Steidel, C. C.; Trainor, R. F.; Reddy, N. A.

    2013-12-10

    We present results from a survey for z ∼ 2.85 Lyman-continuum (LyC) emission in the HS1549+1933 field and place constraints on the amount of ionizing radiation escaping from star-forming galaxies. Using a custom narrowband filter (NB3420) tuned to wavelengths just below the Lyman limit at z ≥ 2.82, we probe the LyC spectral region of 49 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and 91 Lyα emitters (LAEs) spectroscopically confirmed at z ≥ 2.82. Four LBGs and seven LAEs are detected in NB3420. Using V-band data probing the rest-frame nonionizing UV, we observe that many NB3420-detected galaxies exhibit spatial offsets between their LyC and nonionizing UV emission and are characterized by extremely blue NB3420–V colors, corresponding to low ratios of nonionizing to ionizing radiation (F {sub UV}/F {sub LyC}) that are in tension with current stellar population synthesis models. We measure average values of (F {sub UV}/F {sub LyC}) for our LBG and LAE samples, correcting for foreground galaxy contamination and H I absorption in the intergalactic medium. We find (F{sub UV}/F{sub LyC}){sub corr}{sup LBG}=82±45 and (F{sub UV}/F{sub LyC}){sub corr}{sup LAE}=7.4±3.6. These flux density ratios correspond, respectively, to relative LyC escape fractions of f{sub esc,} {sub rel}{sup LBG}=5%--8% and f{sub esc,} {sub rel}{sup LAE}=18%--49%, absolute LyC escape fractions of f{sub esc}{sup LBG}=1%--2% and f{sub esc}{sup LAE}=5%--15%, and a comoving LyC emissivity from star-forming galaxies of 8.8-15.0 × 10{sup 24} erg s{sup –1} Hz{sup –1} Mpc{sup –3}. In order to study the differential properties of galaxies with and without LyC detections, we analyze narrowband Lyα imaging and rest-frame near-infrared imaging, finding that while LAEs with LyC detections have lower Lyα equivalent widths on average, there is no substantial difference in the rest-frame near-infrared colors of LBGs or LAEs with and without LyC detections. These preliminary results are consistent with an

  11. NASA Galaxy Mission Celebrates Sixth Anniversary

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-28

    NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer Mission celebrates its sixth anniversary studying galaxies beyond our Milky Way through its sensitive ultraviolet telescope, the only such far-ultraviolet detector in space. Pictured here, the galaxy NGC598 known as M33. The mission studies the shape, brightness, size and distance of distant galaxies across 10 billion years of cosmic history, giving scientists a wealth of data to help us better understand the origins of the universe. One such object is pictured here, the galaxy NGC598, more commonly known as M33. This image is a blend of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's M33 image and another taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. M33, one of our closest galactic neighbors, is about 2.9 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum, part of what's known as our Local Group of galaxies. Together, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Spitzer can see a broad spectrum of sky. Spitzer, for example, can detect mid-infrared radiation from dust that has absorbed young stars' ultraviolet light. That's something the Galaxy Evolution Explorer cannot see. This combined image shows in amazing detail the beautiful and complicated interlacing of the heated dust and young stars. In some regions of M33, dust gathers where there is very little far-ultraviolet light, suggesting that the young stars are obscured or that stars farther away are heating the dust. In some of the outer regions of the galaxy, just the opposite is true: There are plenty of young stars and very little dust. Far-ultraviolet light from young stars glimmers blue, near-ultraviolet light from intermediate age stars glows green, and dust rich in organic molecules burns red. This image is a 3-band composite including far infrared as red. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11998

  12. Highly absorbing gadolinium test device to characterize the performance of neutron imaging detector systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenzweig, C.; Frei, G.; Lehmann, E.; Kuehne, G.; David, C.

    2007-05-15

    We report on the fabrication and application of a novel neutron imaging test device made of gadolinium. It is designed for a real time evaluation of the spatial resolution, resolution direction, and distortions of a neutron imaging detector system. Measurements of the spatial resolution of {sup 6}LiF doped ZnS scintillator screens with different thicknesses and of imaging plates were performed. The obtained results are in good agreement with comparison measurements using the standard knife edge detection method.

  13. Detection of ultraviolet halos around highly inclined galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Bregman, Joel N.

    2014-07-10

    We report the discovery of diffuse ultraviolet light around late-type galaxies out to 5-20 kpc from the midplane using Swift and GALEX images. The emission is consistent with the stellar outskirts in the early-type galaxies but not in the late-type galaxies, where the emission is quite blue and consistent with a reflection nebula powered by light escaping from the galaxy and scattering off dust in the halo. Our results agree with expectations from halo dust discovered in extinction by Ménard et al. to within a few kpc of the disk and imply a comparable amount of hot and cold gas in galaxy halos (a few× 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉} within 20 kpc) if the dust resides primarily in Mg II absorbers. The results also highlight the potential of UV photometry to study individual galaxy halos.

  14. An Exploration of Dusty Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Submillimeter galaxies i.e., galaxies that we detect in the submillimeter wavelength range are mysterious creatures. Its only within the last couple decades that weve had telescope technology capable of observing them, and were only now getting to the point where angular resolution limits allow us to examine them closely. A new study has taken advantage of new capabilities to explore the properties of a sample of 52 of thesegalaxies.Dusty Star FormationSubmillimeter galaxies are generally observed in the early universe. Though theyre faint in other wavebands, theyre extremely luminous in infrared and submillimeter their infrared luminosities are typically trillions of times the Suns luminosity. This is thought to be because these galaxies are very actively forming stars at rates of hundreds of times that of the Milky Way!Example 10 10 true-color images of ten submillimeter galaxies in the authors ALMA-identified sample. [Simpson et al. 2017]Submillimeter galaxies are also extremely dusty, so we dont see their star formation directly in optical wavelengths. Instead, we see the stellar light after its been absorbed and reemitted by interstellar dust lanes were indirectly observing heavily obscured star formation.Why look for submillimeter galaxies? Studying them can help us to learn about galaxy and star formation early in our universes history, and help us to understand how the universe has evolved into what we see locally today.Submillimeter StrugglesDue to angular resolution limitations in the past, we often couldnt pin down the exact locations of submillimeter galaxies, preventing us from examining them properly. But now a team of scientists has used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array (ALMA) to precisely locate 52 submillimeter galaxies identified by the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA-2) in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field.The precise locations made possible by ALMA allowed the team led by James Simpson (University of Edinburgh

  15. An Atlas of Hubble Space Telescope Spectra and Images of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. A.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Axon, D.; Scarlata, C.; Atkinson, J.; Batcheldor, D.; Binney, J.; Capetti, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Dressel, L.; Gerssen, J.; Macchetto, D.; Maciejewski, W.; Marconi, A.; Merrifield, M.; Ruiz, M.; Sparks, W.; Stiavelli, M.; Tsvetanov, Z.; van der Marel, R.

    2003-08-01

    We have observed 54 nearby spiral galaxies with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain optical long-slit spectra of nuclear gas disks and STIS optical (~R band) images of the central 5''×5'' of the galaxies. These spectra are being used to determine the velocity field of nuclear disks and hence to detect the presence of central massive black holes. Here we present the spectra for the successful observations. Dust obscuration can be significant at optical wavelengths, and so we also combine the STIS images with archival Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer H-band images to produce color maps to investigate the morphology of gas and dust in the central regions. We find a great variety in the different morphologies, from smooth distributions to well-defined nuclear spirals and dust lanes. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  16. High near-infrared absorbing Cu5FeS4 nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Yi, Xuan; Li, Meifang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Shi, Quanliang; Yang, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Multifunctional nanomaterials have shown excellent and promising properties for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Herein, we have developed iron doped copper sulfide (Cu5FeS4) nanoparticles with a non-covalent polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating (Cu5FeS4-PEG) for tumor dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT). The obtained Cu5FeS4-PEG nanoparticles with high near-infrared absorbance could be used for phototoacoustic (PA) imaging and PTT, whereas Fe3+ doping offer the nanoparticles the additional property for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. As shown by PA imaging, Cu5FeS4-PEG exhibit a high tumor uptake (~10% ID g-1) after intravenous injection. In vitro and in vivo cancer treatment further confirm that Cu5FeS4-PEG could act as a novel therapeutic agent for PTT of cancer cells. Our study further promotes the potential applications of multifunctional nanomaterials in a range of tumor diagnoses and treatments.Multifunctional nanomaterials have shown excellent and promising properties for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Herein, we have developed iron doped copper sulfide (Cu5FeS4) nanoparticles with a non-covalent polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating (Cu5FeS4-PEG) for tumor dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT). The obtained Cu5FeS4-PEG nanoparticles with high near-infrared absorbance could be used for phototoacoustic (PA) imaging and PTT, whereas Fe3+ doping offer the nanoparticles the additional property for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. As shown by PA imaging, Cu5FeS4-PEG exhibit a high tumor uptake (~10% ID g-1) after intravenous injection. In vitro and in vivo cancer treatment further confirm that Cu5FeS4-PEG could act as a novel therapeutic agent for PTT of cancer cells. Our study further promotes the potential applications of multifunctional nanomaterials in a range of tumor diagnoses and treatments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04444a

  17. Probing the Interplay between AGN Outflows and their Host Galaxies: - Optical Integral Field Unit and Radio Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Prajval; Dopita, Michael; Kewley, Lisa; Davies, Rebecca; Scharwaechter, Julia; Sutherland, Ralph; Kharb, Preeti; Maithil, Jaya; Sundar, M. N.; Pavana, M.; Radhakrishnan, Vikram; Hampton, Elise; James, Bethan; Ho, I-Ting; Gupta, Maitrayee; Bhatt, Harish; Srivastava, Shweta; Banfield, Julie; Jin, Chichuan

    2015-08-01

    It is well-known that accreting supermassive black holes impact star-formation processes in their host galaxies in a significant way, perhaps contributing to the well-known but poorly understood scaling relationships of supermassive black holes. In this context we have undertaken a spectroscopic imaging survey and follow-up radio observations of a large sample of nearby active galaxies in order to investigate connections between their nuclear properties and the extended emission-line regions, star-formation regions and radio structures. We will present some results from the optical (WiFeS IFU on the Siding Spring 2.3m) and radio imaging from this investigation. The results place important constraints on models of the interplay between AGN outflows and their host galaxies, especially during the earlier phases of cosmic galaxy evolution, when stellar mass assembly and black hole growth both peak.

  18. Absorbed dose measurements for kV-cone beam computed tomography in image-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Kazunari; Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Tomiyama, Yuuki

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we develope a novel method to directly evaluate an absorbed dose-to-water for kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Absorbed doses for the kV-CBCT systems of the Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) and the Elekta X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI) were measured by a Farmer ionization chamber with a 60Co calibration factor. The chamber measurements were performed at the center and four peripheral points in body-type (30 cm diameter and 51 cm length) and head-type (16 cm diameter and 33 cm length) cylindrical water phantoms. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water by using a 60Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated beam quality conversion factor, kQ, for 60Co to kV-CBCT. The irradiation for OBI and XVI was performed with pelvis and head modes for the body- and the head-type phantoms, respectively. In addition, the dose distributions in the phantom for both kV-CBCT systems were calculated with MC method and were compared with measured values. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated at the center in the water phantom and compared with measured doses at four peripheral points. The measured absorbed doses at the center in the body-type phantom were 1.96 cGy for OBI and 0.83 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 2.36-2.90 cGy for OBI and 0.83-1.06 cGy for XVI. The doses for XVI were lower up to approximately one-third of those for OBI. Similarly, the measured doses at the center in the head-type phantom were 0.48 cGy for OBI and 0.21 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 0.26-0.66 cGy for OBI and 0.16-0.30 cGy for XVI. The calculated peripheral doses agreed within 3% in the pelvis mode and within 4% in the head mode with measured doses for both kV-CBCT systems. In addition, the absorbed dose determined in this study was approximately 4% lower than that in TG-61 but the absorbed dose by both methods was in agreement within their combined

  19. Astrophysics. Multiple images of a highly magnified supernova formed by an early-type cluster galaxy lens.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick L; Rodney, Steven A; Treu, Tommaso; Foley, Ryan J; Brammer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Kasper B; Zitrin, Adi; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Filippenko, Alexei V; Jha, Saurabh W; Riess, Adam G; Bradac, Marusa; Weiner, Benjamin J; Scolnic, Daniel; Malkan, Matthew A; von der Linden, Anja; Trenti, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Gavazzi, Raphael; Fontana, Adriano; Merten, Julian C; McCully, Curtis; Jones, Tucker; Postman, Marc; Dressler, Alan; Patel, Brandon; Cenko, S Bradley; Graham, Melissa L; Tucker, Bradley E

    2015-03-06

    In 1964, Refsdal hypothesized that a supernova whose light traversed multiple paths around a strong gravitational lens could be used to measure the rate of cosmic expansion. We report the discovery of such a system. In Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we have found four images of a single supernova forming an Einstein cross configuration around a redshift z = 0.54 elliptical galaxy in the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster. The cluster's gravitational potential also creates multiple images of the z = 1.49 spiral supernova host galaxy, and a future appearance of the supernova elsewhere in the cluster field is expected. The magnifications and staggered arrivals of the supernova images probe the cosmic expansion rate, as well as the distribution of matter in the galaxy and cluster lenses. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Dust-depletion sequences in damped Lyman-α absorbers. A unified picture from low-metallicity systems to the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cia, A.; Ledoux, C.; Mattsson, L.; Petitjean, P.; Srianand, R.; Gavignaud, I.; Jenkins, E. B.

    2016-12-01

    We study metal depletion due to dust in the interstellar medium (ISM) to infer the properties of dust grains and characterize the metal and dust content of galaxies down to low metallicity and intermediate redshift z. We provide metal column densities and abundances of a sample of 70 damped Lyman-α absorbers (DLAs) towards quasars, observed at high spectral resolution with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). This is the largest sample of phosphorus abundances measured in DLAs so far. We use literature measurements for Galactic clouds to cover the high-metallicity end. We discover tight (scatter ≲ 0.2 dex) correlations between [Zn/Fe] and the observed relative abundances from dust depletion. This implies that grain growth in the ISM is an important process of dust production. These sequences are continuous in [Zn/Fe] from dust-free to dusty DLAs, and to Galactic clouds, suggesting that the availability of refractory metals in the ISM is crucial for dust production, regardless of the star formation history. We observe [S/Zn] up to 0.25 dex in DLAs, which is broadly consistent with Galactic stellar abundances. Furthermore, we find a good agreement between the nucleosynthetic pattern of Galactic halo stars and our observations of the least dusty DLAs. This supports recent star formation in low-metallicity DLAs. The derived depletions of Zn, O, P, S, Si, Mg, Mn, Cr, and Fe correlate with [Zn/Fe], with steeper slopes for more refractory elements. P is mostly not affected by dust depletion. We present canonical depletion patterns to be used as reference in future studies of relative abundances and depletion. We derive the total (dust-corrected) metallicity, typically -2 ≲ [M/H] tot ≲ 0 for DLAs, and scattered around solar metallicity for the Galactic ISM. The dust-to-metal ratio (mathcal{{DTM}}) increases with metallicity, again supporting the importance of grain growth for dust production. The dust extinction AV

  1. The dark side of galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Smail, Ian

    2002-12-15

    I discuss the discovery of a population of extremely luminous, but very dusty and very distant, galaxies in the submillimetre (submm) waveband. Almost all the light emitted by the stars in these galaxies is absorbed by interstellar dust (which is produced by the same stars) and re-radiated in the far-infrared. This leaves little to be detected at optical wavelengths and results in most of these galaxies being effectively invisible in even the deepest optical images obtainable with the Hubble space telescope. Yet this population contributes most of the light emitted by galaxies at wavelengths of lambda > or approximately equal 100 microm over the lifetime of the Universe. Together with other observations, this suggests that perhaps up to half of all the stars seen in galaxies today were formed in very dusty regions in the early Universe. Hence, studying the galaxies detected in the submm wavebands is critical for developing and testing models of galaxy formation and evolution. Individually, these luminous submm galaxies are forming stars a thousand times faster than our Galaxy is at the present-day, sufficiently fast to form all the stars in the most luminous galaxy in the local Universe within a short period, up to ca. 0.1-1 Gyr. Detailed study of a handful of examples of this population confirm these estimates and unequivocally identify the bulk of this submm-selected population with dusty, star-burst galaxies in the very distant Universe. The extreme faintness of this population in the optical and near-infrared wavebands, resulting from their obscuration by dust, means that our understanding of the detailed nature of these galaxies is only slowly growing. I give a brief summary of the properties of these highly obscured systems and describe the wide range of facilities currently being developed that will greatly aid in their study.

  2. Seeing Galaxies through Thick and Thin. III. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Dust in Backlit Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, William C.; White, Raymond E., III

    2001-03-01

    We present analysis of Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging of two spiral galaxies partially backlit by elliptical or S0 systems in the pairs AM 1316-241 and AM 0500-620, as well as the (probably spiral) foreground system in NGC 1275. Images in B and I are used to determine the reddening curve of dust in these systems. The foreground spiral component of AM 1316-241 shows dust strongly concentrated in discrete arms, with a reddening law very close to the Milky Way mean [R=AV/E(B-V)=3.4+/-0.2]. The dust distribution is scale-free between about 100 pc and the arm dimension, about 8 kpc. The foreground spiral in AM 0500-620 shows dust concentrated in arms and interarm spurs, with measurable interarm extinction as well. In this case, although the dust properties are less well-determined than in AM 1316-241, we find evidence for a steeper extinction law than the Milky Way mean (formally, R~2.5+/-0.4, with substantial variation depending on data quality in each region). The shape of the reddening law suggests that at least in AM 1316-241 we have resolved most of the dust structure. In AM 0500-620 it is less clear that we have resolved most of the dust structure, since the errors are larger. In AM 0500-620, the slope of the perimeter-scale relation (associated with fractal analysis) steepens systematically when going from regions of low to high extinction. A perimeter-smoothing length test for scale-free (fractal) behavior in AM 1316-241 shows a logarithmic slope typically -0.4 on 100-1000 pc scales. However, we cannot determine a unique fractal dimension from the defining area-perimeter relation, so the projected dust distribution is best defined as fractal-like. For scales above 2-4 pixels (120-250 pc), the box-counting estimate yields a fractal dimension close to 1.4, but the perimeter-area relation yields a dimension of 0.7 on large scales and inconsistent results for small scales, so that the distribution shows only some aspects of a fractal nature. In neither galaxy

  3. Imaging of Early-Type Sa-Sab Spiral Galaxies. II. Global Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Salman; Devereux, Nick

    2005-06-01

    New results, based on one of the most comprehensive Hα imaging surveys of nearby Sa-Sab spirals completed to date, reveals early-type spirals to be a diverse group of galaxies that span a wide range in massive star formation rates. While the majority of Sa-Sab galaxies in our sample are forming stars at a modest rate, a significant fraction (~29%) exhibit star formation rates greater than 1 Msolar yr-1, rivaling the most prolifically star-forming late-type spirals. A similar diversity is apparent in the star formation history of Sa-Sab spirals as measured by their Hα equivalent widths. Consistent with our preliminary results presented in the first paper in this series, we find giant H II regions [L(Hα)>=1039 ergs s-1] in the disks of ~37% of early-type spirals. We suspect that recent minor mergers or past interactions are responsible for the elevated levels of Hα emission and, perhaps, for the presence of giant H II regions in these galaxies. Our results, however, are not in total agreement with the Hα study of Kennicutt & Kent, who did not find any early-type spirals with Hα equivalent widths >14 Å. A close examination of the morphological classification of galaxies, however, suggests that systematic differences between the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog and the Second Reference Catalogue may be responsible for the contrasting results. Based on observations obtained with the 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO) and the 0.9 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). The APO 3.5 m telescope is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  4. Understanding the Relations between QSOs and Their Host Galaxies from Combined HST Imaging and VLT Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letawe, Y.; Magain, P.; Letawe, G.; Courbin, F.; Hutsemékers, D.

    2008-06-01

    The host galaxies of six nearby QSOs are studied on the basis of high-resolution HST optical images and spatially resolved VLT slit spectra. The gas ionization and velocity are mapped as a function of the distance to the central QSO. In the majority of the cases, the QSO significantly contributes to the gas ionization in its whole host galaxy, and sometimes even outside. Reflection or scattering of the QSO Hα line from remote regions of the galaxy is detected in several instances. The line shifts show that, in all cases, the matter responsible for the light reflection moves away from the QSO, likely accelerated by its radiation pressure. The two faintest QSOs reside in spirals, with some signs of a past gravitational perturbation. One of the intermediate-luminosity QSOs resides in a massive elliptical containing gas ionized (and probably pushed away) by the QSO radiation. The other medium-power object is found in a spiral galaxy displaying complex velocity structure, with the central QSO moving with respect to the bulge, probably as a result of a galactic collision. The two most powerful objects are involved in violent gravitational interactions, and one of them has no detected host. These results suggest that (1) large-scale phenomena, such as galactic collisions, are closely related to the triggering and the feeding of the QSO and (2) once ignited, the QSO has significant influence on its large-scale neighborhood (often the whole host and sometimes further away). Based on observations made with the Nasa/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (Cycle 13 proposal 10238), and with ANTU/UT1 at ESO-Paranal observatory in Chile [programs 65.P-0361(A) and 66.B-0139(A)].

  5. The Space Density of Luminous Dusty Star-forming Galaxies at z > 4: SCUBA-2 and LABOCA Imaging of Ultrared Galaxies from Herschel-ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivison, R. J.; Lewis, A. J. R.; Weiss, A.; Arumugam, V.; Simpson, J. M.; Holland, W. S.; Maddox, S.; Dunne, L.; Valiante, E.; van der Werf, P.; Omont, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Smail, Ian; Bertoldi, F.; Bremer, M.; Bussmann, R. S.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Eales, S. A.; Fuller, C.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Ibar, E.; Negrello, M.; Oteo, I.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Riechers, D.; Stevens, J. A.; Swinbank, A. M.; Wardlow, J.

    2016-11-01

    Until recently, only a handful of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) were known at z > 4, most of them significantly amplified by gravitational lensing. Here, we have increased the number of such DSFGs substantially, selecting galaxies from the uniquely wide 250, 350, and 500 μm Herschel-ATLAS imaging survey on the basis of their extremely red far-infrared colors and faint 350 and 500 μm flux densities, based on which, they are expected to be largely unlensed, luminous, rare, and very distant. The addition of ground-based continuum photometry at longer wavelengths from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment allows us to identify the dust peak in their spectral energy distributions (SEDs), with which we can better constrain their redshifts. We select the SED templates that are best able to determine photometric redshifts using a sample of 69 high-redshift, lensed DSFGs, then perform checks to assess the impact of the CMB on our technique, and to quantify the systematic uncertainty associated with our photometric redshifts, σ = 0.14 (1 + z), using a sample of 25 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, each consistent with our color selection. For Herschel-selected ultrared galaxies with typical colors of S 500/S 250 ˜ 2.2 and S 500/S 350 ˜ 1.3 and flux densities, S 500 ˜ 50 mJy, we determine a median redshift, {\\hat{z}}{phot}=3.66, an interquartile redshift range, 3.30-4.27, with a median rest-frame 8-1000 μm luminosity, {\\hat{L}}{IR}, of 1.3 × 1013 L ⊙. A third of the galaxies lie at z > 4, suggesting a space density, ρ z > 4, of ≈6 × 10-7 Mpc-3. Our sample contains the most luminous known star-forming galaxies, and the most overdense cluster of starbursting proto-ellipticals found to date.

  6. Assessment of capabilities of multiangle imaging photo-polarimetry for atmospheric correction in presence of absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Seidel, F. C.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color is a critical tool for assessing the productivity of marine ecosystems and monitoring changes resulting from climatic or environmental influences. Yet water-leaving radiance comprises less than 10% of the signal measured from space, making correction for absorption and scattering by the intervening atmosphere imperative. Traditional ocean color retrieval algorithms utilize a standard set of aerosol models and the assumption of negligible water-leaving radiance in the near-infrared. Modern improvements have been developed to handle absorbing aerosols such as urban particulates in coastal areas and transported desert dust over the open ocean, where ocean fertilization can impact biological productivity at the base of the marine food chain. Even so, imperfect knowledge of the absorbing aerosol optical properties or their height distribution results in well-documented sources of error. In the UV, the problem of UV-enhanced absorption and nonsphericity of certain aerosol types are amplified due to the increased Rayleigh and aerosol optical depth, especially at off-nadir view angles. Multi-angle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool to better understand and retrieve the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of the work to be described is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on water leaving radiance measurement uncertainty by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard

  7. A dosimetric evaluation of tissue equivalent phantom prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin for absorbed dose imaging in Gamma knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Rodrigues, O., Jr.; Cervantes, J. H.; Rabbani, S. R.; Campos, L. L.

    2009-05-01

    Tissue equivalent gel phantoms have been widely studied in radiation therapy for both relative and reference dosimetry. A Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) spherical phantom was evaluated by means of magnetic resonance image method (MRI) to measure absorbed dose distribution resulted from gamma knife irradiation. The FXG phantom was prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin. The gelatin is a tissue equivalent material, of easy preparation, can be used to mold phantoms into different shapes and volumes, is commercially available and inexpensive. The results show that the Fricke gel phantom prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin satisfy the requirements to be used for the quality control in stereotactic radiosurgery using Gamma Knife technique and may constitute one more option of dosimeter in radiation therapy applications.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy structural parameters from 3.6um images (Kim+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Gadotti, D. A.; Sheth, K.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Lee, M. G.; Madore, B. F.; Elmegreen, B.; Knapen, J. H.; Zaritsky, D.; Ho, L. C.; Comeron, S.; Holwerda, B.; Hinz, J. L.; Munoz-Mateos, J.-C.; Cisternas, M.; Erroz-Ferrer, S.; Buta, R.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Laine, J.; Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Regan, M. W.; de Swardt, B.; Gil de Paz, A.; Seibert, M.; Mizusawa, T.

    2016-03-01

    We select our samples from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G; Sheth et al. 2010, cat. J/PASP/122/1397). We chose galaxies that had already been processed by the first three S4G pipelines (Pipelines 1, 2, and 3; Sheth et al. 2010, cat. J/PASP/122/1397) at the moment of this study (2011 November). In brief, Pipeline processes images and provides science-ready images. Pipeline 2 prepares mask images (to exclude foreground and background objects) for further analysis, and Pipeline 3 derives surface brightness profiles and total magnitudes using IRAF ellipse fits. We excluded highly inclined (b/a<0.5), significantly disturbed, very faint, or irregular galaxies. Galaxies were also discarded if their images are unsuitable for decomposition due to contamination such as a bright foreground star or significant stray light from stars in the IRAC scattering zones. Then we chose barred galaxies from all Hubble types from S0 to Sdm using the numerical Hubble types from Hyperleda (Paturel et al. 2003, cat. VII/237, VII/238). The assessment of the presence of a bar was done visually by K. Sheth, T. Kim, and B. de Swardt. Later, we also confirmed the presence of a bar by checking the mid-infrared classification (Buta et al. 2010, cat. J/ApJS/190/147; Buta et al. 2015, cat. J/ApJS/217/32). A total of 144 barred galaxies were selected that satisfy our criteria, and we list our sample in Table1 with basic information. Table2 presents the measures of structural parameters for all galaxies in the sample obtained from the 2D model fit with BUDDA (BUlge/disk Decomposition Analysis, de Souza et al., 2004ApJS..153..411D; Gadotti, 2008MNRAS.384..420G) code. (2 data files).

  9. Polarimetric imaging of the polar ring galaxy NGC 660 - evidence for dust outside the stellar disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, P. B.; Stockdale, D. P.; Scarrott, S. M.; Wolstencroft, R. D.

    2000-05-01

    Optical imaging polarimetry has been carried out for the polar ring, starburst galaxy NGC 660. This galaxy has a highly inclined, severely tidally-disturbed disk which is surrounded by a gas-rich, polar ring. We detect scattered light from a large part of the halo and this is attributable to dust grains residing up to =~ 2.5 kpc from the stellar disk. There is evidence from emission-line imaging carried out in the past, that NGC 660 is host to an energetic outflow of hot gas along the minor axis (a `superwind'). Our results indicate that dust grains are entrained in this same outflow. Polarization due to scattering, however, is also present at positions away from the minor axis suggesting that grains may also be displaced from the stellar disk by tidal forces exerted during galactic collisions. Where the polar ring occludes the stellar disk we observe polarization due to magnetically aligned, dichroic grains. By comparing the recorded polarization with the associated optical extinction we infer that the magnetic field in the ring has a lower (but still comparable) strength to the magnetic field in the Milky Way. We also derive a dust-to-gas ratio for the ring and this is about a factor of 2-3 lower than in the solar neighbourhood (but close to the value measured in some nearby spirals). If the ring comprises the remnants of the `interloper' which collided with NGC 660, we expect that the ruptured galaxy was a massive, metal-rich spiral.

  10. Near-infrared absorbing polymer nano-particle as a sensitive contrast agent for photo-acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hiroyuki; Nojiri, Mayumi; Mukai, Rieko; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2015-01-07

    Polymer nano-particles (PNPs) with a near-infrared (NIR) light absorption were prepared by the nano-emulsion method to develop contrast agents for photo-acoustic (PA) imaging. The PNP containing silicon naphthalocyanine showed a high absorption coefficient up to 10(10) M(-1) cm(-1). This is comparable to plasmonic gold nano-particles, which have been studied as PA contrast agents. For the PNP larger than 100 nm, the enhancement of the PA signal was observed compared to the gold nano-particle with a similar absorption coefficient and size. In the case of the PNP, the heat by the light absorption is confined in the particle due to the low thermal diffusivity of polymer materials. We showed that the strong thermal confinement effect of PNP results in the enhancement of the efficiency of the PA signal generation and that the PA intensity can be enhanced by the increase of the Grüneisen parameter of the matrix polymer of PNP. The PA signal from the PNP of poly(methyl methacrylate) was 9-fold larger than that of gold nano-particles with the same absorption coefficient. We demonstrated that in the in vivo PA imaging the detection limit of PNP was of the order of 10(-13) M. The NIR absorbing PNP will be a promising candidate of a sensitive contrast agent for PA imaging.

  11. Optical imaging and spectral study of FR-I type radio galaxy: CTD 086 (B2 1422+26B)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sheetal K.; Navale, N. R.; Pandey, S. K.; Pandge, M. B.

    2017-09-01

    We present optical imaging and spectroscopic studies of the Fanaroff & Riley class I (FR I) radio galaxy CTD 086 based on Hubble Space Telescope ( HST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey ( SDSS) observations. We use isophote shape analysis to show that there is no stellar disk component within CTD 086 and further that the morphological class of the galaxy is most likely E2. Optical spectroscopy of this galaxy reveals the presence of narrow emission lines only, and thus it qualifies to be termed as a narrow-line radio galaxy (type 2 AGN). We also extract stellar kinematics from the absorption-line spectra of CTD 086 using Penalized Pixel-Fitting method and derive the black hole mass M_{BH} to be equal to (8.8±2.4)×107 {M⊙}.

  12. Adaptive optics imaging of QSO host galaxies with Hokupa'a on the Gemini North telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, O.; Sanders, D. B.; Stockton, A.; Baudoz, P.; Potter, D.

    2001-05-01

    We report the initial results of a new near-infrared imaging survey of quasar hosts using the University of Hawaii Hokupa'a Adaptive Optics system on the 8.2m Gemini-North telescope. J,H,K' images of a complete subsample ( 25) of nearby (z <0.3), "bona-fide" optically selected (MB < -23; Ho = 50, qo=0; Schmidt & Green 1983) QSOs are being taken in order to obtain accurate host galaxy magnitudes and colors and to determine two-dimensional structure. In the initial phase of our observations we found that PSF subtraction residuals were severely limiting our ability to characterize the host galaxy. However we were able to obtain a significant increase in stability of the PSF by turning off the Cassegrain rotator during observations (see Roth et al. contribution at this meeting). Our sample of Palomar-Green Bright QSOs includes both radio quiet and radio loud objects plus objects spanning the full range of observed "infrared excess" continuum emission. One of the most surprising results has been the detection of modest scale (3-5" 5 kpc diameter) "bars" and/or circumnuclear "disks" that were not evident in previous one-dimensional profile analyses. These structures may be related to the reservoir of fuel needed to power the QSO and may provide important clues concerning the origin and evolution of QSO hosts.

  13. High-resolution X-ray imaging of the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Schulman, Eric; Tomisaka, Kohji

    1995-01-01

    Starburst galaxies are predicted to drive hot flows of gas from their central star-forming regions, and to test this expectation, a deep X-ray image was obtained of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 with the High-Resolution Imager (HRI) on the X-ray telescope ROSAT. Aside from three nuclear point sources, the flux is dominated by diffuse emission that we decompose into components along the disk and along the minor axis. The X-ray surface brightness of the disk component decreases exponentially with a scale length of 0.27 kpc, as does the optical line emission from warm ionized gas. This is not due to steady outflow of gas along the plane, but may indicate a rapid decrease in the star formation and energy input rate beyond the nuclear region. The X-ray emission along the minor axis is consistent with the outflow of gas in a jet that is partially confined within 1.6 kpc of the nucleus and expands freely at larger radii; this emission is detected to a distance of 6 kpc. In the center of M82, the hot gas density is 0.2-0.5/cu cm and the central gas pressure is P/k approximately = 0.3-3 x 10(exp 7) K/cu cm, which is similar to estimates of the pressure in the optical emission-line material and molecular gas.

  14. Imaging of Absorbed Dose in Radiotherapy by a Polymer Gel Dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanossi, E.; Gambarini, G.; Carrara, M.; Mariani, M.; Negri, A.

    2008-06-01

    Optical imaging of polymer gel dosimeters in form of layers was investigated to enquire their reliability for in-phantom dose measurements in photon or thermal neutron fields. The obtained dose measurements were compared with those achieved by means of Fricke gel dosimeters. Reliability of Fricke gel dosimeters was confirmed, whereas it has been shown that a conspicuous improvement of the adopted polymer gel dosimeters is necessary.

  15. High-resolution Imaging of PHIBSS z ˜ 2 Main-sequence Galaxies in CO J = 1 → 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolatto, A. D.; Warren, S. R.; Leroy, A. K.; Tacconi, L. J.; Bouché, N.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Cooper, M. C.; Fisher, D. B.; Combes, F.; García-Burillo, S.; Burkert, A.; Bournaud, F.; Weiss, A.; Saintonge, A.; Wuyts, S.; Sternberg, A.

    2015-08-01

    We present Karl Jansky Very Large Array observations of the CO J=1-0 transition in a sample of four z˜ 2 main-sequence galaxies. These galaxies are in the blue sequence of star-forming galaxies at their redshift, and are part of the IRAM Plateau de Bure HIgh-z Blue Sequence Survey which imaged them in CO J=3-2. Two galaxies are imaged here at high signal-to-noise, allowing determinations of their disk sizes, line profiles, molecular surface densities, and excitation. Using these and published measurements, we show that the CO and optical disks have similar sizes in main-sequence galaxies, and in the galaxy where we can compare CO J=1-0 and J=3-2 sizes we find these are also very similar. Assuming a Galactic CO-to-H2 conversion, we measure surface densities of {{{Σ }}}{mol}˜ 1200 {M}⊙ pc-2 in projection and estimate {{{Σ }}}{mol}˜ 500-900 {M}⊙ pc-2 deprojected. Finally, our data yields velocity-integrated Rayleigh-Jeans brightness temperature line ratios r31 that are approximately at unity. In addition to the similar disk sizes, the very similar line profiles in J=1-0 and J=3-2 indicate that both transitions sample the same kinematics, implying that their emission is coextensive. We conclude that in these two main-sequence galaxies there is no evidence for significant excitation gradients or a large molecular reservoir that is diffuse or cold and not involved in active star formation. We suggest that r31 in very actively star-forming galaxies is likely an indicator of how well-mixed the star formation activity and the molecular reservoir are.

  16. SpIOMM and SITELLE: Wide-field Imaging FTS for the Study of Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissen, Laurent; Bernier, Anne-Pier; Robert, Carmelle; Robert

    2011-12-01

    SpIOMM, a wide-field Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer attached to the Mont Mégantic 1.6-m telescope, is capable of obtaining the visible spectrum of every source of light in a 12 arcminute field of view, with a spectral resolution ranging from R = 1 (wide-band image) to R = 25 000, resulting in 1.7 million spectra with a spatial resolution of one arcsecond. SITELLE will be a similar instrument attached to the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, and will be in operation in early 2013. We present a short description of these instruments and illustrate their capabilities to study nearby galaxies with the results of a data cube of M51.

  17. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope observations of the ScI galaxy NGC 628 (M74)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Cornett, Robert H.; Roberts, Morton S.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Neff, Susan G.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Parise, Ronald A.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1992-01-01

    Ultraviolet images of NGC 628 at 1520 and 2490 A show that the nucleus has an oblong appearance and that the arms and disk exhibit features not seen in blue or H-alpha images. Aperture photometry of the nucleus gives results that are compatible with observations in other bandpasses and with models. The spiral arms appear more symmetrical in the UV than in other colors; in particular, two gaps are seen on either side of the nucleus. Combined UV and radio data appear to support a large-scale collective phenomenon, perhaps a quasi-static spiral structure mechanism, as being the dominant mode of spiral formation in this galaxy. We report the detection of a low surface brightness object at a distance of 7.6 arcmin southwest of the nucleus.

  18. Getting to Know the Neighbors: Deep Imaging of the Andromeda Satellite Dwarf Galaxy Cassiopeia III with WIYN pODI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Madison; Rhode, Katherine L.; Janowiecki, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We present results from WIYN pODI imaging of Cassiopeia III/Andromeda XXXII (Cas III/And XXXII), an Andromeda satellite dwarf galaxy recently discovered by Martin et al. (2013) in Pan-STARRS1 survey data. Detailed studies of satellite dwarf galaxies in the Local Group and its environs provide important insight into how low-mass galaxies form and evolve as well as how more massive galaxies are assembled in a hierarchical universe. The goal of this project is to obtain deep, wide-field photometry of Cas III in order to study its stellar population in more detail. The images used for this analysis were taken in October 2013 with the 24' x 24' pODI camera on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope in the SDSS g and i filters. Calibrated photometry was performed on all point sources in the g and i images and then used to quantify the radial distribution of stars in Cas III and to construct a color-magnitude diagram (CMD). We present this CMD along with a map of the resolved stellar population and measurements of the galaxy magnitude and structural properties. This research was supported by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates program (grant number AST-1358980).

  19. Hα3: an Hα imaging survey of HI selected galaxies from ALFALFA . V. The Coma supercluster survey completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Consolandi, Guido; Viscardi, Elisa; Fossati, Matteo; Savorgnan, Giulia; Fumagalli, Michele; Gutierrez, Leonel; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; Boselli, Alessandro; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2015-04-01

    Neutral hydrogen represents the major observable baryonic constituent of galaxies that fuels the formation of stars through transformation of molecular hydrogen. The emission of the hydrogen recombination line Hα is the most direct tracer of the process that transforms gas (fuel) into stars. We continue to present Hα3 (acronym for Hα - αα), an extensive Hα+[NII] narrow-band imaging campaign of galaxies selected from the HI Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA), using the instrumentation available at the San Pedro Martir (SPM) observatory (Mexico). In 48 nights since 2011 we were able to carry out the Hα imaging observations of 724 galaxies in the region of the Coma supercluster 10h < RA < 16h ; 24° < Dec < 28° and 3900 galaxies belonging to different environments (cluster vs. filaments), morphological types (spirals vs. dwarf Irr), over a wide range of stellar mass (~ 108 - 1011.5M⊙) in the Coma supercluster. The present Paper V provides Hα data and derived star formation rates for the observed galaxies. The data available for the 724 galaxies are given in three tables, which are partially listed in the Appendix. The full tables, the Atlas, and the FITS images of the 724 targeted galaxies are distributed via http://goldmine.mib.infn.it/ (Gavazzi et al. 2003, 2014) under the section project/papers.

  20. The DART Imaging And CaT Survey of the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Giuseppina; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M.J.; Letarte, B.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Venn, K.A.; Shetrone, M.D.; Arimoto, N.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Francois, P.; Szeifert, T.; Abel, T.; Sadakane, K.; /Osaka Kyoiku U.

    2006-08-28

    As part of the DART project we have used the ESO/2.2m Wide Field Imager in conjunction with the VLT/FLAMES* GIRAFFE spectrograph to study the detailed properties of the resolved stellar population of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy out to and beyond its tidal radius. Fornax dSph has had a complicated evolution and contains significant numbers of young, intermediate age and old stars. We investigate the relation between these different components by studying their photometric, kinematic and abundance distributions. We re-derived the structural parameters of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal using our wide field imaging covering the galaxy out to its tidal radius, and analyzed the spatial distribution of the Fornax stars of different ages as selected from Colour-Magnitude Diagram analysis. We have obtained accurate velocities and metallicities from spectra in the Ca II triplet wavelength region for 562 Red Giant Branch stars which have velocities consistent with membership in Fornax dwarf spheroidal. We have found evidence for the presence of at least three distinct stellar components: a young population (few 100 Myr old) concentrated in the center of the galaxy, visible as a Main Sequence in the Colour-Magnitude Diagram; an intermediate age population (2-8 Gyr old); and an ancient population (> 10Gyr), which are distinguishable from each other kinematically, from the metallicity distribution and in the spatial distribution of stars found in the Colour-Magnitude Diagram. From our spectroscopic analysis we find that the ''metal rich'' stars ([Fe/H] > -1.3) show a less extended and more concentrated spatial distribution, and display a colder kinematics than the ''metal poor'' stars ([Fe/H] < -1.3). There is tentative evidence that the ancient stellar population in the center of Fornax does not exhibit equilibrium kinematics. This could be a sign of a relatively recent accretion of external material, such as the merger of another galaxy or other means of gas accretion at

  1. WINGS: a WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey. I. Optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, G.; Marmo, C.; Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moles, M.; Pignatelli, E.; Bettoni, D.; Kjærgaard, P.; Rizzi, L.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first paper of a series that will present data and scientific results from the WINGS project, a wide-field, multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic survey of galaxies in 77 nearby clusters. The sample was extracted from the ROSAT catalogs of X-Ray emitting clusters, with constraints on the redshift (0.04< z<0.07) and distance from the galactic plane ({\\vert}b{\\vert}≥ 20 deg). The global goal of the WINGS project is the systematic study of the local cosmic variance of the cluster population and of the properties of cluster galaxies as a function of cluster properties and local environment. This data collection will allow the definition of a local, "zero-point" reference against which to gauge the cosmic evolution when compared to more distant clusters. The core of the project consists of wide-field optical imaging of the selected clusters in the B and V bands. We have also completed a multi-fiber, medium-resolution spectroscopic survey for 51 of the clusters in the master sample. The imaging and spectroscopy data were collected using, respectively, the WFC@INT and WYFFOS@WHT in the northern hemisphere, and the WFI@MPG and 2dF@AAT in the southern hemisphere. In addition, a NIR (J, K) survey of ˜50 clusters and an Hα+U survey of some 10 clusters are presently ongoing with the WFCAM@UKIRT and WFC@INT, respectively, while a very-wide-field optical survey has also been programmed with OmegaCam@VST. In this paper we briefly outline the global objectives and the main characteristics of the WINGS project. Moreover, the observing strategy and the data reduction of the optical imaging survey (WINGS-OPT) are presented. We have achieved a photometric accuracy of ˜0.025 mag, reaching completeness to V˜ 23.5. Field size and resolution (FWHM) span the absolute intervals (1.6-2.7) Mpc and (0.7-1.7) kpc, respectively, depending on the redshift and on the seeing. This allows the planned studies to obtain a valuable description of the local properties of clusters

  2. Calibration of HST wide field camera for quantitative analysis of faint galaxy images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Casertano, Stefano; Neuschaefer, Lyman W.; Wyckoff, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    We present the methods adopted to optimize the calibration of images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera (WFC) (1991-1993). Our main goal is to improve quantitative measurement of faint images, with special emphasis on the faint (I approximately 20-24 mag) stars and galaxies observed as a part of the Medium-Deep Survey. Several modifications to the standard calibration procedures have been introduced, including improved bias and dark images, and a new supersky flatfield obtained by combining a large number of relatively object-free Medium-Deep Survey exposures of random fields. The supersky flat has a pixel-to-pixel rms error of about 2.0% in F555W and of 2.4% in F785LP; large-scale variations are smaller than 1% rms. Overall, our modifications improve the quality of faint images with respect to the standard calibration by about a factor of five in photometric accuracy and about 0.3 mag in sensitivity, corresponding to about a factor of two in observing time. The relevant calibration images have been made available to the scientific community.

  3. Calibration of HST wide field camera for quantitative analysis of faint galaxy images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Casertano, Stefano; Neuschaefer, Lyman W.; Wyckoff, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    We present the methods adopted to optimize the calibration of images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera (WFC) (1991-1993). Our main goal is to improve quantitative measurement of faint images, with special emphasis on the faint (I approximately 20-24 mag) stars and galaxies observed as a part of the Medium-Deep Survey. Several modifications to the standard calibration procedures have been introduced, including improved bias and dark images, and a new supersky flatfield obtained by combining a large number of relatively object-free Medium-Deep Survey exposures of random fields. The supersky flat has a pixel-to-pixel rms error of about 2.0% in F555W and of 2.4% in F785LP; large-scale variations are smaller than 1% rms. Overall, our modifications improve the quality of faint images with respect to the standard calibration by about a factor of five in photometric accuracy and about 0.3 mag in sensitivity, corresponding to about a factor of two in observing time. The relevant calibration images have been made available to the scientific community.

  4. The SLUGGS Survey: stellar masses and effective radii of early-type galaxies from Spitzer Space Telescope 3.6 μm imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Sinpetru, Luciana; Savorgnan, Giulia; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Usher, Christopher; Brodie, Jean

    2017-02-01

    Galaxy starlight at 3.6 μm is an excellent tracer of stellar mass. Here we use the latest 3.6 μm imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure the total stellar mass and effective radii in a homogeneous way for a sample of galaxies from the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey. These galaxies are representative of nearby early-type galaxies in the stellar mass range of 10 < log M*/M⊙ < 11.7 and our methodology can be applied to other samples of early-type galaxies. We model each galaxy in 2D and estimate its total asymptotic magnitude from a 1D curve-of-growth. Magnitudes are converted into stellar masses using a 3.6 μm mass-to-light ratio from the latest stellar population models of Röck et al., assuming a Kroupa initial mass function. We apply a ratio based on each galaxy's mean mass-weighted stellar age within one effective radius (the mass-to-light ratio is insensitive to galaxy metallicity for the generally old stellar ages and high metallicities found in massive early-type galaxies). Our 3.6 μm stellar masses agree well with masses derived from 2.2 μm data. From the 1D surface brightness profile, we fit a single Sérsic law, excluding the very central regions. We measure the effective radius, Sérsic n parameter and effective surface brightness for each galaxy. We find that galaxy sizes derived from shallow optical imaging and the 2MASS survey tend to underestimate the true size of the largest, most massive galaxies in our sample. We adopt the 3.6 μm stellar masses and effective radii for the SLUGGS survey galaxies.

  5. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, F. J. Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Mohr, J.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.

    2015-12-15

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  6. Gravitationally Lensed CO and Dust at High Redshift: New LMT/GTM Images and Spectra of Sub-Millimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenthal, J. D.; Harrington, K.; Berman, D.; Yun, M.; Cybulski, R.; Wilson, G. W.; Aretxaga, I.; Chavez, M.; de La Luz, V.; Erickson, N.; Ferrusca, D.; Gallup, A.; Hughes, D.; Montaña, A.; Narayanan, G.; Sánchez-Argüelles, D.; Schloerb, F. P.; Souccar, K.; Terlevich, E.; Terlevich, R.; Zeballos, M.; Zavala, J. A.

    2017-03-01

    We have assembled a new sample of some of the most FIR-luminous galaxies in the Universe and have imaged them in 1.1 mm dust emission and measured their redshifts 1 < z < 4 via CO emission lines using the 32-m Large Millimeter Telescope / Gran Telescopio Milimétrico (LMT/GTM). Our sample of 31 submm galaxies (SMGs), culled from the Planck and Herschel all-sky surveys, includes 14 of the 21 most luminous galaxies known, with LFIR > 1014 L ⊙ and SFR > 104M⊙/yr. These extreme inferred luminosities - and multiple / extended 1.1 mm images - imply that most or all are strongly gravitationally lensed, with typical magnification μ ~ 10 × . The gravitational lensing provides two significant benefits: (1) it boosts the S/N, and (2) it allows investigation of star formation and gas processes on sub-kpc scales.

  7. THE LYMAN ALPHA MORPHOLOGY OF LOCAL STARBURST GALAXIES: RELEASE OF CALIBRATED IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Oestlin, Goeran; Hayes, Matthew; Kunth, Daniel; Atek, Hakim; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Leitherer, Claus; Petrosian, Artashes E-mail: matthew.hayes@unige.ch

    2009-09-15

    We present reduced and calibrated high resolution Lyman-alpha (Ly{alpha}) images for a sample of six local star-forming galaxies. Targets were selected to represent a range in luminosity and metallicity and to include both known Ly{alpha} emitters and nonemitters. Far ultraviolet imaging was carried out with the Solar Blind Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the F122M (Ly{alpha} online) and F140LP (continuum) filters. The resulting Ly{alpha} images are the product of careful modeling of both the stellar and nebular continua, facilitated by supporting HST imaging at {lambda} {approx} 2200, 3300, 4400, 5500, H{alpha}, and 8000 A, combined with Starburst 99 evolutionary synthesis models, and prescriptions for dust extinction on the continuum. In all, the resulting morphologies in Ly{alpha}, H{alpha}, and UV continuum are qualitatively very different and we show that the bulk of Ly{alpha} emerges in a diffuse component resulting from resonant scattering events. Ly{alpha} escape fractions, computed from integrated H{alpha} luminosities and recombination theory, are found never to exceed 14%. Internal dust extinction is estimated in each pixel and used to correct Ly{alpha} fluxes. However, the extinction corrections are far too small (by factors from 2.6 to infinity) to reconcile the emerging global Ly{alpha} luminosities with standard recombination predictions. Surprisingly, when comparing the global equivalent widths of Ly{alpha} and H{alpha}, the two quantities appear to be anticorrelated, which may be due to the evolution of mechanical feedback from the starburst. This calls for caution in the interpretation of Ly{alpha} observations in terms of star formation rates. The images presented have a physical resolution 3 orders of magnitude better than attainable at high redshifts from the ground with current instrumentation and our images may therefore serve as useful templates for comparing with observations and modeling of

  8. Highest Redshift Image of Neutral Hydrogen in Emission: A CHILES Detection of a Starbursting Galaxy at z = 0.376

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ximena; Gim, Hansung B.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Yun, Min S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Popping, Attila; Chomiuk, Laura; Hess, Kelley M.; Hunt, Lucas; Kreckel, Kathryn; Lucero, Danielle; Maddox, Natasha; Oosterloo, Tom; Pisano, D. J.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Hales, Christopher A.; Chung, Aeree; Dodson, Richard; Golap, Kumar; Gross, Julia; Henning, Patricia; Hibbard, John; Jaffé, Yara L.; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Meyer, Martin; Sanchez-Barrantes, Monica; Schiminovich, David; Wicenec, Andreas; Wilcots, Eric; Bershady, Matthew; Scoville, Nick; Strader, Jay; Tremou, Evangelia; Salinas, Ricardo; Chávez, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Our current understanding of galaxy evolution still has many uncertainties associated with the details of the accretion, processing, and removal of gas across cosmic time. The next generation of radio telescopes will image the neutral hydrogen (H i) in galaxies over large volumes at high redshifts, which will provide key insights into these processes. We are conducting the COSMOS H i Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, which is the first survey to simultaneously observe H i from z = 0 to z ˜ 0.5. Here, we report the highest redshift H i 21 cm detection in emission to date of the luminous infrared galaxy COSMOS J100054.83+023126.2 at z = 0.376 with the first 178 hr of CHILES data. The total H i mass is (2.9 ± 1.0) × 1010 M ⊙ and the spatial distribution is asymmetric and extends beyond the galaxy. While optically the galaxy looks undisturbed, the H i distribution suggests an interaction with a candidate companion. In addition, we present follow-up Large Millimeter Telescope CO observations that show it is rich in molecular hydrogen, with a range of possible masses of (1.8-9.9) × 1010 M ⊙. This is the first study of the H i and CO in emission for a single galaxy beyond z ˜ 0.2.

  9. Young stars in nearby early-type galaxies: SED fitting based on ultraviolet (UV) and optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Bureau, Martin; Davies, Roger L.

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies from the Galaxy Evolution Explore (GALEX) ultraviolet (UV) data have demonstrated that the recent star formation is more common in early-type galaxies (ETGs) than we used to believe. The UV is one order of magnitude more sensitive than the optical to the presence of young stellar populations. The near-ultraviolet (NUV) lights of ETGs, especially, are used to reveal their residual star formation history. Here we used the GALEX UV data of 34 nearby early-type galaxies from the SAURON sample, all of which have optical data from MDM Observatory. At least 15% of the galaxies in this sample show blue UV-optical colours suggesting recent star formation (Jeong et al. 2009). These NUV blue galaxies are generally low velocity dispersion systems and change the slopes of scaling relations (colour-magnitude relations and fundamental planes) and increase the scatters. To quantify the amount of recent star formation in our sample, we assume two bursts of star formation, allowing us to constrain the age and mass fraction of the young component pixel by pixel (Jeong et al. 2007). The pixel-by-pixel SED fitting based on UV and optical imaging reveals that the mass fraction of young (< 1 Gyr old) stars in ETGs varies between 1 and 3% in the nearby universe (Jeong et al. in prep.). We will compare our results with the prediction from the hierarchical merger paradigm to understand the mechanism of low-level recent star formation observed in early-type galaxies.

  10. High Resolution Radio Imaging of the Merging Galaxies NGC3256 and NGC4194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Campion, S. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present new 6cm and 4cm radio continuum images of the central regions of the merging galaxy systems NGC3256 and NGC4194. NGC3256 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 1 in. or approx. 190pc; NGC4194 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 0.3 in. or approx. 50pc. In both systems, we detect numerous compact radio sources embedded in more diffuse radio emission. We detect 65 compact sources in NGC3256 at 6cm and we detect 46 compact sources in NGC4194, both to a limiting luminosity of approx. 5 x 10(exp 18) W/ Hz or approx. 5 times the luminosity of Cas A. Most of the compact radio sources are loosely associated with active star forming regions but not with specific optical emission sources. Several compact radio sources in NGC3256 are near positions of compact X-ray sources detected by Lira et al.. In both NGC3256 and NGC4194, we are able to measure reliable spectral indices for the stronger sources. We find in NGC3256 approx. 20% have nominally flat radio spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by thermal radio emission from HII regions) while approx. 80% have nominally steep spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by nonthermal emission from supernova remnants). In NGC4194, half the compact radio sources have flat spectral indices and half have steep indices. For the flat-spectrum sources, we estimate the number of young massive stars and the associated ionized gas masses. For the steep-spectrum sources, we estimate supernova rates. We compare these results with those from other well-studied merging galaxy systems. We gratefully acknowledge use of the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) and the VLA Archive. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  11. VLT/X-SHOOTER NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AND HST IMAGING OF GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED z ∼ 2 COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Geier, S.; Man, A. W. S.; Krühler, T.; Toft, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Richard, J.; Marchesini, D.

    2013-11-10

    Quiescent massive galaxies at z ∼ 2 are thought to be the progenitors of present-day massive ellipticals. Observations revealed them to be extraordinarily compact. Until now, the determination of stellar ages, star formation rates, and dust properties via spectroscopic measurements has been feasible only for the most luminous and massive specimens (∼3 × M*). Here we present a spectroscopic study of two near-infrared-selected galaxies that are close to the characteristic stellar mass M* (∼0.9 × M* and ∼1.3 × M*) and whose observed brightness has been boosted by the gravitational lensing effect. We measure the redshifts of the two galaxies to be z = 1.71 ± 0.02 and z = 2.15 ± 0.01. By fitting stellar population synthesis models to their spectrophotometric spectral energy distributions we determine their ages to be 2.4{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6} Gyr and 1.7 ± 0.3 Gyr, respectively, which implies that the two galaxies have higher mass-to-light ratios than most quiescent z ∼ 2 galaxies in other studies. We find no direct evidence for active star formation or active galactic nucleus activity in either of the two galaxies, based on the non-detection of emission lines. Based on the derived redshifts and stellar ages we estimate the formation redshifts to be z=4.3{sup +3.4}{sub -1.2} and z=4.3{sup +1.0}{sub -0.6}, respectively. We use the increased spatial resolution due to the gravitational lensing to derive constraints on the morphology. Fitting Sérsic profiles to the de-lensed images of the two galaxies confirms their compactness, with one of them being spheroid-like and the other providing the first confirmation of a passive lenticular galaxy at a spectroscopically derived redshift of z ∼ 2.

  12. Wide field imaging - I. Applications of neural networks to object detection and star/galaxy classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreon, S.; Gargiulo, G.; Longo, G.; Tagliaferri, R.; Capuano, N.

    2000-12-01

    Astronomical wide-field imaging performed with new large-format CCD detectors poses data reduction problems of unprecedented scale, which are difficult to deal with using traditional interactive tools. We present here NExt (Neural Extractor), a new neural network (NN) based package capable of detecting objects and performing both deblending and star/galaxy classification in an automatic way. Traditionally, in astronomical images, objects are first distinguished from the noisy background by searching for sets of connected pixels having brightnesses above a given threshold; they are then classified as stars or as galaxies through diagnostic diagrams having variables chosen according to the astronomer's taste and experience. In the extraction step, assuming that images are well sampled, NExt requires only the simplest a priori definition of `what an object is' (i.e. it keeps all structures composed of more than one pixel) and performs the detection via an unsupervised NN, approaching detection as a clustering problem that has been thoroughly studied in the artificial intelligence literature. The first part of the NExt procedure consists of an optimal compression of the redundant information contained in the pixels via a mapping from pixel intensities to a subspace individualized through principal component analysis. At magnitudes fainter than the completeness limit, stars are usually almost indistinguishable from galaxies, and therefore the parameters characterizing the two classes do not lie in disconnected subspaces, thus preventing the use of unsupervised methods. We therefore adopted a supervised NN (i.e. a NN that first finds the rules to classify objects from examples and then applies them to the whole data set). In practice, each object is classified depending on its membership of the regions mapping the input feature space in the training set. In order to obtain an objective and reliable classification, instead of using an arbitrarily defined set of features

  13. Galaxies in southern bright star fields. I. Near-infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andrew J.; Davies, Richard I.; Lehnert, M. D.; Thatte, N. A.; Vacca, W. D.; Hainaut, O. R.; Jarvis, M. J.; Miley, G. K.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2003-08-01

    As a prerequisite for cosmological studies using adaptive optics techniques, we have begun to identify and characterize faint sources in the vicinity of bright stars at high Galactic latitudes. The initial phase of this work has been a program of Ks imaging conducted with SOFI at the ESO NTT. From observations of 42 southern fields evenly divided between the spring and autumn skies, we have identified 391 additional stars and 1589 galaxies lying at separations Delta theta <= 60arcsec from candidate guide stars in the magnitude range 9.0 <= R <= 12.4. When analyzed as a ``discrete deep field'' with 131 arcmin2 area, our dataset gives galaxy number counts that agree with those derived previously over the range 16 <= Ks < 20.5. This consistency indicates that in the aggregate, our fields should be suitable for future statistical studies. We provide our source catalogue as a resource for users of large telescopes in the southern hemisphere. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, for programmes 66.A-0361 and 68.A-0440. The entirety of Table \\ref{t-src} is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/406/593}

  14. Alignments of radio galaxies in deep radio imaging of ELAIS N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. R.; Jagannathan, P.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the distribution of radio jet position angles of radio galaxies over an area of 1 square degree in the ELAIS N1 field. ELAIS N1 was observed with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 612 MHz to an rms noise level of 10 μJy and angular resolution of 6 arcsec × 5 arcsec. The image contains 65 resolved radio galaxy jets. The spatial distribution reveals a prominent alignment of jet position angles along a `filament' of about 1°. We examine the possibility that the apparent alignment arises from an underlying random distribution and find that the probability of chance alignment is less than 0.1 per cent. An angular covariance analysis of the data indicates the presence of spatially coherence in position angles on scales >0 .^{circ}5. This angular scales translates to a comoving scale of >20 Mpc at a redshift of 1. The implied alignment of the spin axes of massive black holes that give rise to the radio jets suggest the presence of large-scale spatial coherence in angular momentum. Our results reinforce prior evidence for large-scale spatial alignments of quasar optical polarization position angles.

  15. Proper Motion of the Leo II Dwarf Galaxy Based On Hubble Space Telescope Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatek, Slawomir; Pryor, Carlton; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2016-12-01

    This article reports a measurement of the proper motion of Leo II, a dwarf galaxy that is a likely satellite of the Milky Way, based on imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope and Wide Field Camera 3. The measurement uses compact background galaxies as standards of rest in both channels of the camera for two distinct pointings of the telescope, as well as a QSO in one channel for each pointing, resulting in the weighted average of six measurements. The measured proper motion in the the equatorial coordinate system is (μ α ,μ δ )=(-6.9+/- 3.7,-8.7+/- 3.9) mas century-1 and in the Galactic coordinate system it is (μ ℓ,μ b)=(6.2+/- 3.9,-9.2+/- 3.7) mas century-1. The implied space velocity with respect to the Galactic center is (Π,Θ,Z) =(-37+/- 38,117+/- 43,40+/- 16) km s-1 or, expressed in Galactocentric radial and tangential components, (Vr,Vtan )=(21.9+/- 1.5,127+/- 42) km s-1. The space velocity implies that the instantaneous orbital inclination is 68°, with a 95% confidence interval of (66°,80°). The measured motion supports the hypothesis that Leo II, Leo IV, Leo V, Crater 2, and the globular cluster Crater fell into the Milky Way as a group.

  16. THE AzTEC/SMA INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER-SELECTED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Joshua D.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Huang Jiasheng; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Petitpas, Glen R.; Wilner, David J.; Yun, Min S.; Wilson, Grant W.; Scott, Kimberly S.; Austermann, Jason; Perera, Thushara; Peck, Alison B.; Hughes, David H.; Aretxaga, Itziar; Kim, Sungeun; Lowenthal, James D.

    2009-10-10

    We present results from a continuing interferometric survey of high-redshift submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with the Submillimeter Array, including high-resolution (beam size approx2 arcsec) imaging of eight additional AzTEC 1.1 mm selected sources in the COSMOS field, for which we obtain six reliable (peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) >5 or peak S/N >4 with multiwavelength counterparts within the beam) and two moderate significance (peak S/N >4) detections. When combined with previous detections, this yields an unbiased sample of millimeter-selected SMGs with complete interferometric follow up. With this sample in hand, we (1) empirically confirm the radio-submillimeter association, (2) examine the submillimeter morphology-including the nature of SMGs with multiple radio counterparts and constraints on the physical scale of the far infrared-of the sample, and (3) find additional evidence for a population of extremely luminous, radio-dim SMGs that peaks at higher redshift than previous, radio-selected samples. In particular, the presence of such a population of high-redshift sources has important consequences for models of galaxy formation-which struggle to account for such objects even under liberal assumptions-and dust production models given the limited time since the big bang.

  17. A ground-based imaging study of galaxies causing damped Lyman α (DLA), sub-DLA and Lyman limit system absorption in quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sandhya M.; Belfort-Mihalyi, Michèle; Turnshek, David A.; Monier, Eric M.; Nestor, Daniel B.; Quider, Anna

    2011-09-01

    We present results from a search for galaxies that give rise to damped Lyman α (DLA), sub-DLA and Lyman limit system (LLS) absorption at redshifts 0.1 ≲z≲ 1 in the spectra of background quasars. The sample was formed from a larger sample of strong Mg II absorbers (Wλ27960≥ 0.3 Å) whose H I column densities were determined by measuring the Lyα line in Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra. Photometric redshifts, galaxy colours and proximity to the quasar sightline, in decreasing order of importance, were used to identify galaxies responsible for the absorption. Our sample includes 80 absorption systems for which the absorbing galaxies have been identified, of which 54 are presented here for the first time. In some cases a reasonable identification for the absorbing galaxy could not be made. The main results of this study are (i) the surface density of galaxies falls off exponentially with increasing impact parameter, b, from the quasar sightline relative to a constant background of galaxies, with an e-folding length of ≈46 kpc. Galaxies with b≳ 100 kpc calculated at the absorption redshift are statistically consistent with being unrelated to the absorption system, and are either background or foreground galaxies. (ii) ? is inversely correlated with b at the 3.0σ level of significance. DLA galaxies are found systematically closer to the quasar sightline, by a factor of 2, than are galaxies which give rise to sub-DLAs or LLSs. The median impact parameter is 17.4 kpc for the DLA galaxy sample, 33.3 kpc for the sub-DLA sample and 36.4 kpc for the LLS sample. We also find that the decline in ? with b can be roughly described by an exponential with an e-folding length of 12 kpc that occurs at ?. (iii) Absorber galaxy luminosity relative to L*, L/L*, is not significantly correlated with Wλ27960, ? or b. (iv) DLA, sub-DLA and LLS galaxies comprise a mix of spectral types, but are inferred to be predominantly late-type galaxies based on their spectral

  18. Instrumentation and method for measuring NIR light absorbed in tissue during MR imaging in medical NIRS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllylä, Teemu S.; Sorvoja, Hannu S. S.; Nikkinen, Juha; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Myllylä, Risto A.

    2011-07-01

    Our goal is to provide a cost-effective method for examining human tissue, particularly the brain, by the simultaneous use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Due to its compatibility requirements, MRI poses a demanding challenge for NIRS measurements. This paper focuses particularly on presenting the instrumentation and a method for the non-invasive measurement of NIR light absorbed in human tissue during MR imaging. One practical method to avoid disturbances in MR imaging involves using long fibre bundles to enable conducting the measurements at some distance from the MRI scanner. This setup serves in fact a dual purpose, since also the NIRS device will be less disturbed by the MRI scanner. However, measurements based on long fibre bundles suffer from light attenuation. Furthermore, because one of our primary goals was to make the measuring method as cost-effective as possible, we used high-power light emitting diodes instead of more expensive lasers. The use of LEDs, however, limits the maximum output power which can be extracted to illuminate the tissue. To meet these requirements, we improved methods of emitting light sufficiently deep into tissue. We also show how to measure NIR light of a very small power level that scatters from the tissue in the MRI environment, which is characterized by strong electromagnetic interference. In this paper, we present the implemented instrumentation and measuring method and report on test measurements conducted during MRI scanning. These measurements were performed in MRI operating rooms housing 1.5 Tesla-strength closed MRI scanners (manufactured by GE) in the Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology at the Oulu University Hospital.

  19. 12 and 20 micron imaging of the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pina, R. K.; Jones, B.; Puetter, R. C.; Stein, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    The study presents 12- and 20-micron imaging of the starburst galaxy NGC 253 with a spatial resolution of 0.8 arcsec. A positional uncertainty of 1.6 arcsec in these images is estimated on the basis of previous ground-based mid-IR studies to determine the absolute position of the images. It is concluded that the proposed 'nucleus' of NGC 253, i.e., the dominant, bright, flat-spectrum radio source identified by Turner & Ho (1985) (TH 2), is not associated with the mid-IR peak, but rather is located 2.2 arcsec to the northeast. The mid-IR peak, IRS 1, is placed midway between TH 6 and TH 7. Several coincidences with the present 12-micron image are found: IRS 1 falls within 1 arcsec of the 2-micron peak; a second significantly weaker IR source, IRS 2, coincides with TH 2; and the brightest steep-spectrum 6-cm radio source, TH 9, coincides with a 'tongue' of emission extending to the southwest of IRS 1.

  20. Galaxy NGC 4013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An amazing 'edge-on' view of a spiral galaxy 55 million light years from Earth has been captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. The image, available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc , reveals in great detail huge clouds of dust and gas extending along and above the galaxy's main disk.

    The image was taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, which was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The galaxy, called NGC 4013, lies in the direction of the constellation Ursa Major. If we could see it pole-on, it would look like a nearly circular pinwheel. In this Hubble image, NGC 4013 is seen edge-on, from our vantage point. Because the galaxy is larger than Hubble's field of view, the image shows only a little more than half the object, but with unprecedented detail.

    Dark clouds of interstellar dust stand out, since they absorb the light of background stars. Most of the clouds lie in the galaxy's plane and form the dark band, about 500 light years thick, that appears to cut the galaxy in two from upper right to lower left. Scientists believe that new stars form in dark interstellar clouds. NGC 4013 shows several examples of these stellar kindergartens near the center of the image, in front of the dark band along the galaxy's equator. One extremely bright star near the upper left corner is merely a nearby foreground star that lies in our Milky Way and happened to be in the line of sight.

    This new picture was constructed from Hubble images taken in January 2000 by Dr. J. Christopher Howk of Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., and Dr. Blair D. Savage of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Images taken through three different filters have been combined into a color composite covering the region of the galaxy nucleus (behind the bright foreground star at the upper left) and extending along one edge of the galaxy to the lower right.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space

  1. Galaxy NGC 4013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An amazing 'edge-on' view of a spiral galaxy 55 million light years from Earth has been captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. The image, available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc , reveals in great detail huge clouds of dust and gas extending along and above the galaxy's main disk.

    The image was taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, which was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The galaxy, called NGC 4013, lies in the direction of the constellation Ursa Major. If we could see it pole-on, it would look like a nearly circular pinwheel. In this Hubble image, NGC 4013 is seen edge-on, from our vantage point. Because the galaxy is larger than Hubble's field of view, the image shows only a little more than half the object, but with unprecedented detail.

    Dark clouds of interstellar dust stand out, since they absorb the light of background stars. Most of the clouds lie in the galaxy's plane and form the dark band, about 500 light years thick, that appears to cut the galaxy in two from upper right to lower left. Scientists believe that new stars form in dark interstellar clouds. NGC 4013 shows several examples of these stellar kindergartens near the center of the image, in front of the dark band along the galaxy's equator. One extremely bright star near the upper left corner is merely a nearby foreground star that lies in our Milky Way and happened to be in the line of sight.

    This new picture was constructed from Hubble images taken in January 2000 by Dr. J. Christopher Howk of Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., and Dr. Blair D. Savage of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Images taken through three different filters have been combined into a color composite covering the region of the galaxy nucleus (behind the bright foreground star at the upper left) and extending along one edge of the galaxy to the lower right.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space

  2. Deep IRAC Imaging Lensing Galaxy Clusters for JWST 'First Light' Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haojing; Conselice, Christopher; Windhorst, Rogier; Cohen, Seth; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Zitrin, Adi; Broadhurst, Tom; Frye, Brenda; Driver, Simon; Robotham, Aaron; Hopkins, Andrew; Wyithe, Staurt; Jansen, Rolf; Hathi, Nimish; Mechtley, Matthew; Ryan, Russell; Rutkowski, Michael; Finkelstein, Steven; Koekemoer, Anton

    2016-08-01

    JWST has a key goal to search for First Light objects beyond z>10. Our 110-hr JWST GTO program, 'Webb Medium-Deep Fields' (WMDF), will target both blank and lensed fields to probe both the bright and the faint ends of the galaxy luminosity function at z > 10. While a number of well studied lensing clusters exist, not all of them are optimal for the JWST search of First Light objects, either because of their low Ecliptic latitudes (and hence high Zodiacal background) or because of their strong intra-cluster light (ICL) at the critical curve regions corresponding to the redshifts of interest. For this reason, our WMDF candidate lensing targets will include some recently discovered, high-mass (log[M/Msun] ~ 15) galaxy clusters, which we choose either because of their high Ecliptic latitude (beta > 40 deg) or because of their extreme compactness that minimizes the impact of the ICL. As part of our effort to collect ancillary data for these new systems to finalize the target list, we propose IRAC observations for 13 of them that are lacking sufficient data. These 3.6/4.5um data will be critical for our guaranteed JWST program: (1) they will greatly facilitate the modeling of the straylight that JWST will suffer in 1--5 um (the key range to search for z>10--20 objects), a problem that has recently been identified. If left untreated, such straylight components would severely hamper the detection of faint sources in a lensing field. The JWST observations alone would be difficult to separate the ICL from the straylight at the level needed. (2) the new 3.6/4.5um data will best match our deep optical imaging and spectroscopy at HST, Gemini, LBT and MMT. We will derive accurate photometric redshifts for any lensed background galaxies (at z<6) and most member galaxies in the outskirts, which will be critical in refining the mass profile through strong/weak lensing analysis. Finally, we note that these data will be highly valuable for the study of these clusters themselves

  3. Deep Generative Models of Galaxy Images for the Calibration of the Next Generation of Weak Lensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, Francois; Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schneider, Jeff; Poczos, Barnabas

    2017-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing has long been identified as one of the most powerful probes to investigate the nature of dark energy. As such, weak lensing is at the heart of the next generation of cosmological surveys such as LSST, Euclid or WFIRST.One particularly crititcal source of systematic errors in these surveys comes from the shape measurement algorithms tasked with estimating galaxy shapes. GREAT3, the last community challenge to assess the quality of state-of-the-art shape measurement algorithms has in particular demonstrated that all current methods are biased to various degrees and, more importantly, that these biases depend on the details of the galaxy morphologies. These biases can be measured and calibrated by generating mock observations where a known lensing signal has been introduced and comparing the resulting measurements to the ground-truth. Producing these mock observations however requires input galaxy images of higher resolution and S/N than the simulated survey, which typically implies acquiring extremely expensive space-based observations.The goal of this work is to train a deep generative model on already available Hubble Space Telescope data which can then be used to sample new galaxy images conditioned on parameters such as magnitude, size or redshift and exhibiting complex morphologies. Such model can allow us to inexpensively produce large set of realistic realistic images for calibration purposes.We implement a conditional generative model based on state-of-the-art deep learning methods and fit it to deep galaxy images from the COSMOS survey. The quality of the model is assessed by computing an extensive set of galaxy morphology statistics on the generated images. Beyond simple second moment statistics such as size and ellipticity, we apply more complex statistics specifically designed to be sensitive to disturbed galaxy morphologies. We find excellent agreement between the morphologies of real and model generated galaxies.Our results

  4. Galaxy NGC5474

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-25

    NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer took this ultraviolet color image of the galaxy NGC5474 on June 7, 2003. NGC5474 is located 20 million light-years from Earth and is within a group of galaxies dominated by the Messier 101 galaxy. Star formation in this galaxy shows some evidence of a disturbed spiral pattern, which may have been induced by tidal interactions with Messier 101. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04634

  5. Galaxy NGC5398

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-25

    This is an ultraviolet color image of the galaxy NGC5398 taken by NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 7, 2003. NGC5398 is a barred spiral galaxy located 60 million light-years from Earth. The star formation is concentrated in the two bright regions of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04633

  6. Multispectral metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; McCrindle, I J H; Li, C; Cumming, D R S

    2014-03-01

    We present the simulation, implementation, and measurement of a multispectral metamaterial absorber (MSMMA) and show that we can realize a simple absorber structure that operates in the mid-IR and terahertz (THz) bands. By embedding an IR metamaterial absorber layer into a standard THz metamaterial absorber stack, a narrowband resonance is induced at a wavelength of 4.3 μm. This resonance is in addition to the THz metamaterial absorption resonance at 109 μm (2.75 THz). We demonstrate the inherent scalability and versatility of our MSMMA by describing a second device whereby the MM-induced IR absorption peak frequency is tuned by varying the IR absorber geometry. Such a MSMMA could be coupled with a suitable sensor and formed into a focal plane array, enabling multispectral imaging.

  7. Deep Fabry-Perot imaging of NGC 6240: Kinematic evidence for merging galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorn, J. Bland; Wilson, A. S.; Tully, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have observed the superluminous, infrared galaxy NGC 6240 (z = 0.025) at H alpha with the Hawaii Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (HIFI - Bland and Tully 1989). During the past decade, observational evidence from all wavebands indicates that the unusual appearance of NGC 6240 has resulted from a collision between two gas-rich systems, a view which is supported by our spectrophotometric data. However, the origin of the enormous infrared luminosity (4 times 10(exp 11) solar luminosity) detected by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) remains highly controversial, where opinions differ on the relative roles of large-scale shocks, massive star formation or a buried 'active' nucleus. These mechanisms are discussed in the light of the author's Fabry-Perot observations.

  8. Particle accelerators in the hot spots of radio galaxy 3C 445, imaged with the VLT.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M Almudena; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Mack, Karl-Heinz

    2002-10-04

    Hot spots (HSs) are regions of enhanced radio emission produced by supersonic jets at the tip of the radio lobes of powerful radio sources. Obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT), images of the HSs in the radio galaxy 3C 445 show bright knots embedded in diffuse optical emission distributed along the post-shock region created by the impact of the jet into the intergalactic medium. The observations reported here confirm that relativistic electrons are accelerated by Fermi-I acceleration processes in HSs. Furthermore, both the diffuse emission tracing the rims of the front shock and the multiple knots demonstrate the presence of additional continuous re-acceleration processes of electrons (Fermi-II).

  9. EVN VLBI Imaging of the Jet in the Nucleus of the Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 7479

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Seppo J.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Krichbaum, Thomas; Beck, Rainer; Komossa, S.

    2017-01-01

    The nearby (D = 32 Mpc) barred spiral galaxy NGC 7479 hosts a remarkable jet-like radio continuum feature: bright, 12-kpc long in projection, and hosting an S-shaped, aligned magnetic field. The bending of the jet in 3-D is most easily explained by precession, with a jet age less than a million years. We have imaged the nucleus with European VLBI Network (EVN) observations at 6 and 18 cm. Here we report our tentative results on the search for nuclear jet emission on sub-arcsecond scales, including its alignment with the outer kpc-scale jet. We also describe the nature of the nucleus with the help of spectral index determination, brightness temperature limit and variability of the nucleus.

  10. Doubly Imaged Quasar SDSS J1515+1511: Time Delay and Lensing Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalyapin, Vyacheslav N.; Goicoechea, Luis J.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze new optical observations of the gravitational lens system SDSS J1515+1511. These include a 2.6-year photometric monitoring with the Liverpool Telescope (LT) in the r band, as well as a spectroscopic follow-up with the LT and the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). Our r-band LT light curves cover a quiescent microlensing period of the doubly imaged quasar at {z}{{s}} = 2.049, which permits us to robustly estimate the time delay between the two images A and B: 211 ± 5 days (1σ confidence interval; A is leading). Unfortunately, the main lensing galaxy (G1) is so faint and close to the bright quasar that it is not feasible to accurately extract its spectrum through the GTC data. However, assuming the putative redshift {z}{{G}1} = 0.742, the GTC and LT spectra of the distant quasar are used to discuss the macrolens magnification, and the extinction and microlensing effects in G1. The new constraints on the time delay and macrolens magnification ratio essentially do not change previous findings on the mass scale of G1 and external shear, while the redshift of the lensing mass is found to be consistent with the assumed value of {z}{{G}1}. This is clear evidence that G1 is indeed located at {z}{{G}1} = 0.742. From the GTC data, we also obtain the redshift of two additional objects (the secondary galaxy G2 and a new absorption system) and discuss their possible roles in the lens scenario.

  11. Galaxies Collide to Create Hot, Huge Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This image of a pair of colliding galaxies called NGC 6240 shows them in a rare, short-lived phase of their evolution just before they merge into a single, larger galaxy. The prolonged, violent collision has drastically altered the appearance of both galaxies and created huge amounts of heat turning NGC 6240 into an 'infrared luminous' active galaxy.

    A rich variety of active galaxies, with different shapes, luminosities and radiation profiles exist. These galaxies may be related astronomers have suspected that they may represent an evolutionary sequence. By catching different galaxies in different stages of merging, a story emerges as one type of active galaxy changes into another. NGC 6240 provides an important 'missing link' in this process.

    This image was created from combined data from the infrared array camera of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 8.0 microns (red) and visible light from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (green and blue).

  12. Angular clustering of z ˜ 2 star-forming and passive galaxies in 2.5 square degrees of deep CFHT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taro; Sawicki, Marcin; Arcila-Osejo, Liz

    2014-09-01

    We study the angular clustering of z ˜ 2 galaxies using ˜40 000 star-forming (SF) and ˜5000 passively evolving (PE) galaxies selected from ˜2.5 deg2 of deep (Klim = 23-24 AB) Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope imaging. For both populations, the clustering is stronger for galaxies brighter in rest-frame optical and the trend is particularly strong for PE galaxies, indicating that passive galaxies with larger stellar masses reside in more massive haloes. In contrast, at rest-frame ultraviolet we find that while the clustering of SF galaxies increases with increasing luminosity, it decreases for PE galaxies; a possible explanation lies in quenching of star formation in the most massive haloes. Furthermore, we find two components in the correlation functions for both SF and PE galaxies, attributable to one- and two-halo terms. The presence of one-halo terms for both PE and SF galaxies suggests that environmental effects were producing passive galaxies in virtualized environments already by z ˜ 2. Finally, we find notable clustering differences between the four widely separated fields in our study; the popular COSMOS field is the most discrepant (as is also the case for number counts and luminosity functions), highlighting the need for very large areas and multiple sightlines in galaxy evolution statistical studies.

  13. Galaxies in Hiding

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-05

    There are nearly 200 galaxies within the marked circles in this image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. These are part of the Perseus-Pisces supercluster of galaxies located 250 million light-years away.

  14. The Hidden Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-18

    Maffei 2 is the poster child for an infrared galaxy that is almost invisible to optical telescopes. But this infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope penetrates the dust to reveal the galaxy in all its glory.

  15. Galaxy NGC 300

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-10

    This image of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 300 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer in a single orbit exposure of 27 minutes on October 10, 2003. NGC 300 lies 7 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy and is one of a group of galaxies in the constellation Sculptor. NGC 300 is often used as a prototype of a spiral galaxy because in optical images it displays flowing spiral arms and a bright central region of older (and thus redder) stars. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer image taken in ultraviolet light shows us that NGC 300 is an efficient star-forming galaxy. The bright blue regions in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer image reveal new stars forming all the way into the nucleus of NGC 300. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04924

  16. Classic Galaxy with Glamour

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-11

    Young hot blue stars dominate the outer spiral arms of nearby galaxy NGC 300, while the older stars congregate in the nuclear regions which appear yellow-green in this image from NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer.

  17. Detection of CO(1-0) emission and optical imaging of the Seyfert galaxy/QSO Markarian 231

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, D. B.; Scoville, N. Z.; Soifer, B. T.; Young, J. S.; Danielson, G. E.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of CO(J = 1-0) emission and optical imaging of the luminous infrared galaxy Markarian 231 are reported. The galaxy is extremely rich in molecular gas with MT(H2) approximately equal to 1.4 x 10 to the 10th solar masses, approximately 5 times the molecular gas content of the Galaxy. Markarian 231 is the most luminous object in the local universe (z approximately equal to or less than 0.1), with a far-infrared luminosity (lambda = 40-400 microns) of 2.1 x 10 to the 12th solar luminosities. THe CO detection yields a L(FIR)/M(H2) ratio of 150. A deep optical CCD image shows two striking tidal tails with total extent of about 75 kpc. The CCD image strongly suggests that Markarian 231 is an advanced merger system. If the molecular gas is highly concentrated in the nuclear region it may fuel an intense starburst and possibly feed the accretion onto an embedded QSO. The trigger for the intense activity observed in Markarian 231 appears to be the collision of two gas-rich spiral galaxies.

  18. An ultraviolet-selected galaxy redshift survey - III. Multicolour imaging and non-uniform star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Mark; Treyer, Marie A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Mobasher, Bahram

    2004-05-01

    We present panoramic u' and optical ground-based imaging observations of a complete sample of low-redshift (0 < z < 0.4) galaxies selected in the ultraviolet (UV) at 2000 Å using the balloon-borne FOCA instrument of Milliard et al. This survey is highly sensitive to newly formed massive stars and hence to actively star-forming galaxies. We use the new data to investigate further the optical, stellar population and star formation properties of this unique sample, deriving accurate galaxy types and k-corrections based on the broad-band spectral energy distributions. When combined with our earlier spectroscopic surveys, these new data allow us to compare star formation measures derived from aperture-corrected Hα line fluxes, and UV(2000 Å) and u'(3600 Å) continuum fluxes on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis. As expected from our earlier studies, we find broad correlations over several decades in luminosity between the different dust-corrected star formation diagnostics, though the scatter is larger than that from observational errors, with significant offsets from trends expected according to simple models of the star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies. Popular galaxy spectral synthesis models with varying metallicities and/or initial mass functions seem unable to explain the observed discrepancies. We investigate the star formation properties further by modelling the observed spectroscopic and photometric properties of the galaxies in our survey. We find that nearly half of the galaxies surveyed possess features that appear incompatible with simple constant or smoothly declining SFHs, favouring instead irregular or temporally varying SFHs. We demonstrate how this can reconcile the majority of our observations, enabling us to determine empirical corrections that can be used to calculate intrinsic star formation rates (as derived from Hα luminosities) from measures based on UV (or u') continuum observations alone. We discuss the broader implications of our finding that

  19. INVESTIGATING THE CORE MORPHOLOGY-SEYFERT CLASS RELATIONSHIP WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ARCHIVAL IMAGES OF LOCAL SEYFERT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M. J.; Hegel, P. R.; Kim, Hwihyun; Windhorst, R. A.; Tamura, Kazuyuki

    2013-07-01

    The unified model of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has provided a successful explanation for the observed diversity of AGNs in the local universe. However, recent analysis of multi-wavelength spectral and image data suggests that the unified model is only a partial theory of AGNs, and may need to be augmented to remain consistent with all observations. Recent studies using high spatial resolution ground- and space-based observations of local AGNs show that Seyfert class and the ''core'' (r {approx}< 1 kpc) host-galaxy morphology are correlated. Currently, this relationship has only been established qualitatively, by visual inspection of the core morphologies of low-redshift (z < 0.035) Seyfert host galaxies. We re-establish this empirical relationship in Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging by visual inspection of a catalog of 85 local (D < 63 Mpc) Seyfert galaxies. We also attempt to re-establish the core morphology-Seyfert class relationship using an automated, non-parametric technique that combines both existing classification parameter methods (the adapted CAS and G-M {sub 20}) and a new method which implements the Source Extractor software for feature detection in unsharp-mask images. This new method is designed explicitly to detect dust features in the images. We use our automated approach to classify the morphology of the AGN cores and determine that Sy2 galaxies visually appear, on average, to have more dust features than Sy1. With the exception of this ''dustiness'' however, we do not measure a strong correlation between the dust morphology and the Seyfert class of the host galaxy using quantitative techniques. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the unified model.

  20. GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS OF SPIRAL AND S0 GALAXIES: RESULTS FROM WIYN IMAGING OF NGC 1023, NGC 1055, NGC 7332, AND NGC 7339

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Michael D.; Dowell, Jessica L.; Rhode, Katherine L. E-mail: jlwind@astro.indiana.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present results from a study of the globular cluster (GC) systems of four spiral and S0 galaxies imaged as part of an ongoing wide-field survey of the GC systems of giant galaxies. The target galaxies-the SB0 galaxy NGC 1023, the SBb galaxy NGC 1055, and an isolated pair comprised of the Sbc galaxy NGC 7339 and the S0 galaxy NGC 7332-were observed in BVR filters with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope and Minimosaic camera. For two of the galaxies, we combined the WIYN imaging with previously published data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Keck Observatory to help characterize the GC distribution in the central few kiloparsecs. We determine the radial distribution (surface density of GCs versus projected radius) of each galaxy's GC system and use it to calculate the total number of GCs (N{sub GC}). We find N{sub GC} = 490 {+-} 30, 210 {+-} 40, 175 {+-} 15, and 75 {+-} 10 for NGC 1023, NGC 1055, NGC 7332, and NGC 7339, respectively. We also calculate the GC specific frequency (N{sub GC} normalized by host galaxy luminosity or mass) and find values typical of those of the other spiral and E/S0 galaxies in the survey. The two lenticular galaxies have sufficient numbers of GC candidates for us to perform statistical tests for bimodality in the GC color distributions. We find evidence at a high confidence level (>95%) for two populations in the B - R distribution of the GC system of NGC 1023. We find weaker evidence for bimodality (>81% confidence) in the GC color distribution of NGC 7332. Finally, we identify eight GC candidates that may be associated with the Magellanic dwarf galaxy NGC 1023A, which is a satellite of NGC 1023.

  1. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Imaging of Globular Clusters in the Edge-on Spiral Galaxies NGC 4565 and NGC 5907

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissler-Patig, Markus; Ashman, Keith M.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Freeman, Kenneth C.

    1999-07-01

    We present a study of the globular cluster systems of two edge-on spiral galaxies, NGC 4565 and NGC 5907, from WFPC2 images in the F450W and F814W filters. The globular cluster systems of both galaxies appear to be similar to the Galactic globular cluster system. In particular, we derive total numbers of globular clusters of N_GC(4565)=204+/-38^+87_-53 and N_GC(5907)=170+/-41^+47_-72 (where the first are statistical, the second potential systematic errors) for NGC 4565 and NGC 5907, respectively. This determination is based on a comparison with the Milky Way system, for which we adopt a total number of globular clusters of 180+/-20. The specific frequency of both galaxies is S_N~=0.6, indistinguishable from the value for the Milky Way. The similarity in the globular cluster systems of the two galaxies is noteworthy, since they have significantly different thick disks and bulge-to-disk ratios. This would suggest that these two components do not play a major role in the building up of a globular cluster system around late-type galaxies.

  2. Quasar 2175 Å dust absorbers - I. Metallicity, depletion pattern and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingzhe; Ge, Jian; Zhao, Yinan; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Zhang, Shaohua; Ji, Tuo; Schneider, Donald P.

    2017-12-01

    We present 13 new 2175 Å dust absorbers at zabs = 1.0-2.2 towards background quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These absorbers are examined in detail using data from the Echelle Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) on the Keck II telescope. Many low-ionization lines including Fe ii, Zn ii, Mg ii, Si ii, Al ii, Ni ii, Mn ii, Cr ii, Ti ii and Ca ii are present in the same absorber that gives rise to the 2175 Å bump. The relative metal abundances (with respect to Zn) demonstrate that the depletion patterns of our 2175 Å dust absorbers resemble that of the Milky Way clouds although some are disc-like and some are halo-like. The 2175 Å dust absorbers have significantly higher depletion levels compared to literature damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) and sub-DLAs. The dust depletion level indicator [Fe/Zn] tends to anticorrelate with bump strengths. The velocity profiles from the Keck/ESI spectra also provide kinematical information on the dust absorbers. The dust absorbers are found to have multiple velocity components with velocity widths extending from ˜100 to ˜600 km s-1, which are larger than those of most DLAs and sub-DLAs. Assuming the velocity width is a reliable tracer of stellar mass, the host galaxies of 2175 Å dust absorbers are expected to be more massive than DLA/sub-DLA hosts. Not all of the 2175 Å dust absorbers are intervening systems towards background quasars. The absorbers towards quasars J1006+1538 and J1047+3423 are proximate systems that could be associated with the quasar itself or the host galaxy.

  3. Proper motion of the Draco dwarf galaxy based on Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Carlton; Piatek, Slawomir; Olszewski, Edward W. E-mail: piatek@physics.rutgers.edu

    2015-02-01

    We have measured the proper motion of the Draco dwarf galaxy using images at two epochs with a time baseline of about two years taken with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. Wide Field Channels 1 and 2 provide two adjacent fields, each containing a known QSO. The zero point for the proper motion is determined using both background galaxies and the QSOs and the two methods produce consistent measurements within each field. Averaging the results from the two fields gives a proper motion in the equatorial coordinate system of (μ{sub α},μ{sub δ})=(17.7±6.3,−22.1±6.3) mas century{sup −1} and in the Galactic coordinate system of (μ{sub ℓ},μ{sub b})=(−23.1±6.3,−16.3±6.3) mas century{sup −1}. Removing the contributions of the motion of the Sun and of the LSR to the measured proper motion yields a Galactic rest-frame proper motion of (μ{sub α}{sup Grf},μ{sub δ}{sup Grf})=(51.4±6.3,−18.7±6.3) mas century{sup −1} and (μ{sub ℓ}{sup Grf},μ{sub b}{sup Grf})=(−21.8±6.3,−50.1±6.3) mas century{sup −1}. The implied space velocity with respect to the Galactic center is (Π,Θ,Z)=(27±14,89±25,−212±20) km s{sup −1}. This velocity implies that the orbital inclination is 70{sup ∘}, with a 95% confidence interval of (59{sup ∘},80{sup ∘}), and that the plane of the orbit is consistent with that of the vast polar structure (VPOS) of Galactic satellite galaxies.

  4. Identifying galaxy candidates in WSRT H i imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Oosterloo, Tom A.; Cannon, John M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2016-12-01

    Ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) were identified in the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) H i survey as potential gas-bearing dark matter halos. Here we present higher resolution neutral hydrogen (H i) observations of twelve UCHVCS with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The UCHVCs were selected based on a combination of size, isolation, large recessional velocity and high column density as the best candidate dark matter halos. The WSRT data were tapered to image the UCHVCs at 210'' (comparable to the Arecibo resolution) and 105'' angular resolution. In a comparison of the single-dish to interferometer data, we find that the integrated line flux recovered in the WSRT observations is generally comparable to that from the single-dish ALFALFA data. In addition, any structure seen in the ALFALFA data is reproduced in the WSRT maps at the same angular resolution. At 210'' resolution all the sources are generally compact with a smooth H i morphology, as expected from their identification as UCHVCs. At the higher angular resolution, a majority of the sources break into small clumps contained in a diffuse envelope. These UCHVCs also have no ordered velocity motion and are most likely Galactic halo clouds. We identify two UCHVCs, AGC 198606 and AGC 249525, as excellent galaxy candidates based on maintaining a smooth H i morphology at higher angular resolution and showing ordered velocity motion consistent with rotation. A third source, AGC 249565, lies between these two populations in properties and is a possible galaxy candidate. If interpreted as gas-bearing dark matter halos, the three candidate galaxies have rotation velocities of 8-15 km s-1, H i masses of 0.6-50 × 105M⊙, H i radii of 0.3-2 kpc, and dynamical masses of 2-20 × 107M⊙ for a range of plausible distances. These are the UCHVCs with the highest column density values in the ALFALFA H i data and we suggest this is the best way to identify further candidates.

  5. A Machine-learning Model to Separate Stars and Galaxies in iPTF Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Adam; Kulkarni, Maya; Prince, Thomas A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory

    2016-01-01

    The Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) is a dedicated time-domain survey optimized for the rapid characterization of fast transients. While significant efforts have been devoted to the development of software that quickly and reliably identifies new transients, there are currently no mechanisms to automatically classify these sources. The first component in deriving a classification is understanding whether or not the newly discovered transient is galactic or extragalactic in its origin. Here, we present our development of a new framework for classifying sources in iPTF reference images as either stars or galaxies. The framework utilizes the random forest algorithm and is trained with nearly 3 million sources that have Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. The final optimized model achieves a cross-validation accuracy of ~96%, which represents a significant improvement over the automated classification provided by the SExtractor algorithm. This accuracy, while slightly worse than that provided by the SDSS photometric classifier, can be extended over the entire iPTF footprint, which covers >5000 deg^2 that have not been imaged by SDSS. Associating transients with galactic or extragalactic origin is the first step in delivering automated classifications of newly discovered transients.

  6. Self-imaging of transparent objects and structures in focusing of spatially phase-modulated laser radiation into a weakly absorbing medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bubis, E L

    2011-06-30

    Self-imaging of transparent objects and structures in focusing of a spatially phase-modulated laser beam into an extended weakly absorbing medium is described. The laser power level that is necessary for effective imaging corresponds to the illuminating beam power when thermal self-defocusing starts evolving in the medium. The effect can be described in terms of the ideology of Zernike's classical phase-contrast method. Edge enhancement in visualised images of transparent objects is experimentally demonstrated. Self-imaging of a microscopic object in the form of transparent letters and long-lived refractive-index fluctuations in liquid glycerol is shown. Due to the adaptivity of the process under consideration, unlike the classical case, self-imaging occurs also in the situations where a beam is displaced (undergoes random walk) as a whole in the Fourier plane, for example, in the presence of thermal flows. (image processing)

  7. Human absorbed dose calculations for iodine-131 and iodine-123 labeled meta-iodobenzyl-guanidine (mIBG): a potential myocardial and adrenal medulla imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, D.P.; Carey, J.E.; Brown, L.E.; Kline, R.C.; Wieland, D.M.; Thrall, J.H.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1981-06-01

    Tissue distribution studies with radiolabeled meta-iodobenzyl-guanidine (mIBG), an analog of the adrenergic neuronal blocking agent-guanethidine, suggest that this radiotracer may be useful for both myocardial imaging (labeled with I-123) and adrenal medulla imaging (labeled with I-131). Total body elimination was determined by whole body counting (well-type ionization chamber) of rats administered /sup 131/I-mIBG and time-activity tissue distribution data was obtained in dogs using /sup 125/I-mIBG. Using the MIRD formalism, researchers have estimated the human absorbed dose from /sup 131/I-mIBG, radionuclidically pure /sup 123/I-mIBG, and /sup 1/''/sup 3/I-mIBG contaminated with 4.8% /sup 125/I-mIBG (based on /sup 123/I radionuclidic purity specification of 1.4% I-125 at calibration). The largest absorbed dose from /sup 131/I-mIBG was delivered to the adrenals. For pure /sup 123/I-mIBG the largest absorbed dose was delivered to the thyroid (unblocked). The /sup 125/I contamination increased the absorbed dose to the adrenal medulla by a factor of 3.5.

  8. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for (99m)Tc-hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr(3)-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. (99m)Tc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of (99m)hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results.

  9. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for 99mTc-hynic-Tyr3-octreotide Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of 99mTc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr3-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. 99mTc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of 99mhynic-Tyr3-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results. PMID:27134562

  10. Giant galaxies and their globular cluster populations: Analysis and results from a wide-field imaging survey and archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Michael D.

    The globular cluster (GC) systems of giant galaxies are valuable and intriguing tools for a number of reasons, both in terms of the properties of the overall system as well as the properties of the individual GCs that make up the system. GCs are old: their ages range from a few Gyrs up to 12 Gyrs, and they apparently form during galaxy mergers and major star formation events. The ensemble properties (including the color, metallicity, and spatial distributions) of the GC system constrain theoretical models of galaxy formation. For several years we have been carrying out a wide-field imaging survey of the GC populations of a sample of giant spiral, S0, and elliptical galaxies with distances of 10 - 30 Mpc. In this dissertation I present results and analysis of the GC systems of eight giant galaxies, representing a significant addition to the survey dataset. I also describe how the survey data and metadata was collected, homogenized, and ingested into a custom database and archive, and how a web portal was created to disseminate the survey products to the wider scientific community. I have developed and tested a probability factor to quantify the likelihood that a given GC candidate is in actuality a GC. I explored enhanced statistical methods to detect subpopulations in GC systems, and found that six of the GC systems in our survey presented with three GC subpopulations. I explored how the spatial and azimuthal distributions of these subpopulations differ in each host galaxy. I have supplemented our survey results with select GC system studies from the literature, and tested how different host galaxy properties correlate with the total number of globular clusters in a given system, finding that the combination of the dynamical mass of the galaxy and the K-band luminosity of the galaxy offered the best correlation with the number of GCs. Lastly, I applied this combination of predictors to a published catalog of GC system studies and found that the predictions were in

  11. The Highly Ionized Circumgalactic Medium is Kinematically Uniform around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Nikole M.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Muzahid, Sowgat; Churchill, Christopher W.; Murphy, Michael T.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    The circumgalactic medium (CGM) traced by O vi λ λ 1031,1037 doublet absorption has been found to concentrate along the projected major and minor axes of the host galaxies. This suggests that O vi traces accreting and outflowing gas, respectively, which are key components of the baryon cycle of galaxies. We investigate this further by examining the kinematics of 29 O vi absorbers associated with galaxies at 0.13< {z}{gal}< 0.66 as a function of galaxy color, inclination, and azimuthal angle. Each galaxy was imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the absorption was detected in COS/HST spectra of nearby (D< 200 kpc) background quasars. We use the pixel-velocity two-point correlation function to characterize the velocity spread of the absorbers, which is a method used previously for a sample of Mg ii absorber–galaxy pairs. The absorption velocity spread for O vi is more extended than Mg ii, which suggests that the two ions trace differing components of the CGM. Again, in contrast to Mg ii, the O vi absorption velocity spreads are similar regardless of galaxy color, inclination, and azimuthal angle. This indicates that the kinematics of the high-ionization gas is not strongly influenced by the current star formation activity in the galaxy. The kinematic homogeneity of O vi absorption and its tendency to be observed mainly along the projected galaxy major and minor axes is likely due to varying ionization conditions and gas densities about the galaxy. Gas in intermediate azimuthal angles may be ionized out of the O vi phase, possibly resulting in an azimuthal angle dependence of the distribution of gas in higher ionization states.

  12. Structural and Photometric Properties of the Andromeda Satellite Dwarf Galaxy Lacerta I from Deep Imaging with WIYN PODI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Crnojević, Denija; Sand, David J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Young, Michael D.; Spekkens, Kristine

    2017-02-01

    We present results from WIYN pODI imaging of Lacerta I (And XXXI), a satellite dwarf galaxy discovered in the outskirts of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) in Pan-STARRS1 survey data. Our deep, wide-field g,i photometry reaches ∼3 mag fainter than the photometry in the Pan-STARRS1 discovery paper and allows us to trace the stellar population of Lac I beyond two half-light radii from the galaxy center. We measure a Tip of the Red Giant Branch distance for Lac I of {(m-M)}0=24.44+/- 0.11 mag (773 ± 40 kpc, or 264 ± 6 kpc from M31), which is consistent with the Pan-STARRS1 distance. We use a maximum-likelihood technique to derive structural properties for the galaxy, and find a half-light radius (r h ) of 3.24 ± 0.21 arcmin (728 ± 47 pc), ellipticity (ε ) of 0.44 ± 0.03, total magnitude M V = ‑11.4 ± 0.3, and central surface brightness {μ }V,0=24.8+/- 0.3 mag arcsec‑2. We find no H i emission in archival data and set a limit on Lac I’s neutral gas mass-to-light ratio of {M}{{H}{{I}}}/{L}V < 0.06 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ , confirming Lac I as a gas-poor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Photometric metallicities derived from Red Giant Branch stars within 2 r h yield a median [Fe/H] of ‑1.68 ± 0.03, which is more metal-rich than the spectroscopically derived value from Martin et al. Combining our measured magnitude with this higher metallicity estimate places Lac I closer to its expected position on the luminosity–metallicity relation for dwarf galaxies.

  13. Bayesian Inference of Galaxy Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ilsang; Weinberg, M.; Katz, N.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable inference on galaxy morphology from quantitative analysis of ensemble galaxy images is challenging but essential ingredient in studying galaxy formation and evolution, utilizing current and forthcoming large scale surveys. To put galaxy image decomposition problem in broader context of statistical inference problem and derive a rigorous statistical confidence levels of the inference, I developed a novel galaxy image decomposition tool, GALPHAT (GALaxy PHotometric ATtributes) that exploits recent developments in Bayesian computation to provide full posterior probability distributions and reliable confidence intervals for all parameters. I will highlight the significant improvements in galaxy image decomposition using GALPHAT, over the conventional model fitting algorithms and introduce the GALPHAT potential to infer the statistical distribution of galaxy morphological structures, using ensemble posteriors of galaxy morphological parameters from the entire galaxy population that one studies.

  14. Deep WFPC2 and Ground-Based Imaging of a Complete Sample of 3C Quasars and Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, Susan E.; Stockton, Alan

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of an HST and ground-based imaging study of a complete 3C sample of zeta approx. equal to 1 sources, comprising 5 quasars and 5 radio galaxies. We have observed all of the sample in essentially line-free bands at rest-frame 0.33 micrometers with WFPC2 and in rest-frame 1 micrometer images from the ground; we have also observed most of the sample in narrow-band filters centered on [O II]. We resolve continuum structure around all of our quasars in the high-resolution WFPC2 images, and in four of the five ground-based K' images. All of the quasars have some optical continuum structure that is aligned with the radio axis. In at least 3 of these cases, some of this optical structure is directly coincident with a portion of the radio structure, including optical counterparts to radio jets in 3C212 and 3C245 and an optical counterpart to a radio lobe in 3C2. These are most likely due to optical synchrotron radiation, and the radio and optical spectral indices in the northern lobe of 3C2 are consistent with this interpretation. The fact that we see a beamed optical synchotron component in the quasars but not in the radio galaxies complicates both the magnitude and the alignment comparisons. Nonetheless, the total optical and K' flux densities of the quasar hosts are consistent with those of the radio galaxies within the observed dispersion in our sample. The distributions of K' flux densities of both radio galaxies and quasar hosts exhibit similar mean and dispersion to that found for other radio galaxies at this redshift, and the average host galaxy luminosity is equivalent to, or a little fainter than, L*. The formal determination of the alignment in the optical and infrared in the two subsamples yields no significant difference between the radio galaxy and quasar subsamples, and the quasars 3C 196 and 3C 336 have aligned continuum and emission-line structure that is probably not due to beamed optical synchrotron emission. Very blue and/or edge

  15. Galaxy Messier 51

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-25

    NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer took this image of the spiral galaxy Messier 51 on June 19 and 20, 2003. Messier 51 is located 27 million light-years from Earth. Due to a lack of star formation, the companion galaxy in the top of the picture is barely visible as a near ultraviolet object. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04628

  16. Galaxy UGC10445

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-25

    This ultraviolet color image of the galaxy UGC10445 was taken by NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 7 and June 14, 2003. UGC10445 is a spiral galaxy located 40 million light-years from Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04623

  17. Imaging and two-dimensional spectra of the IR-bright galaxy NGC 2146 - A recent low-energy merger?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Lo, E.; Neff, S. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Unger, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    New data are presented on the IR-luminous galaxy NGC 2146 from several sources: direct imaging in B, R, and H-alpha; IR imaging in the J, H, and K bands; long-slit spectroscopy at optical and IR wavelengths; and scanning etalon observations in H-alpha. The results allow measurement of the interstellar extinction in the dust lane, and estimation of the true luminosity of the galaxy and nuclear regions. The spectra indicate that there is no active nucleus, and measure the changing ratio of forbidden to permitted lines across the galaxy. IR images and colors indicate the existence of a significant population of hot young stars in the central regions of the system. The H-alpha velocity maps show the full radial-velocity pattern, and suggest that the system consists of a disturbed disk and a merging or interacting arm which connects to the inner dust and radio structures. Outer H-alpha and H I structures appear to be the earlier remnants of this spiraling merger.

  18. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  19. A 20 centimeter VLA survey of Abell clusters of galaxies. II - Images and optical identifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Frazer N.; White, Richard A.; Burns, Jack O.

    1992-01-01

    Radio contour maps, models, and optical identifications for 130 radio galaxies in Abell clusters of galaxies are presented. Results of Gaussian model fits to sources smaller than two beamwidths are presented. The observations were made between 1979 and 1984 using the VLA at 20 cm.

  20. Imaging Cold Gas to 1 kpc scales in high-redshift galaxies with the ngVLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Caitlin; Narayanan, Desika; Dave, Romeel; Hung, Chao-Ling; Champagne, Jaclyn; Carilli, Chris Luke; Decarli, Roberto; Murphy, Eric J.; Popping, Gergo; Riechers, Dominik; Somerville, Rachel S.; Walter, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    The next generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) will revolutionize our understanding of the distant Universe via the detection of cold molecular gas in the first galaxies. Its impact on studies of galaxy characterization via detailed gas dynamics will provide crucial insight on dominant physical drivers for star-formation in high redshift galaxies, including the exchange of gas from scales of the circumgalactic medium down to resolved clouds on mass scales of ~10^5 M_sun. In this study, we employ a series of high-resolution, cosmological, hydrodynamic zoom simulations from the MUFASA simulation suite and a CASA simulator to generate mock ngVLA observations. Based on a direct comparison between the inferred results from our mock observations and the cosmological simulations, we investigate the capabilities of ngVLA to constrain the mode of star formation, dynamical mass, and molecular gas kinematics in individual high-redshift galaxies using cold gas tracers like CO(1-0) and CO(2-1). Using the Despotic radiative transfer code that encompasses simultaneous thermal and statistical equilibrium in calculating the molecular and atomic level populations, we generate parallel mock observations of high-J transitions of CO and C+ from ALMA for comparison. The factor of 100 times improvement in mapping speed for the ngVLA beyond the Jansky VLA and the proposed ALMA Band 1 will make these detailed, high-resolution imaging and kinematic studies routine at z=2 and beyond.

  1. Near-Infrared Continuum and 3.3um PAH Imaging of the Starburst Ring in the Type I Seyfert Galaxy NGC 7469

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzarella, J.; Voit, G.; Soifer, B.; Matthews, K.; Graham, J.; Armus, L.; Shupe, D.

    1993-01-01

    High resolution near-infrared images of the type 1 Seyfert Galaxy NGC 7469 have been obtained to probe its dusty nuclear environment. Direct images are relatively featureless, but residual images created by subtacting a smooth model based on best-fitting elliptical isoophotes reveal a tight inner spiral whose high surface-brightness portions correspond to a previously detected 3.

  2. Analysis of Galaxy 15 Satellite Images from a Small-Aperture Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, S.; Phillion, D.; Simms, L.; Pertica, A.; Olivier, S.; Cognion, R.

    2011-09-01

    Galaxy 15, a geostationary telecommunications satellite, ceased responding to ground operators commands on April 5, 2010. The satellite went into eastward longitudinal drift interfering with operation of other geostationary satellites. Before and after the control of Galaxy 15 was re-established on December 27, 2010, some optical observations of the satellite were conducted using a small-aperture telescope, at sidereal tracking rate, to derive more accurate orbital parameters for Galaxy 15. Here we present the optical imagery for Galaxy 15 satellite and analyze the data. Applying state-of-the-art streak extraction algorithm, and using batch/sequential least squares orbital fitting, we quantify the orbital improvement derived from these data. In addition, we study photometric signatures of Galaxy 15 in both attitude-controlled and uncontrolled regimes, comparing the light curves. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of optical observations by small aperture telescopes for improving the orbits of GEO satellites.

  3. CHARACTERIZING THE STAR FORMATION OF THE LOW-MASS SHIELD GALAXIES FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Simones, Jacob E.; Cannon, John M.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Salzer, John J.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Elson, Ed C.; Ott, Jürgen

    2015-03-20

    The Survey of Hi in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs is an on-going multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies that populate the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. The galaxies were selected from the first ∼10% of the Hi Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey based on their low Hi mass and low baryonic mass. Here, we measure the star formation properties from optically resolved stellar populations for 12 galaxies using a color–magnitude diagram fitting technique. We derive lifetime average star formation rates (SFRs), recent SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions. Overall, the recent SFRs are comparable to the lifetime SFRs with mean birthrate parameter of 1.4, with a surprisingly narrow standard deviation of 0.7. Two galaxies are classified as dwarf transition galaxies (dTrans). These dTrans systems have star formation and gas properties consistent with the rest of the sample, in agreement with previous results that some dTrans galaxies may simply be low-luminosity dwarf irregulars. We do not find a correlation between the recent star formation activity and the distance to the nearest neighboring galaxy, suggesting that the star formation process is not driven by gravitational interactions, but regulated internally. Further, we find a broadening in the star formation and gas properties (i.e., specific SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions) compared to the generally tight correlation found in more massive galaxies. Overall, the star formation and gas properties indicate these very low-mass galaxies host a fluctuating, non-deterministic, and inefficient star formation process.

  4. The first detection of [OIII] emission from high-redshift damped Lyman-α galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherley, S. J.; Warren, S. J.; Møller, P.; Fall, S. M.; Fynbo, J. U.; Croom, S. M.

    2005-04-01

    We present the detection of [OIII] emission lines from the galaxies responsible for two high-redshift z > 1.75 damped Lyman-α (DLA) absorption lines. We find two sources of [OIII] emission corresponding to the z= 1.92 DLA absorber towards the quasar Q2206-1958, and we also detect [OIII] emission from the galaxy responsible for the z= 3.10 DLA absorber towards the quasar 2233.9+1381. These are the first detections of rest-frame optical emission lines from high-redshift DLA galaxies. Unlike the Lyα line, the [OIII] line provides a measure of the systemic velocity of the galaxy. We compare the [OIII] redshifts with the velocity profile of the low-ionization metal lines in these two absorbers, with the goal of distinguishing between the model of Prochaska and Wolfe of DLA absorbers as large rapidly rotating cold thick discs, and the standard hierarchical cold dark matter model of structure formation, in which DLAs arise in protogalactic fragments. We find some discrepancies with the predictions of the former model. Furthermore, the image of the DLA galaxy towards Q2206-1958 shows a complex disturbed morphology, which is more in accord with the hierarchical picture. We use the properties of the rest-frame optical emission lines to further explore the question posed by Møller et al.: are high-redshift DLA galaxies Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) selected by gas cross-section? The measured velocity dispersions of the DLA galaxies are in agreement with this picture, while the data on the [OIII] luminosities and the velocity differences between the Lyα and [OIII] lines are inconclusive, as there are insufficient LBG measurements overlapping in luminosity. Finally, we estimate the star formation rates in these two DLA galaxies, using a variety of diagnostics, and include a discussion of the extent to which the [OIII] line is useful for this purpose.

  5. HerMES: ALMA Imaging of Herschel-selected Dusty Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann, R. S.; Riechers, D.; Fialkov, A.; Scudder, J.; Hayward, C. C.; Cowley, W. I.; Bock, J.; Calanog, J.; Chapman, S. C.; Cooray, A.; De Bernardis, F.; Farrah, D.; Fu, Hai; Gavazzi, R.; Hopwood, R.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M.; Lacey, C.; Loeb, A.; Oliver, S. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Rigopoulou, D.; Roseboom, I. G.; Scott, Douglas; Smith, A. J.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.

    2015-10-01

    The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) has identified large numbers of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) over a wide range in redshift. A detailed understanding of these DSFGs is hampered by the limited spatial resolution of Herschel. We present 870 μm 0.″45 resolution imaging obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of a sample of 29 HerMES DSFGs that have far-infrared (FIR) flux densities that lie between the brightest of sources found by Herschel and fainter DSFGs found via ground-based surveys in the submillimeter region. The ALMA imaging reveals that these DSFGs comprise a total of 62 sources (down to the 5σ point-source sensitivity limit in our ALMA sample; σ ≈ 0.2 {mJy}). Optical or near-infrared imaging indicates that 36 of the ALMA sources experience a significant flux boost from gravitational lensing (μ \\gt 1.1), but only six are strongly lensed and show multiple images. We introduce and make use of uvmcmcfit, a general-purpose and publicly available Markov chain Monte Carlo visibility-plane analysis tool to analyze the source properties. Combined with our previous work on brighter Herschel sources, the lens models presented here tentatively favor intrinsic number counts for DSFGs with a break near 8 {mJy} at 880 μ {{m}} and a steep fall-off at higher flux densities. Nearly 70% of the Herschel sources break down into multiple ALMA counterparts, consistent with previous research indicating that the multiplicity rate is high in bright sources discovered in single-dish submillimeter or FIR surveys. The ALMA counterparts to our Herschel targets are located significantly closer to each other than ALMA counterparts to sources found in the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey. Theoretical models underpredict the excess number of sources with small separations seen in our ALMA sample. The high multiplicity rate and small projected separations between sources seen in our sample argue in favor of interactions

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey. 2: Deconvolution of Wide Field Camera field galaxy images in the 13 hour + 43 deg field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, R. A.; Schmidtke, P. C.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Gordon, J. M.; Griffiths, R. E.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G.; Glazebrook, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present isophotal profiles of six faint field galaxies from some of the first deep images taken for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey (MDS). These have redshifts in the range z = 0.126 to 0.402. The images were taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) in `parallel mode' and deconvolved with the Lucy method using as the point-spread function nearby stars in the image stack. The WFC deconvolutions have a dynamic range of 16 to 20 dB (4 to 5 mag) and an effective resolution approximately less than 0.2 sec (FWHM). The multiorbit HST images allow us to trace the morphology, light profiles, and color gradients of faint field galaxies down to V approximately equal to 22 to 23 mag at sub-kpc resolution, since the redshift range covered is z = 0.1 to 0.4. The goals of the MDS are to study the sub-kpc scale morphology, light profiles, and color gradients for a large samole of faint field galaxies down to V approximately equal to 23 mag, and to trace the fraction of early to late-type galaxies as function of cosmic time. In this paper we study the brighter MDS galaxies in the 13 hour + 43 deg MDS field in detail, and investigate to what extent model fits with pure exponential disks or a(exp 1/4) bulges are justified at V approximately less than 22 mag. Four of the six field galaxies have light profiles that indicate (small) inner bulges following r(exp 1/4) laws down to 0.2 sec resolution, plus a dominant surrounding exponential disk with little or no color gradients. Two occur in a group at z = 0.401, two are barred spiral galaxies at z = 0.179 and z = 0.302, and two are rather subluminous (and edge-on) disk galaxies at z = 0.126 and z = 0.179. Our deep MDS images can detect galaxies down to V, I approximately less than 25 to 26 mag, and demonstrate the impressive potential of HST--even with its pre-refurbished optics--to resolve morphological details in galaxies at cosmologically significant distances (v approximately less than 23 mag). Since the median

  7. NASA Galaxy Mission Celebrates Sixth Anniversary

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-28

    NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer Mission celebrates its sixth anniversary studying galaxies beyond our Milky Way through its sensitive ultraviolet telescope, the only such far-ultraviolet detector in space. The mission studies the shape, brightness, size and distance of distant galaxies across 10 billion years of cosmic history, giving scientists a wealth of data to help us better understand the origins of the universe. One such object is pictured here, the galaxy NGC598, more commonly known as M33. This image is a blend of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's M33 image and another taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. M33, one of our closest galactic neighbors, is about 2.9 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum, part of what's known as our Local Group of galaxies. Together, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Spitzer can see a broad spectrum of sky. Spitzer, for example, can detect mid-infrared radiation from dust that has absorbed young stars' ultraviolet light. That's something the Galaxy Evolution Explorer cannot see. This combined image shows in amazing detail the beautiful and complicated interlacing of the heated dust and young stars. In some regions of M33, dust gathers where there is very little far-ultraviolet light, suggesting that the young stars are obscured or that stars further away are heating the dust. In some of the outer regions of the galaxy, just the opposite is true: There are plenty of young stars and very little dust. Far-ultraviolet light from young stars glimmers blue, near-ultraviolet light from intermediate age stars glows green, near-infrared light from old stars burns yellow and orange, and dust rich in organic molecules burns red. The small blue flecks outside the spiral disk of M33 are most likely distant background galaxies. This image is a four-band composite that, in addition to the two ultraviolet bands, includes near infrared as yellow/orange and far infrared as red. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11999

  8. The Morphology of Passively Evolving Galaxies at Z approximately 2 from HST/WFC3 Deep Imaging in the Hubble Ultradeep Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassata, P.; Giavalisco, M.; Guo, Yicheng; Ferguson, H.; Koekemoer, A.; Renzini, A.; Fontana, A.; Salimbeni, S.; Dickinson, M.; Casertano, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present near-IR images of six passive galaxies (SSFR< 10(exp -2)/ Gyr) at redshift 1.3 < z < 2.4 with stellar mass M approximately 10(exp 11) solar M, selected from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the WFC3/IR camera. These images provide the deepest and highest angular resolution view of the optical rest-frame morphology of such systems to date. We find that the light profile of these galaxies is generally regular and well described by a Sersic model with index typical of today's spheroids. We confirm the existence of compact and massive early-type galaxies at z approximately 2: four out of six galaxies have r(sub e) approximately 1 kpc or less. The images reach limiting surface brightness mu approximates 26.5 mag/square arcsec in the F160W bandpass; yet there is no evidence of a faint halo in the galaxies of our sample, even in their stacked image. We also find very weak "morphological k-correction" in the galaxies between the rest-frame UV (from the ACS z-band), and the rest-frame optical (WFC3 H-band): the visual classification, Sersic indices and physical sizes of these galaxies are independent or only mildly dependent on the wavelength, within the errors. The presence of an active nucleus is suspected in two out of six galaxies (33%), opening the intriguing possibility that a large, presently unaccounted population of AGN is hosted in these galaxies, possibly responsible for the cessation of star formation.

  9. Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Scientists are seeing unprecedented detail of the spiral arms and dust clouds in the nearby Whirlpool galaxy, thanks to a new Hubble Space Telescope image, available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc/wfpc.html. The image uses data collected January 15 and 24, 1995, and July 21, 1999, by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by JPL. Using the image, a research group led by Dr. Nick Scoville of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, clearly defined the structure of the galaxy's cold dust clouds and hot hydrogen, and they linked star clusters within the galaxy to their parent dust clouds.

    The Whirlpool galaxy is one of the most photogenic galaxies. This celestial beauty is easily seen and photographed with smaller telescopes and studied extensively from large ground- and space-based observatories. The new composite image shows visible starlight and light from the emission of glowing hydrogen, which is associated with the most luminous young stars in the spiral arms.

    The galaxy is having a close encounter with a nearby companion galaxy, NGC 5195, just off the upper edge of the image. The companion's gravitational pull is triggering star formation in the main galaxy, lit up by numerous clusters of young and energetic stars in brilliant detail. Luminous clusters are highlighted in red by their associated emission from glowing hydrogen gas.

    This image was composed by the Hubble Heritage Team from Hubble archive data and was superimposed onto data taken by Dr. Travis Rector of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory at the .9-meter (35-inch) telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Ariz. Scoville's team includes M. Polletta of the University of Geneva, Switzerland; S. Ewald and S. Stolovy of Caltech; and R. Thompson and M. Rieke of the University of Arizona, Tucson.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for the Hubble Space

  10. Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Scientists are seeing unprecedented detail of the spiral arms and dust clouds in the nearby Whirlpool galaxy, thanks to a new Hubble Space Telescope image, available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc/wfpc.html. The image uses data collected January 15 and 24, 1995, and July 21, 1999, by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by JPL. Using the image, a research group led by Dr. Nick Scoville of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, clearly defined the structure of the galaxy's cold dust clouds and hot hydrogen, and they linked star clusters within the galaxy to their parent dust clouds.

    The Whirlpool galaxy is one of the most photogenic galaxies. This celestial beauty is easily seen and photographed with smaller telescopes and studied extensively from large ground- and space-based observatories. The new composite image shows visible starlight and light from the emission of glowing hydrogen, which is associated with the most luminous young stars in the spiral arms.

    The galaxy is having a close encounter with a nearby companion galaxy, NGC 5195, just off the upper edge of the image. The companion's gravitational pull is triggering star formation in the main galaxy, lit up by numerous clusters of young and energetic stars in brilliant detail. Luminous clusters are highlighted in red by their associated emission from glowing hydrogen gas.

    This image was composed by the Hubble Heritage Team from Hubble archive data and was superimposed onto data taken by Dr. Travis Rector of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory at the .9-meter (35-inch) telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Ariz. Scoville's team includes M. Polletta of the University of Geneva, Switzerland; S. Ewald and S. Stolovy of Caltech; and R. Thompson and M. Rieke of the University of Arizona, Tucson.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for the Hubble Space

  11. Galaxy NGC 1850

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    By spying on a neighboring galaxy, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured an image of a young, globular-like star cluster -- a type of object unknown in our Milky Way Galaxy.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/25 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The double cluster NGC 1850 lies in a neighboring satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. It has two relatively young components. The main, globular-like cluster is in the center. A smaller cluster is seen below and to the right, composed of extremely hot, blue stars and fainter red T-Tauri stars. The main cluster is about 50 million years old; the smaller one is 4 million years old.

    A filigree pattern of diffuse gas surrounds NGC 1850. Scientists believe the pattern formed millions of years ago when massive stars in the main cluster exploded as supernovas.

    Hubble can observe a range of star types in NGC 1850, including the faint, low-mass T-Tauri stars, which are difficult to distinguish with ground-based telescopes. Hubble's fine angular resolution can pick out these stars, even in other galaxies. Massive stars of the OB type emit large amounts of energetic ultraviolet radiation, which is absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere. From Hubble's position above the atmosphere, it can detect this ultraviolet light.

    NGC 1850, the brightest star cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud, is in the southern constellation of Dorado, called the Goldfish or the Swordfish. This image was created from five archival exposures taken by the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 between April 3, 1994 and February 6, 1996. More information about the Hubble Space Telescope is online at http://www.stsci.edu. More information about the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 is at http://wfpc2.jpl.nasa.gov.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore

  12. Alfalfa discovery of the nearby gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo P. IV. Distance measurement from LBT optical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Dolphin, Andrew E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu

    2013-12-01

    Leo P is a low-luminosity dwarf galaxy discovered through the blind H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. The H I and follow-up optical observations have shown that Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with both active star formation and an underlying older population, as well as an extremely low oxygen abundance. Here, we measure the distance to Leo P by applying the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) distance method to photometry of the resolved stellar population from new Large Binocular Telescope V and I band imaging. We measure a distance modulus of 26.19{sub −0.50}{sup +0.17} mag corresponding to a distance of 1.72{sub −0.40}{sup +0.14} Mpc. Although our photometry reaches 3 mag below the TRGB, the sparseness of the red giant branch yields higher uncertainties on the lower limit of the distance. Leo P is outside the Local Group with a distance and velocity consistent with the local Hubble flow. While located in a very low-density environment, Leo P lies within ∼0.5 Mpc of a loose association of dwarf galaxies which include NGC 3109, Antlia, Sextans A, and Sextans B, and 1.1 Mpc away from its next nearest neighbor, Leo A. Leo P is one of the lowest metallicity star-forming galaxies known in the nearby universe, comparable in metallicity to I Zw 18 and DDO 68, but with stellar characteristics similar to dwarf spheriodals (dSphs) in the Local Volume such as Carina, Sextans, and Leo II. Given its physical properties and isolation, Leo P may provide an evolutionary link between gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and dSphs that have fallen into a Local Group environment and been stripped of their gas.

  13. Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-04

    The image from NASA Hubble Telescope shows spiral arms and dust clouds in the nearby Whirlpool galaxy. Visible starlight and light from the emission of glowing hydrogen is seen, which is associated with the most luminous young stars in the spiral arms.

  14. SUB-KILOPARSEC IMAGING OF COOL MOLECULAR GAS IN TWO STRONGLY LENSED DUSTY, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Spilker, J. S.; Marrone, D. P.; Aravena, M.; Béthermin, M.; Breuck, C. de; Bothwell, M. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Rotermund, K. M.; Collier, J. D.; Galvin, T.; Grieve, K.; O’Brien, A.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Ma, J.; González-López, J.; Hezaveh, Y.; Malkan, M.; and others

    2015-10-01

    We present spatially resolved imaging obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) of three CO lines in two high-redshift gravitationally lensed dusty star-forming galaxies, discovered by the South Pole Telescope. Strong lensing allows us to probe the structure and dynamics of the molecular gas in these two objects, at z = 2.78 and z = 5.66, with effective source-plane resolution of less than 1 kpc. We model the lensed emission from multiple CO transitions and the dust continuum in a consistent manner, finding that the cold molecular gas as traced by low-J CO always has a larger half-light radius than the 870 μm dust continuum emission. This size difference leads to up to 50% differences in the magnification factor for the cold gas compared to dust. In the z = 2.78 galaxy, these CO observations confirm that the background source is undergoing a major merger, while the velocity field of the other source is more complex. We use the ATCA CO observations and comparable resolution Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array dust continuum imaging of the same objects to constrain the CO–H{sub 2} conversion factor with three different procedures, finding good agreement between the methods and values consistent with those found for rapidly star-forming systems. We discuss these galaxies in the context of the star formation—gas mass surface density relation, noting that the change in emitting area with observed CO transition must be accounted for when comparing high-redshift galaxies to their lower redshift counterparts.

  15. Classic Galaxy with Glamour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This color composite image of nearby NGC 300 combines the visible-light pictures from Carnegie Institution of Washington's 100-inch telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (colored red and yellow), with ultraviolet views from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Galaxy Evolution Explorer detectors image far ultraviolet light (colored blue).

    This composite image traces star formation in progress. Young hot blue stars dominate the outer spiral arms of the galaxy, while the older stars congregate in the nuclear regions which appear yellow-green. Gases heated by hot young stars and shocks due to winds from massive stars and supernova explosions appear in pink, as revealed by the visible-light image of the galaxy.

    Located nearly 7 million light years away, NGC 300 is a member of a nearby group of galaxies known as the Sculptor Group. It is a spiral galaxy like our own Milky Way.

  16. Sunyaev - Zel'dovich Effect Imaging of Massive Clusters of Galaxies at Redshift > 0.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall; LaRoque, Samuel; Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Dawson, Kyle; Ebeling, Harald; Holzapfel, William L.; Nagai, Daisuke; Reese, Erik D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) imaging observations of three distant (z greater than 0.8) and highly X-ray luminous clusters of galaxies, C1J1226+33, C1J0152-13 and MS1054-03. Two of the clusters, C1J1226+33 and C1J0152-13, were recently discovered in the WARPS X-ray survey. Their high X-ray luminosity suggests they are massive systems and, if confirmed, would provide strong constraints on the cosmological parameters of structure formation models. Our Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect data provide confirmation that they are massive clusters similar to the well studied cluster MS1054-03. Assuming the clusters have the same gas mass fraction derived from SZE measurements of eighteen known massive clusters, we are able to infer their mass and electron temperatures from the SZE data. The derived electron temperatures are 10.0, 8.5, and 10.3 KeV, respectively, and we infer total masses of approximately 2 x 10(circumflex) 14 h(circumflex) -l M - sun within a radius of 65" for all three clusters. For C1J0152-13 and MS1054-03 we find good agreement between our SZE derived temperatures and those derived from X-ray spectroscopic measurements. No X-ray derived temperatures are available for C1J1226+33, and thus the SZE data provide the first confirmation that it is indeed a massive system. The demonstrated ability to determine cluster temperatures and masses from SZE observations without access to X-ray data illustrates the power of using deep SZE surveys to probe the distant universe.

  17. RINGFINDER: Automated detection of galaxy-scale gravitational lenses in ground-based multi-filter imaging data

    SciTech Connect

    Gavazzi, Raphaël; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro

    2014-04-20

    We present RINGFINDER, a tool for finding galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses in multi-band imaging data. By construction, the method is sensitive to configurations involving a massive foreground ETG and a faint, background, blue source. RINGFINDER detects the presence of blue residuals embedded in an otherwise smooth red light distribution by difference imaging in two bands. The method is automated for efficient application to current and future surveys, having originally been designed for the 150 deg{sup 2} Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). We describe each of the steps of RINGFINDER. We then carry out extensive simulations to assess completeness and purity. For sources with magnification μ > 4, RINGFINDER reaches 42% (25%) completeness and 29% (86%) purity before (after) visual inspection. The completeness of RINGFINDER is substantially improved in the particular range of Einstein radii 0.''8 ≤ R {sub Ein} ≤ 2.''0 and lensed images brighter than g = 22.5, where it can be as high as ∼70%. RINGFINDER does not introduce any significant bias in the source or deflector population. We conclude by presenting the final catalog of RINGFINDER CFHTLS galaxy-scale strong lens candidates. Additional information obtained with Hubble Space Telescope and Keck adaptive optics high-resolution imaging, and with Keck and Very Large Telescope spectroscopy, is used to assess the validity of our classification and measure the redshift of the foreground and the background objects. From an initial sample of 640,000 ETGs, RINGFINDER returns 2500 candidates, which we further reduce by visual inspection to 330 candidates. We confirm 33 new gravitational lenses from the main sample of candidates, plus an additional 16 systems taken from earlier versions of RINGFINDER. First applications are presented in the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey galaxy-scale lens sample paper series.

  18. RINGFINDER: Automated Detection of Galaxy-scale Gravitational Lenses in Ground-based Multi-filter Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, Raphaël; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    We present RINGFINDER, a tool for finding galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses in multi-band imaging data. By construction, the method is sensitive to configurations involving a massive foreground ETG and a faint, background, blue source. RINGFINDER detects the presence of blue residuals embedded in an otherwise smooth red light distribution by difference imaging in two bands. The method is automated for efficient application to current and future surveys, having originally been designed for the 150 deg2 Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). We describe each of the steps of RINGFINDER. We then carry out extensive simulations to assess completeness and purity. For sources with magnification μ > 4, RINGFINDER reaches 42% (25%) completeness and 29% (86%) purity before (after) visual inspection. The completeness of RINGFINDER is substantially improved in the particular range of Einstein radii 0.''8 <= R Ein <= 2.''0 and lensed images brighter than g = 22.5, where it can be as high as ~70%. RINGFINDER does not introduce any significant bias in the source or deflector population. We conclude by presenting the final catalog of RINGFINDER CFHTLS galaxy-scale strong lens candidates. Additional information obtained with Hubble Space Telescope and Keck adaptive optics high-resolution imaging, and with Keck and Very Large Telescope spectroscopy, is used to assess the validity of our classification and measure the redshift of the foreground and the background objects. From an initial sample of 640,000 ETGs, RINGFINDER returns 2500 candidates, which we further reduce by visual inspection to 330 candidates. We confirm 33 new gravitational lenses from the main sample of candidates, plus an additional 16 systems taken from earlier versions of RINGFINDER. First applications are presented in the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey galaxy-scale lens sample paper series.

  19. Extinction in SC galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Salzer, John J.; Wegner, Gary; da Costa, Luiz N.; Freudling, Wolfram

    1994-06-01

    We analyze the photometric properties of a sample of Sbc-Sc galaxies with known redshifts, single-dish H I profiles, and Charge Coupled Device (CCD) I band images. We derive laws that relate the measured isophotal radius at muI = 23.5, magnitude, scale length, and H I flux to the face-on aspect. We find spiral galaxies to be substantially less transparent than suggested in most previous determinations, but not as opaque as claimed by Valentijn (1990). Regions in the disk farther than two or three scale lengths from the center are close to completely transparent. In addition to statistically derived relations for the inclination dependence of photometric parameters, we present the results of a modeling exercise that utilizes the 'triplex' model of Disney et al. (1989) to obtain upper limits of the disk opacity. Within the framework of that model, and with qualitative consideration of the effects of scattering on extinction, we estimate late spiral disks at I band to have central optical depths tauI(0) less than 5 and dust absorbing layers with scale heights on the order of half that of the stellar component or less. We discuss our results in light of previous determinations of internal extinction relations and point out the substantial impact of internal extinction on the scatter of the Tully-Fisher relation. We also find that the visual diameters by which large catalogs are constructed (UGC, ESO-Uppsala) are nearly proportional to face-on isophotal diameters.

  20. The HST Snapshot Survey of Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Candidates. II. Distance to the M81/NGC2403 Complex Via DSph Galaxies Imaged With WFPC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Dolphin, A. E.; Geisler, D.; Grebel, E. K.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hodge, P. W.; Sarajedini, A.; Seitzer, P.; Sharina, M. E.

    1999-12-01

    The bright spiral galaxies M81 and NGC 2403 and their dwarf companions are two of the closest galaxy groups to our own Local Group. The Cepheid distance moduli of M81 and NGC 2403 are (27.80+/-0.20) and (27.51+/-0.24) mag (Freedman et al. 1994, Freedman & Madore 1988). We obtained Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies K61, K63, K64, DDO 78, BK6N, kk077 in the M81 group and of DDO 44 in the NGC2403 group. The resulting CMDs show the red giant branch with tips in the range of I(TRGB)= [23.5 -- 24.0] mag. The derived true distance moduli of the six M81 dSphs range from 27.55 to 27.95 mag, consistent with their membership in this group. The TRGB distance modulus of DDO 44, (27.52+/-0.15) mag, confirms it as a companion of NGC 2403. Taking into account the TRGB distances derived for M82 (Sakai & Madore 1999), for the dSphs BK5N and F8D1 (Caldwell et al. 1998), and the BCD UGC6456 (Lynds et al. 1998), we obtain a mean distance modulus of (27.82 +/-0.06) mag for the M81 group. The standard deviation of the individual moduli is 0.17 mag. We find the difference of the TRGB distances to the two the groups to be (0.47+/-0.25) Mpc. {From} a projected separation of M81 and NGC 2403 of 0.83 Mpc follows a deprojected distance of 0.95 Mpc. With respect to the Local Group, M81 and NGC 2403 have radial velocities of 106 km/s and 216 km/s, while the velocities of the group centroids are 216 km/s and 275 km/s, respectively. The higher velocity of the closer group may indicate that the two groups are moving towards each other. IDK and EKG are supported by the Henri Chrétien International Research Grant administered by the American Astronomical Society.

  1. Galaxy M101

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-25

    This three-color image of galaxy M101 was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 20, 2003. The far ultraviolet emissions are shown in blue, the near ultraviolet emissions are green, and the red emissions, which were taken from NASA's Digital Sky Survey, represent visible light. This image combines short, medium, and long "exposure" pictures to best display the evolution of star formation in a spiral galaxy. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04630

  2. A MID-INFRARED IMAGING SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER-SELECTED GALAXIES WITH THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hainline, Laura J.; Blain, A. W.; Smail, Ian; Frayer, D. T.; Chapman, S. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Alexander, D. M. E-mail: ljh@astro.umd.edu

    2009-07-10

    We present Spitzer-IRAC and MIPS mid-IR observations of a sample of 73 radio-detected submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) with spectroscopic redshifts, the largest such sample published to date. From our data, we find that IRAC colors of SMGs are much more uniform as compared with rest-frame UV and optical colors, and z>1.5 SMGs tend to be redder in their mid-IR colors than both field galaxies and lower-z SMGs. However, the IRAC colors of the SMGs overlap those of field galaxies sufficiently that color-magnitude and color-color selection criteria suggested in the literature to identify SMG counterparts produce ambiguous counterparts within an 8'' radius in 20%-35% of cases. We use a rest-frame J-H versus H-K color-color diagram and a S {sub 24}/S {sub 8.0} versus S {sub 8.0}/S {sub 4.5} color-color diagram to determine that 13%-19% of our sample are likely to contain active galactic nuclei which dominate their mid-IR emission. We observe in the rest-frame JHK colors of our sample that the rest-frame near-IR emission of SMGs does not resemble that of the compact nuclear starburst observed in local ultraluminous IR galaxies and is consistent with more widely distributed star formation. We take advantage of the fact that many high-z galaxy populations selected at different wavelengths are detected by Spitzer to carry out a brief comparison of mid-IR properties of SMGs to UV-selected high-z galaxies, 24 {mu}m-selected galaxies, and high-z radio galaxies, and find that SMGs have mid-IR fluxes and colors which are consistent with being more massive and more reddened than UV-selected galaxies, while the IRAC colors of SMGs are most similar to powerful high-z radio galaxies.

  3. Metamaterial Resonant Absorbers for Terahertz Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    absorber that can be incorporated into a terahertz (THz) imaging system with a 4.7 THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) illumination source. Finite...absorber that can be incorporated into a terahertz (THz) imaging system with a 4.7 THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) illumination source. Finite...use of THz imaging systems. Recent developments in quantum cascade THz lasers and metamaterial-based THz absorbers allow design of compact imaging

  4. The MG II absorption system in the QSO PKS 2128-12 - A galaxy disc/halo with a radius of 65 KPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, J.

    1986-01-01

    An imaging survey of the field around QSO PKS 2128-12, a QSO with low redshift narrow Mg II absorption line systems, is performed to verify the assumption that sharp metal-rich absorption systems found in the spectra of QSO's arise in intervening materials. The absorber has a redshift, z = 0.4299, that is smaller than that of the QSO emission redshift. The closest galaxy to the QSO, lies 64 kpc north-east of it, and has a redshift equal to that of the absorber. It is gas-rich, and its V and red magnitudes are about those expected for a spiral galaxy. Since the absorbing gas is found to have a small velocity dispersion, fairly high abundances and column densities, and a moderate degree of ionization, it is more likely associated with material in the disc of this galaxy than with a large surrounding halo. This QSO-galaxy pair increases by a factor of four the projected distance from a galaxy center at which absorbing ionized gas has been detected, strongly favoring the assumption of intervening galaxies at least for moderately ionized absorbers.

  5. Joint deprojection of Sunyaev-Zeldovich and X-ray images of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameglio, S.; Borgani, S.; Pierpaoli, E.; Dolag, K.

    2007-11-01

    We present two non-parametric deprojection methods aimed at recovering the three-dimensional density and temperature profiles of galaxy clusters from spatially resolved thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) and X-ray surface brightness maps, thus avoiding the use of X-ray spectroscopic data. In both methods, the cluster is assumed spherically symmetric and modelled with an onion-skin structure. The first method follows a direct geometrical approach, in which the deprojection is performed independently for the tSZ and X-ray images, and the resulting profiles are then combined in order to extract density and temperature. The second method is based on the maximization of a single joint (tSZ and X-ray) likelihood function. This allows us to simultaneously fit the two signals by following a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) approach. These techniques are tested against both an idealized spherical β-model cluster and a set of clusters extracted from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations with and without instrumental noise. In the first case, the quality of reconstruction is excellent and demonstrates that such methods do not suffer from any intrinsic bias. As for the application to simulations, we projected each cluster along the three orthogonal directions defined by the principal axes of the momentum of inertia tensor. This enables us to check any bias in the deprojection associated to the cluster elongation along the line of sight. After averaging over all the three projection directions, we find an overall good reconstruction, with a small (<~10 per cent) overestimate of the gas density profile. This turns into a comparable overestimate of the gas mass within the virial radius, which we ascribe to the presence of residual gas clumping. Apart from this small bias, the reconstruction has an intrinsic scatter of about 5 per cent, which is dominated by gas clumpiness. Cluster elongation along the line of sight biases the deprojected temperature profile upwards at r <~ 0.2rvir

  6. Spitzer/IRAC Imaging of Exceptionally Bright Cluster-Lensed Submillimeter Galaxies Discovered by the Herschel Lensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald; Rawle, Timothy; Clement, Benjamin; Walth, Gregory; Pereira, Maria; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years, discoveries of exceptionally bright (e.g., observed S_peak > 100 mJy in the Herschel/SPIRE bands) gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have generated great excitement. This is because these gravitationally lensed SMGs are so bright that they enable us to perform a variety of follow-up observations using a suite of observing facilities in the submillimeter, millimeter, and radio now available on the ground. Using Herschel, our team has been conducting a survey of such bright lensed galaxies in the fields of massive galaxy clusters: ``The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS)'' (PI: Egami; 419 hours). This large Herschel program targets a total of 581 X-ray/SZ-selected massive clusters, and is currently 80% complete. Cluster lenses are often more powerful than galaxy lenses, producing larger magnifications. For example, typical magnification factors for galaxy-lensed Herschel sources are x10 or less while cluster-lensed systems can often produce magnification factors of x20-30 and even above x100. Cluster lenses will therefore allow us to detect and study intrinsically less-luminous and/or more distant sources with the ability to provide a view of finer-scale (i.e., sub-kpc) structures. Here, we propose to conduct Spitzer/IRAC imaging of 56 bright lensed SMG candidates we have identified in the ~470 HLS cluster fields observed so far. The main scientific goal is twofold: (1) to locate the underlying stellar component, and (2) to study its properties (e.g., stellar mass, specific star-formation rate) by constraining the rest-frame near-infrared SED and comparing with the Herschel and other submillimeter/millimeter data (e.g., SMA, PdB, ALMA, etc.). These rare bright lensed SMGs will allow us to probe the population of heavily dust-obscured vigorously star-forming galaxies at high redshift (z>1), which is thought to play an important role in the cosmic star-formation history of the Universe and yet has been difficult to study due to the

  7. A VLT/FORS2 Narrowband Imaging Search for MgII Emission Around z~0.7 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickards Vaught, Ryan; Rubin, Kate; Arrigoni Battaia, Fabrizio

    2017-06-01

    Galactic-scale outflows are thought to be the primary mechanism in the removal of cool gas in star-forming galaxies. Presently, the mass and energy of these flows remain poorly constrained. One way to better constrain these parameters is to measure the spatial extent of the outflow; however, measuring the spatial extent of such outflows via spectral methods has been traditionally very difficult due to the faintness of emission lines tracing outflowing material. We present VLT/FORS2 narrowband imaging of 5 star forming galaxies at redshift z=0.67-0.69 in the GOODS-S field as part of an effort to spatially resolve large-scale outflows traced by MgII emission. Previous spectra of this sample have already revealed winds traced by MgII absorption. At our sample redshift, the MgII emission lines fall exactly within the FORS2 HeII+47 and HeII/3000+48 interference filters. The total integration time of 10 hrs obtained in each filter permits the analysis of the flow surface brightness and extent on scales over which MgII is typically detected in absorption ( i.e, projected distances >100 kpc). Such measurements can provide stronger constraints on the mass and energy of feedback, helping to advance our understanding of the processes regulating galaxy evolution up to z=1.

  8. Galaxy NGC 247

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-10

    This image of the dwarf spiral galaxy NGC 247 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer on October 13, 2003, in a single orbit exposure of 1600 seconds. The region that looks like a "hole" in the upper part of the galaxy is a location with a deficit of gas and therefore a lower star formation rate and ultraviolet brightness. Optical images of this galaxy show a bright star on the southern edge. This star is faint and red in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet image, revealing that it is a foreground star in our Milky Way galaxy. The string of background galaxies to the North-East (upper left) of NGC 247 is 355 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy whereas NGC 247 is a mere 9 million light years away. The faint blue light that can be seen in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer image of the upper two of these background galaxies may indicate that they are in the process of merging together. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04922

  9. Low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  10. Randomized Comparison of Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold and Mirage Microfiber Sirolimus-Eluting Scaffold Using Multimodality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Serruys, Patrick W; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Costa, Ricardo; Chamié, Daniel; Sotomi, Yohei; Yu, Ting-Bin; Abizaid, Alexander; Liew, Houng-Bang; Santoso, Teguh

    2017-06-12

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Mirage (Manli Cardiology, Singapore) bioresorbable microfiber sirolimus-eluting scaffold compared with the Absorb (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California) bioresorbable vascular scaffold in the treatment of stenotic target lesions located in native coronary arteries, ranging from ≥2.25 to ≤4.0 mm in diameter. Secondary objectives were to establish the medium-term safety, effectiveness, and performance of the Mirage device. The current generation of bioresorbable scaffolds has several limitations, such as thick square struts with large footprints that preclude their deep embedment into the vessel wall, resulting in protrusion into the lumen with microdisturbance of flow. The Mirage sirolimus-eluting bioresorbable microfiber scaffold is designed to address these concerns. In this prospective, single-blind trial, 60 patients were randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to treatment with a Mirage sirolimus-eluting bioresorbable microfiber scaffold or an Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold. The clinical endpoints were assessed at 30 days and at 6 and 12 months. In-device angiographic late loss at 12 months was quantified. Secondary optical coherence tomographic endpoints were assessed post-scaffold implantation at 6 and 12 months. Median angiographic post-procedural in-scaffold minimal luminal diameters of the Mirage and Absorb devices were 2.38 mm (interquartile range [IQR]: 2.06 to 2.62 mm) and 2.55 mm (IQR: 2.26 to 2.71 mm), respectively; the effect size (d) was -0.29. At 12 months, median angiographic in-scaffold minimal luminal diameters of the Mirage and Absorb devices were not statistically different (1.90 mm [IQR: 1.57 to 2.31 mm] vs. 2.29 mm [IQR: 1.74 to 2.51 mm], d = -0.36). At 12-month follow-up, median in-scaffold late luminal loss with the Mirage and Absorb devices was 0.37 mm (IQR: 0.08 to 0.72 mm) and 0.23 mm (IQR: 0.15 to 0.37 mm), respectively (d = 0

  11. Hubble's Megamaser Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Feast your eyes on Hubble's Megamaser galaxy! Phenomena across the Universe emit radiation spanning the entire electromagnetic spectrum — from high-energy gamma rays, which stream out from the most energetic events in the cosmos, to lower-energy microwaves and radio waves. Microwaves, the very same radiation that can heat up your dinner, are produced by a multitude of astrophysical sources, including strong emitters known as masers (microwave lasers), even stronger emitters with the somewhat villainous name of megamasers and the centers of some galaxies. Especially intense and luminous galactic centers are known as active galactic nuclei. They are in turn thought to be driven by the presence of supermassive black holes, which drag surrounding material inwards and spit out bright jets and radiation as they do so. The two galaxies shown here, imaged by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, are named MCG+01-38-004 (the upper, red-tinted one) and MCG+01-38-005 (the lower, blue-tinted one). MCG+01-38-005 (also known as NGC 5765B) is a special kind of megamaser; the galaxy’s active galactic nucleus pumps out huge amounts of energy, which stimulates clouds of surrounding water. Water’s constituent atoms of hydrogen and oxygen are able to absorb some of this energy and re-emit it at specific wavelengths, one of which falls within the microwave regime, invisible to Hubble but detectable by microwave telescopes. MCG+01-38-005 is thus known as a water megamaser! Astronomers can use such objects to probe the fundamental properties of the Universe. The microwave emissions from MCG+01-38-005 were used to calculate a refined value for the Hubble constant, a measure of how fast the Universe is expanding. This constant is named after the astronomer whose observations were responsible for the discovery of the expanding Universe and after whom the Hubble Space Telescope was named, Edwin Hubble.

  12. Herschel *-ATLAS: deep HST/WFC3 imaging of strongly lensed submillimetre galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrello, M.; Hopwood, R.; Dye, S.; Cunha, E. da; Serjeant, S.; Fritz, J.; Rowlands, K.; Fleuren, S.; Bussmann, R. S.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Lapi, A.; Omont, A.; Amber, S.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Danese, L.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Kim, S.; Leeuw, L.; Maddox, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Massardi, M.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Smith, D. J. B.; Sutherland, W.; Temi, P.; Wardlow, J.

    2014-05-01

    We report on deep near-infrared observations obtained with the Wide Field Camera-3 (WFC3) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the first five confirmed gravitational lensing events discovered by the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). We succeed in disentangling the background galaxy from the lens to gain separate photometry of the two components. The HST data allow us to significantly improve on previous constraints of the mass in stars of the lensed galaxy and to perform accurate lens modelling of these systems, as described in the accompanying paper by Dye et al. We fit the spectral energy distributions of the background sources from near-IR to millimetre wavelengths and use the magnification factors estimated by Dye et al. to derive the intrinsic properties of the lensed galaxies. We find these galaxies to have star-formations rates (SFR) ˜ 400-2000 M⊙ yr-1, with ˜(6-25) × 1010 M⊙ of their baryonic mass already turned into stars. At these rates of star formation, all remaining molecular gas will be exhausted in less than ˜100 Myr, reaching a final mass in stars of a few 1011 M⊙. These galaxies are thus proto-ellipticals caught during their major episode of star formation, and observed at the peak epoch (z ˜ 1.5-3) of the cosmic star formation history of the Universe.

  13. ALMA Imaging and Gravitational Lens Models of South Pole Telescope—Selected Dusty, Star-Forming Galaxies at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, J. S.; Marrone, D. P.; Aravena, M.; Béthermin, M.; Bothwell, M. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Crawford, T. M.; de Breuck, C.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Hezaveh, Y.; Litke, K.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Rotermund, K. M.; Strandet, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiss, A.; Welikala, N.

    2016-08-01

    The South Pole Telescope has discovered 100 gravitationally lensed, high-redshift, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We present 0.″5 resolution 870 μ {{m}} Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array imaging of a sample of 47 DSFGs spanning z=1.9{--}5.7, and construct gravitational lens models of these sources. Our visibility-based lens modeling incorporates several sources of residual interferometric calibration uncertainty, allowing us to properly account for noise in the observations. At least 70% of the sources are strongly lensed by foreground galaxies ({μ }870μ {{m}}\\gt 2), with a median magnification of {μ }870μ {{m}}=6.3, extending to {μ }870μ {{m}}\\gt 30. We compare the intrinsic size distribution of the strongly lensed sources to a similar number of unlensed DSFGs and find no significant differences in spite of a bias between the magnification and intrinsic source size. This may indicate that the true size distribution of DSFGs is relatively narrow. We use the source sizes to constrain the wavelength at which the dust optical depth is unity and find this wavelength to be correlated with the dust temperature. This correlation leads to discrepancies in dust mass estimates of a factor of two compared to estimates using a single value for this wavelength. We investigate the relationship between the [C ii] line and the far-infrared luminosity and find that the same correlation between the [C ii]/{L}{{FIR}} ratio and {{{Σ }}}{{FIR}} found for low-redshift star-forming galaxies applies to high-redshift galaxies and extends at least two orders of magnitude higher in {{{Σ }}}{{FIR}}. This lends further credence to the claim that the compactness of the IR-emitting region is the controlling parameter in establishing the “[C ii] deficit.”

  14. The effect of iodine uptake on radiation dose absorbed by patient tissues in contrast enhanced CT imaging: Implications for CT dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Tzedakis, Antonis; Spanakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E; Hatzidakis, Adam; Damilakis, John

    2017-07-14

    To investigate the effect of iodine uptake on tissue/organ absorbed doses from CT exposure and its implications in CT dosimetry. The contrast-induced CT number increase of several radiosensitive tissues was retrospectively determined in 120 CT examinations involving both non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT imaging. CT images of a phantom containing aqueous solutions of varying iodine concentration were obtained. Plots of the CT number increase against iodine concentration were produced. The clinically occurring iodine tissue uptake was quantified by attributing recorded CT number increase to a certain concentration of aqueous iodine solution. Clinically occurring iodine uptake was represented in mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms. Standard 120 kV CT exposures were simulated using Monte Carlo methods and resulting organ doses were derived for non-enhanced and iodine contrast-enhanced CT imaging. The mean iodine uptake range during contrast-enhanced CT imaging was found to be 0.02-0.46% w/w for the investigated tissues, while the maximum value recorded was 0.82% w/w. For the same CT exposure, iodinated tissues were found to receive higher radiation dose than non-iodinated tissues, with dose increase exceeding 100% for tissues with high iodine uptake. Administration of iodinated contrast medium considerably increases radiation dose to tissues from CT exposure. • Radiation absorption ability of organs/tissues is considerably affected by iodine uptake • Iodinated organ/tissues may absorb up to 100 % higher radiation dose • Compared to non-enhanced, contrast-enhanced CT may deliver higher dose to patient tissues • CT dosimetry of contrast-enhanced CT imaging should encounter tissue iodine uptake.

  15. Big Galaxy in Baby Universe

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-09-27

    This image demonstrates how data from two of NASA Great Observatories, the Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes, are used to identify one of the most distant galaxies ever seen. This galaxy is named named HUDF-JD2.

  16. The Invisible Galaxies That Could Not Hide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-02-01

    . Astronomers therefore came up with other ways to study distant galaxies: they use quasars, most probably the brightest distant objects known, as beacons in the Universe. Interstellar clouds of gas in galaxies, located between the quasars and us on the same line of sight, absorb parts of the light emitted by the quasars. The resulting spectrum consequently presents dark 'valleys' that can be attributed to well-known elements. Thus, astronomers can measure the amount of metals present in these galaxies - that are in effect invisible - at various epochs. "This can best be done by high-resolution spectrographs on the largest telescopes, such as the Ultra-violet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on ESO's Kueyen 8.2-m telescope at the Paranal Observatory," declared Péroux. Her team studied in detail the spectrum of the quasar SDSS J1323-0021 that shows clear indications of absorption by a cloud of hydrogen and metals located between the quasar and us. From a careful analysis of the spectrum, the astronomers found this 'system' to be four times richer in zinc than the Sun. Other metals such as iron appear to have condensed into dust grains. "If a large number of such 'invisible' galaxies with high metal content were to be discovered, they might well alleviate considerably the missing metals problem", said Péroux. High resolution images and their captions are available on this page.

  17. Enhanced visualization of small peptides absorbed in rat small intestine by phytic-acid-aided matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Min; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Yoshii, Saori; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2013-11-05

    Enhanced visualization of small peptides absorbed through a rat intestinal membrane was achieved by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) with the aid of phytic acid as a matrix additive. Penetrants through intestinal peptide transporter 1, i.e., glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar, 147.1 m/z) and antihypertensive dipeptide, Val-Tyr (281.2 m/z), were chosen for MALDI-IMS. The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of dipeptides Gly-Sar and Val-Tyr were seen to increase by 2.4- and 8.0-fold, respectively, when using a 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) matrix containing 5.0 mM phytic acid, instead of the THAP matrix alone. Owing to the phytic-acid-aided MALDI-IMS method, Gly-Sar and Val-Tyr absorbed in the rat intestinal membrane were successfully visualized. The proposed imaging method also provided useful information on intestinal peptide absorption; to some extent, Val-Tyr was rapidly hydrolyzed to Tyr by peptidases located at the intestinal microvillus during the absorption process. In conclusion, the strongly acidic additive, phytic acid, is beneficial for enhancing the visualization of small peptides using MALDI-IMS, owing to the suppression of ionization-interfering salts in the tissue.

  18. Galaxy Messier 83

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-25

    This image of the spiral galaxy Messier 83 was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 7, 2003. Located 15 million light years from Earth and known as the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, Messier 83 displays significant amounts of ultraviolet emissions far from the optically bright portion of the galaxy. It is also known to have an extended hydrogen disc that appears to radiate a faint ultraviolet emission. The red stars in the foreground of the image are Milky Way stars. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04629

  19. ALMA Imaging of Gas and Dust in a Galaxy Protocluster at Redshift 5.3: [C II] Emission in "Typical" Galaxies and Dusty Starbursts ≈1 Billion Years after the Big Bang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Capak, Peter L.; Scoville, Nicholas Z.; Smolčić, Vernesa; Schinnerer, Eva; Yun, Min; Cox, Pierre; Bertoldi, Frank; Karim, Alexander; Yan, Lin

    2014-12-01

    We report interferometric imaging of [C II](2 P 3/2→2 P 1/2) and OH(2Π1/2 J = 3/2→1/2) emission toward the center of the galaxy protocluster associated with the z = 5.3 submillimeter galaxy (SMG) AzTEC-3, using the Atacama Large (sub)Millimeter Array (ALMA). We detect strong [C II], OH, and rest-frame 157.7 μm continuum emission toward the SMG. The [C II](2 P 3/2→2 P 1/2) emission is distributed over a scale of 3.9 kpc, implying a dynamical mass of 9.7 × 1010 M ⊙, and a star formation rate (SFR) surface density of ΣSFR = 530 M ⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. This suggests that AzTEC-3 forms stars at ΣSFR approaching the Eddington limit for radiation pressure supported disks. We find that the OH emission is slightly blueshifted relative to the [C II] line, which may indicate a molecular outflow associated with the peak phase of the starburst. We also detect and dynamically resolve [C II](2 P 3/2→2 P 1/2) emission over a scale of 7.5 kpc toward a triplet of Lyman-break galaxies with moderate UV-based SFRs in the protocluster at ~95 kpc projected distance from the SMG. These galaxies are not detected in the continuum, suggesting far-infrared SFRs of <18-54 M ⊙ yr-1, consistent with a UV-based estimate of 22 M ⊙ yr-1. The spectral energy distribution of these galaxies is inconsistent with nearby spiral and starburst galaxies, but resembles those of dwarf galaxies. This is consistent with expectations for young starbursts without significant older stellar populations. This suggests that these galaxies are significantly metal-enriched, but not heavily dust-obscured, "normal" star-forming galaxies at z > 5, showing that ALMA can detect the interstellar medium in "typical" galaxies in the very early universe.

  20. Characterization and MCNP simulation of neutron energy spectrum shift after transmission through strong absorbing materials and its impact on tomography reconstructed image.

    PubMed

    Hachouf, N; Kharfi, F; Boucenna, A

    2012-10-01

    An ideal neutron radiograph, for quantification and 3D tomographic image reconstruction, should be a transmission image which exactly obeys to the exponential attenuation law of a monochromatic neutron beam. There are many reasons for which this assumption does not hold for high neutron absorbing materials. The main deviations from the ideal are due essentially to neutron beam hardening effect. The main challenges of this work are the characterization of neutron transmission through boron enriched steel materials and the observation of beam hardening. Then, in our work, the influence of beam hardening effect on neutron tomographic image, for samples based on these materials, is studied. MCNP and FBP simulation are performed to adjust linear attenuation coefficients data and to perform 2D tomographic image reconstruction with and without beam hardening corrections. A beam hardening correction procedure is developed and applied based on qualitative and quantitative analyses of the projections data. Results from original and corrected 2D reconstructed images obtained shows the efficiency of the proposed correction procedure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gemini/GMOS imaging of globular cluster systems in five early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faifer, Favio R.; Forte, Juan C.; Norris, Mark A.; Bridges, Terry; Forbes, Duncan A.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Beasley, Mike; Gebhardt, Karl; Hanes, David A.; Sharples, Ray M.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present deep high-quality photometry of globular cluster systems (GCSs) belonging to five early-type galaxies, covering a range of mass and environment. Photometric data were obtained with the Gemini North and Gemini South telescopes in the filter passbands g', r' and i'. The combination of these filters with good seeing conditions allows an excellent separation between globular cluster (GC) candidates and unresolved field objects. In fact, our previously published spectroscopic data indicate a contamination level of only ˜10 per cent in our sample of GC candidates. Bimodal GC colour distributions are found in all five galaxies. Most of the GCSs appear bimodal even in the (g'-r') versus (r'-i') plane. A population of resolved/marginally resolved GC and ultracompact dwarf candidates was found in all the galaxies. A search for the so-called 'blue tilt' in the colour-magnitude diagrams reveals that NGC 4649 clearly shows this phenomenon, although no conclusive evidence was found for the other galaxies in the sample. This 'blue tilt' translates into a mass-metallicity relation given by Z∝M0.28 ±0.03. This dependence was found using a new empirical (g'-i') versus [Z/H] relation, which relies on an homogeneous sample of GC colours and metallicities. In this paper, we also explore the radial trends in both colour and surface density for the blue (metal-poor) and red (metal-rich) GC subpopulations. As usual, the red GCs show a steeper radial distribution than the blue GCs. Evidence of galactocentric colour gradients is found in some of the GCSs, which is more significant for the two S0 galaxies in the sample. Red GC subpopulations show similar colours and gradients to the galaxy halo stars in their inner region. A GC mean colour-galaxy luminosity relation, consistent with [Z/H]∝L0.26 ±0.08B, is present for the red GCs. Estimates of the total GC populations and specific frequency SN values are presented for NGC 3115, 3923 and 4649. Based on

  2. Increasing the field of view of x-ray phase contrast imaging using stitched gratings on low absorbent carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiser, J.; Amberger, M.; Willner, M.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Koch, F.; Hipp, A.; Walter, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has become a promising biomedical imaging technique for enhancing soft-tissue contrast. In addition to an absorption contrast image it provides two more types of image, a phase contrast and a small-angle scattering contrast image recorded at the same time. In biomedical imaging their combination allows for the conventional investigation of e.g. bone fractures on the one hand and for soft-tissue investigation like cancer detection on the other hand. Among the different methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging the grating based approach, the Talbot-Lau interferometry, has the highest potential for commercial use in biomedical imaging at the moment, because commercially available X-ray sources can be used in a compact setup. In Talbot-Lau interferometers, core elements are phase and absorption gratings with challenging specifications because of their high aspect ratios (structure height over width). For the long grating lamellas structural heights of more than 100 μm together with structural width in the micron range are requested. We are developing a fabrication process based on deep x-ray lithography and electroforming (LIGA) to fabricate these challenging structures. In case of LIGA gratings the structural area is currently limited to several centimeters by several centimeters which limit the field of view in grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging. In order to increase the grating area significantly we are developing a stitching method for gratings using a 625 μm thick silicon wafer as a carrier substrate. In this work we compare the silicon carrier with an alternative one, polyimide, for patient dose reduction and for the use at lower energies in terms of transmission and image reconstruction problems.

  3. GROUND-BASED Paα NARROW-BAND IMAGING OF LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. I. STAR FORMATION RATES AND SURFACE DENSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tateuchi, Ken; Konishi, Masahiro; Motohara, Kentaro; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kato, Natsuko Mitani; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Todo, Soya; Toshikawa, Koji; Sako, Shigeyuki; Uchimoto, Yuka K.; Ohsawa, Ryou; Asano, Kentaro; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Okada, Kazushi; Ita, Yoshifusa; Komugi, Shinya; Koshida, Shintaro; Manabe, Sho; Nakashima, Asami; and others

    2015-03-15

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are enshrouded by a large amount of dust produced by their active star formation, and it is difficult to measure their activity in optical wavelengths. We have carried out Paα narrow-band imaging observations of 38 nearby star forming galaxies including 33 LIRGs listed in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample catalog with the Atacama Near InfraRed camera on the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) 1.0 m telescope (miniTAO). Star formation rates (SFRs) estimated from the Paα fluxes, corrected for dust extinction using the Balmer decrement method (typically A{sub V} ∼ 4.3 mag), show a good correlation with those from the bolometric infrared luminosity of the IRAS data within a scatter of 0.27 dex. This suggests that the correction of dust extinction for the Paα flux is sufficient in our sample. We measure the physical sizes and surface densities of infrared luminosities (Σ{sub L(IR)}) and the SFR (Σ{sub SFR}) of star forming regions for individual galaxies, and we find that most of the galaxies follow a sequence of local ultra-luminous or luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) on the L(IR)-Σ{sub L(IR)} and SFR-Σ{sub SFR} plane. We confirm that a transition of the sequence from normal galaxies to U/LIRGs is seen at L(IR) = 8 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉}. Also, we find that there is a large scatter in physical size, different from normal galaxies or ULIRGs. Considering the fact that most U/LIRGs are merging or interacting galaxies, this scatter may be caused by strong external factors or differences in their merging stages.

  4. ALFALFA Discovery of the Nearby Gas-rich Dwarf Galaxy Leo P. IV. Distance Measurement from LBT Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Dolphin, Andrew; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Rhode, Katherine L.

    2013-12-01

    Leo P is a low-luminosity dwarf galaxy discovered through the blind H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. The H I and follow-up optical observations have shown that Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with both active star formation and an underlying older population, as well as an extremely low oxygen abundance. Here, we measure the distance to Leo P by applying the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) distance method to photometry of the resolved stellar population from new Large Binocular Telescope V and I band imaging. We measure a distance modulus of 26.19^{+0.17}_{-0.50} mag corresponding to a distance of 1.72^{+0.14}_{-0.40} Mpc. Although our photometry reaches 3 mag below the TRGB, the sparseness of the red giant branch yields higher uncertainties on the lower limit of the distance. Leo P is outside the Local Group with a distance and velocity consistent with the local Hubble flow. While located in a very low-density environment, Leo P lies within ~0.5 Mpc of a loose association of dwarf galaxies which include NGC 3109, Antlia, Sextans A, and Sextans B, and 1.1 Mpc away from its next nearest neighbor, Leo A. Leo P is one of the lowest metallicity star-forming galaxies known in the nearby universe, comparable in metallicity to I Zw 18 and DDO 68, but with stellar characteristics similar to dwarf spheriodals (dSphs) in the Local Volume such as Carina, Sextans, and Leo II. Given its physical properties and isolation, Leo P may provide an evolutionary link between gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and dSphs that have fallen into a Local Group environment and been stripped of their gas. Based on observations made with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Observatory. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max

  5. Barred Ring Galaxy NGC 1291

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-05

    This ultraviolet image left and visual image right from NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer is of the barred ring galaxy NGC 1291. The VIS image is dominated by the inner disk and bar. The UV image is dominated by the low surface brightness outer arms.

  6. A study of the circumgalactic medium at z ˜ 0.6 using damped Lyman α galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Hadi; Péroux, Céline; Turnshek, David A.; Rao, Sandhya M.; Quiret, Samuel; Hamilton, Timothy S.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Monier, Eric M.; Zafar, Tayyaba

    2016-11-01

    We present the study of a sample of nine quasi-stellar object fields, with damped Lyman α (DLA) or sub-DLA systems at z ˜ 0.6, observed with the X-Shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. By suitably positioning the X-Shooter slit based on high spatial resolution images of Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys we are able to detect absorbing galaxies in seven out of nine fields (˜78 per cent success rate) at impact parameters from 10 to 30 kpc. In five out of seven fields the absorbing galaxies are confirmed via detection of multiple emission lines at the redshift of DLAs where only one out of five also emits a faint continuum. In two out of these five fields we detect a second galaxy at the DLA redshift. Extinction corrected star formation rates (SFRs) of these DLA galaxies, estimated using their Hα fluxes, are in the range 0.3-6.7 M⊙ yr-1. The emission metallicities of these five DLA galaxies are estimated to be from 0.2 to 0.9 Z⊙. Based on the Voigt profile fits to absorption lines we find the metallicity of the absorbing neutral gas to be in a range of 0.05-0.6 Z⊙. The two remaining DLA galaxies are quiescent galaxies with SFR < 0.4 M⊙ yr-1 (3σ) presenting continuum emission but no emission lines. Using X-Shooter spectrum we estimate i-band absolute magnitude of -19.5 ± 0.2 for both these DLA galaxies that indicates they are sub-L⋆ galaxies. Comparing our results with that of other surveys in the literature we find a possible redshift evolution of the SFR of DLA galaxies.

  7. Optoacoustic imaging of absorbing objects in a turbid medium: ultimate sensitivity and application to breast cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Kozhushko, Victor V.; Zharinov, Alexei N.; Solomatin, Vladimir S.; Karabutov, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    One of the major medical applications of optoacoustic (OA) tomography is in the diagnostics of early-stage breast cancer. A numerical approach was developed to characterize the following parameters of an OA imaging system: resolution, maximum depth at which the tumor can be detected, and image contrast. The parameters of the 64-element focused array transducer were obtained. The results of numerical modeling were compared with known analytical solutions and further validated by phantom experiments. The OA images of a 3 mm piece of bovine liver immersed in diluted milk at various depths were obtained. Based on the results of modeling, a signal filtering algorithm for OA image contrast enhancement has been proposed.

  8. Optoacoustic imaging of absorbing objects in a turbid medium: ultimate sensitivity and application to breast cancer diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Kozhushko, Victor V.; Zharinov, Alexei N.; Solomatin, Vladimir S.; Karabutov, Alexander A

    2007-01-10

    One of the major medical applications of optoacoustic (OA) tomography is in the diagnostics of early-stage breast cancer. A numerical approach was developed to characterize the following parameters of an OA imaging system: resolution, maximum depth at which the tumor can be detected, and image contrast. The parameters of the 64-element focused array transducer were obtained. The results of numerical modeling were compared with known analytical solutions and further validated by phantom experiments. The OA images of a3 mm piece of bovine liver immersed in diluted milk at various depths were obtained. Based on the results of modeling, a signal filtering algorithm for OA image contrast enhancement has been proposed.

  9. The nature of intermediate-redshift damped Lyα absorbers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, V.; Bergeron, J.; Boisse, P.; Deharveng, J. M.

    1997-05-01

    We present HST/WFPC2 high-spatial resolution images in the R and B bands of the close environment of the sightlines to seven quasars which spectra show either a damped Lyα absorption line, 21cm absorption, or a very strong MgII/FeII absorption system at intermediate redshifts (0.4<=z<=1). Objects down to about 0.3", or 2.0kpc at z=0.6 (H_0_=50km/s/Mpc, q_0_=0), and to a limiting magnitude m_702, lim_=25.9 could be detected for seven fields comprising eight absorbers (one at higher redshift z=1.78 towards MC 1331+170) with high Hi column densities of at least 1x10^20^cm^-2^. In each case, a candidate absorber with absolute magnitude M_B_=~-19.0 or much brighter has been detected. This small sample of gas-rich galaxies at intermediate redshifts covers a wide range in morphological types. There are three spiral galaxies of various sizes and luminosities (towards 3C 196, Q 1209+107 and MC 1331+170), three compact objects (towards EX 0302-223, PKS 0454+039 and, at high redshift, MC 1331+170), and two amorphous, low surface brightness galaxies (towards PKS 1229-021 and 3C 286). In the fields around 3C 196, PKS 1229-021 and Q 1209+107, there is an excess of galaxies in the PC2 images, suggestive of the presence of a group of galaxies associated with the damped Lyα absorber, or maybe with the quasar itself for the two z_e_<=1.0 cases. For 3C 196 and 3C 286, the quasar host galaxies have also tentatively been discovered. We do not detect any quasar multiple images, implying no large amount of dark matter around the damped Lyα absorbers. This survey also led to the discovery of the first z=~1.0 optical counterpart of a quasar radio jet (PKS 1229-021). As will be reported elsewhere (Boisse et al. 1996), spectroscopy with the HST-FOS of the strong MgII/FeII absorption systems confirms the validity of our selection criterion in predicting the existence of damped Lyα systems.

  10. THE COSMOS-WIRCam NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING SURVEY. I. BzK-SELECTED PASSIVE AND STAR-FORMING GALAXY CANDIDATES AT z approx> 1.4

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Capak, P.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Aussel, H.; Daddi, E.; Sanders, D. B.; Ilbert, O.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Kartaltepe, J.; Willott, C. J.; Mancini, C.; Renzini, A.; Cook, R.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Murayama, T.; Shioya, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new near-infrared survey covering the 2 deg{sup 2} COSMOS field conducted using WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. By combining our near-infrared data with Subaru B and z images, we construct a deep, wide-field optical-infrared catalog. At K{sub s} < 23 (AB magnitudes), our survey completeness is greater than 90% and 70% for stars and galaxies, respectively, and contains 143,466 galaxies and 13,254 stars. Using the BzK diagram, we divide our galaxy catalog into quiescent and star-forming galaxy candidates. At z approx 2, our catalogs contain 3931 quiescent and 25,757 star-forming galaxies representing the largest and most secure sample at these depths and redshifts to date. Our counts of quiescent galaxies turns over at K{sub s} approx 22, an effect that we demonstrate cannot be due to sample incompleteness. Both the number of faint and bright quiescent objects in our catalogs exceed the predictions of a recent semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, indicating potentially the need for further refinements in the amount of merging and active galactic nucleus feedback at z approx 2 in these models. We measure the angular correlation function for each sample and find that the slope of the field galaxy correlation function flattens to 1.5 by K{sub s} approx 23. At small angular scales, the angular correlation function for passive BzK galaxies is considerably in excess of the clustering of dark matter. We use precise 30-band photometric redshifts to derive the spatial correlation length and the redshift distributions for each object class. At K{sub s} < 22, we find r {sup g}amma{sup /1.8}{sub 0} = 7.0 +- 0.5h {sup -1} Mpc for the passive BzK candidates and 4.7 +- 0.8 h {sup -1} Mpc for the star-forming BzK galaxies. Our pBzK galaxies have an average photometric redshift of z{sub p} approx 1.4, in approximate agreement with the limited spectroscopic information currently available. The stacked K{sub s} image will be made publicly available from

  11. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  12. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  13. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  14. HST Imaging of Fading AGN Candidates. I. Host-galaxy Properties and Origin of the Extended Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, William C.; Maksym, W. Peter; Bennert, Vardha N.; Lintott, Chris J.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Moiseev, Alexei; Smirnova, Aleksandrina; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Evans, Daniel A.; Pancoast, Anna; Scott, Bryan; Showley, Charles; Flatland, Kelsi

    2015-05-01

    We present narrow- and medium-band Hubble Space Telescope imaging, with additional supporting ground-based imaging, spectrophotometry, and Fabry-Perot interferometric data, for eight galaxies identified as hosting a fading active galactic nucleus (AGN). These are selected to have AGN-ionized gas projected \\gt 10 kpc from the nucleus and energy budgets with a significant shortfall of ionizing radiation between the requirement to ionize the distant gas and the AGN as observed directly, indicating fading of the AGN on ≈50,000 yr timescales. This paper focuses on the host-galaxy properties and origin of the gas. In every galaxy, we identify evidence of ongoing or past interactions, including tidal tails, shells, and warped or chaotic dust structures; a similarly selected sample of obscured AGNs with extended ionized clouds shares this high incidence of disturbed morphologies. Several systems show multiple dust lanes in different orientations, broadly fit by differentially precessing disks of accreted material viewed ˜1.5 Gyr after its initial arrival. The host systems are of early Hubble type; most show nearly pure de Vaucouleurs surface brightness profiles and Sérsic indices appropriate for classical bulges, with one S0 and one SB0 galaxy. The gas has a systematically lower metallicity than the nuclei; three systems have abundances uniformly well below solar, consistent with an origin in tidally disrupted low-luminosity galaxies, while some systems have more nearly solar abundances (accompanied by such signatures as multiple Doppler components), which may suggest redistribution of gas by outflows within the host galaxies themselves. These aspects are consistent with a tidal origin for the extended gas in most systems, although the ionized gas and stellar tidal features do not always match closely. Unlike extended emission regions around many radio-loud AGNs, these clouds are kinematically dominated by rotation, in some cases in warped disks. Outflows can play

  15. Detection of H I, OH, CO, and optical imaging of the distant galaxy IRAS 12112 + 0305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirabel, I. F.; Kazes, I.; Sanders, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    The detection of H I absorption and OH and CO emission from the galaxy IRAS 12112 + 0305, which is receding from the sun at about 7 percent of the speed of light is reported. This galaxy, which appears to be an ongoing merger, radiates about 2 x 10 to the 12th solar luminosities in the infrared. The H I, OH, and CO spectra are indicative of large turbulent motions. From the millimeter wave CO observations, a total mass of molecular gas of 4 x 10 to the 10th solar masses is inferred. The OH emission in the 1667 MHz line is the most luminous extragalactic OH maser reported so far, with an isotropic luminosity of 1800 solar luminosities.

  16. Detection of H I, OH, CO, and optical imaging of the distant galaxy IRAS 12112 + 0305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirabel, I. F.; Kazes, I.; Sanders, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    The detection of H I absorption and OH and CO emission from the galaxy IRAS 12112 + 0305, which is receding from the sun at about 7 percent of the speed of light is reported. This galaxy, which appears to be an ongoing merger, radiates about 2 x 10 to the 12th solar luminosities in the infrared. The H I, OH, and CO spectra are indicative of large turbulent motions. From the millimeter wave CO observations, a total mass of molecular gas of 4 x 10 to the 10th solar masses is inferred. The OH emission in the 1667 MHz line is the most luminous extragalactic OH maser reported so far, with an isotropic luminosity of 1800 solar luminosities.

  17. Predictions for imaging and spectroscopic surveys of galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the mid-/far-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonato, Matteo

    2015-02-01

    While continuum imaging data at far-infrared to sub-millimeter wavelengths have provided tight constraints on the population properties of dusty star-forming galaxies up to high redshifts, future space missions like the Space Infra-Red Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) and ground based facilities like the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope (CCAT) will allow detailed investigations of their physical properties via their mid-/far-infrared line emission. The goal of this thesis project was to carry out predictions for these spectroscopic surveys using both a phenomenological approach and physically grounded models. These predictions are useful to optimize the planning of the surveys. In the first part of the work, I present updated predictions for the number counts and the redshift distributions of star-forming galaxies spectroscopically detectable by these future missions. These predictions exploit a recent upgrade of evolutionary models, that includes the effect of strong gravitational lensing, in the light of the most recent Herschel and South Pole Telescope (SPT) data. Moreover the relations between line and continuum infrared luminosity are re-assessed, considering also differences among source populations, with the support of extensive simulations that take into account dust obscuration. My reference model for the redshift dependent IR luminosity functions is the one worked out by Cai et al. (2013) based on a comprehensive hybrid approach combining a physical model for the progenitors of early-type galaxies with a phenomenological one for late-type galaxies. The derived line luminosity functions are found to be highly sensitive to the spread of the line to continuum luminosity ratios. Estimates of the expected numbers of detections per spectral line by the SpicA FAR infrared Instrument (SAFARI) and by CCAT surveys for different integration times per field of view at fixed total observing

  18. The host galaxies and explosion sites of long-duration gamma ray bursts: Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, J. D.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; McGuire, J. T. W.; Perley, D. A.; Angus, C. R.; Bloom, J. S.; Conselice, C. J.; Fruchter, > A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Starling, R. L. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/F160W SNAPSHOT survey of the host galaxies of 39 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) at z < 3. We have non-detections of hosts at the locations of 4 bursts. Sufficient accuracy to astrometrically align optical afterglow images and determine the location of the LGRB within its host was possible for 31/35 detected hosts. In agreement with other work, we find the luminosity distribution of LGRB hosts is significantly fainter than that of a star formation rate-weighted field galaxy sample over the same redshift range, indicating LGRBs are not unbiasedly tracing the star formation rate. Morphologically, the sample of LGRB hosts are dominated by spiral-like or irregular galaxies. We find evidence for evolution of the population of LGRB hosts towards lower-luminosity, higher concentrated hosts at lower redshifts. Their half-light radii are consistent with other LGRB host samples where measurements were made on rest-frame UV observations. In agreement with recent work, we find their 80 per cent enclosed flux radii distribution to be more extended than previously thought, making them intermediate between core-collapse supernova (CCSN) and super-luminous supernova (SLSN) hosts. The galactocentric projected-offset distribution confirms LGRBs as centrally concentrated, much more so than CCSNe and similar to SLSNe. LGRBs are strongly biased towards the brighter regions in their host light distributions, regardless of their offset. We find a correlation between the luminosity of the LGRB explosion site and the intrinsic column density, NH, towards the burst.

  19. The host galaxies and explosion sites of long-duration gamma ray bursts: Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, J. D.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; McGuire, J. T. W.; Perley, D. A.; Angus, C. R.; Bloom, J. S.; Conselice, C. J.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Starling, R. L. C.

    2017-05-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/F160W Snapshot survey of the host galaxies of 39 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) at z < 3. We have non-detections of hosts at the locations of four bursts. Sufficient accuracy to astrometrically align optical afterglow images and determine the location of the LGRB within its host was possible for 31/35 detected hosts. In agreement with other work, we find the luminosity distribution of LGRB hosts is significantly fainter than that of a star formation rate-weighted field galaxy sample over the same redshift range, indicating LGRBs are not unbiasedly tracing the star formation rate. Morphologically, the sample of LGRB hosts is dominated by spiral-like or irregular galaxies. We find evidence for evolution of the population of LGRB hosts towards lower luminosity, higher concentrated hosts at lower redshifts. Their half-light radii are consistent with other LGRB host samples where measurements were made on rest-frame UV observations. In agreement with recent work, we find their 80 per cent enclosed flux radii distribution to be more extended than previously thought, making them intermediate between core-collapse supernova (CCSN) and superluminous supernova (SLSN) hosts. The galactocentric projected-offset distribution confirms LGRBs as centrally concentrated, much more so than CCSNe and similar to SLSNe. LGRBs are strongly biased towards the brighter regions in their host light distributions, regardless of their offset. We find a correlation between the luminosity of the LGRB explosion site and the intrinsic column density, NH, towards the burst.

  20. X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Andromeda Galaxy's Nuclear Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Zhang, Shuinai; Roberts, Shawn

    2017-06-01

    The central region of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) is currently quiescent in both AGN and star formation, but shows strong indications for recent AGN activity. We have conducted a systematic analysis of Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the region. The diffuse X-ray emission from the high spatial resolution Chandra observations reveals interesting substructures (e.g., cavities), as well as the global distribution of diffuse hot gas in the region. The X-ray grating spectra from the XMM-Newton observations show enhanced forbidden lines of He-like Oxygen, Neon, and Nitrogen Kalpha triplets, as well as signatures for multi-temperature hot gas. We find that these results can be well interpreted by an AGN-relic model, which we have developed, suggesting that galaxy is a bright AGN about 0.4 Myrs ago. In addition, we also present evidence for resonance scattering effects, which broaden the spatial distribution of the relevant line emission and provide a sensitive probe of the hot gas turbulent motion. This study demonstrates the power of the X-ray spectroscopy, which will be greatly improved by upcoming X-ray missions, in our understanding of the recurrence history or frequency of AGN and the galaxy feedback in general.

  1. Optical Imaging of Local Group Galaxy Candidates from the ALFALFA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth; Cannon, John; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha; Rhode, Katherine; Salzer, John

    2013-02-01

    Giovanelli etal (2010) identified within the dataset of the ALFALFA HI survey a small set of ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). If placed at distances of 1 Mpc, these clouds show the structural characteristics of the gas-bearing ``minihalos'' proposed by Sternberg et al. (2002) but could easily be too optically faint and distant to have been discovered by existing optical surveys. It was recently discovered (Giovanelli etal 2012; Rhode etal 2012) that a low velocity (cz +260 km/s), narrow line width, compact HI cloud detected by the ALFALFA survey is, in fact, a very nearby (0.5 Mpc textless D textless 1.5 Mpc), optically faint but star-forming, low mass galaxy, termed Leo P. This validates the hypothesis that some of the ALFALFA UCHVCs may be such isolated, very low mass dark matter halos. Too faint and distant to have been detected in existing optical surveys, Leo P is the first ultrafaint dwarf galaxy discovered by its HI signature, and its existence strongly argues that other very low mass and (nearly) starless objects are included among the ALFALFA UCHVCs. This proposal requests deep optical observations of the very best ALFALFA candidate low mass galaxies to search for optical counterparts to constrain their distance and stellar populations.

  2. The formation and evolution of high-redshift dusty galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingzhe; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Ge, Jian; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Prochaska, Jason X.; Spilker, Justin; Strandet, Maria; Ashby, Matthew; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Lundgren, Britt; Zhao, Yinan; Ji, Tuo; Zhang, Shaohua; Caucal, Paul; SPT SMG Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Star formation and chemical evolution are among the biggest questions in galaxy formation and evolution. High-redshift dusty galaxies are the best sites to investigate mass assembly and growth, star formation rates, star formation history, chemical enrichment, and physical conditions. My thesis is based on two populations of high-redshift dusty galaxies, submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) and quasar 2175 Å dust absorbers, which are selected by dust emission and dust absorption, respectively.For the SMG sample, I have worked on the gravitationally lensed dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at 2.8 < z < 5.7, which were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and further confirmed by ALMA. My thesis is focused on the stellar masses and star formation rates of these objects by means of multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) modelling. The data include HST/WFC3, Spitzer/IRAC, Herschel/PACS, Herschel/SPIRE, APEX/Laboca and SPT. Compared to the star-forming main sequence (MS), these DSFGs have specific SFRs that lie above the MS, suggesting that we are witnessing ongoing strong starburst events that may be driven by major mergers. SPT0346-52 at z = 5.7, the most extraordinary source in the SPT survey for which we obtained Chandra X-ray and ATCA radio data, was confirmed to have the highest star formation surface density of any known galaxy at high-z.The other half of my thesis is focused on a new population of quasar absorption line systems, 2175 Å dust absorbers, which are excellent probes of gas and dust properties, chemical evolution and physical conditions in the absorbing galaxies. This sample was selected from the SDSS and BOSS surveys and followed up with the Echelle Spectrographs and Imager on the Keck-II telescope, the Red & Blue Channel Spectrograph on the Multiple Mirror Telescope, and the Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph onboard the Very Large Telescope. We found a correlation between the presence of the 2175 Å bump and other

  3. The ATLAS3D project - XXIX. The new look of early-type galaxies and surrounding fields disclosed by extremely deep optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Karabal, Emin; Cappellari, Michele; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Paudel, Sanjaya; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Galactic archaeology based on star counts is instrumental to reconstruct the past mass assembly of Local Group galaxies. The development of new observing techniques and data reduction, coupled with the use of sensitive large field of view cameras, now allows us to pursue this technique in more distant galaxies exploiting their diffuse low surface brightness (LSB) light. As part of the ATLAS3D project, we have obtained with the MegaCam camera at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope extremely deep, multiband images of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). We present here a catalogue of 92 galaxies from the ATLAS3D sample, which are located in low- to medium-density environments. The observing strategy and data reduction pipeline, which achieve a gain of several magnitudes in the limiting surface brightness with respect to classical imaging surveys, are presented. The size and depth of the survey are compared to other recent deep imaging projects. The paper highlights the capability of LSB-optimized surveys at detecting new prominent structures that change the apparent morphology of galaxies. The intrinsic limitations of deep imaging observations are also discussed, among those, the contamination of the stellar haloes of galaxies by extended ghost reflections, and the cirrus emission from Galactic dust. The detection and systematic census of fine structures that trace the present and past mass assembly of ETGs are one of the prime goals of the project. We provide specific examples of each type of observed structures - tidal tails, stellar streams and shells - and explain how they were identified and classified. We give an overview of the initial results. The detailed statistical analysis will be presented in future papers.

  4. Directly Imaging Damped Ly-Alpha Galaxies at Redshifts Greater Than 2. III: The Star Formation Rates of Neutral Gas Reservoirs at Redshifts of Approximately 2.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; OMeara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rafelski, Marc; Kanekar, Nissim

    2014-01-01

    We present results from a survey designed to probe the star formation properties of 32 damped Ly alpha systems (DLAs) at redshifts of approximately 2.7. By using the "double-DLA" technique that eliminates the glare of the bright background quasars, we directly measure the rest-frame FUV flux from DLAs and their neighbouring galaxies. At the position of the absorbing gas, we place stringent constraints on the unobscured star formation rates (SFRs) of DLAs to 2 sigma limits of psi less than 0.09-0.27 solar mass yr(exp -1), corresponding to SFR surface densities sigma(sub sfr) less than 10(exp -2.6)-10(exp -1.5) solar mass yr(exp -1) kpc(exp -2). The implications of these limits for the star formation law, metal enrichment, and cooling rates of DLAs are examined. By studying the distribution of impact parameters as a function of SFRs for all the galaxies detected around these DLAs, we place new direct constraints on the bright end of the UV luminosity function of DLA hosts. We find that less than or equal to 13% of the hosts have psi greater than or equal to 2 solar mass yr(exp -1) at impact parameters b(sub dla) less than or equal to (psi/solar mass yr(exp -1))(exp 0.8) + 6 kpc, differently from current samples of confirmed DLA galaxies. Our observations also disfavor a scenario in which the majority of DLAs arise from bright LBGs at distances 20 less than or equal to b(sub dla) less than 100 kpc. These new findings corroborate a picture in which DLAs do not originate from highly star forming systems that are coincident with the absorbers, and instead suggest that DLAs are associated with faint, possibly isolated, star-forming galaxies. Potential shortcomings of this scenario and future strategies for further investigation are discussed.

  5. Investigating the burstiness of the star formation history of low-mass galaxies at intermediate redshifts with KECK/DEIMOS spectroscopy and CANDELS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, Sandra M.; Rafelski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The history of gas accretion, expulsion, and recycling, and star formation of low-mass galaxies (with stellar mass below 10^9 Msun) is thought to be stochastic and bursty. We combine the deep broad-band images of CANDELS and the high-resolution optical spectroscopy from Keck/DEIMOS surveys --- TKRS, DEEP2, DEEP3, and HALO7D --- to explore the star formation histories of low-mass galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.5≤z≤1.0). We study (1) the stellar mass (M)--gas-phase metallicity (Z) relation (MZR) and its scatter and (2) the ratio of star formation rates (SFRs) measured through FUV to that through Hβ (FUV--Hβ ratio). Our MZR sample is ˜20 times larger than those in previous studies beyond the local universe. This huge gain in sample size enables superior constraints on the MZR and its scatter in the low-mass regime. We find that the scatter of the MZR increases as mass decreases. For the FUV--Hβ ratio, we find that it increases with the decrease of mass and SFR. Both results can be explained by low-mass galaxies having a star formation history with more bursts than massive galaxies having. A simple model shows that the star formation occuring in starburst phases in low-mass galaxies is 5x higher than that in a constant star formation phase, while, for massive galaxies, the bursty phases of star formation is negligible. Finally, we find that our median FUV--Hβ ratio for low-mass galaxies is higher than that of local galaxies of the same mass, implying a redshift evolution.

  6. Detection of Lyman-alpha Emission from a Triply Imaged z = 6.85 Galaxy behind MACS J2129.4-0741

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Lemaux, Brian C.; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Hoag, Austin; Bradač, Maruša; Treu, Tommaso; Dijkstra, Mark; Fontana, Adriano; Henry, Alaina; Malkan, Matthew; Mason, Charlotte; Morishita, Takahiro; Pentericci, Laura; Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Trenti, Michele; Wang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    We report the detection of Lyα emission at ˜9538 Å in the Keck/DEIMOS and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 G102 grism data from a triply imaged galaxy at z=6.846+/- 0.001 behind galaxy cluster MACS J2129.4-0741. Combining the emission line wavelength with broadband photometry, line ratio upper limits, and lens modeling, we rule out the scenario that this emission line is [O ii] at z = 1.57. After accounting for magnification, we calculate the weighted average of the intrinsic Lyα luminosity to be ˜ 1.3× {10}42 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 and Lyα equivalent width to be 74 ± 15 Å. Its intrinsic UV absolute magnitude at 1600 Å is -18.6 ± 0.2 mag and stellar mass (1.5+/- 0.3)× {10}7\\quad {M}⊙ , making it one of the faintest (intrinsic {L}{UV}˜ 0.14 {L}{UV}\\ast ) galaxies with Lyα detection at z˜ 7 to date. Its stellar mass is in the typical range for the galaxies thought to dominate the reionization photon budget at z≳ 7; the inferred Lyα escape fraction is high (≳ 10%), which could be common for sub-L* z≳ 7 galaxies with Lyα emission. This galaxy offers a glimpse of the galaxy population that is thought to drive reionization, and it shows that gravitational lensing is an important avenue for probing the sub-L* galaxy population.

  7. RGD-conjugated two-photon absorbing near-IR emitting fluorescent probes for tumor vascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfield, Kevin D.; Yue, Xiling; Morales, Alma R.; Githaiga, Grace W.; Woodward, Adam W.; Tang, Simon; Sawada, Junko; Komatsu, Masanobu; Liu, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the activation and inhibition of angiogenesis processes is important in the progression of cancer. Application of targeting peptides, such as a small peptide that contains adjacent L-arginine (R), glycine (G) and L-aspartic acid (D) residues can afford high selectivity and deep penetration in vessel imaging. To facilitate deep tissue vasculature imaging, probes that can be excited via two-photon absorption (2PA) in the near-infrared (NIR) and subsequently emit in the NIR are essential. In this study, the enhancement of tissue image quality with RGD conjugates was investigated with new NIR-emitting pyranyl fluorophore derivatives in two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of the new probes were comprehensively characterized; significantly the probes exhibited good 2PA over a broad spectral range from 700-1100 nm. Cell and tissue images were then acquired and examined, revealing deep penetration and high contrast with the new pyranyl RGD-conjugates up to 350 μm in tumor tissue.

  8. RGD-conjugated Two-photon Absorbing Near-IR Emitting Fluorescent Probes for Tumor Vasculature Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xiling; Morales, Alma R.; Githaiga, Grace W.; Woodward, Adam W.; Tang, Simon; Sawada, Junko; Komatsu, Masanobu; Liu, Xuan; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Observation of the activation and inhibition of angiogenesis processes is important in the progression of cancer. Application of targeting peptides, such as a small peptide that contains adjacent L-arginine (R), glycine (G) and L-aspartic acid (D) residues can afford high selectivity and deep penetration in vessel imaging. To facilitate deep tissue vasculature imaging, probes that can be excited via two-photon absorption (2PA) in the near-infrared (NIR) and subsequently emit in the NIR are essential. In this study, the enhancement of tissue image quality with RGD conjugates was investigated with new NIR-emitting pyranyl fluorophore derivatives in two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of the new probes were comprehensively characterized; significantly the probes exhibited good 2PA over a broad spectral range from 700–1100 nm. Cell and tissue images were then acquired and examined, revealing deep penetration and high contrast with the new pyranyl RGD-conjugates up to 350 μm in tumor tissue. PMID:26351137

  9. Searching for Distant Galaxy Clusters: Utilizing the Virtual Observatory for Multiwavelength Images and Survey Cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Duyne, J.; Lucas, R.; Tamura, T.; Rohde, D.

    2004-12-01

    Through the tools and technology made available via the Virtual Observatory, we have explored the multiwavelength properties, survey coverage, and environments of a sample of 71 steep (-1.0 < α < 0.5) spectrum radio sources taken from the Texas Interferometer Radio catalog (Douglas et al. 1996). Through the VLA proposal by Lucas & Chambers (1989), these radio sources were observed with the A-array configuration at 20 cm and 1485 MHz and with 1 full Schmidt SRC-J, high-latitude sky survey plate ( ˜ 6 sq deg) down to J ˜ 22 with the purpose of finding optical counterparts of mid-to-high z galaxy clusters. With the knowledge that this field had been imaged via the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR2, r=22.2), we submitted the coordinates of the Lucas & Chambers survey sources to the VO image access protocol (SIAP) to quickly and efficiently explore the SDSS ugriz 5-band color images of these sources, specifically looking for u-band drop-outs. Additionally, we used this same technique to explore the multiwavelength coverage of this field with all surveys registered with the VO (2MASS, ROSAT, VLA FIRST/NVSS, Chandra, XMM) via ˜ 1 arcminute snapshots. This revealed a multitude of interesting objects, such as double-lobed radio galaxies with bent jets, implying intercluster medium interactions, extremely faint optical sources with point source 2MASS/J-band detections, and the re-discovery of 3C 273. Finally, as a proof of concept, we utilized the VO tool Topcat to cross-correlate the radio and X-ray positions of known galaxy clusters via the RBSC-NVSS Sample (Bauer et al. 2000) and ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (Ebeling et al. 1998), resulting in 17 clusters matched at < 15 arcsec separation. These results demonstrate the simple, yet highly effective utility of the Virtual Observatory on a sample data set to reveal scientifically interesting objects on a short timescale. We would like to acknowledge the National Virtual Observatory Summer School for supplying the

  10. NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P.; Escala, A.; Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ∼40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ∼ –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

  11. Early Science with the Large Millimeter Telescope: Detection of Dust Emission in Multiple Images of a Normal Galaxy at z > 4 Lensed by a Frontier Fields Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Alexandra; Montaña, Alfredo; Battisti, Andrew; Limousin, Marceau; Marchesini, Danilo; Wilson, Grant W.; Alberts, Stacey; Aretxaga, Itziar; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Ramón Bermejo-Climent, José; Brammer, Gabriel; Bravo-Alfaro, Hector; Calzetti, Daniela; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Cybulski, Ryan; Giavalisco, Mauro; Hughes, David; Kado-Fong, Erin; Keller, Erica; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Labbe, Ivo; Lange-Vagle, Daniel; Lowenthal, James; Murphy, Eric; Oesch, Pascal; Rosa Gonzalez, Daniel; Sánchez-Argüelles, David; Shipley, Heath; Stefanon, Mauro; Vega, Olga; Whitaker, Katherine; Williams, Christina C.; Yun, Min; Zavala, Jorge A.; Zeballos, Milagros

    2017-04-01

    We directly detect dust emission in an optically detected, multiply imaged galaxy lensed by the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745. We detect two images of the same galaxy at 1.1 mm with the AzTEC camera on the Large Millimeter Telescope leaving no ambiguity in the counterpart identification. This galaxy, MACS0717_Az9, is at z > 4 and the strong lensing model (μ = 7.5) allows us to calculate an intrinsic IR luminosity of 9.7 × 1010 L ⊙ and an obscured star formation rate of 14.6 ± 4.5 M ⊙ yr-1. The unobscured star formation rate from the UV is only 4.1 ± 0.3 M ⊙ yr-1, which means the total star formation rate (18.7 ± 4.5 M ⊙ yr-1) is dominated (75%-80%) by the obscured component. With an intrinsic stellar mass of only 6.9 × 109 M ⊙, MACS0717_Az9 is one of only a handful of z > 4 galaxies at these lower masses that is detected in dust emission. This galaxy lies close to the estimated star formation sequence at this epoch. However, it does not lie on the dust obscuration relation (IRX-β) for local starburst galaxies and is instead consistent with the Small Magellanic Cloud attenuation law. This remarkable lower mass galaxy, showing signs of both low metallicity and high dust content, may challenge our picture of dust production in the early universe.

  12. Amazing Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The many 'personalities' of our great galactic neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy, are exposed in this new composite image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The wide, ultraviolet eyes of Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveal Andromeda's 'fiery' nature -- hotter regions brimming with young and old stars. In contrast, Spitzer's super-sensitive infrared eyes show Andromeda's relatively 'cool' side, which includes embryonic stars hidden in their dusty cocoons.

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer detected young, hot, high-mass stars, which are represented in blue, while populations of relatively older stars are shown as green dots. The bright yellow spot at the galaxy's center depicts a particularly dense population of old stars.

    Swaths of red in the galaxy's disk indicate areas where Spitzer found cool, dusty regions where stars are forming. These stars are still shrouded by the cosmic clouds of dust and gas that collapsed to form them.

    Together, Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Spitzer complete the picture of Andromeda's swirling spiral arms. Hints of pinkish purple depict regions where the galaxy's populations of hot, high-mass stars and cooler, dust-enshrouded stars co-exist.

    Located 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda is our largest nearby galactic neighbor. The galaxy's entire disk spans about 260,000 light-years, which means that a light beam would take 260,000 years to travel from one end of the galaxy to the other. By comparison, our Milky Way galaxy's disk is about 100,000 light-years across.

    This image is a false color composite comprised of data from Galaxy Evolution Explorer's far-ultraviolet detector (blue), near-ultraviolet detector (green), and Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer at 24 microns (red).

  13. Amazing Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The many 'personalities' of our great galactic neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy, are exposed in this new composite image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The wide, ultraviolet eyes of Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveal Andromeda's 'fiery' nature -- hotter regions brimming with young and old stars. In contrast, Spitzer's super-sensitive infrared eyes show Andromeda's relatively 'cool' side, which includes embryonic stars hidden in their dusty cocoons.

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer detected young, hot, high-mass stars, which are represented in blue, while populations of relatively older stars are shown as green dots. The bright yellow spot at the galaxy's center depicts a particularly dense population of old stars.

    Swaths of red in the galaxy's disk indicate areas where Spitzer found cool, dusty regions where stars are forming. These stars are still shrouded by the cosmic clouds of dust and gas that collapsed to form them.

    Together, Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Spitzer complete the picture of Andromeda's swirling spiral arms. Hints of pinkish purple depict regions where the galaxy's populations of hot, high-mass stars and cooler, dust-enshrouded stars co-exist.

    Located 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda is our largest nearby galactic neighbor. The galaxy's entire disk spans about 260,000 light-years, which means that a light beam would take 260,000 years to travel from one end of the galaxy to the other. By comparison, our Milky Way galaxy's disk is about 100,000 light-years across.

    This image is a false color composite comprised of data from Galaxy Evolution Explorer's far-ultraviolet detector (blue), near-ultraviolet detector (green), and Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer at 24 microns (red).

  14. Galaxy NGC 4013

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-15

    An amazing edge-on view of a spiral galaxy 55 million light years from Earth has been captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. The image reveals in great detail huge clouds of dust and gas extending along and above the galaxy main disk.

  15. Intrinsic Absorption and Reddening in Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the origin of the ``dusty lukewarm absorber'', which we previously identified in the reddened Seyfert 1 galaxies NGC 3227 and Akn 564. This absorber is characterized by saturated UV absorption lines (C IV, N V) near the systemic velocity of the host galaxy, and is likely responsible for reddening both the continuum and the emission lines (including those from the narrow-line region) from these Seyferts. From a large sample of Seyfert 1 galaxies, we find that continuum reddening (as measured by UV color) tends to increase with inclination of the host galaxy. Furthermore, reddened, inclined Seyfert galaxies observed at moderate to high spectral resolution all show evidence for dusty lukewarm absorbers. We suggest that these absorbers lie in the plane of the host galaxy at distances greater than about 100 pc from the nucleus, and are physically distinct from the majority of intrinsic absorbers that are outflowing from the nucleus.

  16. Star Formation Triggering Mechanisms Revealed by Far-Ultraviolet, Hα , and HI Images of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, S. G.

    1998-12-01

    Far-Ultraviolet (FUV), Hα , and HI observations of dwarf galaxies Holmberg II, IC2574, and Sextans A are used to investigate the means by which star formation propagates in galaxies lacking dominant global triggering mechanisms. The observations trace the interaction between sites of massive star formation and the neutral and ionized components of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) in these intrinsically simple systems. Both local and large scale triggering mechanisms related to massive star formation are seen suggesting that feedback from massive stars is a microscopic process operating in all galaxies to a certain degree. The data emphasizes the importance of local conditions in regulating star formation from evidence such as massive stars inside ionized shells, compact HII regions surrounding aging clusters, and stars formed in chains of progressing age. Surface brightness profiles show current activity correlates with the time averaged level of past star formation at a given radius demonstrating a reliance on local conditions. Normalized star formation rates show no dependence on global conditions in comparisons with global properties such as the gas fraction. Large scale triggering by HI shells is supported by observations of progenitor populations and secondary sites of star formation on the dense HI rims. Analysis of the energy available from massive stars inside HI shells indicates energy deposited into the ISM from supernovae and stellar winds is sufficient to account for the HI morphology. Ages of individual star forming regions are derived using B, Hα , and FUV photometry and show both older, diffuse FUV regions and younger, compact HII regions. The distribution of ages is reconciled with the HI morphology showing a clear preference of young regions for areas of dense HI and old regions for HI voids. Global kinematical properties may also play a role in the star formation process since large scale feedback from massive stars is shown to operate

  17. Web life: Galaxy Zoo Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    Many readers will already be familiar with the Galaxy Zoo, a project that allows members of the public to trawl through images of galaxies obtained by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and classify them according to their shape and features (see Physics World September 2008 pp27-30). The image-processing power of the site's 150 000 "citizen scientists" has already helped astronomers pick out interesting spiral and elliptical galaxies for further study. Now a new offshoot - dubbed Galaxy Zoo: Understanding Cosmic Mergers - aims to use similar "crowdsourcing" methods to enhance our knowledge of interacting galaxies.

  18. How Do Galaxies Grow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    Astronomers have caught multiple massive galaxies in the act of merging about 4 billion years ago. This discovery, made possible by combining the power of the best ground- and space-based telescopes, uniquely supports the favoured theory of how galaxies form. ESO PR Photo 24/08 ESO PR Photo 24/08 Merging Galaxies in Groups How do galaxies form? The most widely accepted answer to this fundamental question is the model of 'hierarchical formation', a step-wise process in which small galaxies merge to build larger ones. One can think of the galaxies forming in a similar way to how streams merge to form rivers, and how these rivers, in turn, merge to form an even larger river. This theoretical model predicts that massive galaxies grow through many merging events in their lifetime. But when did their cosmological growth spurts finish? When did the most massive galaxies get most of their mass? To answer these questions, astronomers study massive galaxies in clusters, the cosmological equivalent of cities filled with galaxies. "Whether the brightest galaxies in clusters grew substantially in the last few billion years is intensely debated. Our observations show that in this time, these galaxies have increased their mass by 50%," says Kim-Vy Tran from the University of Zürich, Switzerland, who led the research. The astronomers made use of a large ensemble of telescopes and instruments, including ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Hubble Space Telescope, to study in great detail galaxies located 4 billion light-years away. These galaxies lie in an extraordinary system made of four galaxy groups that will assemble into a cluster. In particular, the team took images with VIMOS and spectra with FORS2, both instruments on the VLT. From these and other observations, the astronomers could identify a total of 198 galaxies belonging to these four groups. The brightest galaxies in each group contain between 100 and 1000 billion of stars, a property that makes them comparable

  19. DEEP KECK u-BAND IMAGING OF THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD: A CATALOG OF z approx 3 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, Marc; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Cooke, Jeff; Chen, H.-W.; Armandroff, Taft E.; Wirth, Gregory D. E-mail: awolfe@ucsd.ed E-mail: hchen@oddjob.uchicago.ed E-mail: gwirth@keck.hawaii.ed

    2009-10-01

    We present a sample of 407 z approx 3 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) to a limiting isophotal u-band magnitude of 27.6 mag in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The LBGs are selected using a combination of photometric redshifts and the u-band drop-out technique enabled by the introduction of an extremely deep u-band image obtained with the Keck I telescope and the blue channel of the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer. The Keck u-band image, totaling 9 hr of integration time, has a 1sigma depth of 30.7 mag arcsec{sup -2}, making it one of the most sensitive u-band images ever obtained. The u-band image also substantially improves the accuracy of photometric redshift measurements of approx50% of the z approx 3 LBGs, significantly reducing the traditional degeneracy of colors between z approx 3 and z approx 0.2 galaxies. This sample provides the most sensitive, high-resolution multi-filter imaging of reliably identified z approx 3 LBGs for morphological studies of galaxy formation and evolution and the star formation efficiency of gas at high redshift.

  20. First images of water vapor masers in the galaxy M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, L. J.; Moran, J. M.; Reid, M. J.; Gwinn, C. R.; Menten, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The first successful VLBI observations of 10 extragalactic H2O masers in the M33 galaxy are reported. A spectral-line VLBI synthesis map is constructed, the first of any extragalactic H2O maser sources. The map has the lowest noise of any K-band spectral line VLBI map yet produced. The maser emission extends over about 300 milliarcseconds and is divided into 14 distinct spatial components, the strongest of which has a correlated flux density of about 0.7 Jy. The relative positions of some of these components are determined accurately enough to provide first-epoch measurements for proper motion studies. The characteristics of the maser are similar to those of the most powerful maser in the Galaxy, W49N. A compact H II region is found close to the maser which is 1 pc in diameter and whose emission measure is about 6 x 10 to the 7th pc/cm exp 6. This region is the compact component of a more extended H II complex that extends over about 100 pc.

  1. Specific absorbed fractions from the image-based VIP-Man body model and EGS4-VLSI Monte Carlo code: internal electron emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, T. C.; Xu, X. G.

    2001-04-01

    VIP-Man is a whole-body anatomical model newly developed at Rensselaer from the high-resolution colour images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project. This paper summarizes the use of VIP-Man and the Monte Carlo method to calculate specific absorbed fractions from internal electron emitters. A specially designed EGS4 user code, named EGS4-VLSI, was developed to use the extremely large number of image data contained in the VIP-Man. Monoenergetic and isotropic electron emitters with energies from 100 keV to 4 MeV are considered to be uniformly distributed in 26 organs. This paper presents, for the first time, results of internal electron exposures based on a realistic whole-body tomographic model. Because VIP-Man has many organs and tissues that were previously not well defined (or not available) in other models, the efforts at Rensselaer and elsewhere bring an unprecedented opportunity to significantly improve the internal dosimetry.

  2. Backwards Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found a spiral galaxy that may rotate in the opposite direction from what was expected.

    A picture of the oddball galaxy is available at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/03 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken in May 2001 by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The picture showed which side of galaxy NGC 4622 is closer to Earth; that information helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars, shown in blue.

    Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise.

    NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. Astronomers suspect this oddity was caused by the interaction of NGC 4622 with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a smaller companion galaxy.

    Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 lies 111 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.

    The science team, consisting of Drs. Ron Buta and Gene Byrd from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and Tarsh Freeman of Bevill State

  3. The Highly Variable Absorber of NGC 4507

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braito, Valentina

    2010-03-01

    Variability studies of the X-ray absorbing media in Seyfert galaxies has proved to be a fundamental tool to assess the nature and location of the absorbing matter present in the central region of Active Galactic Nuclei. An exciting recent development is the finding that the X-ray spectra of a few obscured AGN change between characteristically Compton-thin and Compton-thick states on relatively short time scales with the most extreme example being NGC1365. This places severe constraints on the geometry and structure of the X-ray absorbing/reprocessing regions and suggests the presence of apparently multiple absorbers/ reflecting mirrors and that the absorber could be inhomogeneous and could have a range of ionization states. We present the Suzaku observation of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC4507, one of the X-ray brightest Compton-thin Seyfert 2s and a candidate for a variable absorber. Suzaku caught the source in a reflection dominated state. A comparison with previous X-ray observations shows that NGC4507 changes from transmission to reflection dominated. The pattern of this dramatic spectral variability cannot be simply explained purely by variability of the nuclear activity, but also requires strong variability in the amount of absorption.

  4. Galaxy Centaurus A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-25

    This image of the active galaxy Centaurus A was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 7, 2003. The galaxy is located 30 million light-years from Earth and is seen edge on, with a prominent dust lane across the major axis. In this image the near ultraviolet emission is represented as green, and the far ultraviolet emission as blue. The galaxy exhibits jets of high energy particles, which were traced by the X-ray emission and measured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These X-ray emissions are seen as red in the image. Several regions of ultraviolet emission can be seen where the jets of high energy particles intersect with hydrogen clouds in the upper left corner of the image. The emission shown may be the result of recent star formation triggered by the compression of gas by the jet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04624

  5. The numbers of z ˜ 2 star-forming and passive galaxies in 2.5 square degrees of deep CFHT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcila-Osejo, Liz; Sawicki, Marcin

    2013-10-01

    We use an adaptation of the BzKs technique to select ˜40 000 z ˜ 2 galaxies (to KAB = 24), including ˜5000 passively evolving (PE) objects (to KAB = 23), from 2.5 deg2 of deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) imaging. The passive galaxy luminosity function (LF) exhibits a clear peak at R = 22 and a declining faint-end slope (α = -0.12 ^{+0.16}_{-0.14}), while that of star-forming galaxies is characterized by a steep faint-end slope [α = -1.43± 0.02(systematic)^{+0.05}_{-0.04}(random)]. The details of the LFs are somewhat sensitive (at the <25 per cent level) to cosmic variance even in these large (˜0.5 deg2) fields, with the D2 field (located in the Cosmological Evolution Survey, COSMOS field) most discrepant from the mean. The shape of the z ˜ 2 stellar mass function of passive galaxies is remarkably similar to that at z ˜ 0.9, save for a factor of ˜4 lower number density. This similarity suggests that the same mechanism may be responsible for the formation of passive galaxies seen at both these epochs. This same formation mechanism may also operate down to z ˜ 0 if the local PE galaxy mass function, known to be two-component, contains two distinct galaxy populations. This scenario is qualitatively in agreement with recent phenomenological mass-quenching models and extends them to span more than three quarters of the history of the Universe.

  6. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF A z = 6.42 QUASAR HOST GALAXY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3

    SciTech Connect

    Mechtley, M.; Windhorst, R. A.; Cohen, S. H.; Jansen, R. A.; Scannapieco, E.; Ryan, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Schneider, G.; Fan, X.; Hathi, N. P.; Keel, W. C.; Roettgering, H.; Schneider, D. P.; Strauss, M. A.; Yan, H. J.

    2012-09-10

    We report on deep near-infrared F125W (J) and F160W (H) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of the z = 6.42 quasar J1148+5251 to attempt to detect rest-frame near-ultraviolet emission from the host galaxy. These observations included contemporaneous observations of a nearby star of similar near-infrared colors to measure temporal variations in the telescope and instrument point-spread function (PSF). We subtract the quasar point source using both this direct PSF and a model PSF. Using direct subtraction, we measure an upper limit for the quasar host galaxy of m{sub J} > 22.8 and m{sub H} > 23.0 AB mag (2 {sigma}). After subtracting our best model PSF, we measure a limiting surface brightness from 0.''3 to 0.''5 radius of {mu}{sub J} > 23.5 and {mu}{sub H} > 23.7 AB mag arcsec{sup -2} (2 {sigma}). We test the ability of the model subtraction method to recover the host galaxy flux by simulating host galaxies with varying integrated magnitude, effective radius, and Sersic index, and conducting the same analysis. These models indicate that the surface brightness limit ({mu}{sub J} > 23.5 AB mag arcsec{sup -2}) corresponds to an integrated upper limit of m{sub J} > 22-23 AB mag, consistent with the direct subtraction method. Combined with existing far-infrared observations, this gives an infrared excess log (IRX) > 1.0 and corresponding ultraviolet spectral slope {beta} > -1.2 {+-} 0.2. These values match those of most local luminous infrared galaxies, but are redder than those of almost all local star-forming galaxies and z {approx_equal} 6 Lyman break galaxies.

  7. THE MORPHOLOGY OF PASSIVELY EVOLVING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2 FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WFC3 DEEP IMAGING IN THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cassata, P.; Giavalisco, M.; Guo Yicheng; Salimbeni, S.; Ferguson, H.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Casertano, S.; Grogin, N.; Lucas, R. A.; Renzini, A.; Fontana, A.; Dickinson, M.; Lotz, J. M.; Conselice, C. J.; Papovich, C.; Straughn, A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Moustakas, L.

    2010-05-01

    We present near-IR images, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and the WFC3/IR camera, of six passive and massive galaxies at redshift 1.3 < z < 2.4 (specific star formation rate <10{sup -2} Gyr{sup -1}; stellar mass M {approx} 10{sup 11} M {sub sun}), selected from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey. These images, which have a spatial resolution of {approx}1.5 kpc, provide the deepest view of the optical rest-frame morphology of such systems to date. We find that the light profile of these galaxies is regular and well described by a Sersic model with index typical of today's spheroids. Their size, however, is generally much smaller than today's early types of similar stellar masses, with four out of six galaxies having r{sub e} {approx} 1 kpc or less, in quantitative agreement with previous similar measures made at rest-frame UV wavelengths. The images reach limiting surface brightness {mu}{approx} 26.5 mag arcsec{sup -2} in the F160W bandpass; yet, there is no evidence of a faint halo in the galaxies of our sample, even in their stacked image. We also find that these galaxies have very weak 'morphological k-correction' between the rest-frame UV (from the Advanced Camera for Surveys z band) and the rest-frame optical (WFC3 H band): the Sersic index, physical size, and overall morphology are independent or only mildly dependent on the wavelength, within the errors.

  8. A polarization-independent broadband terahertz absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cheng; Zang, XiaoFei E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn; Wang, YiQiao; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn

    2014-07-21

    A highly efficient broadband terahertz absorber is designed, fabricated, and experimentally as well as theoretically evaluated. The absorber comprises a heavily doped silicon substrate and a well-designed two-dimensional grating. Due to the destructive interference of waves and diffraction, the absorber can achieve over 95% absorption in a broad frequency range from 1 to 2 THz and for angles of incidence from 0° to 60°. Such a terahertz absorber is also polarization-independent due to its symmetrical structure. This omnidirectional and broadband absorber have potential applications in anti-reflection coatings, imaging systems, and so on.

  9. ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne

    2006-07-01

    Existing HST observations of nearby galaxies comprise a sparse and highly non-uniform archive, making comprehensive comparative studies among galaxies essentially impossible. We propose to secure HST's lasting impact on the study of nearby galaxies by undertaking a systematic, complete, and carefully crafted imaging survey of ALL galaxies in the Local Universe outside the Local Group. The resulting images will allow unprecedented measurements of: {1} the star formation history {SFH} of a >100 Mpc^3 volume of the Universe with a time resolution of Delta[log{t}]=0.25; {2} correlations between spatially resolved SFHs and environment; {3} the structure and properties of thick disks and stellar halos; and {4} the color distributions, sizes, and specific frequencies of globular and disk clusters as a function of galaxy mass and environment. To reach these goals, we will use a combination of wide-field tiling and pointed deep imaging to obtain uniform data on all 72 galaxies within a volume-limited sample extending to 3.5 Mpc, with an extension to the M81 group. For each galaxy, the wide-field imaging will cover out to 1.5 times the optical radius and will reach photometric depths of at least 2 magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch throughout the limits of the survey volume. One additional deep pointing per galaxy will reach SNR 10 for red clump stars, sufficient to recover the ancient SFH from the color-magnitude diagram. This proposal will produce photometric information for 100 million stars {comparable to the number in the SDSS survey} and uniform multi-color images of half a square degree of sky. The resulting archive will establish the fundamental optical database for nearby galaxies, in preparation for the shift of high-resolution imaging to the near-infrared.

  10. Star Formation Triggering Mechanisms Revealed by Far-Ultraviolet Hα, and HI Images of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Susan Gessner

    1998-12-01

    Far-ultraviolet (FUV), Hα, and HI observations of dwarf galaxies Holmberg II, IC2574, and Sextans A are used to investigate the means by which star formation propagates in galaxies lacking global triggering mechanisms such as spiral density waves. The observations trace the interaction between sites of massive star formation and the neutral and ionized components of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) in these intrinsically simple systems. Both local and large-scale triggering mechanisms related to massive star formation are seen, suggesting that feedback from massive stars is a microscopic process operating in all galaxies to a certain degree. The data emphasize the importance of local conditions in regulating star formation from evidence such as massive stars inside ionized shells, compact HII regions surrounding aging clusters, and stars formed in chains of progressing age. Surface brightness profiles show current activity correlates with the time averaged level of past star formation at a given radius demonstrating a reliance on local conditions. Normalized star formation rates show no dependence on global conditions in comparisons with global properties such as the gas fraction. Large-scale triggering by HI shells is supported by observations of progenitor populations and secondary sites of star formation on the dense HI rims. Analysis of the energy available from massive stars inside HI shells indicates energy deposited into the ISM from supernovae and stellar winds is sufficient to account for the HI morphology. Ages of individual star forming regions are derived using B, Ha, and FUV photometry and show both older, diffuse FUV regions and younger, compact HII regions. The distribution of ages is reconciled with the HI morphology, showing a clear preference of young regions for areas of dense HI and old regions for HI voids. Global kinematical properties may also play a role in the star formation process since differences in the rotation

  11. Metal-line absorption at Zabs approximately Zem from associated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingson, E.; Yee, H. K. C.; Bechtold, Jill; Dobrzycki, Adam

    1994-04-01

    For a preliminary study of whether C IV absorption at Zabs approximately Zem is related to associated galaxy companions, we have collected data from a sample of 10 quasars with 0.15 less than z less than 0.65 for which high-resolution optical and UV spectroscopy is available from the literature, and for which we have deep optical images and limited spectroscopy. We also present new optical spectra for two of our samples. Four of these quasars have associated C IV absorption systems. In thes four fields, there are eight galaxies with Mr less than -19.0 mag within 35 kpc of the quasar (projected distance, assuming they are at the quasar redshift), which may be candidates for the associated C IV absorption. This observed density of galaxies near quasars with associated C IV absorption is significantly greater than that for a control sample of quasars chosen from the literature. This result suggests that galaxies near the quasar line of sight may be linked with associated C IV absorption. None of these quasars show associated Mg II absorption, despite the presence of galaxies very near the line of sight, suggesting a Mg II 'proximity effect,' where ionizing flux from the quasar destroys the Mg(+) from at least the outer parts of the galaxies. Three quasars are located in rich galaxy clusters, but none of these quasars are found to have associated C IV absorption. This suggests that galaxies in rich clusters associated with quasars are less likely to be metal-line absorbers. It is plausible that the extended galaxy halos which may be responsible for the absorptions are stripped from galaxies in these dense environments. While it seems that at Z approximately 0.6 rich clusters do not cause them, associated C IV absorption systems at higher redshift may be explained by associated clusters if there has been evolution in the properties of galaxy halos in dense environments.

  12. COSMIC DUST IN Mg II ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, Brice; Fukugita, Masataka

    2012-08-01

    Mg II absorbers induce reddening on background quasars. We measure this effect and infer the cosmic density of dust residing in these systems to be {Omega} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, in units of the critical density of the universe, which is comparable to the amount of dust found in galactic disks or about half the amount inferred to exist outside galaxies. We also estimate the neutral hydrogen abundance in Mg II clouds to be {Omega} Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, which is approximately 5% of hydrogen in stars in galaxies. This implies a dust-to-gas mass ratio for Mg II clouds of about 1/100, which is similar to the value for normal galaxies. This would support the hypothesis of the outflow origin of Mg II clouds, which are intrinsically devoid of stars and hence have no sources of dust. Considerations of the dust abundance imply that the presence of Mg II absorbers around galaxies lasts effectively for a few Gyr. High-redshift absorbers allow us to measure the rest-frame extinction curve to 900 A, at which the absorption by the Lyman edge dominates over scattering by dust in the extinction opacity.

  13. Mysterious Blob Galaxies Revealed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-01-11

    This image composite shows a giant galactic blob (red) and the three merging galaxies NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope discovered within it (yellow). Blobs are intensely glowing clouds of hot hydrogen gas that envelop faraway galaxies. They are about 10 times as large as the galaxies they surround. Visible-light images reveal the vast extent of blobs, but don't provide much information about their host galaxies. Using its heat-seeking infrared eyes, Spitzer was able to see the dusty galaxies tucked inside one well-known blob located 11 billion light-years away. The findings reveal three monstrously bright galaxies, trillions of times brighter than the Sun, in the process of merging together. Spitzer also observed three other blobs located in the same cosmic neighborhood, all of which were found to be glaringly bright. One of these blobs is also known to be a galactic merger, only between two galaxies instead of three. It remains to be seen whether the final two blobs studied also contain mergers. The Spitzer data were acquired by its multiband imaging photometer. The visible-light image was taken by the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07220

  14. Hubble Peers at the Heart of a Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    This new Hubble image is centered on NGC 5793, a spiral galaxy over 150 million light-years away in the constellation of Libra. This galaxy has two particularly striking features: a beautiful dust lane and an intensely bright center — much brighter than that of our own galaxy, or indeed those of most spiral galaxies we observe. NGC 5793 is a Seyfert galaxy. These galaxies have incredibly luminous centers that are thought to be caused by hungry supermassive black holes — black holes that can be billions of times the size of the sun — that pull in and devour gas and dust from their surroundings. This galaxy is of great interest to astronomers for many reasons. For one, it appears to house objects known as masers. Whereas lasers emit visible light, masers emit microwave radiation. The term "masers" comes from the acronym Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Maser emission is caused by particles that absorb energy from their surroundings and then re-emit this in the microwave part of the spectrum. Naturally occurring masers, like those observed in NGC 5793, can tell us a lot about their environment; we see these kinds of masers in areas where stars are forming. In NGC 5793 there are also intense mega-masers, which are thousands of times more luminous than the sun. Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Perlman (Florida Institute of Technology) NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  15. Lyman Break Galaxies at z ≈ 1.8-2.8: GALEX/NUV Imaging of the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matthew A.; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak; Currie, Thayne; Hayashi, Masao; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Motohara, Kentaro; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Makiko

    2009-06-01

    A photometric sample of ~8000 V < 25.3 candidate Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) has been selected by combining Subaru/Suprime-Cam BV R C i'z' optical data with deep GALEX/NUV imaging of the Subaru Deep Field. Follow-up spectroscopy confirmed 24 LBGs at 1.5 lsim z lsim 2.7. Among the optical spectra, 12 have Lyα emission with rest-frame equivalent widths of ≈5-60 Å. The success rate for identifying LBGs as NUV-dropouts at 1.5 < z < 2.7 is 86%. The rest-frame UV (1700 Å) luminosity function (LF) is constructed from the photometric sample with corrections for stellar contamination and z < 1.5 interlopers (lower limits). The LF is 1.7 ± 0.1 (1.4 ± 0.1 with a hard upper limit on stellar contamination) times higher than those of z ~ 2 BXs and z ~ 3 LBGs. Three explanations were considered, and it is argued that significantly underestimating low-z contamination or effective comoving volume is unlikely: the former would be inconsistent with the spectroscopic sample at 93% confidence, and the second explanation would not resolve the discrepancy. The third scenario is that different photometric selection of the samples yields nonidentical galaxy populations, such that some BX galaxies are LBGs and vice versa. This argument is supported by a higher surface density of LBGs at all magnitudes while the redshift distribution of the two populations is nearly identical. This study, when combined with other star formation rate (SFR) density UV measurements from LBG surveys, indicates that there is a rise in the SFR density: a factor of 3-6 (3-10) increase from z ~ 5 (z ~ 6) to z ~ 2, followed by a decrease to z ~ 0. This result, along with past sub-mm studies that find a peak at z ~ 2 in their redshift distribution, suggests that z ~ 2 is the epoch of peak star formation. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory (operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA), the Subaru Telescope (operated by

  16. The AGN content of ultraluminous IR galaxies: High resolution VLA imaging of the IRAS 1 Jy ULIRG sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, N. M.; Wilson, A. S.; Falcke, H.; Veilleux, S.; Maiolino, R.

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a high resolution radio imaging survey of 83 of the 118 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) in the IRAS 1 Jy ULIRG sample. We have observed these ULIRGs at 15 GHz with the Very Large Array (VLA). We find that ~ 75% of Seyferts (both type 1 and 2) and LINERs have radio nuclei which are compact at our 150 mas resolution. The detection rate of H II nuclei is significantly lower (32%); the detections among these are preferentially H II + LINER/Seyfert composite nuclei. Among ULIRGs with multiple optical or near-IR nuclei our observations detected only one (or no) nucleus; in these the radio detection is typically towards the brightest near-IR nucleus. The compactness of the radio sources, the higher detection rates in AGN-type nuclei than H II nuclei, the preferential detection of nuclei with unresolved point sources in the near-IR, the low soft X-ray to nuclear radio luminosity ratio (arguing against thermal emission powering the radio nuclei), and the lack of correlation between radio power and Hα luminosity, all support an origin of the detected radio nuclei in AGN related activity. This result is especially interesting for LINER ULIRGs for which signatures of AGNs have often been ambiguous in other wavebands. Such a high incidence of AGN would provide, for the first time, a large sample in which to study the interplay between AGN, starbursts, and galaxy mergers. Table 1 is also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/a+A/409/115

  17. Obscured Star-Formation in Merging Galaxies: High Resolution Radio Imaging of a Time-Ordered Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Campion, S. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    We present new, deep, high resolution 6cm and 4cm radio continuum images of the central regions of a time-ordered sequence of seven large galaxy mergers. The radio observations are able to detect star-forming re- gions that are completely obscured at optical wavelengths. In all systems, we detect numerous compact radio sources embedded in more diffuse ra- d