Science.gov

Sample records for absorbing incoming solar

  1. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  2. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  3. Solar concentrator/absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Collector/energy converter, consisting of dual-slope optical concentrator and counterflow thermal energy absorber, is attached to multiaxis support structure. Efficient over wide range of illumination levels, device may be used to generate high temperature steam, serve as solar powered dryer, or power absorption cycle cooler.

  4. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  5. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGES

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; ...

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  6. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  7. Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Craig B.; Kutscher, Charles F.; Gawlik, Keith M.

    1997-01-01

    An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprising an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution.

  8. Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, C.B.; Kutscher, C.F.; Gawlik, K.M.

    1997-12-02

    An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprises an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution. 3 figs.

  9. Perfect selective metamaterial solar absorbers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2013-11-04

    In this work, we numerically investigate the radiative properties of metamaterial nanostructures made of two-dimensional tungsten gratings on a thin dielectric spacer and an opaque tungsten film from UV to mid-infrared region as potential selective solar absorbers. The metamaterial absorber with single-sized tungsten patches exhibits high absorptance in the visible and near-infrared region due to several mechanisms such as surface plasmon polaritons, magnetic polaritons, and intrinsic bandgap absorption of tungsten. Geometric effects on the resonance wavelengths and the absorptance spectra are studied, and the physical mechanisms are elucidated in detail. The absorptance could be further enhanced in a broader spectral range with double-sized metamaterial absorbers. The total solar absorptance of the optimized metamaterial absorbers at normal incidence could be more than 88%, while the total emittance is less than 3% at 100°C, resulting in total photon-to-heat conversion efficiency of 86% without any optical concentration. Moreover, the metamaterial solar absorbers exhibit quasi-diffuse behaviors as well as polarization independence. The results here will facilitate the design of novel highly efficient solar absorbers to enhance the performance of various solar energy conversion systems.

  10. Porous absorber for solar air heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, J.A.

    1980-09-10

    A general discussion of the factors affecting solar collector performance is presented. Bench scale tests done to try to determine the heat transfer characteristics of various screen materials are explained. The design, performance, and evaluation of a crude collector with a simple screen stack absorber is treated. The more sophisticated absorber concept, and its first experimental approximation is examined. A short summary of future plans for the collector concept is included. (MHR)

  11. Thin film absorber for a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, William G.

    1985-01-01

    This invention pertains to energy absorbers for solar collectors, and more particularly to high performance thin film absorbers. The solar collectors comprising the absorber of this invention overcome several problems seen in current systems, such as excessive hardware, high cost and unreliability. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame with a thin film window bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber in accordance with the present invention is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. In a preferred embodiment, thin film layers are formed from a metal/plastic laminate. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. The absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  12. Accelerated life testing of solar absorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Bo; Moeller, K.; Frei, Ulrich; Koehl, Michael

    1994-09-01

    Results from a comprehensive case study on accelerated life testing of some selective solar collector absorber coatings for DHW systems are reviewed. The study was conducted within Task X `Solar Materials Research and Development' of the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program from 1987 to 1992 and is unique due to its quantitative and systematic approach for durability assessment. The work of case study involved the development of both experimental and theoretical tools to aid the assessment of service life or absorber coatings. This entailed performance analysis, failure analysis, microclimate characterization, environmental resistance testing and life date analysis. Predicted in-service degradation of coatings from accelerated life testing was found to be in fairly good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively with what was actually observed on coatings installed and tested for three years in solar collectors working under typical DHW conditions.

  13. Solar upgrading of low income housing

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsdaine, E.; Farrer, R.; Callahan, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design, installation, training and operation experience of retrofitting solar devices (active and passive water heaters, Trombe walls, convective loop window units, etc.) on hundreds of low-income houses along the Southwest Border Region are summarized. The project demonstrates a wide variety of appropriate low-cost solar applications and provides prototypical models for the region's low-income inhabitants. Space heating and cooling systems and water heating systems have been combined with weatherization and conservation techniques. CETA employees, members of various community groups and youth groups, and employees of local non-profit organizations have been trained as installers, and low-income people have been educated in the operation and use of these solar devices. It is anticipated that this transfer of appropriate technology into the region will result in continued retrofitting of solar installations and in the stimulation of local industries, which will create employment opportunities for members of the low-income population.

  14. Exposure testing of solar absorber surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has been involved in supporting, monitoring and conducting exposure testing of solar materials for approximately ten years. The Laboratory has provided technical monitoring of the IITRI, DSET, Lockheed, and Berry contracts and has operated the Los Alamos exposure Facility for over five years. This report will outline some of the past exposure testing, the testing still in progress, and describe some of the major findings. While this report will primarily emphasize solar absorber surfaces, some of the significant findings relative to advanced glazing will be discussed.

  15. Optical analysis of solar energy tubular absorbers.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, C; Sokolov, M

    1982-11-15

    The energy absorbed by a solar energy tubular receiver element for a single incident ray is derived. Two types of receiver elements were analyzed: (1) an inner tube with an absorbing coating surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube, and (2) a semitransparent inner tube filled with an absorbing fluid surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube. The formation of ray cascades in the semitransparent tubes is considered. A numerical simulation to investigate the influence of the angle of incidence, sizing, thickness, and coefficient of extinction of the tubes was performed. A comparison was made between receiver elements with and without cover tubes. Ray tracing analyses in which rays were followed within the tubular receiver element as well as throughout the rest of the collector were performed for parabolic and circular trough concentrating collectors.

  16. Semiconductor nanowire optical antenna solar absorbers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Linyou; Fan, Pengyu; Vasudev, Alok P; White, Justin S; Yu, Zongfu; Cai, Wenshan; Schuller, Jon A; Fan, Shanhui; Brongersma, Mark L

    2010-02-10

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells can serve as a virtually unlimited clean source of energy by converting sunlight into electrical power. Their importance is reflected in the tireless efforts that have been devoted to improving the electrical and structural properties of PV materials. More recently, photon management (PM) has emerged as a powerful additional means to boost energy conversion efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate an entirely new PM strategy that capitalizes on strong broad band optical antenna effects in one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures to dramatically enhance absorption of sunlight. We show that the absorption of sunlight in Si nanowires (Si NWs) can be significantly enhanced over the bulk. The NW's optical properties also naturally give rise to an improved angular response. We propose that by patterning the silicon layer in a thin film PV cell into an array of NWs, one can boost the absorption for solar radiation by 25% while utilizing less than half of the semiconductor material (250% increase in the light absorption per unit volume of material). These results significantly advance our understanding of the way sunlight is absorbed by one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures and provide a clear, intuitive guidance for the design of efficient NW solar cells. The presented approach is universal to any semiconductor and a wide range of nanostructures; as such, it provides a new PV platform technology.

  17. Colorful solar selective absorber integrated with different colored units.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feiliang; Wang, Shao-Wei; Liu, Xingxing; Ji, Ruonan; Li, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Yuwei; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-25

    Solar selective absorbers are the core part for solar thermal technologies such as solar water heaters, concentrated solar power, solar thermoelectric generators and solar thermophotovoltaics. Colorful solar selective absorber can provide new freedom and flexibility beyond energy performance, which will lead to wider utilization of solar technologies. In this work, we present a monolithic integration of colored solar absorber array with different colors on a single substrate based on a multilayered structure of Cu/TiN(x)O(y)/TiO(2)/Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2). A colored solar absorber array with 16 color units is demonstrated experimentally by using combinatorial deposition technique via changing the thickness of SiO(2) layer. The solar absorptivity and thermal emissivity of all the color units is higher than 92% and lower than 5.5%, respectively. The colored solar selective absorber array can have colorful appearance and designable patterns while keeping high energy performance at the same time. It is a new candidate for a number of solar applications, especially for architecture integration and military camouflage.

  18. Absorber Alignment Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    As we pursue efforts to lower the capital and installation costs of parabolic trough solar collectors, it is essential to maintain high optical performance. While there are many optical tools available to measure the reflector slope errors of parabolic trough solar collectors, there are few tools to measure the absorber alignment. A new method is presented here to measure the absorber alignment in two dimensions to within 0.5 cm. The absorber alignment is measured using a digital camera and four photogrammetric targets. Physical contact with the receiver absorber or glass is not necessary. The alignment of the absorber is measured along its full length so that sagging of the absorber can be quantified with this technique. The resulting absorber alignment measurement provides critical information required to accurately determine the intercept factor of a collector.

  19. Obliquity Modulation of the Incoming Solar Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on a basic principle of orbital resonance, we have identified a huge deficit of solar radiation induced by the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity as possibly the causal mechanism for ice age glaciation. Including this modulation effect on solar radiation, we have performed model simulations of climate change for the past 2 million years. Simulation results show that: (1) For the past 1 million years, temperature fluctuation cycles were dominated by a 100-Kyr period due to amplitude-frequency resonance effect of the obliquity; (2) From 2 to 1 million years ago, the amplitude-frequency interactions. of the obliquity were so weak that they were not able to stimulate a resonance effect on solar radiation; (3) Amplitude and frequency modulation analysis on solar radiation provides a series of resonance in the incoming solar radiation which may shift the glaciation cycles from 41-Kyr to 100-Kyr about 0.9 million years ago. These results are in good agreement with the marine and continental paleoclimate records. Thus, the proposed climate response to the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity may be the key to understanding the glaciation puzzles in paleoclimatology.

  20. Impact of structural heterogeneity in solar absorber layers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toney, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Impact of structural heterogeneity in solar absorber layers Michael F Toney SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Structural and morphological heterogeneity is common in thin film and emerging solar cell absorber layers, including organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions (OPV BHJs), hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOIP), and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe), and has a significant impact on the (opto)electronic heterogeneity and hence absorber properties. In this talk I will use X-ray based methods, including scattering and spectroscopies, to characterize and quantify the heterogeneity in OPV BHJs and HOIP absorber layers. The BHJ films are blends of the small molecule X2 and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) where it has been established that there are three distinct region of the films - pure PC71BM, pure X2 and intimately mixed X2:PC71BM. This talk will show how the absolute concentration of the mixed phase can be used to explain the large PC71BM:X2 composition range where good performance is observed [1]. The talk will also show that spin cast CH3NH3PbI3 films consistent of both crystalline and amorphous regions, which can explain previous heterogeneity in the PL imaging [2]. [1] Huang et al., Adv. Energy Mater. 4, 1301886 (2014). [2] deQuilettes et al., Science 348, 683 (2015).

  1. A high absorbance material for solar collectors' applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, A. I.; Maldonado, R. D.; Díaz, E. A.; Montalvo, A. I.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we proposed a low cost material to be used as an excellent absorber for solar collectors, to increase its thermal efficiency by the high capacity to absorb solar radiation. The material, known as "smoke black" (soot) can be obtained by the incomplete combustion of organic materials, such as the oxygen-acetylene, paraffin, or candles. A comparative analysis between the optical properties (reflectance, absorbance, and emissivity) measured on three covered copper surfaces (without paint, with a commercial matte black paint, and with smoke black) shows amazing optical results for the smoke black. Reflectance values of the smoke black applied over copper surfaces improves 56 times the values obtained from commercial black paints. High values of emissivity (E=0.9988) were measured on the surface covered with smoke black by spectrophotometry in the UV-VIS range, which represents about 7% of increment as compared with the value obtained for commercial black paints (E=0.938). The proposed high absorbance material can be easily applied on any kind of surfaces at low cost.

  2. Antimony sulphide, an absorber layer for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N.; Hussain, Arshad; Ahmed, R.; Shamsuri, W. N. Wan; Shaari, A.; Ahmad, N.; Abbas, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Replacement of the toxic, expensive and scarce materials with nontoxic, cheap and earth-abundant one, in solar cell absorber layer, is immensely needed to realize the vision of green and sustainable energy. Two-micrometre-thin antimony sulphide film is considered to be adequate as an absorbing layer in solar cell applications. In this paper, we synthesize antimony sulphide thin films on glass substrate by physical vapour deposition technique, and the obtained films were then annealed at different temperatures (150-250 °C). The as-deposited and annealed samples were investigated for structural and optoelectronic properties using different characterization techniques. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the annealed samples were polycrystalline with Sb2S3 phase, while the as-deposited sample was amorphous in nature. The optical properties are measured via optical ellipsometric techniques. The measured absorbance of the film is adequately high, and every photon is found to be absorbed in visible and NIR range. The conductivity type of the films measured by hot-point probe technique is determined to be p-type. The optical band gap of the resulted samples was in the range (2.4-1.3 eV) for the as-deposited and annealed films.

  3. Gold-black as IR Absorber and Solar Cell Enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peale, Robert E.; Cleary, Justin W.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Smith, C. W.; Baillie, K.; Colwell, J. E.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Joly, Alan G.; Edwards, Oliver; Fredricksen, C. J.

    2010-03-01

    Infrared absorbance and visible/near-IR excited plasmon resonances are investigated in gold-black, a porous nano-structured conducting film. A two level full factorial optimization study with evaporation-chamber pressure, boat current, substrate temperature, and degree of polymer infusion (for hardening) was performed. Polymer infusion was found generally to reduce absorbance in the long wave IR but has little effect at THz wavelengths, although for samples with the highest absorbance there is a slight improvement in the absorbance figure of merit (FOM) in both wavelength regimes. The characteristic length scales of the structured films vary considerably as a function of deposition parameters, but the IR FOM is found to be only weakly correlated with these distributions, which are determined by wavelet analysis of scanning electron micrographs images. Initial investigations of gold-black by photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) reveal plasmon resonances, which have potential to enhance the efficiency of thin film solar cells. For films with different characteristic length scales, the plasmon resonances appear in portions of the film with similar length scales.

  4. Spray CVD for Making Solar-Cell Absorber Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) processes of a special type have been investigated for use in making CuInS2 absorber layers of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells from either of two subclasses of precursor compounds: [(PBu3) 2Cu(SEt)2In(SEt)2] or [(PPh3)2Cu(SEt)2 In(SEt)2]. The CuInS2 films produced in the experiments have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and four-point-probe electrical tests.

  5. Contactless two-stage solar concentrators for tubular absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, Pablo; Minano, Juan C.; Garcia, Raphael; Mohedano Arroyo, Ruben

    1997-10-01

    Two new types of two-mirror solar concentrator for tubular receiver, the snail concentrator and the helmet concentrator , are presented. The main feature of these concentrators is that they have a sizable gap between the secondary mirror and the absorber, and they still achieve concentrations close to the thermodynamic limit with high collection efficiencies. This characteristic makes them unique and, on the contrary to the present two-stage designs, allows for the location of the secondary outside the evacuated tube. One of the differences between the snail and the helmet concentrators is that the last is symmetric (as the conventional parabolic trough) but the first is not. For an acceptance angle of (alpha) equals +/- 0.73 degs and a collection efficiency of 96.8% (i.e. 3.2% of the rays incident on the primary mirror within the acceptance angle are rejected), the snail concentrator and the helmet concentrator achieve an average flux concentration of 91.1% and 72.8% of the thermodynamic limit, respectively. The gap between the absorber and the secondary mirror is 6.8 and 12.1 times the absorber radius for each concentrator. Moreover, both concentrators have also high rim angles of the primary mirror: +/- 86.2 degs (helmet) and 3.1 - 98.8 degs (snail). This is of interest for a good mechanical stability of the collector.

  6. Light Absorbers and Catalysts for Solar to Fuel Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornienko, Nikolay I.

    Increasing fossil fuel consumption and the resulting consequences to the environment has propelled research into means of utilizing alternative, clean energy sources. Solar power is among the most promising of renewable energy sources but must be converted into an energy dense medium such as chemical bonds to render it useful for transport and energy storage. Photoelectrochemistry (PEC), the splitting of water into oxygen and hydrogen fuel or reducing CO 2 to hydrocarbon fuels via sunlight is a promising approach towards this goal. Photoelectrochemical systems are comprised of several components, including light absorbers and catalysts. These parts must all synergistically function in a working device. Therefore, the continual development of each component is crucial for the overall goal. For PEC systems to be practical for large scale use, the must be efficient, stable, and composed of cost effective components. To this end, my work focused on the development of light absorbing and catalyst components of PEC solar to fuel converting systems. In the direction of light absorbers, I focused of utilizing Indium Phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) as photocathodes. I first developed synthetic techniques for InP NW solution phase and vapor phase growth. Next, I developed light absorbing photocathodes from my InP NWs towards PEC water splitting cells. I studied cobalt sulfide (CoSx) as an earth abundant catalyst for the reductive hydrogen evolution half reaction. Using in situ spectroscopic techniques, I elucidated the active structure of this catalyst and offered clues to its high activity. In addition to hydrogen evolution catalysts, I established a new generation of earth abundant catalysts for CO2 reduction to CO fuel/chemical feedstock. I first worked with molecularly tunable homogeneous catalysts that exhibited high selectivity for CO2 reduction in non-aqueous media. Next, in order to retain molecular tunability while achieving stability and efficiency in aqueous

  7. Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim; silverman, vered; harnik, nili; Erlich, caryn

    2016-04-01

    Superposed epoch analysis of meteorological reanalysis data is used to demonstrate a significant connection between intraseasonal solar variability and temperatures in the stratosphere. Decreasing solar flux leads to a cooling of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, while increasing solar flux leads to a warming of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, after a lag of approximately six to ten days. Late winter (February-March) Arctic stratospheric temperatures also change in response to changing incoming solar flux in a manner consistent with that seen on the 11 year timescale: ten to thirty days after the start of decreasing solar flux, the polar cap warms during the easterly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation. In contrast, cooling is present after decreasing solar flux during the westerly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation (though it is less robust than the warming during the easterly phase). The estimated composite mean changes in Northern Hemisphere upper stratospheric (~ 5hPa) polar temperatures exceed 8K, and are potentially a source of intraseasonal predictability for the surface. These changes in polar temperature are consistent with the changes in wave driving entering the stratosphere. Garfinkel, C.I., V. Silverman, N. Harnik, C. Erlich, Y. Riz (2015), Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 7648-7660. doi: 10.1002/2015JD023244.

  8. Effect of forest canopy closure on incoming solar radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dottavio, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes involved in defoliation assessment from remotely sensed data, a field study was designed to investigate the effect of forest canopy closure and other environmental variables on incoming solar radiation. Diffuse radiation measurements were recorded in red, infrared, and middle infrared wavelengths using the Mark 2 three band field radiometer. Results to date indicate that the percent canopy closure is the single most important variable affecting incoming solar radiation. In the visible and near infrared regions, interaction between time of day and date (defined later as solar zenith angle) also affect radiometric response. Aspect has only limited influence on radiance response. These same variables do not influence middle infrared response, however. Uniformity of the forest canopy appears to be more important. These results are compared to LANDSAT MSS classification results of gypsy moth defoliation.

  9. Effect of forest canopy closure on incoming solar radiance

    SciTech Connect

    Dottavio, C.L.

    1981-04-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes involved in defoliation assessment from remotely sensed data, a field study was designed to investigate the effect of forest canopy closure and other environmental variables on incoming solar radiation. Diffuse radiation measurements were recorded in red, infrared, and middle infrared wavelengths using the Mark 2 three band field radiometer. Results to date indicate that the percent canopy closure is the single most important variable affecting incoming solar radiation. In the visible and near infrared regions, interaction between time of day and date (defined later as solar zenith angle) also affect radiometric response. Aspect has only limited influence on radiance response. These same variables do not influence middle infrared response, however. Uniformity of the forest canopy appears to be more important. These results are compared to LANDSAT MSS classification results of gypsy moth defoliation.

  10. Improved high temperature solar absorbers for use in Concentrating Solar Power central receiver applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Ambrosini, Andrea; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Lambert, Timothy L.; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Bencomo, Marlene

    2010-09-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use solar absorbers to convert the heat from sunlight to electric power. Increased operating temperatures are necessary to lower the cost of solar-generated electricity by improving efficiencies and reducing thermal energy storage costs. Durable new materials are needed to cope with operating temperatures >600 C. The current coating technology (Pyromark High Temperature paint) has a solar absorptance in excess of 0.95 but a thermal emittance greater than 0.8, which results in large thermal losses at high temperatures. In addition, because solar receivers operate in air, these coatings have long term stability issues that add to the operating costs of CSP facilities. Ideal absorbers must have high solar absorptance (>0.95) and low thermal emittance (<0.05) in the IR region, be stable in air, and be low-cost and readily manufacturable. We propose to utilize solution-based synthesis techniques to prepare intrinsic absorbers for use in central receiver applications.

  11. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-17

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to their emitter/absorber interfaces, especially for high-efficiency cells with improved bulk properties. When interface defect states are located at efficient recombination energies, performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e. defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (..delta..EC >/= 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a 'cliff' (.delta..EC < 0 eV) is likely to allow many holes in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. In addition, a thin and highly-doped emitter can invert the absorber, form a large hole barrier, and decrease device performance losses due to high interface defect density. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. Other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ..delta..EC. These materials are predicted to yield higher

  12. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  13. Development of optical tool for the characterization of selective solar absorber tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braillon, Julien; Stollo, Alessio; Delord, Christine; Raccurt, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    In the Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies, selective solar absorbers, which have a cylindrical geometry, are submitted to strong environmental constraints. The degradation of their optical properties (total solar absorbance and total emittance) has a direct impact on the performances. In order to know optical properties of absorber tubes, we present in this article a new optical tool developed by our laboratory which fit onto commercial spectrometers. Total solar absorbance and total emittance are calculated from total reflectance spectra measured by UV-Vis and IR spectrophotometry. To verify and validate the measurement method, we performed a comparative study between flat and cylindrical samples with same surface properties.

  14. Laterally assembled nanowires for ultrathin broadband solar absorbers.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung-Deok; Kempa, Thomas J; Park, Hong-Gyu; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2014-05-05

    We studied optical resonances in laterally oriented Si nanowire arrays by conducting finite-difference time-domain simulations. Localized Fabry-Perot and whispering-gallery modes are supported within the cross section of each nanowire in the array and result in broadband light absorption. Comparison of a nanowire array with a single nanowire shows that the current density (J(SC)) is preserved for a range of nanowire morphologies. The J(SC) of a nanowire array depends on the spacing of its constituent nanowires, which indicates that both diffraction and optical antenna effects contribute to light absorption. Furthermore, a vertically stacked nanowire array exhibits significantly enhanced light absorption because of the emergence of coupled cavity-waveguide modes and the mitigation of a screening effect. With the assumption of unity internal quantum efficiency, the J(SC) of an 800-nm-thick cross-stacked nanowire array is 14.0 mA/cm², which yields a ~60% enhancement compared with an equivalent bulk film absorber. These numerical results underpin a rational design strategy for ultrathin solar absorbers based on assembled nanowire cavities.

  15. Flat solar energy collector with low heat contact between absorber and edge of collector

    SciTech Connect

    Hussmann, E.

    1981-10-27

    The present invention relates to a flat, gas-tight solar energy collector having a novel absorber means consisting of an absorber plate and an edge connecting means attached thereto for connecting the absorber to the edge structure of the collector. No direct thermal contact exists between the edge of the absorber plate and the edge structure means. Thus, heat losses on the sides of the collector are kept to a minimum.

  16. Are sea-ice driven increases of absorbed solar radiation in the Arctic offset by increasing sea ice extent in the Antarctic?: A bipolar comparison of satellite-derived estimates of absorbed solar radiation and sea ice area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, W.; Ahlert, A.; Loeb, N. G.; Stewart, S.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its high surface albedo, sea ice reflects a substantial amount of incoming solar radiation relative to an ice-free ocean surface. Thus the presence of sea ice results in less absorption of energy during the long days of the polar summers. AS expected, the dramatic decline in Arctic summer sea ice area over the past decades has been accompanied by an increase in absorbed solar radiation (ASR). This has been observed by in situ measurements as well as satellite observations. The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument on the NASA EOS Terra platform has provided global coverage of solar radiation since late 1999, providing a large-scale indicator of changes in absorbed solar radiation. These data show that the dramatic decrease in Arctic summer sea ice has been accompanied an increase in absorbed solar radiation during the boreal summer, with the largest gains corresponding to regions of the most notable summer ice loss. While overall there is good correlation, the relationship is far from perfect. This is not unexpected since other factors - particularly clouds - play a role in the amount of ASR. In contrast to the decreasing sea ice in the Arctic, the Antarctic has seen a trend of increasing coverage. The increases are smaller, in both absolute and relative terms. However, the southern hemisphere sea ice cover is at a higher average latitude than in the north due to the presence of the Antarctic continent and is thus is potentially exposed to higher incoming solar radiation. Here we investigate the relationship between changes in sea ice and changes in ASR (estimated from CERES data) in the Arctic and Antarctic during their respective summer seasons. To first order, both hemispheres show an expected relationship between sea ice and absorbed solar radiation in the Arctic (sea ice decrease, ASR increase) and the Antarctic (sea ice increase, ASR decrease). However, the correlation in the Antarctic is not nearly as clear in the Arctic and the

  17. Structural and optical properties of copper-coated substrates for solar thermal absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratesi, Stefano; De Lucia, Maurizio; Meucci, Marco; Sani, Elisa

    2016-10-01

    Spectral selectivity, i.e. merging a high absorbance at sunlight wavelengths to a low emittance at the wavelengths of thermal spectrum, is a key characteristics for materials to be used for solar thermal receivers. It is known that spectrally selective absorbers can raise the receiver efficiency for all solar thermal technologies. Tubular sunlight receivers for parabolic trough collector (PTC) systems can be improved by the use of spectrally selective coatings. Their absorbance is increased by deposing black films, while the thermal emittance is minimized by the use of properly-prepared substrates. In this work we describe the intermediate step in the fabrication of black-chrome coated solar absorbers, namely the fabrication and characterization of copper coatings on previously nickel-plated stainless steel substrates. We investigate the copper surface features and optical properties, correlating them to the coating thickness and to the deposition process, in the perspective to assess optimal conditions for solar absorber applications.

  18. Theoretical and thermal characterization of a wideband perfect absorber for application in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufangura, Patrick; Sabah, Cumali

    2016-12-01

    This paper suggests a metamaterial (MTM) absorber structure to be used for efficiency improved solar cell. The proposed MTM absorber consists of the topmost three concentric circular ring resonators, and a ground metal plane sandwiched to the top layer with a dielectric spacer. Numerical simulation and theoretical (interference theory) studies on the proposed design show a wideband with near-perfect (>99%) absorption response in the visible frequency region of the solar spectrum. Thermal characterization of the suggested design is also conducted in order to investigate its absorption capability at different temperatures. The proposed MTM absorber design is believed to be an outstanding candidate toward high-efficiency solar photovoltaic cell.

  19. Imperfectly geometric shapes of nanograting structures as solar absorbers with superior performance for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huu, Nghia; Cada, Michael; Pištora, Jaromír

    2014-03-10

    The expectation of perfectly geometric shapes of subwavelength grating (SWG) structures such as smoothness of sidewalls and sharp corners and nonexistence of grating defects is not realistic due to micro/nanofabrication processes. This work numerically investigates optical properties of an optimal solar absorber comprising a single-layered silicon (Si) SWG deposited on a finite Si substrate, with a careful consideration given to effects of various types of its imperfect geometry. The absorptance spectra of the solar absorber with different geometric shapes, namely, the grating with attached nanometer-sized features at the top and bottom of sidewalls and periodic defects within four and ten grating periods are investigated comprehensively. It is found that the grating with attached features at the bottom absorbs more energy than both the one at the top and the perfect grating. In addition, it is shown that the grating with defects in each fourth period exhibits the highest average absorptance (91%) compared with that of the grating having defects in each tenth period (89%), the grating with attached features (89%), and the perfect one (86%). Moreover, the results indicate that the absorptance spectrum of the imperfect structures is insensitive to angles of incidence. Furthermore, the absorptance enhancement is clearly demonstrated by computing magnetic field, energy density, and Poynting vector distributions. The results presented in this study prove that imperfect geometries of the nanograting structure display a higher absorptance than the perfect one, and provide such a practical guideline for nanofabrication capabilities necessary to be considered by structure designers.

  20. Self-assembly of highly efficient, broadband plasmonic absorbers for solar steam generation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Tan, Yingling; Ji, Dengxin; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Pei; Xu, Jun; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Yu, Zongfu; Zhu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    The study of ideal absorbers, which can efficiently absorb light over a broad range of wavelengths, is of fundamental importance, as well as critical for many applications from solar steam generation and thermophotovoltaics to light/thermal detectors. As a result of recent advances in plasmonics, plasmonic absorbers have attracted a lot of attention. However, the performance and scalability of these absorbers, predominantly fabricated by the top-down approach, need to be further improved to enable widespread applications. We report a plasmonic absorber which can enable an average measured absorbance of ~99% across the wavelengths from 400 nm to 10 μm, the most efficient and broadband plasmonic absorber reported to date. The absorber is fabricated through self-assembly of metallic nanoparticles onto a nanoporous template by a one-step deposition process. Because of its efficient light absorption, strong field enhancement, and porous structures, which together enable not only efficient solar absorption but also significant local heating and continuous stream flow, plasmonic absorber-based solar steam generation has over 90% efficiency under solar irradiation of only 4-sun intensity (4 kW m(-2)). The pronounced light absorption effect coupled with the high-throughput self-assembly process could lead toward large-scale manufacturing of other nanophotonic structures and devices.

  1. Development of optical tools for the characterization of selective solar absorber at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Philemon; Braillon, Julien; Delord, Christine; Raccurt, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for characterization of this solar absorber in condition of use that is to say in air and at elevated temperature. In this paper we present two new optical test benches developed for optical characterization of solar absorbers in condition of use up to 800°C. The first equipment is an integrated sphere with heated sample holder which measures the hemispherical reflectance between 280 and 2500 nm to calculate the solar absorbance at high temperature. The second optical test bench measures the emittance of samples up to 1000°C in the range of 1.25 to 28.57 µm. Results of high temperature measurements on a series of metallic absorbers with selective coating and refractory material for high thermal receiver are presented.

  2. Analysis of heat-pipe absorbers in evacuated-tube solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. R.; Schertz, W. W.; Allen, J. W.

    1986-02-01

    Heat transfer in evacuated-tube solar collectors with heat-pipe absorbers is compared with that for similar collectors with flow-through absorbers. In systems that produce hot water or other heated fluids, the heat-pipe absorber suffers a heat transfer penalty compared with the flow-through absorber, but in many cases the penalty can be minimized by proper design at the heat-pipe condenser and system manifold. The heat transfer penalty decreases with decreasing collector heat loss coefficient, suggesting that evacuated tubes with optical concentration are more appropriate for use with heat pipes than evacuated or nonevacuated flat-plate collectors. When the solar collector is used to drive an absorption chiller, the heat-pipe absorber has better heat transfer characteristics than the flow-through absorbers.

  3. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-01-01

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities. PMID:26392542

  4. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-10-06

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities.

  5. Photochromic And Thermochromic Pigments For Solar Absorbing-Reflecting Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinson, Thomas

    1987-11-01

    Both photochromic and thermochromic compounds were synthesized and physical measurements were made to determine coefficients of relectance, absorbance and emission. The most interesting group of thermochromic compounds are related to silver tctraiodomercurate and the most interesting photochromic compounds are substituted benzoindolinopyrospirans. The synthesis and optical reflectance and absorbance properties of other classes of compounds are also reported.

  6. Intensity and absorbed-power distribution in a cylindrical solar-pumped dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The internal intensity and absorbed-power distribution of a simplified hypothetical dye laser of cylindrical geometry is calculated. Total absorbed power is also calculated and compared with laboratory measurements of lasing-threshold energy deposition in a dye cell to determine the suitability of solar radiation as a pump source or, alternatively, what modifications, if any, are necessary to the hypothetical system for solar pumping.

  7. Self-assembly of highly efficient, broadband plasmonic absorbers for solar steam generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; Tan, Yingling; Ji, Dengxin; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Pei; Xu, Jun; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Yu, Zongfu; Zhu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The study of ideal absorbers, which can efficiently absorb light over a broad range of wavelengths, is of fundamental importance, as well as critical for many applications from solar steam generation and thermophotovoltaics to light/thermal detectors. As a result of recent advances in plasmonics, plasmonic absorbers have attracted a lot of attention. However, the performance and scalability of these absorbers, predominantly fabricated by the top-down approach, need to be further improved to enable widespread applications. We report a plasmonic absorber which can enable an average measured absorbance of ~99% across the wavelengths from 400 nm to 10 μm, the most efficient and broadband plasmonic absorber reported to date. The absorber is fabricated through self-assembly of metallic nanoparticles onto a nanoporous template by a one-step deposition process. Because of its efficient light absorption, strong field enhancement, and porous structures, which together enable not only efficient solar absorption but also significant local heating and continuous stream flow, plasmonic absorber–based solar steam generation has over 90% efficiency under solar irradiation of only 4-sun intensity (4 kW m−2). The pronounced light absorption effect coupled with the high-throughput self-assembly process could lead toward large-scale manufacturing of other nanophotonic structures and devices. PMID:27152335

  8. Electromagnetic resonances of solar-selective absorbers with nanoparticle arrays embedded in a dielectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Atsushi; Kawamata, Tomoaki

    2016-11-01

    We numerically investigate a solar-selective absorber with tungsten core-shell nanoparticle arrays embedded in an SiO2 layer. The 3D full-wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations are performed to investigate the geometric effects of different types of solar-selective absorbers. Consequently, broadband light absorption was achieved with either a tungsten nanoparticle array or a tungsten core-shell nanoparticle array because of the strong electric field enhancement in the gap between the core nanoparticles. The solar performance of the proposed structure is shown for high-efficiency solar light absorption. This study enhances understanding of the light absorption mechanism of metallic nanoparticle/dielectric composite and facilitates the design of high-efficiency solar-selective absorbers.

  9. BOREAS HYD-3 Subcanopy Incoming Solar Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Janet P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Davis, Robert E.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-3 team collected several data sets related to the hydrology of forested areas. This data set contains solar radiation measurements from several pyranometers (solar radiometers) placed on the snow surface in jack pine (1994) and black spruce and aspen forests (1996) in the BOREAS southern study area (SSA). An array of radiometers was used to collect data for three to four consecutive days in each forest type to study the hypothesis that energy transfer and snow water equivalent would vary spatially as a function of canopy closure. The quality of the data is good, because the days were generally clear and the radiometers were checked daily to remove anything that landed on the radiometers. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The subcanopy incoming solar radiation measurement data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. Controlling optical absorption in metamaterial absorbers for plasmonic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Wyatt; Vora, Ankit; Gwamuri, Jephias; Pearce, Joshua M.; Güney, Durdu Ö.

    2015-08-01

    Metals in the plasmonic metamaterial absorbers for photovoltaics constitute undesired resistive heating. However, tailoring the geometric skin depth of metals can minimize resistive losses while maximizing the optical absorbance in the active semiconductors of the photovoltaic device. Considering experimental permittivity data for InxGa1-xN, absorbance in the semiconductor layers of the photovoltaic device can reach above 90%. The results here also provides guidance to compare the performance of different semiconductor materials. This skin depth engineering approach can also be applied to other optoelectronic devices, where optimizing the device performance demands minimizing resistive losses and power consumption, such as photodetectors, laser diodes, and light emitting diodes.

  11. Development of a carbonaceous selective absorber for solar thermal energy collection and process for its formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, John D.

    1989-02-01

    The main goal of the US Department of Energy supported part of this project is to develop information about controlling the complicated chemical processes involved in the formation of a carbonaceous selective absorber and learn what equipment will allow production of this absorber commercially. The work necessary to accomplish this goal is not yet complete. Formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber in the conveyor oven tried so far has been unsatisfactory, because the proper conditions for applying the carbonaceous coating in each conveyor oven fabricated, either have been difficult to obtain, or have been difficult to maintain over an extended period of time. A new conveyor oven is nearing completion which is expected to allow formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber on absorber tubes in a continuous operation over many days without the necessity of cleaning the conveyor oven or changing the thickness of the electroplated nickel catalyst to compensate for changes in the coating environment in the oven. Work under this project concerned with forming and sealing glass panels to test ideas on evacuated glass solar collector designs and production have been generally quite satisfactory. Delays in completion of the selective absorber work, has caused postponement of the fabrication of a small prototype evacuated glass solar collector panel. Preliminary cost estimates of the selective absorber and solar collector panel indicate that this collector system should be lower in cost than evacuated solar collectors now on the market.

  12. Removal of fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance of dissolved organic matter in reclaimed water by solar light.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Chao; Wang, Wenlong; He, Tao; Hu, Hongying; Du, Ye; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Storing reclaimed water in lakes is a widely used method of accommodating changes in the consumption of reclaimed water during wastewater reclamation and reuse. Solar light serves as an important function in degrading pollutants during storage, and its effect on dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated in this study. Solar light significantly decreased the UV254 absorbance and fluorescence (FLU) intensity of reclaimed water. However, its effect on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) value of reclaimed water was very limited. The decrease in the UV254 absorbance intensity and FLU excitation-emission matrix regional integration volume (FLU volume) of reclaimed water during solar light irradiation was fit with pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The decrease of UV254 absorbance was much slower than that of the FLU volume. Ultraviolet light in solar light had a key role in decreasing the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity during solar light irradiation. The light fluence-based removal kinetic constants of the UV254 and FLU intensity were independent of light intensity. The peaks of the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity with an apparent molecular weight (AMW) of 100Da to 2000Da decreased after solar irradiation, whereas the DOC value of the major peaks did not significantly change.

  13. Design of wide-angle solar-selective absorbers using aperiodic metal-dielectric stacks.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Nicholas P; Pincon, Olivier; Agrawal, Mukul; Peumans, Peter

    2009-12-07

    Spectral control of the emissivity of surfaces is essential in applications such as solar thermal and thermophotovoltaic energy conversion in order to achieve the highest conversion efficiencies possible. We investigated the spectral performance of planar aperiodic metal-dielectric multilayer coatings for these applications. The response of the coatings was optimized for a target operational temperature using needle-optimization based on a transfer matrix approach. Excellent spectral selectivity was achieved over a wide angular range. These aperiodic metal-dielectric stacks have the potential to significantly increase the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic and solar thermal conversion systems. Optimal coatings for concentrated solar thermal conversion were modeled to have a thermal emissivity <7% at 720K while absorbing >94% of the incident light. In addition, optimized coatings for solar thermophotovoltaic applications were modeled to have thermal emissivity <16% at 1750K while absorbing >85% of the concentrated solar radiation.

  14. Improved Single-Source Precursors for Solar-Cell Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Improved single-source precursor compounds have been invented for use in spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) of chalcopyrite semiconductor absorber layers of thin-film cells. A "single-source precursor compound" is a single molecular compound that contains all the required elements, which when used under the spray CVD conditions, thermally decomposes to form CuIn(x)Ga(1-x)S(y)Se(2-y).

  15. Antireflection treatment of thickness sensitive spectrally selective (TSSS) paints for thermal solar absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, M.; Waeckelgaard, E.; Blom, T.

    2010-01-15

    There are several methods to produce solar absorbers, and one cheap alternative is painted absorbers, preferably painted with a spectrally selective paint. The optical properties of Thickness Sensitive Spectrally Selective (TSSS) paints are, however, limited by the thickness of the paint layer. In this study it is shown that the solar absorptance of two commercial TSSS paints can be increased between 0.01 and 0.02 units with an antireflection treatment using a silicon dioxide layer deposited from silica-gel. It was found that the thermal emittance (100 C) did not change significantly after the treatment. (author)

  16. Experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in a low-profile, concentrated solar thermal collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiyuan; Zheng, Cheng; Mesgari, Sara; Hewakuruppu, Yasitha L.; Hjerrild, Natasha; Crisostomo, Felipe; Morrison, Karl; Woffenden, Albert; Rosengarten, Gary; Scott, Jason A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies [1-3] have demonstrated that nanotechnology, in the form of nanoparticles suspended in water and organic liquids, can be employed to enhance solar collection via direct volumetric absorbers. However, current nanofluid solar collector experimental studies are either relevant to low-temperature flat plate solar collectors (<100 °C) [4] or higher temperature (>100 °C) indoor laboratory-scale concentrating solar collectors [1, 5]. Moreover, many of these studies involve in thermal properties of nanofluid (such as thermal conductivity) enhancement in solar collectors by using conventional selective coated steel/copper tube receivers [6], and no full-scale concentrating collector has been tested at outdoor condition by employing nanofluid absorber [2, 6]. Thus, there is a need of experimental researches to evaluate the exact performance of full-scale concentrating solar collector by employing nanofluids absorber at outdoor condition. As reported previously [7-9], a low profile (<10 cm height) solar thermal concentrating collector was designed and analysed which can potentially supply thermal energy in the 100-250 °C range (an application currently met by gas and electricity). The present study focuses on the design and experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in this newly designed collector. The nanofluid absorber consists of glass tubes used to contain chemically functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed in DI water. MWCNTs (average diameter of 6-13 nm and average length of 2.5-20 μm) were functionalized by potassium persulfate as an oxidant. The nanofluids were prepared with a MCWNT concentration of 50 +/- 0.1 mg/L to form a balance between solar absorption depth and viscosity (e.g. pumping power). Moreover, experimentally comparison of the thermal efficiency between two receivers (a black chrome-coated copper tube versus a MWCNT nanofluid contained within a glass tubetube) is investigated. Thermal

  17. Effects of the provisions of the corporate and personal income tax codes on solar investment decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedmak, M. R.

    The effects of the provisions of the existing corporate and personal income tax codes on solar investment decisions are analyzed. It is shown that the provisions of a tax code do not discriminate against investment in solar technologies if the present value of depreciation and interest expense tax deductions over the relevant decision period is equal to the present value of actual capital expenses. However, on the basis of a quantitative analyses, it is concluded that the existing corporate income tax code does discriminate against solar investments for the majority of corporations, although the 25 percent tax credit available to businesses for solar investments is sufficient to alleviate the distortion in most cases. In contrast, the provisions of the existing personal income tax code favor solar investments over investments in less capital intensive energy generating units, as the interest paid on loads used to finance solar investments made by individuals is tax deductible, while conventional fuel expenses are not deductible.

  18. Electronic properties of perovskite absorbers for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Marina; Giustino, Feliciano

    2015-03-01

    Metal halide perovskite absorbers have captured the attention of the photovoltaics research community in the past 3 years, reaching efficiencies over 19%. Despite this unprecedented progress, the remarkable physical properties of these materials are not yet fully understood. In this work we show an exhaustive computational study of CH3NH3PbI3 within density functional theory and the GW approximation. We show the effect of semicore states and spin-orbit coupling on the quasiparticle band gap of CH3NH3PbI3 and describe a straightforward ``self-consistent scissor'' method to correct the underestimated dielectric screening in the G0W0 approach. Finally, we model the interplay between the structural and electronic properties of lead-iodide perovskites and propose novel lead-iodide peroskite absorbers with different cations at the center of the cuboctahedral cavity facilitating the tunning of the fundamental band gap. This work was supported by the ERC (EU FP7 / ERC 239578), UK EPSRC (EP/J009857/1) and the Leverhulme Trust (RL-2012-001).

  19. Highly absorbing solar cells--a survey of plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Ricky B; Pfadler, Thomas; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas

    2012-03-12

    Plasmonic light trapping in thin film solar cells is investigated using full-wave electromagnetic simulations. Light absorption in the semiconductor layer with three standard plasmonic solar cell geometries is compared to absorption in a flat layer. We identify near-field absorption enhancement due to the excitation of localized surface plasmons but find that it is not necessary for strong light trapping in these configurations: significant enhancements are also found if the real metal is replaced by a perfect conductor, where scattering is the only available enhancement mechanism. The absorption in a 60 nm thick organic semiconductor film is found to be enhanced by up to 19% using dispersed silver nanoparticles, and up to 13% using a nanostructured electrode. External in-scattering nanoparticles strongly limit semiconductor absorption via back-reflection.

  20. Unexpected Performances of Flat Sb2S3-Based Hybrid Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Takuma; Larramona, Gerardo; Dennler, Gilles

    2013-07-01

    We report unexpected results obtained on hybrid extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells based on the structure TiO2/Sb2S3/poly(3-hexylthiophene)/hole conducting layer (HCL). We show that we can maintain a large, state-of-the-art short-circuit current by switching from a three-dimensional to a two-dimensional device, that is, by simplifying drastically the device structure. Moreover, we prove that the HCL plays an important role in the solar cell working mechanism, and influences significantly its open-circuit voltage. We believe that these findings suggest new directions for the optimization of solid-state sensitized solar cells.

  1. Absorber and emitter for solar thermo-photovoltaic systems to achieve efficiency exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit.

    PubMed

    Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2009-08-17

    We present theoretical considerations as well as detailed numerical design of absorber and emitter for Solar Thermophotovoltaics (STPV) applications. The absorber, consisting of an array of tungsten pyramids, was designed to provide near-unity absorptivity over all solar wavelengths for a wide angular range, enabling it to absorb light effectively from solar sources regardless of concentration. The emitter, a tungsten slab with Si/SiO(2) multilayer stack, provides a sharp emissivity peak at the solar cell band-gap while suppressing emission at lower frequencies. We show that, under a suitable light concentration condition, and with a reasonable area ratio between the emitter and absorber, a STPV system employing such absorber-emitter pair and a single-junction solar cell can attain efficiency that exceeds the Shockley-Queisser limit.

  2. One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures as absorber layers in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jayadevan, K P; Tseng, T Y

    2005-11-01

    The one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures of cadmium chalcogenides (Il-VI: CdSe, CdTe), InP and GaAs (III-V), and the ternary chalcopyrites CulnS2, CulnSe2, and CulnTe2 (I-III-VI2) are the candidate semiconductors of interest as absorber layers in solar cells. In the confinement regime (approximately 1-10 nm) of these 1-D nanostructures, the electronic energy levels are quantized so that the oscillator strength and the resultant absorption of solar energy are enhanced. Moreover, the discrete energy levels effectively separate the electrons and holes at the two electrodes or at the interfaces with a polymer in a hybrid structure, so that an oriented and 1-D nanostructured absorber layer is expected to improve the conversion efficiency of solar cells. The intrinsic anisotropy of Il-VI and l-lll-VI2 crystal lattices and the progress in various growth processes are assessed to derive suitable morphological features of these 1-D semiconductor nanostructures. The present status of research in nanorod-based solar cells is reviewed and possible routes are identified to improve the performance of nanorod-based solar cells. Finally, the characteristics of nanorod-based solar cells are compared with the dye-sensitized and organic solar cells.

  3. High-flux solar absorber concept for central receiver power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, B. D.; Roberts, J. M.; Narayanan, T. V.

    1981-02-01

    For cylindrical receivers with a capacity of about 400 MW/t, an aim-at-the belt focusing strategy can produce average fluxes the order of 0.5 MW/sq m with peaks as high as 2 MW/sq m. An absorber concept is described which uses liquid sodium coolant and a three-header configuration to efficiently capture this solar power. The mechanical design of this absorber is discussed and thermal performance estimates are presented showing the solar-capture efficiency over a range of solar intensities. The sodium-flow characteristics and some potential flow-control problems are also described. A thermal-stress analysis is presented which shows that a limiting factor on the flux capability may be tube-wall creep/fatigue failure and not the heat-transfer capability of sodium.

  4. Bifacial solar cell with SnS absorber by vapor transport deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wangperawong, Artit; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yee, Yesheng; Herron, Steven M.; Clemens, Bruce M.; Cui, Yi; Bent, Stacey F.

    2014-10-27

    The SnS absorber layer in solar cell devices was produced by vapor transport deposition (VTD), which is a low-cost manufacturing method for solar modules. The performance of solar cells consisting of Si/Mo/SnS/ZnO/indium tin oxide (ITO) was limited by the SnS layer's surface texture and field-dependent carrier collection. For improved performance, a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate was used in place of the Mo to smooth the topography of the VTD SnS and to make bifacial solar cells, which are potentially useful for multijunction applications. A bifacial SnS solar cell consisting of glass/FTO/SnS/CdS/ZnO/ITO demonstrated front- and back-side power conversion efficiencies of 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively.

  5. Unassisted HI photoelectrolysis using n-WSe2 solar absorbers.

    PubMed

    McKone, James R; Potash, Rebecca A; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-06-07

    Molybdenum and tungsten diselenide are among the most robust and efficient semiconductor materials for photoelectrochemistry, but they have seen limited use for integrated solar energy storage systems. Herein, we report that n-type WSe2 photoelectrodes can facilitate unassisted aqueous HI electrolysis to H2(g) and HI3(aq) when placed in contact with a platinum counter electrode and illuminated by simulated sunlight. Even in strongly acidic electrolyte, the photoelectrodes are robust and operate very near their maximum power point. We have rationalized this behavior by characterizing the n-WSe2|HI/HI3 half cell, the Pt|HI/H2||HI3/HI|Pt full cell, and the n-WSe2 band-edge positions. Importantly, specific interactions between the n-WSe2 surface and aqueous iodide significantly shift the semiconductor's flatband potential and allow for unassisted HI electrolysis. These findings exemplify the important role of interfacial chemical reactivity in influencing the energetics of semiconductor-liquid junctions and the resulting device performance.

  6. Oxidation of electrodeposited black chrome selective solar absorber films

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, P.H.; Shanker, K.; Pettit, R.B.; Sowell, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopies have been used to study the composition and oxidation of electrodeposited black chrome films. The outer layer of the film is Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with the inner layer being a continuously changing mixture of Cr + Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Initially, approximately 40% by volume of the film is combined as Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and the volume percentage of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ increases to greater than 60% after only 136 hours at 250/sup 0/C. After approximately 3600 hours at 400/sup 0/C, the volume percentage of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ increased to as high as 80%. The thermal emittance decreased approximately linearly with increasing oxide content, while the solar absorptance remained constant until the percentage of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ exceeded approximately 70%. Oxidation was slower when the Cr/sup +3/ concentration in the plating bath was reduced from 16 g/l to 8 g/l, and when black chrome was deposited on stainless steel rather than sulfamate nickel.

  7. Electromagnetic resonances of wavelength-selective solar absorbers with film-coupled fishnet gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Yuki; Sakurai, Atsushi

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the optical characteristics of a Tungsten-SiO2-based film-coupled metamaterial with a fishnet-shaped grating, and we aim to show that this structure could potentially be used as a solar selective absorber for a solar thermophotovoltaic system. The proposed film-coupled metamaterial absorber combined with a fishnet-shaped grating shows significant enhancement in its absorption in the visible spectral region compared with a flat Tungsten surface, and it keeps its spectral emission low in the infrared region, thereby reducing radiative heat loss. The underlying mechanisms of the proposed absorber are discussed through a 3D full-wave electromagnetic simulation, the results of which are compared with that of theoretical equations. Furthermore, its spectral absorption under oblique incident light at the transverse magnetic and transverse electric waves is scrutinized. The underlying absorption mechanisms and relations between each optical resonance are discussed in this paper and will prove to be fundamental not only in the design of solar selective absorbers but also in other wavelength-selective thermal radiation controlling devices.

  8. Sputtered solar absorber coatings with high-spectral selectivity and good durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Wolfgang; Brucker, Franz; Koehl, Michael; Troescher, Thomas; Wittwer, Volker; Blessing, Rolf; Herlitze, Lothar

    1995-08-01

    Sputtering is a well established coating technology for glass panes. This technology is also interesting for the production of selective solar absorber coatings because the environmental impact is much less than for electroplating. There are already several sputtered absorber coatings for evacuated tubular collectors existing on the market. The application in ventilated collectors requires better durability of the absorbers and a technology which can be applied to planar substrates. The coatings presented here are produced by dc-magnetron sputtering. The maximum sample size was 2 m multiplied by 3 m. A thermal emittance (at 373 K) below 5% was achieved together with a solar absorptance (AM 1.5) above 90%. The coating is deposited directly onto copper sheets without the commonly used anti-corrosion nickel coating in between. The durability of the absorbers was found to be sufficient for the application in ventilated flat-plate collectors containing moisture according to the tests and requirements proposed by Task X of the Solar Heating and Cooling Programme of the International Energy Agency.

  9. Thermal and optical analysis of selective absorber coatings based on soot for applications in solar cookers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servín, H.; Peña, M.; Sobral, H.; González, M.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal and optical properties of selective absorber coatings of a solar cooker have been investigated. Coatings have been prepared using soot from pine resin, wood stove and sugarcane, previously separated by size. Results show that the cooking power and the overall efficiency of these pots are higher than others painted with black primer. Besides, by using an integrating sphere, the diffuse reflectance of absorbers has been obtained. Lower values of the reflectance have been measured for the pots covered with soot, showing a high correlation with the results achieved from the thermal tests, considering the measurement errors.

  10. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-09-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed.

  11. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed. PMID:27582317

  12. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-09-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed.

  13. Investigation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cell Performance Deviations in Nominally Equal Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, Robin; Parisi, Jürgen; Riedel, Ingo; Schäffler, Raymund; Dimmler, Bernhard

    2012-10-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) solar cells were fabricated independently by industrial scale co-evaporation in two separate production lines with the same nominal composition and thickness of the absorber film. Although the device properties were believed to be the same we observed substantial deviations of the respective values of the open circuit voltage (ΔVOC = 40 mV) and of the fill factor (ΔFF= 4%), whereas the short circuit current was essentially the same. We performed fundamental device analysis, space charge and defect spectroscopy, transient photoluminescence as well as in-depth profiling of the chemical gradients of the absorber films. Using the results from the experiments we set up a simulation baseline which allowed us to conclude that the apparent deviations can be related to the presence of deep recombination centers with different concentration within the CIGSe absorber as well as to variations of the band gap grading.

  14. Metamaterial-plasmonic absorber structure for high efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Sun, Tianyi; Paudel, Trilochan; Zhang, Yi; Ren, Zhifeng; Kempa, Krzysztof

    2012-01-11

    We show that a planar structure, consisting of an ultrathin semiconducting layer topped with a solid nanoscopically perforated metallic film and then a dielectric interference film, can highly absorb (superabsorb) electromagnetic radiation in the entire visible range, and thus can become a platform for high-efficiency solar cells. The perforated metallic film and the ultrathin absorber in this broadband superabsorber form a metamaterial effective film, which negatively refracts light in this broad frequency range. Our quantitative simulations confirm that the superabsorption bandwidth is maximized at the checkerboard pattern of the perforations. These simulations show also that the energy conversion efficiency of a single-junction amorphous silicon solar cell based on our optimized structure can exceed 12%.

  15. Methacrylic resin having a high solar radiant energy absorbing property and process for producing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Kamada, K.; Nakai, Y.

    1981-10-20

    A methacrylic resin having a high solar radiant energy absorbing property wherein an organic compound (A) containing cupric ion and a compound (B) having at least one p-o-h bond in a molecule are contained into the methacrylic resin selected from poly(Methyl methacrylate) or methacrylic polymers containing at least 50% by weight of a methyl methacrylate unit. A process for producing said methacrylic resin is also disclosed.

  16. Importance of Depletion Width on Charge Transport and Interfacial Recombination in Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edley, Michael; Jones, Treavor; Baxter, Jason

    The dynamics of charge carrier transport and recombination and their dependence on physical and electrochemical length scales in extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells is vital to cell design. We used J-V characterization, transient photocurrent / photovoltage, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study electron transport and interfacial recombination in ETA cell. ETA cells were composed of ZnO nanowires coated with an ultrathin (5 nm) CdS buffer layer and CdSe absorbers with thicknesses of 10 - 40 nm, with polysulfide electrolyte. In thinner absorbers near short circuit, the depletion region can extend radially into the nanowire, inhibiting interfacial recombination rate. However, depleting the periphery of the nanowire reduces the cross sectional area for charge transport, resulting in longer characteristic collection times. Thicker absorbers suffered more significant bias-dependent collection, and we conclude that slight radial penetration of the depletion region into the nanowires enhances charge collection. This work highlights the importance of considering the impact of depletion width on charge transport and interfacial recombination in the design of liquid junction, semiconductor-sensitized solar cells.

  17. PEDOT:PSS emitters on multicrystalline silicon thin-film absorbers for hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghanns, Marcus; Plentz, Jonathan; Andrä, Gudrun; Gawlik, Annett; Höger, Ingmar; Falk, Fritz

    2015-02-01

    We fabricated an efficient hybrid solar cell by spin coating poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) on planar multicrystalline Si (mc-Si) thin films. The only 5 μm thin Si absorber layers were prepared by diode laser crystallization of amorphous Si deposited by electron beam evaporation on glass. On these absorber layers, we studied the effect of SiOx and Al2O3 terminated Si surfaces. The short circuit density and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the mc-Si/Al2O3/PEDOT:PSS solar cell increase from 20.6 to 25.4 mA/cm2 and from 7.3% to 10.3%, respectively, as compared to the mc-Si/SiOx/PEDOT:PSS cell. Al2O3 lowers the interface recombination and improves the adhesion of the polymer film on the hydrophobic mc-Si thin film. Open circuit voltages up to 604 mV were reached. This study demonstrates the highest PCE so far of a hybrid solar cell with a planar thin film Si absorber.

  18. PEDOT:PSS emitters on multicrystalline silicon thin-film absorbers for hybrid solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Junghanns, Marcus; Plentz, Jonathan Andrä, Gudrun; Gawlik, Annett; Höger, Ingmar; Falk, Fritz

    2015-02-23

    We fabricated an efficient hybrid solar cell by spin coating poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) on planar multicrystalline Si (mc-Si) thin films. The only 5 μm thin Si absorber layers were prepared by diode laser crystallization of amorphous Si deposited by electron beam evaporation on glass. On these absorber layers, we studied the effect of SiO{sub x} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} terminated Si surfaces. The short circuit density and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the mc-Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PEDOT:PSS solar cell increase from 20.6 to 25.4 mA/cm{sup 2} and from 7.3% to 10.3%, respectively, as compared to the mc-Si/SiO{sub x}/PEDOT:PSS cell. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} lowers the interface recombination and improves the adhesion of the polymer film on the hydrophobic mc-Si thin film. Open circuit voltages up to 604 mV were reached. This study demonstrates the highest PCE so far of a hybrid solar cell with a planar thin film Si absorber.

  19. Metamaterial-based high efficiency absorbers for high temperature solar applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellowhair, Julius E.; Kwon, Hoyeong; Alù, Andrea; Jarecki, Robert L.; Shinde, Subhash L.

    2016-09-01

    Operation of concentrated solar power receivers at higher temperatures (<700°C) would enable supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) power cycles for improved power cycle efficiencies (<50%) and cost-effective solar thermal power. Unfortunately, radiative losses at higher temperatures in conventional receivers can negatively impact the system efficiency gains. One approach to improve receiver thermal efficiency is to utilize selective coatings that enhance absorption across the visible solar spectrum while minimizing emission in the infrared to reduce radiative losses. Existing coatings, however, tend to degrade rapidly at elevated temperatures. In this paper, we report on the initial designs, fabrication, and characterization of spectrally selective metamaterial-based absorbers for high-temperature, high-thermal flux environments important for solarized sCO2 power cycles. Metamaterials are structured media whose optical properties are determined by sub-wavelength structural features instead of bulk material properties, providing unique solutions by decoupling the optical absorption spectrum from thermal stability requirements. The key enabling innovative concept proposed is the use of structured surfaces with spectral responses that can be tailored to optimize the absorption and retention of solar energy for a given temperature range. In this initial study we use Tungsten for its stability in expected harsh environments, compatibility with microfabrication techniques, and required optical performance. Our goal is to tailor the optical properties for high (near unity) absorptivity across the majority of the solar spectrum and over a broad range of incidence angles, and at the same time achieve negligible absorptivity in the near infrared to optimize the energy absorbed and retained. To this goal, we apply the recently developed concept of plasmonic Brewster angle to suitably designed nanostructured Tungsten surfaces. We predict that this will improve the receiver

  20. Scientists Identify New Quaternary Materials for Solar Cell Absorbers (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Research provides insight for exploring use of earth-abundant quaternary semiconductors for large-scale solar cell applications. For large-scale solar electricity generation, it is critical to find new material that is Earth abundant and easily manufactured. Previous experimental studies suggest that Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} could be a strong candidate absorber materials for large-scale thin-film solar cells due to its optimal bandgap, high adsorption coefficient, and ease of synthesis. However, due to the complicated nature of the quaternary compound, it is unclear whether other quaternary compounds have physical properties suitable for solar cell application. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Fudan University, and University College London have performed systematic searches of quaternary semiconductors using a sequential cation mutation method in which the material properties of the quaternary compounds can be derived and understood through the evolution from the binary, to ternary, and to quaternary compounds. The searches revealed that in addition to Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4}, Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} are also suitable quaternary materials for solar cell absorbers. Through the extensive study of defect and alloy properties of these materials, the researchers propose that to maximize solar cell performance, growth of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} under Cu-poor/Zn-rich conditions will be optimal and the formation of Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} alloy will be beneficial in improving solar cell performance.

  1. Relationship Between Absorber Layer Properties and Device Operation Modes For High Efficiency Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Ram; Kokenyesi, Robert; Wager, John; Keszler, Douglas; CenterInverse Design Team

    2014-03-01

    A thin film solar cell (TFSC) can be differentiated into two distinct operation modes based on the transport mechanism. Current TFSCs predominantly exploit diffusion to extract photogenerated minority carriers. For efficient extraction, the absorber layer requires high carrier mobilities and long minority carrier lifetimes. Materials exhibiting a strong optical absorption onset near the fundamental band gap allows reduction of the absorber layer thickness to significantly less than 1 μm. In such a TFSC, a strong intrinsic electric field drives minority carrier extraction, resulting in drift-based transport. The basic device configuration utilized in this simulation study is a heterojunction TFSC with a p-type absorber layer. The diffusion/drift device operation modes are simulated by varying the thickness and carrier concentration of the absorber layer, and device performance between the two modes is compared. In addition, the relationship between device operation mode and transport properties, including carrier mobility and minority carrier lifetime are explored. Finally, candidate absorber materials that enable the advantages of a drift-based TFSC developed within the Center for Inverse Design are presented. School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

  2. Experimental indication for band gap widening of chalcopyrite solar cell absorbers after potassium fluoride treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pistor, P.; Greiner, D.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Brunken, S.; Gorgoi, M.; Steigert, A.; Calvet, W.; Lauermann, I.; Klenk, R.; Unold, T.; Lux-Steiner, M.-C.

    2014-08-11

    The implementation of potassium fluoride treatments as a doping and surface modification procedure in chalcopyrite absorber preparation has recently gained much interest since it led to new record efficiencies for this kind of solar cells. In the present work, Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorbers have been evaporated on alkali containing Mo/soda-lime glass substrates. We report on compositional and electronic changes of the Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber surface as a result of a post deposition treatment with KF (KF PDT). In particular, by comparing standard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron-based hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), we are able to confirm a strong Cu depletion in the absorbers after the KF PDT which is limited to the very near surface region. As a result of the Cu depletion, we find a change of the valence band structure and a shift of the valence band onset by approximately 0.4 eV to lower binding energies which is tentatively explained by a band gap widening as expected for Cu deficient compounds. The KF PDT increased the open circuit voltage by 60–70 mV compared to the untreated absorbers, while the fill factor deteriorated.

  3. First principle analyses of direct bandgap solar cells with absorbing substrates versus mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Alexander P.; Kirk, Wiley P.

    2013-11-07

    Direct bandgap InP, GaAs, CdTe, and Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P solar cells containing backside mirrors as well as parasitically absorbing substrates are analyzed for their limiting open circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency with comparison to record solar cells. From the principle of detailed balance, it is shown quantitatively that mirror solar cells have greater voltage and power conversion efficiency than their substrate counterparts. Next, the radiative recombination coefficient and maximum radiative lifetime of GaAs mirror and substrate solar cells are calculated and compared to the nonradiative Auger and Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes. Mirror solar cells have greater radiative lifetime than their substrate variants. Auger lifetime exceeds radiative lifetime for both substrate and mirror cells while SRH lifetime may be less or greater than radiative lifetime depending on trap concentration and capture cross section. Finally, the change in free energy of the photogenerated carriers is analyzed in a comparison between InP, GaAs, CdTe, and Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P mirror and substrate solar cells in order to characterize the relationship between solar photon quality and free energy management in solar cells with differing bandgaps. Wider bandgap visible threshold Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P solar cells make better use of the available change in free energy of the photogenerated charge carriers, even when normalized to the bandgap energy, than narrower bandgap near-IR threshold InP, GaAs, and CdTe solar cells.

  4. First principle analyses of direct bandgap solar cells with absorbing substrates versus mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Alexander P.; Kirk, Wiley P.

    2013-11-01

    Direct bandgap InP, GaAs, CdTe, and Ga0.5In0.5P solar cells containing backside mirrors as well as parasitically absorbing substrates are analyzed for their limiting open circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency with comparison to record solar cells. From the principle of detailed balance, it is shown quantitatively that mirror solar cells have greater voltage and power conversion efficiency than their substrate counterparts. Next, the radiative recombination coefficient and maximum radiative lifetime of GaAs mirror and substrate solar cells are calculated and compared to the nonradiative Auger and Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes. Mirror solar cells have greater radiative lifetime than their substrate variants. Auger lifetime exceeds radiative lifetime for both substrate and mirror cells while SRH lifetime may be less or greater than radiative lifetime depending on trap concentration and capture cross section. Finally, the change in free energy of the photogenerated carriers is analyzed in a comparison between InP, GaAs, CdTe, and Ga0.5In0.5P mirror and substrate solar cells in order to characterize the relationship between solar photon quality and free energy management in solar cells with differing bandgaps. Wider bandgap visible threshold Ga0.5In0.5P solar cells make better use of the available change in free energy of the photogenerated charge carriers, even when normalized to the bandgap energy, than narrower bandgap near-IR threshold InP, GaAs, and CdTe solar cells.

  5. CIGS absorber layer with double grading Ga profile for highly efficient solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, M.; Moradi, M.; Zahedifar, M.

    2016-04-01

    It is well-known that the band gap grading in CIGS solar cells is crucial for achieving highly efficient solar cells. We stimulate a CIGS solar cell and investigate the effects of the band gap grading on performance of the CIGS solar cell, where Ga/(Ga + In) ratio (GGI) at back (Cb) and front (Cf) of the absorber layer are considered constant. Our simulations show that by increasing the GGI at middle of CIGS absorber layer (Cm), the JSC decreases and VOC increases independent of the distance of the Cm from the back contact (Xm). For Cm lower than Cf, JSC increases and VOC decreases when the Xm shifts to the front of the CIGS layer. The behavior of JSC and VOC became reverse for the case of Cm greater than Cf. Almost in all of the structures, efficiency and FF have same behaviors. Our simulations show that the highest efficiency is obtained at Cm = 0.8 and Xm = 200 nm.

  6. A Solar Volumetric Receiver: Influence of Absorbing Cells Configuration on Device Thermal Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Shuja, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal performance of a solar volumetric receiver incorporating the different cell geometric configurations is investigated. Triangular, hexagonal, and rectangular absorbing cells are incorporated in the analysis. The fluid volume fraction, which is the ratio of the volume of the working fluid over the total volume of solar volumetric receiver, is introduced to assess the effect of cell size on the heat transfer rates in the receiver. In this case, reducing the fluid volume fraction corresponds to increasing cell size in the receiver. SiC is considered as the cell material, and air is used as the working fluid in the receiver. The Lambert's Beer law is incorporated to account for the solar absorption in the receiver. A finite element method is used to solve the governing equation of flow and heat transfer. It is found that the fluid volume fraction has significant effect on the flow field in the solar volumetric receiver, which also modifies thermal field in the working fluid. The triangular absorbing cell gives rise to improved effectiveness of the receiver and then follows the hexagonal and rectangular cells. The second law efficiency of the receiver remains high when hexagonal cells are used. This occurs for the fluid volume fraction ratio of 0.5.

  7. fs Laser surface nano-structuring of high refractory ceramics to enhance solar radiation absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, E.; Orlando, S.; Sciti, D.; Bellucci, A.; Lettino, A.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    High refractory pressure-less sintered ternary composite ceramics of AlN-SiC-MoSi2 (ASMY), polished by mechanical grinding to a surface roughness R a ~40 nm, have been treated in vacuum by fs Ti:sapphire laser, operating at 800 nm wavelength, 100 fs pulse duration, and increasing fluence, to generate a "black ceramic material", able to minimize solar radiation reflectance, in such a way that they could be used as the absorber material in an innovative conversion module of solar radiation into electrical energy. Disk specimens of approximately 3 cm in diameter and 3 mm thick have been treated by normal incident laser beam, generating a scanning pattern of parallel lines, at a lateral distance of about 80 μm, using a stage in motion, in the x, y, z directions, driven by a computer. The experimental conditions of laser treatment (energy fluence, speed of transition and lateral distance of steps) have been optimized to maximize the absorption properties of the patterned surface. In some samples this value was increased by about 15 %, compared to untreated surface, up to a value of final absorbance of about 95 %, all over the range of solar radiation spectrum (from UV to NIR). The morphological and chemical effects have been evaluated by SEM-EDS analysis. At higher fluence, we obtained the characteristic ablation craters and corresponding local material decomposition, while at lower fluence (over the ablation threshold) an ordered periodic nano-structure has been obtained, exploitable for its high capacity of entrapment of visible light. The laser treated ceramic specimen, characterized by very high absorption properties and reflectivity values lower than 4 %, has been used as active absorber material in a conversion module, installed in a solar test platform.

  8. Solar-thermophotovoltaic systems using spectrally selective absorber/emitter based on metal-dielectric multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohiyama, A.; Shimizu, M.; Yugami, H.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, high-efficiency STPV systems are investigated using spectrally selective absorber/emitter consisted of metal-dielectric multilayer and a GaSb TPV cell. A solar-thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system is expected to as highefficiency solar energy conversion using single-junction photovoltaic (PV) cells. However, the reached experimental system efficiency has been still low because spectral control of emitter is not sufficient. Narrowband thermal radiation from the emitter is effective for obtaining high-efficiency STPV systems, exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit. From theoretical analysis, the narrowband thermal emitter can leads to obtain PV conversion efficiency over 45% at Qvalue= 30 and 1300K. The spectrally selective absorber/emitter was also investigated to obtain high ηPV. The ηPV = 23.5% was estimated by the fabricated emitter spectrum, which exceeds the Shockley-Queisser limit of 19.6% for a GaSb bandgap of 0.67 eV. The entire STPV system and the power generation tests were conducted using the fabricated absorber/emitter. The total system efficiency 4.9% at 1505K was obtained under an irradiance of 109 Wcm-2.

  9. Solar conversion efficiency of photovoltaic and photoelectrolysis cells with carrier multiplication absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, M. C.; Nozik, A. J.

    2006-10-01

    We calculate the maximum power conversion efficiency for conversion of solar radiation to electrical power or to a flux of chemical free energy for the case of hydrogen production from water photoelectrolysis. We consider several types of ideal absorbers where absorption of one photon can produce more than one electron-hole pair that are based on semiconductor quantum dots with efficient multiple exciton generation (MEG) or molecules that undergo efficient singlet fission (SF). Using a detailed balance model with 1 sun AM1.5G illumination, we find that for single gap photovoltaic (PV) devices the maximum efficiency increases from 33.7% for cells with no carrier multiplication to 44.4% for cells with carrier multiplication. We also find that the maximum efficiency of an ideal two gap tandem PV device increases from 45.7% to 47.7% when carrier multiplication absorbers are used in the top and bottom cells. For an ideal water electrolysis two gap tandem device, the maximum conversion efficiency is 46.0% using a SF top cell and a MEG bottom cell versus 40.0% for top and bottom cell absorbers with no carrier multiplication. We also consider absorbers with less than ideal MEG quantum yields as are observed experimentally.

  10. Modeling and characterization of extremely thin absorber (eta) solar cells based on ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mora-Seró, Iván; Giménez, Sixto; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Azaceta, Eneko; Tena-Zaera, Ramón; Bisquert, Juan

    2011-04-21

    Extremely thin absorber (eta)-solar cells based on ZnO nanowires sensitized with a thin layer of CdSe have been prepared, using CuSCN as hole transporting material. Samples with significantly different photovoltaic performance have been analyzed and a general model of their behavior was obtained. We have used impedance spectroscopy to model the device discriminating the series resistance, the role of the hole conducting material CuSCN, and the interface process. Correlating the impedance analysis with the microstructural properties of the solar cell interfaces, a good description of the solar cell performance is obtained. The use of thick CdSe layers leads to high recombination resistances, increasing the open circuit voltage of the devices. However, there is an increase of the internal recombination in thick light absorbing layers that also inhibit a good penetration of CuSCN, reducing the photocurrent. The model will play an important role on the optimization of these devices. This analysis could have important implications for the modeling and optimization of all-solid devices using a sensitizing configuration.

  11. Light trapping in ZnO nanowire arrays covered with an absorbing shell for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Michallon, Jérôme; Bucci, Davide; Morand, Alain; Zanuccoli, Mauro; Consonni, Vincent; Kaminski-Cachopo, Anne

    2014-06-30

    The absorption properties of ZnO nanowire arrays covered with a semiconducting absorbing shell for extremely thin absorber solar cells are theoretically investigated by optical computations of the ideal short-circuit current density with three-dimensional rigorous coupled wave analysis. The effects of nanowire geometrical dimensions on the light trapping and absorption properties are reported through a comprehensive optical mode analysis. It is shown that the high absorptance of these heterostructures is driven by two different regimes originating from the combination of individual nanowire effects and nanowire arrangement effects. In the short wavelength regime, the absorptance is likely dominated by optical modes efficiently coupled with the incident light and interacting with the nearby nanowires (i.e. diffraction), induced by the period of core shell ZnO nanowire arrays. In contrast, in the long wavelength regime, the absorptance is governed by key optically guided modes, related to the diameter of individual core shell ZnO nanowires.

  12. High-throughput synthesis and screening of photon absorbers and photocatalysts for solar fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Slobodan; Marcin, Martin; Lin, Sean; Jin, Jian

    2012-02-01

    Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis is a D.O.E. Energy Innovation Hub conceived to develop solar fuel cell technologies by bringing together the critical mass of scientist and engineers nationwide. The High-Throughput Experimentation group at JCAP is developing pipelines for accelerated discovery of new materials - photon absorbers, photoelectrochemical and electrochemical catalysts - using combinatorial approaches (ink-jet, sol-gel, physical vapor deposition). Thin films of semiconducting metal-oxides, sulfides, nitrides and phosphides are synthesized and screened in high-throughput according to their optical and photoelectrochemical properties, as well as structure and phase. Vast libraries of materials and data are generated and made available to inside and outside research groups. Here we present data on binary, ternary and quaternary metal-oxide systems prepared by the ink-jet technology. The systems include tungsten-based photo-absorbers and nickel-iron-based catalysts for water splitting.

  13. Unidirectional radiative heat transfer with a spectrally selective planar absorber/emitter for high-efficiency solar thermophotovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohiyama, Asaka; Shimizu, Makoto; Yugami, Hiroo

    2016-11-01

    A high-efficiency solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system has been demonstrated using spectrally selective planar absorber/emitter systems and a GaSb TPV cell. In this study, a novel approach for designing the STPV system based on the efficiency of unidirectional radiative heat transfer has been introduced. To achieve high extraction and photovoltaic conversion efficiencies, the spectrally selective absorber/emitter based on a coherent perfect absorber composed of a thin molybdenum layer sandwiched between hafnium layers was applied. The extraction efficiency was further investigated with respect to the absorber/emitter area ratio. The experimental efficiency of STPV reached 5.1% with the area ratio of 2.3.

  14. Copper gallium diselenide thin film absorber growth for solar cell device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczynski, Ryan

    2007-12-01

    A custom-built migration-enhanced epitaxy reactor originally optimized for CuInSe2 (CIS) deposition was modified to grow gallium-containing compound semiconductor thin films, such as CuGaSe2 (CGS) and CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS). The addition of gallium allows for the manufacturing of solar cell absorber layers with wider band gaps. Three distinct growth recipes under several growth temperatures and a wide range of metal-composition ratios are used to deposit polycrystalline CGS thin films. The surface morphology of gallium-rich films is typically very uniform, with long needle-like grains when grown by the first recipe, a constant copper-rate process. In contrast, copper-rich films grown by this same recipe or by a modified three-stage process have island structures with very large grains embedded in a matrix region that possesses small grains. The surface morphology becomes more uniform and the grains in the matrix region become larger when a higher growth temperature is used. The third recipe, an emulated three-stage process, does not produce films with an island-matrix structure, and the grains are uniformly large. The highest conversion efficiency achieved for solar cells based on CGS is 5.3%, delivered by a copper-rich absorber deposited at the highest sustainable growth temperature of 491°C. This device has a large fill factor of 66%, but the open-circuit voltage of 0.48 V is lower than what is expected from a wide band-gap absorber. A set of CIGS solar cells was completely fabricated and characterized in-house. This led to the most efficient device produced from an absorber grown in our reactor, in the form of a 9% CIS solar cell featuring a one-micron film deposited at 491°C. Finally, a dynamic reactor model was created to describe the deposition environment in our epitaxial reactor. All relevant physical features are incorporated, including the cyclic motion of a rotating platen and the spatial distribution of the flux produced by three metal effusion sources

  15. Absorption and scattering of light by pigment particles in solar-absorbing paints.

    PubMed

    Gunde, M K; Orel, Z C

    2000-02-01

    The optical properties of black-pigmented solar absorbing paint were analyzed phenomenologically by use of the Kubelka-Munk theory, including correction for reflection on front and rear surfaces. The effective absorption and scattering coefficients and the efficiency curves for absorption and scattering were calculated for coatings with different pigment-to-volume concentration ratios. The dependence of absorption and scattering efficiency on the pigment-to-volume concentration ratio was analyzed by reference to theoretical data in the literature. It was concluded that, during drying and curing of coatings, spherical primary pigment particles most likely collect in elongated groups oriented perpendicularly to the coating surface. Formation of such groups helps in understanding the independent measurements of solar absorptance.

  16. An Optical Characterization Technique for Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors Using Images of the Absorber Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owkes, Jeanmarie Kathleen

    As the concentrating solar power industry competes to develop a less-expensive parabolic trough collector, assurance is needed that new parabolic trough collectors maintain accurate optical alignment. Previous optical characterization techniques are either too slow, ill-suited for field testing, or do not allow the collector to be tested in realistic orientations. The Observer method presented here enables the rapid optical characterization of parabolic trough collectors in any orientation in the field. The Observer method directly measures the combined optical angular errors in the reflector surface shape and the absorber position, which can be separated into its two components: reflector surface slope and absorber misalignment. The data acquisition requires the placement of photogrammetry targets on and around the collector. Multiple photographs of the absorber and its reflection are taken with a digital camera from different angles with respect to the collector. The images are processed to determine the camera location of each image using photogrammetry bundle analysis. The absorber and its reflection are found in the photographs using image-processing techniques. A Monte Carlo uncertainty model was developed to determine the uncertainty in the Observer measurements. The uncertainty was estimated for a wide array of measurement test scenarios to demonstrate the user's control over the measurement uncertainty. To validate the Observer method, the absorber alignment technique was compared to traditional photogrammetry; the absorber position measured with the two methods compared with a root-mean-square difference of 1.5 mm in the transverse direction and 0.86 mm along the optical axis. The reflector surface slope error measurement was compared to both VSHOT and SOFAST, two well-established optical characterization tools, by measuring a single reflector panel in the laboratory. The VSHOT and SOFAST measurements agreed with the Observer with a root

  17. Experimental evaluation of a stationary spherical reflector tracking absorber solar energy collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steward, W. G.; Kreider, J. F.; Caruso, P. S., Jr.; Kreith, F.

    1976-01-01

    This article presents experimental data for the thermal performance of a stationary, spherical-reflector, tracking-absorber solar energy collector (SRTA). The principle of operation and details of thermal performance of such an SRTA have previously been described. These experimental results were compared with the predictions of a thermal analysis previously published. Experimental results were compared with the prediction of Kreider's computer model. Within the range of the temperature of the experiments, the predicted performance of the unit agreed well with experimental data collected under clear sky conditions. In addition, the extrapolation of the efficiency to higher temperature is shown so that the potential of an SRTA solar collector as a means of providing high temperature steam to operate an electric power facility or for process heat can be evaluated. As a result of the tests conducted by NASA, and an economic analysis not yet publicly available, it appears that the SRTA solar collector concept will be economically viable in competition with any other existing solar system in providing electrical energy.

  18. Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) metric to characterize solar absorber coatings for the CSP industry

    DOE PAGES

    Boubault, Antoine; Ho, Clifford K.; Hall, Aaron; ...

    2015-07-08

    The contribution of each component of a power generation plant to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) can be estimated and used to increase the power output while reducing system operation and maintenance costs. The LCOE is used in order to quantify solar receiver coating influence on the LCOE of solar power towers. Two new parameters are introduced: the absolute levelized cost of coating (LCOC) and the LCOC efficiency. Depending on the material properties, aging, costs, and temperature, the absolute LCOC enables quantifying the cost-effectiveness of absorber coatings, as well as finding optimal operating conditions. The absolute LCOC is investigatedmore » for different hypothetic coatings and is demonstrated on Pyromark 2500 paint. Results show that absorber coatings yield lower LCOE values in most cases, even at significant costs. Optimal reapplication intervals range from one to five years. At receiver temperatures greater than 700 °C, non-selective coatings are not always worthwhile while durable selective coatings consistently reduce the LCOE—up to 12% of the value obtained for an uncoated receiver. Moreover the absolute LCOC is a powerful tool to characterize and compare different coatings, not only considering their initial efficiencies but also including their durability.« less

  19. Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) metric to characterize solar absorber coatings for the CSP industry

    SciTech Connect

    Boubault, Antoine; Ho, Clifford K.; Hall, Aaron; Lambert, Timothy N.; Ambrosini, Andrea

    2015-07-08

    The contribution of each component of a power generation plant to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) can be estimated and used to increase the power output while reducing system operation and maintenance costs. The LCOE is used in order to quantify solar receiver coating influence on the LCOE of solar power towers. Two new parameters are introduced: the absolute levelized cost of coating (LCOC) and the LCOC efficiency. Depending on the material properties, aging, costs, and temperature, the absolute LCOC enables quantifying the cost-effectiveness of absorber coatings, as well as finding optimal operating conditions. The absolute LCOC is investigated for different hypothetic coatings and is demonstrated on Pyromark 2500 paint. Results show that absorber coatings yield lower LCOE values in most cases, even at significant costs. Optimal reapplication intervals range from one to five years. At receiver temperatures greater than 700 °C, non-selective coatings are not always worthwhile while durable selective coatings consistently reduce the LCOE—up to 12% of the value obtained for an uncoated receiver. Moreover the absolute LCOC is a powerful tool to characterize and compare different coatings, not only considering their initial efficiencies but also including their durability.

  20. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials: Aging on the component level

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.; Meir, M.; Rekstad, J.

    2010-03-15

    Within this study, the aging behavior of a PPE + PS absorber material was investigated on the absorber component level. To indicate aging, characteristic mechanical values were determined by indentation tests of specimens taken from components and exposed to laboratory aging (140 C in air, 80 C in water) and service near outdoor aging conditions (stagnation in northern climate). In addition to the mechanical tests, the unaged and aged specimens were also characterized thermo-analytically via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that reductions in both characteristic mechanical values of the indentation tests, i.e., load of the first transition and ultimate indentation, reflect at least some physical aging although chemical aging may also be of importance based on previous analytical investigations of laboratory aged polymer films. While laboratory aging in air at 140 C and service exposure at a test facility in Oslo (N) under stagnation conditions led to a significant reduction in the mechanical indentation resistance, no influence of laboratory aging in water at 80 C on the mechanical behavior of the absorber sheet was found. Depending on the ultimate failure criterion applied (reduction of characteristic mechanical values to 80% and 50%, respectively), the technical service life found for hot air laboratory and stagnation service conditions was found to be less than 51 and 159 h, respectively. As these durations are significantly below the estimated stagnation conditions accumulated in the desired operation lifetime for such a collector, the PPE + PS type investigated does not seem to be a proper material candidate for solar thermal absorbers. Finally, based on the results obtained, a relation between laboratory aging time in air at 140 C and cumulated irradiation energy during exposure on the test facility in Oslo was established. (author)

  1. Testing of a Receiver-Absorber-Converter (RAC) for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerman, Kurt O.; Miles, Barry J.

    1998-01-01

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar bi-modal system based on a concept developed by Babcock & Wilcox in 1992. ISUS will provide advanced power and propulsion capabilities that will enable spacecraft designers to either increase the mass to orbit or decrease the cost to orbit for their satellites. In contrast to the current practice of using chemical propulsion for orbit transfer and photovoltaic conversion/battery storage for electrical power, ISUS uses a single collection, storage, and conversion system for both the power and propulsion functions. The ISUS system is currently being developed by the Air Force's Phillips Laboratory. The ISUS program consists of a systems analysis, design, and integration (SADI) effort, and three major sub-system development efforts: the Concentrator Array and Tracking (CATS) sub-system which tracks the sun and collects/focuses the energy; the Receiver-Absorber-Converter (RAC) sub-system which receives and stores the solar energy, transfers the stored energy to the propellant during propulsion operations, and converts the stored energy to electricity during power operations; and the Cryogenic Storage and Propellant Feed Sub-system (CSPFS) which stores the liquid hydrogen propellant and provides it to the RAC during propulsion operations. This paper discuses the evolution of the RAC sub-system as a result of the component level testing, and provides the initial results of systems level ground testing. A total of 5 RACs were manufactured as part of the Phillips Laboratory ISUS Technology Development program. The first series of component tests were carried out at the Solar Rocket Propulsion Laboratory at Edwards AFB, California. These tests provided key information on the propulsion mode of operations. The second series of RAC tests were performed at the Thermionic Evaluation Facility (TEF) in Albuquerque, New Mexico and provided information on the electrical performance of the RAC. The systems level testing was

  2. Organic solar cells with graded absorber layers processed from nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Stefan; Reich, Stefan; Bruns, Michael; Czolk, Jens; Colsmann, Alexander

    2016-03-28

    The fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures from solution is often limited by the choice of solvents since most organic semiconductors dissolve in the same aromatic agents. In this work, we investigate multi-pass deposition of organic semiconductors from eco-friendly ethanol dispersion. Once applied, the nanoparticles are insoluble in the deposition agent, allowing for the application of further nanoparticulate layers and hence for building poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):indene-C60 bisadduct absorber layers with vertically graded polymer and conversely graded fullerene concentration. Upon thermal annealing, we observe some degrees of polymer/fullerene interdiffusion by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Replacing the common bulk-heterojunction by such a graded photo-active layer yields an enhanced fill factor of the solar cell due to an improved charge carrier extraction, and consequently an overall power conversion efficiency beyond 4%. Wet processing of such advanced device architectures paves the way for a versatile, eco-friendly and industrially feasible future fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures.

  3. Inorganic-organic solar cells based on quaternary sulfide as absorber materials.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tiantian; Liu, Zhifeng; Yan, Weiguo; Liu, Junqi; Zhang, Xueqi

    2015-12-14

    We report a novel promising quaternary sulfide (CuAgInS) to serve as a semiconductor sensitizer material in the photoelectrochemical field. In this study, CuAgInS (CAIS) sulfide sensitized ZnO nanorods were fabricated on ITO substrates through a facile and low-cost hydrothermal chemical method and applied on photoanodes for solar cells for the first time. The component and stoichiometry were key factors in determining the photoelectric performance of CAIS sulfide, which were controlled by modulating their reaction time. ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 nanoarrays exhibit an enhanced optical and photoelectric performance and the power conversion efficiency of ITO/ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2/P3HT/Pt solid-state solar cell was up to 1.80%. The remarkable performance stems from improved electron transfer, a higher efficiency of light-harvesting and appropriate band gap alignment at the interface of the ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 NTs. The research indicates that CAIS as an absorbing material has enormous potential in solar cell systems.

  4. Interfacial Engineering and Charge Carrier Dynamics in Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edley, Michael

    Photovoltaic energy is a clean and renewable source of electricity; however, it faces resistance to widespread use due to cost. Nanostructuring decouples constraints related to light absorption and charge separation, potentially reducing cost by allowing a wider variety of processing techniques and materials to be used. However, the large interfacial areas also cause an increased dark current which negatively affects cell efficiency. This work focuses on extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells that used a ZnO nanowire array as a scaffold for an extremely thin CdSe absorber layer. Photoexcited electrons generated in the CdSe absorber are transferred to the ZnO layer, while photogenerated holes are transferred to the liquid electrolyte. The transfer of photoexcited carriers to their transport layer competes with bulk recombination in the absorber layer. After charge separation, transport of charge carriers to their respective contacts must occur faster than interfacial recombination for efficient collection. Charge separation and collection depend sensitively on the dimensions of the materials as well as their interfaces. We demonstrated that an optimal absorber thickness can balance light absorption and charge separation. By treating the ZnO/CdSe interface with a CdS buffer layer, we were able to improve the Voc and fill factor, increasing the ETA cell's efficiency from 0.53% to 1.34%, which is higher than that achievable using planar films of the same material. We have gained additional insight into designing ETA cells through the use of dynamic measurements. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that characteristic times for electron injection from CdSe to ZnO are less than 1 ps. Electron injection is rapid compared to the 2 ns bulk lifetime in CdSe. Optoelectronic measurements such as transient photocurrent/photovoltage and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were applied to study the processes of charge transport and interfacial recombination

  5. Structure, optical properties and thermal stability of Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic spectrally selective solar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang-Hu; Wang, Cheng-Bing; Guo, Zhi-Ming; Geng, Qing-Fen; Theiss, Wolfgang; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Traditional metal-dielectric composite coating has found important application in spectrally selective solar absorbers. However, fine metal particles can easily diffuse, congregate, or be oxidized at high temperature, which causes deterioration in the optical properties. In this work, we report a new spectrally selective solar absorber coating, composed of low Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(L)-WC) layer, high Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(H)-WC layer) and Al2O3 antireflection layer. The features of our work are: 1) compared with the metal-dielectric composites concept, Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic successfully achieves the all-ceramic concept, which exhibits a high solar absorptance of 0.94 and a low thermal emittance of 0.08, 2) Al2O3 and WC act as filler material and host material, respectively, which are different from traditional concept, 3) Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic solar absorber coating exhibits good thermal stability at 600 °C. In addition, the solar absorber coating is successfully modelled by a commercial optical simulation programme, the result of which agrees with the experimental results.

  6. Study of thermal effects and optical properties of an innovative absorber in integrated collector storage solar water heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Yaser; Alimardani, Kazem; Ziapour, Behrooz M.

    2015-10-01

    Solar passive water heaters are potential candidates for enhanced heat transfer. Solar water heaters with an integrated water tank and with the low temperature energy resource are used as the simplest and cheapest recipient devices of the solar energy for heating and supplying hot water in the buildings. The solar thermal performances of one primitive absorber were determined by using both the experimental and the simulation model of it. All materials applied for absorber such as the cover glass, the black colored sands and the V shaped galvanized plate were submerged into the water. The water storage tank was manufactured from galvanized sheet of 0.0015 m in thickness and the effective area of the collector was 0.67 m2. The absorber was installed on a compact solar water heater. The constructed flat-plate collectors were tested outdoors. However the simulation results showed that the absorbers operated near to the gray materials and all experimental results showed that the thermal efficiencies of the collector are over than 70 %.

  7. Thin film CdTe solar cells with an absorber layer thickness in micro- and sub-micrometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhizhong; Yang, Jun; Wang, Deliang

    2011-10-01

    CdTe thin film solar cell with an absorber layer as thin as 0.5 μm was fabricated. An efficiency of 7.9% was obtained for a 1-μm-thick CdTe solar cell. An increased intensity of deep recombination states in the band gap, which was responsible for the reduced open-circuit voltage and fill factor for ultra-thin solar cells, was induced due to the not-well-developed polycrystalline CdTe microstructure and the CdS/CdTe heterojunction and the presence of Cu in the back contact. The experimental results presented in this study demonstrated that 1-μm-thick absorber layer is thick enough to fabricate CdTe solar cell with a decent efficiency.

  8. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the costmore » of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.« less

  9. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the cost of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.

  10. Design principles for morphologies of antireflection patterns for solar absorbing applications.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yoon-Jong; Na, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional surface texturing is a widespread technology for imparting broadband antireflection, yet its design rules are not completely understood. The dependence of the reflectance spectrum of a periodically patterned glass film on various structural parameters (e.g., pitch, height, shape, and fill factor) has been investigated by means of full-vectorial numerical simulations. An average weighted reflectivity accounting for the AM1.5G solar spectrum (λ=300-1000  nm) was sinusoidally modulated by a rod pattern's height, and was minimized for pitches of 400-600 nm. When a rationally optimized cone pattern was used, the average weighted reflectivity was less than 0.5%, for incident angles of up to 40° off normal. The broadband antireflection of a cone pattern was reproduced well by a graded refractive index film model corresponding to its geometry, with the addition of a diffraction effect resulting from its periodicity. The broadband antireflection ability of optimized cone patterns is not limited to the glass material, but rather is generically applicable to other semiconductor materials, including Si and GaAs. The design rules developed herein represent a key step in the development of light-absorbing devices, such as solar cells.

  11. Optimization of the design of extremely thin absorber solar cells based on electrodeposited ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lévy-Clément, Claude; Elias, Jamil

    2013-07-22

    The properties of the components of ZnO/CdSe/CuSCN extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells based on electrodeposited ZnO nanowires (NWs) were investigated. The goal was to study the influence of their morphology on the characteristics of the solar cells. To increase the energy conversion efficiency of the solar cell, it was generally proposed to increase the roughness factor of the ZnO NW arrays (i.e. to increase the NW length) with the purpose of decreasing the absorber thickness, improving the light scattering, and consequently the light absorption in the ZnO/CdSe NW arrays. However, this strategy increased the recombination centers, which affected the efficiency of the solar cell. We developed another strategy that acts on the optical configuration of the solar cells by increasing the diameter of the ZnO NW (from 100 to 330 nm) while maintaining a low roughness factor. We observed that the scattering of the ZnO NW arrays occurred over a large wavelength range and extended closer to the CdSe absorber bandgap, and this led to an enhancement in the effective absorption of the ZnO/CdSe NW arrays and an increase in the solar cell characteristics. We found that the thicknesses of CuSCN above the ZnO/CdSe NW tips and the CdSe coating layer were optimized at 1.5 μm and 30 nm, respectively. Optimized ZnO/CdSe/CuSCN solar cells exhibiting 3.2% solar energy conversion efficiency were obtained by using 230 nm diameter ZnO NWs.

  12. 2D Homologous Perovskites as Light-Absorbing Materials for Solar Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Duyen H; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2015-06-24

    We report on the fabrication and properties of the semiconducting 2D (CH3(CH2)3NH3)2(CH3NH3)(n-1)Pb(n)I(3n+1) (n = 1, 2, 3, and 4) perovskite thin films. The band gaps of the series decrease with increasing n values, from 2.24 eV (CH3(CH2)3NH3)2PbI4 (n = 1) to 1.52 eV CH3NH3PbI3 (n = ∞). The compounds exhibit strong light absorption in the visible region, accompanied by strong photoluminescence at room temperature, rendering them promising light absorbers for photovoltaic applications. Moreover, we find that thin films of the semi-2D perovskites display an ultrahigh surface coverage as a result of the unusual film self-assembly that orients the [Pb(n)I(3n+1)](-) layers perpendicular to the substrates. We have successfully implemented this 2D perovskite family in solid-state solar cells, and obtained an initial power conversion efficiency of 4.02%, featuring an open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 929 mV and a short-circuit current density (J(sc)) of 9.42 mA/cm(2) from the n = 3 compound. This result is even more encouraging considering that the device retains its performance after long exposure to a high-humidity environment. Overall, the homologous 2D halide perovskites define a promising class of stable and efficient light-absorbing materials for solid-state photovoltaics and other applications.

  13. Characterization of Al/Al 2O 3/NiO x solar absorber obtained by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ienei, Elena; Isac, Luminita; Cazan, Cristina; Duta, Anca

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to obtain high efficient and inexpensive spectral selective solar absorbers, for solar thermal flat plat collectors using a simple technique - spray pyrolysis deposition (SPD). To achieve maximum solar absorptance and minimum thermal emittance, the following parameters are optimized: the precursor solution concentration and composition, substrate temperature and annealing treatment. The structural and morphological properties of the films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements. The thermal emittance and solar absorptance of as-deposited films were correlated with the chemical composition, crystalline structure and morphology. The results prove that coatings with excellent spectral selective properties (normal solar absorptance of 0.92 and a normal thermal emittance of 0.03) can be obtained by SPD.

  14. Seasonal Evolution and Interannual Variability of the Local Solar Energy Absorbed by the Arctic Sea Ice-Ocean System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Markus, Thorsten; Schwieger, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The melt season of the Arctic sea ice cover is greatly affected by the partitioning of the incident solar radiation between reflection to the atmosphere and absorption in the ice and ocean. This partitioning exhibits a strong seasonal cycle and significant interannual variability. Data in the period 1998, 2000-2004 were analyzed in this study. Observations made during the 1997-1998 SHEBA (Surface HEat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) field experiment showed a strong seasonal dependence of the partitioning, dominated by a five-phase albedo evolution. QuikSCAT scatterometer data from the SHEBA region in 1999-2004 were used to further investigate solar partitioning in summer. The time series of scatterometer data were used to determine the onset of melt and the beginning of freezeup. This information was combined with SSM/I-derived ice concentration, TOVS-based estimates of incident solar irradiance, and SHEBA results to estimate the amount of solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system for these years. The average total solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system from April through September was 900 MJ m(sup -2). There was considerable interannual variability, with a range of 826 to 1044 MJ m(sup -2). The total amount of solar energy absorbed by the ice and ocean was strongly related to the date of melt onset, but only weakly related to the total duration of the melt season or the onset of freezeup. The timing of melt onset is significant because the incident solar energy is large and a change at this time propagates through the entire melt season, affecting the albedo every day throughout melt and freezeup.

  15. Two new methods used to simulate the circumferential solar flux density concentrated on the absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Minghuan; Wang, Zhifeng; Sun, Feihu

    2016-05-01

    The optical efficiencies of a solar trough concentrator are important to the whole thermal performance of the solar collector, and the outer surface of the tube absorber is a key interface of energy flux. So it is necessary to simulate and analyze the concentrated solar flux density distributions on the tube absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector for various sun beam incident angles, with main optical errors considered. Since the solar trough concentrators are linear focusing, it is much of interest to investigate the solar flux density distribution on the cross-section profile of the tube absorber, rather than the flux density distribution along the focal line direction. Although a few integral approaches based on the "solar cone" concept were developed to compute the concentrated flux density for some simple trough concentrator geometries, all those integral approaches needed special integration routines, meanwhile, the optical parameters and geometrical properties of collectors also couldn't be changed conveniently. Flexible Monte Carlo ray trace (MCRT) methods are widely used to simulate the more accurate concentrated flux density distribution for compound parabolic solar trough concentrators, while generally they are quite time consuming. In this paper, we first mainly introduce a new backward ray tracing (BRT) method combined with the lumped effective solar cone, to simulate the cross-section flux density on the region of interest of the tube absorber. For BRT, bundles of rays are launched at absorber-surface points of interest, directly go through the glass cover of the absorber, strike on the uniformly sampled mirror segment centers in the close-related surface region of the parabolic reflector, and then direct to the effective solar cone around the incident sun beam direction after the virtual backward reflection. All the optical errors are convoluted into the effective solar cone. The brightness distribution of the effective solar cone is supposed

  16. Bandgap Tunability in Sb-Alloyed BiVO₄ Quaternary Oxides as Visible Light Absorbers for Solar Fuel Applications.

    PubMed

    Loiudice, Anna; Ma, Jie; Drisdell, Walter S; Mattox, Tracy M; Cooper, Jason K; Thao, Timothy; Giannini, Cinzia; Yano, Junko; Wang, Lin-Wang; Sharp, Ian D; Buonsanti, Raffaella

    2015-11-01

    The challenge of fine compositional tuning and microstructure control in complex oxides is overcome by developing a general two-step synthetic approach. Antimony-alloyed bismuth vanadate, which is identified as a novel light absorber for solar fuel applications, is prepared in a wide compositional range. The bandgap of this quaternary oxide linearly decreases with the Sb content, in agreement with first-principles calculations.

  17. Development of statistical seasonal prediction models of Arctic Sea Ice concentration using CERES absorbed solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoojin; Kim, Ha-Rim; Choi, Yong-Sang; Kim, WonMoo; Kim, Hye-Sil

    2016-11-01

    Statistical seasonal prediction models for the Arctic sea ice concentration (SIC) were developed for the late summer (August-October) when the downward trend is dramatic. The absorbed solar radiation (ASR) at the top of the atmosphere in June has a significant seasonal leading role on the SIC. Based on the lagged ASR-SIC relationship, two simple statistical models were established: the Markovian stochastic and the linear regression models. Crossvalidated hindcasts of SIC from 1979 to 2014 by the two models were compared with each other and observation. The hindcasts showed general agreement between the models as they share a common predictor, ASR in June and the observed SIC was well reproduced, especially over the relatively thin-ice regions (of one- or multi-year sea ice). The robust predictability confirms the functional role of ASR in the prediction of SIC. In particular, the SIC prediction in October was quite promising probably due to the pronounced icealbedo feedback. The temporal correlation coefficients between the predicted SIC and the observed SIC were 0.79 and 0.82 by the Markovian and regression models, respectively. Small differences were observed between the two models; the regression model performed slightly better in August and September in terms of temporal correlation coefficients. Meanwhile, the prediction skills of the Markovian model in October were higher in the north of Chukchi, the East Siberian, and the Laptev Seas. A strong non-linear relationship between ASR in June and SIC in October in these areas would have increased the predictability of the Markovian model.

  18. Ultra-thin metamaterial absorber with extremely bandwidth for solar cell and sensing applications in visible region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingyao; Xiao, Zhongyin; Xu, Kaikai

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a broadband and ultra-thin metamaterial absorber in the visible region. The absorber is composed of three layers, and the most remarkable difference is that the split ring resonators (SRR) made of metal stannum are encrusted in the indium antimonide (InSb) plane on the top layer. Numerical results reveal that a broadband absorption spectrum above 90% can be realized from 353.9 THz to 613.2 THz due to the coupling effect between the material of stannum and InSb. The metamaterial absorber is ultra-thin, having the total thickness of 56 nm, i.e. less than λ/10 with respect to the center frequency of the absorption band more than 90%. In addition, the impedance matching theory, surface current distributions, E-field and H-field are investigated to explain the physical mechanism of the absorption. The sensing applications are discussed and the simulated results show that the proposed absorber operates well with a good efficiency. Moreover, the visible absorber has potential applications in the aspects of solar energy harvest, integrated photodetectors and so on.

  19. Numerical study of an ultra-broadband near-perfect solar absorber in the visible and near-infrared region.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dong; Liu, Chang; Liu, Yumin; Yu, Li; Yu, Zhongyuan; Chen, Lei; Ma, Rui; Ye, Han

    2017-02-01

    We propose and numerically investigate a novel ultra-broadband solar absorber by applying iron in a 2D simple metamaterial structure. The proposed structure can achieve the perfect absorption above 95% covering the wavelength range from 400 to 1500 nm. The average absorption reaches 97.8% over this wavelength range. The broadband perfect absorption is caused by the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance and propagating surface plasmon resonance. We first propose and demonstrate that the iron is obviously beneficial to achieve impedance matching between the metamaterial structure and the free space over an ultra-broad frequency band in the visible and near-infrared region, which play an extremely important role to generate an ultra-broadband perfect absorption. In order to further broaden the absorption band, we also demonstrate the perfect absorption exceeding 92% for the 400-2000 nm range by adding the number of metal-dielectric pairs and using both gold and iron simultaneously in the proposed structure. The average absorption of the improved absorber reaches 96.4% over the range of 400-2000 nm. The metamaterial absorbers using iron are very promising for many applications, which can greatly broaden the perfect absorption band in the solar spectrum and, meanwhile, can enormously reduce the cost in the actual production.

  20. Reducing heat loss from the energy absorber of a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Chao, Bei Tse; Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing convective heat loss in a cylindrical radiant energy collector. It includes a curved reflective wall in the shape of the arc of a circle positioned on the opposite side of the exit aperture from the reflective side walls of the collector. Radiant energy exiting the exit aperture is directed by the curved wall onto an energy absorber such that the portion of the absorber upon which the energy is directed faces downward to reduce convective heat loss from the absorber.

  1. Dielectric compound parabolic concentrating solar collector with a frustrated total internal reflection absorber.

    PubMed

    Hull, J R

    1989-01-01

    Coupling a dielectric compound parabolic concentrator (DCPC) to an absorber across a vacuum gap by means of frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) can theoretically approach the maximum concentration permitted by physical laws, thus allowing higher radiative fluxes in thermal applications. The calculated optical performance of 2-D DCPCs with FTIR absorbers indicates that the ratio of gap thickness to optical wavelength must be <0.22 before the optical performance of the DCPC is superior to that of the nondielectric CPC.

  2. Pinning down high-performance Cu-chalcogenides as thin-film solar cell absorbers: A successive screening approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Youwei; Zhang, Jiawei; Xi, Lili; Zhang, Peihong; Zhang, Wenqing

    2016-05-21

    Photovoltaic performances of Cu-chalcogenides solar cells are strongly correlated with the absorber fundamental properties such as optimal bandgap, desired band alignment with window material, and high photon absorption ability. According to these criteria, we carry out a successive screening for 90 Cu-chalcogenides using efficient theoretical approaches. Besides the well-recognized CuInSe2 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 materials, several novel candidates are identified to have optimal bandgaps of around 1.0-1.5 eV, spike-like band alignments with CdS window layer, sharp photon absorption edges, and high absorption coefficients. These new systems have great potential to be superior absorbers for photovolatic applications if their carrrier transport and defect properties are properly optimized.

  3. Investigations into alterntive substrate, absorber, and buffer layer processing for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, J.R.; Berens, T.A.; Keane, J.

    1996-05-01

    High-performance Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}(CIGS)-based solar cells are presently fabricated within a narrow range of processing options. In this contribution, alternative substrate, absorber, and buffer layer processing is considered. Cell performance varies considerably when alternative substrates are employed. These variations are narrowed with the addition of Na via a Na{sub 2}S compound. Sputtered and electrodeposited CIGS precursors and completed absorbers show promise as alternatives to evaporation. A recrystallization process is required to improve their quality. (In,Ga){sub y}Se buffer layers contribute to cell performance above 10. Further improvements in these alternatives will lead to combined cell performance greater than 10% in the near term.

  4. Exploration of nano-element array architectures for substrate solar cells using an a-Si:H absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun Nam, Wook; Ji, Liming; Varadan, Vasundara V.; Fonash, Stephen J.

    2012-06-01

    Architectures involving Ag and transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nano-element arrays for light and photocarrier collection management in substrate solar cells are numerically explored and compared. Some architectures with TCO nano-elements are shown to perform better than the best reported Ag arrays and (1) increase JSC at least 57% over that of a planar 200 nm a-Si:H control, (2) attain absorber utilization <7 mg/W, and (3) have only 224 nm as the longest collection length. Photonic effects are the cause of the light trapping enhancement in these devices. While the computations were done for a-Si:H, the insight provided is equally applicable to other absorbers.

  5. Surface Modification of Polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Thin-Film Solar Cell Absorber Surfaces for PEEM Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, R. G.; Contreras, M. A.; Lehmann, S.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Bismaths, L. T.; Kronast, F.; Noufi, R.; Bar, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a thorough examination of the {micro}m-scale topography of Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} ('CIGSe') thin-film solar cell absorbers using different microscopy techniques. We specifically focus on the efficacy of preparing smooth sample surfaces - by etching in aqueous bromine solution - for a spatially resolved study of their chemical and electronic structures using photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM). The etching procedure is shown to reduce the CIGSe surface roughness from ca. 40 to 25 nm after 40s etching, resulting in an increase in the quality of the obtained PEEM images. Furthermore we find that the average observed grain size at the etched surfaces appears larger than at the unetched surfaces. Using a liftoff procedure, it is additionally shown that the backside of the absorber is flat but finely patterned, likely due to being grown on the finely-structured Mo back contact.

  6. Theoretical Evaluation of Cu-Sn-S and Cu-Sb-S Based Solar Absorbers for Earth-Abundant Thin-Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Pawel; Peng, Haowei; Zakutayev, Andriy; Lany, Stephan

    2013-03-01

    Current thin-film solar absorbers such as Cu(In/Ga)Se2 or CdTe, although remarkably efficient, incorporate limited-supply elements like indium or tellurium. Meeting the cost competiveness criterion necessary for a large-scale deployment of thin-film PV technologies requires development of new earth-abundant solar absorbers. In an effort to accelerate such development we combine first principles theory and high throughput experiments to explore In-free ternary copper chalcogenides. As part of the theoretical evaluation, we study the Cu2SnS3, Cu4SnS4, CuSbS2 and Cu3SbS3 based compounds formed by isovalent alloying on Sn, Sb, and S sites. For this set of materials we predict band-structures and optical absorption coefficients and demonstrate the feasibility of achieving the optimal band gap of 1.3 eV for a single junction cell and a high optical absorption of ~104 cm-1 at Eg+0.2 eV. We additionally perform defect studies to elucidate the doping trends within this class of materials. The project ``Rapid Development of Earth-abundant Thin Film Solar Cells'' is supported as a part of the SunShot initiative by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to NREL.

  7. Effect of Morphology Control of Light Absorbing Layer on CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Binglong; Eze, Vincent Obiozo; Mori, Tatsuo

    2016-04-01

    As one of the most significant components of perovskite solar cells, the perovskite light absorbing layer demands high quality to guarantee extraordinary power conversion efficiency (PCE). We have fabricated series of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells by virtue of gas-flowing assisting (GFA), spin coating twice for the Pbl2 layer and dipping the semi-samples in a thermal CH3NH3I solution, by which some undesirable perovskite morphologies can be effectively avoided. The modified conductions have also dramatically improved the perovskite layer and elevated the coverage ratio from 53.6% to 79.5%. All the fabrication processes, except the steps for deposition of the hole transport material (HTM) and back gold electrode, have been conducted in air and an average PCE of 6.6% has been achieved by initiatively applying N,N'-bis(1-naphtyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (α-NPD) doped by MoO3 as HTM. The CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite's morphology and its coverage ratio to the underneath TiO2 mesoporic layer are evaluated to account for the cells' performance. It has demonstrated that higher homogeneity and coverage ratio of the CH3NH3PbI3 layer have most significantly contributed to the solar cells' light conversion efficiency. Keywords: Perovskite, Solar Cell, Morphology, Coverage Ratio, Hole Transport Material.

  8. A facile fabrication of chemically converted graphene oxide thin films and their uses as absorber materials for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelifard, Mehdi; Darudi, Hosein

    2016-07-01

    There is a great interest in the use of graphene sheets in thin film solar cells with low-cost and good-optoelectronic properties. Here, the production of absorbent conductive reduced graphene oxide (RGO) thin films was investigated. RGO thin films were prepared from spray-coated graphene oxide (GO) layers at various substrate temperature followed by a simple hydrazine-reducing method. The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical characterizations of graphene oxide (GO) and RGO thin films were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a phase shift from GO to RGO due to hydrazine treatment, in agreement with the FTIR spectra of the layers. FESEM images clearly exhibited continuous films resulting from the overlap of graphene nanosheets. The produced low-cost thin films had high absorption coefficient up to 1.0 × 105 cm-1, electrical resistance as low as 0.9 kΩ/sq, and effective optical band gap of about 1.50 eV, close to the optimum value for solar conversion. The conductive absorbent properties of the reduced graphene oxide thin films would be useful to develop photovoltaic cells.

  9. The effect of hydrophobic absorbent for reducing charge recombination to improve dye-sensitized solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sae-Kung, C.; Hatha, E.; Sichanugrist, P.; Pungwiwut, N.; Laosooksathit, S.

    2007-09-01

    Normally, it has been widely acceptable that dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) plays important roles compared to the conventional solar cells such as monocrystalline, polycrystalline, and even amorphous silicon in accordance with its low manufacturing and fabrication cost. However, the DSSC consists of many interfaces between anode and cathode such as semiconductor to dye and dye to electrolyte and electrolyte to platinum catalyst at the cathode. Therefore, the effect of charge recombination at dye-electrolyte interface is a major role to cell efficiency. One of major implementations to alleviate the recombination effect could be efficiently solved by adding hydrophobic co-adsorbent to dye solution. The co-absorbent molecule will be anchored to titanium dioxide semiconductor like dye and can be the barrier to protect the interface of the triiodide, dye and mesoporous titanium dioxide (TiO II). In our works, we investigate on various hydrophobic co-adsorbent such as 1-adamantane acetic acid, cholic acid and chenodeoxy cholic acid. The amounts of the co-absorbent were varied as well as the amount of dye N719. It was found that the cholic and chenodeoxy cholic acid increase photovoltage and photocurrent, especially when the concentration was increased. This may be due to shift of conduction band (CB) to negative direction by the co-absorbent but 1-adamantane-acetic acid could not resist charge recombination. In addition multilayer of titanium dioxide was also studied on the effect of conversion efficiency. The maximum 4 layers of TiO II provided the best cell performance of 8.3 efficiency with the presence of cholic acid.

  10. Epidermal UV-A absorbance and whole-leaf flavonoid composition in pea respond more to solar blue light than to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Siipola, Sari M; Kotilainen, Titta; Sipari, Nina; Morales, Luis O; Lindfors, Anders V; Robson, T Matthew; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Plants synthesize phenolic compounds in response to certain environmental signals or stresses. One large group of phenolics, flavonoids, is considered particularly responsive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, here we demonstrate that solar blue light stimulates flavonoid biosynthesis in the absence of UV-A and UV-B radiation. We grew pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Meteor) outdoors, in Finland during the summer, under five types of filters differing in their spectral transmittance. These filters were used to (1) attenuate UV-B; (2) attenuate UV-B and UV-A < 370 nm; (3) attenuate UV-B and UV-A; (4) attenuate UV-B, UV-A and blue light; and (5) as a control not attenuating these wavebands. Attenuation of blue light significantly reduced the flavonoid content in leaf adaxial epidermis and reduced the whole-leaf concentrations of quercetin derivatives relative to kaempferol derivatives. In contrast, UV-B responses were not significant. These results show that pea plants regulate epidermal UV-A absorbance and accumulation of individual flavonoids by perceiving complex radiation signals that extend into the visible region of the solar spectrum. Furthermore, solar blue light instead of solar UV-B radiation can be the main regulator of phenolic compound accumulation in plants that germinate and develop outdoors.

  11. Atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation derived from Nimbus 7 Earth radiation budget data set, November 1978 to October 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Rutan, David; Bess, T. Dale

    1990-01-01

    An atlas of monthly mean global contour maps of albedo and absorbed solar radiation is presented. This atlas contains 7 years of continuous data from November 1978 through October 1985. The data were retrieved from measurements made by the second Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) wide field-of-view instrument, which flew on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft in 1978. The deconvolution method used to produce these data is briefly discussed here so that the user may understand their generation and limitations. These geographical distributions of albedo and absorbed solar radiation are provided as a resource for researchers studying the radiation budget of the Earth. This atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation complements the atlases of outgoing longwave radiation by Bess and Smith, also based on the Nimbus 6 and 7 ERB data.

  12. Dependence of lattice strain relaxation, absorbance, and sheet resistance on thickness in textured ZnO@B transparent conductive oxide for thin-film solar cell applications

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Kuang-Yang; Huang, Yu-En; Chen, Chien-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Summary The interplay of surface texture, strain relaxation, absorbance, grain size, and sheet resistance in textured, boron-doped ZnO (ZnO@B), transparent conductive oxide (TCO) materials of different thicknesses used for thin film, solar cell applications is investigated. The residual strain induced by the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal expansion coefficient for thicker ZnO@B is relaxed, leading to an increased surface texture, stronger absorbance, larger grain size, and lower sheet resistance. These experimental results reveal the optical and material characteristics of the TCO layer, which could be useful for enhancing the performance of solar cells through an optimized TCO layer. PMID:26925355

  13. Dependence of lattice strain relaxation, absorbance, and sheet resistance on thickness in textured ZnO@B transparent conductive oxide for thin-film solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Kou, Kuang-Yang; Huang, Yu-En; Chen, Chien-Hsun; Feng, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of surface texture, strain relaxation, absorbance, grain size, and sheet resistance in textured, boron-doped ZnO (ZnO@B), transparent conductive oxide (TCO) materials of different thicknesses used for thin film, solar cell applications is investigated. The residual strain induced by the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal expansion coefficient for thicker ZnO@B is relaxed, leading to an increased surface texture, stronger absorbance, larger grain size, and lower sheet resistance. These experimental results reveal the optical and material characteristics of the TCO layer, which could be useful for enhancing the performance of solar cells through an optimized TCO layer.

  14. Absorbency and conductivity of quasi-solid-state polymer electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells: A characterization review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Ahmad Azmin

    2016-10-01

    The application of quasi-solid state electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells opens up an interesting research field to explore, which is evident from the increasing amount of publications on this topic. Since 2010, significant progress has been made with new and more complicated quasi-solid-states materials being produced. The optimization of new materials requires specific characterizations. This review presents a comprehensive overview and recent progress of characterization methods for studying quasi-solid-state electrolytes. Emphasis is then placed on the absorbency and conductivity characterizations. Each characterization will be reviewed according to the objective, experimental set-up, summary of important outcomes, and a few case studies worth discussing. Finally, strategies for future characterizations and developments are described.

  15. High concentration two-stage optics for parabolic trough solar collectors with tubular absorber and large rim angle

    SciTech Connect

    Collares-Pereira, M. ); Gordon, J.M. ); Rabl, A. ); Winston, R. )

    1991-01-01

    A new two-stage optical design is proposed for parabolic trough solar collectors with tubular absorbers. It can boost the concentration ratio by a factor of 2.5 relative to the conventional design, while maintaining the large rim angles (i.e., low nominal f-numbers) that are desirable for practical and economical reasons. The second state involves asymmetric nonimaging concentrators of the CPC type, facing segments of the parabolic first stage. The second stage can be accommodated inside an evacuated receiver, allowing the use of first-surface silvered reflectors. The low heat loss of this design opens the possibility of producing steam at temperatures and pressures of conventional power plants, using only one-axis tracking. The improvement in conversion efficiency would be substantial.

  16. Epitaxial Crystal Silicon Absorber Layers and Solar Cells Grown at 1.8 Microns per Minute: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bobela, D. C.; Teplin, C. W.; Young, D. L.; Branz, H. M.; Stradins, P.

    2011-07-01

    We have grown device-quality epitaxial silicon thin films at growth rates up to 1.8 μm/min, using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition from silane at substrate temperatures below 750 degrees C. At these rates, which are more than 30 times faster than those used by the amorphous and nanocrystalline Si industry, capital costs for large-scale solar cell production would be dramatically reduced, even for cell absorber layers up to 10 ?m thick. We achieved high growth rates by optimizing the three key parameters: silane flow, depletion, and filament geometry, based on our model developed earlier. Hydrogen coverage of the filament surface likely limits silane decomposition and growth rate at high system pressures. No considerable deterioration in PV device performance is observed when grown at high rate, provided that the epitaxial growth is initiated at low rate. A simple mesa device structure (wafer/epi Si/a-Si(i)/a-Si:H(p)/ITO) with a 2.3 um epitaxial silicon absorber layer was grown at 700 nm/min. The finished device had an open-circuit voltage of 0.424 V without hydrogenation treatment.

  17. Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Kesterite Solar Cell Based on in Situ Deposition of Ultrathin Absorber Layer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi; Azimi, Hamed; Gasparini, Nicola; Salvador, Michael; Chen, Wei; Khanzada, Laraib S; Brandl, Marco; Hock, Rainer; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-09-30

    The production of high-performance, solution-processed kesterite Cu2ZnSn(Sx,Se1-x)4 (CZTSSe) solar cells typically relies on high-temperature crystallization processes in chalcogen-containing atmosphere and often on the use of environmentally harmful solvents, which could hinder the widespread adoption of this technology. We report a method for processing selenium free Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cells based on a short annealing step at temperatures as low as 350 °C using a molecular based precursor, fully avoiding highly toxic solvents and high-temperature sulfurization. We show that a simple device structure consisting of ITO/CZTS/CdS/Al and comprising an extremely thin absorber layer (∼110 nm) achieves a current density of 8.6 mA/cm(2). Over the course of 400 days under ambient conditions encapsulated devices retain close to 100% of their original efficiency. Using impedance spectroscopy and photoinduced charge carrier extraction by linearly increasing voltage (photo-CELIV), we demonstrate that reduced charge carrier mobility is one limiting parameter of low-temperature CZTS photovoltaics. These results may inform less energy demanding strategies for the production of CZTS optoelectronic layers compatible with large-scale processing techniques.

  18. Production of crystalline refractory metal oxides containing colloidal metal precipitates and useful as solar-effective absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, Jagdish; Chen, Yok

    1983-01-01

    This invention is a new process for producing refractory crystalline oxides having improved or unusual properties. The process comprises the steps of forming a doped-metal crystal of the oxide; exposing the doped crystal in a bomb to a reducing atmosphere at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature effecting precipitation of the dopant metal in the crystal lattice of the oxide but insufficient to effect net diffusion of the metal out of the lattice; and then cooling the crystal. Preferably, the cooling step is effected by quenching. The process forms colloidal precipitates of the metal in the oxide lattice. The process may be used, for example, to produce thermally stable black MgO crystalline bodies containing magnetic colloidal precipitates consisting of about 99% Ni. The Ni-containing bodies are solar-selective absorbers, having a room-temperature absorptivity of about 0.96 over virtually all of the solar-energy spectrum and exhibiting an absorption edge in the region of 2 .mu.m. The process parameters can be varied to control the average size of the precipitates. The process can produce a black MgO crystalline body containing colloidal Ni precipitates, some of which have the face-centered-cubic structure and others of which have the body-centered cubic structure. The products of the process are metal-precipitate-containing refractory crystalline oxides which have improved or unique optical, mechanical, magnetic, and/or electronic properties.

  19. Sputtered Aluminium-Nitrogen Solar Absorbing Selective Surfaces For All-Glass Evacuated Collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiqiang, Yin; Harding, G. L.; Chow, S. P.

    1986-09-01

    Five composite materials of Al-N have been prepared by dc magnetron reactive sputtering techniques. Good agreement is obtained between computed and experimentily measured reflec-tances and absorptances for Al-N/Al(AD). Solar absorptance of Al-N/A1 selective surface(HT) is - 0.92 and emittance - 0.04 at room temperature. Gas evolution from sputtered Al-N/Al has been studied using thermomanometry and mass spectrometry. The total outgassing from the surface is considerably low.

  20. From Anti-greenhouse Effect of Solar Absorbers to Cooling Effect of Greenhouse Gases: A 1-D Radiative Convective Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shia, R.

    2012-12-01

    The haze layer in Titan's upper atmosphere absorbs 90% of the solar radiation, but is inefficient for trapping infrared radiation generated by the surface. Its existence partially compensates for the greenhouse warming and keeps the surface approximately 9°C cooler than would otherwise be expected from the greenhouse effect alone. This is the so called anti-greenhouse effect (McKay et al., 1991). This effect can be used to alleviate the warming caused by the increasing level of greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere. A one-dimensional radiative convective model (Kasting et al., 2009 and references listed there) is used to investigate the anti-greenhouse effect in the Earth atmosphere. Increasing of solar absorbers, e.g. aerosols and ozone, in the stratosphere reduces the surface solar flux and cool the surface. However, the absorption of the solar flux also increases the temperature in the upper atmosphere, while reduces the temperature at the surface. Thus, the temperature profile of the atmosphere changes and the regions with positive vertical temperature gradient are expanded. According to Shia (2010) the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases is directly related to the vertical temperature gradient. Under the new temperature profile increases of greenhouse gases should have less warming effect. When the solar absorbers keep increasing, eventually most of the atmosphere has positive temperature gradient and increasing greenhouse gases would cool the surface (Shia, 2011). The doubling CO2 scenario in the Earth atmosphere is simulated for different levels of solar absorbers using the 1-D RC model. The model results show that if the solar absorber increases to a certain level that less than 50% solar flux reaching the surface, doubling CO2 cools the surface by about 2 C. This means if the snowball Earth is generated by solar absorbers in the stratosphere, increasing greenhouse gases would make it freeze even more (Shia, 2011). References: Kasting, J. et al

  1. Scientists Identify New Family of Iron-Based Absorber Materials for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Use of Earth-abundant materials in solar absorber films is critical for expanding the reach of photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The use of Earth-abundant and inexpensive Fe in PV was proposed more than 25 years ago in the form of FeS{sub 2} pyrite - fool's gold. Unfortunately, the material has been plagued by performance problems that to this day are both persistent and not well understood. Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oregon State University, working collaboratively in the Center for Inverse Design, an Energy Frontier Research Center, have uncovered several new insights into the problems of FeS{sub 2}. They have used these advances to propose and implement design rules that can be used to identify new Fe-containing materials that can circumvent the limitations of FeS{sub 2} pyrite. The team has identified that it is the unavoidable metallic secondary phases and surface defects coexisting near the FeS{sub 2} thin-film surfaces and grain boundaries that limit its open-circuit voltage, rather than the S vacancies in the bulk, which has long been commonly assumed. The materials Fe{sub 2}SiS{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}GeS{sub 4} hold considerable promise as PV absorbers. The ternary Si compound is especially attractive, as it contains three of the more abundant low-cost elements available today. The band gap (E{sub g} = 1.5 eV) from both theory and experiment is higher than those of c-Si and FeS{sub 2}, offering better absorption of the solar spectrum and potentially higher solar cell efficiencies. More importantly, these materials do not have metallic secondary phase problems as seen in FeS{sub 2}. High calculated formation energies of donor-type defects are consistent with p-type carriers in thin films and are prospects for high open-circuit voltages in cells.

  2. Estimating solar radiation absorbed by live phytoplankton from satellite ocean-color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Robert J.; Ruddorff, Natalia M.; Kampel, Milton

    2014-11-01

    Primary production, PP, or the quantity of organic matter synthesized by phytoplankton per unit of surface and time, depends on the photo-synthetically available radiation absorbed by live phytoplankton, APAR. Computing APAR requires knowledge of the absorption coefficient of live phytoplankton and the total absorption coefficient, quantities that are difficult to retrieve accurately from satellite ocean-color data. In the proposed approach, APAR is estimated directly from a linear combination of marine reflectance in the PAR spectral range. Feasibility is demonstrated theoretically from simulations using a marine reflectance model, and experimentally using data collected at 19 biooptical stations during the February-March 2011 R/V Melville oceanographic cruise in the Southern Atlantic and Southeastern Pacific. Improvements in APAR accuracy are quantified in comparisons with estimates obtained from absorption coefficients or chlorophyll concentration determined from marine reflectance via standard satellite algorithms. The linear combination of marine reflectance is fairly robust to atmospheric correction errors. Due to the linear nature of the algorithm, their impact may be further reduced when using space- or time-averaged reflectance. The methodology is applied to actual MODIS imagery over the Southern Atlantic, and variability in the resulting APAR field is analyzed. The study suggests that determining APAR directly from marine reflectance has the potential to improve PP estimates from space.

  3. Atomic layer deposition of titanium sulfide and its application in extremely thin absorber solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahuli, Neha; Sarkar, Shaibal K.

    2015-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiS{sub 2} is investigated with titanium tetrachloride and hydrogen sulfide precursors. In-situ quartz crystal microbalance and ex-situ x-ray reflectivity measurements are carried out to study self-limiting deposition chemistry and material growth characteristics. The saturated growth rate is found to be ca. 0.5 Å/cycle within the ALD temperature window of 125–200 °C. As grown material is found poorly crystalline. ALD grown TiS{sub 2} is applied as a photon harvesting material for solid state sensitized solar cells with TiO{sub 2} as electron transport medium. Initial results with Spiro-OMeTAD as hole conducting layer show ca. 0.6% energy conversion efficiency under 1 sun illumination.

  4. Hydrocarbon pyrolysis reactor experimentation and modeling for the production of solar absorbing carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederickson, Lee Thomas

    Much of combustion research focuses on reducing soot particulates in emissions. However, current research at San Diego State University (SDSU) Combustion and Solar Energy Laboratory (CSEL) is underway to develop a high temperature solar receiver which will utilize carbon nanoparticles as a solar absorption medium. To produce carbon nanoparticles for the small particle heat exchange receiver (SPHER), a lab-scale carbon particle generator (CPG) has been built and tested. The CPG is a heated ceramic tube reactor with a set point wall temperature of 1100-1300°C operating at 5-6 bar pressure. Natural gas and nitrogen are fed to the CPG where natural gas undergoes pyrolysis resulting in carbon particles. The gas-particle mixture is met downstream with dilution air and sent to the lab scale solar receiver. To predict soot yield and general trends in CPG performance, a model has been setup in Reaction Design CHEMKIN-PRO software. One of the primary goals of this research is to accurately measure particle properties. Mean particle diameter, size distribution, and index of refraction are calculated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and a Diesel Particulate Scatterometer (DPS). Filter samples taken during experimentation are analyzed to obtain a particle size distribution with SEM images processed in ImageJ software. These results are compared with the DPS, which calculates the particle size distribution and the index of refraction from light scattering using Mie theory. For testing with the lab scale receiver, a particle diameter range of 200-500 nm is desired. Test conditions are varied to understand effects of operating parameters on particle size and the ability to obtain the size range. Analysis of particle loading is the other important metric for this research. Particle loading is measured downstream of the CPG outlet and dilution air mixing point. The air-particle mixture flows through an extinction tube where opacity of the mixture is measured with a 532 nm

  5. Charge Carrier Trapping at Surface Defects of Perovskite Solar Cell Absorbers: A First-Principles Study.

    PubMed

    Uratani, Hiroki; Yamashita, Koichi

    2017-02-16

    The trapping of charge carriers at defects on surfaces or grain boundaries is detrimental for the performance of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). For example, it is the main limiting factor for carrier lifetime. Moreover, it causes hysteresis in the current-voltage curves, which is considered to be a serious issue for PSCs' operation. In this work, types of surface defects responsible for carrier trapping are clarified by a comprehensive first-principles investigation into surface defects of tetragonal CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3). Considering defect formation energetics, it is proposed that a Pb-rich condition is preferred to an I-rich one; however, a moderate condition might possibly be the best choice. Our result paves the way for improving the performance of PSCs through a rational strategy of suppressing carrier trapping at surface defects.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of a nanostructured TiO2/In2S3-Sb2S3/CuSCN extremely thin absorber (eta) solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Flores, Alí M.; García-Gómez, Nora A.; de la Parra-Arciniega, Salomé M.; Sánchez, Eduardo M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we report the successful assembly and characterization of a TiO2/In2S3-Sb2S3/CuSCN extremely thin absorber solar cell. Nanostructured TiO2 deposited by screen printing on an ITO substrate was used as an n-type electrode. An ∼80 nm extremely thin layer of the system In2S3-Sb2S3 deposited by successive ionic layer adsorption and a reaction (silar) method was used as an absorber. The voids were filled with p-type CuSCN and the entire assembly was completed with a gold contact. The solar cell fabricated with this heterostructure showed an energy conversion efficiency of 4.9%, which is a promising result in the development of low cost and simple fabrication of solar cells.

  7. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh; Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria; Sekkat, Zouheir; Abd-lefdil, Mohammed; El Khakani, My Ali

    2017-02-01

    We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (Ta), but their crystallinity is much improved for Ta ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with Ta (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at Ta = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for Ta = 300-400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV-vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at Ta = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS spectroscopies to determine their chemical bondings, the position of their valence band maximum (relative to Fermi level), and their work function values. This enabled us to sketch out, as accurately as possible, the band alignment of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials.

  8. Tunable Narrow Band Gap Absorbers For Ultra High Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bedair, Salah M.; Hauser, John R.; Elmasry, Nadia; Colter, Peter C.; Bradshaw, G.; Carlin, C. Z.; Samberg, J.; Edmonson, Kenneth

    2012-07-31

    We report on a joint research program between NCSU and Spectrolab to develop an upright multijunction solar cell structure with a potential efficiency exceeding the current record of 41.6% reported by Spectrolab. The record efficiency Ge/GaAs/InGaP triple junction cell structure is handicapped by the fact that the current generated by the Ge cell is much higher than that of both the middle and top cells. We carried out a modification of the record cell structure that will keep the lattice matched condition and allow better matching of the current generated by each cell. We used the concept of strain balanced strained layer superlattices (SLS), inserted in the i-layer, to reduce the bandgap of the middle cell without violating the desirable lattice matched condition. For the middle GaAs cell, we have demonstrated an n-GaAs/i-(InGaAs/GaAsP)/p-GaAs structure, where the InxGa1-xAs/GaAs1-yPy SLS is grown lattice matched to GaAs and with reduced bandgap from 1.43 eV to 1.2 eV, depending upon the values of x and y.

  9. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-porphyrin conjugates as broadly absorbing sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Warnan, Julien; Favereau, Ludovic; Meslin, Frédéric; Severac, Marjorie; Blart, Errol; Pellegrin, Yann; Jacquemin, Denis; Odobel, Fabrice

    2012-08-01

    A series of four new push-pull zinc porphyrin-based dyes was synthesised for hybrid photovoltaic solar cells with a view to enhancing the light-harvesting efficiency at approximately 550 nm with a diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) unit. The strength of the donor side of the push-pull porphyrin was tuned by affixing the electron-rich 4,4'-dimethoxydiphenylamine group at the meso position of the macrocycle, and the influence of the distance between the semiconductor surface and the porphyrin chromophore was assessed by introducing different π-conjugated spacers. Charge-transfer transitions over great distances were characterised by electronic absorption spectroscopy and DFT calculations. The absorption and photoactivity spectra of the new bichromophoric dyes spans the whole visible spectrum to the red, implying a better light-harvesting efficiency than regular porphyrin as the absorption spectra of DPP and porphyrin complement one another. Photovoltaic conversion efficiencies accordingly increase from 2.40 to 5.19 %. Interestingly, the best overall efficiency was reached with dye 3, which lacks the powerful donating group in the meso position of the porphyrin core. Optical and electrochemical measurements coupled to time dependent (TD)-DFT calculations give insight into the deleterious effect of the 4,4'-dimethoxydiphenylamine unit on the photovoltaic performances, paving the way towards the design of efficient push-pull porphyrin-based sensitizers.

  10. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure, and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants for understanding and predicting their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the analytical solutions of random distributions of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and is suitable for ecological models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change.

  11. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2014-07-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate the solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in order to understand and predict their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming that crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the results of random distribution of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and can be included in vegetation models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change. The code and a user's manual are provided as Supplement of the paper.

  12. Effects of Thermochemical Treatment on CuSbS 2 Photovoltaic Absorber Quality and Solar Cell Reproducibility

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza Lucas, Francisco Willian; Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Dippo, Patricia C.; Hempel, Hannes; Unold, Thomas; Eichberger, Rainer; Blank, Beatrix; Rau, Uwe; Mascaro, Lucia H.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-08-25

    CuSbS2 is a promising nontoxic and earth-abundant photovoltaic absorber that is chemically simpler than the widely studied Cu2ZnSnS4. However, CuSbS2 photovoltaic (PV) devices currently have relatively low efficiency and poor reproducibility, often due to suboptimal material quality and insufficient optoelectronic properties. To address these issues, here we develop a thermochemical treatment (TT) for CuSbS2 thin films, which consists of annealing in Sb2S3 vapor followed by a selective KOH surface chemical etch. The annealed CuSbS2 films show improved structural quality and optoelectronic properties, such as stronger band-edge photoluminescence and longer photoexcited carrier lifetime. These improvements also lead to more reproducible CuSbS2 PV devices, with performance currently limited by a large cliff-type interface band offset with CdS contact. Overall, these results point to the potential avenues to further increase the performance of CuSbS2 thin film solar cell, and the findings can be transferred to other thin film photovoltaic technologies.

  13. Development of High Band Gap Absorber and Buffer Materials for Thin Film Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Dan

    2011-12-01

    CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) device efficiencies are the highest of the thin film absorber materials (vs. CdTe, alpha-Si, CuInSe2). However, the band gap of the highest efficiency CIGS cells deviates from the expected ideal value predicted by models [1]. Widening the band gap to the theoretically ideal value is one way to increase cell efficiencies. Widening the band gap can be accomplished in two ways; by finding a solution to the Ga-related defects which limit the open circuit voltage at high Ga ratios, or by utilizing different elemental combinations to form an alternative high band gap photoactive Cu-chalcopyrite (which includes any combination of the cations Cu, Al, Ga, and In along with the anions S, Se, and Te). This thesis focuses on the second option, substituting aluminum for gallium in the chalcopyrite lattice to form a CuInAlSe2 (CIAS) film using a sputtering and selenization approach. Both sequential and co-sputtering of metal precursors is performed. Indium was found to be very mobile during both sputtering processes, with a tendency to diffuse to the film surface even when deposited as the base layer in a sequential sputtering process. Elemental diffusion was controlled to a degree using thicker Cu top layer in co-sputtering. The greater thermal conductivity of stainless steel foil (16 W/mK) vs. glass (0.9-1.3 W/mK) can also be used to limit indium diffusion, by keeping the substrate cooler during sputtering. In both sputtering methods aluminum is deposited oxygen-free by capping the film with a Cu capping layer in combination with controlling the indium diffusion. Selenization of metal precursor films is completed using two different techniques. The first is a thermal evaporation approach from a heated box source (method 1 -- reactive thermal evaporation (RTE-Se)). The second is batch selenization using a heated tube furnace (method 2 -- batch selenization). Some batch selenized precursors were capped with ˜ 1mum of selenium. In both selenization methods

  14. Solar energy collector

    DOEpatents

    Brin, Raymond L.; Pace, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a solar energy collector comprising solar energy absorbing material within chamber having a transparent wall, solar energy being transmitted through the transparent wall, and efficiently absorbed by the absorbing material, for transfer to a heat transfer fluid. The solar energy absorbing material, of generally foraminous nature, absorbs and transmits the solar energy with improved efficiency.

  15. Sodium antimony sulfide (NaSbS2): Turning an unexpected impurity into a promising, environmentally friendly novel solar absorber material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahayu, Siti Utari; Chou, Chia-Ling; Suriyawong, Nipapon; Aragaw, Belete Asefa; Shi, Jen-Bin; Lee, Ming-Way

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel absorber material—NaSbS2—for solar cells. NaSbS2 is formed as an unexpected byproduct in the chemical synthesis of Sb2S3. However, NaSbS2 has many attractive features for a solar material. Here single phase NaSbS2 nanoparticles were synthesized through solution processing. NaSbS2 semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were demonstrated for the first time. The best cell yielded Jsc = 10.76 mA/cm2, Voc = 0.44 V, FF = 48.6%, and efficiency η = 2.30% under 1 sun. At the reduced 0.1 sun, the η increased to 3.18%—a respectable η for a new solar material.

  16. SnO2-based dye-sensitized hybrid solar cells exhibiting near unity absorbed photon-to-electron conversion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Snaith, Henry J; Ducati, Caterina

    2010-04-14

    Improving the solar light harvesting and photon-to-electron conversion efficiency for hybrid, organic-inorganic photovoltaics are critical challenges. Titania based solid-state hybrid solar cells are moderately efficient at converting visible photons to electrons, but major electrical losses still remain. A material based paradigm shift is required to dramatically enhance the performance of these devices. Here, we present an investigation into solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (SDSCs) incorporating a molecular hole-transporter and mesoporous tin oxide electrodes, in place of titania usually employed. We investigate the influence of treating the surface of the SnO(2) with different oxides and find that MgO "passivated" SnO(2) electrodes demonstrate an unprecedented absorbed photon-to-electron conversion efficiency of near unity across a broad spectral range. A dual surface treatment of TiO(2) followed by MgO enables tuning of the solar cell photovoltage, fill factor, and efficiency with visible light absorbing cells delivering 3% solar-to-electrical full sun power conversion efficiency.

  17. Atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation derived from Nimbus 7 earth radiation budget data set, November 1985 to October 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Rutan, David; Bess, T. Dale

    1992-01-01

    An atlas of monthly mean global contour maps of albedo and absorbed solar radiation is presented for 21 months from Nov. 1985 to Oct. 1987. These data were retrieved from measurements made by the shortwave wide-field-of-view radiometer of the Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) instrument aboard the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. Profiles of zonal mean albedos and absorbed solar radiation were tabulated. These geographical distributions are provided as a resource for researchers studying the radiation budget of the Earth. The El Nino/Southern Oscillation event of 1986-1987 is included in this data set. This atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation extends to 12 years the period covered by two similar atlases: NASA RP-1230 (Jul. 1975 - Oct. 1978) and NASA RP-1231 (Nov. 1978 - Oct. 1985). These three compilations complement the atlases of outgoing longwave radiation by Bess and Smith in NASA RP-1185, RP-1186, and RP-1261, which were also based on the Nimbus 6 and 7 ERB data.

  18. A Simple Solar, Spectral Model for Studying the Effects of Cloud Cover and Surface Albedo on the Incoming Solar Radiation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    designed for particular locations ( Barbaro , 1979), clear sky cases only (Bird, 1984), for slopes of different orientation (Temps and Coulson, 1977...not desirable. In late 1982, a volcano (El Chichon) erupted in Mexico and spewed ash and other constituents into the atmosphere. The volcanic cloud...April 1981, pp. 889-894. Barbaro , S.; Coppolino, S.; Leone, C.; and Sinagra, E. "An Atmospheric Model For computing Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation

  19. CPCs with segmented absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Keita, M.; Robertson, H.S. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the most promising means of improving the performance of solar thermal collectors is to reduce the energy lost by the hot absorber. One way to do this, not currently part of the technology, is to recognize that since the absorber is usually not irradiated uniformly, it is therefore possible to construct an absorber of thermally isolated segments, circulate the fluid in sequence from low to high irradiance segments, and reduce loss by improving effective concentration. This procedure works even for ideal concentrators, without violating Winston's theorem. Two equivalent CPC collectors with single and segmented absorber were constructed and compared under actual operating conditions. The results showed that the daily thermal efficiency of the collector with segmented absorber is higher (about 13%) than that of the collector with nonsegmented absorber.

  20. Surface modifications of Cu(In ,Ga)S2 thin film solar cell absorbers by KCN and H2O2/H2SO4 treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Groß, D.; Umbach, E.; Heske, C.; Dhere, N. G.; Kadam, A. A.; Kulkarni, S. S.

    2006-07-01

    KCN etching of the CuxS surface layer formed during the production process of Cu(In ,Ga)S2 thin film solar cell absorbers as well as subsequent H2O2/H2SO4 etching of the Cu(In ,Ga)S2 surface have been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy, and x-ray emission spectroscopy. We find that the KCN etching removes the CuxS layer—being identified as Cu2S—and that there is K deposited during this step, which is removed by the subsequent H2O2/H2SO4 oxidation treatment. When a CdS buffer layer is deposited on the absorber directly after KCN etching, a K compound (KCO3) is observed at the CdS surface.

  1. Investigation of blister formation in sputtered Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} absorbers for thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bras, Patrice; Sterner, Jan; Platzer-Björkman, Charlotte

    2015-11-15

    Blister formation in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films sputtered from a quaternary compound target is investigated. While the thin film structure, composition, and substrate material are not correlated to the blister formation, a strong link between sputtering gas entrapment, in this case argon, and blistering effect is found. It is shown that argon is trapped in the film during sputtering and migrates to locally form blisters during the high temperature annealing. Blister formation in CZTS absorbers is detrimental for thin film solar cell fabrication causing partial peeling of the absorber layer and potential shunt paths in the complete device. Reduced sputtering gas entrapment, and blister formation, is seen for higher sputtering pressure, higher substrate temperature, and change of sputtering gas to larger atoms. This is all in accordance with previous publications on blister formation caused by sputtering gas entrapment in other materials.

  2. Fabrication of P-Type ZnO:N Film by Radio-Frequency Magnetron Sputtering for Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Hu; Li, Rong-Bin; Fan, Dong-Hua

    2013-03-01

    We successfully fabricate p-type ZnO:N films by using rf magnetron sputtering and in situ annealing in O2 atmosphere. These p-type ZnO:N films can be used as p-type window materials for extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells composed of quartz glass/p-ZnO:N/i-ZnO/CdSe/i-ZnO/n-ZnO:Al. The short-circuit photocurrent density, open circuit voltage, fill factor and conversion efficiency of the ETA solar cells can be determined to be 8.549 mA/cm2, 0.702V, 0.437 and 2.623%, respectively, through measurements of photovoltaic properties under illumination with a 100mW/cm2 at air-mass (AM) 1.5.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of Turbulent Flows through a Solar Air Heater Having Square-Sectioned Transverse Rib Roughness on the Absorber Plate

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anil Singh; Bhagoria, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Solar air heater is a type of heat exchanger which transforms solar radiation into heat energy. The thermal performance of conventional solar air heater has been found to be poor because of the low convective heat transfer coefficient from the absorber plate to the air. Use of artificial roughness on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the rate of heat transfer. A CFD-based investigation of turbulent flow through a solar air heater roughened with square-sectioned transverse rib roughness has been performed. Three different values of rib-pitch (P) and rib-height (e) have been taken such that the relative roughness pitch (P/e = 14.29) remains constant. The relative roughness height, e/D, varies from 0.021 to 0.06, and the Reynolds number, Re, varies from 3800 to 18,000. The results predicted by CFD show that the average heat transfer, average flow friction, and thermohydraulic performance parameter are strongly dependent on the relative roughness height. A maximum value of thermohydraulic performance parameter has been found to be 1.8 for the range of parameters investigated. Comparisons with previously published work have been performed and found to be in excellent agreement. PMID:24222752

  4. High voltage and efficient bilayer heterojunction solar cells based on an organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite absorber with a low-cost flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi-Fang; Jeng, Jun-Yuan; Lee, Mu-Huan; Peng, Shin-Rung; Chen, Peter; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Wen, Ten-Chin; Hsu, Yao-Jane; Hsu, Ching-Ming

    2014-04-07

    A low temperature (<100 °C), flexible solar cell based on an organic-inorganic hybrid CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite-fullerene planar heterojunction (PHJ) is successfully demonstrated. In this manuscript, we study the effects of energy level offset between a solar absorber (organic-inorganic hybrid CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite) and the selective contact materials on the photovoltaic behaviors of the planar organometallic perovskite-fullerene heterojunction solar cells. We find that the difference between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite and the Fermi level of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) dominates the voltage output of the device. ITO films on glass or on the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flexible substrate with different work functions are investigated to illustrate this phenomenon. The higher work function of the PET/ITO substrate decreases the energy loss of hole transfer from the HOMO of perovskite to ITO and minimizes the energy redundancy of the photovoltage output. The devices using the high work function ITO substrate as contact material show significant open-circuit voltage enhancement (920 mV), with the power conversion efficiency of 4.54%, and these types of extra-thin planar bilayer heterojunction solar cells have the potential advantages of low-cost and lightweight.

  5. Na incorporation into Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers deposited on polyimide: Impact on the chemical and electronic surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Caballero, R.; Félix, R.; Gerlach, D.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Schock, H.-W.; Wilks, R. G.; Bär, M.

    2012-02-01

    Na has deliberately been incorporated into Cu(In,Ga)Se2 ("CIGSe") chalcopyrite thin-film solar cell absorbers deposited on Mo-coated polyimide flexible substrates by adding differently thick layers of NaF in-between CIGSe absorber and Mo back contact. The impact of Na on the chemical and electronic surface structure of CIGSe absorbers with various Cu-contents deposited at comparatively low temperature (420 °C) has been studied using x-ray photoelectron and x-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy. We observe a higher Na surface content for the Cu-richer CIGSe samples and can distinguish between two different chemical Na environments, best described as selenide-like and oxidized Na species, respectively. Furthermore, we find a Cu-poor surface composition of the CIGSe samples independent of Na content and — for very high Na contents — indications for the formation of a (Cu,Na)-(In,Ga)-Se like compound. With increasing Na surface content, also a shift of the photoemission lines to lower binding energies could be identified, which we interpret as a reduction of the downward band bending toward the CIGSe surface explained by the Na-induced elimination of InCu defects.

  6. Impact of environmental conditions on the chemical surface properties of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin-film solar cell absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, D. E-mail: l.weinhardt@kit.edu; Meyer, F.; Pohlner, S.; Lechner, R.; Dietmüller, R.; Palm, J.; Heske, C.; Reinert, F.

    2014-05-14

    Environmentally driven aging effects play a crucial role in thin-film solar cells based on Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2}, both for long-term stability and short air exposure during production. For a better understanding of such effects, Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} absorber surfaces were investigated by x-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy after exposure to different environmental conditions. Identical absorbers were stored in a nitrogen atmosphere, in damp heat, and under ambient conditions for up to 14 days. We find varying degrees of diffusion of sulfur, copper, and sodium towards the surface, with potential impact on the electronic surface structure (band gap) and the properties of the interface to a buffer layer in a solar cell device. Furthermore, we observe an oxidation (in decreasing order) of indium, copper, and selenium (but no oxidation of sulfur). And finally, varying amounts of carbon- and oxygen-containing adsorbates are found. In particular, the findings suggest that, for ambient air exposure, sodium carbonate is formed at the surface.

  7. 3-D solar cells by electrochemical-deposited Se layer as extremely-thin absorber and hole conducting layer on nanocrystalline TiO2 electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duy-Cuong; Tanaka, Souichirou; Nishino, Hitoshi; Manabe, Kyohei; Ito, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional selenium solar cell with the structure of Au/Se/porous TiO2/compact TiO2/fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass plates was fabricated by an electrochemical deposition method of selenium, which can work for the extremely thin light absorber and the hole-conducting layer. The effect of experimental conditions, such as HCl and H2SeO3 in an electrochemical solution and TiO2 particle size of porous layers, was optimized. This kind of solar cell did not use any buffer layer between an n-type electrode (porous TiO2) and a p-type absorber layer (selenium). The crystallinity of the selenium after annealing at 200°C for 3 min in the air was significantly improved. The cells with a selenium layer deposited at concentrations of HCl = 11.5 mM and H2SeO3 = 20 mM showed the best performance, resulting in 1- to 2-nm thickness of the Se layer, short-circuit photocurrent density of 8.7 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage of 0.65 V, fill factor of 0.53, and conversion efficiency of 3.0%.

  8. 3-D solar cells by electrochemical-deposited Se layer as extremely-thin absorber and hole conducting layer on nanocrystalline TiO2 electrode.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy-Cuong; Tanaka, Souichirou; Nishino, Hitoshi; Manabe, Kyohei; Ito, Seigo

    2013-01-03

    A three-dimensional selenium solar cell with the structure of Au/Se/porous TiO2/compact TiO2/fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass plates was fabricated by an electrochemical deposition method of selenium, which can work for the extremely thin light absorber and the hole-conducting layer. The effect of experimental conditions, such as HCl and H2SeO3 in an electrochemical solution and TiO2 particle size of porous layers, was optimized. This kind of solar cell did not use any buffer layer between an n-type electrode (porous TiO2) and a p-type absorber layer (selenium). The crystallinity of the selenium after annealing at 200°C for 3 min in the air was significantly improved. The cells with a selenium layer deposited at concentrations of HCl = 11.5 mM and H2SeO3 = 20 mM showed the best performance, resulting in 1- to 2-nm thickness of the Se layer, short-circuit photocurrent density of 8.7 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage of 0.65 V, fill factor of 0.53, and conversion efficiency of 3.0%.

  9. The role of surface albedo in the parameterization of the relationship between system and surface absorbed solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Major, G.

    1994-12-31

    The radiation budget of the atmosphere, its layers and the surface is one of the basic forces in the climate and weather processes. A surface solar radiation budget database could be derived from satellite measurements using different parameterization between the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface solar radiation budget values. The proposed parameterizations suggest that the role of surface albedo is not significant; therefore it should not be taken into account. In this paper an empirical validation is made of the proposed model-based parameterizations using Nimbus-7 and ERBE satellites and the corresponding surface data. It is shown that the role of surface albedo cannot be neglected.

  10. Interfacial engineering of solution-processed Ni nanochain-SiOx (x < 2) cermets towards thermodynamically stable, anti-oxidation solar selective absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaobai; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-04-01

    Cermet solar thermal selective absorber coatings are an important component of high-efficiency concentrated solar power (CSP) receivers. The oxidation of the metal nanoparticles in cermet solar absorbers is a great challenge for vacuum-free operation. Recently, we have demonstrated that oxidation is kinetically retarded in solution processed, high-optical-performance Ni nanochain-SiOx cermet system compared to conventional Ni-Al2O3 system when annealed in air at 450-600 °C for several hours. However, for long-term, high-temperature applications in CSP systems, thermodynamically stable antioxidation behavior is highly desirable, which requires new mechanisms beyond kinetically reducing the oxidation rate. Towards this goal, in this paper, we demonstrate that pre-operation annealing of Ni nanochain-SiOx cermets at 900 °C in N2 forms the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase of NiSi at the Ni/SiOx interfaces, leading to self-terminated oxidation at 550 °C in air due to this interfacial engineering. In contrast, pre-operation annealing at a lower temperature of 750 °C in N2 (as conducted in our previous work) cannot achieve interfacial NiSi formation directly, and further annealing in air at 450-600 °C for >4 h only leads to the formation of the less stable (metastable) hexagonal phase of NiSi. Therefore, the high-temperature pre-operation annealing is critical to form the desirable orthorhombic phase of NiSi at Ni/SiOx interfaces towards thermodynamically stable antioxidation behavior. Remarkably, with this improved interfacial engineering, the oxidation of 80-nm-diameter Ni nanochain-SiOx saturates after annealing at 550 °C in air for 12 h. Additional annealing at 550 °C in air for as long as 20 h (i.e., 32 h air annealing at >550 °C in total) has almost no further impact on the structural or optical properties of the coatings, the latter being very sensitive to any interfacial changes due to the localized surface plasmon resonances of the metal

  11. Deep absorbing porphyrin small molecule for high-performance organic solar cells with very low energy losses.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ke; Li, Lisheng; Lai, Tianqi; Xiao, Liangang; Huang, Yuan; Huang, Fei; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Janssen, René A J; Peng, Xiaobin

    2015-06-17

    We designed and synthesized the DPPEZnP-TEH molecule, with a porphyrin ring linked to two diketopyrrolopyrrole units by ethynylene bridges. The resulting material exhibits a very low energy band gap of 1.37 eV and a broad light absorption to 907 nm. An open-circuit voltage of 0.78 V was obtained in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells, showing a low energy loss of only 0.59 eV, which is the first report that small molecule solar cells show energy losses <0.6 eV. The optimized solar cells show remarkable external quantum efficiency, short circuit current, and power conversion efficiency up to 65%, 16.76 mA/cm(2), and 8.08%, respectively, which are the best values for BHJ solar cells with very low energy losses. Additionally, the morphology of DPPEZnP-TEH neat and blend films with PC61BM was studied thoroughly by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, resonant soft X-ray scattering, and transmission electron microscopy under different fabrication conditions.

  12. Electronic level alignment at the deeply buried absorber/Mo interface in chalcopyrite-based thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, M.; Nishiwaki, S.; Weinhardt, L.; Pookpanratana, S.; Shafarman, W. N.; Heske, C.

    2008-07-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of the absorber/back contact interface for S-free [Cu(In ,Ga)Se2 ("CIGSe")] and S-containing [Cu(In ,Ga)(S,Se)2 ("CIGSSe")] chalcopyrites with direct and inverse photoemission. Comparison of the electronic levels of the cleavage planes reveals a pronounced cliff in the conduction band at the CIG(S )Se/Mo interface. For the valence band, we find a flat alignment and a small spike for the CIGSe- and CIGSSe-based structures, respectively.

  13. A study on the optics of copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells with ultra-thin absorber layers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Man; Wachters, Arthur J H; van Deelen, Joop; Mourad, Maurice C D; Buskens, Pascal J P

    2014-03-10

    We present a systematic study of the effect of variation of the zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) layer thickness on the absorption characteristics of CIGS solar cells using a simulation program based on finite element method (FEM). We show that the absorption in the CIGS layer does not decrease monotonically with its layer thickness due to interference effects. Ergo, high precision is required in the CIGS production process, especially when using ultra-thin absorber layers, to accurately realize the required thickness of the ZnO, cadmium sulfide (CdS) and CIGS layer. We show that patterning the ZnO window layer can strongly suppress these interference effects allowing a higher tolerance in the production process.

  14. Annealing effect on the structural and optical properties of Cr/α-Cr2O3 monodispersed particles based solar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamlich, S.; McCrindle, R.; Nuru, Z. Y.; Cingo, N.; Maaza, M.

    2013-01-01

    A cost-effective and environmentally friendly green chemical method, the so-called aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, was used to deposit chromium/alpha-chromium(III) oxide, Cr/α-Cr2O3, monodispersed particles, for solar absorbers applications. The deposited particles were annealed at various temperatures in a hydrogen atmosphere for 2 h to study the annealing temperature dependence of the structural, chemical and optical properties of the particles grown on tantalum substrates. The deposited Cr/α-Cr2O3 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflection (ATR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and diffuse reflectance UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The XRD and ATR analysis indicated that by increasing annealing temperature, the particles crystallinity was improved and Ta2O5 was formed around 600 °C, due to the fast oxygen diffusion from the deposited α-Cr2O3 toward the tantalum substrate. The optical measurements show that samples annealed at 400 and 500 °C exhibit the targeted high absorbing optical characteristics of "Black chrome", while those annealed below 400 °C and above 500 °C show a significant low absorptivity and high emissivity.

  15. Electrochemical Characterization of CdSe-Coated ZnO Nanowire Extremely-Thin-Absorber Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Treavor Zachary

    Four different CdSe-coated nanostructured ZnO ETA configurations as photoelectrochemical cells with polysulfide electrolyte were studied using both conventional and electrochemical characterization techniques. ETA configurations with different ZnO nanowire lengths of 500 nm and 1000 nm were varied with different CdSe absorber-layer thicknesses of 15 nm and 45 nm to examine the effects on PV performance, carrier transport, and carrier recombination. Linear-sweep voltammetry (J-V) measurements showed that longer ZnO nanowires with thinner CdSe absorber layers gave better PV performance with the 1000 nm length/15 nm CdSe thickness samples having the highest JSC ˜4.4 mA/cm2, VOC ˜0.38 V, Pmax ˜0.52 mW/cm2, and second-highest FF ˜0.32. Mott-Schottky (MS) analysis was performed on individual ETA-layer materials to obtain estimates of their ND and VFB for insight into how individual layers in an ETA cell can assist in carrier separation. MS results were shown to be irrespective of illumination, exposed area, or the electrolyte used. Annealed ZnO nanowires had an ND ˜2x10 19 cm-3, a VFB ˜(-0.4) V. versus Ag/AgCl, and were observed to be n-type. MS analysis of planar CdSe showed it to be slightly n-type and gave parameter estimates of ND ˜3x10 17 cm-3 and VFB ˜-1.1 V v. Ag/AgCl, which were also used to calculate its VBI to be ˜0.4 V, and its depletion width, W to be ˜44 nm. Carrier transport studies were performed using IMPS and photocurrent decay measurements to estimate the time constant for carrier transport, with the fastest observed for shorter nanowires and thicker CdSe absorber layers at ˜10 micros. Carrier recombination studies were also performed using IMVS, photovoltage decay, and EIS measurements to estimate the time constant for carrier recombination, with the slowest estimated for the samples with 45 nm CdSe thickness samples at ˜100 ms. Therefore, shorter nanowires with thicker CdSe absorber layers showed the best potential for improving carrier

  16. Optical analysis of CH3NH3Sn x Pb1-x I3 absorbers: a roadmap for perovskite-on-perovskite tandem solar cells.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Miguel; Correa-Baena, Juan P; Lozano, Gabriel; Saliba, Michael; Anguita, Pablo; Roose, Bart; Abate, Antonio; Steiner, Ullrich; Grätzel, Michael; Calvo, Mauricio E; Hagfeldt, Anders; Míguez, Hernán

    2016-08-07

    Organic-inorganic perovskite structures in which lead is substituted by tin are exceptional candidates for broadband light absorption. Herein we present a thorough analysis of the optical properties of CH3NH3Sn x Pb1-x I3 films, providing the field with definitive insights about the possibilities of these materials for perovskite solar cells of superior efficiency. We report a user's guide based on the first set of optical constants obtained for a series of tin/lead perovskite films, which was only possible to measure due to the preparation of optical quality thin layers. According to the Shockley-Queisser theory, CH3NH3Sn x Pb1-x I3 compounds promise a substantial enhancement of both short circuit photocurrent and power conversion efficiency in single junction solar cells. Moreover, we propose a novel tandem architecture design in which both top and bottom cells are made of perovskite absorbers. Our calculations indicate that such perovskite-on-perovskite tandem devices could reach efficiencies over 35%. Our analysis serves to establish the first roadmap for this type of cells based on actual optical characterization data. We foresee that this study will encourage the research on novel near-infrared perovskite materials for photovoltaic applications, which may have implications in the rapidly emerging field of tandem devices.

  17. Optical approaches to improve the photocurrent generation in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells with absorber thicknesses down to 0.5 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, N.; Jehl, Z.; Hildebrandt, T.; Greffet, J.-J.; Guillemoles, J.-F.; Lincot, D.; Naghavi, N.

    2012-11-01

    Improving the optical management is a key issue for ultrathin based solar cells performance. It can be accomplished either by trapping the light in the active layer or by decreasing the parasitic absorptions in the cell. We calculate the absorption of the different layers of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) based solar cell and propose to increase the absorption in the CIGSe layer by optimizing three parameters. First, by increasing the transmitted light to the cell using a textured surface of ZnO:Al front contact which functions as a broadband antireflection layer. Second, by replacing the CdS/i-ZnO buffer layers with ZnS/ZnMgO buffer layers which have higher energy bandgaps. Third, by replacing the Mo back contact with a higher reflective metal, such as silver or gold. Calculations show that modifying these layers improves the total absorption by 32% in a 0.5 μm thick CIGSe absorber. These predicted improvements of the short circuit current are confirmed experimentally.

  18. Extracting Information about the Electronic Quality of Organic Solar-Cell Absorbers from Fill Factor and Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaienburg, Pascal; Rau, Uwe; Kirchartz, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the fill factor in organic solar cells remains challenging due to its complex dependence on a multitude of parameters. By means of drift-diffusion simulations, we thoroughly analyze the fill factor of such low-mobility systems and demonstrate its dependence on a collection coefficient defined in this work. We systematically discuss the effect of different recombination mechanisms, space-charge regions, and contact properties. Based on these findings, we are able to interpret the thickness dependence of the fill factor for different experimental studies from the literature. The presented model provides a facile method to extract the photoactive layer's electronic quality which is of particular importance for the fill factor. We illustrate that over the past 15 years, the electronic quality has not been continuously improved, although organic solar-cell efficiencies increased steadily over the same period of time. Only recent reports show the synthesis of polymers for semiconducting films of high electronic quality that are able to produce new efficiency records.

  19. Improved visible solar absorber based on TiO2 nanotube film by surface-loading of plasmonic Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhufeng; Wang, Xinshun; Ren, Shoutian; Tian, Zhaoshuo; Fan, Shengli; Sun, Shengsheng; Liu, Shutian; Wang, Qiang

    2013-08-01

    Plasmon-driven electrons injection into active layers of optoelectronic devices is a promising and challenging research topic due to the great unavailability of suitable materials and devices configurations capable of providing comprehensively high photocurrent. In this letter, anodic TiO2 nanotubes array (TNA) films are formed to show enhanced visible light absorbing properties by surface-loading of isolated Au nanoparticles (NPs), exhibiting increased photocurrent and decreased response time. Surface Plasmon produces hot free electrons in the gold NPs when the device is illuminated by visible light with suitable photon energies, and the direct injection of hot electrons into TNA film is realized due to the energy nonequilibrium between gold NPs and TNA film. A significant fraction of these electrons will tunnel into the semiconductor's conduction band, which will introduce the surface n-type conduction layer, resulting in about 145% enhancement of photocurrent and 37% reduction of response time. A scattering-induced enhancement mechanism contributes effectively to the plasmonic photoresponse.

  20. Electronic structures and optical properties of α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys for solar absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Congxin; Jia, Yu; Zhang, Qiming

    2015-05-01

    The band structures and optical properties of α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys are studied by means of first-principles methods, considering different Se contents x. Numerical results show that Se content has an obvious influence on band structures and optical properties of α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys. The band gap values of α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys decrease monotonically when Se concentrations increase, resulting in an obvious increase of the optical absorption edge in the visible range. In particular, our results show that α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys have the direct band gap properties with band gap values when Se content x ≈ 0.17, which is beneficial to solar cell applications.

  1. Polyethylene glycol-assisted growth of Cu2SnS3 promising absorbers for thin film solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, S.; Çetinkaya, S.; Yaşar, S.; Bilican, İ.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the results of the polyethylene glycol- (PEG) assisted preparation and characterization of high-quality and well-crystallized Cu2SnS3 (CTS) thin films obtained using sol-gel spin-coating method and a subsequent annealing in a sulphur atmosphere. Structural, morphological, compositional, electrical and optical investigations were carried out. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples proved the polycrystalline nature and preferred crystallization of the films. No peak referring to other binary or ternary phases were detected in the patterns. The intensity of the preferred orientation and crystallite size of the films increased with increasing PEG content. This trend yielded an improvement in photo-transient currents of the PEG-assisted growth of CTS films. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the CTS films have continuous, dense and agglomeration-like morphology. Through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies, it has been deduced that the samples consist of Cu, Sn and S of which atomic percentages were consistent with Cu/Sn and S/metal initial ratios. The agglomerated morphology of the samples has been attributed to increasing PEG content. A remarkable enhancement was observed in photo-transient currents of p-n junction of the produced films along with increasing PEG content. Through resistivity-temperature measurements, three impurity level electrical activation energy values for each film were found. Optical band gap values of the films were estimated via absorbance-wavelength behaviours and decreased with increasing PEG content. It has been revealed that PEG-assisted growth of CTS thin films is a promising way to improve its photovoltaic characteristics.

  2. Origin of High Electronic Quality in Solar Cell Absorber CH3NH3PbI3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wanjian; Shi, Tingting; Wei, Suhua; Yan, Yanfa

    Thin-film solar cells based on CH3NH3PbI3 halide perovskites have recently shown remarkable performance. First-principle calculations and molecular dynamic simulations show that the structure of pristine CH3NH3PbI3 is much more disordered than the inorganic archetypal thin-film semiconductor CdTe. However, the structural disorders from thermal fluctuation, point defects and grain boundaries introduce rare deep defect states within the bandgaps; therefore, the material has high electronic quality. We have further shown that this unusually high electronic quality is attributed to the unique electronic structures of halide perovskite: the strong coupling between cation lone-pair Pb s orbitals and anion p orbitals and the large atomic size of constitute cation atoms. We further found that although CH3NH3PbI3 GBs do not introduce a deep gap state, the defect level close to the VBM can still act as a shallow hole trap state. Cl and O can spontaneously segregate into GBs and passivate those defect levels and deactivate the trap state.

  3. 2D/3D perovskite hybrids as moisture-tolerant and efficient light absorbers for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chaoyan; Leng, Chongqian; Ji, Yixiong; Wei, Xingzhan; Sun, Kuan; Tang, Linlong; Yang, Jun; Luo, Wei; Li, Chaolong; Deng, Yunsheng; Feng, Shuanglong; Shen, Jun; Lu, Shirong; Du, Chunlei; Shi, Haofei

    2016-11-03

    The lifetime and power conversion efficiency are the key issues for the commercialization of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). In this paper, the development of 2D/3D perovskite hybrids (CA2PbI4/MAPbIxCl3-x) was firstly demonstrated to be a reliable method to combine their advantages, and provided a new concept for achieving both stable and efficient PSCs through the hybridization of perovskites. 2D/3D perovskite hybrids afforded significantly-improved moisture stability of films and devices without encapsulation in a high humidity of 63 ± 5%, as compared with the 3D perovskite (MAPbIxCl3-x). The 2D/3D perovskite-hybrid film did not undergo any degradation after 40 days, while the 3D perovskite decomposed completely under the same conditions after 8 days. The 2D/3D perovskite-hybrid device maintained 54% of the original efficiency after 220 hours, whereas the 3D perovskite device lost all the efficiency within only 50 hours. Moreover, the 2D/3D perovskite hybrid achieved comparable device performances (PCE: 13.86%) to the 3D perovskite (PCE: 13.12%) after the optimization of device fabrication conditions.

  4. Role of shielding in modulating the effects of solar particle events: Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose and DNA complex lesions in different organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.; De Biaggi, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Panzarasa, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Zankl, M.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2004-01-01

    Distributions of absorbed dose and DNA clustered damage yields in various organs and tissues following the October 1989 solar particle event (SPE) were calculated by coupling the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code with two anthropomorphic phantoms (a mathematical model and a voxel model), with the main aim of quantifying the role of the shielding features in modulating organ doses. The phantoms, which were assumed to be in deep space, were inserted into a shielding box of variable thickness and material and were irradiated with the proton spectra of the October 1989 event. Average numbers of DNA lesions per cell in different organs were calculated by adopting a technique already tested in previous works, consisting of integrating into "condensed-history" Monte Carlo transport codes--such as FLUKA--yields of radiobiological damage, either calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations, or taken from experimental works available in the literature. More specifically, the yields of "Complex Lesions" (or "CL", defined and calculated as a clustered DNA damage in a previous work) per unit dose and DNA mass (CL Gy-1 Da-1) due to the various beam components, including those derived from nuclear interactions with the shielding and the human body, were integrated in FLUKA. This provided spatial distributions of CL/cell yields in different organs, as well as distributions of absorbed doses. The contributions of primary protons and secondary hadrons were calculated separately, and the simulations were repeated for values of Al shielding thickness ranging between 1 and 20 g/cm2. Slight differences were found between the two phantom types. Skin and eye lenses were found to receive larger doses with respect to internal organs; however, shielding was more effective for skin and lenses. Secondary particles arising from nuclear interactions were found to have a minor role, although their relative contribution was found to be larger for the Complex Lesions than for the

  5. Review on first-principles study of defect properties of CdTe as a solar cell absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Yin, Wan-Jian; Park, Ji-Sang; Ma, Jie; Wei, Su-Huai

    2016-08-01

    CdTe is one of the leading materials for high-efficiency, low-cost, and thin-film solar cells. In this work, we review the recent first-principles study of defect properties of CdTe and present that: (1) When only intrinsic defects are present, p-type doping in CdTe is weak and the hole density is low due to the relatively deep acceptor levels of Cd vacancy. (2) When only intrinsic defects present, the dominant non-radiative recombination center in p-type CdTe is T{e}Cd2+, which limits the carrier lifetime to be around 200 ns. (3) Extrinsic p-type doping in CdTe by replacing Te with group V elements generally will be limited by the formation of AX centers. This could be overcome through a non-equilibrium cooling process and the hole density can achieve {10}17 {{{cm}}}-3. However, the long-term stability will be a challenging issue. (4) Extrinsic p-type doping by replacing Cd with alkaline group I elements is limited by alkaline interstitials and a non-equilibrium cooling process can efficiently enhance the hole density to the order of {10}17 {{{cm}}}-3. (5) Cu and Cl treatments are discussed. In bulk CdTe, Cu can enhance p-type doping, but Cl is found to be unsuitable for this. Both Cu and Cl show segregation at grain boundaries, especially at those with Te-Te wrong bonds. (6) External impurities are usually incorporated by diffusion. Therefore, the diffusion processes in CdTe are investigated. We find that cation interstitial (Nai, Cui) diffusion follows relatively simple diffusion paths, but anion diffusion (Cli, Pi) follows more complicated paths due to the degenerated defect wavefunctions.

  6. Review on first-principles study of defect properties of CdTe as a solar cell absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Yin, Wan-Jian; Park, Ji-Sang; Ma, Jie; Wei, Su-Huai

    2016-07-15

    CdTe is one of the leading materials for high-efficiency, low-cost, and thin-film solar cells. In this work, we review the recent first-principles study of defect properties of CdTe and present that: (1) When only intrinsic defects are present, p-type doping in CdTe is weak and the hole density is low due to the relatively deep acceptor levels of Cd vacancy. (2) When only intrinsic defects present, the dominant non-radiative recombination center in p-type CdTe is Te-2+/Cd, which limits the carrier lifetime to be around 200 ns. (3) Extrinsic p-type doping in CdTe by replacing Te with group V elements generally will be limited by the formation of AX centers. This could be overcome through a non-equilibrium cooling process and the hole density can achieve 10^17 cm-3. However, the long-term stability will be a challenging issue. (4) Extrinsic p-type doping by replacing Cd with alkaline group I elements is limited by alkaline interstitials and a non-equilibrium cooling process can efficiently enhance the hole density to the order of 10^17 cm-3. (5) Cu and Cl treatments are discussed. In bulk CdTe, Cu can enhance p-type doping, but Cl is found to be unsuitable for this. Both Cu and Cl show segregation at grain boundaries, especially at those with Te-Te wrong bonds. (6) External impurities are usually incorporated by diffusion. Therefore, the diffusion processes in CdTe are investigated. We find that cation interstitial (Nai, Cui) diffusion follows relatively simple diffusion paths, but anion diffusion (Cli, Pi) follows more complicated paths due to the degenerated defect wavefunctions.

  7. Deposition of ultra thin CuInS2 absorber layers by ALD for thin film solar cells at low temperature (down to 150 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nathanaelle; Bouttemy, Muriel; Genevée, Pascal; Lincot, Daniel; Donsanti, Frédérique

    2015-02-01

    Two new processes for the atomic layer deposition of copper indium sulfide (CuInS2) based on the use of two different sets of precursors are reported. Metal chloride precursors (CuCl, InCl3) in combination with H2S imply relatively high deposition temperature (Tdep = 380 °C), and due to exchange reactions, CuInS2 stoechiometry was only achieved by depositing In2S3 layers on a CuxS film. However, the use of acac- metal precursors (Cu(acac)2, In(acac)3) allows the direct deposition of CuInS2 at temperature as low as 150 °C, involving in situ copper-reduction, exchange reaction and diffusion processes. The morphology, crystallographic structure, chemical composition and optical band gap of thin films were investigated using scanning electronic microscope, x-ray diffraction under grazing incidence conditions, x-ray fluorescence, energy dispersive spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Films were implemented as ultra-thin absorbers in a typical CIS-solar cell architecture and allowed conversion efficiencies up to 2.8%.

  8. Nanomorphology of P3HT:PCBM-based absorber layers of organic solar cells after different processing conditions analyzed by low-energy scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Marina; Klein, Michael F G; Müller, Erich; Müller, Philipp; Colsmann, Alexander; Lemmer, Uli; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2012-12-01

    In this study the nanomorphology of P3HT:PC61BM absorber layers of organic solar cells was studied as a function of the processing parameters and for P3HT with different molecular weight. For this purpose we apply scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at low electron energies in a scanning electron microscope. This method exhibits sensitive material contrast in the high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) mode, which is well suited to distinguish materials with similar densities and mean atomic numbers. The images taken with low-energy HAADF STEM are compared with conventional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images to illustrate the capabilities of the different techniques. For the interpretation of the low-energy HAADF STEM images, a semiempirical equation is used to calculate the image intensities. The experiments show that the nanomorphology of the P3HT:PC61BM blends depends strongly on the molecular weight of the P3HT. Low-molecular-weight P3HT forms rod-like domains during annealing. In contrast, only small globular features are visible in samples containing high-molecular-weight P3HT, which do not change significantly after annealing at 150°C up to 30 min.

  9. Influence of the Cu Content in Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cell absorbers on order-disorder related band gap changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Mario; Renz, Tobias; Mathes, Niklas; Neuwirth, Markus; Schnabel, Thomas; Kalt, Heinz; Hetterich, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the electronic structure and the radiative recombination in wet-chemically fabricated Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cell absorbers utilizing photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy, focusing especially on the effects of varying Cu content. This includes the impact of the latter on the band gap energy and the change in band gap energy related to the order-disorder transition. Characteristic PL and PLE parameters like the energetic position of the PL maximum and the PL yield as a function of the excitation power as well as the PLE tailing parameter do not depend on composition indicating that the nature of the radiative transition is not altered by the Cu content. However, the band gap energy Eg significantly increases as a function of decreasing Cu content. This increase is more pronounced in the disordered than in the ordered atomic arrangement of Cu and Zn atoms in the Cu-Zn planes of the kesterite crystal structure.

  10. Highly Corrosion Resistant and Sandwich-like Si3N4/Cr-CrNx/Si3N4 Coatings Used for Solar Selective Absorbing Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Du, Miao; Haoa, Lei; Meng, Jianping; Wang, Jining; Mi, Jing; Liu, Xiaopeng

    2016-12-14

    Highly corrosion resistant, layer-by-layer nanostructured Si3N4/Cr-CrNx/Si3N4 coatings were deposited on aluminum substrate by DC/RF magnetron sputtering. Corrosion resistance experiments were performed in 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 wt % NaCl salt spray at 35 °C for 168 h. Properties of the coatings were comprehensively investigated in terms of optical property, surface morphology, microstructure, elemental valence state, element distribution, and potentiodynamic polarization. UV-vis-near-IR spectrophotometer and FTIR measurements show that the change process in optical properties of Si3N4/Cr-CrNx/Si3N4/Al coatings can be divided into three stages: a rapid active degradation stage, a steady passivation stage, and a transpassivation degradation stage. With the increase in the concentration of NaCl salt spray, solar absorptance and thermal emittance experienced a slight degradation. SEM images reveal that there is an increase in surface defects, such as microcracks and holes and -cracks. XRD and TEM measurements indicate that the phase structure changed partially and the content of CrOx and Al2O3 has increased. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that the elements of Cr, N, and O have undergone a minor diffusion. Electrochemical polarization curves show that the as-deposited Si3N4/Cr-CrNx/Si3N4/Al coatings have excellent corrosion resistance of 3633.858 kΩ, while after corroding in 5.0 wt % NaCl salt spray for 168 h the corrosion resistance dropped to 13.759 kΩ. However, these coatings still have an outstanding performance of high solar absorptance of 0.924 and low thermal emittance of 0.090 after corroding in 3.0 wt % NaCl salt spray for 120 h. Thus, the Si3N4/Cr-CrNx/Si3N4/Al coating is a good choice for solar absorber coatings applied in the high-saline environment.

  11. Workshop Report on Managing Solar Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Lee (Compiler); Caldeira, Ken (Compiler); Chatfield, Robert (Compiler); Langhoff, Stephanie (Compiler)

    2007-01-01

    The basic concept of managing Earth's radiation budget is to reduce the amount of incoming solar radiation absorbed by the Earth so as to counterbalance the heating of the Earth that would otherwise result from the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The workshop did not seek to decide whether or under what circumstances solar radiation management should be deployed or which strategies or technologies might be best, if it were deployed. Rather, the workshop focused on defining what kinds of information might be most valuable in allowing policy makers more knowledgeably to address the various options for solar radiation management.

  12. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  13. Growth of Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystallites on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays as Novel Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cell Structure via the Successive-Ion-Layer-Adsorption-Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoran; Demopoulos, George P

    2015-10-21

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is an environmentally benign semiconductor with excellent optoelectronic properties that attracts a lot of interest in thin film photovoltaics. In departure from that conventional configuration, we fabricate and test a novel absorber-conductor structure featuring in situ successive-ion-layer-adsorption-reaction (SILAR)-deposited CZTS nanocrystallites as a light absorber on one-dimensional TiO2 (rutile) nanorods as an electron conductor. The effectiveness of the nanoscale heterostructure in visible light harvesting and photoelectron generation is demonstrated with an initial short circuit current density of 3.22 mA/cm(2) and an internal quantum efficiency of ∼60% at the blue light region, revealing great potential in developing CZTS extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells.

  14. Relationship between open-circuit voltage in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell and peak position of (220/204) preferred orientation near its absorber surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chantana, J. Minemoto, T.; Watanabe, T.; Teraji, S.; Kawamura, K.

    2013-11-25

    Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) absorbers with various Ga/III, Ga/(In+Ga), profiles are prepared by the so-called “multi-layer precursor method” using multi-layer co-evaporation of material sources. It is revealed that open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of CIGS solar cell is primarily dependent on averaged Ga/III near the surface of its absorber. This averaged Ga/III is well predicted by peak position of (220/204) preferred orientation of CIGS film near its surface investigated by glancing-incidence X-ray diffraction with 0.1° incident angle. Finally, the peak position of (220/204) preferred orientation is proposed as a measure of V{sub OC} before solar cell fabrication.

  15. Leaves of Citrus aurantifolia exhibit a different sensibility to solar UV-B radiation according to development stage in relation to photosynthetic pigments and UV-B absorbing compounds production.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Silvina; Rosa, Mariana; Hilal, Mirna; González, Juan A; Prado, Fernando E

    2008-03-28

    Plants of Citrus aurantifolia grown in a greenhouse without solar UV radiation (UVR) were transferred outdoors to evaluate the effect of solar UV-B radiation (UVBR, 280-315 nm) in prior-developed leaves, constituted by apical bud and those fully expanded before being taken outdoors, and post-developed leaves, formed by those expanded outdoors. Results demonstrated that over a 40 d outdoor period leaf chlorophyll content and distribution pattern were different with and without solar UVBR. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll contents in both treatments were higher in prior-developed leaves than in post-developed ones. However, highest values were observed in prior-developed leaves under solar UVBR, whereas in post-developed leaves an opposite trend was observed. Carotenoids content in prior-developed leaves was higher with solar UVBR, whereas in post-developed leaves there were no significant differences in both with and without solar UVBR. In addition, prior-developed leaves under solar UVBR accumulated flavonoids, but not anthocyanins. Growth parameters (e.g. DW, DW/FW ratio, LMA, plant height, length and width of foliar lamina) did not show significant differences between plants grown with and without solar UVBR. Thus, our results demonstrated that C. aurantifolia leaves exhibited a different sensibility to solar UVBR according to development stage in relation to photosynthetic pigments and UV-B absorbing compounds production. In addition, the solar UVBR was not necessary as inductor of photosynthetic protection mechanisms in a short-time growth period. On the other hand, our results also demonstrated that solar UVBR acted as an effective feeding deterrent against citrus leafminer.

  16. A Two-Step Absorber Deposition Approach To Overcome Shunt Losses in Thin-Film Solar Cells: Using Tin Sulfide as a Proof-of-Concept Material System

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, Vera; Chakraborty, Rupak; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Hartman, Katy; Brandt, Riley E.; Polizzotti, Alex; Yang, Chuanxi; Moriarty, Tom; Gradečak, Silvija; Gordon, Roy G.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-08-31

    As novel absorber materials are developed and screened for their photovoltaic (PV) properties, the challenge remains to reproducibly test promising candidates for high-performing PV devices. Many early-stage devices are prone to device shunting due to pinholes in the absorber layer, producing 'false-negative' results. Here, we demonstrate a device engineering solution toward a robust device architecture, using a two-step absorber deposition approach. We use tin sulfide (SnS) as a test absorber material. The SnS bulk is processed at high temperature (400 degrees C) to stimulate grain growth, followed by a much thinner, low-temperature (200 degrees C) absorber deposition. At a lower process temperature, the thin absorber overlayer contains significantly smaller, densely packed grains, which are likely to provide a continuous coating and fill pinholes in the underlying absorber bulk. We compare this two-step approach to the more standard approach of using a semi-insulating buffer layer directly on top of the annealed absorber bulk, and we demonstrate a more than 3.5x superior shunt resistance Rsh with smaller standard error ..sigma..Rsh. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements indicate a lower density of pinholes in the SnS absorber bulk when using the two-step absorber deposition approach. We correlate those findings to improvements in the device performance and device performance reproducibility.

  17. Effect of post-deposition annealing on the growth of Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin films for a solar cell absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, G. Suresh; Kishore Kumar, Y. B.; Uday Bhaskar, P.; Sundara Raja, V.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of substrate temperature and post-deposition annealing on the growth and properties of Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin films, a potential candidate for a solar cell absorber layer, is investigated. The substrate temperature (Ts) is chosen to be in the range 523-673 K and the annealing temperature (Tpa) is kept at 723 K. Powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of as-deposited films revealed that the films deposited at Ts = 523 K and 573 K contain Cu2-xSe as a secondary phase. Single phase, polycrystalline Cu2ZnSnSe4 films are obtained at Ts = 623 K and films deposited at Ts = 673 K have ZnSe as a secondary phase along with Cu2ZnSnSe4. Direct band gap of as-deposited CZTSe films is found to lie between 1.40 eV and 1.65 eV depending on Ts. XRD patterns of post-deposition annealed films revealed that the films deposited at Ts = 523-623 K are single phase CZTSe and films deposited at Ts = 673 K still contain ZnSe secondary phase. CZTSe films are found to exhibit kesterite structure with the lattice parameters a = 0.568 nm and c = 1.136 nm. Optical absorption studies of post-deposition annealed films show that there is a slight increase in the band gap on annealing, due to decrease in the Cu content. Electrical resistivity of the films is found to lie in the range 0.02-2.6 Ω cm depending on Ts.

  18. Melanin pigmented solar absorbing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gallas, J.M.; Eisner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Selectivity enhancement is shown to result for melanin, a black biopolymer pigment, for sufficiently low sample density. The effect is proposed to follow from a consideration of the evanescent waves associated with the total internal reflection phenomenon. A relationship is discussed among powder density, pH and the paramagnetic properties of melanin; this relationship is shown to be consistent with, and offer support to an amino-acid side group proposed earlier as part of the melanin structure. A brief discussion is also presented on the optical properties of melanin and the relative importance of quinhydrone, a change transfer complex believed to exist in the polymeric structure of melanin.

  19. A dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole based, NIR absorbing, solution processable, small molecule donor for efficient bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Busireddy, Manohar Reddy; Raju Mantena, Venkata Niladri; Chereddy, Narendra Reddy; Shanigaram, Balaiah; Kotamarthi, Bhanuprakash; Biswas, Subhayan; Sharma, Ganesh Datt; Vaidya, Jayathirtha Rao

    2016-11-30

    A novel, NIR absorbing organic small molecular donor material denoted as ICT3 with an A-D-D-D-A architecture having dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole (DTP) and butylrhodanine as donor and acceptor moieties, respectively, is synthesized and its thermal, photophysical, electrochemical and photovoltaic properties are explored. ICT3 has excellent stability over a broad range of temperatures with a decomposition temperature (Td corresponds to 5% weight loss) of 372 °C, soluble in most common organic solvents (solubility up to 30 mg mL(-1)) and suitable for solution processing during device fabrication. ICT3 has broad (520-820 nm) and intense visible region absorption (molar excitation coefficient is 1.69 × 10(5) mol(-1) cm(-1)) and has suitable HOMO and LUMO energy levels with the [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) acceptor for efficient exciton dissociation and charge transfer. Bulk heterojunction solar cells (BHJSCs) with an indium tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/ICT3:PC71BM/poly(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)fluorene-2,7-diyl)-alt-(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) (PFN)/aluminium (Al) structure are fabricated and the BHJSCs with the active layer as cast from chloroform solution displayed a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.04% (JSC = 8.22 mA cm(-2), VOC = 0.86 V and FF = 0.43). Annealing the active layer significantly improved the PCE of these BHJSCs. While thermal annealing of the active layer improved the PCE of the BHJSCs to 4.94%, thermal followed by solvent vapour annealing enhanced the PCE to 6.53%. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analyses are carried out on the active layer and these results revealed that annealing treatment improves the crystallinity and nanoscale morphology of the active layer, enriches the device exciton generation and dissociation efficiency, charge transport and collection efficiency and reduces carrier recombination. The observed higher PCE (6

  20. Solar energy collector

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, R.J.

    1980-09-02

    A sun tracking solar energy collector assembly having both a longitudinally extending flat plate absorber and a tube absorber spaced from and extending longitudinally generally parallel to the flat plate absorber. In one form a parabolic reflector focuses direct rays of solar radiation on the tube absorber and directs diffused rays of solar radiation onto the plate absorber. In another form a fresnel lens plate focuses direct rays of solar radiation on the tube absorber and flat reflector surfaces direct diffused solar radiation passing through the lens plate onto the plate absorber. In both forms a fluid is first heated as it circulates through passages in the flat plate absorber and then is further heated to a higher temperature as it passes through the tube absorber.

  1. Selenization of Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} absorber layer: An efficient step to improve device performance of CdS/Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Meiying; Luo, Miao; Chen, Chao; Qin, Sikai; Chen, Jie; Zhong, Jie; Tang, Jiang

    2014-08-25

    Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} appeared as a very promising solar absorber because of their attractive material, optical and electrical properties. Previously, we reported thermal evaporated superstrate CdS/Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} solar cell achieving 1.9% efficiency. In this letter, we improved device performance to 3.7% (Voc = 0.335 V, Jsc = 24.4 mA/cm{sup 2}, and FF = 46.8%) by an additional selenization step. Careful external quantum efficiency, capacitance-voltage profiling, and photoresponse study indicated selenization probably compensated selenium loss during thermal evaporation, reducing V{sub Se} associated recombination loss and improving device performance.

  2. Solar reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D. C.

    1981-02-17

    A solar reflector having a flexible triangular reflective sheet or membrane for receiving and reflecting solar energy therefrom. The reflector is characterized by the triangular reflective sheet which is placed under tension thereby defining a smooth planar surface eliminating surface deflection which heretofore has reduced the efficiency of reflectors or heliostats used in combination for receiving and transmitting solar energy to an absorber tower.

  3. THz-metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuong Pham, Van; Park, J. W.; Vu, Dinh Lam; Zheng, H. Y.; Rhee, J. Y.; Kim, K. W.; Lee, Y. P.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrabroad-band metamaterial absorber was investigated in mid-IR regime based on a similar model in previous work. The high absorption of metamaterial was obtained in a band of 8-11.7 THz with energy loss distributed in SiO2, which is appropriate potentially for solar-cell applications. A perfect absorption peak was provided by using a sandwich structure with periodical anti-dot pattern in the IR region, getting closed to visible-band metamaterials. The dimensional parameters were examined for the corresponding fabrication. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  4. Effect of band-aligned double absorber layers on photovoltaic characteristics of chemical bath deposited PbS/CdS thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ho Yeon, Deuk; Chandra Mohanty, Bhaskar; Lee, Seung Min; Soo Cho, Yong

    2015-09-23

    Here we report the highest energy conversion efficiency and good stability of PbS thin film-based depleted heterojunction solar cells, not involving PbS quantum dots. The PbS thin films were grown by the low cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) process at relatively low temperatures. Compared to the quantum dot solar cells which require critical and multistep complex procedures for surface passivation, the present approach, leveraging the facile modulation of the optoelectronic properties of the PbS films by the CBD process, offers a simpler route for optimization of PbS-based solar cells. Through an architectural modification, wherein two band-aligned junctions are stacked without any intervening layers, an enhancement of conversion efficiency by as much as 30% from 3.10 to 4.03% facilitated by absorption of a wider range of solar spectrum has been obtained. As an added advantage of the low band gap PbS stacked over a wide gap PbS, the devices show stability over a period of 10 days.

  5. Effect of band-aligned double absorber layers on photovoltaic characteristics of chemical bath deposited PbS/CdS thin film solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Ho Yeon, Deuk; Chandra Mohanty, Bhaskar; Lee, Seung Min; Soo Cho, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the highest energy conversion efficiency and good stability of PbS thin film-based depleted heterojunction solar cells, not involving PbS quantum dots. The PbS thin films were grown by the low cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) process at relatively low temperatures. Compared to the quantum dot solar cells which require critical and multistep complex procedures for surface passivation, the present approach, leveraging the facile modulation of the optoelectronic properties of the PbS films by the CBD process, offers a simpler route for optimization of PbS-based solar cells. Through an architectural modification, wherein two band-aligned junctions are stacked without any intervening layers, an enhancement of conversion efficiency by as much as 30% from 3.10 to 4.03% facilitated by absorption of a wider range of solar spectrum has been obtained. As an added advantage of the low band gap PbS stacked over a wide gap PbS, the devices show stability over a period of 10 days. PMID:26394761

  6. Effect of band-aligned double absorber layers on photovoltaic characteristics of chemical bath deposited PbS/CdS thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho Yeon, Deuk; Chandra Mohanty, Bhaskar; Lee, Seung Min; Soo Cho, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the highest energy conversion efficiency and good stability of PbS thin film-based depleted heterojunction solar cells, not involving PbS quantum dots. The PbS thin films were grown by the low cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) process at relatively low temperatures. Compared to the quantum dot solar cells which require critical and multistep complex procedures for surface passivation, the present approach, leveraging the facile modulation of the optoelectronic properties of the PbS films by the CBD process, offers a simpler route for optimization of PbS-based solar cells. Through an architectural modification, wherein two band-aligned junctions are stacked without any intervening layers, an enhancement of conversion efficiency by as much as 30% from 3.10 to 4.03% facilitated by absorption of a wider range of solar spectrum has been obtained. As an added advantage of the low band gap PbS stacked over a wide gap PbS, the devices show stability over a period of 10 days.

  7. Charge carrier dynamics and recombination in graded band gap CuIn1-xGaxSe2 polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic solar cell absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuciauskas, Darius; Li, Jian V.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Pankow, Joel; Dippo, Patricia; Young, Matthew; Mansfield, Lorelle M.; Noufi, Rommel; Levi, Dean

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of spectroscopic time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) analysis for polycrystalline CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) films. On the <5 ns time scale, we investigated minority carrier spatial redistribution from the initial absorption profile near the surface of the films to the conduction band minimum. Based on these data, the estimated minority carrier mobility is 75–230 cm2 V-1s-1. Full TRPL decays were analyzed using models for donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombination. We estimated that the concentration of DAP recombination centers was 5×1015–1017cm-3. Data also show that Shockley-Reed-Hall and surface recombination are not significant for polycrystalline CIGS absorbers used in high-efficiency photovoltaic solar cells.

  8. Atomic and electronic structure of perfect dislocations in the solar absorber materials CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 studied by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragan-Yani, Daniel; Albe, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Structural and electronic properties of screw and 60∘-mixed glide and shuffle dislocations in the solar absorber materials CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 are investigated by means of electronic structure calculations within density functional theory (DFT). Screw dislocations present distorted bonds but remain fully coordinated after structural relaxation. Relaxed 60∘-mixed dislocations, in contrast, exhibit dangling and "wrong," cation-cation or anion-anion bonds, which induce deep charge transition levels and are electrically active. Analysis of Bader charges and local density of states (LDOS) reveals that acceptor and donor levels are induced by α and β cores, respectively. Moreover, there is local charge accumulation in the surrounding of those cores which contain dangling or "wrong" bonds. Thus the apparently harmless nature of dislocations is not because they are electrically inactive, but can only be a result of passivation by segregating defects.

  9. Formation of a K-In-Se Surface Species by NaF/KF Postdeposition Treatment of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Thin-Film Solar Cell Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Handick, Evelyn; Reinhard, Patrick; Wilks, Regan G; Pianezzi, Fabian; Kunze, Thomas; Kreikemeyer-Lorenzo, Dagmar; Weinhardt, Lothar; Blum, Monika; Yang, Wanli; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Ikenaga, Eiji; Gerlach, Dominic; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Chikyow, Toyohiro; Heske, Clemens; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N; Bär, Marcus

    2017-02-01

    A NaF/KF postdeposition treatment (PDT) has recently been employed to achieve new record efficiencies of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin film solar cells. We have used a combination of depth-dependent soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as well as soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy to gain detailed insight into the chemical structure of the CIGSe surface and how it is changed by different PDTs. Alkali-free CIGSe, NaF-PDT CIGSe, and NaF/KF-PDT CIGSe absorbers grown by low-temperature coevaporation have been interrogated. We find that the alkali-free and NaF-PDT CIGSe surfaces both display the well-known Cu-poor CIGSe chemical surface structure. The NaF/KF-PDT, however, leads to the formation of bilayer structure in which a K-In-Se species covers the CIGSe compound that in composition is identical to the chalcopyrite structure of the alkali-free and NaF-PDT absorber.

  10. Modification of electron states in CdTe absorber due to a buffer layer in CdTe/CdS solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorenko, Y. G. Major, J. D.; Pressman, A.; Phillips, L. J.; Durose, K.

    2015-10-28

    By application of the ac admittance spectroscopy method, the defect state energy distributions were determined in CdTe incorporated in thin film solar cell structures concluded on ZnO, ZnSe, and ZnS buffer layers. Together with the Mott-Schottky analysis, the results revealed a strong modification of the defect density of states and the concentration of the uncompensated acceptors as influenced by the choice of the buffer layer. In the solar cells formed on ZnSe and ZnS, the Fermi level and the energy position of the dominant deep trap levels were observed to shift closer to the midgap of CdTe, suggesting the mid-gap states may act as recombination centers and impact the open-circuit voltage and the fill factor of the solar cells. For the deeper states, the broadening parameter was observed to increase, indicating fluctuations of the charge on a microscopic scale. Such changes can be attributed to the grain-boundary strain and the modification of the charge trapped at the grain-boundary interface states in polycrystalline CdTe.

  11. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  12. Technical use of solar energy: Conversion from solar to thermal energy, solar cooling and thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafa, A.; Fisch, N.; Hahne, E.; Kraus, K.; Seemann, D.; Seifert, B.; Sohns, J.; Schetter, G.; Schweigerer, W.

    1983-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies in the field of solar energy utilization are reviewed. Specific topics considered are: flat plate water collectors, solar absorbers, air collectors, solar absorption cooling, solar simulators, aquifiers, latent heat stores, and space heating systems.

  13. Improvement of external quantum efficiency depressed by visible light-absorbing hole transport material in solid-state semiconductor-sensitized heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Choong-Sun; Im, Sang Hyuk; Chang, Jeong Ah; Lee, Yong Hui; Kim, Hi-jung; Seok, Sang Il

    2012-01-21

    A mesoporous (mp)-TiO(2)/Sb(2)S(3)/P3HT [poly(3-hexylthiophene)] heterojunction solar cell displays reduced external quantum efficiency (EQE) at a wavelength of approximately 650 nm. This loss in EQE is due to incomplete charge carrier transport because the transportation of charge carriers generated in P3HT by the absorption of light into Sb(2)S(3) was inefficient, and consequently, the carriers recombined. The depression of the EQE was greatly relieved by introducing the porous structure formed by thermal decomposition of 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) into the P3HT layer.

  14. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  15. Electron-beam-induced current at absorber back surfaces of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavalakkatt, J.; Abou-Ras, D.; Haarstrich, J.; Ronning, C.; Nichterwitz, M.; Caballero, R.; Rissom, T.; Unold, T.; Scheer, R.; Schock, H. W.

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports on investigations of the influence of the microstructure on electronic properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin-film solar cells. For this purpose, ZnO/CdS/CIGSe stacks of these solar cells were lifted off the Mo-coated glass substrates. The exposed CIGSe backsides of these stacks were investigated by means of electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) and cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements as well as by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). EBIC and CL profiles across grain boundaries (GBs), which were identified by EBSD, do not show any significant changes at Σ3 GBs. Across non-Σ3 GBs, on the other hand, the CL signals exhibit local minima with varying peak values, while by means of EBIC, decreased and also increased short-circuit current values are measured. Overall, EBIC and CL signals change across non-Σ3 GBs always differently. This complex situation was found in various CIGSe thin films with different [Ga]/([In]+[Ga]) and [Cu]/([In]+[Ga]) ratios. A part of the EBIC profiles exhibiting reduced signals across non-Σ3 GBs can be approximated by a simple model based on diffusion of generated charge carriers to the GBs.

  16. Solar Energy Technician/Installer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Solar power (also known as solar energy) is solar radiation emitted from the sun. Large panels that absorb the sun's energy as the sun beats down on them gather solar power. The energy in the rays can be used for heat (solar thermal energy) or converted to electricity (photovoltaic energy). Each solar energy project, from conception to…

  17. Laser-assisted manufacturing of micro-optical volume elements for enhancing the amount of light absorbed by solar cells in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peharz, Gerhard; Kuna, Ladislav; Leiner, Claude

    2015-03-01

    The laser-generation of micro-optical volume elements is a promising approach to decrease the optical shadowing of front side metal contacts of solar cells. Focusing a femtosecond laser beam into the volume of the encapsulation material causes a local modification its optical constants. Suchlike fabricated micro-optical elements can be used to decrease the optical shadowing of the front side metallization of c-Si solar cells. Test samples comprising of a sandwich structure of a glass sheet with metallic grid-lines, an Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant and another glass sheet were manufactured in order to investigate the optical performance of the volume optics. Transmission measurements show that the shadowing of the metalling grid-lines is substantially decreased by the micro-optical volume elements created in the EVA bulk right above the grid-fingers. A detailed investigation of the optical properties of these volume elements was performed: (i) experimentally on the basis of goniometric measurements, as well as (ii) theoretically by applying optical modelling and optimization procedures. This resulted in a better understanding of the effectiveness of the optical volume elements in decreasing the optical shadowing of metal grid lines on the active cell surfaces. Moreover, results of photovoltaic mini-modules with incorporated micro-optical volume elements are presented. Results of optical simulation and Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) experiments show that the losses due to the grid fingers can be reduced by about 50%, when using this fs-laser structuring approach for the fabrication of micro-optical volume elements in the EVA material.

  18. Classification of lattice defects in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 earth-abundant solar cell absorbers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiyou; Walsh, Aron; Gong, Xin-Gao; Wei, Su-Huai

    2013-03-20

    The kesterite-structured semiconductors Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 are drawing considerable attention recently as the active layers in earth-abundant low-cost thin-film solar cells. The additional number of elements in these quaternary compounds, relative to binary and ternary semiconductors, results in increased flexibility in the material properties. Conversely, a large variety of intrinsic lattice defects can also be formed, which have important influence on their optical and electrical properties, and hence their photovoltaic performance. Experimental identification of these defects is currently limited due to poor sample quality. Here recent theoretical research on defect formation and ionization in kesterite materials is reviewed based on new systematic calculations, and compared with the better studied chalcopyrite materials CuGaSe2 and CuInSe2 . Four features are revealed and highlighted: (i) the strong phase-competition between the kesterites and the coexisting secondary compounds; (ii) the intrinsic p-type conductivity determined by the high population of acceptor CuZn antisites and Cu vacancies, and their dependence on the Cu/(Zn+Sn) and Zn/Sn ratio; (iii) the role of charge-compensated defect clusters such as [2CuZn +SnZn ], [VCu +ZnCu ] and [ZnSn +2ZnCu ] and their contribution to non-stoichiometry; (iv) the electron-trapping effect of the abundant [2CuZn +SnZn ] clusters, especially in Cu2ZnSnS4. The calculated properties explain the experimental observation that Cu poor and Zn rich conditions (Cu/(Zn+Sn) ≈ 0.8 and Zn/Sn ≈ 1.2) result in the highest solar cell efficiency, as well as suggesting an efficiency limitation in Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 cells when the S composition is high.

  19. A thermo-electric system using concentrated solar energy with photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.-F. V.; Dorney, S.

    The work reported here is a preliminary study of a thermo-electric system using concentrated solar radiation with photovoltaic cells. The system incorporated a novel concentrating system with the designed purpose of utilizing those portions of the solar spectrum that the silicon solar cells were not responsive to. The experimental set-up consisted of a 3.8 cm diameter glass tube, 76.2 cm long with the glass silicon cells positioned at equal intervals on its underside. Fresnel lenses were placed so that the incoming solar radiation was concentrated onto the silicon cells. The glass tube was filled with water which absorbed energy from the solar radiation before it reached the cells. The water had its temperature raised nine degrees Fahrenheit while also allowing the solar cells to produce approximately 0.05 watt. This results in an efficiency of around 35 percent. The results obtained are preliminary, and represent typical conditions in south Florida.

  20. Application of ICP-OES to the determination of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin films used as absorber materials in solar cell devices.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Caballero, Raquel; Guillén, Cecilia; Gutiérrez, María Teresa; Rucandio, María Isabel

    2005-05-01

    CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 [CIGS; x=Ga/(In+Ga)] thin films are among of the best candidates as absorber materials for solar cell applications. The material quality and main properties of the polycrystalline absorber layer are critically influenced by deviations in the stoichiometry, particularly in the Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratio. In this work a simple, sensitive and accurate method has been developed for the quantitative determination of these thin films by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The proposed method involves an acid digestion of the samples to achieve the complete solubilization of CIGS, followed by the analytical determination by ICP-OES. A digestion procedure with 50% HNO3 alone or in the presence of 10% HCl was performed to dissolve those thin films deposited on glass or Mo-coated glass substrates, respectively. Two analytical lines were selected for each element (Cu 324.754 and 327.396 nm, Ga 294.364 and 417.206 nm, In 303.936 and 325.609 nm, Se 196.090 and 203.985 nm, and Mo 202.030 and 379.825 nm) and a study of spectral interferences was performed which showed them to be suitable, since they offered a high sensitivity and no significant inter-element interferences were detected. Detection limits for all elements at the selected lines were found to be appropriate for this kind of application, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 1.5% for all elements with the exception of Se (about 5%). The Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratios obtained from the application of this method to CIGS thin films were consistent with the study of the structural and morphological properties by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  1. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  2. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  3. Real-time observation of Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cell absorber layer formation from nanoparticle precursors.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Roland; Walker, Bryce C; Schmidt, Sebastian S; Zander, Ole; Weber, Alfons; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Humberto; Just, Justus; Klaus, Manuela; Agrawal, Rakesh; Unold, Thomas

    2013-11-07

    The selenization of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanocrystals is a promising route for the fabrication of low-cost thin film solar cells. However, the reaction pathway of this process is not completely understood. Here, the evolution of phase formation, grain size, and elemental distributions is investigated during the selenization of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanoparticle precursor thin films by synchrotron-based in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis as well as by ex situ electron microscopy. The precursor films are heated in a closed volume inside a vacuum chamber in the presence of selenium vapor while diffraction and fluorescence signals are recorded. The presented results reveal that during the selenization the cations diffuse to the surface to form large grains on top of the nanoparticle layer and the selenization of the film takes place through two simultaneous reactions: (1) a direct and fast formation of large grained selenides, starting with copper selenide which is subsequently transformed into Cu2ZnSnSe4; and (2) a slower selenization of the remaining nanoparticles. As a consequence of the initial formation of copper selenides at the surface, the subsequent formation of CZTSe starts under Cu-rich conditions despite an overall Cu-poor composition of the film. The implications of this process path for the film quality are discussed. Additionally, the proposed growth model provides an explanation for the previously observed accumulation of carbon from the nanoparticle precursor beneath the large grained layer.

  4. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Lehmann, Sebastian; Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Bär, Marcus; Sadewasser, Sascha

    2014-12-01

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for "realistic" surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 thin films with an average x = [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH3-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is - apart from a slight change in surface composition - identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  5. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cell absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Jascha; Lehmann, Sebastian; Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Bär, Marcus; Sadewasser, Sascha

    2014-12-21

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for “realistic” surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} thin films with an average x = [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH{sub 3}-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is – apart from a slight change in surface composition – identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  6. Substitution of Li for Cu in Cu2ZnSnS4: Toward Wide Band Gap Absorbers with Low Cation Disorder for Thin Film Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lafond, A; Guillot-Deudon, C; Vidal, J; Paris, M; La, C; Jobic, S

    2017-03-06

    The substitution of lithium for copper in Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. Formally, the (Cu1-xLix)ZnSnS4 system exhibits two well-defined solid solutions. Indeed, single crystal structural analyses demonstrate that the low (x < 0.4) and high (x > 0.6) lithium-content compounds adopt the kesterite structure and the wurtz-kesterite structure, respectively. For x between 0.4 and 0.6, the two aforementioned structure types coexist. Moreover, (119)Sn NMR analyses carried out on a (Cu0.7Li0.3)2ZnSnS4 sample clearly indicate that lithium replaces copper preferentially on two of the three available 2-fold crystallographic sites commonly occupied by Cu and Zn in disordered kesterite. Furthermore, the observed individual lines in the NMR spectrum suggest that the propensity of Cu and Zn atoms to be randomly distributed over the 2c and 2d crystallographic sites is lowered when lithium is partially substituted for copper. Additionally, the first-principles calculations provide insights into the arrangement of Li atoms as a function of the Cu/Zn disorder and its effect on the structural (lattice parameters) and optical properties of CZTS (band gap evolution). Those calculations agree with the experimental observations and account for the evolutions of the unit cell parameters as well as for the increase of band gap when the Li-content increases. The calculation of the formation enthalpy of point defect unambiguously indicates that Li modifies the Cu/Zn disorder in a manner similar to the change of Cu/Zn disorder induced by Ag alloying. Overall, it was found that Li alloying is a versatile way of tuning the optoelectronic properties of CZTS making it a good candidate as wide band gap materials for the top cells of tandem solar cells.

  7. Investigation of L-cystine assisted Cu3BiS 3 synthesis for energetically and environmentally improved integration as thin-film solar cell p-type semiconductor absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viezbicke, Brian D.

    Solar photovoltaic energy technology is increasingly implemented in response to continuously growing global energy needs. While legacy technology utilizing silicon has captured much of the market, thin-film solar modules are projected to rise particularly in the U.S. production sector. Current materials utilized in production and deployment encounter resource and environmental impact constraints. This research investigates the viably controllable synthesis of multi-crystalline copper bismuth sulfide for potential use as an absorber layer in thin-film solar cells and early investigation of thin-film growth parameters which may enable a cost-effective route to full scale production of epitaxial copper bismuth sulfide films. The first step of this investigation has entailed a novel route for the solvo-thermally grown Cu3BiS 3 films facilitated by L-cystine as a sulfur donating and complexing agent. In the characterization of the nanoparticulate product UV-VIS spectra were analyzed via the Tauc method of bandgap interpolation. The validity of the Tauc method in application to polycrystalline films has been investigated and proven to be robust for the material class. This justifies the bandgap assessment of the subject material and provides support for wider use of the method. With the synthesis method established, the reaction was transferred to a custom built continuous flow reactor to explore this process and help understand its capabilities and limits with respect to producing single layers for an eventual photovoltaic cell stack. Though the published work has established novel chemistry, the need to deposit and/or grow a functional p-type layer for further characterization and eventual device incorporation is key to the material evolution. First evidence of continuous flow micro-reactor deposition of Cu3BiS3 has been shown with an array of resulting microstructures. The grown microstructures are evaluated with relevance to prior synthesis laboratory procedure and

  8. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  9. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  10. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  11. Income generation for women with renewable energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, L.

    1996-10-01

    70% of the world`s poor are women. The poverty that is especially hard hitting for rural women throughout the world has many causes. The lack of access to education, credit and new technologies make it almost impossible for women to earn an income. Yet, when women earn an income, it not only improves their lives, but also improves the lives of their children and their communities. Solar energy technologies, along with access to credit, can help rural women improve the quality of their lives through income generating enterprises. The technologies discussed are solar cooking, solar food drying, solar blenders, and photovoltaics.

  12. Power efficiency for very high temperature solar thermal cavity receivers

    DOEpatents

    McDougal, Allan R.; Hale, Robert R.

    1984-01-01

    This invention is an improved solar energy cavity receiver for exposing materials and components to high temperatures. The receiver includes a housing having an internal reflective surface defining a cavity and having an inlet for admitting solar radiation thereto. A photothermal absorber is positioned in the cavity to receive radiation from the inlet. A reflective baffle is positioned between the absorber and the inlet to severely restrict the re-radiation of energy through the inlet. The front surface of the baffle defines a narrow annulus with the internal reflective surface of the housing. The front surface of the baffle is contoured to reflect incoming radiation onto the internal surface of the housing, from which it is reflected through the annulus and onto the front surface of the absorber. The back surface of the baffle intercepts infrared radiation from the front of the absorber. With this arrangement, a high percentage of the solar power input is retained in the cavity; thus, high internal temperatures are attained.

  13. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  14. Multispectral metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; McCrindle, I J H; Li, C; Cumming, D R S

    2014-03-01

    We present the simulation, implementation, and measurement of a multispectral metamaterial absorber (MSMMA) and show that we can realize a simple absorber structure that operates in the mid-IR and terahertz (THz) bands. By embedding an IR metamaterial absorber layer into a standard THz metamaterial absorber stack, a narrowband resonance is induced at a wavelength of 4.3 μm. This resonance is in addition to the THz metamaterial absorption resonance at 109 μm (2.75 THz). We demonstrate the inherent scalability and versatility of our MSMMA by describing a second device whereby the MM-induced IR absorption peak frequency is tuned by varying the IR absorber geometry. Such a MSMMA could be coupled with a suitable sensor and formed into a focal plane array, enabling multispectral imaging.

  15. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.

    1994-08-30

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

  16. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion effiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer.

  17. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  18. Electromagnetic power absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R. S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A structure is presented with a surface portion of dielectric material which passes electromagnetic radiation and with a portion below the surface which includes material that absorbs the radiation, the face of the structure being formed with numerous steep ridges. The steepness of the dielectric material results in a high proportion of the electromagnetic energy passing through the surface for absorption by the absorbing material under the surface. A backing of aluminum or other highly heat-conductive and reflective material lies under the face and has very steep protuberances supporting the absorbing and dielectric materials.

  19. OVI absorbers in SDSS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan

    with the ubiquitous Lya forest lines, and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber and the measured S/N of the spectrum by modelling typical Ly forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the 'incompleteness and S/N corrected' redshift number densities of O VI absorbers. We can place a secure lower limit for the contribution of O VI to the closure mass density at the redshifts probed here: O OV I (2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 1.9 × 10 - 8 h -1 . We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionisation fraction, [Special characters omitted.] , and adopting the Anders & Grevesse (1989) solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicty of the gas probed in our search : z(2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 3.6 × 10 -4 h , in good agreement with other studies. These results demonstrate that large spectroscopic datasets such as SDSS can play an important role in QSO absorption line studies, in spite of the relatively low resolution. Lastly, we have performed a stacking analysis whereby we shift individual spectra back to the rest-frame of the absorber candidate, and derive a mean absorption spectrum for various subsamples. Besides further validating the reality of the absorbers themselves, i.e. ruling out spurious interlopers and other misclassifications, we can use these stacked spectra for a variety of purposes. First of all, we can judge the effects of additional cut criteria like a minimal strength for associated CIV absorption, and hence produce cleaner and better defined subsamples, increasing the strength of future proposals for high-resolution studies. Secondly, the stack itself contains valuable information about the gas probed in our search. We have

  20. Income inequality and happiness.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Kesebir, Selin; Diener, Ed

    2011-09-01

    Using General Social Survey data from 1972 to 2008, we found that Americans were on average happier in the years with less national income inequality than in the years with more national income inequality. We further demonstrated that this inverse relation between income inequality and happiness was explained by perceived fairness and general trust. That is, Americans trusted other people less and perceived other people to be less fair in the years with more national income inequality than in the years with less national income inequality. The negative association between income inequality and happiness held for lower-income respondents, but not for higher-income respondents. Most important, we found that the negative link between income inequality and the happiness of lower-income respondents was explained not by lower household income, but by perceived unfairness and lack of trust.

  1. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  2. Income Affluence in Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brzezinski, Michal

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution of income affluence (richness) in Poland during 1998-2007. Using household survey data, the paper estimates several statistical indices of income affluence including income share of the top percentiles, population share of individuals receiving incomes higher than the richness line, and measures that take into…

  3. Thin-film infrared absorber structures for advanced thermal detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. D.; Pedder, D. J.

    1988-06-01

    Imaging thermal detector technology is a rapidly advancing field in which the current emphasis is towards the development of very large arrays of very small pyroelectric detector elements. For maximum responsivity, each of the thin pyroelectric elements in an array must be provided with a thermal absorber to convert incoming infrared radiation into heat. This paper describes one such absorber structure, comprising a thin metal film, impedance matched to free space, and a quarter-wave polymer film which offers an acceptably low thermal mass. The structure and properties of this thin-film absorber are compared with those of an electroplated platinum black absorber commonly used in thermal detectors. The theory of the absorber is presented and good agreement is shown between calculated and experimentally derived absorption spectra.

  4. Solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, W.G.

    The invention pertains to a flat plate collector that employs high performance thin films. The solar collector of this invention overcomes several problems in this field, such as excessive hardware, cost and reliability, and other prior art drawbacks outlined in the specification. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame. A thin film window is bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber of laminate construction is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. Absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  5. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  6. Shock absorber servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepler, Jack L. (Inventor); Hill, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A tool to assist in the servicing of a shock absorber wherein the shock absorber is constructed of a pair of aligned gas and liquid filled chambers. Each of the chambers is separated by a movable separator member. Maximum efficiency of the shock absorber is achieved in the locating of a precise volume of gas within the gas chamber and a precise volume of liquid within the liquid chamber. The servicing tool of this invention employs a rod which is to connect with the separator and by observation of the position of the rod with respect to the gauge body, the location of the separator is ascertained even though it is not directly observable.

  7. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  8. Preliminary results of fluid dynamic model calculation of convective motion induced by solar heating at the Venus cloud top level.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Imamura, Takeshi; Maejima, Yasumitsu; Sugiyama, Ko-ichiro

    The thick cloud layer of Venus reflects solar radiation effectively, resulting in a Bond albedo of 76% (Moroz et al., 1985). Most of the incoming solar flux is absorbed in the upper cloud layer at 60-70 km altitude. An unknown UV absorber is a major sink of the solar energy at the cloud top level. It produces about 40-60% of the total solar heating near the cloud tops, depending on its vertical structure (Crisp et al., 1986; Lee et al., in preparation). UV images of Venus show a clear difference in morphology between laminar flow shaped clouds on the morning side and convective-like cells on the afternoon side of the planet in the equatorial region (Titov et al., 2012). This difference is probably related to strong solar heating at the cloud tops at the sub-solar point, rather than the influence from deeper level convection in the low and middle cloud layers (Imamura et al., 2014). Also, small difference in cloud top structures may trigger horizontal convection at this altitude, because various cloud top structures can significantly alter the solar heating and thermal cooling rates at the cloud tops (Lee et al., in preparation). Performing radiative forcing calculations for various cloud top structures using a radiative transfer model (SHDOM), we investigate the effect of solar heating at the cloud tops on atmospheric dynamics. We use CReSS (Cloud Resolving Storm Simulator), and consider the altitude range from 35 km to 90 km, covering a full cloud deck.

  9. Shock Absorbing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    A lightweight, inexpensive shock-absorbing system, developed by Langley Research Center 20 years ago, is now in service as safety device for an automated railway at Duke University Medical Center. The transportation system travels at about 25 miles per hour, carrying patients, visitors, staff and cargo. At the end of each guideway of the system are "frangible," (breakable) tube "buffers." If a slowing car fails to make a complete stop at the terminal, it would bump and shatter the tubes, absorbing energy that might otherwise jolt the passengers or damage the vehicle.

  10. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  11. Shock Absorbing Helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a description of helmets used by football players that offer three times the shock-absorbing capacity of earlier types. An interior padding for the helmets, composed of Temper Foam, first used by NASA's Ames Research Center in the design of aircraft seats is described.

  12. Improved power efficiency for very-high-temperature solar-thermal-cavity receivers

    DOEpatents

    McDougal, A.R.; Hale, R.R.

    1982-04-14

    This invention is an improved solar energy cavity receiver for exposing materials and components to high temperatures. The receiver includes a housing having an internal reflective surface defining a cavity and having an inlet for admitting solar radiation thereto. A photothermal absorber is positiond in the cavity to receive radiation from the inlet. A reflective baffle is positioned between the absorber and the inlet to severely restrict the re-radiation of energy through the inlet. The front surface of the baffle defines a narrow annulus with the internal reflective surface of the housing. The front surface of the baffle is contoured to reflect incoming radiation onto the internal surface of the housing, from which it is reflected through the annulus and onto the front surface of the absorber. The back surface of the baffle intercepts radiation from the front of the absorber. With this arrangement, a high percentage of the solar power input is retained in the cavity; thus, high internal temperatues are attained.

  13. Sheltering Retirement Income.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, E. Lewis; Cash, L. Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Eligibility for an IRA has been severely changed by the Tax Reform Act of 1986. In 1987 educators who have a retirement plan administered by their employer will face new eligibility rules. For self-employment income, a Keogh plan is an excellent way to shelter income and provide retirement income. (MLW)

  14. Nanofluid optical property characterization: towards efficient direct absorption solar collectors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert A; Phelan, Patrick E; Otanicar, Todd P; Adrian, Ronald; Prasher, Ravi

    2011-03-15

    Suspensions of nanoparticles (i.e., particles with diameters < 100 nm) in liquids, termed nanofluids, show remarkable thermal and optical property changes from the base liquid at low particle loadings. Recent studies also indicate that selected nanofluids may improve the efficiency of direct absorption solar thermal collectors. To determine the effectiveness of nanofluids in solar applications, their ability to convert light energy to thermal energy must be known. That is, their absorption of the solar spectrum must be established. Accordingly, this study compares model predictions to spectroscopic measurements of extinction coefficients over wavelengths that are important for solar energy (0.25 to 2.5 μm). A simple addition of the base fluid and nanoparticle extinction coefficients is applied as an approximation of the effective nanofluid extinction coefficient. Comparisons with measured extinction coefficients reveal that the approximation works well with water-based nanofluids containing graphite nanoparticles but less well with metallic nanoparticles and/or oil-based fluids. For the materials used in this study, over 95% of incoming sunlight can be absorbed (in a nanofluid thickness ≥10 cm) with extremely low nanoparticle volume fractions - less than 1 × 10-5, or 10 parts per million. Thus, nanofluids could be used to absorb sunlight with a negligible amount of viscosity and/or density (read: pumping power) increase.

  15. Nanofluid optical property characterization: towards efficient direct absorption solar collectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Suspensions of nanoparticles (i.e., particles with diameters < 100 nm) in liquids, termed nanofluids, show remarkable thermal and optical property changes from the base liquid at low particle loadings. Recent studies also indicate that selected nanofluids may improve the efficiency of direct absorption solar thermal collectors. To determine the effectiveness of nanofluids in solar applications, their ability to convert light energy to thermal energy must be known. That is, their absorption of the solar spectrum must be established. Accordingly, this study compares model predictions to spectroscopic measurements of extinction coefficients over wavelengths that are important for solar energy (0.25 to 2.5 μm). A simple addition of the base fluid and nanoparticle extinction coefficients is applied as an approximation of the effective nanofluid extinction coefficient. Comparisons with measured extinction coefficients reveal that the approximation works well with water-based nanofluids containing graphite nanoparticles but less well with metallic nanoparticles and/or oil-based fluids. For the materials used in this study, over 95% of incoming sunlight can be absorbed (in a nanofluid thickness ≥10 cm) with extremely low nanoparticle volume fractions - less than 1 × 10-5, or 10 parts per million. Thus, nanofluids could be used to absorb sunlight with a negligible amount of viscosity and/or density (read: pumping power) increase. PMID:21711750

  16. The 3D heat flux density distribution on a novel parabolic trough wavy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demagh, Yassine; Kabar, Yassine; Bordja, Lyes; Noui, Samira

    2016-05-01

    The non-uniform concentrated solar flux distribution on the outer surface of the absorber pipe can lead to large circumferential gradient temperature and high concentrated temperature of the absorber pipe wall, which is one of the primary causes of parabolic trough solar receiver breakdown. In this study, a novel shape of the parabolic trough absorber pipe is proposed as a solution to well homogenize the solar flux distribution, as well as, the temperature in the absorber wall. The conventional straight absorber located along the focal line of the parabola is replaced by wavy one (invention patent by Y. Demagh [1]) for which the heat flux density distribution on the outer surface varies in both axial and azimuthal directions (3D) while it varies only in the azimuthal direction on the former (2D). As far as we know, there is not previous study which has used a longitudinally wavy pipe as an absorber into the parabolic trough collector unit.

  17. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  18. Apollo couch energy absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, C. J.; Drexel, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Load attenuators for the Apollo spacecraft crew couch and its potential applications are described. Energy absorption is achieved through friction and cyclic deformation of material. In one concept, energy absorption is accomplished by rolling a compressed ring of metal between two surfaces. In another concept, energy is absorbed by forcing a plastically deformed washer along a rod. Among the design problems that had to be solved were material selection, fatigue life, ring slippage, lubrication, and friction loading.

  19. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  20. Passive integral solar heat collector system

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman Jr., K. T.

    1985-04-30

    The present invention relates to an improved apparatus for collecting, absorbing, transferring, and storing solar heat energy, economically and passively, without pumps or electric power. The apparatus comprises a solar collector with a flat finned heat pipe absorber and an attached integral insulated storage tank with a double wall heat exchanger. The absorber, made of one or more slightly tilted gravity assisted heat pipes with flat absorber fins, absorbs and transfers solar heat by evaporation, vapor transport, and condensation to the slightly elevated heat storage tank. The one or more heat pipes turn on when the sun is shining and turn off automatically when the sun is not shining.

  1. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    SciTech Connect

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  2. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing

    PubMed Central

    Mattiucci, N.; Bloemer, M. J.; Aközbek, N.; D'Aguanno, G.

    2013-01-01

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others. PMID:24220284

  3. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  4. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  5. Solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, William G.

    1982-01-01

    The field of this invention is solar collectors, and more particularly, the invention pertains to a flat plate collector that employs high performance thin films. The solar collector of this invention overcomes several problems in this field, such as excessive hardware, cost and reliability, and other prior art drawbacks outlined in the specification. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame (14). A thin film window (42) is bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber (24) of laminate construction is comprised of two thin film layers (24a, 24b) that are sealed perimetrically. The layers (24a, 24b) define a fluid-tight planar envelope (24c) of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. Absorber (24) is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  6. High efficiency flat plate solar energy collector

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, R. F.

    1985-04-30

    A concentrating flat plate collector for the high efficiency collection of solar energy. Through an arrangement of reflector elements, incoming solar radiation, either directly or after reflection from the reflector elements, impinges upon both surfaces of a collector element.

  7. Volunteering, income and health

    PubMed Central

    Detollenaere, Jens; Willems, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Separate literatures have related volunteering to health gains and income gains. We study the association between volunteering, income and health within one statistical framework. A state-of-the-art mediation analysis is conducted on data concerning the health, volunteering and sociodemographic characteristics of 42926 individuals within 29 European countries. We find that volunteering is positively associated to self-rated health. This association is partially mediated by household income. PMID:28273163

  8. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  9. Acoustic metamaterial structures based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, P. Frank; Peng, Hao

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a new metamaterial beam based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers for broadband vibration absorption. The proposed metamaterial beam consists of a uniform isotropic beam and small two-mass spring-mass- damper subsystems at many locations along the beam to act as multi-frequency vibration absorbers. For an infinite metamaterial beam, governing equations of a unit cell are derived using the extended Hamilton principle. The existence of two stopbands is demonstrated using a model based on averaging material properties over a cell length and a model based on finite element modeling and the Bloch-Floquet theory for periodic structures. For a finite metamaterial beam, because these two idealized models cannot be used for finite beams and/or elastic waves having short wavelengths, a finite-element method is used for detailed modeling and analysis. The concepts of negative effective mass and effective stiffness and how the spring-mass-damper subsystem creates two stopbands are explained in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the actual working mechanism of the proposed metamaterial beam is based on the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers. For an incoming wave with a frequency in one of the two stopbands, the absorbers are excited to vibrate in their optical modes to create shear forces to straighten the beam and stop the wave propagation. For an incoming wave with a frequency outside of but between the two stopbands, it can be efficiently damped out by the damper with the second mass of each absorber. Hence, the two stopbands are connected into a wide stopband. Numerical examples validate the concept and show that the structure's boundary conditions do not have significant influence on the absorption of high-frequency waves. However, for absorption of low-frequency waves, the structure's boundary conditions and resonance frequencies and the location and spatial distribution of absorbers need to be considered in design, and it

  10. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  11. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  12. Ferroelectrics based absorbing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jianping; Sadaune, Véronique; Burgnies, Ludovic; Lippens, Didier

    2014-07-01

    We show that ferroelectrics-based periodic structure made of BaSrTiO3 (BST) cubes, arrayed onto a metal plate with a thin dielectric spacer film exhibit a dramatic enhancement of absorbance with value close to unity. The enhancement is found around the Mie magnetic resonance of the Ferroelectrics cubes with the backside metal layer stopping any transmitted waves. It also involves quasi-perfect impedance matching resulting in reflection suppression via simultaneous magnetic and electrical activities. In addition, it was shown numerically the existence of a periodicity optimum, which is explained from surface waves analysis along with trade-off between the resonance damping and the intrinsic loss of ferroelectrics cubes. An experimental verification in a hollow waveguide configuration with a good comparison with full-wave numerical modelling is at last reported by measuring the scattering parameters of single and dual BST cubes schemes pointing out coupling effects for densely packed structures.

  13. Dual broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ju; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-02-23

    We propose polarization-independent and dual-broadband metamaterial absorbers at microwave frequencies. This is a periodic meta-atom array consisting of metal-dielectric-multilayer truncated cones. We demonstrate not only one broadband absorption from the fundamental magnetic resonances but additional broadband absorption in high-frequency range using the third-harmonic resonance, by both simulation and experiment. In simulation, the absorption was over 90% in 3.93-6.05 GHz, and 11.64-14.55 GHz. The corresponding experimental absorption bands over 90% were 3.88-6.08 GHz, 9.95-10.46 GHz and 11.86-13.84 GHz, respectively. The origin of absorption bands was elucidated. Furthermore, it is independent of polarization angle owing to the multilayered circular structures. The design is scalable to smaller size for the infrared and the visible ranges.

  14. In situ codoping of a CuO absorber layer with aluminum and titanium: the impact of codoping and interface engineering on the performance of a CuO-based heterojunction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Radhakrishnan, K.; Ru, Tan Hui; Yi, Ren; Wong, Ten It; Dalapati, Goutam Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Aluminum-doped cupric oxide (CuO:Al) was prepared via an out-diffusion process of Al from an Al-coated substrate into the deposited CuO thin film upon thermal treatment. The effect of the annealing temperature on the structural and optical properties of CuO:Al was investigated in detail. The influence of Al incorporation on the photovoltaic properties was then investigated by preparing a p-CuO:Al/n-Si heterojunction solar cell. A significant improvement in the performance of the solar cell was achieved by controlling the out-diffusion of Al. A novel in situ method to co-dope CuO with Al and titanium (Ti) has been proposed to demonstrate CuO-based solar cells with the front surface field (FSF) design. The FSF design was created by depositing a CuO:Al layer followed by a Ti-doped CuO (CuO:Ti) layer. This is the first successful experimental demonstration of the codoping of a CuO thin film and CuO thin film solar cells with the FSF design. The open circuit voltage (V oc), short circuit current density (J sc) and fill factor (FF) of the fabricated solar cells were significantly higher for the FSF device compared to devices without FSF. The FF of this device improved by 68% through the FSF design and a record efficiency ɳ of 2% was achieved. The improvement of the solar cell properties is mainly attributed to the reduction of surface recombination, which influences the charge carrier collection.

  15. Income Elasticity Literature Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following advice from the SAB Council, when estimating the economic value of reductions in air pollution-related mortality and morbidity risk, EPA accounts for the effect of personal income on the willingness to pay to reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes. These income grow...

  16. Solar cell with back side contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Clews, Peggy J

    2013-12-24

    A III-V solar cell is described herein that includes all back side contacts. Additionally, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact compoud semiconductor layers of the solar cell other than the absorbing layer of the solar cell. That is, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact passivating layers of the solar cell.

  17. Method for making an aluminum or copper substrate panel for selective absorption of solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.; Krupnick, A. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A panel is described for selectively absorbing solar energy comprising an aluminum substrate. A zinc layer was covered by a layer of nickel and an outer layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide or a copper substrate with a nickel layer. A layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide distal from the copper substrate was included. A method for making these panels is disclosed.

  18. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  19. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  20. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  1. Intermixing at the absorber-buffer layer interface in thin-film solar cells: The electronic effects of point defects in Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 and Cu2ZnSn(Se,S)4 devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, J. B.; Lordi, V.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate point defects in the buffer layers CdS and ZnS that may arise from intermixing with Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGS) or Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTS) absorber layers in thin-film photovoltaics. Using hybrid functional calculations, we characterize the electrical and optical behavior of Cu, In, Ga, Se, Sn, Zn, Na, and K impurities in the buffer. We find that In and Ga substituted on the cation site act as shallow donors in CdS and tend to enhance the prevailing n-type conductivity at the interface facilitated by Cd incorporation in CIGS, whereas they are deep donors in ZnS and will be less effective dopants. Substitutional In and Ga can favorably form complexes with cation vacancies (A-centers) which may contribute to the "red kink" effect observed in some CIGS-based devices. For CZTS absorbers, we find that Zn and Sn defects substituting on the buffer cation site are electrically inactive in n-type buffers and will not supplement the donor doping at the interface as in CIGS/CdS or ZnS devices. Sn may also preferentially incorporate on the S site as a deep acceptor in n-type ZnS, which suggests possible concerns with absorber-related interfacial compensation in CZTS devices with ZnS-derived buffers. Cu, Na, and K impurities are found to all have the same qualitative behavior, most favorably acting as compensating acceptors when substituting on the cation site. Our results suggest one beneficial role of K and Na incorporation in CIGS or CZTS devices is the partial passivation of vacancy-related centers in CdS and ZnS buffers, rendering them less effective interfacial hole traps and recombination centers.

  2. Acoustic metamaterial panels based on multi frequency vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chao; Sun, Hongwei; Hu, Xiaolei; Gu, Jinliang

    2016-04-01

    Presented here is a new metamaterial panel based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers for broadband vibration absorption. The proposed metamaterial panel consists of a uniform isotropic panel and small two-mass spring-mass-damper subsystem many locations along the panel to act as multi-frequency vibration absorbers. The existence of two stopbands is demonstrated using a model based on averaging material properties over a cell length and a model based on finite element modeling and the Bloch-Floquet theory for periodic structures. For a finite metamaterial panel, because these two idealized models can not be used for finite panels and/or elastic waves having short wavelengths, a finite-element method is used for detailed modeling and analysis. The concepts of negative effective stiffness is explained in detail. For an incoming wave with a frequency in one of the two stopbands, the absorbers are excited to vibrate in their optical modes to create shear forces to straighten the panel and stop the wave propagation. For an incoming wave with a frequency outside of but between the two stopbands, it can be efficiently damped out by the damper with these mass of each absorber. Hence, the two stopbands are connected in to a wide stopband. Numerical examples validate the concept and show that the structures boundary conditions do not have significant influence on the absorption of high-frequency waves. However, for absorption of low-frequency waves, the structures boundary conditions and resonance frequencies and the location and spatial distribution of absorbers need to be considered in design, and it is better to use heavier masses for absorbers.

  3. Parabolic solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, W. L., IV; Goetchius, W.

    The further development of parabolic solar collectors to increase their efficiency and simplify their operation was the prime objective of this research project. Three primary objectives were pursued. The first of these was to investigate the simplest and most efficient techniques to build and mass-produce parabolic solar collectors. The second objective was to further develop and simplify absorber tubes used to collect and transfer the solar energy. Absorber tubes represented a significant area of this research project. The third objective was to develop accurate, low cost, and durable tracking systems for solar collectors. Solar tracking systems are covered including several schematic representations of various systems and designs. The testing systems and associated mechanisms for the designs discussed in this report are described.

  4. Black Liquid Solar Collector Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichman, F. L.; Austen, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the details of constructing, and use of, a solar collector. Uses a black liquid to absorb the energy, the thermosyphon effect to drive the liquid through the collector, and a floodlamp as a surrogate sun. (GA)

  5. Energy absorber for the CETA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy absorber that was developed for the CETA (Crew Equipment and Translation Aid) on Space Station Freedom is a metal on metal frictional type and has a load regulating feature that prevents excessive stroking loads from occurring while in operation. This paper highlights some of the design and operating aspects and the testing of this energy absorber.

  6. Improvement Of The Helmholtz Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Duane L.

    1992-01-01

    Helmholtz-resonator system improved to enable it to absorb sound at more than one frequency without appreciable loss of effectiveness at primary frequency. Addition of annular cavities enables absorption of sound at harmonic frequencies in addition to primary frequency. Improved absorber designed for use on structures of high transmission loss. Applied to such machines as fixed-speed engines and fans.

  7. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  8. Porphyrin Based Near Infrared-Absorbing Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiwen

    The conservation and transformation of energy is essential to the survival of mankind, and thus concerns every modern society. Solar energy, as an everlasting source of energy, holds one of the key solutions to some of the most urgent problems the world now faces, such as global warming and the oil crisis. Advances in technologies utilizing clean, abundant solar energy, could be the steering wheel of our societies. Solar cells, one of the major advances in converting solar energy into electricity, are now capturing people's interest all over the globe. While solar cells have been commercially available for many years, the manufacturing of solar cells is quite expensive, limiting their broad based implementation. The cost of solar cell based electricity is 15-50 cents per kilowatt hour (¢/kwh), depending on the type of solar cell, compared to 0.7 ¢/kwh for fossil fuel based electricity. Clearly, decreasing the cost of electricity from solar cells is critical for their wide spread deployment. This will require a decrease in the cost of light absorbing materials and material processing used in fabricating the cells. Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) utilize organic materials such as polymers and small molecules. These devices have the advantage of being flexible and lower cost than conventional solar cells built from inorganic semiconductors (e.g. silicon). The low cost of OPVs is tied to lower materials and fabrication costs of organic cells. However, the current power conversion efficiencies of OPVs are still below 15%, while convention crystalline Si cells have efficiencies of 20-25%. A key limitation in OPVs today is their inability to utilize the near infrared (NIR) portion of the solar spectrum. This part of the spectrum comprises nearly half of the energy in sunlight that could be used to make electricity. The first and foremost step in conversion solar energy conversion is the absorption of light, which nature has provided us optimal model of, which is

  9. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  10. Application of advanced methods for durability assessment of new absorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Ulrich; Brunold, Stefan; Koehl, Michael; Brucker, Franz; Carlsson, Bo; Moeller, K.

    1995-08-01

    Accelerated life testing of solar energy materials has been one of the main topics within the former Task X 'Solar Materials Research and Development' of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. In the case study of some selective solar absorber coating materials for domestic hot water systems procedures are presented for service time assessment, applicable for example to absorber coating materials. As a continuation of the finalized Task X a working group, 'Materials in Solar Thermal Systems' also in the framework of the International Energy Agency (IEA) 'Solar Heating and Cooling Programme' was initiated. One of the first projects is described here. Its aim is to investigate the conformity of the durability assessment, applied on solar absorber coatings tested by different laboratories. Each lab is working independently, this means there is no information exchange between the labs until the results are on paper. Test samples are delivered by the participants. Four different absorber coatings are identified to be useful for the project. The coating materials as well as the production procedures of the coatings are not relevant for the study, therefore no information is given. The experimental procedures as well as the judgement over the different absorber coatings are described in detail. Some comparisons between individual results of the different labs indicates possible weaknesses and further necessary refinements. Finally, expected costs for the whole procedure are presented.

  11. Exact analytic flux distributions for two-dimensional solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Fraidenraich, Naum; Henrique de Oliveira Pedrosa Filho, Manoel; Vilela, Olga C; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    A new approach for representing and evaluating the flux density distribution on the absorbers of two-dimensional imaging solar concentrators is presented. The formalism accommodates any realistic solar radiance and concentrator optical error distribution. The solutions obviate the need for raytracing, and are physically transparent. Examples illustrating the method's versatility are presented for parabolic trough mirrors with both planar and tubular absorbers, Fresnel reflectors with tubular absorbers, and V-trough mirrors with planar absorbers.

  12. Nonimaging secondary concentrators for large rim angle parabolic troughs with tubular absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Harald; Spirkl, Wolfgang

    1996-05-01

    For parabolic trough solar collectors with tubular absorbers, we design new tailored secondary concentrators. The design is applicable for any rim angle of a parabolic reflector. With the secondary, the concentration can be increased by a factor of more than 2 with a compact secondary reflector consisting of a single piece, even for the important case of a rim angle of 90 deg. The parabolic reflector can be used without changes; the reduced absorber is still tubular but smaller than the original absorber and slightly displaced toward the primary. concentrators, solar trough collectors, tailored reflectors.

  13. Solar pond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Shallow pools of liquid to collect low-temperature solar generated thermal energy are described. Narrow elongated trenches, grouped together over a wide area, are lined with a heat-absorbing black liner. The heat-absorbing liquid is kept separate from the thermal energy removing fluid by means such as clear polyethylene material. The covering for the pond may be a fluid or solid. If the covering is a fluid, fire fighting foam, continuously generated, or siloons are used to keep the surface covering clean and insulated. If the thermal energy removing fluid is a gas, a fluid insulation layer contained in a flat polyethlene tubing is used to cover the pond. The side of the tube directed towards the sun is treated to block out ultraviolet radiation and trap in infrared radiation.

  14. Optical analysis of CH3NH3SnxPb1–xI3 absorbers: a roadmap for perovskite-on-perovskite tandem solar cells† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ta04840d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Anaya, Miguel; Lozano, Gabriel; Saliba, Michael; Anguita, Pablo; Roose, Bart; Abate, Antonio; Steiner, Ullrich; Grätzel, Michael; Calvo, Mauricio E.; Hagfeldt, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Organic–inorganic perovskite structures in which lead is substituted by tin are exceptional candidates for broadband light absorption. Herein we present a thorough analysis of the optical properties of CH3NH3SnxPb1–xI3 films, providing the field with definitive insights about the possibilities of these materials for perovskite solar cells of superior efficiency. We report a user's guide based on the first set of optical constants obtained for a series of tin/lead perovskite films, which was only possible to measure due to the preparation of optical quality thin layers. According to the Shockley–Queisser theory, CH3NH3SnxPb1–xI3 compounds promise a substantial enhancement of both short circuit photocurrent and power conversion efficiency in single junction solar cells. Moreover, we propose a novel tandem architecture design in which both top and bottom cells are made of perovskite absorbers. Our calculations indicate that such perovskite-on-perovskite tandem devices could reach efficiencies over 35%. Our analysis serves to establish the first roadmap for this type of cells based on actual optical characterization data. We foresee that this study will encourage the research on novel near-infrared perovskite materials for photovoltaic applications, which may have implications in the rapidly emerging field of tandem devices. PMID:27774148

  15. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  16. An introduction to absorbent dressings.

    PubMed

    Jones, Menna Lloyd

    2014-12-01

    Exudate bathes the wound bed with a serous fluid that contains essential components that promote wound healing. However, excess exudate is often seen as a challenge for clinicians. Absorbent dressings are often used to aid in the management of exudate, with the aim of providing a moist but unmacerated environment. With so many different types of absorbent dressings available today-alongside making a holistic assessment-it is essential that clinicians also have the knowledge and skill to select the most appropriate absorbent dressing for a given patient.

  17. Self-Regulating Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical shock absorber keeps frictional damping force within tolerable limit. Its damping force does not increase with coefficient of friction between energy-absorbing components; rather, frictional damping force varies only slightly. Relatively insensitive to manufacturing variations and environmental conditions altering friction. Does not exhibit high breakaway friction and consequent sharp increase followed by sharp decrease in damping force at beginning of stroking. Damping force in absorber does not vary appreciably with speed of stroking. In addition, not vulnerable to leakage of hydraulic fluid.

  18. Toward a High-Efficient Utilization of Solar Radiation by Quad-Band Solar Spectral Splitting.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Huang, Yi; Tang, Lu; Sun, Tianyi; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Chen, Gang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2016-12-01

    The promising quad-band solar spectral splitter incorporates the properties of the optical filter and the spectrally selective solar thermal absorber can direct PV band to PV modules and absorb thermal band energy for thermal process with low thermal losses. It provides a new strategy for spectral splitting and offers potential ways for hybrid PVT system design.

  19. Income distribution impacts of climate change mitigation policy in the Susquehanna River Basin Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A

    2007-01-01

    We examine the cost-side income distribution impacts of a carbon tax in the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) Region of the United States utilizing a computable general equilibrium model. We find the aggregate impacts of a $25/ton carbon tax on the SRB economy are likely to be negative but modest-an approximately one-third of 1% reduction in Gross Regional Product (GRP) in the short-run and double that amount in the long-run. However, unlike many previous studies, we find that the carbon tax is mildly progressive as measured by income bracket changes, per capita equivalent variation, and Gini coefficient changes based on expenditure patterns. The dominant factors affecting the distributional impacts are the pattern of output, income and consumption impacts that affect lower income groups relatively less than higher income ones, an increase in transfer payments favoring lower income groups, and decreased corporate profits absorbed primarily by higher income groups.

  20. Income and Child Development

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Lawrence M.; Paxson, Christina; Waldfogel, Jane

    2010-01-01

    We examine how income is associated with the home environments and the cognitive and behavioral development of pre-school children, using data from a birth cohort study of children born at the end of the 20th century. Lower-income 3-year-old children are more likely than wealthier children to live in homes with inadequate physical environments and to have mothers who are more likely to be stressed, depressed, harsh and unresponsive. Additionally, low income children have lower PPVT scores, more mother-reported aggressive, withdrawn, and anxious behavior problems, and also more interviewer-reported problems with behavior, than more affluent children. A key policy question is whether increases in the incomes of poor families would result in improvements in children’s outcomes, at least in part through improvements in the home environment. This question is difficult to answer using observational data. However, we argue that, even under the most generous interpretation of the associations we estimate, large income transfer programs would have relatively small effects on children’s cognitive and behavioral outcomes. PMID:20368763

  1. Single-axle, double-axis solar tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W.; Lawson, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    Solar concentrator tracking mechanism consisting of angular axle and two synchronized drive motors, follows seasonal as well as diurnal changes in earth's orientation with respect to incoming sunlight.

  2. Spontaneous emission and absorber theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegg, David T.

    1997-01-01

    One of the long term interests of George Series was the construction of a theory of spontaneous emission which does not involve field quantisation. His approach was written in terms of atomic operators only and he drew a parallel with the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory of radiation. By making a particular extra postulate, he was able to obtain the correct spontaneous emission rate and the Lamb shift reasonably simply and directly. An examination of his approach indicates that this postulate is physically reasonable and the need for it arises because quantisation in his theory occurs after the response of the absorber has been accounted for by means of the radiative reaction field. We review briefly an alternative absorber theory approach to spontaneous emission based on the direct action between the emitting atom and a quantised absorber, and outline some applications to more recent effects of interest in quantum optics.

  3. Guided tissue regeneration. Absorbable barriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; MacNeil, R L

    1998-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, techniques aimed at regeneration of lost periodontal tissue have become widely used and accepted in clinical practice. Among these techniques are those which use the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), wherein barriers (i.e., membranes) are used to control cell and tissue repopulation of the periodontal wound. A variety of non-absorbable and absorbable barriers have been developed and used for this purpose, with a trend in recent years toward increased use of absorbable GTR materials. This article describes the evolution of absorbable barrier materials and overview materials available for clinical use today. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of these materials are discussed, as well as possible new developments in barrier-based GTR therapy.

  4. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  5. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  6. Solar energy collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector having an extended curved sawtooth-contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material, reflects solar energy to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus reflector primary. The primary reflector may be constructed by a process utilizing well known freeway paving machinery. The solar energy absorber is preferably a fluid transporting pipe. Efficient utilization leading to high temperatures from the reflected solar energy is obtained by cylindrical shaped secondary reflectors that direct off-angle energy to the absorber pipe. A seriatim arrangement of cylindrical secondary reflector stages and spot-forming reflector stages produces a high temperature solar energy collection system of greater efficiency.

  7. Preparation And Properties Of Black Zinc Selective Absorbers Formed By Reactive rf Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Michael G.; Figgures, Christopher C.; Childs, Geoffrey N.

    1989-03-01

    Black zinc selective solar absorber coatings with solar absorptance 0.94 and thermal emittance 0.21 have been prepared by the reactive rf sputtering of Zn targets in Ar-02 atmospheres. For these films the zinc to oxygen ratio is greater than one and the films are composed of both zinc and zinc oxide. The surface microstructure of the films considerably enhances the short wavelength absorptance properties. The coatings represent a possible low-cost selective absorber for flat plate and evacuated tube solar collector applications.

  8. A checkerboard selective absorber with excellent spectral selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Liu; Mo, Lei; Chen, Tuo; Forsberg, Erik; He, Sailing

    2015-11-14

    A selective absorber with excellent spectral selectivity is proposed and analyzed. The absorber is based on a germanium (Ge) checkerboard on top of a tantalum (Ta) substrate. At wavelengths shorter than the 1.2 μm cutoff, a very high absorption is achieved due to strong cavity resonances in the Ge nanosquares, and their interactions with adjacent nanocavities and the bottom Ta substrate. At longer wavelengths, absorption is greatly suppressed due to destructive interference between the transparent checkerboard layer and the highly reflective Ta substrate. To better describe the superior selectivity of our configuration, a new figure of merit (FOM) is introduced. We observe a FOM value of 0.88 compared to 0.69 for its planar counterpart. We also conduct a thermal analysis to verify the excellent selectivity of our absorber. A high temperature can be achieved and maintained, promising good potential for applications in solar thermophotovoltaic systems.

  9. Sea shell solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for the collection and concentration of solar radiant energy including a longitudinally extending structure having a wall for directing radiant energy. The wall is parabolic with its focus along a line parallel to an extreme ray of the sun at one solstice and with its axis along a line parallel to an extreme ray of the sun at the other solstice. An energy absorber is positioned to receive the solar energy thereby collected.

  10. Energy from solar balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Grena, Roberto

    2010-04-15

    Solar balloons are hot air balloons in which the air is heated directly by the sun, by means of a black absorber. The lift force of a tethered solar balloon can be used to produce energy by activating a generator during the ascending motion of the balloon. The hot air is then discharged when the balloon reaches a predefined maximum height. A preliminary study is presented, along with an efficiency estimation and some considerations on possible realistic configurations. (author)

  11. Fixture for assembling solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, P. A.; Fritz, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Vacuum fixture attaches array of silicon solar cells to mounting plate made of clear glass which holds and protects cells. Glass plate transmits, rather than absorbs, solar energy thus cooling cells for efficient operation. Device therefore reduces handling of cells and interconnecting conductors to one operation.

  12. Solar Energy - An Option for Future Energy Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Peter E.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the exponential growth of energy consumption and future consequences. Possible methods of converting solar energy to power such as direct energy conversion, focusing collectors, selective rediation absorbers, ocean thermal gradient, and space solar power are considered. (DF)

  13. Semiconductor Solar Superabsorbers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yiling; Huang, Lujun; Cao, Linyou

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the maximal enhancement of solar absorption in semiconductor materials by light trapping promises the development of affordable solar cells. However, the conventional Lambertian limit is only valid for idealized material systems with weak absorption, and cannot hold for the typical semiconductor materials used in solar cells due to the substantial absorption of these materials. Herein we theoretically demonstrate the maximal solar absorption enhancement for semiconductor materials and elucidate the general design principle for light trapping structures to approach the theoretical maximum. By following the principles, we design a practical light trapping structure that can enable an ultrathin layer of semiconductor materials, for instance, 10 nm thick a-Si, absorb > 90% sunlight above the bandgap. The design has active materials with one order of magnitude less volume than any of the existing solar light trapping designs in literature. This work points towards the development of ultimate solar light trapping techniques. PMID:24531211

  14. Schooling and Income Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Alan; Psacharopoulos, George

    1976-01-01

    Analyzes the relationship between years of schooling and income distribution, based on human capital theory. (Available from North-Holland Publishing Company, P.O. Box 211, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; $13.50 annually, plus $4.00 postage and handling) (JG)

  15. Annual Income Tax Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    An income tax guide is presented to aid families with certain aspects of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 that specifically affect disabled persons and their families. Among items covered are personal and standard deductions, the additional standard deduction, deduction for dependents, deductions for medical expenses, and tax credits. (Author/DB)

  16. Income Tax Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Darryl Lee

    2006-01-01

    Every year at this time millions of Americans scramble to file or extend their income tax returns. This article explores some of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) sections that might affect (or relate to) the taxation of parents of disabled or special healthcare needs children. Many of these tax provisions also apply to parents with adult children…

  17. The Middle Income Squeeze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Steve

    1978-01-01

    Complaints about a middle income family's hardships in sending their children to private colleges and universities are examined. The difficulty may be attributable to a progressive College Scholarship Service (CSS) taxation rate schedule that causes larger proportionate reductions in the standard of living for some families than others.…

  18. Solar air heaters and their applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    The solar air heater appears to be the most logical choice, as far as the ultimate application of heating air to maintain a comfortable environment is concerned. One disadvantage of solar air heaters is the need for handling larger volumes of air than liquids due to the low density of air as a working substance. Another disadvantage is the low thermal capacity of air. In cases where thermal storage is needed, water is superior to air. Design variations of solar air heaters are discussed along with the calculation of the efficiency of a flat plate solar air heater, the performance of various collector types, and the applications of solar air heaters. Attention is given to collectors with nonporous absorber plates, collectors with porous absorbers, the performance of flat plate collectors with finned absorbers, a wire mesh absorber, and an overlapped glass plate air heater.

  19. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  20. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  1. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  2. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  3. A new laboratory-scale experimental facility for detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Garcia, Fabrisio; Santiago, Sergio; Luque, Salvador; Romero, Manuel; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new modular laboratory-scale experimental facility that was designed to conduct detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers for use in concentrating solar power plants. Absorbers are generally considered to be the element with the highest potential for efficiency gains in solar thermal energy systems. The configu-ration of volumetric absorbers enables concentrated solar radiation to penetrate deep into their solid structure, where it is progressively absorbed, prior to being transferred by convection to a working fluid flowing through the structure. Current design trends towards higher absorber outlet temperatures have led to the use of complex intricate geometries in novel ceramic and metallic elements to maximize the temperature deep inside the structure (thus reducing thermal emission losses at the front surface and increasing efficiency). Although numerical models simulate the conjugate heat transfer mechanisms along volumetric absorbers, they lack, in many cases, the accuracy that is required for precise aerothermal validations. The present work aims to aid this objective by the design, development, commissioning and operation of a new experimental facility which consists of a 7 kWe (1.2 kWth) high flux solar simulator, a radiation homogenizer, inlet and outlet collector modules and a working section that can accommodate volumetric absorbers up to 80 mm × 80 mm in cross-sectional area. Experimental measurements conducted in the facility include absorber solid temperature distributions along its depth, inlet and outlet air temperatures, air mass flow rate and pressure drop, incident radiative heat flux, and overall thermal efficiency. In addition, two windows allow for the direct visualization of the front and rear absorber surfaces, thus enabling full-coverage surface temperature measurements by thermal imaging cameras. This paper presents the results from the aerothermal characterization of a siliconized silicon

  4. Low temperature selective absorber research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzenberg, S. A.; Silberglitt, R.

    1982-04-01

    Research carried out since 1979 on selective absorbers is surveyed, with particular attention given to the low-temperature coatings seen as promising for flat plate and evacuated tube applications. The most thoroughly investigated absorber is black chrome, which is highly selective and is the most durable low-temperature absorber. It is believed that other materials, because of their low cost and lower content of strategic materials, may eventually supplant black chrome. Among these candidates are chemically converted black nickel; anodically oxidized nickel, zinc, and copper composites; and nickel or other low-cost multilayer coatings. In reviewing medium and high-temperature research, black chrome, multilayer coatings and black cobalt are seen as best medium-temperature candidates. For high temperatures, an Al2O3/Pt-Al203 multilayer composite or the zirconium diboride coating is preferred.

  5. Photocatalysis: Plasmonic solar desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Li, Yat

    2016-06-01

    The sustainability of many existing desalination technologies is questionable. Plasmon-mediated solar desalination has now been demonstrated for the first time, using an aluminium structure that absorbs photons spanning the 200 nm to 2,500 nm wavelength range, and is both cheap and 'clean'.

  6. The HI Environment of Nearby Lyman-alpha Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanGorkom, J. H.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, John T.; Perlman, Eric S.; Shull, J. Michael

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of a VLA and WSRT search for H I emission from the vicinity of seven nearby clouds, which were observed in Ly-alpha absorption with HST toward Mrk 335, Mrk 501, and PKS 2155-304. Around the absorbers, we searched a volume of 4O' x 40' x 1000 km/s; for one of the absorbers we probed a velocity range of only 600 km/s. The H I mass sensitivity (5 sigma) very close to the lines of sight varies from 5 x 10(exp 6) solar mass at best to 5 x 10(exp 8) solar mass at worst. We detected H I emission in the vicinity of four out of seven absorbers. The closest galaxy we find to the absorbers is a small dwarf galaxy at a projected distance of 68 h(exp -1) kpc from the sight line toward Mrk 335. This optically uncataloged galaxy has the same velocity (V = 1970 km/s) as one of the absorbers, is fainter than the SMC, and has an H I mass of only 4 x 10(exp 7) solar mass. We found a somewhat more luminous galaxy at exactly the velocity (V = 5100 km/s) of one of the absorbers toward PKS 2155-304 at a projected distance of 230 h(exp -1) kpc from the sight line. Two other, stronger absorbers toward PKS 2155-304 at V approx. 17,000 km/s appear to be associated with a loose group of three bright spiral galaxies, at projected distances of 300 to 600 h(exp -1) kpc. These results support the conclusions emerging from optical searches that most nearby Ly-alpha forest clouds trace the large-scale structures outlined by the optically luminous galaxies, although this is still based on small-number statistics. We do not find any evidence from the H I distribution or kinematics that there is a physical association between an absorber and its closest galaxy. While the absorbing clouds are at the systemic velocity of the galaxies, the H I extent of the galaxies is fairly typical, and at least an order of magnitude smaller than the projected distance to the sight line at which the absorbers are seen. On the other hand, we also do not find evidence against such a connection. In

  7. Magnetically tunable metamaterial perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Feng, Ningyue; Wang, Qingmin; Hao, Yanan; Huang, Shanguo; Bi, Ke

    2016-06-01

    A magnetically tunable metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) based on ferromagnetic resonance is experimentally and numerically demonstrated. The ferrite-based MPA is composed of an array of ferrite rods and a metallic ground plane. Frequency dependent absorption of the ferrite-based MPA under a series of applied magnetic fields is discussed. An absorption peak induced by ferromagnetic resonance appears in the range of 8-12 GHz under a certain magnetic field. Both the simulated and experimental results demonstrate that the absorption frequency of the ferrite-based MPA can be tuned by the applied magnetic field. This work provides an effective way to fabricate the magnetically tunable metamaterial perfect absorber.

  8. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated.

  9. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  10. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  11. Coupling of Luminescent Solar Concentrators to Plasmonic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-Yi

    To make inexpensive solar cells is a continuous goal for solar photovoltaic (PV) energy industry. Thin film solar cells of various materials have been developed and continue to emerge in order to replace bulk silicon solar cells. A thin film solar cell not only uses less material but also requires a less expensive refinery process. In addition, other advantages coming along with small thickness are higher open circuit voltage and higher conversion efficiency. However, thin film solar cells, especially those made of silicon, have significant optical losses. In order to address this problem, this thesis investigates the spectral coupling of thin films PV to luminescent solar concentrators (LSC). LSC are passive devices, consisting of plastic sheets embedded with fluorescent dyes which absorb part of the incoming radiation spectrum and emit at specific wavelength. The emitted light is concentrated by total internal reflection to the edge of the sheet, where the PVs are placed. Since the light emitted from the LSC edge is usually in a narrow spectral range, it is possible to employ diverse strategies to enhance PV absorption at the peak of the emission wavelength. Employing plasmonic nanostructures has been shown to enhance absorption of thin films via forward scattering, diffraction and localized surface plasmon. These two strategies are theoretically investigated here for improving the absorption and elevating the output power of a thin film solar cell. First, the idea of spectral coupling of luminescent solar concentrators to plasmonic solar cells is introduced to assess its potential for increasing the power output. This study is carried out employing P3HT/PC60BM organic solar cells and LSC with Lumogen Red dyes. A simplified spectral coupling analysis is employed to predict the power density, considering the output spectrum of the LSC equivalent to the emission spectrum of the dye and neglecting any angular dependence. Plasmonic tuning is conducted to enhance

  12. Solar Thermal Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1982-11-01

    The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

  13. 20 CFR 627.450 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Definition of program income. (1) Program income means income received by the recipient or subrecipient that... for copyrighted material, patents, patent applications, trademarks, and inventions developed by...

  14. Solar energy, its conversion and utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    The work being carried out at the University of Florida Solar Energy and Energy Conversion Laboratory in converting solar energy, our only income, into other needed and useful forms of energy is described. A treatment such as this demonstrates, in proper perspective, how solar energy can benefit mankind with its many problems of shortages and pollution. Descriptions were given of the conversion processes, equipment, and performance. The testing of materials, solar water heating, space heating, cooking and baking, solar distillation, refrigeration and air-conditioning, work with the solar furnace, conversion to mechanical power, hot air engines, solar-heated sewage digestion, conversion to electricity, and other devices will be discussed.

  15. The Widening Income Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.

    2013-01-01

    Has the academic achievement gap between high-income and low-income students changed over the last few decades? If so, why? And what can schools do about it? Researcher Sean F. Reardon conducted a comprehensive analysis of research to answer these questions and came up with some striking findings. In this article, he shows that income-related…

  16. Launching Low-Income Entrepreneurs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laney, Kahliah

    2013-01-01

    With middle-income jobs in decline, entrepreneurship offers an increasingly promising pathway out of poverty; but few low-income New Yorkers are currently taking this route to economic self-sufficiency. This report provides the most comprehensive examination of low-income entrepreneurship in New York. The report documents current self-employment…

  17. Income and Well-Being: Relative Income and Absolute Income Weaken Negative Emotion, but Only Relative Income Improves Positive Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zonghuo; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Whether relative income or absolute income could affect subjective well-being has been a bone of contention for years. Life satisfaction and the relative frequency of positive and negative emotions are parts of subjective well-being. According to the prospect theory, hedonic adaptation helps to explain why positive emotion is often so hard to be maintained, and negative emotion wouldn’t be easy to be eliminated. So we expect the relationship between income and positive emotion is different from that between income and negative emotion. Given that regional reference is the main comparison mechanism, effects of regional average income on regional average subjective well-being should be potentially zero if only relative income matters. Using multilevel analysis, we tested the hypotheses with a dataset of 30,144 individuals from 162 counties in China. The results suggested that household income at the individual level is associated with life satisfaction, happiness and negative emotions. On the contrary, at a county level, household income is only associated with negative emotion. In other words, happiness and life satisfaction was only associated with relative income, but negative emotion was associated with relative income and absolute income. Without social comparison, income doesn’t improve happiness, but it could weaken negative emotion. Therefore, it is possible for economic growth to weaken negative emotion without improving happiness. These findings also contribute to the current debate about the “Esterling paradox.” PMID:28066312

  18. Income and Well-Being: Relative Income and Absolute Income Weaken Negative Emotion, but Only Relative Income Improves Positive Emotion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zonghuo; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Whether relative income or absolute income could affect subjective well-being has been a bone of contention for years. Life satisfaction and the relative frequency of positive and negative emotions are parts of subjective well-being. According to the prospect theory, hedonic adaptation helps to explain why positive emotion is often so hard to be maintained, and negative emotion wouldn't be easy to be eliminated. So we expect the relationship between income and positive emotion is different from that between income and negative emotion. Given that regional reference is the main comparison mechanism, effects of regional average income on regional average subjective well-being should be potentially zero if only relative income matters. Using multilevel analysis, we tested the hypotheses with a dataset of 30,144 individuals from 162 counties in China. The results suggested that household income at the individual level is associated with life satisfaction, happiness and negative emotions. On the contrary, at a county level, household income is only associated with negative emotion. In other words, happiness and life satisfaction was only associated with relative income, but negative emotion was associated with relative income and absolute income. Without social comparison, income doesn't improve happiness, but it could weaken negative emotion. Therefore, it is possible for economic growth to weaken negative emotion without improving happiness. These findings also contribute to the current debate about the "Esterling paradox."

  19. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  20. Luminescent solar concentrators and all-inorganic nanoparticle solar cells for solar energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholin, Veronica

    Increasing energy demand and the parallel increase of greenhouse gas emissions are challenging researchers to find new and cleaner energy sources. Solar energy harvesting is arguably the most promising candidate for replacing fossil-fuel power generation. Photovoltaics are the most direct way of collecting solar energy; cost continues to hinder large-scale implementation of photovoltaics, however. Therefore, alternative technologies that will allow the extraction of solar power, while maintaining the overall costs of fabrication, installation, collection, and distribution low, must be explored. This thesis focuses on the fabrication and testing of two types of devices that step up to this challenge: the luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) and all-inorganic nanoparticle solar cells. In these devices I make use of novel materials, semiconducting polymers and inorganic nanoparticles, both of which have lower costs than the crystalline materials used in the fabrication of traditional photovoltaics. Furthermore, the cost of manufacturing LSCs and the nanoparticle solar cells is lower than the manufacturing cost of traditional optics-based concentrators and crystalline solar cells. An LSC is essentially a slab of luminescent material that acts as a planar light pipe. The LSC absorbs incoming photons and channels fluoresced photons toward appropriately located solar cells, which perform the photovoltaic conversion. By covering large areas with relatively inexpensive fluorescing organic dyes or semiconducting polymers, the area of solar cell needed is greatly reduced. Because semiconducting polymers and quantum dots may have small absorption/emission band overlaps, tunable absorption, and longer lifetimes, they are good candidates for LSC fabrication, promising improvement with respect to laser dyes traditionally used to fabricate LSCs. Here the efficiency of LSCs consisting of liquid solutions of semiconducting polymers encased in glass was measured and compared to the

  1. Solar energy trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for trapping solar energy for heating a fluid that could be subsequently used in turbines and similar devices. The apparatus includes an elongated vertical light pipe having an open end through which the visible spectrum of electromagnetic radiation from the sun passes to strike a tubular absorber. The light pipe has a coated interior surface of a low absorptivity and a high reflectivity at the visible wavelengths and a high absorptivity/emissivity ratio at infrared wavelengths. The tubular absorber has a coating on the surface for absorbing visible wavelengths to heat the fluid passing through. Infrared wave lengths are radiated from the tubular absorber back into the light pipe for heating fluid passing through a tubular coil wound around it.

  2. Metamaterial Absorbers for Microwave Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    a) Depiction of metamaterial array of square resonators atop FR4. (b) Metamaterial dimensions and structure...comparison for varying resonator array dimension sizes. ..............23 Figure 12. Absorption derived from raw reflection data...36 x Figure 23. Metamaterial absorber array where resonator dimensions control the detection frequencies and

  3. Oil and fat absorbing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for forming a solid network polymer having a minimal amount of crosslinking for use in absorbing fats and oils. The polymer remains solid at a swelling ratio in oil or fat of at least ten and provides an oil absorption greater than 900 weight percent.

  4. Solar Hot Water Heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The solar panels pictured below, mounted on a Moscow, Idaho home, are part of a domestic hot water heating system capable of providing up to 100 percent of home or small business hot water needs. Produced by Lennox Industries Inc., Marshalltown, Iowa, the panels are commercial versions of a collector co-developed by NASA. In an effort to conserve energy, NASA has installed solar collectors at a number of its own facilities and is conducting research to develop the most efficient systems. Lewis Research Center teamed with Honeywell Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota to develop the flat plate collector shown. Key to the collector's efficiency is black chrome coating on the plate developed for use on spacecraft solar cells, the coating prevents sun heat from "reradiating," or escaping outward. The design proved the most effective heat absorber among 23 different types of collectors evaluated in a Lewis test program. The Lennox solar domestic hot water heating system has three main components: the array of collectors, a "solar module" (blue unit pictured) and a conventional water heater. A fluid-ethylene glycol and water-is circulated through the collectors to absorb solar heat. The fluid is then piped to a double-walled jacket around a water tank within the solar module.

  5. Thin film solar cells by selenization sulfurization using diethyl selenium as a selenium precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Kadam, Ankur A.

    2009-12-15

    A method of forming a CIGSS absorber layer includes the steps of providing a metal precursor, and selenizing the metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form a selenized metal precursor layer (CIGSS absorber layer). A high efficiency solar cell includes a CIGSS absorber layer formed by a process including selenizing a metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form the CIGSS absorber layer.

  6. Non-tracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, Henry

    1977-01-01

    A nontracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio is provided. The concentrator includes a plurality of energy absorbers which communicate with a main header by which absorbed heat is removed. Undesired heat flow of those absorbers not being heated by radiant energy at a particular instant is impeded, improving the efficiency of the concentrator.

  7. INCOME INCONGRUITY, RACE AND PRETERM BIRTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous research with vital records finds income incongruity associated with adverse birth outcomes. We examined the effects of negative income incongruity (reporting lower household income than the census tract median household income) on preterm birth (PTB <37 weeks completed ...

  8. INCOME INCONGRUITY, RACE AND PRETERM BIRTH (PTB)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous research using birth records has found income incongruity associated with adverse birth outcomes. The effects of negative income incongruity (reporting lower household income than the census tract median household income) on PTB (<37 weeks completed gestation) are examin...

  9. Solar collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. I.

    1984-08-01

    Solar dishes, photovoltaics, passive solar building and solar hot water systems, Trombe walls, hot air panels, hybrid solar heating systems, solar grain dryers, solar greenhouses, solar hot water worhshops, and solar workshops are discussed. These solar technologies are applied to residential situations.

  10. The Solar Constant: A Take Home Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, B. G.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes a method that uses energy from the sun, absorbed by aluminum discs, to melt ice, and allows the determination of the solar constant. The take-home equipment includes Styrofoam cups, a plastic syringe, and aluminum discs. (MLH)

  11. The Surprising Power of Solar Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA-funded researchers say a flurry of solar storms from March 8-10, 2012 dumped enough energy in Earth's upper atmosphere (our thermosphere absorbed 26 billion kWh of energy) to power every resid...

  12. Thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows in pasture.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Guilhermino, Magda Maria; de Morais, Débora Andréia E Façanha

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present paper was to assess a method for estimating the thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows (0.875 Holstein-0.125 Guzerath) on pasture. A field test was conducted with 472 crossbred dairy cows in three locations of a tropical region. The following environmental data were collected: air temperature, partial vapour pressure, wind speed, black globe temperature, ground surface temperature and solar radiation. Average total radiation absorbed by animals was calculated as R(abs) = 640.0 +/- 3.1 W .m(-2). Absorbed short-wave radiation (solar direct, diffuse and reflected) averaged 297.9 +/- 2.7 W m(-2); long wave (from the sky and from terrestrial surfaces) averaged 342.1 +/- 1.5 W m(-2). It was suggested that a new environmental measurement, the effective radiant heat load (ERHL), could be used to assess the effective mean radiant temperature (T*(mr)). Average T*(mr) was 101.4 +/- 1.2 degrees C, in contrast to the usual mean radiant temperature, T(mr) = 65.1 +/- 0.5 degrees C. Estimates of T*(mr) were considered as more reliable than those of T (mr) in evaluating the thermal environment in the open field, because T (mr) is almost totally associated only with long wave radiation.

  13. Digital Alloy Absorber for Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the spectral response range and improve the mobility of the photo-generated carriers (e.g. in an nBn photodetector), a digital alloy absorber may be employed by embedding one (or fraction thereof) to several monolayers of a semiconductor material (insert layers) periodically into a different host semiconductor material of the absorber layer. The semiconductor material of the insert layer and the host semiconductor materials may have lattice constants that are substantially mismatched. For example, this may performed by periodically embedding monolayers of InSb into an InAsSb host as the absorption region to extend the cutoff wavelength of InAsSb photodetectors, such as InAsSb based nBn devices. The described technique allows for simultaneous control of alloy composition and net strain, which are both key parameters for the photodetector operation.

  14. 24 CFR 570.504 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program income. 570.504 Section 570... income. (a) Recording program income. The receipt and expenditure of program income as defined in § 570... of program income received by recipients. (1) Program income received before grant closeout may...

  15. 24 CFR 5.611 - Adjusted income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjusted income. 5.611 Section 5... Serving Persons with Disabilities: Family Income and Family Payment; Occupancy Requirements for Section 8 Project-Based Assistance Family Income § 5.611 Adjusted income. Adjusted income means annual income...

  16. 7 CFR 277.10 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 277.10 Section 277.10 Agriculture... § 277.10 Program income. (a) Program income is gross income resulting from activities financed with program funds. Such earnings exclude interest income but include income from service fees, usage or...

  17. 24 CFR 5.611 - Adjusted income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjusted income. 5.611 Section 5... Serving Persons with Disabilities: Family Income and Family Payment; Occupancy Requirements for Section 8 Project-Based Assistance Family Income § 5.611 Adjusted income. Adjusted income means annual income...

  18. 24 CFR 570.504 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Program income. 570.504 Section 570... income. (a) Recording program income. The receipt and expenditure of program income as defined in § 570... of program income received by recipients. (1) Program income received before grant closeout may...

  19. 7 CFR 277.10 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program income. 277.10 Section 277.10 Agriculture... § 277.10 Program income. (a) Program income is gross income resulting from activities financed with program funds. Such earnings exclude interest income but include income from service fees, usage or...

  20. 43 CFR 12.65 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to State and Local Governments Post-Award Requirements § 12.65 Program income. (a) General. Grantees... interest earned on any of them. (b) Definition of program income. Program income means gross income... program income. Program income shall be deducted from outlays which may be both Federal and non-Federal...

  1. Solar energy collector

    SciTech Connect

    Kellberg, H.; Wilder, A.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a solar energy collector structure comprising: a plurality of partially evacuated tublar members substantially transparent to incident solar radiation, said tubular members having opposed lateral ends being arranged in a first and second group and lying adjacent one another in parallel axial alignment, means for joining each tubular member next to each adjacent tubular member of the group to form a first and second respective tube sheet structure; said tube sheets arranged adjacent each other in tendem to form at least one flow channel therebetween in a self-supporting structure; an absorber member disposed within said flow channel for intercepting and absorbing solar energy; and an insulating film having deposited theron a radiation reflecting substance located behind said absorber member disposed over and conforming closely to a surface of said second tube sheet for forming an insulating space between the insulating film and the second tube sheet to thereby suppress radiation, conduction and convection from said absorber in a direction out of the interior of the flow channel.

  2. A nanophotonic solar thermophotovoltaic device.

    PubMed

    Lenert, Andrej; Bierman, David M; Nam, Youngsuk; Chan, Walker R; Celanović, Ivan; Soljačić, Marin; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-02-01

    The most common approaches to generating power from sunlight are either photovoltaic, in which sunlight directly excites electron-hole pairs in a semiconductor, or solar-thermal, in which sunlight drives a mechanical heat engine. Photovoltaic power generation is intermittent and typically only exploits a portion of the solar spectrum efficiently, whereas the intrinsic irreversibilities of small heat engines make the solar-thermal approach best suited for utility-scale power plants. There is, therefore, an increasing need for hybrid technologies for solar power generation. By converting sunlight into thermal emission tuned to energies directly above the photovoltaic bandgap using a hot absorber-emitter, solar thermophotovoltaics promise to leverage the benefits of both approaches: high efficiency, by harnessing the entire solar spectrum; scalability and compactness, because of their solid-state nature; and dispatchablility, owing to the ability to store energy using thermal or chemical means. However, efficient collection of sunlight in the absorber and spectral control in the emitter are particularly challenging at high operating temperatures. This drawback has limited previous experimental demonstrations of this approach to conversion efficiencies around or below 1% (refs 9, 10, 11). Here, we report on a full solar thermophotovoltaic device, which, thanks to the nanophotonic properties of the absorber-emitter surface, reaches experimental efficiencies of 3.2%. The device integrates a multiwalled carbon nanotube absorber and a one-dimensional Si/SiO2 photonic-crystal emitter on the same substrate, with the absorber-emitter areas optimized to tune the energy balance of the device. Our device is planar and compact and could become a viable option for high-performance solar thermophotovoltaic energy conversion.

  3. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  4. Income, education, and fertility.

    PubMed

    1978-01-01

    A study based on data from the National Impact Survey (1968-69) delineates the impact of family planning programs on the demography of Pakistan. Son preference was found to be a strong factor in deciding the desire for an additional child. Raising the status of women would decrease the fertility rate. In the rural areas higher income had a positive effect on fertility; in the urban areas it had a negative effect. Policies explicitly directed at actual distribution of income would have a positive effect. The educational level of the family, especially the wife, was related to lower family size. Families with at least one child in school had a lower completed family size. Couples who married later in life did not tend to have smaller families but smaller intervals between births. Rural nuclear families have more children than non-nuclear families or kinship groups, presumably because they need children for labor and old age security. Incentives and disincentives to motivate couples to limit family size should be offered by the Pakistan government.

  5. Why Income Comparison is Rational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2010-01-01

    A major factor affecting a person s happiness is the gap between their income and their neighbors , independent of their own income. This effect is strongest when the neighbor has moderately higher income. In addition a person s lifetime happiness often follows a "U" shape. Previous models have explained subsets of these phenomena, typically assuming the person has limited ability to assess their own (hedonic) utility. Here I present a model that explains all the phenomena, without such assumptions. In this model greater income of your neighbor is statistical data that, if carefully analyzed, would recommend that you explore for a new income-generating strategy. This explains unhappiness that your neighbor has greater income, as an emotional "prod" that induces you to explore, in accord with careful statistical analysis. It explains the "U" shape of happiness similarly. Another benefit of this model is that it makes many falsifiable predictions.

  6. The most metal-rich intervening quasar absorber known

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péroux, C.; Kulkarni, V. P.; Meiring, J.; Ferlet, R.; Khare, P.; Lauroesch, J. T.; Vladilo, G.; York, D. G.

    2006-04-01

    The metallicity in portions of high-redshift galaxies has been successfully measured thanks to the gas observed in absorption in the spectra of quasars, in the Damped Lyman-α systems (DLAs). Surprisingly, the global mean metallicity derived from DLAs is about 1/10th solar at 0⪉ z ⪉4 leading to the so-called "missing-metals problem". In this paper, we present high-resolution observations of a sub-DLA system at z_abs = 0.716 with super-solar metallicity toward SDSS J1323-0021. This is the highest metallicity intervening high-H i quasar absorber currently known, and is only the second super-solar such absorber known to date. We provide a detailed study of this unique object from VLT/UVES spectroscopy. We derive [Zn/H] = +0.61, [Fe/H]=-0.51, [Cr/H] = < -0.53, [Mn/H] = -0.37, and [Ti/H] = -0.61. Observations and photoionisation models using the CLOUDY software confirm that the gas in this sub-DLA is predominantly neutral and that the abundance pattern is probably significantly different from a Solar pattern. Fe/Zn and Ti/Zn vary among the main velocity components by factors of ˜ 3 and ˜ 35, respectively, indicating non-uniform dust depletion. Mn/Fe is super-solar in almost all components, and varies by a factor of ˜ 3 among the dominant components. It would be interesting to observe more sub-DLA systems and determine whether they might contribute significantly toward the cosmic budget of metals.

  7. Shock absorber operates over wide range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creasy, W. K.; Jones, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Piston-type hydraulic shock absorber, with a metered damping system, operates over a wide range of kinetic energy loading rates. It is used for absorbing shock and vibration on mounted machinery and heavy earth-moving equipment.

  8. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... absorber is a device made of paper or cotton intended to absorb moisture from the oral cavity during dental... manufacturing practice requirements of the quality system regulation in part 820 of this chapter, with...

  9. Solar absorption in thick and multilayered glazings

    SciTech Connect

    Powles, Rebecca; Curcija, Dragan; Kohler, Christian

    2002-02-01

    Thick and multilayered glazings generally have a nonuniform distribution of absorbed solar radiation which is not taken into account by current methods for calculating the center of glass solar gain and thermal performance of glazing systems. This paper presents a more accurate method for calculating the distribution of absorbed solar radiation inside thick and multilayered glazings and demonstrates that this can result in a small but significant difference in steady-state temperature profile and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient for some types of glazing systems when compared to the results of current methods. This indicates that a more detailed approach to calculating the distribution of absorbed solar radiation inside glazings and resulting thermal performance may be justified for certain applications.

  10. The solar irradiance registered at a flat- hemispherical field of view- bolometric oscillation sensor on board PICARD satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Karatekin, Ozgur; van Ruymbeke, Michel; Dewitte, Steven; Thuillier, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    The value of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) is varying over the 11-year sunspot cycle. The cycle amplitude is about 0.1% solar constant, which could be traced with the absolute radiometers onboard dedicated space missions. The operating principle of the absolute radiometer is measuring the electrical heating power of the heat sensing unit during the closed and opened phase of each measurement cycle. The difference between the power integrated cross the closed phase and the power integrated cross the open phase gives the value of the solar irradiance. The cadence of the measurement is usually from one to several minutes. The final TSI value in physics unit is obtained after taking into account the electronic calibration, correction of the instruments effects, and normalizing to 1 AU. The Bolometric Oscillation Sensor on board PICARD microsatellite is a new designed remote sensing instrument. The BOS is operated continually with a 10 seconds cadence to fill the time gaps between open and close phases of the SOVAP absolute radiometer. The BOS has two sensing surfaces, the main one with a light mass is black coated, the second surface is white painted with a heavier mass. The sensor has a hemispherical field of view. The heat flux absorbed by the main detector is thermally conducted by a thin shunt to the heat sink. The principle of the measurements is that the sum of the power of the blacked coated surface and the power along the shunt is equal to the incoming electromagnetic radiation. However as the BOS has a HFOV, the incoming radiation caught by it, has three kinds of origin: the solar irradiance, the reflected solar visible light form the Earth and the terrestrial infrared radiation. In this work, we are going to discuss the solar irradiance isolated from the measurements of the BOS instrument as well as the comparison with the sunspot number and the TSI composite from the VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE experiments.

  11. Improving the laboratory monitoring of absorbent oil

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Shved; S.S. Sychev; I.V. Safina; S.A. Klykov

    2009-05-15

    The performance of absorbent coal tar oil is analyzed as a function of the constituent and group composition. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the oil that ensures the required absorbent properties is determined. Operative monitoring may be based on absorbent characteristics that permit regulation of the beginning and end of regeneration.

  12. Light-absorbing impurities in Arctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, S. J.; Warren, S. G.; Grenfell, T. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Brandt, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Absorption of radiation by ice is extremely weak at visible and near-ultraviolet wavelengths, so small amounts of light-absorbing impurities in snow can dominate the absorption of solar radiation at these wavelengths, reducing the albedo relative to that of pure snow, contributing to the surface energy budget and leading to earlier snowmelt. In this study Arctic snow is surveyed for its content of light-absorbing impurities, expanding and updating the 1983-1984 survey of Clarke and Noone. Samples were collected in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Svalbard, Norway, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean during 1998 and 2005-2009, on tundra, glaciers, ice caps, sea ice, frozen lakes, and in boreal forests. Snow was collected mostly in spring, when the entire winter snowpack is accessible for sampling. Sampling was carried out in summer on the Greenland Ice Sheet and on the Arctic Ocean, of melting glacier snow and sea ice as well as cold snow. About 1200 snow samples have been analyzed for this study. The snow is melted and filtered; the filters are analyzed in a specially designed spectrophotometer system to infer the concentration of black carbon (BC), the fraction of absorption due to non-BC light-absorbing constituents and the absorption Ångstrom exponent of all particles. This is done using BC calibration standards having a mass absorption efficiency of 6.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm and by making an assumption that the absorption Angstrom exponent for BC is 1.0 and for non-BC light-absorbing aerosol is 5.0. The reduction of snow albedo is primarily due to BC, but other impurities, principally brown (organic) carbon, are typically responsible for ~40% of the visible and ultraviolet absorption. The meltwater from selected snow samples was saved for chemical analysis to identify sources of the impurities. Median BC amounts in surface snow are as follows (nanograms of carbon per gram of snow): Greenland 3, Arctic Ocean snow 7, melting sea ice 8, Arctic Canada 8, subarctic Canada 14

  13. Aluminium or copper substrate panel for selective absorption of solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.; Krupnick, A. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method for making panels which selectively absorb solar energy is disclosed. The panels are comprised of an aluminum substrate, a layer of zinc thereon, a layer of nickel over the zinc layer and an outer layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide or a copper substrate with a layer of nickel thereon and a layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide distal from the copper substrate.

  14. Immersible solar heater for fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1995-01-01

    An immersible solar heater comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

  15. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  16. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  17. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  18. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  19. Carbon dioxide absorbents for rebreather diving.

    PubMed

    Pennefather, John

    2016-09-01

    Firstly I would like to thank SPUMS members for making me a Life Member of SPUMS; I was surprised and greatly honoured by the award. I also want to confirm and expand on the findings on carbon dioxide absorbents reported by David Harvey et al. For about 35 years, I was the main player in deciding which absorbent went into Australian Navy and Army diving sets. On several occasions, suppliers of absorbents to the anaesthesia market tried to supply the Australian military market. On no occasion did they provide absorbent that came close to the minimum absorbent capacity required, generally being 30-40% less efficient than diving-grade absorbents. Because I regard lives as being more important than any likely dollar saving, the best absorbent was always selected unless two suppliers provided samples with the same absorbent capacity. On almost every occasion, there was a clear winner and cost was never considered. I suggest the same argument for the best absorbent should be used by members and their friends who dive using rebreather sets. I make this point because of my findings on a set that was brought to me after the death of its owner. The absorbent was not the type or grain size recommended by the manufacturer of the set and did not resemble any of the diving grade absorbents I knew of. I suspected by its appearance that it was anaesthetic grade absorbent. When I tested the set, the absorbent system failed very quickly so it is likely that carbon dioxide toxicity contributed to his death. The death was not the subject of an inquest and I have no knowledge of how the man obtained the absorbent. Possibly there was someone from an operating theatre staff who unintentionally caused their friend's death by supplying him with 'borrowed absorbent'. I make this point as I would like to discourage members from making a similar error.

  20. Dust in the Milky Way absorbs and scatters starlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    1.25, 2.2, and 3.5 Aum Solar elongation angle = 90 degree Maps. Galactic coordinate Mollweide projection maps of the entire sky as seen by the DIRBE at a fixed angle relative to the Sun. Stars concentrated in the Galactic plane (horizontal feature) dominate the images at these wavelengths. Dust in the Milky Way absorbs and scatters starlight, producing the dark band that runs through the Galactic center in the 1.25 Aum image; this 'extinction' effect diminishes with increasing wavelength.

  1. A polarization-independent broadband terahertz absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cheng; Zang, XiaoFei E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn; Wang, YiQiao; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn

    2014-07-21

    A highly efficient broadband terahertz absorber is designed, fabricated, and experimentally as well as theoretically evaluated. The absorber comprises a heavily doped silicon substrate and a well-designed two-dimensional grating. Due to the destructive interference of waves and diffraction, the absorber can achieve over 95% absorption in a broad frequency range from 1 to 2 THz and for angles of incidence from 0° to 60°. Such a terahertz absorber is also polarization-independent due to its symmetrical structure. This omnidirectional and broadband absorber have potential applications in anti-reflection coatings, imaging systems, and so on.

  2. Solar thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Toberer, Eric S.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Warren, Emily L.

    2016-05-03

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from concentrated sunlight. A novel detailed balance model for STEGs is provided and applied to both state-of-the-art and idealized materials. STEGs can produce electricity by using sunlight to heat one side of a thermoelectric generator. While concentrated sunlight can be used to achieve extremely high temperatures (and thus improved generator efficiency), the solar absorber also emits a significant amount of black body radiation. This emitted light is the dominant loss mechanism in these generators. In this invention, we propose a solution to this problem that eliminates virtually all of the emitted black body radiation. This enables solar thermoelectric generators to operate at higher efficiency and achieve said efficient with lower levels of optical concentration. The solution is suitable for both single and dual axis solar thermoelectric generators.

  3. Broadband Polarization-Independent Perfect Absorber Using a Phase-Change Metamaterial at Visible Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chen-wei; Simpson, Robert E.; Zhang, Lei; Cryan, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber with wide-angle near unity absorbance in the visible regime. Our structure is composed of an array of thin Au squares separated from a continuous Au film by a phase change material (Ge2Sb2Te5) layer. It shows that the near perfect absorbance is flat and broad over a wide-angle incidence up to 80° for either transverse electric or magnetic polarization due to a high imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of Ge2Sb2Te5. The electric field, magnetic field and current distributions in the absorber are investigated to explain the physical origin of the absorbance. Moreover, we carried out numerical simulations to investigate the temporal variation of temperature in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer and to show that the temperature of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 can be raised from room temperature to > 433 K (amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition temperature) in just 0.37 ns with a low light intensity of 95 nW/μm2, owing to the enhanced broadband light absorbance through strong plasmonic resonances in the absorber. The proposed phase-change metamaterial provides a simple way to realize a broadband perfect absorber in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions and is important for a number of applications including thermally controlled photonic devices, solar energy conversion and optical data storage. PMID:24492415

  4. Broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber using a phase-change metamaterial at visible frequencies.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chen-wei; Simpson, Robert E; Zhang, Lei; Cryan, Martin J

    2014-02-04

    We report a broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber with wide-angle near unity absorbance in the visible regime. Our structure is composed of an array of thin Au squares separated from a continuous Au film by a phase change material (Ge2Sb2Te5) layer. It shows that the near perfect absorbance is flat and broad over a wide-angle incidence up to 80° for either transverse electric or magnetic polarization due to a high imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of Ge2Sb2Te5. The electric field, magnetic field and current distributions in the absorber are investigated to explain the physical origin of the absorbance. Moreover, we carried out numerical simulations to investigate the temporal variation of temperature in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer and to show that the temperature of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 can be raised from room temperature to > 433 K (amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition temperature) in just 0.37 ns with a low light intensity of 95 nW/μm(2), owing to the enhanced broadband light absorbance through strong plasmonic resonances in the absorber. The proposed phase-change metamaterial provides a simple way to realize a broadband perfect absorber in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions and is important for a number of applications including thermally controlled photonic devices, solar energy conversion and optical data storage.

  5. End-side-pumped Nd:YAG solar laser with four Fresnel lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinhas, B.; Liang, D.

    2013-11-01

    Solar-pumped solid-state lasers are promising for renewable extreme-temperature material processing and space power applications. An efficient Fresnel lens solar laser pumping approach is proposed here. The incoming solar power is firstly collected and concentrated by four 800 mm x 800 mm square Fresnel lenses and redirected by four plane mirrors to a central focal spot of 12 mm FWHM diameter, attaining 443 W concentrated solar power. Secondly for further concentration, both a set of four aspherical lenses and a fused silica sphere are positioned in the focal zone. Both side-pumping and end-pumping are achieved simultaneously for a 7 mm diameter by 12 mm length Nd:YAG single-crystal rod mounted within the sphere. Since there is no strong pump radiation absorption within the central core zone of the rod, thermal lensing effect is also minimized with the proposed scheme. A 600 mm length plane-plane resonant cavity is used to extract 1064 nm laser emission efficiently. Optimum pumping parameters and solar laser output powers are found through ZEMAX non-sequential ray-tracing and LASCAD laser cavity analysis. By taking into account 16 % of spectrum overlap between the 1.0 % Nd:YAG absorption spectrum and the solar spectrum, 183 W absorbed solar power is assumed in ZEMAX numerical analysis. Considering a round trip loss of 1.32 % for the resonant cavity, 45.2 W laser power is numerically attained through LASCAD software, corresponding to 17.7 W/m2 collection efficiency. The proposed pumping scheme presents an excellent compromise between the laser output power and its beam quality.

  6. Carbon nanohorns-based nanofluids as direct sunlight absorbers.

    PubMed

    Sani, E; Barison, S; Pagura, C; Mercatelli, L; Sansoni, P; Fontani, D; Jafrancesco, D; Francini, F

    2010-03-01

    The optimization of the poor heat transfer characteristics of fluids conventionally employed in solar devices are at present one of the main topics for system efficiency and compactness. In the present work we investigated the optical and thermal properties of nanofluids consisting in aqueous suspensions of single wall carbon nanohorns. The characteristics of these nanofluids were evaluated in view of their use as sunlight absorber fluids in a solar device. The observed nanoparticle-induced differences in optical properties appeared promising, leading to a considerably higher sunlight absorption. We found that the thermal conductivity of the nanofluids was higher than pure water. Both these effects, together with the possible chemical functionalization of carbon nanohorns, make this new kind of nanofluids very interesting for increasing the overall efficiency of the sunlight exploiting device.

  7. Solar thermal collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranovitch, E.

    Thermal processes in solar flat plate collectors are described and evaluated analytically, and numerical models are presented for evaluating the performance of various designs. A flat plate collector consists of a black absorber plate which transfers absorbed heat to a fluid, a cover which limits thermal losses, and insulation to prevent backlosses. Calculated efficiencies for the collectors depend on the radiation absorbed, as well as IR losses due to natural convection, conduction, and radiation out of the collector. Formulations for the global emittance and heat transfer, as well as losses and their dependence on the Nusselt number and Grashof number are defined. Consideration is given to radiation transmission through transparent covers and Fresnel reflections at interfaces in the cover material. Finally, the performance coefficients for double-glazed and selective surface flat plate collectors are examined.

  8. Central solar energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Drost, M. Kevin

    1983-01-01

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  9. A solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvat, Pavel; Ostry, Milan; Mauder, Tomas; Klimes, Lubomir

    2012-04-01

    Simulations of the behaviour of a solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage were performed. The model of the collector was created with the use of coupling between TRNSYS 17 and MATLAB. Latent heat storage (Phase Change Material - PCM) was integrated with the solar absorber. The model of the latent heat storage absorber was created in MATLAB and the model of the solar air collector itself was created in TRNSYS with the use of TYPE 56. The model of the latent heat storage absorber allows specification of the PCM properties as well as other parameters. The simulated air collector was the front and back pass collector with the absorber in the middle of the air cavity. Two variants were considered for comparison; the light-weight absorber made of sheet metal and the heat-storage absorber with the PCM. Simulations were performed for the climatic conditions of the Czech Republic (using TMY weather data).

  10. 34 CFR 80.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... total allowable costs to determine the net allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current... income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income... the final financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by...

  11. 45 CFR 1183.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes otherwise. Program income....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs... award reflected in the final financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized...

  12. 49 CFR 18.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... total allowable costs to determine the net allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current... income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income... the final financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by...

  13. 7 CFR 3016.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... costs to determine the net allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current costs unless the... are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for...) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by Federal regulations or the grant agreement,...

  14. 36 CFR 1207.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... costs to determine the net allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current costs unless the... are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for...) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by Federal regulations or the grant agreement,...

  15. 21 CFR 1403.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes otherwise. Program income....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs... award reflected in the final financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized...

  16. 10 CFR 600.225 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes otherwise. Program income....225 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs... award reflected in the final financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized...

  17. 45 CFR 1157.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes otherwise. Program income which the grantee did not... income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income... the final financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by...

  18. 44 CFR 13.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes.... Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees... financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by Federal regulations or the...

  19. 45 CFR 1174.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes otherwise. Program income....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs... award reflected in the final financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized...

  20. 22 CFR 135.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... total allowable costs to determine the net allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current... income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income... the final financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by...

  1. 24 CFR 85.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes.... Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees... financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by Federal regulations or the...

  2. 32 CFR 33.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes... encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services...) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by Federal regulations or the grant agreement,...

  3. 29 CFR 97.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes.... Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees... financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by Federal regulations or the...

  4. 20 CFR 437.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program income. 437.25 Section 437.25....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real...

  5. 13 CFR 143.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program income. 143.25 Section 143... Administration § 143.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of...

  6. 44 CFR 13.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program income. 13.25 Section... LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 13.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from...

  7. 45 CFR 602.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program income. 602.25 Section 602.25 Public... Requirements § 602.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of...

  8. 24 CFR 85.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program income. 85.25 Section 85.25... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from...

  9. 40 CFR 31.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program income. 31.25 Section 31.25... Requirements Financial Administration § 31.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from...

  10. 32 CFR 33.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program income. 33.25 Section 33.25 National... Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 33.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for...

  11. 42 CFR 435.831 - Income eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Income eligibility. 435.831 Section 435.831 Public... Needy Medically Needy Income Eligibility § 435.831 Income eligibility. The agency must determine income... must use budget periods of not more than 6 months to compute income. The agency may use more than...

  12. 42 CFR 435.831 - Income eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Income eligibility. 435.831 Section 435.831 Public... Needy Medically Needy Income Eligibility § 435.831 Income eligibility. The agency must determine income... must use budget periods of not more than 6 months to compute income. The agency may use more than...

  13. 24 CFR 1003.503 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program income. 1003.503 Section....503 Program income. (a) Program income requirements for ICDBG grantees are set forth in 24 CFR 85.25, as modified by this section. (b) Program income means gross income received by the grantee or...

  14. 20 CFR 627.450 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program income. 627.450 Section 627.450... PROGRAMS UNDER TITLES I, II, AND III OF THE ACT Administrative Standards § 627.450 Program income. (a) Definition of program income. (1) Program income means income received by the recipient or subrecipient...

  15. 29 CFR 97.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program income. 97.25 Section 97.25 Labor Office of the... LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 97.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from...

  16. 21 CFR 1403.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program income. 1403.25 Section 1403.25 Food and....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use of rental of real...

  17. 15 CFR 24.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program income. 24.25 Section 24.25... Administration § 24.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of...

  18. 38 CFR 43.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program income. 43.25... Requirements Financial Administration § 43.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from...

  19. 20 CFR 404.1086 - Community income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Community income. 404.1086 Section 404.1086...- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Self-Employment Income § 404.1086 Community income. If community property laws apply to income that an individual derives from a trade or...

  20. 20 CFR 404.1086 - Community income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Community income. 404.1086 Section 404.1086...- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Self-Employment Income § 404.1086 Community income. If community property laws apply to income that an individual derives from a trade or...

  1. 45 CFR 1174.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program income. 1174.25 Section 1174.25 Public....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real...

  2. 7 CFR 3016.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program income. 3016.25 Section 3016.25 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 3016.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees...

  3. 45 CFR 1157.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program income. 1157.25 Section 1157.25 Public... income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or personal...

  4. 36 CFR 1207.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program income. 1207.25... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1207.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees...

  5. 43 CFR 12.65 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program income. 12.65 Section 12.65 Public... to State and Local Governments Post-Award Requirements § 12.65 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees...

  6. 24 CFR 1003.503 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program income. 1003.503 Section....503 Program income. (a) Program income requirements for ICDBG grantees are set forth in 24 CFR 85.25, as modified by this section. (b) Program income means gross income received by the grantee or...

  7. 28 CFR 66.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program income. 66.25 Section 66.25... Administration § 66.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of...

  8. 49 CFR 18.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program income. 18.25 Section 18.25 Transportation... income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or personal...

  9. 24 CFR 5.609 - Annual income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Annual income. 5.609 Section 5.609... Persons with Disabilities: Family Income and Family Payment; Occupancy Requirements for Section 8 Project-Based Assistance Family Income § 5.609 Annual income. (a) Annual income means all amounts, monetary...

  10. 45 CFR 92.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program income. 92.25 Section 92.25 Public Welfare... Administration § 92.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of...

  11. 29 CFR 1470.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program income. 1470.25 Section 1470.25 Labor Regulations... Financial Administration § 1470.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use...

  12. 22 CFR 135.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program income. 135.25 Section 135.25 Foreign... income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or personal...

  13. 45 CFR 2541.250 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program income. 2541.250 Section 2541.250 Public... Post-Award Requirements § 2541.250 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from...

  14. 24 CFR 5.609 - Annual income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual income. 5.609 Section 5.609... Persons with Disabilities: Family Income and Family Payment; Occupancy Requirements for Section 8 Project-Based Assistance Family Income § 5.609 Annual income. (a) Annual income means all amounts, monetary...

  15. 34 CFR 80.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program income. 80.25 Section 80.25 Education Office of... income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or personal...

  16. 45 CFR 1183.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program income. 1183.25 Section 1183.25 Public....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real...

  17. 14 CFR 1273.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Program income. 1273.25 Section 1273.25... Administration § 1273.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of...

  18. SUMO: Solar Ultraviolet Monitor and Ozone Nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, L.; Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Sarkissian, A.; Godin-Beekman, S.; Rogers, D. J.; Bove, P.; Lagage, P. O.; DeWitte, S.

    2014-12-01

    SUMO is an innovative proof-of-concept nanosatellite aiming to measure on the same platform the different components of the Earth radiation budget (ERB), the solar energy input and the energy reemitted at the top of the Earth atmosphere, with a particular focus on the far UV (FUV) part of the spectrum and on the ozone layer. The FUV is the only wavelength band with energy absorbed in the high atmosphere (stratosphere), in the ozone (Herzberg continuum, 200-220 nm) and oxygen bands, and its high variability is most probably at the origin of a climate influence (UV affects stratospheric dynamics and temperatures, altering interplanetary waves and weather patterns both poleward and downward to the lower stratosphere and tropopause). A simultaneous observation of incoming FUV and ozone production would bring an invaluable information on this process of solar-climate forcing. Space instruments have already measured the different components of the ERB but this is the first time that all instruments will operate on the same platform. This characteristic by itself guarantees original scientific results. SUMO is a 3.6 kg, 3W, 10x10x30 cm3 nanosatellite ("3U"), with a "1U" payload of <1 kg and 1 W. 5 instruments: an ozone meter, a FUV measure at 215 nm, 2 radiometers (0.2 - 3 & 0.2 - 40 µm) and a bolometer. Orbit is polar, Sun-synchronous, ~600 km, since a further challenge are relations between solar UV variability and stratospheric ozone on Arctic and Antarctic regions. Mission is expected to last 1 to 2 years. SUMO definition has been completed (platform and payload AIT are possible in 24 months). SUMO is proposed for the nanosatellite program of Polytechnic School and CNES (following QB50) for a flight in 2018. Follow-up is 2 fold: on one part more complete measurements using SUMO miniaturized instruments on a larger satellite; on the other part, increase of the coverage in local time and latitude using a constellation of SUMO nanosatellites around the Earth to further

  19. Solar Cell light trapping beyond the ray optic limit.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Dennis M; Munday, Jeremy N; Atwater, Harry A

    2012-01-11

    In 1982, Yablonovitch proposed a thermodynamic limit on light trapping within homogeneous semiconductor slabs, which implied a minimum thickness needed to fully absorb the solar spectrum. However, this limit is valid for geometrical optics but not for a new generation of subwavelength solar absorbers such as ultrathin or inhomogeneously structured cells, wire-based cells, photonic crystal-based cells, and plasmonic cells. Here we show that the key to exceeding the conventional ray optic or so-called ergodic light trapping limit is in designing an elevated local density of optical states (LDOS) for the absorber. Moreover, for any semiconductor we show that it is always possible to exceed the ray optic light trapping limit and use these principles to design a number of new solar absorbers with the key feature of having an elevated LDOS within the absorbing region of the device, opening new avenues for solar cell design and cost reduction.

  20. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  1. Preparation of Cu2ZnSnSe4 Absorber Layer by Nonvacuum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang-En; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Hou-Ying

    2013-12-01

    Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) was prepared by a nonvacuum, solution-based method, and used as an absorber layer in CZTSe solar cells. Copper(II) acetate monohydrate, zinc(II) acetate dehydrate, and tin(II) chloride dihydrate were used as the starting materials of the sol-gel method, and 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine were used as the solvent and stabilizer, respectively. The precursor solution was deposited on Mo-coated soda lime glass (SLG) by spin-coating, then annealed at 570 °C in selenium atmosphere to convert it into the CZTSe absorber layer. The synthesized CZTSe absorber layer phase was identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum analyses. By increasing the number of spin-coating/drying cycles, the CZTSe absorber layer thickness was increased and resulted in a current density increase in the current-voltage curve. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were carried out to confirm the absorber layer thickness and metal ratios. The highest efficiency of the solar cell was 1.08% with a 1.45 µm absorber layer.

  2. Solar Water-Heater Design and Installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlamert, P.; Kennard, J.; Ciriunas, J.

    1982-01-01

    Solar/Water heater system works as follows: Solar--heated air is pumped from collectors through rock bin from top to bottom. Air handler circulates heated air through an air-to-water heat exchanger, which transfers heat to incoming well water. In one application, it may reduce oil use by 40 percent.

  3. Non-tracking solar energy collector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy collector system characterized by an improved concentrator for directing incident rays of solar energy on parallel vacuum-jacketed receivers or absorbers is described. Numerous individually mounted reflector modules of a common asymmetrical triangular cross-sectional configuration are supported for independent reorientation. Asymmetric vee-trough concentrators are defined.

  4. Spectral sensitization of nanocrystalline solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Spitler, Mark T.; Ehret, Anne; Stuhl, Louis S.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to dye sensitized polycrystalline photoelectrochemical solar cells for use in energy transduction from light to electricity. It concerns the utility of highly absorbing organic chromophores as sensitizers in such cells and the degree to which they may be utilized alone and in combination to produce an efficient photoelectrochemical cell, e.g., a regenerative solar cell.

  5. Particulate and solar radiation stable coating for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, W. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A laminate thermal control coating for spacecraft comprising a layer of solar radiation stable film, a layer of particulate radiation stable film applied to the upper surface of the solar radiation stable film, and a layer of reflecting material applied to the lower surface of the solar radiation stable film was described. The coating experiences no increase in solar radiation absorptance (the proportion of radiant energy absorbed) upon exposure to particulate or solar radiation as the particulate radiation is substantially absorbed in the particulate radiation stable layer and the solar radiation partially absorbed by the particulate radiation stable layer is transmitted by the solar radiation stable film to the reflecting material which reflects it back through the laminate and into space.

  6. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

    1982-09-29

    A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  7. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.; Hansen, Leif J.; Evans, David B.

    1985-01-01

    A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  8. Liquid crystal tunable metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Shrekenhamer, David; Chen, Wen-Chen; Padilla, Willie J

    2013-04-26

    We present an experimental demonstration of electronically tunable metamaterial absorbers in the terahertz regime. By incorporation of active liquid crystal into strategic locations within the metamaterial unit cell, we are able to modify the absorption by 30% at 2.62 THz, as well as tune the resonant absorption over 4% in bandwidth. Numerical full-wave simulations match well to experiments and clarify the underlying mechanism, i.e., a simultaneous tuning of both the electric and magnetic response that allows for the preservation of the resonant absorption. These results show that fundamental light interactions of surfaces can be dynamically controlled by all-electronic means and provide a path forward for realization of novel applications.

  9. Oxalate: Effect on calcium absorbability

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, R.P.; Weaver, C.M. )

    1989-10-01

    Absorption of calcium from intrinsically labeled Ca oxalate was measured in 18 normal women and compared with absorption of Ca from milk in these same subjects, both when the test substances were ingested in separate meals and when ingested together. Fractional Ca absorption from oxalate averaged 0.100 +/- 0.043 when ingested alone and 0.140 +/- 0.063 when ingested together with milk. Absorption was, as expected, substantially lower than absorption from milk (0.358 +/- 0.113). Nevertheless Ca oxalate absorbability in these women was higher than we had previously found for spinach Ca. When milk and Ca oxalate were ingested together, there was no interference of oxalate in milk Ca absorption and no evidence of tracer exchange between the two labeled Ca species.

  10. Solar energy narrative close-out report: Jacksonville Urban League

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    Ten solar energy water heaters were installed by trained CETA workers. Once installed the solar water heaters were monitored. In low income communities, where the solar equipment was installed, it was found to be difficult to obtain clients and find suitable homes for the project. (LEW)

  11. Investigation of the solar influence on clean and dusty CO2-ice under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, E.; Hagermann, A.; Wolters, S.

    2015-10-01

    CO2 is the main component of the Martian atmosphere. Therefore the polar caps are - depending on hemisphere and season - partially or totally covered with CO2-ice. In contrast to rock and soil surface layers, which absorb and reflect incoming solar radiation immediately at the surface, ices are partially transparent in the visible spectral range, while they are opaque in the infrared. These properties are responsible for the so-called "Solid- State Greenhouse Effect" (SSGE). The SSGE may have a major influence on the sublimation and recondensation of CO2 and its circulation in the Martian atmosphere. Our work will concentrate on the influence of the SSGE on CO2-ice under Martian like conditions.

  12. Light-absorbing impurities in Arctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, S. J.; Warren, S. G.; Grenfell, T. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Brandt, R. E.

    2010-08-01

    Absorption of radiation by ice is extremely weak at visible and near-ultraviolet wavelengths, so small amounts of light-absorbing impurities in snow can dominate the absorption of solar radiation at these wavelengths, reducing the albedo relative to that of pure snow, contributing to the surface energy budget and leading to earlier snowmelt. In this study Arctic snow is surveyed for its content of light-absorbing impurities, expanding and updating the 1983-1984 survey of Clarke and Noone. Samples were collected in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Svalbard, Norway, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean during 2005-2009, on tundra, glaciers, ice caps, sea ice, frozen lakes, and in boreal forests. Snow was collected mostly in spring, when the entire winter snowpack is accessible for sampling. Sampling was carried out in summer on the Greenland ice sheet and on the Arctic Ocean, of melting glacier snow and sea ice as well as cold snow. About 1200 snow samples have been analyzed for this study. The snow is melted and filtered; the filters are analyzed in a specially designed spectrophotometer system to infer the concentration of black carbon (BC), the fraction of absorption due to non-BC light-absorbing constituents and the absorption Ångstrom exponent of all particles. The reduction of snow albedo is primarily due to BC, but other impurities, principally brown (organic) carbon, are typically responsible for ~40% of the visible and ultraviolet absorption. The meltwater from selected snow samples was saved for chemical analysis to identify sources of the impurities. Median BC amounts in surface snow are as follows (nanograms of carbon per gram of snow): Greenland 3, Arctic Ocean snow 7, melting sea ice 8, Arctic Canada 8, Subarctic Canada 14, Svalbard 13, Northern Norway 21, Western Arctic Russia 26, Northeastern Siberia 17. Concentrations are more variable in the European Arctic than in Arctic Canada or the Arctic Ocean, probably because of the proximity to BC sources. Individual

  13. Lanthanum hexaboride for solar energy applications.

    PubMed

    Sani, Elisa; Mercatelli, Luca; Meucci, Marco; Zoli, Luca; Sciti, Diletta

    2017-04-06

    We investigate the optical properties of LaB6 - based materials, as possible candidates for solid absorbers in Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) systems. Bulk LaB6 materials were thermally consolidated by hot pressing starting from commercial powders. To assess the solar absorbance and spectral selectivity properties, room-temperature hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared, considering different compositions, porosities and surface roughnesses. Thermal emittance at around 1100 K has been measured. Experimental results showed that LaB6 can have a solar absorbance comparable to that of the most advanced solar absorber material in actual plants such as Silicon Carbide, with a higher spectral selectivity. Moreover, LaB6 has also the appealing characteristics to be a thermionic material, so that it could act at the same time both as direct high-temperature solar absorber and as electron source, significantly reducing system complexity in future concentrating solar thermionic systems and bringing a real innovation in this field.

  14. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  15. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  16. Solar power absorption in a glass tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Michael D.

    1987-01-01

    The optics of a glass tube to be used in near-Earth space at the focus of a solar concentrator has been examined, and an equation for the power absorbed from multiple-reflected light beams in the tube wall has been developed. The equation has been used to calculate the power absorbed by a highly transmissive form of fused silica. The equilibrium temperature reached by the tube with only radiative cooling has also been examined, and it shows a significant rise with large solar concentrations. The results apply specifically to cylindrical containment vessels for space-based solar-pumped lasers and generally to any similarly irradiated tubes.

  17. Income Smoothing: Methodology and Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    that managers desire a pattern % of income that has low variability relative to a linear time trend. 2. Industry Trend. Target 2 assumes that firms...R167 55? INCOME SMOOTHING: METHODOLOGY ND NODELS(U) UMVL in1POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA 0 D HOSES "AY S6 UNCLASSIFIED NP5-604FO53 E * I* vu...California oCiD ELEC fl MAY 12 986 INCOME SMOOTHING - METHODOLOGY AND MODELS by 0. Douglas Moses May 1986 *Approved frpublic release; ditibto uniie

  18. Income Inequality and Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bloome, Deirdre

    2015-03-01

    Is there a relationship between family income inequality and income mobility across generations in the United States? As family income inequality rose in the United States, parental resources available for improving children's health, education, and care diverged. The amount and rate of divergence also varied across US states. Researchers and policy analysts have expressed concern that relatively high inequality might be accompanied by relatively low mobility, tightening the connection between individuals' incomes during childhood and adulthood. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and various government sources, this paper exploits state and cohort variation to estimate the relationship between inequality and mobility. Results provide very little support for the hypothesis that inequality shapes mobility in the United States. The inequality children experienced during youth had no robust association with their economic mobility as adults. Formal analysis reveals that offsetting effects could underlie this result. In theory, mobility-enhancing forces may counterbalance mobility-reducing effects. In practice, the results suggest that in the US context, the intergenerational transmission of income may not be very responsive to changes in inequality.

  19. Income Inequality and Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bloome, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Is there a relationship between family income inequality and income mobility across generations in the United States? As family income inequality rose in the United States, parental resources available for improving children’s health, education, and care diverged. The amount and rate of divergence also varied across US states. Researchers and policy analysts have expressed concern that relatively high inequality might be accompanied by relatively low mobility, tightening the connection between individuals’ incomes during childhood and adulthood. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and various government sources, this paper exploits state and cohort variation to estimate the relationship between inequality and mobility. Results provide very little support for the hypothesis that inequality shapes mobility in the United States. The inequality children experienced during youth had no robust association with their economic mobility as adults. Formal analysis reveals that offsetting effects could underlie this result. In theory, mobility-enhancing forces may counterbalance mobility-reducing effects. In practice, the results suggest that in the US context, the intergenerational transmission of income may not be very responsive to changes in inequality. PMID:26388653

  20. Electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, Brian T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1988-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from pyramidal and wedge absorbers used to line the walls of modern anechoic chambers is measured and compared with theoretically predicted values. The theoretical performance for various angles of incidence is studied. It is shown that a pyramidal absorber scatters electromagnetic energy more as a random rough surface does. The apparent reflection coefficient from an absorber wall illuminated by a plane wave can be much less than the normal absorber specifications quoted by the manufacturer. For angles near grazing incidence, pyramidal absorbers give a large backscattered field from the pyramid side-faces or edges. The wedge absorber was found to give small backscattered fields for near-grazing incidence. Based on this study, some new guidelines for the design of anechoic chambers are advocated because the specular scattering models used at present do not appear valid for pyramids that are large compared to the wavelength.

  1. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  2. Low Cost Solar Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    William Bostic

    2005-12-16

    This project was directed by NREL to pursue development of an all polymer solar thermal collector. The proposed design utilized a dual sheet thermoform process to coincidentally form the absorber as well as the containment structure to support the glazing. It utilized ventilation to overcome stagnation degradation of the polymer materials.

  3. Absorbent product and articles made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multilayer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is described. The product has a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, and a first fibrous wicking layer overlaying the water pervious layer. A first container section is defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material in between a first absorbent mass and a second container section defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material between what is disposed a second absorbent mass, and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer overlaying the second fibrous wicking layer.

  4. Nonlinear dynamic vibration absorbers with a saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febbo, M.; Machado, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    The behavior of a new type of nonlinear dynamic vibration absorber is studied. A distinctive characteristic of the proposed absorber is the impossibility to extend the system to infinity. The mathematical formulation is based on a finite extensibility nonlinear elastic potential to model the saturable nonlinearity. The absorber is attached to a single degree-of-freedom linear/nonlinear oscillator subjected to a periodic external excitation. In order to solve the equations of motion and to analyze the frequency-response curves, the method of averaging is used. The performance of the FENE absorber is evaluated considering a variation of the nonlinearity of the primary system, the damping and the linearized frequency of the absorber and the mass ratio. The numerical results show that the proposed absorber has a very good efficiency when the nonlinearity of the primary system increases. When compared with a cubic nonlinear absorber, for a large nonlinearity of the primary system, the FENE absorber shows a better effectiveness for the whole studied frequency range. A complete absence of quasi-periodic oscillations is also found for an appropriate selection of the parameters of the absorber. Finally, direct integrations of the equations of motion are performed to verify the accuracy of the proposed method.

  5. Metamaterial absorber with random dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiren; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-05-01

    The metamaterial absorber composed of random dendritic cells has been investigated at microwave frequencies. It is found that the absorptivities come to be weaker and the resonant frequency get red shift as the disordered states increasing, however, the random metamaterial absorber still presents high absorptivity more than 95%. The disordered structures can help understanding of the metamaterial absorber and may be employed for practical design of infrared metamaterial absorber, which may play important roles in collection of radiative heat energy and directional transfer enhancement.

  6. Near-infrared sensitization in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyung; Viscardi, Guido; Barolo, Claudia; Barbero, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are a low cost and colorful promising alternative to standard silicon photovoltaic cells. Though many of the highest efficiencies have been associated with sensitizers absorbing only in the visible portion of the solar radiation, there is a growing interest for NIR sensitization. This paper reviews the efforts made so far to find sensitizers able to absorb efficiently in the far-red NIR region of solar light. Panchromatic sensitizers as well as dyes absorbing mainly in the 650-920 nm region have been considered.

  7. Automatically acquired broadband plasmonic-metamaterial black absorber during the metallic film-formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengqi; Liu, Xiaoshan; Huang, Shan; Pan, Pingping; Chen, Jing; Liu, Guiqiang; Gu, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Broadband electromagnetic wave absorbers are highly desirable in numerous applications such as solar-energy harvesting, thermo-photovoltaics, and photon detection. The aim to efficiently achieve ultrathin broadband absorbers with high-yield and low-cost fabrication process has long been pursued. Here, we theoretically propose and experimentally demonstrate a unique broadband plasmonic-metamaterial absorber by utilizing a sub-10 nm meta-surface film structure to replace the precisely designed metamaterial crystal in the common metal-dielectric-metal absorbers. The unique ultrathin meta-surface can be automatically obtained during the metal film formation process. Spectral bandwidth with absorbance above 80% is up to 396 nm, where the full absorption width at half-maximum is about 92%. The average value of absorbance across the whole spectral range of 370-880 nm reaches 83%. These super absorption properties can be attributed to the particle plasmon resonances and plasmon near-field coupling by the automatically formed metallic nanoparticles as well as the plasmon polaritons of the metal film with the induced plasmonic magnetic resonances occurring between the top meta-surface and the bottom metal mirror. This method is quite simple, cost-effective for large-area fabrication, and compatible with current industrial methods for microelectro-mechanical systems, which makes it an outstanding candidate for advanced high-efficiency absorber materials.

  8. Optimal nonimaging integrated evacuated solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, John D.; Duff, W. S.; O'Gallagher, Joseph J.; Winston, Roland

    1993-11-01

    A non imaging integrated evacuated solar collector for solar thermal energy collection is discussed which has the lower portion of the tubular glass vacuum enveloped shaped and inside surface mirrored to optimally concentrate sunlight onto an absorber tube in the vacuum. This design uses vacuum to eliminate heat loss from the absorber surface by conduction and convection of air, soda lime glass for the vacuum envelope material to lower cost, optimal non imaging concentration integrated with the glass vacuum envelope to lower cost and improve solar energy collection, and a selective absorber for the absorbing surface which has high absorptance and low emittance to lower heat loss by radiation and improve energy collection efficiency. This leads to a very low heat loss collector with high optical collection efficiency, which can operate at temperatures up to the order of 250 degree(s)C with good efficiency while being lower in cost than current evacuated solar collectors. Cost estimates are presented which indicate a cost for this solar collector system which can be competitive with the cost of fossil fuel heat energy sources when the collector system is produced in sufficient volume. Non imaging concentration, which reduces cost while improving performance, and which allows efficient solar energy collection without tracking the sun, is a key element in this solar collector design.

  9. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, C.E.

    1979-08-29

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  10. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  11. Anti-terrorist vehicle crash impact energy absorbing barrier

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J.

    1989-01-01

    An anti-terrorist vehicle crash barrier includes side support structures, crushable energy absorbing aluminum honeycomb modules, and an elongated impact-resistant beam extending between, and at its opposite ends through vertical guideways defined by, the side support structures. An actuating mechanism supports the beam at its opposite ends for movement between a lowered barrier-withdrawn position in which a traffic-supporting side of the beam is aligned with a traffic-bearing surface permitting vehicular traffic between the side support structures and over the beam, and a raised barrier-imposed position in which the beam is aligned with horizontal guideways defined in the side support structures above the traffic-bearing surface, providing an obstruction to vehicular traffic between the side support structures. The beam is movable rearwardly in the horizontal guideways with its opposite ends disposed transversely therethrough upon being impacted at its forward side by an incoming vehicle. The crushable modules are replaceably disposed in the horizontal guideways between aft ends thereof and the beam. The beam, replaceable modules, side support structures and actuating mechanism are separate and detached from one another such that the beam and replaceable modules are capable of coacting to disable and stop an incoming vehicle without causing structural damage to the side support structures and actuating mechanism.

  12. Anti-terrorist vehicle crash impact energy absorbing barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Swahlan, D.J.

    1989-04-18

    An anti-terrorist vehicle crash barrier includes side support structures, crushable energy absorbing aluminum honeycomb modules, and an elongated impact-resistant beam extending between, and at its opposite ends through vertical guideways defined by, the side support structures. An actuating mechanism supports the beam at its opposite ends for movement between a lowered barrier-withdrawn position in which a traffic-supporting side of the beam is aligned with a traffic-bearing surface permitting vehicular traffic between the side support structures and over the beam, and a raised barrier-imposed position in which the beam is aligned with horizontal guideways defined in the side support structures above the traffic-bearing surface, providing an obstruction to vehicular traffic between the side support structures. The beam is movable rearwardly in the horizontal guideways with its opposite ends disposed transversely therethrough upon being impacted at its forward side by an incoming vehicle. The crushable modules are replaceably disposed in the horizontal guideways between aft ends thereof and the beam. The beam, replaceable modules, side support structures and actuating mechanism are separate and detached from one another such that the beam and replaceable modules are capable of coacting to disable and stop an incoming vehicle without causing structural damage to the side support structures and actuating mechanism. 6 figs.

  13. Absorbencies of six different rodent beddings: commercially advertised absorbencies are potentially misleading.

    PubMed

    Burn, C C; Mason, G J

    2005-01-01

    Moisture absorbency is one of the most important characteristics of rodent beddings for controlling bacterial growth and ammonia production. However, bedding manufacturers rarely provide information on the absorbencies of available materials, and even when they do, absorption values are usually expressed per unit mass of bedding. Since beddings are usually placed into cages to reach a required depth rather than a particular mass, their volumetric absorbencies are far more relevant. This study therefore compared the saline absorbencies of sawdust, aspen woodchips, two virgin loose pulp beddings (Alpha-Dri and Omega-Dri), reclaimed wood pulp (Tek-Fresh), and corncob, calculated both by volume and by mass. Absorbency per unit volume correlated positively with bedding density, while absorbency per unit mass correlated negatively. Therefore, the relative absorbencies of the beddings were almost completely reversed depending on how absorbency was calculated. By volume, corncob was the most absorbent bedding, absorbing about twice as much saline as Tek-Fresh, the least absorbent bedding. Conversely, when calculated by mass, Tek-Fresh appeared to absorb almost three times as much saline as the corncob. Thus, in practical terms the most absorbent bedding here was corncob, followed by the loose pulp beddings; and this is generally supported by their relatively low ammonia production as seen in previous studies. Many factors other than absorbency determine whether a material is suitable as a rodent bedding, and they are briefly mentioned here. However, manufacturers should provide details of bedding absorbencies in terms of volume, in order to help predict the relative absorbencies of the beddings in practical situations.

  14. An ultrathin dual-band metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Duan, Junping; Zhang, Wendong; Wang, Wanjun; Zhang, Binzhen

    2016-10-01

    The design and preparation of an ultrathin dual-band metamaterial absorber whose resonant frequency located at radar wave (20 GHz-60 GHz) is presented in this paper. The absorber is composed of a 2-D periodic sandwich featured with two concentric annuluses. The influence on the absorber's performance produced by resonant cell's structure size and material parameters was numerically simulated and analyzed based on the standard full wave finite integration technology in CST. Laser ablation process was adopted to prepare the designed absorber on epoxy resin board coated with on double plane of copper with a thickness that is 1/30 and 1/50 of the resonant wavelength at a resonant frequency of 30.51 GHz and 48.15 GHz. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) reached 2.2 GHz and 2.35 GHz and the peak of the absorptance reached 99.977%. The ultrathin absorber is nearly omnidirectional for all polarizations. The test results of prepared sample testify the designed absorber's excellent absorbing performance forcefully. The absorber expands inspirations of radar stealth in military domain due to its flexible design, cost-effective and other outstanding properties.

  15. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A...

  17. Solar thermophotovoltaic system using nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Craig; Gray, Stephen K; Gupta, Mool C

    2015-09-21

    This paper presents results on a highly efficient experimental solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system using simulated solar energy. An overall power conversion efficiency of 6.2% was recorded under solar simulation. This was matched with a thermodynamic model, and the losses within the system, as well as a path forward to mitigate these losses, have been investigated. The system consists of a planar, tungsten absorbing/emitting structure with an anti-reflection layer coated laser-microtextured absorbing surface and single-layer dielectric coated emitting surface. A GaSb PV cell was used to capture the emitted radiation and convert it into electrical energy. This simple structure is both easy to fabricate and temperature stable, and contains no moving parts or heat exchange fluids.

  18. [Absorbed doses in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S D; Roccuzzo, M; Albrito, F; Ragona, R; Anglesio, S

    1996-01-01

    The growing use of dento-maxillo-facial radiographic examinations has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies on dosimetry. A thorough review of the literature is presented in this article. Most studies were carried out on tissue equivalent skull phantoms, while only a few were in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vivo absorbed doses during Orthopantomography (OPT). Full Mouth Periapical Examination (FMPE) and Intraoral Tube Panoramic Radiography (ITPR). Measurements were made on 30 patients, reproducing clinical conditions, in 46 anatomical sites, with 24 intra- and 22 extra-oral thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDS). The highest doses were measured, in orthopantomography, at the right mandibular angle (1899 mu Gy) in FMPE on the right naso-labial fold (5640 mu Gy and in ITPR on the palatal surface of the left second upper molar (1936 mu Gy). Intraoral doses ranged from 21 mu Gy, in orthopantomography, to 4494 mu Gy in FMPE. Standard errors ranged from 142% in ITPR to 5% in orthopantomography. The highest rate of standard errors was found in FMPE and ITPR. The data collected in this trial are in agreement with others in major literature reports. Disagreements are probably due to different exam acquisition and data collections. Such differences, presented comparison in several sites, justify lower doses in FMPE and ITPR. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo dosimetry of the maxillary region are discussed, the former being a close resemblance to clinical conditions of examination and the latter the impossibility of collecting values in depth of tissues. Finally, both ITPR and FMPE required lower doses than expected, and can be therefore reconsidered relative to their radiation risk.

  19. 38 CFR 43.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes... income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the... award and the ending date of the award reflected in the final financial report. (c) Cost of...

  20. 20 CFR 437.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the net allowable costs. Program income must be used for current costs unless SSA authorizes otherwise....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs... the final financial report. (c) Cost of generating program income. If authorized by SSA regulations...

  1. 43 CFR 12.65 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes... Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS AND COST... are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees...

  2. 40 CFR 31.25 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allowable costs. Program income shall be used for current costs unless the Federal agency authorizes... income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the... award and the ending date of the award reflected in the final financial report. (c) Cost of...

  3. 78 FR 72393 - Net Investment Income Tax

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ...This document contains final regulations under section 1411 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). These regulations provide guidance on the general application of the Net Investment Income Tax and the computation of Net Investment Income. The regulations affect individuals, estates, and trusts whose incomes meet certain income...

  4. 20 CFR 322.8 - Miscellaneous income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Miscellaneous income. 322.8 Section 322.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REMUNERATION § 322.8 Miscellaneous income. (a) Income from self-employment. In determining whether income...

  5. 20 CFR 322.8 - Miscellaneous income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Miscellaneous income. 322.8 Section 322.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REMUNERATION § 322.8 Miscellaneous income. (a) Income from self-employment. In determining whether income...

  6. 20 CFR 322.8 - Miscellaneous income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Miscellaneous income. 322.8 Section 322.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REMUNERATION § 322.8 Miscellaneous income. (a) Income from self-employment. In determining whether income...

  7. 20 CFR 322.8 - Miscellaneous income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Miscellaneous income. 322.8 Section 322.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REMUNERATION § 322.8 Miscellaneous income. (a) Income from self-employment. In determining whether income...

  8. 20 CFR 322.8 - Miscellaneous income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Miscellaneous income. 322.8 Section 322.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REMUNERATION § 322.8 Miscellaneous income. (a) Income from self-employment. In determining whether income...

  9. 10 CFR 600.314 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program income. 600.314 Section 600.314 Energy DEPARTMENT... Program income. (a) DOE must apply the standards in this section to the disposition of program income from... program income earned: (1) From license fees and royalties for copyrighted material, patents,...

  10. 13 CFR 130.480 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program income. 130.480 Section... CENTERS § 130.480 Program income. (a) Program income for recipient organizations or SBDC service providers... A-110). Program income for recipient organizations or SBDC service providers based in State or...

  11. 10 CFR 603.1305 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program income. 603.1305 Section 603.1305 Energy... Used in this Part § 603.1305 Program income. Gross income earned by the recipient or a participant that is generated by a supported activity or earned as a direct result of a TIA. Program income...

  12. 42 CFR 436.831 - Income eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Income eligibility. 436.831 Section 436.831 Public... Requirements for the Medically Needy Medically Needy Income Eligibility and Liability for Payment of Medical Expenses § 436.831 Income eligibility. The agency must determine income eligibility of medically...

  13. 17 CFR 256.409 - Income taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Income taxes. 256.409 Section... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 Income and Expense Accounts § 256.409 Income taxes. (a) This account shall include the amount of local, State and Federal taxes on income properly accruable during the period covered by...

  14. 13 CFR 130.480 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 130.480 Section... CENTERS § 130.480 Program income. (a) Program income for recipient organizations or SBDC service providers... A-110). Program income for recipient organizations or SBDC service providers based in State or...

  15. 23 CFR 1200.24 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program income. 1200.24 Section 1200.24 Highways... Implementation and Management of the Highway Safety Program § 1200.24 Program income. (a) Inclusions. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or...

  16. 34 CFR 361.63 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program income. 361.63 Section 361.63 Education... State Vocational Rehabilitation Programs § 361.63 Program income. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, program income means gross income received by the State that is directly generated by an...

  17. 10 CFR 603.1305 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 603.1305 Section 603.1305 Energy... Used in this Part § 603.1305 Program income. Gross income earned by the recipient or a participant that is generated by a supported activity or earned as a direct result of a TIA. Program income...

  18. 24 CFR 236.60 - Excess Income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excess Income. 236.60 Section 236... § 236.60 Excess Income. (a) Definition. Excess Income consists of cash collected as rent from the... Rent. The unit-by-unit requirement necessitates that, if a unit has Excess Income, the Excess...

  19. 23 CFR 1200.24 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program income. 1200.24 Section 1200.24 Highways... Implementation and Management of the Highway Safety Program § 1200.24 Program income. (a) Inclusions. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or...

  20. 17 CFR 256.409 - Income taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Income taxes. 256.409 Section... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 Income and Expense Accounts § 256.409 Income taxes. (a) This account shall include the amount of local, State and Federal taxes on income properly accruable during the period covered by...