Science.gov

Sample records for absorbing material layer

  1. Multiple-layer Radiation Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Baker, Bonnie Sue

    A structure is discussed for absorbing incident radiation, either electromagnetic (EM) or sound. Such a surface structure is needed, for example, in a highly sensitive high-frequency gravitational wave or HFGW detector such as the Li-Baker. The multi-layer absorber, which is discussed, is constructed with metamaterial [MM] layer or layers on top. This MM is configured for a specific EM or sound radiation frequency band, which absorbs incident EM or sound radiation without reflection. Below these top MM layers is a substrate of conventional EM-radiation absorbing or acoustical absorbing reflective material, such as an array of pyramidal foam absorbers. Incident radiation is partially absorbed by the MM layer or layers, and then it is more absorbed by the lower absorbing and reflecting substrate. The remaining reflected radiation is even further absorbed by the MM layers on its "way out_ so that essentially all of the incident radiation is absorbed _ a nearly perfect black-body absorber. In a HFGW detector a substrate, such as foam absorbers, may outgas into a high vacuum and reduce the capability of the vacuum-producing equipment, however, the layers above this lowest substrate will seal the absorbing and reflecting substrate from any external vacuum. The layers also serve to seal the absorbing material against air or water flow past the surfaces of aircraft, watercraft or submarines. Other applications for such a multiple-level radiation absorber include stealth aircraft, missiles and submarines.

  2. Improving impact resistance of ceramic materials by energy absorbing surface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, H. P.; Seretsky, J.

    1974-01-01

    Energy absorbing surface layers were used to improve the impact resistance of silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics. Low elastic modulus materials were used. In some cases, the low elastic modulus was achieved using materials that form localized microcracks as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy, thermal expansion differences between phases, or phase transformations. In other cases, semi-vitreous or vitreous materials were used. Substantial improvements in impact resistance were observed at room and elevated temperatures.

  3. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  4. Perfectly matched layer based multilayer absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Stolarek, Marcin; Pastuszczak, Anna; Wróbel, Piotr; Wieciech, Bartosz; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Kotyński, Rafał

    2015-05-01

    Broadband layered absorbers are analysed theoretically and experimentally. A genetic algorithm is used to opti- mize broadband and wide-angle of incidence metal-dielectric layered absorbers. An approximate representation of the perfectly matched layer with a spatially varied absorption strength is discussed. The PML is realised as a stack of uniform and isotropic metamaterial layers with permittivieties and permeabilities given from the effective medium theory. This approximate representation of PML is based on the effective medium theory and we call it an effective medium PML (EM-PML).1 We compare the re ection properties of the layered absorbers to that of a PML material and demonstrate that after neglecting gain and magnetic properties, the absorber remains functional.

  5. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  6. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  7. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  8. Multilayer Radar Absorbing Non-Woven Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedov, A. V.; Nazarov, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the electrical properties of multilayer radar absorbing materials obtained by adding nonwoven sheets of dielectric fibers with an intermediate layer of electrically conductive carbon fibers. Multilayer materials that absorb electromagnetic radiation in a wide frequency range are obtained by varying the content of the carbon fibers. The carbon-fiber content dependent mechanism of absorption of electromagnetic radiation by sheets and multilayer materials is considered.

  9. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  10. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  11. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  12. Layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  13. Combining linear polarization spectroscopy and the Representative Layer Theory to measure the Beer-Lambert law absorbance of highly scattering materials.

    PubMed

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (Vis-NIR) Spectroscopy is a powerful non destructive analytical method used to analyze major compounds in bulk materials and products and requiring no sample preparation. It is widely used in routine analysis and also in-line in industries, in-vivo with biomedical applications or in-field for agricultural and environmental applications. However, highly scattering samples subvert Beer-Lambert law's linear relationship between spectral absorbance and the concentrations. Instead of spectral pre-processing, which is commonly used by Vis-NIR spectroscopists to mitigate the scattering effect, we put forward an optical method, based on Polarized Light Spectroscopy to improve the absorbance signal measurement on highly scattering samples. This method selects part of the signal which is less impacted by scattering. The resulted signal is combined in the Absorption/Remission function defined in Dahm's Representative Layer Theory to compute an absorbance signal fulfilling Beer-Lambert's law, i.e. being linearly related to concentration of the chemicals composing the sample. The underpinning theories have been experimentally evaluated on scattering samples in liquid form and in powdered form. The method produced more accurate spectra and the Pearson's coefficient assessing the linearity between the absorbance spectra and the concentration of the added dye improved from 0.94 to 0.99 for liquid samples and 0.84-0.97 for powdered samples. PMID:25467494

  14. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  15. Absorbing layers for the Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinaud, Olivier

    2015-05-15

    This work is devoted to the construction of perfectly matched layers (PML) for the Dirac equation, that not only arises in relativistic quantum mechanics but also in the dynamics of electrons in graphene or in topological insulators. While the resulting equations are stable at the continuous level, some care is necessary in order to obtain a stable scheme at the discrete level. This is related to the so-called fermion doubling problem. For this matter, we consider the numerical scheme introduced by Hammer et al. [19], and combine it with the discretized PML equations. We state some arguments for the stability of the resulting scheme, and perform simulations in two dimensions. The perfectly matched layers are shown to exhibit, in various configurations, superior absorption than the absorbing potential method and the so-called transport-like boundary conditions.

  16. Absorbing layers for the Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    This work is devoted to the construction of perfectly matched layers (PML) for the Dirac equation, that not only arises in relativistic quantum mechanics but also in the dynamics of electrons in graphene or in topological insulators. While the resulting equations are stable at the continuous level, some care is necessary in order to obtain a stable scheme at the discrete level. This is related to the so-called fermion doubling problem. For this matter, we consider the numerical scheme introduced by Hammer et al. [19], and combine it with the discretized PML equations. We state some arguments for the stability of the resulting scheme, and perform simulations in two dimensions. The perfectly matched layers are shown to exhibit, in various configurations, superior absorption than the absorbing potential method and the so-called transport-like boundary conditions.

  17. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  18. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  19. Attenuation layer for magnetostatic wave (MSW) absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, H. L.; Adkins, L. R.; Stearns, F. S.

    1984-09-01

    A new technique has been developed for the suppression of MSW end reflections which give rise to passband ripple. The basic idea is to provide a thin film of highly attenuating epitaxial material at the ends of a MSW delay line while preserving high quality YIG in the active region of the device. The GGG wafer preparation is a three step process which involves: (1) the growth of the attenuation layer, (2) the removal of this layer from the central region of the wafer and (3) the growth of high quality YIG on the remaining structure. Delay lines using the attenuation layer for end terminations have been evaluated experimentally and compared to devices utilizing other termination methods. The results indicate that the attenuation layer method produces ripple suppression characteristics which are the equal of those obtained with other termination techniques. The advantage of this new method lies in its suitability for large quantity fabrication requirements.

  20. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  1. Antimony sulphide, an absorber layer for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N.; Hussain, Arshad; Ahmed, R.; Shamsuri, W. N. Wan; Shaari, A.; Ahmad, N.; Abbas, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Replacement of the toxic, expensive and scarce materials with nontoxic, cheap and earth-abundant one, in solar cell absorber layer, is immensely needed to realize the vision of green and sustainable energy. Two-micrometre-thin antimony sulphide film is considered to be adequate as an absorbing layer in solar cell applications. In this paper, we synthesize antimony sulphide thin films on glass substrate by physical vapour deposition technique, and the obtained films were then annealed at different temperatures (150-250 °C). The as-deposited and annealed samples were investigated for structural and optoelectronic properties using different characterization techniques. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the annealed samples were polycrystalline with Sb2S3 phase, while the as-deposited sample was amorphous in nature. The optical properties are measured via optical ellipsometric techniques. The measured absorbance of the film is adequately high, and every photon is found to be absorbed in visible and NIR range. The conductivity type of the films measured by hot-point probe technique is determined to be p-type. The optical band gap of the resulted samples was in the range (2.4-1.3 eV) for the as-deposited and annealed films.

  2. Solar absorber material reflectivity measurements at temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bonometti, J.A.; Hawk, C.W.

    1999-07-01

    Assessment of absorber shell material properties at high operating temperatures is essential to the full understanding of the solar energy absorption process in a solar thermal rocket. A review of these properties, their application and a new experimental methodology to measure them at high temperatures is presented. The direct application for the research is absorber cavity development for a Solar Thermal Upper Stage (STUS). High temperature measurements, greater than 1,000 Kelvin, are difficult to obtain for incident radiation upon a solid surface that forms an absorber cavity in a solar thermal engine. The basic material properties determine the amount of solar energy that is absorbed, transmitted or reflected and are dependent upon the material's temperature. This investigation developed a new approach to evaluate the material properties (i.e., reflectivity, absorptive) of the absorber wall and experimentally determined them for rhenium and niobium sample coupons. The secular reflectivity was measured both at room temperature and at temperatures near 1,000 Kelvin over a range of angles from 0 to 90 degrees. The same experimental measurements were used to calculate the total reflectivity of the sample by integrating the recorded intensities over a hemisphere. The test methodology used the incident solar energy as the heating source while directly measuring the reflected light (an integrated value over all visible wavelengths). Temperature dependence on total reflectivity was found to follow an inverse power function of the material's temperature.

  3. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-28

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  4. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-30

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  5. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  6. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  7. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-06-17

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  8. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-07-15

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  9. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variations from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.

  10. New Electromagnetic Absorbers Composed of Left-handed and Right-handed Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Weihai; Xu, Shanjia

    2008-08-01

    New double-layered electromagnetic absorbers are presented in this paper. The new absorbers composed of one lossy left-handed material absorbing layer and one impedance matching layer consisted of lossless right-handed material. It is indicated that the reflection loss of below -20dB can be obtained in the frequency range 7GHz 13GHz. Power attenuation achieving -50dB of narrow frequency band electromagnetic absorbers can also be obtained by modulate permittivity of right-handed material. Furthermore, the thickness of the whole absorbing structure is only 2mm, which is particularly helpful in some practical applications. The presented results are of reference significance for accurate design of the new electromagnetic absorbers and of practical prospects for stealth technology.

  11. Plasmonic broadband absorber by stacking multiple metallic nanoparticle layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ting; Peng, Lining; Zhu, Yuntao; Yang, Fan; Cui, Yanxia; Wu, Xueyan; Liu, Liu; He, Sailing; Zhu, Furong; Hao, Yuying

    2015-04-01

    High efficiency, broadband plasmonic absorbers are constructed based on a stack of alternating metallic nanoparticle layers (MNLs) and SiO2 slabs on top of a reflective Ag substrate. Experimental results show that the stacks with thick MNLs absorb light better than those with thin MNLs when the number of MNL/SiO2 cells (N) is small (e.g., 1 or 2), but the situation gets reversed when N is greater than 3. When the nominal thickness of MNL is as thin as 5 nm, the acquired Ag nanoparticles are so small that light penetration through all of the stacked MNLs in the proposed design is possible. Thus, an increase in N leads to a growing number of light trapping elements. Our simulation reveals that the Ag nanoparticles at different layers are hybridized to excite rich localized plasmonic resonances, resulting in multiple absorption peaks at optical frequencies and thus a broader absorption band. The broadband absorbers with an integrated absorption efficiency of 96% over the 300-1100 nm wavelength range were achieved by stacking 18 MNL/SiO2 cells. The proposed absorbers can be used for applications in solar energy harvesting and thermal emission tailoring, due to their easy fabrication procedure and excellent optical properties.

  12. Relationship Between Absorber Layer Properties and Device Operation Modes For High Efficiency Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Ram; Kokenyesi, Robert; Wager, John; Keszler, Douglas; CenterInverse Design Team

    2014-03-01

    A thin film solar cell (TFSC) can be differentiated into two distinct operation modes based on the transport mechanism. Current TFSCs predominantly exploit diffusion to extract photogenerated minority carriers. For efficient extraction, the absorber layer requires high carrier mobilities and long minority carrier lifetimes. Materials exhibiting a strong optical absorption onset near the fundamental band gap allows reduction of the absorber layer thickness to significantly less than 1 μm. In such a TFSC, a strong intrinsic electric field drives minority carrier extraction, resulting in drift-based transport. The basic device configuration utilized in this simulation study is a heterojunction TFSC with a p-type absorber layer. The diffusion/drift device operation modes are simulated by varying the thickness and carrier concentration of the absorber layer, and device performance between the two modes is compared. In addition, the relationship between device operation mode and transport properties, including carrier mobility and minority carrier lifetime are explored. Finally, candidate absorber materials that enable the advantages of a drift-based TFSC developed within the Center for Inverse Design are presented. School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

  13. Waste glass as absorbent for thin layer chromatography (TLC).

    PubMed

    Pant, Deepak

    2009-07-01

    This study shows that glass powder of 200-300 mesh size range can be used as an absorbent for thin layer chromatography without adding any binder provided its uniformity is improved by a suitable thermal treatment. For this purpose TLC plates of the said mesh size range glass powder are heated thermally in a muffle furnace at a temperature of 650 degrees C for a period of 3 h. PMID:19375296

  14. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the index of refraction on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux in semitransparent materials, such as some ceramics, is investigated analytically. In the case considered here, a plane layer of a ceramic material is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces; the material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. It is shown that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained in a simple manner from the results for an index of refraction of unity.

  15. Spray CVD for Making Solar-Cell Absorber Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) processes of a special type have been investigated for use in making CuInS2 absorber layers of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells from either of two subclasses of precursor compounds: [(PBu3) 2Cu(SEt)2In(SEt)2] or [(PPh3)2Cu(SEt)2 In(SEt)2]. The CuInS2 films produced in the experiments have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and four-point-probe electrical tests.

  16. Fabrication of chalcopyrite light-absorbing layers based on nanoparticle and nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuhang; Luo, Paifeng; Gao, Bo; Cevher, Zehra; Sun, Chivin

    2013-03-01

    We report on a method of preparing chalcopyrite, CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) light-absorbing layers using low cost air stable ink based on semiconductor nanoparticle and nanowires. The nanoparticles and nanowires are prepared from metal salts such as metal chloride and acetate at room temperature without inert gas protection. A uniform and non-aggregation CIGS precursor layer is fabricated with the formation of nanoparticle and nanowire networks utilizing ultrasonic spaying technique. We obtain a high quality CIGS absorber by cleaning the residue salts and carbon agents at an increased temperature and through selenizing the pretreated CIGS precursors. Our results offer an opportunity for the low-cost deposition of chalcopyrite absorber materials at large scale with high throughput. This work was partially sponsored by Sun Harmonics Ltd. and by NYSTAR through the Photonics Center for Applied Technology at the City University of New York.

  17. A robust absorbing layer method for anisotropic seismic wave modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Labbé, S.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2014-12-15

    When applied to wave propagation modeling in anisotropic media, Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) exhibit instabilities. Incoming waves are amplified instead of being absorbed. Overcoming this difficulty is crucial as in many seismic imaging applications, accounting accurately for the subsurface anisotropy is mandatory. In this study, we present the SMART layer method as an alternative to PML approach. This method is based on the decomposition of the wavefield into components propagating inward and outward the domain of interest. Only outgoing components are damped. We show that for elastic and acoustic wave propagation in Transverse Isotropic media, the SMART layer is unconditionally dissipative: no amplification of the wavefield is possible. The SMART layers are not perfectly matched, therefore less accurate than conventional PML. However, a reasonable increase of the layer size yields an accuracy similar to PML. Finally, we illustrate that the selective damping strategy on which is based the SMART method can prevent the generation of spurious S-waves by embedding the source in a small zone where only S-waves are damped.

  18. Refractive Index Effects on Radiation in an Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Laminated Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    A simple set of equations is derived for predicting temperature radiative energy flow in a two-region semitransparent laminated layer in the limit of zero heat conduction. The composite is heated on its two sides by unequal amounts of incident radiation. The two layers of the composite have different refractive indices, and each material absorbs, emits, and isotropically scatters radiation. The interfaces are diffuse, and all interface reflections are included. To illustrate the thermal behavior that is readily calculated from the equations, typical results an given for various optical thicknesses and refractive indices of the layers. Internal reflections have a substantial effect on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flow.

  19. Assessment of Bulk Absorber Properties for Multi-Layer Perforates in Porous Honeycomb Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2006-01-01

    CONTINUING progress in materials technology provides potential for improved acoustic liners for attenuating broadband fan noise emissions from aircraft engine nacelles. Conventional liners (local-reacting perforate-over-honeycomb structures) provide significant narrow-band attenuation, but limited attenuation over wide bandwidths. Two approaches for increasing attenuation bandwidth are to (1) replace the honeycomb structure with bulk material, or (2) cascade multiple layers of perforate/honeycomb structures. Usage of the first approach is limited because of mechanical and maintenance reasons, while multi-layer liners are limited to about three layers because of their additional mechanical complexity, depth and weight. The current research concerns a novel approach reported by the University of Cincinnati, in which a single-layer conventional liner is converted into an extended-reaction, broadband absorber by making the honeycomb core structure porous. This modified single-layer liner requires no increase in depth and weight, and minimal increase in mechanical complexity. Langley has initiated research to identify potential benefits of liner structures with porous cell walls. This research has two complementary goals: (1) develop and validate experimental techniques for treating multi-layer perforates (representative of the internal cells of a liner with porous cell walls) as 1-D bulk materials, and (2) develop analytical approaches to validate this bulk material assumption. If successful, the resultant model can then be used to design optimized porous honeycomb liners. The feasibility of treating an N-layer perforate system (N porous plates separated by uniform air gaps) as a one-dimensional bulk absorber is assessed using the Two-Thickness Method (TTM), which is commonly used to educe bulk material intrinsic acoustic parameters. Tests are conducted with discrete tone and random noise sources, over an SPL range sufficient to determine the nonlinearity of the test

  20. Intensity tunable infrared broadband absorbers based on VO2 phase transition using planar layered thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Palacios, Edgar; Liu, Zizhuo; Tongay, Sefaattin; Fu, Deyi; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Aydin, Koray

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonic and metamaterial based nano/micro-structured materials enable spectrally selective resonant absorption, where the resonant bandwidth and absorption intensity can be engineered by controlling the size and geometry of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a simple, lithography-free approach for obtaining a resonant and dynamically tunable broadband absorber based on vanadium dioxide (VO2) phase transition. Using planar layered thin film structures, where top layer is chosen to be an ultrathin (20 nm) VO2 film, we demonstrate broadband IR light absorption tuning (from ~90% to ~30% in measured absorption) over the entire mid-wavelength infrared spectrum. Our numerical and experimental results indicate that the bandwidth of the absorption bands can be controlled by changing the dielectric spacer layer thickness. Broadband tunable absorbers can find applications in absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaics and sensing.

  1. Intensity tunable infrared broadband absorbers based on VO2 phase transition using planar layered thin films

    PubMed Central

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Palacios, Edgar; Liu, Zizhuo; Tongay, Sefaattin; Fu, Deyi; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Aydin, Koray

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic and metamaterial based nano/micro-structured materials enable spectrally selective resonant absorption, where the resonant bandwidth and absorption intensity can be engineered by controlling the size and geometry of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a simple, lithography-free approach for obtaining a resonant and dynamically tunable broadband absorber based on vanadium dioxide (VO2) phase transition. Using planar layered thin film structures, where top layer is chosen to be an ultrathin (20 nm) VO2 film, we demonstrate broadband IR light absorption tuning (from ~90% to ~30% in measured absorption) over the entire mid-wavelength infrared spectrum. Our numerical and experimental results indicate that the bandwidth of the absorption bands can be controlled by changing the dielectric spacer layer thickness. Broadband tunable absorbers can find applications in absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaics and sensing. PMID:26294085

  2. The Workshop on Microwave-Absorbing Materials for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Isidoro Campisi

    1993-05-01

    A workshop on the physics and applications of microwave-absorbing materials in accelerators and related systems was held at CEBAF February 22-24, 1993. The gathering brought together about 150 scientists and representatives of industries from all over the world. The main topics of discussion were the properties of ''absorbing'' materials and how the stringent conditions in an accelerator environment restrict the choice of usable material.

  3. Multi-pulse LIBDE of fused silica at different thicknesses of the organic absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Ehrhardt, Martin; Lorenz, Pierre; Han, Bing; Hopp, Bela; Vass, Csaba; Ni, Xiaowu; Zimmer, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced etching techniques feature several unique characteristics that enable ultraprecise machining of transparent materials. However, LIBDE (laser-induced back side dry etching) and LIBWE (laser-induced back side wet etching) are preferentially studied due to experimental feasibilities either using a very thin or a bulk absorber at the rear side of the transparent material. This study aims to fill the gap by examining the thickness dependence of the absorbing material. Multi-pulse-LIBDE (MP-LIBDE) of fused silica using different thick photoresist absorber layers (dL = 0.2-11.7 μm) was performed with a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, tp ≈ 20 ns). The influence of several experimental parameters, such as laser fluence, pulse number, film thickness, on the ablation morphology and the etching rate were investigated. Especially at moderate fluences (F = 0.7-1.5 J/cm2) MP-LIBDE and LIBWE show several similar process characteristics such as the etching rate dependence on the laser fluence and the pulse number with a typical etching rate of approx. 12 nm at 1 J/cm2. However, the specific etching rate values depend on the absorber layer thickness, for instance. The morphology of the etched surface is smooth with a roughness of below 5 nm rms. Further, the modification of the surface has been observed and will be discussed in relation to the multi-pulse laser etching mechanism.

  4. Thin films of copper antimony sulfide: A photovoltaic absorber material

    SciTech Connect

    Ornelas-Acosta, R.E.; Shaji, S.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K.; Krishnan, B.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • CuSbS{sub 2} thin films were prepared by heating Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers. • Analyzed the structure, composition, optical, and electrical properties. • PV structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag were formed at different conditions. • The PV parameters (J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF) were evaluated from the J–V characteristics. • J{sub sc}: 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, V{sub oc}:187–323 mV, FF: 0.27–0.48 were obtained. - Abstract: In this work, we report preparation and characterization of CuSbS{sub 2} thin films by heating glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers and their use as absorber material in photovoltaic structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag. The Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films of 600 nm were prepared by chemical bath deposition on which copper thin films of 50 nm were thermally evaporated, and the glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu multilayers were heated in vacuum at different temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of orthorhombic CuSbS{sub 2} after heating the precursor layers. Studies on identification and chemical state of the elements were done using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical band gap of the CuSbS{sub 2} thin films was 1.55 eV and the thin films were photoconductive. The photovoltaic parameters of the devices using CuSbS{sub 2} as absorber and CdS as window layer were evaluated from the J–V curves, yielding J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF values in the range of 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, 187–323 mV, and 0.27–0.48, respectively, under illumination of AM1.5 radiation.

  5. Schlieren photography to study sound interaction with highly absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Nico F; Degrieck, Joris; Leroy, Oswald

    2005-06-01

    Strong absorption of sound is often caused by the conversion of sound energy into heat. When this happens, it is not possible to study the interaction of sound with the absorbing material by means of reflected sound characteristics, because there is no reflected sound. Detecting for example the distance that sound travels in a strongly absorbing material, can be done by heat detection systems. However, the presence of temperature detectors in such materials interferes with the sound field and is therefore not really suitable. Infrared measurements are a possible option. Another option is the use of Schlieren photography for simultaneous visualization of sound and heat. This technique is briefly outlined with a 3 MHz sound beam incident on a highly absorbing sponge. PMID:15950023

  6. TECHNICAL NOTE: Design and development of electromagnetic absorbers with carbon fiber composites and matching dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neo, C. P.; Varadan, V. K.

    2001-10-01

    Radar absorbing materials are designed and developed with carbon fibers and suitable matching layers. Complex permittivities of carbon fiber composite are predicted on the basis that the modulus of permittivity obeys a logarithmic law of mixtures and the dielectric loss tangents are related through a linear law of mixtures. Linear regression analysis performed on the data points provides the constants which are used to predict the effective permittivities of carbon fiber composite at different frequencies. Using the free space measurement system, complex permittivities of the lossy dielectric at different frequencies are obtained. These complex permittivities are used to predict the reflectivity of a thin lossy dielectric layer on carbon fiber composite substrate. The predicted results agree quite well with the measured data. It is interesting to note that the thin lossy dielectric layer, about 0.03 mm thick, has helped to reduce the reflectivity of the 5.2 mm thick carbon fiber composite considerably.

  7. Comparison of silicon oxide and silicon carbide absorber materials in silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Cordula; Kellermann, Martin; Wendler, Elke; Rensberg, Jura; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    Since solar energy conversion by photovoltaics is most efficient for photon energies at the bandgap of the absorbing material the idea of combining absorber layers with different bandgaps in a multijunction cell has become popular. In silicon thin-film photovoltaics a multijunction stack with more than two subcells requires a high bandgap amorphous silicon alloy top cell absorber to achieve an optimal bandgap combination. We address the question whether amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) or amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO:H) is more suited for this type of top cell absorber. Our single cell results show a better performance of amorphous silicon carbide with respect to fill factor and especially open circuit voltage at equivalent Tauc bandgaps. The microstructure factor of single layers indicates less void structure in amorphous silicon carbide than in amorphous silicon oxide. Yet photoconductivity of silicon oxide films seems to be higher which could be explained by the material being not truly intrinsic. On the other hand better cell performance of amorphous silicon carbide absorber layers might be connected to better hole transport in the cell.

  8. Photoluminescence-based quality control for thin film absorber layers of photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Repins, Ingrid L.; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2015-07-07

    A time-resolved photoluminescence-based system providing quality control during manufacture of thin film absorber layers for photovoltaic devices. The system includes a laser generating excitation beams and an optical fiber with an end used both for directing each excitation beam onto a thin film absorber layer and for collecting photoluminescence from the absorber layer. The system includes a processor determining a quality control parameter such as minority carrier lifetime of the thin film absorber layer based on the collected photoluminescence. In some implementations, the laser is a low power, pulsed diode laser having photon energy at least great enough to excite electron hole pairs in the thin film absorber layer. The scattered light may be filterable from the collected photoluminescence, and the system may include a dichroic beam splitter and a filter that transmit the photoluminescence and remove scattered laser light prior to delivery to a photodetector and a digital oscilloscope.

  9. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The index of refraction can considerably influence the temperature distribution and radiative heat flow in semitransparent materials such as some ceramics. For external radiant heating, the refractive index influences the amount of energy transmitted into the interior of the material. Emission within a material depends on the square of its refractive index, and hence this emission can be many times that for a biackbody radiating into a vacuum. Since radiation exiting through an interface into a vacuum cannot exceed that of a blackbody, there is extensive reflection at the internal surface of an interface, mostly by total internal reflection. This redistributes energy within the layer and tends to make its temperature distribution more uniform. The purpose of the present analysis is to show that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained very simply from the results for an index of refraction of unity. For the situation studied here, the layer is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces. The material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. For simplicity the index of refraction is unity in the medium surrounding the layer. The surfaces of the layer are assumed diffuse. This is probably a reasonable approximation for a ceramic layer that has not been polished. When transmitted radiation or radiation emitted from the interior reaches the inner surface of an interface, the radiation is diffused and some of it thereby placed into angular directions for which there is total internal reflection. This provides a trapping effect for retaining energy within the layer and tends to equalize its temperature distribution. An analysis of temperature distributions in absorbing-emitting layers, including index of refraction effects, was developed by Gardon (1958) to predict cooling and heat treating of glass plates

  10. Microwave absorption properties of double-layer absorber based on carbonyl iron/barium hexaferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaohu; Fan, Huiqing; Cheng, Yankui

    2016-05-01

    The microwave absorption properties of BaCo0.4Zn1.6Fe16O27 ferrite and carbonyl iron powder with single-layer and double-layer composite absorbers were investigated based on the electromagnetic transmission line theory in the frequency range from 1 to 14 GHz. XRD was used to characterize the structure of prepared absorbing particles. SEM was used to examine the micromorphology of the particles and composites. The complex permittivity and permeability of composites were measured by using a vector network analyzer. The reflection loss of the single-layer and double-layer absorbers with different thicknesses and orders was investigated. The results show that double-layer absorbers have better microwave absorption properties than single-layer absorbers. The microwave absorption properties of the double-layer structure are influenced by the coupling interactions between the matching and absorption layers. As the pure ferrite used as matching layer and the composite of BF-5CI used as absorption, the minimum RL of absorber can achieve to -55.4 dB and the bandwidth of RL <-10 dB ranged from 5.6 to 10.8 GHz when the thicknesses of matching layer and absorption layer were 0.9 and 1.4 mm, respectively.

  11. Absorbing Boundary Conditions For Optical Pulses In Dispersive, Nonlinear Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present results in computational nonlinear optics. An algorithm will be described that provides absorbing boundary conditions for optical pulses in dispersive, nonlinear materials. A new numerical absorber at the boundaries has been developed that is responsive to the spectral content of the pulse. Also, results will be shown of calculations of 2-D electromagnetic nonlinear waves computed by directly integrating in time the nonlinear vector Maxwell's equations. The results will include simulations of "light bullet" like pulses. Here diffraction and dispersion will be counteracted by nonlinear effects. Comparisons will be shown of calculations that use the standard boundary conditions and the new ones.

  12. Preparation and characterization of CuInS2 absorber layers by sol-gel method for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerioun, M. H.; Ghazi, M. E.; Izadifard, M.; Bahramian, B.

    2016-04-01

    CuInSe2 , CuInS2 ( CIS2 and CuInGaS2 alloys and their compounds with band gaps between 1.05 and 1.7eV are absorbance materials based on chalcopyrite, in which, because of their suitable direct band gap, high absorbance coefficient and short carrier diffusion are used as absorbance layers in solar cells. In this work, the effects of decrease in p H and thickness variation on characteristics of the CIS2 absorber layers, grown by spin coating on glass substrates, are investigated. Furthermore by using thiourea as a sulphur source in solvent, the sulfurization of layers was done easier than other sulfurization methods. Due to the difficulty in dissolving thiourea in the considered solvent that leads to a fast deposition during the dissolving process, precise conditions are employed in order to prepare the solution. In fact, this procedure can facilitate the sulfurization process of CuIn layers. The results obtained from this investigation indicate reductions in absorbance and band gap in the visible region of the spectrum as a result of decrease in p H. Finally, conductivity of layers is studied by the current vs. voltage curve that represents reduction of electrical resistance with decrease and increase in p H and thickness, respectively.

  13. Sound-absorbing slabs and structures based on granular materials (bound and unbound). [energy absorbing efficiency of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre-Lazar, S.; Popeea, G.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorbing slabs and structures made up of bound or unbound granular materials are considered and how to manufacture these elements at the building site. The raw material is a single grain powder (sand, expanded blast furnace slag, etc.) that imparts to the end products an apparent porosity of 25-45% and an energy dissipation within the structure leading to absorption coefficients that can be compared with those of mineral wool and urethane.

  14. Synthesis and absorbing mechanism of two-layer microwave absorbers containing polycrystalline iron fibers and carbonyl iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qingwei; Zhang, Mingang; Zhang, Cunrui; Qian, Tianwei

    2013-04-01

    Polycrystalline iron fibers were fabricated by α-FeOOH fiber precursors. Two-layer microwave absorber had been prepared by as-prepared polycrystalline iron fibers and carbonyl iron. The structure, morphology and properties of the composites were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Network Analyzer. The complex permittivity and reflection loss (dB) of the composites were measured employing vector network analyzer model PNA 3629D vector in the frequency range between 30 and 6000 MHz. The thickness effect of the carbonyl iron layer on the microwave loss properties of the composites was investigated. A possible microwave-absorbing mechanism of polycrystalline iron fibers/carbonyl iron composite was proposed. The polycrystalline iron fibers/carbonyl iron composite can find applications in suppression of electromagnetic interference, and reduction of radar signature.

  15. A study of heat transfer for two layered composite inclined plate crotch absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.

    1989-11-01

    Since a copper plate (Z=29) absorbs most of the photon energy very near the surface, the temperature of the surface becomes very high despite of having a high thermal conductivity. On the other hand, a beryllium plate( Z=4) can diffuse the intense radiation throughout the depth of its plate by allowing photons to penetrate, but has a low thermal conductivity (about half of that of a copper). As an effort to combine both merits of Be and Cu, a Be-Cu composite absorber was developed and has been successfully used in CESR. They analyzed composite the heat transfer problem numerically for the case of a vertically located Be-Cu composite cylinder which results in symmetry with respect to the center of photon beam and allows them to consider only half a domain. In this note, an inclined absorber with two layered metal plates is considered and a full domain solution is sought to study the asymmetric heating due to the inclined photon beam penetration heating. An analytical solution for heat transfer is obtained for a full domain using the Fourier integral transformation and of particular interests are the effects of different thickness ratios of two materials and different inclination angles.

  16. Laser Writing Block Copolymer Self-Assembly on Graphene Light-Absorbing Layer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyeong Min; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Ju Young; Son, Seung-Woo; Kim, Bong Hoon; Lee, Hwan Keon; Mun, Jeong Ho; Cha, Seung Keun; Kim, Jun Soo; Nealey, Paul F; Lee, Keon Jae; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2016-03-22

    Recent advance of high-power laser processing allows for rapid, continuous, area-selective material fabrication, typically represented by laser crystallization of silicon or oxides for display applications. Two-dimensional materials such as graphene exhibit remarkable physical properties and are under intensive development for the manufacture of flexible devices. Here we demonstrate an area-selective ultrafast nanofabrication method using low intensity infrared or visible laser irradiation to direct the self-assembly of block copolymer films into highly ordered manufacturing-relevant architectures at the scale below 12 nm. The fundamental principles underlying this light-induced nanofabrication mechanism include the self-assembly of block copolymers to proceed across the disorder-order transition under large thermal gradients, and the use of chemically modified graphene films as a flexible and conformal light-absorbing layers for transparent, nonplanar, and mechanically flexible surfaces. PMID:26871736

  17. An `H'-shape three-dimensional meta-material used in honeycomb structure absorbing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Daqing; Kang, Feiyu; Zhou, Zhuohui; Cheng, Hongfei; Ding, Heyan

    2015-03-01

    An `H'-shape three-dimensional meta-material structure which loaded on the sidewall of honeycomb structure absorbing material was designed and fabricated in this project. The simulation results demonstrated a super-wide absorption band below -10 dB between 2.3 and 18 GHz, which expanded 7 GHz compared with the absorber without meta-material. The relative impedance curve was analyzed, which showed that the meta-material has little impact on the impedance-matching characteristics of the honeycomb structure absorbing material. We further studied the distribution of both electronic field energy and magnetic field energy. The former one indicated that the low-frequency absorption peaks could easily be moved by adjusting the parameters of the parallel-plate capacitors which generate electric resonance, and the latter one illustrated that the three-dimensional meta-material could generate magnetic resonance between units which would not exist in two-dimensional meta-material. Then we verified the simulation results through experiment which display a similar absorbing curve. The differences between simulation results and experiment results were caused by the addition substrate of the meta-material, which could not be eliminated in this experiment. However, it still implied that we can obtain a meta-material absorber that has a super-wide absorbing band if we can put the meta-material on the sidewall of the honeycomb without attachments.

  18. Microfiber-based few-layer black phosphorus saturable absorber for ultra-fast fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Meng; Guo, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Xiao-Fang; Luo, Ai-Ping; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Yu, Xue-Feng; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Han

    2015-07-27

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP), as the most alluring graphene analogue owing to its similar structure as graphene and thickness dependent direct band-gap, has now triggered a new wave of research on two-dimensional (2D) materials based photonics and optoelectronics. However, a major obstacle of practical applications for few-layer BPs comes from their instabilities of laser-induced optical damage. Herein, we demonstrate that, few-layer BPs, which was fabricated through the liquid exfoliation approach, can be developed as a new and practical saturable absorber (SA) by depositing few-layer BPs with microfiber. The saturable absorption property of few-layer BPs had been verified through an open-aperture z-scan measurement at the telecommunication band. The microfiber-based BP device had been found to show a saturable average power of ~4.5 mW and a modulation depth of 10.9%, which is further confirmed through a balanced twin detection measurement. By integrating this optical SA device into an erbium-doped fiber laser, it was found that it can deliver the mode-locked pulse with duration down to 940 fs with central wavelength tunable from 1532 nm to 1570 nm. The prevention of BP from oxidation through the "lateral interaction scheme" owing to this microfiber-based few-layer BP SA device might partially mitigate the optical damage problem of BP. Our results not only demonstrate that black phosphorus might be another promising SA material for ultrafast photonics, but also provide a practical solution to solve the optical damage problem of black phosphorus by assembling with waveguide structures such as microfiber. PMID:26367661

  19. Extremely efficient and recyclable absorbents for oily pollutants enabled by ultrathin-layered functionalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Hanghua; Xiong, Sen; Chen, Rizhi; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-12

    Oils and organic solvents that leak into water bodies must be promptly removed to avoid ecological disasters, for example, by selective absorption using oleophilic absorbents. However, it remains a challenge for the low-cost synthesis of efficient and recyclable absorbents for oily pollutants. By surface functionalization to inexpensive polyurethane (PU) foams, we synthesize oil absorbents exhibiting the highest absorption capacity and the best recyclability among all polymeric absorbents. The synthesis is enabled by atomic layer deposition of ∼5 nm-thick Al2O3 transition layer onto the skeleton surface of PU foams, followed by coupling a single-molecule layer of silanes to the Al2O3 layer. The sub-10 nm functionalization layer provides the PU foam an outstanding water-repelling and oil-absorbing functionality without compromising its high porosity and elasticity. The functionalized foam is able to quickly absorb oily pollutants spread on water surfaces or precipitated in water with a capacity more than 100 times its own weight. This ultrathin-layer-functionalization method is also applicable to renewable porous biomaterials, providing a sustainable solution for oil spills. Moreover, we propose devices than can continuously operate to efficiently collect oil spills from water surfaces based on the functionalized PU foam developed in this work. PMID:25315285

  20. Thermal imaging of subsurface microwave absorbers in dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiander, Robert; Maclachlan Spicer, Jane W.; Murphy, John C.

    1994-03-01

    The use of microwaves as a heating source in time-resolved IR radiometry provides the ability to heat surface and subsurface microwave-absorbing regions of a specimen directly. This can improve the contrast and spatial resolution of such regions and enhance their detectibility when compared with conventional laser or flashlamp sources. The experiments reported here use microwave heating with IR detection. Results on plexiglass-water-Teflon test specimens with absorbers at different depths in the sample are described by a 1D analytical model. Measurements using microwave and optical heating on epoxy-coated steel pipes are compared and demonstrate the ability of microwave heating to detect subsurface water voids very efficiently. Other applications of the method to microwave imaging, field mapping and imaging of defects in composite materials are discussed.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of absorbing thin films on nanostructured electrodes for short-wavelength infrared photosensing

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jixian; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Fan, Fengjia; Sargent, Edward H.; Kinge, Sachin

    2015-10-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD), prized for its high-quality thin-film formation in the absence of high temperature or high vacuum, has become an industry standard for the large-area deposition of a wide array of oxide materials. Recently, it has shown promise in the formation of nanocrystalline sulfide films. Here, we demonstrate the viability of ALD lead sulfide for photodetection. Leveraging the conformal capabilities of ALD, we enhance the absorption without compromising the extraction efficiency in the absorbing layer by utilizing a ZnO nanowire electrode. The nanowires are first coated with a thin shunt-preventing TiO{sub 2} layer, followed by an infrared-active ALD PbS layer for photosensing. The ALD PbS photodetector exhibits a peak responsivity of 10{sup −2} A W{sup −1} and a shot-derived specific detectivity of 3 × 10{sup 9} Jones at 1530 nm wavelength.

  2. Absorbing materials with applications in radiotherapy and radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Spunei, M; Malaescu, I; Mihai, M; Marin, C N

    2014-11-01

    The radiotherapy centres are using linear accelerators equipped with multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) for treatments of various types of cancer. For superficial cancers located at a maximum depth of 3 cm high-energy electrons are often used, but MLC cannot be used together with electron applicators. Due to the fact that the tumour shape is not square (as electron applicators), searching for different materials that can be used as absorbents or shields for the protection of adjacent organs is of paramount importance. This study presents an experimental study regarding the transmitted dose through some laboratory-made materials when subjected to electron beams of various energies (ranging from 6 to 15 MeV). The investigated samples were composite materials consisting of silicon rubber and micrometre aluminium particles with different thicknesses and various mass fraction of aluminium. The measurements were performed at a source surface distance of 100 cm in the acrylic phantom. The experimental results show that the transmitted dose through tested samples is ranging between ∼1.8 and 90%, depending on the electron beam energy, sample thickness and sample composition. These preliminary results suggest that the analysed materials can be used as absorbers or shields in different applications in radiotherapy and radioprotection. PMID:25071243

  3. Porphyrin Based Near Infrared-Absorbing Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiwen

    The conservation and transformation of energy is essential to the survival of mankind, and thus concerns every modern society. Solar energy, as an everlasting source of energy, holds one of the key solutions to some of the most urgent problems the world now faces, such as global warming and the oil crisis. Advances in technologies utilizing clean, abundant solar energy, could be the steering wheel of our societies. Solar cells, one of the major advances in converting solar energy into electricity, are now capturing people's interest all over the globe. While solar cells have been commercially available for many years, the manufacturing of solar cells is quite expensive, limiting their broad based implementation. The cost of solar cell based electricity is 15-50 cents per kilowatt hour (¢/kwh), depending on the type of solar cell, compared to 0.7 ¢/kwh for fossil fuel based electricity. Clearly, decreasing the cost of electricity from solar cells is critical for their wide spread deployment. This will require a decrease in the cost of light absorbing materials and material processing used in fabricating the cells. Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) utilize organic materials such as polymers and small molecules. These devices have the advantage of being flexible and lower cost than conventional solar cells built from inorganic semiconductors (e.g. silicon). The low cost of OPVs is tied to lower materials and fabrication costs of organic cells. However, the current power conversion efficiencies of OPVs are still below 15%, while convention crystalline Si cells have efficiencies of 20-25%. A key limitation in OPVs today is their inability to utilize the near infrared (NIR) portion of the solar spectrum. This part of the spectrum comprises nearly half of the energy in sunlight that could be used to make electricity. The first and foremost step in conversion solar energy conversion is the absorption of light, which nature has provided us optimal model of, which is

  4. Enforced Layer-by-Layer Stacking of Energetic Salts towards High-Performance Insensitive Energetic Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaheng; Mitchell, Lauren A; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-08-26

    Development of modern high-performance insensitive energetic materials is significant because of the increasing demands for both military and civilian applications. Here we propose a rapid and facile strategy called the "layer hydrogen bonding pairing approach" to organize energetic molecules via layer-by-layer stacking, which grants access to tunable energetic materials with targeted properties. Using this strategy, an unusual energetic salt, hydroxylammonium 4-amino-furazan-3-yl-tetrazol-1-olate, with good detonation performances and excellent sensitivities, was designed, synthesized, and fully characterized. In addition, the expected unique layer-by-layer structure with a high crystal packing coefficient was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Calculations indicate that the layer-stacking structure of this material can absorb the mechanical stimuli-induced kinetic energy by converting it to layer sliding, which results in low sensitivity. PMID:26262555

  5. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  6. Boron-copper neutron absorbing material and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry

    1991-01-01

    A composite, copper clad neutron absorbing material is comprised of copper powder and boron powder enriched with boron 10. The boron 10 content can reach over 30 percent by volume, permitting a very high level of neutron absorption. The copper clad product is also capable of being reduced to a thickness of 0.05 to 0.06 inches and curved to a radius of 2 to 3 inches, and can resist temperatures of 900.degree. C. A method of preparing the material includes the steps of compacting a boron-copper powder mixture and placing it in a copper cladding, restraining the clad assembly in a steel frame while it is hot rolled at 900.degree. C. with cross rolling, and removing the steel frame and further rolling the clad assembly at 650.degree. C. An additional sheet of copper can be soldered onto the clad assembly so that the finished sheet can be cold formed into curved shapes.

  7. Decontamination of skin exposed to nanocarriers using an absorbent textile material and PEG-12 dimethicone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Baier, G.; Landfester, K.; Frazier, L.; Gefeller, H.; Wunderlich, U.; Gross, I.; Rühl, E.; Knorr, F.

    2014-11-01

    The removal of noxious particulate contaminants such as pollutants derived from particle-to-gas conversions from exposed skin is essential to avoid the permeation of potentially harmful substances into deeper skin layers via the stratum corneum or the skin appendages and their dispersion throughout the circulatory system. This study is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of using the silicone glycol polymer PEG-12 dimethicone and an absorbent textile material to remove fluorescing hydroxyethyl starch nanocapsules implemented as model contaminants from exposed porcine ear skin. Using laser scanning microscopy, it could be shown that while the application and subsequent removal of the absorbent textile material alone did not result in sufficient decontamination, the combined application with PEG-12 dimethicone almost completely eliminated the nanocapsules from the surface of the skin. By acting as a wetting agent, PEG-12 dimethicone enabled the transfer of the nanocapsules into a liquid phase which was taken up by the absorbent textile material. Only traces of fluorescence remained detectable in several skin furrows and follicular orifices, suggesting that the repeated implementation of the procedure may be necessary to achieve total skin surface decontamination.

  8. Liftoff lithography of metals for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask absorber layer patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Adam; Teki, Ranganath; Hartley, John

    2012-03-01

    The authors present a process for patterning Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) mask absorber metal using electron beam evaporation and bi-layer liftoff lithography. The Line Edge Roughness (LER) and Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) of patterned chrome absorber are determined for various chrome thicknesses on silicon substrates, and the viability of the method for use with nickel absorber and on EUVL masks is demonstrated. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) data is used with SuMMIT software to determine the absorber LER and CDU. The Lawrence Berkeley National Labs Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is used to verify the printability of the pattern down to 24nm half pitch. The effect of processing on the integrity of the mask multilayer is measured using an actinic reflectometer at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering.

  9. The Multi-Layer Variable Absorbers in NGC 1365 Revealed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, E.; Risaliti, G.; Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F.; Arevalo, P.; Baur, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brenneman, L. W.; Brightman, M.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Between 2012 July and 2013 February, NuSTAR and XMM-Newton performed four long-look joint observations of the type 1.8 Seyfert, NGC 1365. We have analyzed the variable absorption seen in these observations in order to characterize the geometry of the absorbing material. Two of the observations caught NGC 1365 in an unusually low absorption state, revealing complexity in the multi-layer absorber that had previously been hidden. We find the need for three distinct zones of neutral absorption in addition to the two zones of ionized absorption and the Compton-thick torus previously seen in this source. The most prominent absorber is likely associated with broad-line region clouds with column densities of around approximately 10 (sup 23) per square centimeter and a highly clumpy nature as evidenced by an occultation event in 2013 February. We also find evidence of a patchy absorber with a variable column around approximately 10 (sup 22) per square centimeter and a line-of-sight covering fraction of 0.3-0.9, which responds directly to the intrinsic source flux, possibly due to a wind geometry. A full-covering, constant absorber with a low column density of approximately 1 by 10 (sup 22) per square centimeter is also present, though the location of this low density haze is unknown.

  10. An optimal perfectly matched layer with unbounded absorbing function for time-harmonic acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, A.; Hervella-Nieto, L.; Prieto, A.; Rodríguez, R.

    2007-05-01

    We introduce an optimal bounded perfectly matched layer (PML) technique by choosing a particular absorbing function with unbounded integral. With this choice, spurious reflections are avoided, even though the thickness of the layer is finite. We show that such choice is easy to implement in a finite element method and overcomes the dependency of parameters for the discrete problem. Finally, its efficiency and accuracy are illustrated with some numerical tests.

  11. Impact of annealing on electrical properties of Cu2ZnSnSe4 absorber layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Thomas Paul; Redinger, Alex; Rey, Germain; Schwarz, Torsten; Spies, Maria; Cojocura-Mirédin, Oana; Choi, P.-P.; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Reported growth processes for kesterite absorber layers generally rely on a sequential process including a final high temperature annealing step. However, the impact and details for this annealing process vary among literature reports and little is known on its impact on electrical properties of the absorber. We used kesterite absorber layers prepared by a high temperature co-evaporation process to explicitly study the impact of two different annealing processes. From electrical characterization it is found that the annealing process incorporates a detrimental deep defect distribution. On the other hand, the doping density could be reduced leading to a better collection and a higher short circuit current density. The activation energy of the doping acceptor was studied with admittance spectroscopy and showed Meyer-Neldel behaviour. This indicates that the entropy significantly contributes to the activation energy.

  12. Solution of the Inverse Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Problem for an Absorbing Substrate with a Dielectric Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stas'kov, N. I.; Shulga, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    An analytical solution of the inverse spectroscopic ellipsometry problem for a transparent layer on an absorbing substrate is obtained based on the envelope function approximation. It is used to determine the spectral dependences of the refractive index n(λ) and absorption k(λ) for model and real silicon substrates with silicon dioxide layers. It was possible to determine analytically the effective optical characteristics of the silicon substrate in the approximation of a layer-substrate model with ideal interface boundaries. This result, together with the relative positions of the spectral curves for the ellipsometric angles tan ψ(λ) and cos Δ(λ) measured for a silicon substrate with a natural surface layer and for a silicon dioxide layer-silicon substrate structure, can be explained by the fact that the silicon dioxide layer is surrounded by transition and surface layers.

  13. Alternative materials to cadmium for neutron absorbers in safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Corey R; Geist, William H; West, James D

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium is increasingly difficult to use in safeguards applications because of rising cost and increased safety regulations. This work examines the properties of two materials produced by Ceradyne, inc. that present alternatives to cadmium for neutron shielding. The first is an aluminum metal doped with boron and the second is a boron carbide powder, compressed into a ceramic. Both are enriched in the {sup 10}B isotope. Two sheets of boron doped aluminum (1.1 mm and 5.2mm thick) and one sheet of boron carbide (8.5mm thick) were provided by Ceradyne for testing. An experiment was designed to test the neutron absorption capabilities of these three sheets against two different thicknesses of cadmium (0.6mm and 1.6mm thick). The thinner piece of aluminum boron alloy (1.1mm) performed as well as the cadmium pieces at absorbing neutrons. The thicker aluminum-boron plate provided more shielding than the cadmium sheets and the boron carbide performed best by a relatively large margin. Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code modeling of the experiment was performed to provide validaLed computational tools for predicting the behavior of systems in which these materials may be incorporated as alternatives to cadmium. MCNPX calculations predict that approximately 0.17mm of the boron carbide is equivalent to 0.6mm of cadmium. There are drawbacks to these materials that need to be noted when considering using them as replacements for cadmium. Notably, they may need to be thicker than cadmium, and are not malleable, requiring machining to fit any curved forms.

  14. Effects of oxygen incorporation in solar cells with a-SiOx:H absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuo; Smirnov, Vladimir; Chen, Tao; Holländer, Bernhard; Zhang, Xiaodan; Xiong, Shaozhen; Zhao, Ying; Finger, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The effects of oxygen incorporation on layer properties and cell performance were investigated in thin film solar cells with a-SiOx:H absorber layers. Besides the widened optical band gap and increased defect densities, a doping effect is observed upon oxygen incorporation even for the layers with wide band gap. From comparison of solar cells illuminated from either p- or n-side, we conclude that overall hole carrier collection is strongly deteriorated by increasing the oxygen concentration. The donor-like states induced by oxygen reform the electric field in the absorber. The intensified electric field near the p/i interface improves the quantum efficiency (QE) around 400 nm, which is attributed to the better carrier collection in the p-layer. The maximum of QE shows a blue shift with both p- and n-side illumination. It is consistent with the enhanced optical band gap of the absorber layer and shows the potential of usage in multi-junction solar cells.

  15. Dysprosium titanate as an absorber material for control rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risovany, V. D.; Varlashova, E. E.; Suslov, D. N.

    2000-09-01

    Disprosium titanate is an attractive control rod material for the thermal neutron reactors. Its main advantages are: insignificant swelling, no out-gassing under neutron irradiation, rather high neutron efficiency, a high melting point (˜1870°C), non-interaction with the cladding at temperatures above 1000°C, simple fabrication and easily reprocessed non-radioactive waste. It can be used in control rods as pellets and powder. The disprosium titanate control rods have worked off in the MIR reactor for 17 years, in VVER-1000 - for 4 years without any operating problems. After post-irradiation examinations this type of control rod having high lifetime was recommended for the VVER and RBMK. The paper presents the examination results of absorber element dummies containing dysprosium titanate, irradiated in the SM reactor to the neutron fluence of 3.4×10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and, also, the data on structure, thermal-physical properties of dysprosium titanate, efficiency of dysprosium titanate control rods.

  16. Calcined Mg-Fe layered double hydroxide as an absorber for the removal of methyl orange

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Chao; Dai, Jing; Yu, Jianying; Yin, Jian

    2015-05-15

    In this work, methyl orange (MO) was effectively removed from aqueous solution with the calcined product of hydrothermal synthesized Mg/Fe layered double hydroxide (Mg/Fe-LDH). The structure, composition, morphology and textural properties of the Mg/Fe-LDH before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption apparatus and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was confirmed that MO had been absorbed by calcined Mg/Fe-LDH which had strong interactions with MO. The adsorption of MO onto the Mg/Fe-LDH was systematically investigated by batch tests. The adsorption capacity of the Mg/Fe-LDH toward MO was found to be 194.9 mg • g{sup −1}. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm studies revealed that the adsorption of MO onto Mg/Fe-LDH was a spontaneous and endothermic process. These results indicate that Mg/Fe-LDH is a promising material for the removal of MO.

  17. Calcined Mg-Fe layered double hydroxide as an absorber for the removal of methyl orange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Dai, Jing; Yu, Jianying; Yin, Jian

    2015-05-01

    In this work, methyl orange (MO) was effectively removed from aqueous solution with the calcined product of hydrothermal synthesized Mg/Fe layered double hydroxide (Mg/Fe-LDH). The structure, composition, morphology and textural properties of the Mg/Fe-LDH before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption apparatus and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was confirmed that MO had been absorbed by calcined Mg/Fe-LDH which had strong interactions with MO. The adsorption of MO onto the Mg/Fe-LDH was systematically investigated by batch tests. The adsorption capacity of the Mg/Fe-LDH toward MO was found to be 194.9 mg • g-1. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm studies revealed that the adsorption of MO onto Mg/Fe-LDH was a spontaneous and endothermic process. These results indicate that Mg/Fe-LDH is a promising material for the removal of MO.

  18. Solar absorber material stability under high solar flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, A.; Zajac, G.; Smith, G. B.

    1982-04-01

    Solar absorbing Black Chrome coatings have been exposed to high temperatures (350-400 C) under high solar fluxes (0.4 to 2.0 MW/sq m) to test for their stability under actual operating conditions. Field tests at the White Sands Solar Furnace have shown higher stability than expected from oven tested samples. Laboratory studies utilizing spectrally selective concentrated solar simulated radiation have indicated that the cause of the higher stability under solar irradiation is photo-stimulated desorption of oxygen bearing species at the absorber surface and resultant reduced oxidation of the absorber.

  19. The Effects of an Absorbing Smoke Layer on MODIS Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Optical Property Retrievals and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Clouds, aerosols, and their interactions are widely considered to be key uncertainty components in our current understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and radiation budget. The work presented here is focused on the quasi-permanent marine boundary layer . (MBL) clouds off the southern Atlantic coast of Africa and the effects on MODIS cloud optical property retrievals (MOD06) of an overlying absorbing smoke layer. During much of August and September, a persistent smoke layer resides over this region, produced from extensive biomass burning throughout the southern African savanna. The resulting absorption, which increases with decreasing wavelength, potentially introduces biases into the MODIS cloud optical property retrievals of the underlying MBL clouds. This effect is more pronounced in the cloud optical thickness retrievals, which over ocean are derived from the wavelength channel centered near 0.86 micron (effective particle size retrievals are derived from the longer-wavelength near-IR channels at 1.6, 2.1, and 3.7 microns). Here, the spatial distributions of the scalar statistics of both the cloud and aerosol layers are first determined from the CALIOP 5 km layer products. Next, the MOD06 look-up tables (LUTs) are adjusted by inserting an absorbing smoke layer of varying optical thickness over the cloud. Retrievals are subsequently performed for a subset of MODIS pixels collocated with the CALIOP ground track, using smoke optical thickness from the CALIOP 5km aerosol layer product to select the appropriate LUT. The resulting differences in cloud optical property retrievals due to the inclusion of the smoke layer in the LUTs will be examined. In addition, the direct radiative forcing of this smoke layer will be investigated from the perspective of the cloud optical property retrieval differences.

  20. Analysis and evaluation of RF absorbing material in suppressing modes associated with a metallic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David L.

    Application of absorbing materials within enclosures designed to house high-speed digital electronics has become common practice for suppressing resonances associated with the enclosure geometry. Use of absorbing material is often considered toward the end of the design phase when the product is undergoing electromagnetic compatibility compliance testing, leaving little time for the additional experimentation required to optimize absorber material selection or placement within the device. The engineering principles required for maximizing absorber performance within the enclosure are often disregarded, replaced by a "shotgun" approach where multiple material options are experimented with until a solution is achieved. For this research a frequency domain reverberation chamber technique and one-port time domain quality factor estimation technique are employed to quantify the ability of various absorbing materials to suppress resonances of a physically small, electrically large cavity representative of those that may be used to enclose high-speed circuitry. Using both measurement techniques, assessment of the performance of various absorbing materials was performed as well as an evaluation of the affect absorber position has on overall material performance. It was found that both measurement techniques were effective in quantifying absorber performance within the cavity. For the frequency domain reverberation chamber approach the absorber effectiveness, defined as the difference in insertion loss between the cavity with and without absorbing material, was analyzed for various materials. For the undermoded cavity it was found that absorber effectiveness was positionally dependent. For the overmoded cavity, however, the position of the absorber within the cavity, as long as the total exposed surface area remained constant, did not have a significant impact on the absorber effectiveness. Similar results were also found by comparing the estimated quality factor for

  1. On absorbing boundary conditions for linearized Euler equations by a perfectly matched layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Fang Q.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, Berenger introduced a Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique for absorbing electromagnetic waves. In the present paper, a perfectly matched layer is proposed for absorbing out-going two-dimensional waves in a uniform mean flow, generated by linearized Euler equations. It is well known that the linearized Euler equations support acoustic waves, which travel with the speed of sound relative to the mean flow, and vorticity and entropy waves, which travel with the mean flow. The PML equations to be used at a region adjacent to the artificial boundary for absorbing these linear waves are defined. Plane waves solutions to the PML equations are developed and wave propagation and absorption properties are given. It is shown that the theoretical reflection coefficients at an interface between the Euler and PML domains are zero, independent of the angle of incidence and frequency of the waves. As such, the present study points out a possible alternative approach for absorbing out-going waves of the Euler equations with little or no reflection in computation. Numerical examples that demonstrate the validity of the proposed PML equations are also presented.

  2. Nanorod solar cell with an ultrathin a-Si:H absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yinghuan; van der Werf, Karine H. M.; Houweling, Z. Silvester; Schropp, Ruud E. I.

    2011-03-01

    We propose a nanostructured three-dimensional (nano-3D) solar cell design employing an ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) n-i-p junction deposited on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays. The ZnO nanorods were prepared by aqueous chemical growth at 80 °C. The photovoltaic performance of the nanorod/a-Si:H solar cell with an ultrathin absorber layer of only 25 nm is experimentally demonstrated. An efficiency of 3.6% and a short-circuit current density of 8.3 mA/cm2 were obtained, significantly higher than values achieved for planar or even textured counterparts with three times thicker (˜75 nm) a-Si:H absorber layers.

  3. Infrared spectral emittance profiles of spectrally selective solar absorbing layers at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Soule, D E; Smith, D W

    1977-11-01

    A study was made to characterize parametrically the spectrally selective absorptance profiles of typical interference, bulk absorption, and mixed-type absorbing layers for solar-thermal conversion at temperatures to 500 degrees C. A five parameter empirical Fermi function was used to model the spectral absorptance converted from the measured spectral reflectance. An alternative method using the Fermi model is presented for defining the ir spectral emittance profile, as scaled to the measured hemispherical total emittahce. PMID:20174248

  4. A Two-Step Absorber Deposition Approach To Overcome Shunt Losses in Thin-Film Solar Cells: Using Tin Sulfide as a Proof-of-Concept Material System.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Vera; Chakraborty, Rupak; Rekemeyer, Paul H; Hartman, Katy; Brandt, Riley E; Polizzotti, Alex; Yang, Chuanxi; Moriarty, Tom; Gradečak, Silvija; Gordon, Roy G; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-08-31

    As novel absorber materials are developed and screened for their photovoltaic (PV) properties, the challenge remains to reproducibly test promising candidates for high-performing PV devices. Many early-stage devices are prone to device shunting due to pinholes in the absorber layer, producing "false-negative" results. Here, we demonstrate a device engineering solution toward a robust device architecture, using a two-step absorber deposition approach. We use tin sulfide (SnS) as a test absorber material. The SnS bulk is processed at high temperature (400 °C) to stimulate grain growth, followed by a much thinner, low-temperature (200 °C) absorber deposition. At a lower process temperature, the thin absorber overlayer contains significantly smaller, densely packed grains, which are likely to provide a continuous coating and fill pinholes in the underlying absorber bulk. We compare this two-step approach to the more standard approach of using a semi-insulating buffer layer directly on top of the annealed absorber bulk, and we demonstrate a more than 3.5× superior shunt resistance Rsh with smaller standard error σRsh. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements indicate a lower density of pinholes in the SnS absorber bulk when using the two-step absorber deposition approach. We correlate those findings to improvements in the device performance and device performance reproducibility. PMID:27494110

  5. Characterization and device performance of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanket, Gregory; Boyle, Jonathan H.; Shafarman, William N.

    2009-06-08

    The study of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers is of interest in that Ag-chalcopyrites exhibit both wider bandgaps and lower melting points than their Cu counterparts. (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers were deposited over the composition range 0 < Ag/(Ag+Cu) < 1 and 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) < 1.0 using a variety of elemental co-evaporation processes. Films were found to be singlephase over the entire composition range, in contrast to prior studies. Devices with Ga content 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) <0.5 tolerated Ag incorporation up to Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.5 without appreciable performance loss. Ag-containing films with Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 showed improved device characteristics over Cu-only control samples, in particular a 30-40% increase in short-circuit current. An absorber layer with composition Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.75 and Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 yielded a device with VOC = 890 mV, JSC = 20.5mA/cm2, fill factor = 71.3%, and η = 13.0%.

  6. Knitted radar absorbing materials (RAM) based on nickel-cobalt magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teber, Ahmet; Unver, Ibrahim; Kavas, Huseyin; Aktas, Bekir; Bansal, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    There has been a long-standing interest in the development of flexible, lightweight, thin, and reconfigurable radar absorbing materials (RAM) for military applications such as camouflaging ground-based hardware against airborne radar observation. The use of polymeric Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fabrics as a host matrix for magnetic metal nano-particles (either at the yarn-stage or after weaving the fabric) for shielding and absorbing applications has been described in the literature. In our experimental investigation, the relative concentrations of Nickel and Cobalt as well as the coating time are varied with a view to optimizing the microwave absorption characteristics of the resulting PAN-based composite material in the radar-frequency bands (X, Ku, and K). It is found that the PAN samples with the shortest coating time have the best return losses (under -20 dB return loss over a moderate bandwidth).

  7. The NuSTAR View of Reflecting and Absorbing Circumnuclear Material in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    The physical conditions and precise geometry of the accreting circumnuclear material in the vicinity of supermassive black holes remain open and critical questions. Between July 2012 and February 2013, NuSTAR and XMM-Newton performed four long-look joint observations of the type 1.8 Seyfert, NGC 1365. We have analyzed the variable absorption seen in these observations in order to characterize the geometry of the absorbing material. Two of the observations caught NGC 1365 in an unusually low absorption state, revealing complexity in the multi-layer absorbers which had previously been hidden, including a the Compton-thick torus, BLR clouds, and a patchy absorber with a variable column around 1022 cm-2 and a line of sight covering fraction of 0.3-0.9 which responds directly to the intrinsic source flux, possibly due to a wind geometry. We have also analyzed two NuSTAR observations of NGC 7582, a well-studied X-ray bright Seyfert 2 with moderately heavy highly variable absorption and strong reflection spectral features. Changes in the spectral shape and high reflection fractions have led to competing explanations: 1) the central X-ray source partially “shut off”, decreasing in intrinsic luminosity, with a delayed decrease in reflection features due to the light-crossing time of the Compton-thick material or 2) the source became more heavily obscured, with only a portion of the power law continuum leaking through. The high quality of the NuSTAR spectra above 10 keV give us the best look at the reflection hump to date and allow us to test these two scenarios.

  8. Effect of Morphology Control of Light Absorbing Layer on CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Binglong; Eze, Vincent Obiozo; Mori, Tatsuo

    2016-04-01

    As one of the most significant components of perovskite solar cells, the perovskite light absorbing layer demands high quality to guarantee extraordinary power conversion efficiency (PCE). We have fabricated series of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells by virtue of gas-flowing assisting (GFA), spin coating twice for the Pbl2 layer and dipping the semi-samples in a thermal CH3NH3I solution, by which some undesirable perovskite morphologies can be effectively avoided. The modified conductions have also dramatically improved the perovskite layer and elevated the coverage ratio from 53.6% to 79.5%. All the fabrication processes, except the steps for deposition of the hole transport material (HTM) and back gold electrode, have been conducted in air and an average PCE of 6.6% has been achieved by initiatively applying N,N'-bis(1-naphtyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (α-NPD) doped by MoO3 as HTM. The CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite's morphology and its coverage ratio to the underneath TiO2 mesoporic layer are evaluated to account for the cells' performance. It has demonstrated that higher homogeneity and coverage ratio of the CH3NH3PbI3 layer have most significantly contributed to the solar cells' light conversion efficiency. Keywords: Perovskite, Solar Cell, Morphology, Coverage Ratio, Hole Transport Material. PMID:27451600

  9. Nanotribological properties of water films adsorbing atop, and absorbing below, graphene layers supported by metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zijian; Curtis, C. K.; Stine, R.; Sheehan, P.; Krim, J.

    The tribological properties of graphite, a common lubricant with known sensitivity to the presence of water, have been studied extensively at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. Although far less attention has been devoted to the tribological properties of graphene, it has been established that the tribological response to the presence of water is dissimilar from that of graphite. We report here a quartz crystal microbalance study of the nanotribological properties of water films adsorbed/absorbed on graphene layers prepared by either chemical decomposition on nickel(111) substrates or transfer of freestanding graphene layers to aluminum substrates. Sliding friction levels of the water films were also measured for metal surfaces in the absence of a graphene layer. We observe very high friction levels for water adsorbed atop graphene on Ni(111) and very low levels for water on aluminum. For the case of graphene/aluminum, the data indicate that the water is absorbing between the graphene layer and the aluminum. Dissipation levels moreover indicate the presence of an interstitial water increases sliding friction between the graphene and the aluminum substrate Work supported by NSF and NRL.

  10. Development of FeCoB/Graphene Oxide based microwave absorbing materials for X-Band region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta; Chandra Nayak, Ganesh; Sahu, S. K.; Oraon, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    This work explored the microwave absorption capability of Graphene Oxide and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB for stealth technology. Epoxy based microwave absorbing materials were prepared with 30% loading of Graphene Oxide, FeCoB alloy and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB. Graphene Oxide and FeCoB were synthesized by Hummer's and Co-precipitation methods, respectively. The filler particles were characterized by FESEM, XRD and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer techniques. Permittivity, permeability and reflection loss values of the composite absorbers were measured with vector network analyzer which showed a reflection loss value of -7.86 dB, at 10.72 GHz, for single layered Graphene Oxide/Epoxy based microwave absorbers which can be correlated to the absorption of about 83.97% of the incident microwave energy. Reflection loss value of FeCoB/Epoxy based microwave absorber showed -13.30 dB at 11.67 GHz, which corresponded to maximum absorption of 93.8%. However, reflection loss values of Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB/Epoxy based single-layer absorber increased to -22.24 dB at 12.4 GHz which corresponds to an absorption of 99% of the incident microwave energy.

  11. Layer like porous materials with hierarchical structure.

    PubMed

    Roth, Wieslaw J; Gil, Barbara; Makowski, Wacław; Marszalek, Bartosz; Eliášová, Pavla

    2016-06-13

    Many chemical compositions produce layered solids consisting of extended sheets with thickness not greater than a few nanometers. The layers are weakly bonded together in a crystal and can be modified into various nanoarchitectures including porous hierarchical structures. Several classes of 2-dimensional (2D) materials have been extensively studied and developed because of their potential usefulness as catalysts and sorbents. They are discussed in this review with focus on clays, layered transition metal oxides, silicates, layered double hydroxides, metal(iv) phosphates and phosphonates, especially zirconium, and zeolites. Pillaring and delamination are the primary methods for structural modification and pore tailoring. The reported approaches are described and compared for the different classes of materials. The methods of characterization include identification by X-ray diffraction and microscopy, pore size analysis and activity assessment by IR spectroscopy and catalytic testing. The discovery of layered zeolites was a fundamental breakthrough that created unprecedented opportunities because of (i) inherent strong acid sites that make them very active catalytically, (ii) porosity through the layers and (iii) bridging of 2D and 3D structures. Approximately 16 different types of layered zeolite structures and modifications have been identified as distinct forms. It is also expected that many among the over 200 recognized zeolite frameworks can produce layered precursors. Additional advances enabled by 2D zeolites include synthesis of layered materials by design, hierarchical structures obtained by direct synthesis and top-down preparation of layered materials from 3D frameworks. PMID:26489452

  12. Absorbent product and articles made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multilayer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is described. The product has a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, and a first fibrous wicking layer overlaying the water pervious layer. A first container section is defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material in between a first absorbent mass and a second container section defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material between what is disposed a second absorbent mass, and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer overlaying the second fibrous wicking layer.

  13. Neutron-Absorbing Coatings for Safe Storage of Fissile Materials with Enhanced Shielding & Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J; Farmer, J; Lee, C; Fischer, L; Boussoufi, M; Liu, B; Egbert, H

    2007-07-03

    Neutron-absorbing Fe-based amorphous-metal coatings have been developed that are more corrosion resistant than other criticality-control materials, including Al-B{sub 4}C composites, borated stainless steels, and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys. The presence of relatively high concentration of boron in these coatings not only enhances its neutron-absorption capability, but also enables these coatings to exist in the amorphous state. Exceptional corrosion resistance has been achieved with these Fe-based amorphous-metal alloys through additions of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten. The addition of rare earth elements such as yttrium has lowered the critical cooling rate of these materials, thereby rendering them more easily processed. Containers used for the storage of nuclear materials, and protected from corrosion through the application of amorphous metal coatings, would have greatly enhanced service lives, and would therefore provide greater long-term safety. Amorphous alloy powders have been successfully produced in multi-ton quantities with gas atomization, and applied to several half-scale spent fuel storage containers and criticality control structures with the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. Salt fog testing and neutron radiography of these prototypes indicates that such an approach is viable for the production of large-scale industrial-scale facilities and containers. The use of these durable neutron-absorbing materials to coat stainless steel containers and storage racks, as well as vaults, hot-cell facilities and glove boxes could substantially reduce the risk of criticality in the event of an accident. These materials are particularly attractive for shielding applications since they are fire proof. Additionally, layers of other cold and thermal sprayed materials that include carbon and/or carbides can be used in conjunction with the high-boron amorphous metal coatings for the purpose of moderation. For example, various carbides, including boron

  14. CIGS absorber layer with double grading Ga profile for highly efficient solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, M.; Moradi, M.; Zahedifar, M.

    2016-04-01

    It is well-known that the band gap grading in CIGS solar cells is crucial for achieving highly efficient solar cells. We stimulate a CIGS solar cell and investigate the effects of the band gap grading on performance of the CIGS solar cell, where Ga/(Ga + In) ratio (GGI) at back (Cb) and front (Cf) of the absorber layer are considered constant. Our simulations show that by increasing the GGI at middle of CIGS absorber layer (Cm), the JSC decreases and VOC increases independent of the distance of the Cm from the back contact (Xm). For Cm lower than Cf, JSC increases and VOC decreases when the Xm shifts to the front of the CIGS layer. The behavior of JSC and VOC became reverse for the case of Cm greater than Cf. Almost in all of the structures, efficiency and FF have same behaviors. Our simulations show that the highest efficiency is obtained at Cm = 0.8 and Xm = 200 nm.

  15. Boron cage compound materials and composites for shielding and absorbing neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2014-03-04

    Boron cage compound-containing materials for shielding and absorbing neutrons. The materials include BCC-containing composites and compounds. BCC-containing compounds comprise a host polymer and a BCC attached thereto. BCC-containing composites comprise a mixture of a polymer matrix and a BCC filler. The BCC-containing materials can be used to form numerous articles of manufacture for shielding and absorbing neutrons.

  16. A Novel, Real-Valued Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Radar Absorbing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, John Michael

    2004-01-01

    A novel, real-valued Genetic Algorithm (GA) was designed and implemented to minimize the reflectivity and/or transmissivity of an arbitrary number of homogeneous, lossy dielectric or magnetic layers of arbitrary thickness positioned at either the center of an infinitely long rectangular waveguide, or adjacent to the perfectly conducting backplate of a semi-infinite, shorted-out rectangular waveguide. Evolutionary processes extract the optimal physioelectric constants falling within specified constraints which minimize reflection and/or transmission over the frequency band of interest. This GA extracted the unphysical dielectric and magnetic constants of three layers of fictitious material placed adjacent to the conducting backplate of a shorted-out waveguide such that the reflectivity of the configuration was 55 dB or less over the entire X-band. Examples of the optimization of realistic multi-layer absorbers are also presented. Although typical Genetic Algorithms require populations of many thousands in order to function properly and obtain correct results, verified correct results were obtained for all test cases using this GA with a population of only four.

  17. Broadband single-layered graphene absorber using periodic arrays of graphene ribbons with gradient width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhihong, Zhu; Chucai, Guo; Jianfa, Zhang; Ken, Liu; Xiaodong, Yuan; Shiqiao, Qin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a broadband single-layered graphene absorber can be obtained in the THz range using periodic arrays of chemically doped graphene ribbons with gradient width, supported on a dielectric film placed on a thick piece of metal. The working bandwidth of 90% absorption for this structure is as high as 1.3 THz with a central frequency of 3 THz. The broadband operation mechanism is a result of the varying continuous plasmon resonances occurring in graphene ribbons with gradient width. The operation wavelength can be expanded to the far-infrared range.

  18. Framework to predict optimal buffer layer pairing for thin film solar cell absorbers: A case study for tin sulfide/zinc oxysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Mangan, Niall M.; Brandt, Riley E.; Steinmann, Vera; Jaramillo, R.; Poindexter, Jeremy R.; Chakraborty, Rupak; Buonassisi, Tonio; Yang, Chuanxi; Park, Helen Hejin; Zhao, Xizhu; Gordon, Roy G.

    2015-09-21

    An outstanding challenge in the development of novel functional materials for optoelectronic devices is identifying suitable charge-carrier contact layers. Herein, we simulate the photovoltaic device performance of various n-type contact material pairings with tin(II) sulfide (SnS), a p-type absorber. The performance of the contacting material, and resulting device efficiency, depend most strongly on two variables: conduction band offset between absorber and contact layer, and doping concentration within the contact layer. By generating a 2D contour plot of device efficiency as a function of these two variables, we create a performance-space plot for contacting layers on a given absorber material. For a simulated high-lifetime SnS absorber, this 2D performance-space illustrates two maxima, one local and one global. The local maximum occurs over a wide range of contact-layer doping concentrations (below 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}), but only a narrow range of conduction band offsets (0 to −0.1 eV), and is highly sensitive to interface recombination. This first maximum is ideal for early-stage absorber research because it is more robust to low bulk-minority-carrier lifetime and pinholes (shunts), enabling device efficiencies approaching half the Shockley-Queisser limit, greater than 16%. The global maximum is achieved with contact-layer doping concentrations greater than 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, but for a wider range of band offsets (−0.1 to 0.2 eV), and is insensitive to interface recombination. This second maximum is ideal for high-quality films because it is more robust to interface recombination, enabling device efficiencies approaching the Shockley-Queisser limit, greater than 20%. Band offset measurements using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and carrier concentration approximated from resistivity measurements are used to characterize the zinc oxysulfide contacting layers in recent record-efficiency SnS devices. Simulations representative of these

  19. Organic solar cells with graded absorber layers processed from nanoparticle dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Stefan; Reich, Stefan; Bruns, Michael; Czolk, Jens; Colsmann, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures from solution is often limited by the choice of solvents since most organic semiconductors dissolve in the same aromatic agents. In this work, we investigate multi-pass deposition of organic semiconductors from eco-friendly ethanol dispersion. Once applied, the nanoparticles are insoluble in the deposition agent, allowing for the application of further nanoparticulate layers and hence for building poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):indene-C60 bisadduct absorber layers with vertically graded polymer and conversely graded fullerene concentration. Upon thermal annealing, we observe some degrees of polymer/fullerene interdiffusion by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Replacing the common bulk-heterojunction by such a graded photo-active layer yields an enhanced fill factor of the solar cell due to an improved charge carrier extraction, and consequently an overall power conversion efficiency beyond 4%. Wet processing of such advanced device architectures paves the way for a versatile, eco-friendly and industrially feasible future fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures.

  20. Organic solar cells with graded absorber layers processed from nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Stefan; Reich, Stefan; Bruns, Michael; Czolk, Jens; Colsmann, Alexander

    2016-03-28

    The fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures from solution is often limited by the choice of solvents since most organic semiconductors dissolve in the same aromatic agents. In this work, we investigate multi-pass deposition of organic semiconductors from eco-friendly ethanol dispersion. Once applied, the nanoparticles are insoluble in the deposition agent, allowing for the application of further nanoparticulate layers and hence for building poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):indene-C60 bisadduct absorber layers with vertically graded polymer and conversely graded fullerene concentration. Upon thermal annealing, we observe some degrees of polymer/fullerene interdiffusion by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Replacing the common bulk-heterojunction by such a graded photo-active layer yields an enhanced fill factor of the solar cell due to an improved charge carrier extraction, and consequently an overall power conversion efficiency beyond 4%. Wet processing of such advanced device architectures paves the way for a versatile, eco-friendly and industrially feasible future fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures. PMID:26952692

  1. An Absorbing Boundary Condition for the Lattice Boltzmann Method Based on the Perfectly Matched Layer.

    PubMed

    Najafi-Yazdi, A; Mongeau, L

    2012-09-15

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a well established computational tool for fluid flow simulations. This method has been recently utilized for low Mach number computational aeroacoustics. Robust and nonreflective boundary conditions, similar to those used in Navier-Stokes solvers, are needed for LBM-based aeroacoustics simulations. The goal of the present study was to develop an absorbing boundary condition based on the perfectly matched layer (PML) concept for LBM. The derivation of formulations for both two and three dimensional problems are presented. The macroscopic behavior of the new formulation is discussed. The new formulation was tested using benchmark acoustic problems. The perfectly matched layer concept appears to be very well suited for LBM, and yielded very low acoustic reflection factor. PMID:23526050

  2. An Absorbing Boundary Condition for the Lattice Boltzmann Method Based on the Perfectly Matched Layer

    PubMed Central

    Najafi-Yazdi, A.; Mongeau, L.

    2012-01-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a well established computational tool for fluid flow simulations. This method has been recently utilized for low Mach number computational aeroacoustics. Robust and nonreflective boundary conditions, similar to those used in Navier-Stokes solvers, are needed for LBM-based aeroacoustics simulations. The goal of the present study was to develop an absorbing boundary condition based on the perfectly matched layer (PML) concept for LBM. The derivation of formulations for both two and three dimensional problems are presented. The macroscopic behavior of the new formulation is discussed. The new formulation was tested using benchmark acoustic problems. The perfectly matched layer concept appears to be very well suited for LBM, and yielded very low acoustic reflection factor. PMID:23526050

  3. Femtosecond solid-state laser based on a few-layered black phosphorus saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiancui; Wang, Yiran; Zhang, Baitao; Zhao, Ruwei; Yang, Kejian; He, Jingliang; Hu, Qiangqiang; Jia, Zhitai; Tao, Xutang

    2016-05-01

    In this Letter, a high-quality, few-layered black phosphorus (BP) saturable absorber (SA) was fabricated successfully, and a femtosecond solid-state laser modulated by BP-SA was experimentally demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Pulses as short as 272 fs were achieved with an average output power of 0.82 W, corresponding to the pulse energy of 6.48 nJ and peak power of 23.8 MW. So far, these represent the shortest pulse duration and highest output power ever obtained with a BP-based mode-locked solid-state laser. The results indicate the promising potential of few-layered BP-SA for applications in solid-state femtosecond mode-locked lasers. PMID:27128045

  4. Ultrasonic classification of thin layers within multi-layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hägglund, F.; Carlson, J. E.; Andersson, T.

    2010-01-01

    Methods for non-destructive inspection of layered materials are becoming more and more popular as a way of assuring product integrity and quality. In this paper, we present a model-based technique using ultrasonic measurements for classification of thin bonding layers within three-layered materials. This could be, for example, an adhesive bond between two thin plates, where the integrity of the bonding layer needs to be evaluated. The method is based on a model of the wave propagation of pulse-echo ultrasound that first reduces the measured data to a few parameters for each measured point. The model parameters are then fed into a statistical classifier that assigns the bonding layer to one of a set of predefined classes. In this paper, two glass plates are bonded together with construction silicone, and the classifiers are trained to determine if the bonding layer is intact or if it contains regions of air or water. Two different classification methods are evaluated: nominal logistic regression and discriminant analysis. The former is slightly more computationally demanding but, as the results show, it performs better when the model parameters cannot be assumed to belong to a multivariate Gaussian distribution. The performance of the classifiers is evaluated using both simulations and real measurements.

  5. Epitaxial Crystal Silicon Absorber Layers and Solar Cells Grown at 1.8 Microns per Minute

    SciTech Connect

    Bobela, D. C.; Teplin, C. W.; Young, D. L.; Branz, H. M.; Stradins, P.

    2011-01-01

    We have grown device-quality epitaxial silicon thin films at growth rates up to 1.85 {micro}m/min, using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition from silane, at substrate temperatures below 750 C. At these rates, which are more than 30 times faster than those used by the amorphous and nanocrystalline Si industry, capital costs for large-scale solar cell production would be dramatically reduced, even for cell absorber layers up to 10 {micro}m thick. We achieved high growth rates by optimizing the three key parameters: silane flow, depletion, and filament geometry, based on our model developed earlier. Hydrogen coverage of the filament surface likely limits silane decomposition and growth rate at high system pressures. No considerable deterioration in PV device performance is observed when grown at high rate, provided that the epitaxial growth is initiated at low rate. A simple mesa device structure (wafer/epi Si/a-Si(i)/a-Si:H(p)/ITO) with a 2.3 {micro}m thick epitaxial silicon absorber layer was grown at 0.7 {micro}m/min. The finished device had an open-circuit voltage of 0.424 V without hydrogenation treatment.

  6. Influence of microstructure on properties of Ni-Zn ferrite radio-absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. G.; Menshova, S. B.; Klimov, A. N.; Vergazov, R. M.; Bibikov, S. B.; Prokofiev, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this work there have been carried out studies in the radiophysical characteristics of the samples of Ni-Zn ferrite radio-absorbing materials, obtained by the ceramic method under different technological conditions. There has been established the influence of microstructure on the electromagnetic losses of Ni-Zn ferrite radio-absorbing materials. The results indicate that the coarse-grained structure leads to an increase of radio-absorbing capacity at frequencies below 30 MHz. It can be explained by the resonance of domain boundaries.

  7. Magnetic Moment Distribution in Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. M. C.; Zhang, X.-G.; Wang, Y.; Shelton, W. A.; Butler, W. H.; Stocks, G. M.; MacLaren, J. M.

    1996-03-01

    Thin layers of magnetic material surrounded by non-magnetic layers display a reduced moment per atom relative to the bulk magnetic material. Plots of sturation magnetization versus magnetic layer thickness can be explained in terms of magnetically dead layers at interfaces. First principles calculations indicate a more complex distribution of magnetic moments. Moment distributions calculated in the local density approximation restricted to colinear spins and with unrestricted spin orientations will be presented for Cu/Ni/Cu, Cu/permalloy/Cu, and Mo/Ni/Mo structures. Work supported by Division of Materials Science, the Mathematical Information and Computational Science Division of the Office of Computational Technology Research, and by the Assistant Secretary of Defence Programs, Technology Management Group, Technology Transfer Initiative, US DOE under subcontract DEAC05-84OR21400 with Martin-Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.

  8. Negative Refraction in a Uniaxial Absorbent Dielectric Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Yu, Ching-Wei; Lin, Chin-Te

    2009-01-01

    Refraction of light from an isotropic dielectric medium to an anisotropic dielectric material is a complicated phenomenon that can have several different characteristics not usually discussed in electromagnetics textbooks for undergraduate students. With a simple problem wherein the refracting material is uniaxial with its optic axis normal to the…

  9. Investigation of the crater-like microdefects induced by laser shock processing with aluminum foil as absorbent layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y. X.; Xuan, T.; Lian, Z. C.; Feng, Y. Y.; Hua, X. J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports that 3D crater-like microdefects form on the metal surface when laser shock processing (LSP) is applied. LSP was conducted on pure copper block using the aluminum foil as the absorbent material and water as the confining layer. There existed the bonding material to attach the aluminum foil on the metal target closely. The surface morphologies and metallographs of copper surfaces were characterized with 3D profiler, the optical microscopy (OM) or the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Temperature increases of metal surface due to LSP were evaluated theoretically. It was found that, when aluminum foil was used as the absorbent material, and if there existed air bubbles in the bonding material, the air temperatures within the bubbles rose rapidly because of the adiabatic compression. So at the locations of the air bubbles, the metal materials melted and micromelting pool formed. Then under the subsequent expanding of the air bubbles, a secondary shock wave was launched against the micromelting pool and produced the crater-like microdefects on the metal surface. The temperature increases due to shock heat and high-speed deformation were not enough to melt the metal target. The temperature increase induced by the adiabatic compression of the air bubbles may also cause the gasification of the metal target. This will also help form the crater-like microdefects. The results of this paper can help to improve the surface quality of a metal target during the application of LSP. In addition, the results provide another method to fabricate 3D crater-like dents on metal surface. This has a potential application in mechanical engineering.

  10. Study of alternative capping and absorber layers for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks for sub-16nm half-pitch nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Abbas; House, Matthew; Tian, Ruahi; Laursen, Thomas; Antohe, Alin; Kearney, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    Multiple challenges, including the availability of a reliable high power source, defect free mask, and proper resist material, have forced extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography to be considered for sub-10 nm half-pitch nodes. Therefore, techniques such as phase shift masks (PSMs) or high numerical aperture (NA) lithography might be considered. Such techniques require thin EUV absorber materials to be optimized to reduce EUV mask shadowing effects. Despite the challenges in dry etching of Ni and finding proper chemistries with a high etch selectivity to suitable capping materials, we decided to examine the chemical stability of Ni for existing mask cleaning chemistries. Ni, after Ag, has the highest absorption in EUV light at λ = 13.5 nm, which makes it a proper candidate—in pure form or in mixing with other elements—for thin absorber film. Depending on the composition of the final material, proper integration schemes will be developed. We studied Ni stability in commonly used mask cleaning processes based on ammonium hydroxide/ hydrogen peroxide (APM) and water mixtures. Ni films deposited with an ion beam deposition technique with a thickness of 35 nm are sufficient to totally absorb EUV light at λ = 13.5 nm. Multiple cleanings of these Ni films resulted in Ni oxidation— confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) analysis as NiO with thickness about 1.5 nm. Furthermore, Ni oxidation processes are self-limiting and oxide layer thickness did not increase with a further cleaning. A three minute exposure to sulfuric acid/hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) can remove NiO and Ni totally. To protect Ni film from etching by SPM chemistry a 3 nm Si capping was used on top of Ni film. However, Si capping was removed by APM chemistry and could not protect Ni film against SPM chemistry. TiO2 may be a very good capping layer for EUV optics but it is not suitable for EUV mask blanks and will be removed by APM chemistries.

  11. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Layered materials play an important role in nuclear waste management and environmental cleanup. Better understanding of radionuclide interactions with those materials is critical for engineering high-performance materials for various applications. This presentation will provide an overview on radionuclide interactions with two general categories of layered materials - cationic clays and anionic clays - from a perspective of nanopore confinement. Nanopores are widely present in layered materials, either as the interlayers or as inter-particle space. Nanopore confinement can significantly modify chemical reactions in those materials. This effect may cause the preferential enrichment of radionuclides in nanopores and therefore directly impact the mobility of the radionuclides. This effect also implies that conventional sorption measurements using disaggregated samples may not represent chemical conditions in actual systems. The control of material structures on ion exchange, surface complexation, and diffusion in layered materials will be systematically examined, and the related modeling approaches will be discussed. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, which is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  12. Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Clifford K.; Pacheco, James E.

    2014-08-08

    A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

  13. Photochemical aging of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol material.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Moussa, Samar G; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-04-11

    Dark reactions of methylglyoxal with NH4(+) in aqueous aerosols yield light-absorbing and surface-active products that can influence the physical properties of the particles. Little is known about how the product mixture and its optical properties will change due to photolysis as well as oxidative aging by O3 and OH in the atmosphere. Here, we report the results of kinetics and product studies of the photochemical aging of aerosols formed by atomizing aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal and ammonium sulfate. Experiments were performed using aerosol flow tube reactors coupled with an aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometer (Aerosol-CIMS) for monitoring gas- and particle-phase compositions. Particles were also impacted onto quartz windows in order to assess changes in their UV-visible absorption upon oxidation. Photooxidation of the aerosols leads to the formation of small, volatile organic acids including formic acid, acetic acid, and glyoxylic acid. The atmospheric lifetime of these species during the daytime is predicted to be on the order of minutes, with photolysis being an important mechanism of degradation. The lifetime with respect to O3 oxidation was observed to be on the order of hours. O3 oxidation also leads to a net increase in light absorption by the particles due to the formation of additional carbonyl compounds. Our results are consistent with field observations of high brown carbon absorption in the early morning. PMID:23506538

  14. Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ho, Clifford K.; Pacheco, James E.

    2014-08-08

    A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annualmore » thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.« less

  15. Nanoscale buckling deformation in layered copolymer materials

    PubMed Central

    Makke, Ali; Perez, Michel; Lame, Olivier; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    In layered materials, a common mode of deformation involves buckling of the layers under tensile deformation in the direction perpendicular to the layers. The instability mechanism, which operates in elastic materials from geological to nanometer scales, involves the elastic contrast between different layers. In a regular stacking of “hard” and “soft” layers, the tensile stress is first accommodated by a large deformation of the soft layers. The inhibited Poisson contraction results in a compressive stress in the direction transverse to the tensile deformation axis. The hard layers sustain this transverse compression until buckling takes place and results in an undulated structure. Using molecular simulations, we demonstrate this scenario for a material made of triblock copolymers. The buckling deformation is observed to take place at the nanoscale, at a wavelength that depends on strain rate. In contrast to what is commonly assumed, the wavelength of the undulation is not determined by defects in the microstructure. Rather, it results from kinetic effects, with a competition between the rate of strain and the growth rate of the instability. PMID:22203970

  16. Dual-wavelength synchronously Q-switched solid-state laser with multi-layered graphene as saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongguang; Li, Xianlei; Xu, Miaomiao; Yu, Haohai; Wu, Yongzhong; Wang, Zhengping; Hao, Xiaopeng; Xu, Xinguang

    2013-02-11

    Using multilayered graphene as the saturable absorber (SA), Nd:LYSO crystal as the laser material, we demonstrated a laser-diode (LD) pumped, dual-wavelength passively Q-switched solid-state laser. The maximum average output power is 1.8 W, the largest pulse energy and highest peak power is 11.3 μJ, 118 W, respectively. As we have known, they are the best results for passively Q-switched operation of graphene. The pulse laser is strong enough to realize extra-cavity frequency conversions. With a KTP crystal as the sum-frequency generator, the dual wavelengths are proved to be well time overlapped, which manifests the synchronous modulation to the dual-wavelength with multi-layered graphene. PMID:23481809

  17. 3D-Printing ‘Smarter’ Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-08-29

    Foams are, by nature, disordered materials studded with air pockets of varying sizes. Lack of control over the material’s architecture at the micrometer or nanometer scale can make it difficult to adjust the foam’s basic properties. But Eric Duoss and a team of Livermore researchers are using additive manufacturing to develop “smarter” silicone cushions. By architecting the structure at the micro scale, they are able to control macro-scale properties previously unachievable with foam materials.

  18. Bioinspired layered materials with superior mechanical performance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qunfeng; Jiang, Lei; Tang, Zhiyong

    2014-04-15

    Nature has inspired researchers to construct structures with ordered layers as candidates for new materials with high mechanical performance. As a prominent example, nacre, also known as mother of pearl, consists of a combination of inorganic plates (aragonite calcium carbonate, 95% by volume) and organic macromolecules (elastic biopolymer, 5% by volume) and shows a unique combination of strength and toughness. Investigations of its structure reveal that the hexagonal platelets of calcium carbonate and the amorphous biopolymer are alternatively assembled into the orderly layered structure. The delicate interface between the calcium carbonate and the biopolymer is well defined. Both the building blocks that make up these assembled layers and the interfaces between the inorganic and organic components contribute to the excellent mechanical property of natural nacre. In this Account, we summarize recent research from our group and from others on the design of bioinspired materials composed by layering various primitive materials. We focus particular attention on nanoscale carbon materials. Using several examples, we describe how the use of different combinations of layered materials leads to particular properties. Flattened double-walled carbon nanotubes (FDWCNTs) covalently cross-linked in a thermoset three-dimensional (3D) network produced the materials with the highest strength. The stiffest layered materials were generated from borate orthoester covalent bonding between adjacent graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets, and the toughest layered materials were fabricated with Al2O3 platelets and chitosan via hydrogen bonding. These new building blocks, such as FDWCNTs and GO, and the replication of the elaborate micro-/nanoscale interface of natural nacre have provided many options for developing new high performance artificial materials. The interface designs for bioinspired layered materials are generally categorized into (1) hydrogen bonding, (2) ionic bonding, and (3

  19. Method of Synthesizing a Novel Absorbent Titanosilicate Material (UPRM-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo (Inventor); Primera-Pedrozo, Jose N (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A titanium silicate variant named UPRM-5 was prepared using tetraethylammonium hydroxide as a structure-directing agent (SDA). Successful detemplation was achieved via ion exchange with NH4Cl. Effective functionalization was obtained after ion exchanging the detemplated material using SrCl2 and BaCl2. Adsorption of CO2 at 25 deg C in Sr(-) and Ba-UPRM-5 materials activated at different temperatures. For low partial pressures, the observed CO2 adsorption capacities increased as follows: NH4-UPRM-5 less than Sr-UPRM-5 less than Ba-UPRM-5. Both the Sr(-) and Ba-UPRM-5 materials exhibited outstanding selectivity for CO2 over CH4, N2 and O2.

  20. Electrokinetic profiles of nonowoven cotton for absorbent incontinence material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper discusses recent work on cotton/synthetic nonwovens, their electrokinetic analysis, and their potential use in incontinence materials. Electrokinetic analysis is useful in exploring fiber surface polarity properties, and it is a useful tool to render a snap shot of the role of fiber char...

  1. Molecular models and simulations of layered materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Heinz, Hendrik; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-11-01

    The micro- to nano-sized nature of layered materials, particularly characteristic of naturally occurring clay minerals, limits our ability to fully interrogate their atomic dispositions and crystal structures. The low symmetry, multicomponent compositions, defects, and disorder phenomena of clays and related phases necessitate the use of molecular models and modern simulation methods. Computational chemistry tools based on classical force fields and quantum-chemical methods of electronic structure calculations provide a practical approach to evaluate structure and dynamics of the materials on an atomic scale. Combined with classical energy minimization, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo techniques, quantum methods provide accurate models of layered materials such as clay minerals, layered double hydroxides, and clay-polymer nanocomposites.

  2. Switchable wavelength-selective and diffuse metamaterial absorber/emitter with a phase transition spacer layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2014-08-18

    We numerically demonstrate a switchable metamaterial absorber/emitter by thermally turning on or off the excitation of magnetic resonance upon the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). Perfect absorption peak exists around the wavelength of 5 μm when the excitation of magnetic resonance is supported with the insulating VO{sub 2} spacer layer. The wavelength-selective absorption is switched off when the magnetic resonance is disabled with metallic VO{sub 2} that shorts the top and bottom metallic structures. The resonance wavelength can be tuned with different geometry, and the switchable metamaterial exhibits diffuse behaviors at oblique angles. The results would facilitate the design of switchable metamaterials for active control in energy and sensing applications.

  3. Switchable wavelength-selective and diffuse metamaterial absorber/emitter with a phase transition spacer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2014-08-01

    We numerically demonstrate a switchable metamaterial absorber/emitter by thermally turning on or off the excitation of magnetic resonance upon the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2). Perfect absorption peak exists around the wavelength of 5 μm when the excitation of magnetic resonance is supported with the insulating VO2 spacer layer. The wavelength-selective absorption is switched off when the magnetic resonance is disabled with metallic VO2 that shorts the top and bottom metallic structures. The resonance wavelength can be tuned with different geometry, and the switchable metamaterial exhibits diffuse behaviors at oblique angles. The results would facilitate the design of switchable metamaterials for active control in energy and sensing applications.

  4. Development of 4-Pixel-Array TES Microcalorimeters with Mushroom-Shaped Absorbers with Insulating Layers Supporting Overhang Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehata, K.; Iyomoto, N.; Maeda, M.; Ezaki, S.; Takano, A.; Matsumura, S.; Hara, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Tanaka, K.

    2014-08-01

    A four-pixel-array superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter with a mushroom-shaped absorber was developed for energy dispersive spectroscopy performed on a transmission electron microscope. The TES consists of a bilayer of Au/Ti with either a 120- or 50-nm thickness. The absorber is made from a Au layer and its stem is deposited in the center of the TES surface. A TaO insulating layer of 100-nm thickness is inserted between the overhang region of the absorber and the TES surface. Two types of microcalorimeter were fabricated with differing absorber thicknesses of 0.5 and 5.0 m. An energy resolution of 15 eV FWHM with 5.9-keV X-rays was obtained using the 0.5-m-type microcalorimeter.

  5. Crystallographic study of phases present in CuInSe2 absorber layers produced by laser annealing co-electrodeposited precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, H. J.; Bhatia, A.; Stefan, C.; Schorr, S.; Scarpulla, M. A.; Dale, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    For the production of high efficiency thin film, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells, absorber layers with grain sizes of a few hundred nanometers and without detrimental secondary phases are favored. Co-electrodeposition offers a low-cost and material efficient synthesis route, where, in a single step, films containing CuInSe2 are formed. However, the material is nanocrystalline, constitutes multiple phases and has poor photovoltaic properties 1. Therefore a subsequent annealing step is required to produce absorber layers suitable for use in photovoltaic devices. Laser annealing has been demonstrated to improve crystallinity, stimulate atomic diffusion and develop opto-electronic properties when compared to the precursor 2. In this work, high resolution X-ray diffraction was used in order to assess the presence of secondary phases in the absorber layer. All diffractograms of laser annealed films exhibited an additional, unknown peak, measurable through the full depth of the material which is independent of precursor composition, annealing time or laser flux. Evaluation of literature on codeposited CuInSe2, combined with Rietveld refinement suggests a number of possible identities for this peak. The candidates in order of most likely to least likely are structural defects, In2Se3, and CuIn3Se5. We consider the impact that each of these would have on a device formed via this process and thus its success as a new manufacturing route for CuInSe2 solar cells.

  6. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  7. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  8. Multi-spectral materials: hybridisation of optical plasmonic filters, a mid infrared metamaterial absorber and a terahertz metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, James; McCrindle, Iain J H; Cumming, David R S

    2016-02-22

    Multi-spectral imaging systems typically require the cumbersome integration of disparate filtering materials and detectors in order to operate simultaneously in multiple spectral regions. Each distinct waveband must be detected at different spatial locations on a single chip or by separate chips optimised for each band. Here, we report on a single component that optically multiplexes visible, Mid Infrared (4.5 μm) and Terahertz (126 μm) radiation thereby maximising the spectral information density. We hybridise plasmonic and metamaterial structures to form a device capable of simultaneously filtering 15 visible wavelengths and absorbing Mid Infrared and Terahertz. Our synthetic multi-spectral component could be integrated with silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology where Si photodiodes are available to detect the visible radiation and micro-bolometers available to detect the Infrared/Terahertz and render an inexpensive, mass-producible camera capable of forming coaxial visible, Infrared and Terahertz images. PMID:26907004

  9. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  10. Development of energy-absorbing reaction-sintered Si3N4 surface layers on hot-pressed Si3N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Energy-absorbing Si3N4 surface layers on dense Si3N4 substrates were formed by in-place nitridation of fine-grained silicon powder. Ballistic impact tests performed on samples with 1-mm thick layers at room temperature and 1370 C showed up to an eightfold increase in the energy necessary to fracture the substrate. For maximum impact resistance, a small amount (about 20 vol %) of residual Si must be present in the reaction-sintered Si3N4 surface layer. Thermal cycling to 1370 C did not affect impact resistance, even though a considerable amount of SiO2 formed within the reaction-sintered Si3N4 layer during cycling. Erosion testing of samples in a Mach 0.8 burner rig at 1370 C resulted in minimal surface recession of the surface layer. Chemically vapor-deposited SiC-coated material similarly tested exhibited no surface recession.

  11. Determining the Absorbance Spectra of Photochromic Materials From Measured Spectrophotometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1998-01-01

    If a two-state photochromic material is optically bleached, the absorbance spectrum data measured by a spectrophotometer is in general comprised of components from both the ground state and the upper state. Under general conditions, it may be difficult to extract the actual upper state spectrum from the spectrum of the bleached material. A simple algorithm is presented here for the recovery of the pure absorbance spectra of the upper state of a material such as bacteriorhodopsin, given single wavelength bleaching illumination, steady-state conditions, and accurate knowledge of phototransition rates and thermal decay rates.

  12. Gamma ray attenuation coefficient measurement for neutron-absorbent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Majid; Mohammadi, Ali

    2008-05-01

    The compounds Na 2B 4O 7, H 3BO 3, CdCl 2 and NaCl and their solutions attenuate gamma rays in addition to neutron absorption. These compounds are widely used in the shielding of neutron sources, reactor control and neutron converters. Mass attenuation coefficients of gamma related to the four compounds aforementioned, in energies 662, 778.9, 867.38, 964.1, 1085.9, 1173, 1212.9, 1299.1,1332 and 1408 keV, have been determined by the γ rays transmission method in a good geometry setup; also, these coefficients were calculated by MCNP code. A comparison between experiments, simulations and Xcom code has shown that the study has potential application for determining the attenuation coefficient of various compound materials. Experiment and computation show that H 3BO 3 with the lowest average Z has the highest gamma ray attenuation coefficient among the aforementioned compounds.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of titanium sulfide and its application in extremely thin absorber solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahuli, Neha; Sarkar, Shaibal K.

    2015-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiS{sub 2} is investigated with titanium tetrachloride and hydrogen sulfide precursors. In-situ quartz crystal microbalance and ex-situ x-ray reflectivity measurements are carried out to study self-limiting deposition chemistry and material growth characteristics. The saturated growth rate is found to be ca. 0.5 Å/cycle within the ALD temperature window of 125–200 °C. As grown material is found poorly crystalline. ALD grown TiS{sub 2} is applied as a photon harvesting material for solid state sensitized solar cells with TiO{sub 2} as electron transport medium. Initial results with Spiro-OMeTAD as hole conducting layer show ca. 0.6% energy conversion efficiency under 1 sun illumination.

  14. Absorber Materials for Transition-Edge Sensor X-ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Bandler, Simon; Brekosky, Regis; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Fred; Sadleir, Jack; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Porter, F. Scott; Smith, Stephen; Saab, Tarek; Sadleir, Jac,

    2007-01-01

    Arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) can provide high spatial and energy resolution necessary for x-ray astronomy. High quantum efficiency and uniformity of response can be achieved with a suitable absorber material, in which absorber x-ray stopping power, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity are relevant parameters. Here we compare these parameters for bismuth and gold. We have fabricated electroplated gold, electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, and evaporated gold/evaporated bismuth 8x8 absorber arrays and find that a correlation exists between the residual resistance ratio (RRR) and thin film microstructure. This finding indicates that we can tailor absorber material conductivity via microstructure alteration, so as to permit absorber thermalization on timescales suitable for high energy resolution x-ray microcalorimetry. We show that by incorporating absorbers possessing large grain size, including electroplated gold and electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, into our current Mo/Au TES, devices with tunable heat capacity and energy resolution of 2.3 eV (gold) and 2.1 eV (gold/bismuth) FWHM at 6 keV have been fabricated.

  15. Microstructure-based calculations and experimental results for sound absorbing porous layers of randomly packed rigid spherical beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieliński, Tomasz G.

    2014-07-01

    Acoustics of stiff porous media with open porosity can be very effectively modelled using the so-called Johnson-Champoux-Allard-Pride-Lafarge model for sound absorbing porous media with rigid frame. It is an advanced semi-phenomenological model with eight parameters, namely, the total porosity, the viscous permeability and its thermal analogue, the tortuosity, two characteristic lengths (one specific for viscous forces, the other for thermal effects), and finally, viscous and thermal tortuosities at the frequency limit of 0 Hz. Most of these parameters can be measured directly, however, to this end specific equipment is required different for various parameters. Moreover, some parameters are difficult to determine. This is one of several reasons for the so-called multiscale approach, where the parameters are computed from specific finite-element analyses based on some realistic geometric representations of the actual microstructure of porous material. Such approach is presented and validated for layers made up of loosely packed small identical rigid spheres. The sound absorption of such layers was measured experimentally in the impedance tube using the so-called two-microphone transfer function method. The layers are characterised by open porosity and semi-regular microstructure: the identical spheres are loosely packed by random pouring and mixing under the gravity force inside the impedance tubes of various size. Therefore, the regular sphere packings were used to generate Representative Volume Elements suitable for calculations at the micro-scale level. These packings involve only one, two, or four spheres so that the three-dimensional finite-element calculations specific for viscous, thermal, and tortuous effects are feasible. In the proposed geometric packings, the spheres were slightly shifted in order to achieve the correct value of total porosity which was precisely estimated for the layers tested experimentally. Finally, in this paper some results based on

  16. Layered zeolite materials and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Tsapatsis, Michael; Maheshwari, Sudeep; Bates, Frank S; Koros, William J

    2013-08-06

    A novel oxide material (MIN-I) comprising YO.sub.2; and X.sub.2O.sub.3, wherein Y is a tetravalent element and X is a trivalent element, wherein X/Y=O or Y/X=30 to 100 is provided. Surprisingly, MIN-I can be reversibly deswollen. MIN-I can further be combined with a polymer to produce a nanocomposite, depolymerized to produce predominantly fully exfoliated layers (MIN-2), and pillared to produce a pillared oxide material (MIN-3), analogous to MCM-36. The materials are useful in a wide range of applications, such as catalysts, thin films, membranes, and coatings.

  17. Analytical one-dimensional model for laser-induced ultrasound in planar optically absorbing layer.

    PubMed

    Svanström, Erika; Linder, Tomas; Löfqvist, Torbjörn

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound generated by means of laser-based photoacoustic principles are in common use today and applications can be found both in biomedical diagnostics, non-destructive testing and materials characterisation. For certain measurement applications it could be beneficial to shape the generated ultrasound regarding spectral properties and temporal profile. To address this, we studied the generation and propagation of laser-induced ultrasound in a planar, layered structure. We derived an analytical expression for the induced pressure wave, including different physical and optical properties of each layer. A Laplace transform approach was employed in analytically solving the resulting set of photoacoustic wave equations. The results correspond to simulations and were compared to experimental results. To enable the comparison between recorded voltage from the experiments and the calculated pressure we employed a system identification procedure based on physical properties of the ultrasonic transducer to convert the calculated acoustic pressure to voltages. We found reasonable agreement between experimentally obtained voltages and the voltages determined from the calculated acoustic pressure, for the samples studied. The system identification procedure was found to be unstable, however, possibly from violations of material isotropy assumptions by film adhesives and coatings in the experiment. The presented analytical model can serve as a basis when addressing the inverse problem of shaping an acoustic pulse from absorption of a laser pulse in a planar layered structure of elastic materials. PMID:24262676

  18. Preparation of steel slag porous sound-absorbing material using coal powder as pore former.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare a porous sound-absorbing material using steel slag and fly ash as the main raw material, with coal powder and sodium silicate used as a pore former and binder respectively. The influence of the experimental conditions such as the ratio of fly ash, sintering temperature, sintering time, and porosity regulation on the performance of the porous sound-absorbing material was investigated. The results showed that the specimens prepared by this method had high sound absorption performance and good mechanical properties, and the noise reduction coefficient and compressive strength could reach 0.50 and 6.5MPa, respectively. The compressive strength increased when the dosage of fly ash and sintering temperature were raised. The noise reduction coefficient decreased with increasing ratio of fly ash and reducing pore former, and first increased and then decreased with the increase of sintering temperature and time. The optimum preparation conditions for the porous sound-absorbing material were a proportion of fly ash of 50% (wt.%), percentage of coal powder of 30% (wt.%), sintering temperature of 1130°C, and sintering time of 6.0hr, which were determined by analyzing the properties of the sound-absorbing material. PMID:26456608

  19. Absorbent Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A superabsorbent fabric developed by Johnson Space Center and described in Tech Briefs was adapted by Honeywell and fabricated into special containment devices used on Navy "smart" torpedos. The superabsorbent fabric can sequester up to 400 times its own weight in water and protects the torpedo electronic controls from possible short circuiting by deepwater hull seepage.

  20. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Learn, R.; Feigenbaum, E.

    2016-05-27

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. Furthermore, the second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  1. Optimization of UV absorptivity of layered double hydroxide by intercalating organic UV-absorbent molecules.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Sumaiyah Megat Nabil; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Sarijo, Siti Halimah; Fakurazi, Sharida; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2014-08-01

    Intercalation of Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) with benzophenone 9 (B9), a strong ultraviolet (UV) absorber, had been carried out by two different routes; co-precipitation and ion exchange method. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns of co-precipitated (ZB9C) and ion exchanged product (ZB91) showed basal spacing of 15.9 angstrom and 16.6 angstrom, respectively, as a result of the intercalation of B9 anions into the lamellae spaces of LDH. Intercalation was further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur (CHNS) and thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric (TGA/DTG) studies. UV-vis absorption properties of the nanocomposite was investigated with diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectrometer and showed broader UV absorption range. Furthermore, stability of sunscreen molecules in LDH interlayer space was tested in deionized water, artificial sea water and skin pH condition to show slow deintercalation and high retention in host. Cytotoxicity study of the synthesized nanocomposites on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells shows no significant cytotoxicity after 24 h exposure for test concentrations up to 25 microg/mL. PMID:25016649

  2. Chemical precursor impact on the properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashistha, Indu B.; Sharma, Mahesh C.; Sharma, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    In present work impact of different chemical precursor on the deposition of solar absorber layer Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) were studied by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) method without using expensive vacuum facilities and followed by annealing. As compared to the other deposition methods, CBD method is interesting one because it is simple, reproducible, non-hazardous, cost effective and well suited for producing large-area thin films at low temperatures, although effect of precursors and concentration plays a vital role in the deposition. So, the central theme of this work is optimizing and controlling of chemical reactions for different chemical precursors. Further Effect of different chemical precursors i.e. sulphate and chloride is analyzed by structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) of annealed CZTS thin film revealed that films were polycrystalline in nature with kestarite tetragonal crystal structure. The Atomic Force micrographs (AFM) images indicated total coverage compact film and as well as growth of crystals. The band gap of annealed CZTS films was found in the range of optimal band gap by absorption spectroscopy.

  3. Clinical studies with disposable diapers containing absorbent gelling materials: evaluation of effects on infant skin condition.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R L; Seymour, J L; Stone, L C; Milligan, M C

    1987-12-01

    Disposable infant diapers with absorbent gelling material (cross-linked sodium polyacrylates) incorporated into the core were clinically evaluated for their effect on infant skin condition. Absorbent gelling materials tightly hold water and provide pH control by a buffering capacity as well as by helping to segregate urine apart from feces. Four clinical studies were conducted with each following a rigid protocol that controlled for variables of diet and age in addition to the diaper material that may influence the development of diaper dermatitis and helped to control for any inherent bias in the study. This allowed for the controlled assessment of skin condition with respect to diaper type. Absorbent gelling material-containing disposable, conventional (100% cellulose core) disposable, and home-laundered cloth diapers were test products. In these studies 1614 infants were initially enrolled with 522 of them assigned to absorbent gelling material disposable, 738 to conventional disposable, and 354 to home-laundered cloth diapers. Objective measurements of skin wetness (transepidermal water loss) and skin pH, as well as double-blind grading of diaper dermatitis, were the measures of skin condition. Absorbent gelling material disposable diapers were associated with significantly reduced skin wetness, closer to normal skin pH, and lower degrees of diaper dermatitis when compared to conventional disposable or home-laundered cloth diapers. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that better control in the diaper area of skin wetness, skin pH, and the prevention of the mixing of urine and feces produces a better diaper environment. PMID:3323274

  4. Food-processes wastewaters treatment using food solid-waste materials as adsorbents or absorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapti, Ilaira; Georgopoulos, Stavros; Antonopoulou, Maria; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Papadaki, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The wastewaters generated by olive-mills during the production of olive oil, wastewaters from a dairy and a cow-farm unit and wastewaters from a small food factory have been treated by means of selected materials, either by-products of the same units, or other solid waste, as absorbents or adsorbents in order to identify the capacity of those materials to remove organic load and toxicity from the aforementioned wastewaters. The potential of both the materials used as absorbents as well as the treated wastewaters to be further used either as fertilizers or for agricultural irrigation purposes are examined. Dry olive leaves, sheep wool, rice husks, etc. were used either in a fixed-bed or in a stirred batch arrangemen,t employing different initial concentrations of the aforementioned wastewaters. The efficiency of removal was assessed using scpectrophotometric methods and allium test phytotoxicity measurements. In this presentation the response of each material employed is shown as a function of absorbent/adsorbent quantity and kind, treatment time and wastewater kind and initial organic load. Preliminary results on the potential uses of the adsorbents/absorbents and the treated wastewaters are also shown. Keywords: Olive-mill wastewaters, dairy farm wastewaters, olive leaves, zeolite, sheep wool

  5. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaorong

    This dissertation describes studies of the surfaces of layered materials, including graphite intercalation compounds, transition-metal-dichalcogenides, and single layers of MoS_2. with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In order to understand how tunneling images reflect the atomic nature of sample surfaces, the electronic and structural properties of intercalated graphite surfaces imaged with STM have been investigated theoretically. The corrugation amplitude (CA) and carbon site asymmetry (CSA) are sensitive to the number of graphite layers covering the first intercalate layer, to the amount and distribution of the charge transferred from intercalate to host and to the surface subband structure. The CA and CSA can be used to map the stage domains across a freshly cleaved surface. The STM images of the surfaces of both donor and acceptor graphite intercalation compounds are discussed. The theory successfully explained the available experimental results, and yielded some predictions which have been verified in recent experiments. A STM system for operation in air was assembled. The crystalline surfaces of graphite and three transition-metal -dichalcogenides (2H-MoS_2, WTe _2 and ReSe_2) have been studied with the STM system. Single layers of MoS_2 can be obtained by the exfoliation of lithium-intercalated MoS_2 powder in water and in several alcohols. In the STM observations, the samples were prepared by depositing either an aqueous or butanol suspension of single-layer MoS_2 on graphite substrates to form restacked films with two monolayers of solvent molecules included between the layers of MoS_2 . The real-space images obtained from the films all showed the existence of an approximate 2 x 1 superstructure on the surfaces, although the 2 x 1 pattern can be modulated by the interface interaction between the MoS_2 layer and the solvent molecules. These results, in conjunction with existing x-ray diffraction and Raman results, imply that the single layers of MoS_2

  6. Realizing thin electromagnetic absorbers for wide incidence angles from commercially available planar circuit materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, Brian B; Whites, Kieth W; Radway, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    In this study, recent work on engineering R-card surface resistivity with printed metallic patterns is extended to the design of thin electromagnetic absorbers. Thin electromagnetic absorbers for wide incidence angles and both polarizations have recently been computationally verified by Luukkonen et al.. These absorbers are analytically modeled high-impedance surfaces with capacitive arrays of square patches implemented with relatively high dielectric constant and high loss substrate. However, the advantages provided by the accurate analytical model are largely negated by the need to obtain high dielectric constant material with accurately engineered loss. Fig. I(c) illustrates full-wave computational results for an absorber without vias engineered as proposed by Luukkonen et al.. Unique values for the dielectric loss are required for different center frequencies. Parameters for the capacitive grid are D=5.0 mm and w=O.l mm for a center frequency of 3.36 GHz. The relative permittivity and thickness is 9.20(1-j0.234) and 1=3.048 mm. Consider a center frequency of5.81 GHz and again 1=3.048 mm, the required parameters for the capacitive grid are D=2.0 mm and w=0.2 mm where the required relative permittivity is now 9.20(1-j0.371) Admittedly, engineered dielectrics are themselves a historically interesting and fruitful research area which benefits today from advances in monolithic fabrication using direct-write of dielectrics with nanometer scale inclusions. However, our objective in the present study is to realize the advantages of the absorber proposed by Luukkonen et al. without resort to engineered lossy dielectrics. Specifically we are restricted to commercially available planer circuit materials without use of in-house direct-write technology or materials engineering capability. The materials considered here are TMM 10 laminate with (35 {mu}lm copper cladding with a complex permittivity 9.20-j0.0022) and Ohmegaply resistor conductor material (maximum 250 {Omega

  7. Ripplocations: A Novel Defect in Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Jacob; Lang, Andrew; Griggs, Justin; Tucker, Garritt; Barsoum, Michel

    Recently, a new defect, the ripplocation, the mechanical buckling of a single atomic layer, was proposed to explain the behavior of two dimensional materials. Leveraging atomistic simulations, this concept is extended to bulk layered materials. Unlike dislocations, ripplocations do not possess a Burgers vector and do not have polarity. In graphite, ripplocations are attracted both to vacancies, where they can annihilate, and other ripplocations, forming larger complexes and eventually kink boundaries. While some ripplocation behavior can be described by dislocation complexes, the failure of these models to explain core interactions suggests that ripplocations are a fundamentally new class of defect. Furthermore, TEM examination of nanoindented Ti3SiC2, where dislocation theory does not provide a complete description of behavior, reveals the presence of defects with no Burgers vector and with rotation and strain fields similar to those predicted in simulation, suggesting the presences of buckled basal planes. Ripplocations have profound implications for the deformation of plastically anisotropic solids, including graphite, layered silicates and the MAX phases.

  8. Cold tests of HOM absorber material for the ARIEL eLINAC at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, P.; Laxdal, R. E.; Zvyagintsev, V.; Chao, Y. C.; Amini, B.

    2014-01-01

    At TRIUMF development of a 50 MeV electron accelerator is well under way. Five 1.3 GHz, superconducting 9-cell cavities will accelerate 10 mA electrons to a production target to produce rare isotopes. Each cavity will provide 10 MV accelerating voltage. Plans to upgrade the accelerator in the future to a small ring with ERL capabilities requires that the shunt impedance of the dipole higher order modes to be less than 10 MΩ . The design of the accelerator incorporates beam line absorbers to reduce the shunt impedance of potentially dangerous dipole modes. The performance of the absorber is dependant on its electrical conductivity at the operational temperature. Measurements of the electrical conductivity in RF fields of a sample of the proposed beam line absorber material at room temperature and at its operational temperature will be presented for frequencies between 1.3 and 2.4 GHz.

  9. Methane and carbon dioxide increases in the urban boundary layer: Inferences from whole-column infrared absorbance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, K.R.; Hansen, A.D.A.; Rosen, H.

    1988-01-01

    Using the sun as an infrared source, we determined the total atmospheric column absorbance of methane and carbon dioxide spectral lines in the 8- to 10-..mu..m infrared region. At our laboratory located in an urban region, these absorbances showed fluctuations larger than can be accounted for by known variabilities in the background atmosphere. We interpret these observations in terms of large changes in concentration of methane and carbon dioxide within the urban boundary layer. These increases could affect the radiative balance in urban locations and contribute to the urban heat island. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  10. Composite neutron absorbing coatings for nuclear criticality control

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Richard N.; Swank, W. David; Mizia, Ronald E.

    2005-07-19

    Thermal neutron absorbing composite coating materials and methods of applying such coating materials to spent nuclear fuel storage systems are provided. A composite neutron absorbing coating applied to a substrate surface includes a neutron absorbing layer overlying at least a portion of the substrate surface, and a corrosion resistant top coat layer overlying at least a portion of the neutron absorbing layer. An optional bond coat layer can be formed on the substrate surface prior to forming the neutron absorbing layer. The neutron absorbing layer can include a neutron absorbing material, such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium phosphate, dispersed in a metal alloy matrix. The coating layers may be formed by a plasma spray process or a high velocity oxygen fuel process.

  11. Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou; Schunk, Peter Randall; Chandross, Michael Evan; Roberts, Scott A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.

  12. Research and application of kapok fiber as an absorbing material: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yian; Wang, Jintao; Zhu, Yongfeng; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-01-01

    Kapok fiber corresponds to the seed hairs of the kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra), and is a typical cellulosic fiber with the features of thin cell wall, large lumen, low density and hydrophobic-oleophilic properties. As a type of renewable natural plant fiber, kapok fiber is abundant, biocompatible and biodegradable, and its full exploration and potential application have received increasing attention in both academic and industrial fields. Based on the structure and properties of kapok fiber, this review provides a summary of recent research on kapok fiber including chemical and physical treatments, kapok fiber-based composite materials, and the application of kapok fiber as an absorbent material for oils, metal ions, dyes, and sound, with special attention to its use as an oil-absorbing material, one predominant application of kapok fiber in the coming future. PMID:25597659

  13. Plasmonic materials based on ZnO films and their potential for developing broadband middle-infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Kesim, Yunus E. Battal, Enes; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-07-15

    Noble metals such as gold and silver have been extensively used for plasmonic applications due to their ability to support plasmons, yet they suffer from high intrinsic losses. Alternative plasmonic materials that offer low loss and tunability are desired for a new generation of efficient and agile devices. In this paper, atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown ZnO is investigated as a candidate material for plasmonic applications. Optical constants of ZnO are investigated along with figures of merit pertaining to plasmonic waveguides. We show that ZnO can alleviate the trade-off between propagation length and mode confinement width owing to tunable dielectric properties. In order to demonstrate plasmonic resonances, we simulate a grating structure and computationally demonstrate an ultra-wide-band (4–15 μm) infrared absorber.

  14. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  15. Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect

    K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

    2005-04-15

    In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

  16. Synthesis of CoFe/Al2O3 composite nanoparticles as the impedance matching layer of wideband multilayer absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, L.; Gong, Y. X.; Jiang, J. T.; Xu, C. Y.; Shao, W. Z.; Liu, P.; Tang, J.

    2011-04-01

    CoFe/Al2O3 composite nanoparticles were successfully prepared by hydrogen-thermally reducing cobalt aluminum ferrite. Compared with CoFe alloy nanoparticles, the permeability of CoFe/Al2O3 composite nanoparticles was remarkably enhanced and an improved impedance characteristic was achieved due to the introduction of insulated Al2O3. A multilayer absorber with CoFe/Al2O3 composite nanoparticles as the impedance matching layer and CoFe nanoflake as the dissipation layer was designed by using genetic algorithm, in which an ultrawide operation frequency bandwidth over 2.5-18 GHz was obtained. The microwave absorption performance in both normal and oblique incident case was evaluated by using electromagnetic simulator. The backward radar cross-section (RCS) was decreased at least 10 dB over a wide frequency range by covering the multilayer absorber on the surface of perfect electrical conductive plate.

  17. Investigations into alterntive substrate, absorber, and buffer layer processing for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, J.R.; Berens, T.A.; Keane, J.

    1996-05-01

    High-performance Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}(CIGS)-based solar cells are presently fabricated within a narrow range of processing options. In this contribution, alternative substrate, absorber, and buffer layer processing is considered. Cell performance varies considerably when alternative substrates are employed. These variations are narrowed with the addition of Na via a Na{sub 2}S compound. Sputtered and electrodeposited CIGS precursors and completed absorbers show promise as alternatives to evaporation. A recrystallization process is required to improve their quality. (In,Ga){sub y}Se buffer layers contribute to cell performance above 10. Further improvements in these alternatives will lead to combined cell performance greater than 10% in the near term.

  18. Benzodipyrrole-based Donor-Acceptor-type Boron Complexes as Tunable Near-infrared-Absorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-07-20

    Benzodipyrrole-based donor-acceptor boron complexes were designed and synthesized as near-infrared-absorbing materials. The electron-rich organic framework combined with the Lewis acidic boron co-ordination enabled us to tune the LUMO energy level and the HOMO-LUMO gap (i.e.,the absorption wavelength) by changing the organic acceptor units, the number of boron atoms, and the substituents on the boron atoms. PMID:27311060

  19. 3-D solar cells by electrochemical-deposited Se layer as extremely-thin absorber and hole conducting layer on nanocrystalline TiO2 electrode

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional selenium solar cell with the structure of Au/Se/porous TiO2/compact TiO2/fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass plates was fabricated by an electrochemical deposition method of selenium, which can work for the extremely thin light absorber and the hole-conducting layer. The effect of experimental conditions, such as HCl and H2SeO3 in an electrochemical solution and TiO2 particle size of porous layers, was optimized. This kind of solar cell did not use any buffer layer between an n-type electrode (porous TiO2) and a p-type absorber layer (selenium). The crystallinity of the selenium after annealing at 200°C for 3 min in the air was significantly improved. The cells with a selenium layer deposited at concentrations of HCl = 11.5 mM and H2SeO3 = 20 mM showed the best performance, resulting in 1- to 2-nm thickness of the Se layer, short-circuit photocurrent density of 8.7 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage of 0.65 V, fill factor of 0.53, and conversion efficiency of 3.0%. PMID:23286700

  20. Computational Discovery, Characterization, and Design of Single-Layer Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2014-03-01

    Single-layer materials open up tremendous opportunities for applications in nanoelectronic devices and energy technologies. We first review the four components of a materials science tetrahedron for single-layer materials. We then provide a theoretical perspective of characterizing single-layer materials. This leads to a general data-mining process to predict and computationally characterize emerging single-layer materials. Finally, we comment on limitations and possible improvements of current computational procedures for the discovery, characterization, and design of single-layer materials.

  1. Optical response of strongly absorbing inhomogeneous materials: Application to paper degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missori, M.; Pulci, O.; Teodonio, L.; Violante, C.; Kupchak, I.; Bagniuk, J.; Łojewska, J.; Conte, A. Mosca

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new noninvasive and nondestructive approach to recover scattering and absorption coefficients from reflectance measurements of highly absorbing and optically inhomogeneous media. Our approach is based on the Yang and Miklavcic theoretical model of light propagation through turbid media, which is a generalization of the Kubelka-Munk theory, extended to accommodate optically thick samples. We show its applications to paper, a material primarily composed of a web of fibers of cellulose, whose optical properties are strongly governed by light scattering effects. Samples studied were ancient and industrial paper sheets, aged in different conditions and highly absorbing in the ultraviolet region. The recovered experimental absorptions of cellulose fibers have been compared to theoretical ab initio quantum-mechanical computational simulations carried out within time-dependent density functional theory. In this way, for each sample, we evaluate the absolute concentration of different kinds of oxidized groups formed upon aging and acting as chromophores causing paper discoloration. We found that the relative concentration of different chromophores in cellulose fibers depends on the aging temperature endured by samples. This clearly indicates that the oxidation of cellulose follows temperature-dependent reaction pathways. Our approach has a wide range of applications for cellulose-based materials, like paper, textiles, and other manufactured products of great industrial and cultural interest, and can potentially be extended to other strongly absorbing inhomogeneous materials.

  2. Radionuclide separations using pillared layered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, N.C.; Wade, K.L.; Morgan, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Pillared Layered Materials (PLMs) are layered inorganic ion exchangers propped apart by metal oxide pillars. PLMs have been synthesized to sorb strontium from liquid nuclear wastes. A study that compared over 60 sorbers for their ability to sorb strontium from Hanford simulants showed that PLMs were the best sorbers; strontium distribution coefficients ({sup Sr}K{sub d}) > 20000 mL/g were obtained. In addition, PLMs showed a high degree of selectivity for strontium over cesium, transition metals, lanthanides and actinides. The sorption of strontium is, however, inhibited by complexants (EDTA); {sup Sr}K{sub d} values drop to <20 mL/g when they are present. The most promising PLMs were the Cr, Ti, Zr, and Si pillared tantalum tungstate. The K{sub d} values for Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} show a strong pH dependence; K{sub d} values increase to >10{sup 4} above pH 12. The general surface complexation mechanism explains the sorption of these cations on PLMs.

  3. Dependence of acoustic properties of sound absorbing fibrous materials on their structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronina, N. N.

    1984-07-01

    The performance of sound absorbing structures is characterized by two acoustic parameters: the dimensionless wave impedance (referred to the wave impedance of air) and the propagation constant. Both parameters can be defined as complex quantities whose real and imaginary parts were evaluated for various materials. On the basis of experimental data, semiempirical relations were established describing these parameters as functions of the density and of the fiber thickness, in the case of fibrous materials, as well as their frequency characteristics. The results given in pertain to fiberglass, mineral cotton wool, and nylon fiber.

  4. Methods for making thin layers of crystalline materials

    DOEpatents

    Lagally, Max G; Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Tanto, Boy

    2013-07-23

    Methods for making growth templates for the epitaxial growth of compound semiconductors and other materials are provided. The growth templates are thin layers of single-crystalline materials that are themselves grown epitaxially on a substrate that includes a thin layer of sacrificial material. The thin layer of sacrificial material, which creates a coherent strain in the single-crystalline material as it is grown thereon, includes one or more suspended sections and one or more supported sections.

  5. Thermoelectric material including conformal oxide layers and method of making the same using atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Jung Young; Ahn, Dongjoon; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2016-06-07

    A thermoelectric material includes a substrate particle and a plurality of conformal oxide layers formed on the substrate particle. The plurality of conformal oxide layers has a total oxide layer thickness ranging from about 2 nm to about 20 nm. The thermoelectric material excludes oxide nanoparticles. A method of making the thermoelectric material is also disclosed herein.

  6. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range.

    PubMed

    González, M; Crespo, M; Baselga, J; Pozuelo, J

    2016-05-19

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials. PMID:27152472

  7. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide materials.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Meng, Xiangbo; Elam, Jeffrey W; Martinson, Alex B F

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The field of nanoscience is delivering increasingly intricate yet elegant geometric structures incorporating an ever-expanding palette of materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful driver of this field, providing exceptionally conformal coatings spanning the periodic table and atomic-scale precision independent of substrate geometry. This versatility is intrinsic to ALD and results from sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. This characteristic facilitates digital synthesis, in which the film grows linearly with the number of reaction cycles. While the majority of ALD processes identified to date produce metal oxides, novel applications in areas such as energy storage, catalysis, and nanophotonics are motivating interest in sulfide materials. Recent progress in ALD of sulfides has expanded the diversity of accessible materials as well as a more complete understanding of the unique chalcogenide surface chemistry. ALD of sulfide materials typically uses metalorganic precursors and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As in oxide ALD, the precursor chemistry is critical to controlling both the film growth and properties including roughness, crystallinity, and impurity levels. By modification of the precursor sequence, multicomponent sulfides have been deposited, although challenges remain because of the higher propensity for cation exchange reactions, greater diffusion rates, and unintentional annealing of this more labile class of materials. A deeper understanding of these surface chemical reactions has been achieved through a combination of in situ studies and quantum-chemical calculations. As this understanding matures, so does our ability to deterministically tailor film properties to new applications and more sophisticated devices. This Account highlights the attributes of ALD chemistry that are unique to metal sulfides and surveys recent applications of these materials in photovoltaics, energy storage, and photonics. Within each application

  8. Development of High Band Gap Absorber and Buffer Materials for Thin Film Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Dan

    2011-12-01

    CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) device efficiencies are the highest of the thin film absorber materials (vs. CdTe, alpha-Si, CuInSe2). However, the band gap of the highest efficiency CIGS cells deviates from the expected ideal value predicted by models [1]. Widening the band gap to the theoretically ideal value is one way to increase cell efficiencies. Widening the band gap can be accomplished in two ways; by finding a solution to the Ga-related defects which limit the open circuit voltage at high Ga ratios, or by utilizing different elemental combinations to form an alternative high band gap photoactive Cu-chalcopyrite (which includes any combination of the cations Cu, Al, Ga, and In along with the anions S, Se, and Te). This thesis focuses on the second option, substituting aluminum for gallium in the chalcopyrite lattice to form a CuInAlSe2 (CIAS) film using a sputtering and selenization approach. Both sequential and co-sputtering of metal precursors is performed. Indium was found to be very mobile during both sputtering processes, with a tendency to diffuse to the film surface even when deposited as the base layer in a sequential sputtering process. Elemental diffusion was controlled to a degree using thicker Cu top layer in co-sputtering. The greater thermal conductivity of stainless steel foil (16 W/mK) vs. glass (0.9-1.3 W/mK) can also be used to limit indium diffusion, by keeping the substrate cooler during sputtering. In both sputtering methods aluminum is deposited oxygen-free by capping the film with a Cu capping layer in combination with controlling the indium diffusion. Selenization of metal precursor films is completed using two different techniques. The first is a thermal evaporation approach from a heated box source (method 1 -- reactive thermal evaporation (RTE-Se)). The second is batch selenization using a heated tube furnace (method 2 -- batch selenization). Some batch selenized precursors were capped with ˜ 1mum of selenium. In both selenization methods

  9. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials: Aging on the component level

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.; Meir, M.; Rekstad, J.

    2010-03-15

    Within this study, the aging behavior of a PPE + PS absorber material was investigated on the absorber component level. To indicate aging, characteristic mechanical values were determined by indentation tests of specimens taken from components and exposed to laboratory aging (140 C in air, 80 C in water) and service near outdoor aging conditions (stagnation in northern climate). In addition to the mechanical tests, the unaged and aged specimens were also characterized thermo-analytically via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that reductions in both characteristic mechanical values of the indentation tests, i.e., load of the first transition and ultimate indentation, reflect at least some physical aging although chemical aging may also be of importance based on previous analytical investigations of laboratory aged polymer films. While laboratory aging in air at 140 C and service exposure at a test facility in Oslo (N) under stagnation conditions led to a significant reduction in the mechanical indentation resistance, no influence of laboratory aging in water at 80 C on the mechanical behavior of the absorber sheet was found. Depending on the ultimate failure criterion applied (reduction of characteristic mechanical values to 80% and 50%, respectively), the technical service life found for hot air laboratory and stagnation service conditions was found to be less than 51 and 159 h, respectively. As these durations are significantly below the estimated stagnation conditions accumulated in the desired operation lifetime for such a collector, the PPE + PS type investigated does not seem to be a proper material candidate for solar thermal absorbers. Finally, based on the results obtained, a relation between laboratory aging time in air at 140 C and cumulated irradiation energy during exposure on the test facility in Oslo was established. (author)

  10. Emittance of a radar absorber coated with an infrared layer in the 3~5microm window.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingyun; Gong, Rongzhou; Cheng, Yongshan; Zhang, Fengguo; He, Huahui; Huang, Dexiu

    2005-12-12

    By use of the Kubelka-Munk theory, the Mie theory and the independent scattering approximation, we obtain the explicit expression of the emittance of an infrared coating attached to a radar absorber with a high emittance, in the 3~5microm window. Taking aluminum particles with spherical shape as the pigments within the coating, we give the dependence of the coating emittance with respect to the particle radius, the thickness of the coating. At a volume fraction of 0.05, we propose the optimum particle radius range of the pigment particles is around 0.35~0.6microm. When the thickness of the coating exceeds 300microm, the decrease of emittance at 4microm wavelength becomes negligible. Too much thickness of IR layer wouldn't contribute to the decrease of emittance. We study the influence of the infrared coating on the performance of the radar absorber, and believe that not too much thick infrared coating consisting of spherical Al particles wouldn't result in a remarkable deterioration of the absorbing ability of the radar absorber. PMID:19503253

  11. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  12. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, T.W.

    1983-12-21

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  13. Surface-active and Light-absorbing Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, V. F.; Sareen, N.; Schwier, A. N.; Shapiro, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    We have observed the formation of light-absorbing, high-molecular-weight, and surface-active organics from methylgyloxal interacting with ammonium salts in aqueous aerosol mimics. Mixtures of methylglyoxal and glyoxal also form light-absorbing products and exhibit surface tension depression with a Langmuir-like dependence on initial methylglyoxal concentration. We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a volatilization flow tube inlet (Aerosol-CIMS) to characterize the product species. The results are consistent with aldol condensation products, carbon-nitrogen species, sulfur-containing compounds, and oligomeric species up to 759 amu. These observations have potentially significant implications for our understanding of the effects of SOA on climate, since a) SOA are typically treated as non-absorbing in climate models, and b) surface tension depression in aqueous aerosols by SOA material may result in increased cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. Furthermore, surface film formation could affect aerosol heterogeneous chemistry. We will also discuss aerosol flow tube O3 oxidation experiments designed to determine the atmospheric lifetimes of the observed product compounds.

  14. Ultra-thin Materials from Atomic Layer Deposition for Microbolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenfeld, Nathan Thomas

    This research focuses on the incorporation of atomic layer deposition (ALD) materials into microbolometer devices for infrared (IR) imaging. Microbolometers are suspended micro-electromechanical (MEMS) devices, which respond electrically to absorbed IR radiation. By minimizing the heat capacity (thermal mass) of these devices, their performance may be substantially improved. Thus, implementing ultra-thin freestanding ALD materials into microbolometer devices will offer a substantial reduction in the overall heat capacity of the device. A novel nanofabrication method is developed to produce robust ultra-thin suspended structures from ALD generated materials including W, Ru and Al2O 3. Unique aspects of ALD such as high conformality offer the ability to create 3-dimensional structures with mechanical reinforcement. Additionally, the ability to tune residual stresses via atomically precise thickness control enables the fabrication of flat suspended structures. Since microbolometer elements are electro-thermally active, the electro-thermal properties of ultra-thin ALD W, Ru and Al2O3 are investigated. Several distinct deviations from bulk electro-thermal properties of resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity are identified and interpreted with traditional nanoscale transport modeling and theory. For example, for ALD W, the electrical resistivity is increased by up to 99%, thermal conductivity is reduced by up to 91% and specific heat capacity increased 70% from bulk. Finally, the developed ALD nano-fabrication process and measured ALD material properties are combined to fabricate an industrial level, state-of-the-art microbolometer pixel structure with 1.4X performance improvement. Further microbolomter performance enhancements based on the developed nanofabrication methods and electro-thermal measurements are discussed.

  15. Matching conditions of single layer absorber with sendust flaky-filler composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Xiling; Wang, Tao; Tang, Liyun; Li, Fashen

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a model of interface reflection interference in order to determine matching frequency and thickness with minimum reflection loss. It is found that a proper combination of the front-face reflection and back-face reflection is necessary to produce perfect matching, which leads to global minimum reflection loss. The calculated amplitude differences of the front-face reflection and back-face reflection from the derived formula agree well with the intensity variation of the microwave matching absorbing peak.

  16. Low dielectric electromagnetic absorbing material in 18-40 GHz using large scale photonic crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, T.; Matsumura, K.; Kagawa, Y.

    2007-02-01

    The interaction behavior between a monolithic low dielectric block with unidirectionally aligned through holes and an electromagnetic wave at a frequency range from 18to40GHz has been studied. Hexagonally aligned through holes, whose diameters are 8.0, 9.0, and 10.0mm, are introduced to a polymethylmethacrylate block. The electromagnetic wave reflection and transmission spectra perpendicular to the hole axis show a unique structure dependence, which is related to the diameter of the hole and its arrangement. A large decrease in the reflectance and transmittance appears in the spectra, which originates from the interference effect between the electromagnetic wave and material. It is concluded that the material has a potential for controlling the electromagnetic wave at a tailored target frequency and is expected to be usable as monolithic low dielectric electromagnetic wave absorbing material.

  17. Nanostructured thin film-based near-infrared tunable perfect absorber using phase-change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocer, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured thin film absorbers embedded with phase-change thermochromic material can provide a large level of absorption tunability in the near-infrared region. Vanadium dioxide was employed as the phase-change material in the designed structures. The optical absorption properties of the designed structures with respect to the geometric and material parameters were systematically investigated using finite-difference time-domain computations. Absorption level of the resonance wavelength in the near-IR region was tuned from the perfect absorption level to a low level (17%) with a high positive dynamic range of near-infrared absorption intensity tunability (83%). Due to the phase transition of vanadium dioxide, the resonance at the near-infrared region is being turned on and turned off actively and reversibly under the thermal bias, thereby rendering these nanostructures suitable for infrared camouflage, emitters, and sensors.

  18. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials - Part 2: Commodity plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-09-15

    In this series of two papers, various polymeric materials are investigated as to their potential applicability as absorber materials for solar thermal collectors. While Part 1 of this paper series deals with the aging behavior of engineering plastics, including two amorphous polymers (PPE + PS) and (PC) and two semi-crystalline polymers (two types of PA12), the present Part 2 treats the aging behavior of semi-crystalline so-called ''commodity'' plastics (two types of crosslinked polyethylene (PE-X) and two types of polypropylene (PP)). As in Part 1, the focus of the investigation is to study the aging behavior of these materials under maximum operating conditions (80 C in water up to 16,000 h) and stagnation conditions (140 C in air up to 500 h) typical for northern climate. The materials supplied or produced as polymer films were first characterized in the unaged state and then for different states of aging by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and by mechanical tensile tests. DSC was applied primarily to obtain information on physical aging phenomena, whereas SEC analysis was used to characterize chemical degradation of the materials. In addition, physical and chemical aging were both analyzed via the small and large strain mechanical behavior. Comparing the two aging conditions in hot air and hot water, a rather stable mechanical performance profile was found for both PP types over the investigated aging time, which was interpreted in terms of competing physical and chemical aging mechanisms. Analogously such competing mechanisms were also inferred for one of the PE-X materials, while the other exhibited substantial degradation in terms of strain-to-break values for both aging conditions. In principle, both PP and PE-X are promising candidates for black absorber applications in northern climates if proper measures against overheating are taken and when adequately modified. (author)

  19. A new type of clear orthodontic retainer incorporating multi-layer hybrid materials

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo-Won; Kim, Kyung A

    2015-01-01

    Clear thermoplastic retainers have been widely used in daily orthodontics; however, they have inherent limitations associated with thermoplastic polymer materials such as dimensional instability, low strength, and poor wear resistance. To solve these problems, we developed a new type of clear orthodontic retainer that incorporates multi-layer hybrid materials. It consists of three layers; an outer polyethylenterephthalate glycol modified (PETG) hard-type polymer, a middle thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) soft-type polymer, and an inner reinforced resin core. The resin core improves wear resistance and mechanical strength, which prevent unwanted distortion of the bucco-palatal wall of the retainer. The TPU layer absorbs impact and the PETG layer has good formability, optical qualities, fatigue resistance, and dimensional stability, which contributes to increased support from the mandibular dentition, and helps maintain the archform. This new type of vacuum-formed retainer showed improved mechanical strength and rate of water absorption. PMID:26445722

  20. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials - Part 1: Engineering plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-09-15

    In this series of two papers, various polymeric materials are investigated as to their potential applicability as absorber materials for solar thermal collectors. The focus of the investigation is to study the aging behavior of these materials under maximum operating conditions (80 C in water up to 16,000 h) and stagnation conditions (140 C in air up to 500 h) typical for northern climate. The materials supplied or produced as polymer films were first characterized in the unaged state and then for different states of aging by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and by mechanical tensile tests. Physical aging phenomena were studied by DSC, SEC analysis provided information on chemical degradation of the materials. In addition, physical and chemical aging were both analyzed via the small and large strain mechanical behavior. While the present Part 1 of this paper series deals with the aging behavior of engineering plastics, including two amorphous polymers (a polyphenylene ether polystyrene blend (PPE + PS) and polycarbonate (PC)) and two semi-crystalline polymers (two types of polyamide 12 (PA12)), the aging behavior of so-called ''commodity'' plastics (PE and PP) is the subject of Part 2. Comparing the two aging conditions, the amorphous materials (PPE + PS and PC) turned out to be more prone to physical and chemical aging at 140 C in air. In contrast, the semi-crystalline PA12 materials were more strongly affected by exposure to water at 80 C, although to different degrees, depending on the modification. (author)

  1. Design of energy absorbing materials and composite structures based on porous shape memory alloys (SE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying

    Recently, attention has been paid to porous shape memory alloys. This is because the alloys show large and recoverable deformation, i.e. superelasticity and shape memory effect. Due to their light weight and potential large deformations, porous shape memory alloys have been considered as excellent candidates for energy absorption materials. In the present study, porous NiTi alloy with several different porosities are processed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The compression behavior of the porous NiTi is examined with an aim of using it for a possible high energy absorbing material. Two models for the macroscopic compression behavior of porous shape memory alloy (SMA) are presented in this work, where Eshelby's inhomogeneous inclusion method is used to predict the effective elastic and superelastic behavior of a porous SMA based on the assumption of stress-strain curve. The analytical results are compared with experimental data for porous NiTi with 13% porosity, resulting in a reasonably good agreement. Based on the study upon porous NiTi, an energy absorbing composite structure made of a concentric NiTi spring and a porous NiTi rod is presented in this PhD dissertation. Both NiTi spring and porous NiTi rod are of superelastic grade. Ductile porous NiTi cylindrical specimens are fabricated by spark plasma sintering. The composite structure exhibits not only high reversible force-displacement behavior for small to intermediate loading but also high energy absorbing property when subjected to large compressive loads. A model for the compressive force-displacement curve of the composite structure is presented. The predicted curve is compared to the experimental data, resulting in a reasonably good agreement.

  2. Scientists Identify New Quaternary Materials for Solar Cell Absorbers (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Research provides insight for exploring use of earth-abundant quaternary semiconductors for large-scale solar cell applications. For large-scale solar electricity generation, it is critical to find new material that is Earth abundant and easily manufactured. Previous experimental studies suggest that Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} could be a strong candidate absorber materials for large-scale thin-film solar cells due to its optimal bandgap, high adsorption coefficient, and ease of synthesis. However, due to the complicated nature of the quaternary compound, it is unclear whether other quaternary compounds have physical properties suitable for solar cell application. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Fudan University, and University College London have performed systematic searches of quaternary semiconductors using a sequential cation mutation method in which the material properties of the quaternary compounds can be derived and understood through the evolution from the binary, to ternary, and to quaternary compounds. The searches revealed that in addition to Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4}, Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} are also suitable quaternary materials for solar cell absorbers. Through the extensive study of defect and alloy properties of these materials, the researchers propose that to maximize solar cell performance, growth of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} under Cu-poor/Zn-rich conditions will be optimal and the formation of Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} alloy will be beneficial in improving solar cell performance.

  3. Results of the Workshop on Microwave-Absorbing Materials for Accelerators (MAMA): A Personal View

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I E

    1993-04-01

    The first workshop on the properties and uses of special materials for absorption of microwaves in particle accelerators was held at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, February 22-24, 1993. The meeting's purpose was to review the advances of ceramic and materials science and to describe the accelerator projects the success of which strongly depends on the existence and availability of microwave-absorbing materials with special characteristics. Scientists from various branches of physics, materials science, microwave engineering, accelerator physics and from national and international laboratories, from universities and industries participated in this gathering. This interdisciplinary meeting brought new people and new ideas together which in the future will bloom into better understanding of general materials and of physical processes and eventually to collaborative efforts to design and produce custom made materials. This paper describes the major topics covered in the workshop and is a personal elaboration of the author on the future possibilities opened by this interaction.

  4. Efficient positioning of absorbing material in complex systems by using the Patch Transfer Function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totaro, N.; Guyader, J. L.

    2012-06-01

    Given the need to decrease energy consumption in the automobile industry, vehicle weight has become an important issue. Regarding acoustic comfort, the weight of noise reduction devices must be minimized inside vehicle compartments. Consequently, these devices, for example those using poro-elastic materials, must be designed carefully to maximize their influence on noise reduction. The present paper describes a method developed to obtain an efficient positioning of a given surface (or mass) of absorbing material characterized by its surface impedance. This technique is based on the Patch Transfer Function method used to couple complex vibro-acoustic sub-domains and which has been successfully applied in the European ViSPeR and Silence projects. First, a numerical analysis of the possibilities of this method is performed on a non-rectangular cavity with rigid walls after which an experimental validation of this numerical analysis is performed to evaluate the accuracy of the method under real conditions.

  5. The kinetic boundary layer around an absorbing sphere and the growth of small droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, M.E.; Titulaer, U.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Deviations from the classical Smoluchowski expression for the growth rate of a droplet in a supersaturated vapor can be expected when the droplet radius is not large compared to the mean free path of a vapor molecule. The growth rate then depends significantly on the structure of the kinetic boundary layer around a sphere. The authors consider this kinetic boundary layer for a dilute system of Brownian particles. For this system a large class of boundary layer problems for a planar wall have been solved. They show how the spherical boundary layer can be treated by a perturbation expansion in the reciprocal droplet radius. In each order one has to solve a finite number of planar boundary layer problems. The first two corrections to the planar problem are calculated explicitly. For radii down to about two velocity persistence lengths (the analog of the mean free path for a Brownian particle) the successive approximations for the growth rate agree to within a few percent. A reasonable estimate of the growth rate for all radii can be obtained by extrapolating toward the exactly known value at zero radius. Kinetic boundary layer effects increase the time needed for growth from 0 to 10 (or 2{1/2}) velocity persistence lengths by roughly 35% (or 175%).

  6. Antireflecting and polarizing dielectric single-layer coating at oblique incidence on absorbing substrates at λ = 10.6 μm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, E.; Julea, T.

    Transparent single-layer antireflection coating on an absorbing substrate for p and s polarizations of the infrared light at λ = 10.6 μm as a function of the angle of incidence is studied in this paper. Two cases of low absorbing Ge, GaAs, ZnSe substrates and high absorbing Cu substrate are considered. It is found that the Cu substrate coated by an adequate antireflecting single-layer film functions as an excellent Rs = 0 reflection polarizer.

  7. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Crespo, M.; Baselga, J.; Pozuelo, J.

    2016-05-01

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials.Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Scheme of hydrogenated derivative of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (HDGEBA) and m-xylylenediamine; X-ray diffractograms of pristine CNT

  8. Assessing Layered Materials in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.

    2001-01-01

    The recent analysis of high resolution Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images of layered outcrops in equatorial regions reinforces two important ideas, which will probably eventually become paradigms, about Mars: 1) It has had a long, complex geologic history marked by change, as manifested in the different layers observed, and 2) Standing bodies of water existed for substantial lengths of time, indicating clement conditions possibly conducive to life. Although observations of layering and evidence for lakes and oceans has been reported for years based on Mariner 9 and Viking data, the MOC data show that this layering is much more pervasive and complex than previously thought. These layered sites are ideal for studying the geologic, and possibly biologic, history of Mars. Here, a layered site within Gale Crater is advocated as a Mars Exploration Rover (MER) target. This is one of the few layered areas within closed depressions (e.g., other craters and Vallis Marineris) that meets the landing site constraints and is accessible to both MER A and B.

  9. Epitaxial Crystal Silicon Absorber Layers and Solar Cells Grown at 1.8 Microns per Minute: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bobela, D. C.; Teplin, C. W.; Young, D. L.; Branz, H. M.; Stradins, P.

    2011-07-01

    We have grown device-quality epitaxial silicon thin films at growth rates up to 1.8 μm/min, using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition from silane at substrate temperatures below 750 degrees C. At these rates, which are more than 30 times faster than those used by the amorphous and nanocrystalline Si industry, capital costs for large-scale solar cell production would be dramatically reduced, even for cell absorber layers up to 10 ?m thick. We achieved high growth rates by optimizing the three key parameters: silane flow, depletion, and filament geometry, based on our model developed earlier. Hydrogen coverage of the filament surface likely limits silane decomposition and growth rate at high system pressures. No considerable deterioration in PV device performance is observed when grown at high rate, provided that the epitaxial growth is initiated at low rate. A simple mesa device structure (wafer/epi Si/a-Si(i)/a-Si:H(p)/ITO) with a 2.3 um epitaxial silicon absorber layer was grown at 700 nm/min. The finished device had an open-circuit voltage of 0.424 V without hydrogenation treatment.

  10. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to

  11. Laser ablation of optically thin absorbing liquid layer predeposited onto a transparent solid substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryashov, S. I.; Lyon, K.; Shukla, S.; Murry, D.; Allen, S. D.

    2006-09-01

    Ablation of optically thin liquid 2-propanol layers of variable thickness on IR-transparent solid Si substrate by a nanosecond CO{sub 2} laser has been experimentally studied using time-resolved optical interferometric and microscopy techniques. Basic ablation parameters - threshold fluences for surface vaporization and explosive homogeneous boiling of the superheated liquid, ablation depths, vaporization (ablation) rates, and characteristic ablation times versus laser fluence - were measured as a function of alcohol layer thickness. The underlying ablation mechanisms, their thermodynamics, and microscopic details are discussed.

  12. Measurements of the light-absorbing material inside cloud droplets and its effect on cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Clarke, A. D.; Warren, Stephen G.; Radke, L. F.; Charleson, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    Most of the measurements of light-absorbing aerosol particles made previously have been in non-cloudy air and therefore provide no insight into aerosol effects on cloud properties. Here, researchers describe an experiment designed to measure light absorption exclusively due to substances inside cloud droplets, compare the results to related light absorption measurements, and evaluate possible effects on the albedo of clouds. The results of this study validate those of Twomey and Cocks and show that the measured levels of light-absorbing material are negligible for the radiative properties of realistic clouds. For the measured clouds, which appear to have been moderately polluted, the amount of elemental carbon (EC) present was insufficient to affect albedo. Much higher contaminant levels or much larger droplets than those measured would be necessary to significantly alter the radiative properties. The effect of the concentrations of EC actually measured on the albedo of snow, however, would be much more pronounced since, in contrast to clouds, snowpacks are usually optically semi-infinite and have large particle sizes.

  13. Millimeter wave complex dielectric permittivity and complex magnetic permeability measurements of absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachov, Igor Ivanovich

    2000-09-01

    This dissertation presents new methods for characterization of materials in the millimeter wave range. Historically, this has been the most difficult part of the electromagnetic spectrum for accurate measurements of material properties. New instrumentation has now been developed for operation in this frequency band. The new techniques developed in the course of this work allowed precise measurement of dielectric properties as well as the separation of magnetic properties from dielectric in the millimeter wave range. A new quasi-optical spectrometer with a waveguide reference channel has been designed and built for the precision measurement of the real part of dielectric permittivity of medium and highly absorbing materials over an extended W-band frequency range (70-118 GHz). A new method of phase measurement with this unique unbalanced quasi-optical waveguide bridge spectrometer has been developed. The phase of the electromagnetic wave transmitted through the specimen can be measured accurately, leading to the determination of the real part of the complex dielectric permittivity of moderate and highly absorbing dielectric materials with high precision. A simple quasi-optical transmission configuration of the spectrometer, a single free space channel provides the transmittance data with a high resolution from which the spectra of the imaginary part of dielectric permittivity of materials are evaluated accurately. A backward wave oscillator (BWO) is used as the source of tunable coherent radiation for the spectrometer. The high output power of the BWO and the high sensitivity of the receiver system, which employs a specially constructed liquid helium cooled InSb detector, enable adequate sensitivity in transmission for highly absorbing materials. Systematic study of dielectric and magnetic properties of various materials has been performed with the quasi-optical free space method in the millimeter wave range from 34GHz to 117GHz for the first time. Specific results

  14. Method for absorbing an ion from a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Huizhen; Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles R.

    2007-07-03

    A method for absorbing an ion from a fluid by using dispersing an organic acid into an anion surfactant solution, mixing in a divalent-metal containing compound and a trivalent-metal containing compound and calcining the resulting solid layered double hydroxide product to form an absorbent material and then contacting the absorbent material with an aqueous solution of cations or anions to be absorbed.

  15. The hybrid of SnO2 nanoparticle and polypyrrole aerogel: an excellent electromagnetic wave absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Dai, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Wanchun; Wu, Fan; Xie, Aming

    2016-07-01

    As a kind of costless and lightweight material, SnO2 nanoparticles@polypyrrole hybrid aerogels have been synthesized and displayed electromagnetic wave absorbing (EWA) performance. Only with 10 wt% of nano-SnO2 filler loading in wax, effective EWA bandwidth of the hybrid aerogel can reach 7.28 GHz which is the widest lightweight EWA material among the reported absorbents. Through the regulation of sample thicknesses, effective EWA at lower frequencies can also be achieved. It was demonstrated that this aerogel can be used as an effective lightweight broadband EWA material.

  16. Novel solutions for thin film layer deposition for organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiper, Dietmar; Long, Michael; Schwambera, Markus; Gersdorff, Markus; Kreis, Juergen; Heuken, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Innovative systems for carrier-gas enhanced vapor phase deposition of organic layers offer advanced methods for the precise deposition of complex thin-film layer stacks. The approach inherently avoids potential short-comings from solvent-based polymer deposition and offers new opportunities. The process operates at low pressure (thus avoiding complex vacuum setups), and, by employing AIXTRON's extensive experience in freely scalable solutions, can be adapted to virtually any production process and allows for R&D and production systems alike. Deposition of organic layers and stacks recommends the approach for a wide range of organic small molecule and polymer materials (including layers with gradual change of the composition), for conductive layers, for dielectric layers, for barrier systems, for OLED materials, and surface treatments such as oleophobic / hydrophobic coatings. With the combination of other vapor phase deposition solutions, hybrid systems combining organic and inorganic materials and other advanced stacks can be realized.

  17. Intercalation of ethylene glycol into yttrium hydroxide layered materials.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yuanzhou; Davis, Robert J

    2010-04-19

    Intercalation of ethylene glycol into layered yttrium hydroxide containing nitrate counterions was accomplished by heating the reagents in a methanol solution of sodium methoxide under autogenous pressure at 413 K for 20 h. The resulting crystalline material had an expanded interlayer distance of 10.96 A, confirming the intercalation of an ethylene glycol derived species. Characterization of the material by FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and the catalytic transesterification of tributyrin with methanol was consistent with direct bonding of ethylene glycolate anions (O(2)C(2)H(5)(-)) to the yttrium hydroxide layers, forming Y-O-C bonds. The layers of the material are proposed to be held together by H-bonding between the hydroxyls of grafted ethylene glycol molecules attached to adjacent layers. Glycerol can also be intercalated into yttrium hydroxide layered materials by a similar method. PMID:20302308

  18. A comparison of the shock-absorbing properties of cervical disc prosthesis bearing materials

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Michael C.; Jacobsen, Stephen; Metcalf, Newton; Sasso, Rick; Ching, Randal P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Data Cervical arthroplasty offers theoretical advantages over traditional spinal fusion, including elimination of adjacent segment disease and elimination of the risk of pseudoarthrosis formation. Initial studies of cervical arthroplasty have shown promising results, however, the ideal design characteristics for disc replacement constructs have not been determined. The current study seeks to quantify the differences in the shock absorption characteristics of three commonly used materials in cervical disc arthroplasty. Methods Three different nucleus materials, polyurethane (PU), polyethylene (PE) and a titanium-alloy (Ti) were tested in a humidity- and temperature-controlled chamber. Ten of each nucleus type underwent three separate mechanical testing protocols to measure 1) dynamic stiffness, 2) quasi-static stiffness, 3) energy absorption, and 4) energy dissipation. The results were compared using analysis of variance. Results PU had the lowest mean dynamic stiffness (435 ± 13 N/mm, P < .0001) and highest energy absorption (19.4 ± 0.1 N/mm, P < .0001) of all three nucleus materials tested. PU was found to have significantly higher energy dissipation (viscous damping ratio 0.017 ± 0,001, P < .0001) than the PE or TI nuclei. PU had the lowest quasi-static stiffness (598 ± 23 N/mm, P < .0001) of the nucleus materials tested. A biphasic response curve was observed for all of the PU nuclei tests. Conclusions Polyurethane absorbs and dissipates more energy and is less stiff than either polyethylene or titanium. Level of Evidence Basic Science/Biomechanical Study. Clinical Relevance This study characterizes important differences in biomechanical properties of materials that are currently being used for different cervical disc prostheses. PMID:25802668

  19. Direct evidence of void passivation in Cu(InGa)(SSe){sub 2} absorber layers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongho; Kim, Young-Su; Mo, Chan B.; Huh, Kwangsoo; Yang, JungYup E-mail: ddang@korea.ac.kr; Nam, Junggyu; Baek, Dohyun; Park, Sungchan; Kim, ByoungJune; Kim, Dongseop; Lee, Jaehan; Heo, Sung; Park, Jong-Bong; Kang, Yoonmook E-mail: ddang@korea.ac.kr

    2015-02-23

    We have investigated the charge collection condition around voids in copper indium gallium sulfur selenide (CIGSSe) solar cells fabricated by sputter and a sequential process of selenization/sulfurization. In this study, we found direct evidence of void passivation by using the junction electron beam induced current method, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The high sulfur concentration at the void surface plays an important role in the performance enhancement of the device. The recombination around voids is effectively suppressed by field-assisted void passivation. Hence, the generated carriers are easily collected by the electrodes. Therefore, when the S/(S + Se) ratio at the void surface is over 8% at room temperature, the device performance degradation caused by the recombination at the voids is negligible at the CIGSSe layer.

  20. Measurement and modeling of terahertz spectral signatures from layered material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniffin, G. P.; Schecklman, S.,; Chen, J.; Henry, S. C.; Zurk, L. M.; Pejcinovic, B.; Timchenko, A. I.

    2010-04-01

    Many materials such as drugs and explosives have characteristic spectral signatures in the terahertz (THz) band. These unique signatures hold great promise for potential detection utilizing THz radiation. While such spectral features are most easily observed in transmission,real life imaging systems will need to identify materials of interest from reflection measurements,often in non-ideal geometries. In this work we investigate the interference effects introduced by layered materials,whic h are commonly encountered in realistic sensing geometries. A model for reflection from a layer of material is presented,along with reflection measurements of single layers of sample material. Reflection measurements were made to compare the response of two materials; α-lactose monohydrate which has sharp absorption features,and polyethylene which does not. Finally,the model is inverted numerically to extract material parameters from the measured data as well as simulated reflection responses from the explosive C4.

  1. The case for using a sacrificial layer of absorbent insulation in the design of flat and low-sloped roofing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Gregory R.

    2013-05-01

    Beginning about twenty-five years ago, there was a marked increase in the number of single-ply membrane roof designs used to cover and waterproof flat and low-sloped building roofs. Over the past ten years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of installations of white and more reflective single-ply roof systems, mostly using high density cellular foam insulation in the substrate for insulation. A major factor in the increase in the popularity of these highly insulated and more reflective roof systems is the fact that many governments began offering incentives for building owners to use reflective coverings and better insulated roofs. Now, owing to the energy efficient requirements for the design and construction of new buildings put forth in ASHRAE Standard 90.1, "Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings" and the world's apparent desire to be "green" (or at least appear to be), more and more roof designs will include these reflective single-ply membranes, which use the cellular foam insulation boards to meet these requirements. Using a lower density traditional insulation will mean that the roof will have to be very thick to comply, increasing the costs of installation. High density cellular foams do not absorb water until time, vapor pressure drive, UV and thermal shock break down the foam and it becomes more absorbent. This could be 5-7 years or longer, depending on the roof construction and other factors. This means that any water that enters the roof through a breach (leak) in the membrane goes straight into the building. This is not a good consequence since the failure mode of any roof is water entering the building. Keeping the water out of the building is the purpose of the waterproofing layer. This paper reviews the techniques of moisture testing on building roofs and infrared (IR) thermography, and puts forth the idea and reasoning behind having a sacrificial layer of very absorbent insulation installed in every

  2. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the costmore » of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.« less

  3. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the cost of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.

  4. Inorganic-organic solar cells based on quaternary sulfide as absorber materials.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tiantian; Liu, Zhifeng; Yan, Weiguo; Liu, Junqi; Zhang, Xueqi

    2015-12-14

    We report a novel promising quaternary sulfide (CuAgInS) to serve as a semiconductor sensitizer material in the photoelectrochemical field. In this study, CuAgInS (CAIS) sulfide sensitized ZnO nanorods were fabricated on ITO substrates through a facile and low-cost hydrothermal chemical method and applied on photoanodes for solar cells for the first time. The component and stoichiometry were key factors in determining the photoelectric performance of CAIS sulfide, which were controlled by modulating their reaction time. ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 nanoarrays exhibit an enhanced optical and photoelectric performance and the power conversion efficiency of ITO/ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2/P3HT/Pt solid-state solar cell was up to 1.80%. The remarkable performance stems from improved electron transfer, a higher efficiency of light-harvesting and appropriate band gap alignment at the interface of the ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 NTs. The research indicates that CAIS as an absorbing material has enormous potential in solar cell systems. PMID:26553746

  5. Anisotropic layers with through-thickness thermal and material variations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, M. )

    1992-09-01

    The thermoelastic problem of an inhomogeneous anisotropic layer with material properties that vary smoothly through the thickness is examined. The problem is solved via a semiinverse technique, relying on the assumptions of the simply-connectedness of the body. The solution is applicable to the analysis of materials with chemical composition gradients and/or temperature-dependent material properties. 14 refs.

  6. Interface crack problems in layered orthotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogan, F.; Wu, Binghua

    1993-05-01

    T HE PRIMARY objective of this paper is to study the influence of the structure and thickness of the interfacial regions on the strain energy release rate in bonded isotropic or orthotropic materials containing collinear interface cracks. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations of the second kind which is solved by using a relatively simple and efficient technique. A number of examples are given for various crack geometries and material combinations. The results show that the effect of the properties and the relative thickness of the interfacial region on the stress intensity factors and the strain energy release rate can be highly significant.

  7. Analysis of SnS2 hyperdoped with V proposed as efficient absorber material.

    PubMed

    Seminovski, Yohanna; Palacios, Pablo; Wahnón, Perla

    2014-10-01

    Intermediate-band materials can improve the photovoltaic efficiency of solar cells through the absorption of two subband-gap photons that allow extra electron-hole pair formations. Previous theoretical and experimental findings support the proposal that the layered SnS2 compound, with a band-gap of around 2 eV, is a candidate for an intermediate-band material when it is doped with a specific transition-metal. In this work we characterize vanadium doped SnS2 using density functional theory at the dilution level experimentally found and including a dispersion correction combined with the site-occupancy-disorder method. In order to analyze the electronic characteristics that depend on geometry, two SnS2 polytypes partially substituted with vanadium in symmetry-adapted non-equivalent configurations were studied. In addition the magnetic configurations of vanadium in a SnS2 2H-polytype and its comparison with a 4H-polytype were also characterized. We demonstrate that a narrow intermediate-band is formed, when these dopant atoms are located in different layers. Our theoretical predictions confirm the recent experimental findings in which a paramagnetic intermediate-band material in a SnS2 2H-polytype with 10% vanadium concentration is obtained. PMID:25204457

  8. Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Kesterite Solar Cell Based on in Situ Deposition of Ultrathin Absorber Layer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi; Azimi, Hamed; Gasparini, Nicola; Salvador, Michael; Chen, Wei; Khanzada, Laraib S; Brandl, Marco; Hock, Rainer; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-09-30

    The production of high-performance, solution-processed kesterite Cu2ZnSn(Sx,Se1-x)4 (CZTSSe) solar cells typically relies on high-temperature crystallization processes in chalcogen-containing atmosphere and often on the use of environmentally harmful solvents, which could hinder the widespread adoption of this technology. We report a method for processing selenium free Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cells based on a short annealing step at temperatures as low as 350 °C using a molecular based precursor, fully avoiding highly toxic solvents and high-temperature sulfurization. We show that a simple device structure consisting of ITO/CZTS/CdS/Al and comprising an extremely thin absorber layer (∼110 nm) achieves a current density of 8.6 mA/cm(2). Over the course of 400 days under ambient conditions encapsulated devices retain close to 100% of their original efficiency. Using impedance spectroscopy and photoinduced charge carrier extraction by linearly increasing voltage (photo-CELIV), we demonstrate that reduced charge carrier mobility is one limiting parameter of low-temperature CZTS photovoltaics. These results may inform less energy demanding strategies for the production of CZTS optoelectronic layers compatible with large-scale processing techniques. PMID:26353923

  9. The relationship of boundary layer clouds in the tropical southeast Atlantic to absorbing aerosols, meteorology and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, P.; Adebiyi, A. A.; Ramajiguru, L.

    2015-12-01

    Ascension Island, a remote island located in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean within the trade-wind region oat 8S, 14.5W, experiences the outflow of biomass-burning aerosols from continental Africa, over 2000 km away, from July through November, peaking in August and September. The shortwave-absorbing free-tropospheric aerosols, located in a region of high solar irradiance, provide a climate warming that is poorly represented in global aerosol climate models. The low clouds can respond to the smoke layer in myriad possible ways that are not yet well-documented. The shortwave-warming can stabilize the free-troposphere, enhancing the low cloud fraction. The deepening boundary layer and subsiding smoke layer also increase the likelihood of aerosol-cloud microphysical interactions. Interest in this climate regime is supporting an observational strategy of a year-long DOE ARM Mobile Facility deployment to Ascension (Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds, or LASIC), and an NSF aircraft campaign (ObservatioNs of Fireʼs Impact on the southeast atlantic REgion, or ONFIRE) based on Sao Tome Island. These campaigns will be integrated with NASA, UK and African activities sharing similar goals based further south in Namibia. Initial analysis is distinguishing meteorology from aerosol impacts on the boundary layer cloud fields. The forward trajectories of emissions from over 24,000 fire sources on continental Africa show that a free-tropospheric jet can advect aerosols to above Ascension island in just one-two days. The fast transport time encourages retention of signatures of the fire sources, in particular the radiatively-crucial single-scattering albedo value. Thereafter, a deep land-based anticyclonic high recirculates over one-third of these trajectories back to the African continent, explaining the widespread extent of the aerosol layer. The free-tropospheric jet also reduces the mean atmospheric subsidence independently of shortwave absorption by the aerosols

  10. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  11. Coupling Hollow Fe3O4-Fe Nanoparticles with Graphene Sheets for High-Performance Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Material.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bin; Zhu, Chunling; Li, Chunyan; Zhang, Xitian; Chen, Yujin

    2016-02-17

    We developed a strategy for coupling hollow Fe3O4-Fe nanoparticles with graphene sheets for high-performance electromagnetic wave absorbing material. The hollow Fe3O4-Fe nanoparticles with average diameter and shell thickness of 20 and 8 nm, respectively, were uniformly anchored on the graphene sheets without obvious aggregation. The minimal reflection loss RL values of the composite could reach -30 dB at the absorber thickness ranging from 2.0 to 5.0 mm, greatly superior to the solid Fe3O4-Fe/G composite and most magnetic EM wave absorbing materials recently reported. Moreover, the addition amount of the composite into paraffin matrix was only 18 wt %. PMID:26829291

  12. Tailoring nanoporous materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Detavernier, Christophe; Dendooven, Jolien; Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Ludwig, Karl F; Martens, Johan A

    2011-11-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a cyclic process which relies on sequential self-terminating reactions between gas phase precursor molecules and a solid surface. The self-limiting nature of the chemical reactions ensures precise film thickness control and excellent step coverage, even on 3D structures with large aspect ratios. At present, ALD is mainly used in the microelectronics industry, e.g. for growing gate oxides. The excellent conformality that can be achieved with ALD also renders it a promising candidate for coating porous structures, e.g. for functionalization of large surface area substrates for catalysis, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, filtration devices, sensors, membranes etc. This tutorial review focuses on the application of ALD for catalyst design. Examples are discussed where ALD of TiO(2) is used for tailoring the interior surface of nanoporous films with pore sizes of 4-6 nm, resulting in photocatalytic activity. In still narrower pores, the ability to deposit chemical elements can be exploited to generate catalytic sites. In zeolites, ALD of aluminium species enables the generation of acid catalytic activity. PMID:21695333

  13. First-principles analysis of the spectroscopic limited maximum efficiency of photovoltaic absorber layers for CuAu-like chalcogenides and silicon.

    PubMed

    Bercx, Marnik; Sarmadian, Nasrin; Saniz, Rolando; Partoens, Bart; Lamoen, Dirk

    2016-07-27

    Chalcopyrite semiconductors are of considerable interest for application as absorber layers in thin-film photovoltaic cells. When growing films of these compounds, however, they are often found to contain CuAu-like domains, a metastable phase of chalcopyrite. It has been reported that for CuInS2, the presence of the CuAu-like phase improves the short circuit current of the chalcopyrite-based photovoltaic cell. We investigate the thermodynamic stability of both phases for a selected list of I-III-VI2 materials using a first-principles density functional theory approach. For the CuIn-VI2 compounds, the difference in formation energy between the chalcopyrite and CuAu-like phase is found to be close to 2 meV per atom, indicating a high likelihood of the presence of CuAu-like domains. Next, we calculate the spectroscopic limited maximum efficiency (SLME) of the CuAu-like phase and compare the results with those of the corresponding chalcopyrite phase. We identify several candidates with a high efficiency, such as CuAu-like CuInS2, for which we obtain an SLME of 29% at a thickness of 500 nm. We observe that the SLME can have values above the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit, and show that this can occur because the SQ limit assumes the absorptivity to be a step function, thus overestimating the radiative recombination in the detailed balance approach. This means that it is possible to find higher theoretical efficiencies within this framework simply by calculating the J-V characteristic with an absorption spectrum. Finally, we expand our SLME analysis to indirect band gap absorbers by studying silicon, and find that the SLME quickly overestimates the reverse saturation current of indirect band gap materials, drastically lowering their calculated efficiency. PMID:27405243

  14. Incorporation of Integral Fuel Burnable Absorbers Boron and Gadolinium into Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Clad Material

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, K.; Renk, T.J.; Lahoda, E.J.; Corradini, M.L

    2004-12-14

    Long-lived fuels require the use of higher enrichments of 235U or other fissile materials. Such high levels of fissile material lead to excessive fuel activity at the beginning of life. To counteract this excessive activity, integral fuel burnable absorbers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly. The two commonly used IFBA elements are gadolinium, which is added as gadolinium-oxide to the UO2 powder, and boron, which is applied as a zirconium-diboride coating on the UO2 pellets using plasma spraying or chemical vapor deposition techniques. The incorporation of IFBA into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be very costly because of their small volume and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. Other manufacturing issues that impact cost and performance are maintaining the correct levels of dosing, the reduction in fuel melting point due to gadolinium-oxide additions, and parasitic neutron absorption at fuel's end-of-life. The goal of the proposed research is to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of boron or gadolinium into the outer surface of the fuel cladding material rather than as an additive to the fuel pellets. This paradigm shift will allow for the introduction of the IFBA in a non-nuclear regulated environment and will obviate the necessity of additional handling and processing of the fuel pellets. This could represent significant cost savings and potentially lead to greater reproducibility and control of the burnable fuel in the early stages of the reactor operation. The surface alloying is being performed using the IBEST (Ion Beam Surface Treatment) process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. IBEST involves the delivery of energetic ion beam pulses onto the surface of a material, near-surface melting, and rapid solidification. The non-equilibrium nature of such processing allows for surface

  15. Sand dune materials and polar layered deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P.; Weitz, C.

    1989-09-01

    The possible place of sand in the Martian polar layered deposits is examined. The erosional features in layered deposits and the morphologic relationship of dunes and the layered deposits are discussed. The colors of the polar dunes are shown to be similar to the colors of dunes at other latitudes, suggesting that the polar dunes can be explained without any special or exotic mechanism. Consideration is given to mixing and segregation of materials by eolian processes observed on Mars, showing that sand was probably carried to the polar regions during part of the formation of the layered deposits.

  16. Method for depositing layers of high quality semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Chi C.

    2001-08-14

    Plasma deposition of substantially amorphous semiconductor materials is carried out under a set of deposition parameters which are selected so that the process operates near the amorphous/microcrystalline threshold. This threshold varies as a function of the thickness of the depositing semiconductor layer; and, deposition parameters, such as diluent gas concentrations, must be adjusted as a function of layer thickness. Also, this threshold varies as a function of the composition of the depositing layer, and in those instances where the layer composition is profiled throughout its thickness, deposition parameters must be adjusted accordingly so as to maintain the amorphous/microcrystalline threshold.

  17. Tunable Bragg filters with a phase transition material defect layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Gong, Zilun; Dong, Kaichen; Lou, Shuai; Slack, Jonathan; Anders, Andre; Yao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    We propose an all-solid-state tunable Bragg filter with a phase transition material as the defect layer. Bragg filters based on a vanadium dioxide defect layer sandwiched between silicon dioxide/titanium dioxide Bragg gratings are experimentally demonstrated. Temperature dependent reflection spectroscopy shows the dynamic tunability and hysteresis properties of the Bragg filter. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy reveals the connection between the tunability and the phase transition of the vanadium dioxide defect layer. This work paves a new avenue in tunable Bragg filter designs and promises more applications by combining phase transition materials and optical cavities. PMID:27607643

  18. Ablative Laser Propulsion Using Multi-Layered Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nehls, Mary; Edwards, David; Gray, Perry; Schneider, T.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental investigations are ongoing to study the force imparted to materials when subjected to laser ablation. When a laser pulse of sufficient energy density impacts a material, a small amount of the material is ablated. A torsion balance is used to measure the momentum produced by the ablation process. The balance consists of a thin metal wire with a rotating pendulum suspended in the middle. The wire is fixed at both ends. Recently, multi-layered material systems were investigated. These multi-layered materials were composed of a transparent front surface and opaque sub surface. The laser pulse penetrates the transparent outer surface with minimum photon loss and vaporizes the underlying opaque layer.

  19. Measured Wavelength-Dependent Absorption Enhancement of Internally Mixed Black Carbon with Absorbing and Nonabsorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    You, Rian; Radney, James G; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Optical absorption spectra of laboratory generated aerosols consisting of black carbon (BC) internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials (ammonium sulfate, AS, and sodium chloride, NaCl) and BC with a weakly absorbing brown carbon surrogate derived from humic acid (HA) were measured across the visible to near-IR (550 to 840 nm). Spectra were measured in situ using a photoacoustic spectrometer and step-scanning a supercontinuum laser source with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. BC had a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) of 7.89 ± 0.25 m(2) g(-1) at λ = 550 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 1.03 ± 0.09 (2σ). For internally mixed BC, the ratio of BC mass to the total mass of the mixture was chosen as 0.13 to mimic particles observed in the terrestrial atmosphere. The manner in which BC mixed with each material was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AS/BC and HA/BC particles were fully internally mixed, and the BC was both internally and externally mixed for NaCl/BC particles. The AS/BC, NaCl/BC, and HA/BC particles had AAEs of 1.43 ± 0.05, 1.34 ± 0.06, and 1.91 ± 0.05, respectively. The observed absorption enhancement of mixed BC relative to the pure BC was wavelength dependent for AS/BC and decreased from 1.5 at λ = 550 nm with increasing wavelength while the NaCl/BC enhancement was essentially wavelength independent. For HA/BC, the enhancement ranged from 2 to 3 and was strongly wavelength dependent. Removal of the HA absorption contribution to enhancement revealed that the enhancement was ≈1.5 and independent of wavelength. PMID:27359341

  20. Rice straw-wood particle composite for sound absorbing wooden construction materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han-Seung; Kim, Dae-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2003-01-01

    In this study, rice straw-wood particle composite boards were manufactured as insulation boards using the method used in the wood-based panel industry. The raw material, rice straw, was chosen because of its availability. The manufacturing parameters were: a specific gravity of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8, and a rice straw content (10/90, 20/80, and 30/70 weight of rice straw/wood particle) of 10, 20, and 30 wt.%. A commercial urea-formaldehyde adhesive was used as the composite binder, to achieve 140-290 psi of bending modulus of rupture (MOR) with 0.4 specific gravity, 700-900 psi of bending MOR with 0.6 specific gravity, and 1400-2900 psi of bending MOR with a 0.8 specific gravity. All of the composite boards were superior to insulation board in strength. Width and length of the rice straw particle did not affect the bending MOR. The composite boards made from a random cutting of rice straw and wood particles were the best and recommended for manufacturing processes. Sound absorption coefficients of the 0.4 and 0.6 specific gravity boards were higher than the other wood-based materials. The recommended properties of the rice straw-wood particle composite boards are described, to absorb noises, preserve the temperature of indoor living spaces, and to be able to partially or completely substitute for wood particleboard and insulation board in wooden constructions. PMID:12653275

  1. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics - Part 1: Surface tension depression and light-absorbing products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Shapiro, E. L.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2009-07-01

    We show that methylglyoxal forms light-absorbing secondary organic material in aqueous ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosol particles. The light-absorbing products form on the order of minutes, and solution composition continues to change over several days. The results suggest an aldol condensation pathway involving the participation of the ammonium ion. Aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal, with and without inorganic salts, exhibit surface tension depression. Methylglyoxal uptake could potentially change the optical properties, climate effects, and heterogeneous chemistry of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  2. Two-Dimensional Layered Materials-Based Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guohui; Wu, Xing; Tong, Wenqi; Duan, Chungang

    2015-12-01

    The recent emergence of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials — graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides — opens a new avenue for exploring the internal quantum degrees of freedom of electrons and their potential for new electronics. Here, we provide a brief review of experimental achievements concerning electrical spin injection, spin transport, graphene nanoribbons spintronics and transition metal dichalcogenides spin and pseudospins. Future research in 2D layered materials spintronics will need to address the development of applications such as spin transistors and spin logic devices, as well as exotic physical properties including pseudospins-valley phenomena in graphene and other 2D materials.

  3. Analysis of the effect of different absorber materials and loading on the shielding effectiveness of a metallic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, S.; Karcoon, H.; Dickmann, S.; Rambousky, R.

    2015-11-01

    Metallic rooms as part of a complex system, like a ship, are necessarily connected electromagnetically via apertures and cables to the outside. Therefore, their electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (SE) is limited by ventilation openings, cable feed-throughs and door gaps. Thus, electronic equipment inside these rooms is susceptible to outer electromagnetic threats like IEM (Intentional Electromagnetic Interference). Dielectric or magnetic absorber inside such a screened room can be used in order to prevent the SE from collapsing at the resonant frequencies. In this contribution, the effect of different available absorber materials is compared, as well as other properties like weight and workability. Furthermore, parameter variations of the absorber as well as the effect of loading in form of metallic and dielectric structures on the SE are analyzed.

  4. Performance Boosting of Flexible ZnO UV Sensors with Rational Designed Absorbing Antireflection Layer and Humectant Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Hu, Youfan; Wang, Zongpeng; Fang, Zheyu; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-01-13

    Flexible ZnO thin film UV sensors with 3 orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity and 2 orders of magnitude acceleration in speed are realized via light absorption efficiency enhancement and surface encapsulation. Devices are constructed on polyethylene substrate incorporating morphology controlled ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs) as absorbing antireflection layers. By adjusting the morphology of ZnO NRAs, the light absorptance exceeds 99% through effectively trapping incident photons. As a result, the sensitivity of the UV sensor reaches 109 000. Moreover, a mechanism of competitive chemisorption between O2 and H2O at oxygen vacancy sites is proposed to explain the phenomenon of the speed acceleration in moist environment. A new approach of humectant encapsulation is used to make H2O participant rapid processes dominant for speed acceleration. Two orders of magnitude speed enhancement in reset time is achieved by polyethylene glycol encapsulation. After a total 3000 cycles bending test, the decay in the responsivity of UV sensor is within 20%, indicating good mechanical stability. All these results not only demonstrate a simple, effective and scalable approach to fabricate high sensitive and fast response flexible ZnO UV sensors, but also provide meaningful references for performance boosting of photoelectronic devices based on other oxide semiconductors. PMID:26652032

  5. Prepare dispersed CIS nano-scale particles and spray coating CIS absorber layers using nano-scale precursors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Mo-electrode thin films were deposited by a two-stepped process, and the high-purity copper indium selenide-based powder (CuInSe2, CIS) was fabricated by hydrothermal process by Nanowin Technology Co. Ltd. From the X-ray pattern of the CIS precursor, the mainly crystalline phase was CIS, and the almost undetectable CuSe phase was observed. Because the CIS powder was aggregated into micro-scale particles and the average particle sizes were approximately 3 to 8 μm, the CIS power was ground into nano-scale particles, then the 6 wt.% CIS particles were dispersed into isopropyl alcohol to get the solution for spray coating method. Then, 0.1 ml CIS solution was sprayed on the 20 mm × 10 mm Mo/glass substrates, and the heat treatment for the nano-scale CIS solution under various parameters was carried out in a selenization furnace. The annealing temperature was set at 550°C, and the annealing time was changed from 5 to 30 min, without extra Se content was added in the furnace. The influences of annealing time on the densification, crystallization, resistivity (ρ), hall mobility (μ), and carrier concentration of the CIS absorber layers were well investigated in this study. PMID:24380376

  6. Near-IR absorbing phthalocyanine derivatives as materials for organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayukh, Mayank

    2011-12-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pcs) are highly conjugated synthetic porphyrin analogs that exhibit high extinction coefficients and hole mobilities, and strong pi-pi interactions. We have developed a general method for the synthesis of peripherally functionalized Pc chromophores using 'click' chemistry, wherein an alkynyl substituted Pc is reacted with an azide, providing an elegant route to the creation of a library of numerous Pcs. We have also developed a simple route to the synthesis of tri- and tetravalent metal Pc derivatives such as titanyl phthalocyanine (TiO Pc) involving solvent-free conditions. Solvent-free conditions are environmentally friendly and industrially economical, and in the present context effectively eliminate the formation of non-metallated phthalocyanine (H 2Pc), a side product often seen in other routes that interferes with their purification. We have also prepared and characterized thin-films of some of these Pcs, TiOPcs in particular, wherein we have developed an easy route to various TiO Pc polymorphs exhibiting different near-IR sensitivities via spin-coating whose optical properties are reminiscent of Phase-I and Phase-II polymorphs of the unmodified TiOPc. Phase-II is particularly interesting as it is photoelectrically active in the near-IR region with a Q-band maximum at ca. 890 nm. We have also fabricated and characterized organic solar cells in both planar heterojunction (PHJ) and bulk heterojunction (BHJ) architectures based on one of these materials, which exhibited good near-IR photoactivity with the absorption spectrum extending up to 1 micrometer in the near-IR. The incident and absorbed photon to current efficiency (IPCE and APCE) spectra showed contributions from the TiOPc in the near-IR region with local maxima around 680 nm and 920 nm, corresponding to the Frenkel and the charge-transfer (CT) bands of the TiOPc, respectively.

  7. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lumin; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  8. Material parameter computation for multi-layered vocal fold models

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bastian; Stingl, Michael; Leugering, Günter; Berry, David A.; Döllinger, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Today, the prevention and treatment of voice disorders is an ever-increasing health concern. Since many occupations rely on verbal communication, vocal health is necessary just to maintain one’s livelihood. Commonly applied models to study vocal fold vibrations and air flow distributions are self sustained physical models of the larynx composed of artificial silicone vocal folds. Choosing appropriate mechanical parameters for these vocal fold models while considering simplifications due to manufacturing restrictions is difficult but crucial for achieving realistic behavior. In the present work, a combination of experimental and numerical approaches to compute material parameters for synthetic vocal fold models is presented. The material parameters are derived from deformation behaviors of excised human larynges. The resulting deformations are used as reference displacements for a tracking functional to be optimized. Material optimization was applied to three-dimensional vocal fold models based on isotropic and transverse-isotropic material laws, considering both a layered model with homogeneous material properties on each layer and an inhomogeneous model. The best results exhibited a transversal-isotropic inhomogeneous (i.e., not producible) model. For the homogeneous model (three layers), the transversal-isotropic material parameters were also computed for each layer yielding deformations similar to the measured human vocal fold deformations. PMID:21476672

  9. Layered material characterization using ultrasonic transmission. An inverse estimation methodology.

    PubMed

    Messineo, María G; Rus, Guillermo; Eliçabe, Guillermo E; Frontini, Gloria L

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an inverse methodology with the aim to characterize a layered material through the identification of acoustical and mechanical properties of its layers. The framework to accomplish this objective is provided by the Inverse Problems (IPs) theory. Material characterization refers to the detection and localization of discontinuities, as well as to the identification of physical properties, in order to predict the material behaviour. In this particular case, the IP is solved in the form of a parameter estimation problem, in which the goal is the estimation of the characteristic acoustic impedance, transit time, and attenuation of each layer. These parameters are directly related to relevant material properties, such as the speed of sound, density, elastic modulus and elastic energy dissipation constants. The IP solution is obtained by minimizing a cost functional formulated as the least squares error between the waveform calculated using an equivalent model, and the measured waveform obtained from ultrasonic transmission tests. The applied methodology allowed the accurate estimation of the desired parameters in materials composed of up to three layers. As a second contribution, a power law frequency dependence of the wave attenuation was identified for several homogeneous materials, based on the same ultrasonic transmission experiments. PMID:26456278

  10. Designing high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K H; Fischer, Karl F F; Zhang, Wenqing; Shi, Xun; Iversen, Bo B

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach naturally leads to design maps for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor through forming solid solutions and biaxial strain. Using this approach, we predict a series of potential thermoelectric candidates from layered CaAl2Si2-type Zintl compounds. Several of them contain nontoxic, low-cost and earth-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials. PMID:26948043

  11. Designing high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Fischer, Karl F. F.; Zhang, Wenqing; Shi, Xun; Iversen, Bo B.

    2016-03-01

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach naturally leads to design maps for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor through forming solid solutions and biaxial strain. Using this approach, we predict a series of potential thermoelectric candidates from layered CaAl2Si2-type Zintl compounds. Several of them contain nontoxic, low-cost and earth-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials.

  12. Designing high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Fischer, Karl F. F.; Zhang, Wenqing; Shi, Xun; Iversen, Bo B.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach naturally leads to design maps for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor through forming solid solutions and biaxial strain. Using this approach, we predict a series of potential thermoelectric candidates from layered CaAl2Si2-type Zintl compounds. Several of them contain nontoxic, low-cost and earth-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials. PMID:26948043

  13. Visibility of two-dimensional layered materials on various substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, M. R. E-mail: knoch@iht.rwth-aachen.de; Gumprich, A.; Ecik, E.; Kallis, K. T.; Winkler, F.; Kardynal, B.; Petrov, I.; Kunze, U.; Knoch, J. E-mail: knoch@iht.rwth-aachen.de

    2015-10-14

    For the investigation of 2D layered materials such as graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides, boron nitride, and their heterostructures, dedicated substrates are required to enable unambiguous identification through optical microscopy. A systematic study is conducted, focusing on various 2D layered materials and substrates. The simulated colors are displayed and compared with microscopy images. Additionally, the issue of defining an appropriate index for measuring the degree of visibility is discussed. For a wide range of substrate stacks, layer thicknesses for optimum visibility are given along with the resulting sRGB colors. Further simulations of customized stacks can be conducted using our simulation tool, which is available for download and contains a database featuring a wide range of materials.

  14. Materials Science and Engineering with Two-dimensional Atomic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    There has been tremendous interest in recent years to study two-dimensional atomic layers which form building blocks of many bulk layered materials and devices. This talk will focus on the materials science aspects of 2D atomic layer, in particular the emerging structures based on transition metal chalcogenides. Several aspects that include synthesis, characterization and device fabrication will be explored with the objective of achieving all 2D functional structures for future technologies. The concept of nanoscale engineering and the goal of creating new artificially stacked van der Waals solids will be discussed through a number of examples. The challenges involved in scalable synthesis, doping, defect engineering, surface modifications of monolayers and the controlled creation of stacked structures and in-plane junctions from multiple compositions will be discussed. Some of anticipated applications of these materials will also be discussed.

  15. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-plane Anisotropic Layered Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ling, Xi; Lin, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuqing; Mao, Nannan; Zhang, Na; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the basic charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structure, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulphide (ReS2), has attracted great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions due to the anisotropic carrier mobilities of the 2D materials are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials.

  16. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-plane Anisotropic Layered Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ling, Xi; Lin, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuqing; Mao, Nannan; Zhang, Na; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the basic charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structure, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulphide (ReS2), has attractedmore » great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions due to the anisotropic carrier mobilities of the 2D materials are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials.« less

  17. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-Plane Anisotropic Layered Materials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jingjing; Liang, Liangbo; Ling, Xi; Zhang, Shuqing; Mao, Nannan; Zhang, Na; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2015-12-16

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structures, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulfide (ReS2), has attracted great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions between the 2D materials and molecules are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials. PMID:26583533

  18. Incorporating microorganisms into polymer layers provides bioinspired functional living materials

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Lukas C.; Koehler, Fabian M.; Grass, Robert N.; Stark, Wendelin J.

    2012-01-01

    Artificial two-dimensional biological habitats were prepared from porous polymer layers and inoculated with the fungus Penicillium roqueforti to provide a living material. Such composites of classical industrial ingredients and living microorganisms can provide a novel form of functional or smart materials with capability for evolutionary adaptation. This allows realization of most complex responses to environmental stimuli. As a conceptual design, we prepared a material surface with self-cleaning capability when subjected to standardized food spill. Fungal growth and reproduction were observed in between two specifically adapted polymer layers. Gas exchange for breathing and transport of nutrient through a nano-porous top layer allowed selective intake of food whilst limiting the microorganism to dwell exclusively in between a confined, well-enclosed area of the material. We demonstrated a design of such living materials and showed both active (eating) and waiting (dormant, hibernation) states with additional recovery for reinitiation of a new active state by observing the metabolic activity over two full nutrition cycles of the living material (active, hibernation, reactivation). This novel class of living materials can be expected to provide nonclassical solutions in consumer goods such as packaging, indoor surfaces, and in biotechnology. PMID:22198770

  19. Two-dimensional material-based saturable absorbers: towards compact visible-wavelength all-fiber pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhengqian; Wu, Duanduan; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian; Xu, Shuo; Zhu, Chunhui; Wang, Fengqiu; Sun, Zhipei; Zhang, Han

    2015-12-01

    Passive Q-switching or mode-locking by placing a saturable absorber inside the laser cavity is one of the most effective and popular techniques for pulse generation. However, most of the current saturable absorbers cannot work well in the visible spectral region, which seriously impedes the progress of passively Q-switched/mode-locked visible pulsed fibre lasers. Here, we report a kind of visible saturable absorber--two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs, e.g. WS2, MoS2, MoSe2), and successfully demonstrate compact red-light Q-switched praseodymium (Pr3+)-doped all-fibre lasers. The passive Q-switching operation at 635 nm generates stable laser pulses with ~200 ns pulse duration, 28.7 nJ pulse energy and repetition rate from 232 to 512 kHz. This achievement is attributed to the ultrafast saturable absorption of these layered TMDs in the visible region, as well as the compact and all-fibre laser-cavity design by coating a dielectric mirror on the fibre end facet. This work may open a new route for next-generation high-performance pulsed laser sources in the visible (even ultraviolet) range.Passive Q-switching or mode-locking by placing a saturable absorber inside the laser cavity is one of the most effective and popular techniques for pulse generation. However, most of the current saturable absorbers cannot work well in the visible spectral region, which seriously impedes the progress of passively Q-switched/mode-locked visible pulsed fibre lasers. Here, we report a kind of visible saturable absorber--two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs, e.g. WS2, MoS2, MoSe2), and successfully demonstrate compact red-light Q-switched praseodymium (Pr3+)-doped all-fibre lasers. The passive Q-switching operation at 635 nm generates stable laser pulses with ~200 ns pulse duration, 28.7 nJ pulse energy and repetition rate from 232 to 512 kHz. This achievement is attributed to the ultrafast saturable absorption of these layered TMDs in the visible

  20. On the physical and geometrical properties responsible for the highly absorbing nature of black materials in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Steven Robert

    Black surfaces are of paramount importance in the design of terrestrial and space-borne optical systems. Optical designers can choose from a variety of black materials to suppress reflected and scattered stray light. Among these applications are the suppression of unwanted reflection or scattering of light in optical systems, solar collectors, blackbody absorbers, thermal insulators, telescope housing and baffles where stray light reduction is vital, and cold stops and light shields for infrared detectors. The physical mechanisms responsible for understanding the highly absorbing nature of black materials in the infrared spectral region are investigated in this dissertation. We present experimental data on the optical, surface, and constituent properties of black materials. In addition, we developed unique optical instrumentation to characterize the hemispherical reflectance and scattering properties of these materials as a function of incident angle and state of polarization. We compared the experimental data to theoretical rough surface scattering models to understand the absorption mechanisms of these black materials and found good agreement. Furthermore, results from a new, highly absorbing black material in the infrared wavelength regime, known as carbon aerogels, are presented and shown to be superior or equivalent to existing black materials used by optical designers. In addition, we presented a new cylindrical-spherical cavity enclosure and calculated the apparent emissivity along the bounding surfaces of this new cavity enclosure. To our knowledge, this was the first calculation of the apparent emissivity for a cavity enclosure with obscuration. Finally, we proposed several improvements for each individual black material in order to achieve even higher absorption levels.

  1. Resistance to forced airflow through layers of composting organic material.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Denis Leocádio; de Matos, Antonio Teixeira; Melo, Evandro de Castro

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to adjust equations to estimate the static pressure gradient of airflow through layers of organic residues submitted to two stages of biochemical degradation, and to evaluate the static pressure drop of airflow thought the material layer. Measurements of static pressure drop in the layers of sugarcane bagasse and coffee husks mixed with poultry litter on day 0 and after 30 days of composting were performed using a prototype with specific airflow rates ranging from 0.02 to 0.13 m(3) s(-1) m(-2). Static pressure gradient and specific airflow rate data were properly fit to the Shedd, Hukill & Ives and Ergun models, which may be used to predict the static pressure gradient of air to be blown through the organic residue layers. However, the Shedd model was that which best represented the phenomenon studied. The static pressure drop of airflow increased as a power of the material layer thickness and showed tendency for decreasing with the biochemical degradation time of the organic material. PMID:25536861

  2. Porous Materials with Tunable Structure and Mechanical Properties via Templated Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    PubMed

    Ziminska, Monika; Dunne, Nicholas; Hamilton, Andrew R

    2016-08-31

    The deposition of stiff and strong coatings onto porous templates offers a novel strategy for fabricating macroscale materials with controlled architectures at the micro- and nanoscale. Here, layer-by-layer assembly is utilized to fabricate nanocomposite-coated foams with highly customizable properties by depositing polymer-nanoclay coatings onto open-cell foam templates. The compressive mechanical behavior of these materials evolves in a predictable manner that is qualitatively captured by scaling laws for the mechanical properties of cellular materials. The observed and predicted properties span a remarkable range of density-stiffness space, extending from regions of very soft elastomer foams to very stiff, lightweight honeycomb and lattice materials. PMID:27513218

  3. Two-dimensional material-based saturable absorbers: towards compact visible-wavelength all-fiber pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhengqian; Wu, Duanduan; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian; Xu, Shuo; Zhu, Chunhui; Wang, Fengqiu; Sun, Zhipei; Zhang, Han

    2016-01-14

    Passive Q-switching or mode-locking by placing a saturable absorber inside the laser cavity is one of the most effective and popular techniques for pulse generation. However, most of the current saturable absorbers cannot work well in the visible spectral region, which seriously impedes the progress of passively Q-switched/mode-locked visible pulsed fibre lasers. Here, we report a kind of visible saturable absorber-two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs, e.g. WS2, MoS2, MoSe2), and successfully demonstrate compact red-light Q-switched praseodymium (Pr(3+))-doped all-fibre lasers. The passive Q-switching operation at 635 nm generates stable laser pulses with ∼200 ns pulse duration, 28.7 nJ pulse energy and repetition rate from 232 to 512 kHz. This achievement is attributed to the ultrafast saturable absorption of these layered TMDs in the visible region, as well as the compact and all-fibre laser-cavity design by coating a dielectric mirror on the fibre end facet. This work may open a new route for next-generation high-performance pulsed laser sources in the visible (even ultraviolet) range. PMID:26658877

  4. Limit pulses in passive nonlinear absorbers. [solid-state laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The propagation of coherent pulses in absorbers with nonlinear refractive index is investigated. It is shown that a term neglected by previous authors places an upper limit on the attainable field strength in steady-state pulses. In ruby with a Cr(3+) doping density of 10 to the 17th power per cu cm, for example, this limit is less than 2,000,000 V/cm.

  5. Preparation and study on microwave absorbing materials of boron nitride coated pyrolytic carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Xiao, Peng; Li, Yang

    2012-09-01

    Boron nitride coatings were synthesized on pyrolytic carbon (BN-coated PyC) particles via chemical reaction of boric acid and urea in nitrogen. The results of Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FI-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) show the formation of boron nitride coating. The TGA curves indicate that the oxidation resistance of the PyC particles is improved by incorporating BN coating on the surface. The mass of the BN-coated PyC particles remains over 60% at 1200 °C whereas the PyC particles are oxidized completely at 920 °C. The investigation of microwave absorbing property reveals that compared with the PyC particles, the BN-coated PyC particles have lower permittivity (ɛ', ɛ″) and better absorbing property. The BN-coated PyC particles show a strong absorbing peak at 10.64 GHz, where the lowest reflectivity -21.72 dB is reached. And the reflectivity less than -10 dB is over the range of 9.6-12 GHz.

  6. LayerOptics: Microscopic modeling of optical coefficients in layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorwerk, Christian; Cocchi, Caterina; Draxl, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Theoretical spectroscopy is a powerful tool to describe and predict optical properties of materials. While nowadays routinely performed, first-principles calculations only provide bulk dielectric tensors in Cartesian coordinates. These outputs are hardly comparable with experimental data, which are typically given by macroscopic quantities, crucially depending on the laboratory setup. Even more serious discrepancies can arise for anisotropic materials, e.g., organic crystals, where off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor can significantly contribute to the spectral features. Here, we present LayerOptics, a versatile and user-friendly implementation, based on the solution of the Maxwell's equations for anisotropic materials, to compute optical coefficients in anisotropic layered materials. We apply this tool for post-processing full dielectric tensors of molecular materials, including excitonic effects, as computed from many-body perturbation theory using the exciting code. For prototypical examples, ranging from optical to X-ray frequencies, we show the importance of combining accurate ab initio methods to obtain dielectric tensors, with the solution of the Maxwell's equations to compute optical coefficients accounting for optical anisotropy of layered systems. Good agreement with experimental data supports the potential of our approach, in view of achieving microscopic understanding of spectroscopic properties in complex materials.

  7. CMUTs with High-K Atomic Layer Deposition Dielectric Material Insulation Layer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Toby; Tekes, Coskun; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Use of high-κ dielectric, atomic layer deposition (ALD) materials as an insulation layer material for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is investigated. The effect of insulation layer material and thickness on CMUT performance is evaluated using a simple parallel plate model. The model shows that both high dielectric constant and the electrical breakdown strength are important for the dielectric material, and significant performance improvement can be achieved, especially as the vacuum gap thickness is reduced. In particular, ALD hafnium oxide (HfO2) is evaluated and used as an improvement over plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride (SixNy) for CMUTs fabricated by a low-temperature, complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor-compatible, sacrificial release method. Relevant properties of ALD HfO2 such as dielectric constant and breakdown strength are characterized to further guide CMUT design. Experiments are performed on parallel fabricated test CMUTs with 50-nm gap and 16.5-MHz center frequency to measure and compare pressure output and receive sensitivity for 200-nm PECVD SixNy and 100-nm HfO2 insulation layers. Results for this particular design show a 6-dB improvement in receiver output with the collapse voltage reduced by one-half; while in transmit mode, half the input voltage is needed to achieve the same maximum output pressure. PMID:25474786

  8. CMUTs with high-K atomic layer deposition dielectric material insulation layer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Toby; Tekes, Coskun; Degertekin, F

    2014-12-01

    Use of high-κ dielectric, atomic layer deposition (ALD) materials as an insulation layer material for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is investigated. The effect of insulation layer material and thickness on CMUT performance is evaluated using a simple parallel plate model. The model shows that both high dielectric constant and the electrical breakdown strength are important for the dielectric material, and significant performance improvement can be achieved, especially as the vacuum gap thickness is reduced. In particular, ALD hafnium oxide (HfO2) is evaluated and used as an improvement over plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride (Six)Ny)) for CMUTs fabricated by a low-temperature, complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor-compatible, sacrificial release method. Relevant properties of ALD HfO2) such as dielectric constant and breakdown strength are characterized to further guide CMUT design. Experiments are performed on parallel fabricated test CMUTs with 50-nm gap and 16.5-MHz center frequency to measure and compare pressure output and receive sensitivity for 200-nm PECVD Six)Ny) and 100-nm HfO2) insulation layers. Results for this particular design show a 6-dB improvement in receiver output with the collapse voltage reduced by one-half; while in transmit mode, half the input voltage is needed to achieve the same maximum output pressure. PMID:25474786

  9. Microstructural Characterization of Burnable Absorber Materials Being Evaluated for Application in LEU U-Mo Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    J. F. Jue; B. Miller; B. Yao; E. Perez; Y. H. Sohn

    2011-03-01

    The starting microstructure of a fuel plate will impact how it performs during irradiation. As a result, microstructural characterization has been performed on as-fabricated monolithic fuel plates to determine the changes in fuel plate microstructure that may result from changes in fabrication parameters. Particular focus has been given to the fuel plate U-10Mo/Zr and Zr/AA6061 cladding interfaces, since the integrity of these interfaces will play a big role in determining the overall performance of the fuel plate during irradiation. In addition, burnable absorber materials for potential incorporation into monolithic fuel plates have been characterized to identify their as-fabricated microstructures. This information will be important when trying to understand the PIE data from fuel plates with burnable absorbers that are irradiated in future irradiation experiments. This paper will focus on the microstructures observed using optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy for monolithic fuel plates exposed to different fabrication parameters and for as-fabricated burnable absorber materials.

  10. A facile fabrication of chemically converted graphene oxide thin films and their uses as absorber materials for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelifard, Mehdi; Darudi, Hosein

    2016-07-01

    There is a great interest in the use of graphene sheets in thin film solar cells with low-cost and good-optoelectronic properties. Here, the production of absorbent conductive reduced graphene oxide (RGO) thin films was investigated. RGO thin films were prepared from spray-coated graphene oxide (GO) layers at various substrate temperature followed by a simple hydrazine-reducing method. The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical characterizations of graphene oxide (GO) and RGO thin films were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a phase shift from GO to RGO due to hydrazine treatment, in agreement with the FTIR spectra of the layers. FESEM images clearly exhibited continuous films resulting from the overlap of graphene nanosheets. The produced low-cost thin films had high absorption coefficient up to 1.0 × 105 cm-1, electrical resistance as low as 0.9 kΩ/sq, and effective optical band gap of about 1.50 eV, close to the optimum value for solar conversion. The conductive absorbent properties of the reduced graphene oxide thin films would be useful to develop photovoltaic cells.

  11. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  12. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  13. Adhesion layer for etching of tracks in nuclear trackable materials

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Contolini, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A method for forming nuclear tracks having a width on the order of 100-200 nm in nuclear trackable materials, such as polycarbonate (LEXAN) without causing delamination of the LEXAN. The method utilizes an adhesion film having a inert oxide which allows the track to be sufficiently widened to >200 nm without delamination of the nuclear trackable materials. The adhesion film may be composed of a metal such as Cr, Ni, Au, Pt, or Ti, or composed of a dielectric having a stable surface, such as silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), silicon nitride (SiN.sub.x), and aluminum oxide (AlO). The adhesion film can either be deposited on top of the gate metal layer, or if the properties of the adhesion film are adequate, it can be used as the gate layer. Deposition of the adhesion film is achieved by standard techniques, such as sputtering or evaporation.

  14. Ultralight Weight Optical Systems Using Nano-Layered Synthesized Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie; Breckinridge, James

    2014-01-01

    Optical imaging is important for many NASA science missions. Even though complex optical systems have advanced, the optics, based on conventional glass and mirrors, require components that are thick, heavy and expensive. As the need for higher performance expands, glass and mirrors are fast approaching the point where they will be too large, heavy and costly for spacecraft, especially small satellite systems. NASA Langley Research Center is developing a wide range of novel nano-layered synthesized materials that enable the development and fabrication of ultralight weight optical device systems that enable many NASA missions to collect science data imagery using small satellites. In addition to significantly reducing weight, the nano-layered synthesized materials offer advantages in performance, size, and cost.

  15. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of Layered Material Superlattices and Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanath, Suresh; Liu, Xinyu; Rouvimov, Sergei; Furdyna, Jacek K.; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace

    2014-03-01

    Stacking of various layered materials is being pursued widely to realize various devices and observe novel physics. Mostly, these have been limited to exfoliation and stacking either manually or in solution, where control on rotational alignment or order of stacking is lost. We have demonstrated molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of Bi2Se3/MoSe2 superlatticeand Bi2Se3/MoSe2/SnSe2 heterostructure on sapphire. We have achieved a better control on the order of stacking and number of layers as compared to the solution technique. We have characterized these structures using RHEED, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, AFM, X-ray reflectometry, cross-section (cs) and in-plane (ip) TEM. The rotational alignment is dictated by thermodynamics and is understood using ip-TEM diffraction patterns. Layered growth and long range order is evident from the streaky RHEED pattern. Abrupt change in RHEED pattern, clear demarcation of boundary between layers seen using cs-TEM and observation of Raman peaks corresponding to all the layers suggest van-der-waals epitaxy. In our knowledge this is a first demonstration of as grown superlattices and heterostuctures involving transition metal dichalcogenides and is an important step towards the goal of stacking of 2D crystals like lego blocks.

  16. Light-absorbing secondary organic material formed by glyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, E. L.; Szprengiel, J.; Sareen, N.; Jen, C. N.; Giordano, M. R.; McNeill, V. F.

    2009-01-01

    Light-absorbing and high-molecular-weight secondary organic products were observed to result from the reaction of glyoxal in mildly acidic (pH=4) aqueous inorganic salt solutions mimicking aqueous tropospheric aerosol particles. High-molecular-weight (500-600 amu) products were observed when ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) or sodium chloride (NaCl) was present in the aqueous phase. The products formed in the (NH4)2SO4 solutions absorb light at UV and visible wavelengths. Substantial absorption at 300-400 nm develops within two hours, and absorption between 400-600 nm develops within days. Pendant drop tensiometry measurements show that the products are not surface-active. The experimental results along with ab initio predictions of the UV/Vis absorption of potential products suggest that an aldol condensation mechanism is active in the glyoxal-(NH4)2SO4system, resulting in the formation of pi-conjugated products. If similar products are formed in atmospheric aerosol particles, they could change the optical properties of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  17. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials and methods of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, Seth (Inventor); Perry, Joseph (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions capable of simultaneous two-photon absorption and higher order absorptivities are disclosed. Many of these compositions are compounds satisfying the formulae D-.PI.-D, A-.PI.-A, D-A-D and A-D-A, wherein D is an electron donor group, A is an electron acceptor group and .PI. comprises a bridge of .pi.-conjugated bonds connecting the electron donor groups and electron acceptor groups. In A-D-A and D-A-D compounds, the .pi. bridge is substituted with electron donor groups and electron acceptor groups, respectively. Also disclosed are methods that generate an electronically excited state of a compound, including those satisfying one of these formulae. The electronically excited state is achieved in a method that includes irradiating the compound with light. Then, the compound is converted to a multi-photon electronically excited state upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of light. The sum of the energies of all of the absorbed photons is greater than or equal to the transition energy from a ground state of the compound to the multi-photon excited state. The energy of each absorbed photon is less than the transition energy between the ground state and the lowest single-photon excited state of the compound is less than the transition energy between the multi-photon excited state and the ground state.

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition for the Conformal Coating of Nanoporous Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Guang; Han, Catherine Y.; Wang, H. Hau; Birrell, James P.; Welp, Ulrich; Hryn, John N.; Pellin, Michael J.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Poco, John F.; et al

    2006-01-01

    Amore » tomic layer deposition ( ALD ) is ideal for applying precise and conformal coatings over nanoporous materials. We have recently used ALD to coat two nanoporous solids: anodic aluminum oxide ( AAO ) and silica aerogels. AAO possesses hexagonally ordered pores with diameters d ∼ 40 nm and pore length L ∼ 70 microns. The AAO membranes were coated by ALD to fabricate catalytic membranes that demonstrate remarkable selectivity in the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane.dditional AAO membranes coated with ALD Pd films show promise as hydrogen sensors. Silica aerogels have the lowest density and highest surface area of any solid material. Consequently, these materials serve as an excellent substrate to fabricate novel catalytic materials and gas sensors by ALD .« less

  19. Elastic properties of nanostructured materials with layered grain boundary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakasidis, T. E.; Charitidis, C. A.; Skarakis, D.; Chouliaras, F.

    2007-08-01

    Atomistic calculations of the elastic constants for a bulk nanostructured material that consists of a layered structure where alternating layers meet along high angle grain boundaries and where atoms interact via a Lennard-Jones potential are presented. The calculations of the elastic constants were performed in the frame of homogeneous deformations for a wide range of layer widths ranging from 2.24 up to 74.62 nm. The results showed that the relaxation of the atomic structure affects the elastic constants for the cases where more than 5% of atoms are located in the GB region. Also it was found that the way that external stresses are applied on the system affects the values of the obtained elastic properties, with the elastic constants related to the characteristic directions of the grain boundary being the most affected ones. The findings of this work are of interest for the fabrication methods of nanostructured materials, the measurement methods of their elastic properties as well as multiscale modeling schemes of nanostructured materials.

  20. Quantitation of absorbed or deposited materials on a substrate that measures energy deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Patrick G.; Bakajin, Olgica; Vogel, John S.; Bench, Graham

    2005-01-18

    This invention provides a system and method for measuring an energy differential that correlates to quantitative measurement of an amount mass of an applied localized material. Such a system and method remains compatible with other methods of analysis, such as, for example, quantitating the elemental or isotopic content, identifying the material, or using the material in biochemical analysis.

  1. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-04-28

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  2. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2014-09-16

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  3. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-22

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  4. Antitumoral materials with regenerative function obtained using a layer-by-layer technique

    PubMed Central

    Ficai, Denisa; Sonmez, Maria; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Mihaiescu, Dan Eduard; Ficai, Anton; Bleotu, Coralia

    2015-01-01

    A layer-by layer technique was successfully used to obtain collagen/hydroxyapatite-magnetite-cisplatin (COLL/HAn-Fe3O4-CisPt, n=1–7) composite materials with a variable content of hydroxyapatite intended for use in the treatment of bone cancer. The main advantages of this system are the possibility of controlling the rate of delivery of cytostatic agents, the presence of collagen and hydroxyapatite to ensure more rapid healing of the injured bone tissue, and the potential for magnetite to be a passive antitumoral component that can be activated when an appropriate external electromagnetic field is applied. In vitro cytotoxicity assays performed on the COLL/HAn-Fe3O4-CisPt materials obtained using a layer-by layer method confirmed their antitumoral activity. Samples with a higher content of hydroxyapatite had more antitumoral activity because of their better absorption of cisplatin and consequently a higher amount of cisplatin being present in the matrices. PMID:25767374

  5. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials for generation of reactive species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  6. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials for generation of reactive species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  7. Two-Photon or Higher-Order Absorbing Optical Materials for Generation of Reactive Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  8. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  9. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  10. Theoretical fracture criterion of the layered elastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćilli, A.

    2016-03-01

    The theoretical fracture limit in compression of a composite material with two isotropic homogeneous elastic layers is studied using the piecewise homogeneous body model with the three-dimensional theory of elasticity. We assumed the layers have the initial local imperfections and these imperfections are moved with respect to each other by the same length which is expressed by the angle β. The aim of the investigations was to study the influence of this length on the values of the theoretical fracture criterion limit. The numerical results for the influence of the initial local imperfections on the values of fracture limit are presented. It is therefore concluded that the values of the theoretical fracture limit increase with the length of the shifting.

  11. Materials design of ceramic-based layer structures for crowns.

    PubMed

    Lawn, B R; Deng, Y; Lloyd, I K; Janal, M N; Rekow, E D; Thompson, V P

    2002-06-01

    Radial cracking has been identified as the primary mode of failure in all-ceramic crowns. This study investigates the hypothesis that critical loads for radial cracking in crown-like layers vary explicitly as the square of ceramic layer thickness. Experimental data from tests with spherical indenters on model flat laminates of selected dental ceramics bonded to clear polycarbonate bases (simulating crown/dentin structures) are presented. Damage initiation events are video-recorded in situ during applied loading, and critical loads are measured. The results demonstrate an increase in the resistance to radial cracking for zirconia relative to alumina and for alumina relative to porcelain. The study provides simple a priori predictions of failure in prospective ceramic/substrate bilayers and ranks ceramic materials for best clinical performance. PMID:12097438

  12. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-05-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  13. Studies of layered and pillared manganese oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying

    Synthetic Birnessite, an octahedral layered manganese oxide material called OL-1 was synthesized with Na+, K+, Na +/Mg2+, K+/Mg2+, Na +/K+ ions as interlayer cations by redox reactions between permanganate and alcohols in a strong basic media. Chromia pillared OL-1s were prepared under reflux conditions using trinuclear chromium hydroxyl acetate as a pillaring agent followed by calcination in a N2 atmosphere at 200°C. Vanadium oxide pillared OL-1s were obtained by intercalating neutral vanadyl acetylacetonate (VOacac) or vanadium acetylacetonate (Vacac) into the interlayer of OL-1 and subsequently calcining in air at 300°C. The synthesis procedures were monitored using X-ray diffraction studies. The resultant materials were characterized by XRD, X-ray absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectra, FTIR, UV-VIS, inductively coupled plasma, transmission electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, potentiometric titration, thermal analyses, TPD measurements, BET surface area and pore size distribution measurements. OL-1 materials prepared using this alcohol route showed enhanced thermal stabilities and increased Mg accommodation compared to OL-1s prepared with other methods. Based on the analysis methods developed here, Na-OL-1 exhibited recoverable and reversible structural and surface O2 oxygen species while K-OL-1 showed higher stability. Na-OL-1 had predominantly Bronsted acid sites resulting from OH groups bonded to Mn on Na-OL-1 surfaces, while the Na/Mg-OL-1 had mainly Lewis acid sites. Large porosity was obtained in chromia pillared OL-1 materials with a narrow pore size distribution centered around 18 A. Although these materials remained "amorphous" as determined by XRD after calcination, TEM morphology studies suggest that the materials were still layered. EXAFS studies indicated the formation of Cr-O-Mn bonds in the resultant materials via comer-shared linkages of CrO6 and MnO6 octahedra. Good crystallinity in

  14. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte. PMID:25411566

  15. Nanoscale engineering materials by supercritical fluid and atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qing

    With the development of material science and technology, modification of substrates, which have random geometry and high aspect ratio three dimensional (3D) complex structures, with desired functional, reactive and stable coatings becomes important and challenging. The ability to fabricate mono- or multi-layers of functional materials with precisely controlled dimensions, finely tuned composition and molecular structures, attracts significant interests in materials science and is the key to construct such devices and structures at nano- and micro-scale with desired properties. In this study, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) has been studied as an alternative route for modifying substrates due to the unique gas-like (low viscosity, high diffusivity and zero surface tension) and liquid-like properties (high density). (1) The reaction kinetics of metal oxides thin film deposition from pyrolysis of metal organics in scCO2 was studied in detail. This method was demonstrated as a powerful technique to coat oxides, including Al2O3, Ga2O3 and others, into 3D high aspect ratio complex structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) forest. (2) The low temperature scCO 2 based hydrogenolysis process was developed as a useful way to functionalize aligned CNTs forest with dense Nickel nanoparticles. On the second part of this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD)/molecular layer deposition (MLD), as a vapor phase, stepwise and self-limiting vacuum based deposition process, was demonstrated as a powerful way to form highly conformal and uniform film onto substrates, even into highly complex 3D complex structures. In this study, (4) Metal oxide ALD is applied onto 3D electrospun polymer microfiber mats template to illustrate an effective and robust strategy to fabricate long and uniform metal oxide microtubes with precisely controllable wall thickness. Designer tubes of various sizes and different materials were demonstrated by using this method. (5) By further extending this technique

  16. Canyon transfer neutron absorber to fissile material ratio analysis. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmons, J.S.

    1994-03-04

    Waste tank fissile material and non-fissile material estimates are used to evaluate criticality safety for the existing sludge inventory and batches of sludge sent to Extended Sludge Processing (ESP). This report documents the weight ratios of several non-fissile waste constituents to fissile waste constituents from canyon reprocessing waste streams. Weight ratios of Fe, Mn, Al, Mi, and U-238 to fissile material are calculated from monthly loss estimates from the F and H Canyon Low Heat Waste (LHW) and High Heat Waste (HHW) streams. The monthly weight ratios for Fe, Mn and U-238 are then compared to calculated minimum safe weight ratios. Documented minimum safe weight ratios for Al and Ni to fissile material are currently not available. Total mass data for the subject sludge constituents is provided along with scatter plots of the monthly weight ratios for each waste stream.

  17. The physical properties of black carbon and other light-absorbing material emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Yokelson, R. J.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fortner, E.; Onasch, T. B.; Akagi, S. K.; Taylor, J.; Coe, H.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol emitted from fires absorbs light, leading to visibility degradation as well as regional and global climate impacts. Fires also emit a wide range of trace gases and particulates that can interact with emitted BC and alter its optical properties and atmospheric lifetime. Non-BC particulate species emitted by fires can also scatter and absorb light, leading to additional effects on visibility. Recent work has shown that certain organic species can absorb light strongly at shorter wavelengths, giving it a brown or yellow color. This material has been classified as brown carbon, though it is not yet well defined. Land managers must find a balance between the negative impacts of prescribed fire emissions on visibility and air quality and the need to prevent future catastrophic wildfire as well as manage ecosystems for habitat restoration or other purposes. This decision process requires accurate assessments of the visibility impacts of fire emissions, including BC and brown carbon, which in turn depend on their optical properties. We present recent laboratory and aircraft measurements of black carbon and aerosol optical properties emitted from biomass burning. All measurement campaigns included a single particle soot photometer (SP2) instrument capable of providing size-resolved measurements of BC mass and number distributions and mixing state, which are needed to separate the BC and brown carbon contributions to total light absorption. The laboratory experiments also included a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer that provided accurate measurements of aerosol light absorption. The laboratory systems also characterized emissions after they had been treated with a thermal denuder to remove semi-volatile coatings, allowing an assessment of the role of non-BC coatings on bulk aerosol optical properties. Emissions were also aged in an environmental smog chamber to examine the role of secondary aerosol production on aerosol optical properties.

  18. Prediction of the niche effect for single flat panels with or without attached sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Sgard, Franck; Atalla, Noureddine; Nélisse, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The sound transmission loss (STL) of a test sample measured in sound transmission facilities is affected by the opening in which it is located. This is called the niche effect. This paper uses a modal approach to study the STL of a rectangular plate with or without an attached porous material located inside a box-shaped niche. The porous material is modeled as a limp equivalent fluid. The proposed model is validated by comparison with finite element/boundary element computations. Using a condensation of the pressure fields in the niche, the niche effect is interpreted in terms of a modification of the modal blocked pressure fields acting on the panel induced by the front cavity and by a modification of the radiation efficiency of the panel modes due to the presence of the back cavity. The modal approach is then used to investigate the impact of (1) the presence of a porous material attached to the panel on the niche effect and (2) the niche effect on the assessment of the porous material insertion loss. A simplified model for the porous material based on a transfer matrix approach is also proposed to predict the STL of the system and its validity is discussed. PMID:25618044

  19. First-charge instabilities of layered-layered lithium-ion-battery materials.

    PubMed

    Croy, Jason R; Iddir, Hakim; Gallagher, Kevin; Johnson, Christopher S; Benedek, Roy; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam

    2015-10-01

    Li- and Mn-rich layered oxides with composition xLi2MnO3·(1 -x)LiMO2 enable high capacity and energy density Li-ion batteries, but suffer from degradation with cycling. Evidence of atomic instabilities during the first charge are addressed in this work with X-ray absorption spectroscopy, first principles simulation at the GGA+U level, and existing literature. The pristine material of composition xLi2MnO3·(1 -x)LiMn0.5Ni0.5O2 is assumed in the simulations to have the form of LiMn2 stripes, alternating with NiMn stripes, in the metal layers. The charged state is simulated by removing Li from the Li layer, relaxing the resultant system by steepest descents, then allowing the structure to evolve by molecular dynamics at 1000 K, and finally relaxing the evolved system by steepest descents. The simulations show that about ¼ of the oxygen ions in the Li2MnO3 domains are displaced from their original lattice sites, and form oxygen-oxygen bonds, which significantly lowers the energy, relative to that of the starting structure in which the oxygen sublattice is intact. An important consequence of the displacement of the oxygen is that it enables about ⅓ of the (Li2MnO3 domain) Mn ions to migrate to the delithiated Li layers. The decrease in the coordination of the Mn ions is about twice that of the Ni ions. The approximate agreement of simulated coordination number deficits for Mn and Ni following the first charge with analysis of EXAFS measurements on 0.3Li2MnO3·0.7LiMn0.5Ni0.5O2 suggests that the simulation captures significant features of the real material. PMID:26334949

  20. Hydrogen Absorbing Materials for Use as Radiation Shielding During Extended Space Flight Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Minimizing radiation exposure from the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment during extended space missions is particularly crucial to crew health and safety. Here, an ideal candidate for shielding would be pure solid or liquid hydrogen, a material that effectively fragments heavy ions into ones of lower mass and energy that are more easily attenuated. Unfortunately, utilizing pure hydrogen is not presently feasible. It is, however, known that the hydrogen content of other materials (for example, metal hydrides, palladium alloys, and organic compounds) can exceed that of pure solid hydrogen and thus merit consideration as shielding candidates. This presentation will discuss an ongoing effort to develop novel shielding from such materials in concert with a coordinated testing/evaluation and modeling effort.

  1. Characterization of porous glass-ceramic material as absorber of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmina, O.; Suslyaev, V.; Dushkina, M.; Semukhin, B.

    2015-04-01

    Investigations of a foam glass-ceramic material synthesized from raw siliceous earth material by the two-stage method at temperatures below 950°C have demonstrated the improvement of its physic mechanical properties in comparison with foam glass synthesized from glass cullet. This material actively interacts with microwaves and can be used for the development of protective screens reducing the adverse effect of microwaves on biological objects, anechoic chambers, and rooms with low level of electromagnetic background noise. Spectra of the transmission and absorption coefficients and of the complex dielectric permittivity for frequencies in the range 26-260 GHz are presented. The observed effects demonstrate the existence of regions with partial and total reflection arising on the glass-pore boundary and of the microwave interaction with ultradisperse carbon particles that remain after foaming with incomplete frothier transition from the soot to the gas phase.

  2. Failure modes and materials design for biomechanical layer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yan

    Ceramic materials are finding increasing usage in the area of biomechanical replacements---dental crowns, hip and bone implants, etc.---where strength, wear resistance, biocompatibility, chemical durability and even aesthetics are critical issues. Aesthetic ceramic crowns have been widely used in dentistry to replace damaged or missing teeth. However, the failure rates of ceramic crowns, especially all-ceramic crowns, can be 1%˜6% per year, which is not satisfactory to patients. The materials limitations and underlying fracture mechanisms of these prostheses are not well understood. In this thesis, fundamental fracture and damage mechanisms in model dental bilayer and trilayer structures are studied. Principle failure modes are identified from in situ experimentation and confirmed by fracture mechanics analysis. In bilayer structures of ceramic/polycarbonate (representative of ceramic crown/dentin structure), three major damage sources are identified: (i) top-surface cone cracks or (ii) quasiplasticity, dominating in thick ceramic bilayers; (iii) bottom-surface radial cracks, dominating in thin ceramic bilayers. Critical load P for each damage mode are measured in six dental ceramics: Y-TZP zirconia, glass-infiltrated zirconia and alumina (InCeram), glass-ceramic (Empress II), Porcelain (Mark II and Empress) bonded to polymer substrates, as a function of ceramic thickness d in the range of 100 mum to 10 mm. P is found independent of d for mode (i) and (ii), but has a d 2 relations for mode (iii)---bottom surface radial cracking. In trilayer structures of glass/core-ceramic/polycarbonate (representing veneer porcelain/core/dentin structures), three inner fracture origins are identified: radial cracks from the bottom surface in the (i) first and (ii) second layers; and (iii) quasiplasticity in core-ceramic layer. The role of relative veneer/core thickness, d1/d 2 and materials properties is investigated for three core materials with different modulus (114--270GPa

  3. Antimicrobial Formulations of Absorbable Bone Substitute Materials as Drug Carriers Based on Calcium Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Pförringer, D; Obermeier, A; Kiokekli, M; Büchner, H; Vogt, S; Stemberger, A; Burgkart, R; Lucke, M

    2016-07-01

    Substitution of bones is a well-established, necessary procedure to treat bone defects in trauma and orthopedic surgeries. For prevention or treatment of perioperative infection, the implantation of resorbable bone substitute materials carrying antibiotics is a necessary treatment. In this study, we investigated the newly formulated calcium-based resorbable bone substitute materials containing either gentamicin (CaSO4-G [Herafill-G]), vancomycin (CaSO4-V), or tobramycin (Osteoset). We characterized the released antibiotic concentration per unit. Bone substitute materials were implanted in bones of rabbits via a standardized surgical procedure. Clinical parameters and levels of the antibiotic-releasing materials in serum were determined. Local concentrations of antibiotics were measured using antimicrobial tests of bone tissue. Aminoglycoside release kinetics in vitro per square millimeter of bead surface showed the most prolonged release for gentamicin, followed by vancomycin and, with the fastest release, tobramycin. In vivo level in serum detected over 28 days was highest for gentamicin at 0.42 μg/ml, followed by vancomycin at 0.11 μg/ml and tobramycin at 0.04 μg/ml. The clinical parameters indicated high biocompatibility for materials used. None of the rabbits subjected to the procedure showed any adverse reaction. The highest availability of antibiotics at 14.8 μg/g on day 1 in the cortical tibia ex vivo was demonstrated for gentamicin, decreasing within 14 days. In the medulla, vancomycin showed a high level at 444 μg/g on day 1, decreasing continuously over 14 days, whereas gentamicin decreased faster within the initial 3 days. The compared antibiotic formulations varied significantly in release kinetics in serum as well as locally in medulla and cortex. PMID:27067337

  4. Microwave absorption properties of a double-layer absorber based on nanocomposite BaFe12O19/α-Fe and nanocrystalline α-Fe microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiang-Qian; Liu, Hong-Bo; Wang, Zhou; Qian, Xin-Ye; Jing, Mao-Xiang; Yang, Xin-Chun

    2014-07-01

    The nanocomposite BaFe12O19/α-Fe and nanocrystalline α-Fe microfibers with diameters of 1-5 μm, high aspect ratios and large specific areas are prepared by the citrate gel transformation and reduction process. The nanocomposite BaFe12O19/α-Fe microfibers show some exchange—coupling interactions largely arising from the magnetization hard (BaFe12O19) and soft (α-Fe) nanoparticles. For the microwave absorptions, the double-layer structures consisting of the nanocomposite BaFe12O19/α-Fe and α-Fe microfibers each exhibit a wide band and strong absorption behavior. When the nanocomposite BaFe12O19/α-Fe microfibers are used as a matching layer of 2.3 mm in thickness and α-Fe microfibers as an absorbing layer of 1.2 mm in thickness, the optimal reflection loss (RL) achieves -47 dB at 15.6 GHz, the absorption bandwidth is about 12.7 GHz ranging from 5.3 to 18 GHz, exceeding -20 dB, which covers 72.5% C-band (4.2-8.2 GHz) and whole X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) and Ku-band (12.4-18 GHz). The enhanced absorption properties of these double-layer absorbers are mainly ascribed to the improvement in impedance matching ability and microwave multi-reflection largely resulting from the dipolar polarization, interfacial polarization, exchange—coupling interaction, and small size effect.

  5. Gate induced superconductivity in layered material based electronic double layer field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, J. T.; Inoue, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Kasahara, Y.; Yuan, H. T.; Shimotani, H.; Iwasa, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Applying the principle of field effect transistor to layered materials provides new opportunities to manipulate their electronic properties for interesting sciences and applications. Novel gate dielectrics like electronic double layer (EDL) formed by ionic liquids are demonstrated to achieve an electrostatic surface charge accumulation on the order of 1014 cm-2. To realize electric field-induced superconductivity, we chose a layered compound: ZrNCl, which is known to be superconducting by introducing electrons through intercalation of alkali metals into the van der Waals gaps. A ZrNCl-based EDL transistor was micro fabricated on a thin ZrNCl single crystal made by mechanical micro-cleavage. Accumulating charges using EDL gate dielectrics onto the channel surface of ZrNCl shows effective field effect modulation of its electronic properties. Sheet resistance of ZrNCl EDL transistor is reduced by applying a gate voltage from 0 to 4.5 V. Temperature dependence of sheet resistance showed clear evidence of metal-insulator transition upon gating, observed at a gate voltage higher than 3.5 V. Furthermore, gate-induced superconductivity took place after metal-insulator transition when the transistor is cooled down to about 15 K.

  6. Layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition: a mechanism for forming biocomposite materials

    PubMed Central

    Tan, YerPeng; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Wei, Wei; Waite, J. Herbert; Miserez, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Complex coacervates prepared from poly-Aspartic acid (polyAsp) and poly-L-Histidine (polyHis) were investigated as models of the metastable protein phases used in the formation of biological structures such as squid beak. When mixed, polyHis and polyAsp form coacervates whereas poly-L-Glutamic acid (polyGlu) forms precipitates with polyHis. Layer-by-layer (LbL) structures of polyHis-polyAsp on gold substrates were compared with those of precipitate-forming polyHis-polyGlu by monitoring with iSPR and QCM-D. PolyHis-polyAsp LbL was found to be stiffer than polyHis-polyGlu LbL with most water evicted from the structure but with sufficient interfacial water remaining for molecular rearrangement to occur. This thin layer is believed to be fluid and like preformed coacervate films, capable of spreading over both hydrophilic ethylene glycol as well as hydrophobic monolayers. These results suggest that coacervate-forming polyelectrolytes deserve consideration for potential LbL applications and point to LbL as an important process by which biological materials form. PMID:23600626

  7. Multi-layered black phosphorus as saturable absorber for pulsed Cr:ZnSe laser at 2.4 μm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaowei; Zhao, Ruwei; He, Jingliang; Zhang, Baitao; Ning, Jian; Wang, Yiran; Su, Xiancui; Hou, Jia; Lou, Fei; Yang, Kejian; Fan, Yisong; Bian, Jintian; Nie, Jinsong

    2016-01-25

    A high-quality black phosphorus (BP) saturable-absorber mirror (SAM) was successfully fabricated with the multi-layered BP, prepared by liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) method. The modulation depth and saturation power intensity of BP absorber were measured to be 10.7% and 0.96 MW/cm2, respectively. Using the BP-SAM, we experimentally demonstrated the mid-infrared (mid-IR) pulse generation from a BP Q-switched Cr:ZnSe laser for the first time to our best knowledge. Stable Q-switched pulse as short as 189 ns with an average output power of 36 mW was realized at 2.4 μm, corresponding to a repetition rate of 176 kHz and a single pulse energy of 205 nJ. Our work sufficiently validated that multi-layer BP could be used as an optical modulator for mid-IR pulse laser sources. PMID:26832537

  8. Assessment of doses caused by electrons in thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials, using MCNP.

    PubMed

    Heide, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Absorbed doses caused by electron irradiation were calculated with Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) for thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials. The layers were so thin that the calculation of energy deposition was on the border of the scope of MCNP. Therefore, in this article application of three different methods of calculation of energy deposition is discussed. This was done by means of two scenarios: in the first one, electrons were emitted from the centre of a sphere of water and also recorded in that sphere; and in the second, an irradiation with the PTB Secondary Standard BSS2 was modelled, where electrons were emitted from an (90)Sr/(90)Y area source and recorded inside a cuboid phantom made of tissue-equivalent material. The speed and accuracy of the different methods were of interest. While a significant difference in accuracy was visible for one method in the first scenario, the difference in accuracy of the three methods was insignificant for the second one. Considerable differences in speed were found for both scenarios. In order to demonstrate the need for calculating the dose in thin small zones, a third scenario was constructed and simulated as well. The third scenario was nearly equal to the second one, but a pike of lead was assumed to be inside the phantom in addition. A dose enhancement (caused by the pike of lead) of ∼113 % was recorded for a thin hollow cylinder at a depth of 0.007 cm, which the basal-skin layer is referred to in particular. Dose enhancements between 68 and 88 % were found for a slab with a radius of 0.09 cm for all depths. All dose enhancements were hardly noticeable for a slab with a cross-sectional area of 1 cm(2), which is usually applied to operational radiation protection. PMID:23576794

  9. Si3AlP: a new promising material for solar cell absorber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Zhai, Yingteng; Liu, Hengrui; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xingao; Wei, Su-Huai

    2012-08-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to study the structural and optoelectronic properties of the newly synthesized nonisovalent and lattice-matched (Si(2))(0.6)(AlP)(0.4) alloy (Watkins, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2011, 133, 16212). We found that the most stable structure of Si(3)AlP is a superlattice along the [111] direction with separated AlP and Si layers, which has a similar optical absorption spectrum to silicon. The ordered C1c1-Si(3)AlP is found to be the most stable one among all structures with a basic unit of one P atom surrounded by three Si atoms and one Al atom, in agreement with experimental suggestions. We predict that C1c1-Si(3)AlP has good optical properties, i.e., it has a larger fundamental band gap and a smaller direct band gap than Si; thus, it has much higher absorption in the visible light region. The calculated properties of Si(3)AlP suggest that it is a promising candidate for improving the performance of the existing Si-based solar cells. The understanding on the stability and band structure engineering obtained in this study is general and can be applied for future study of other nonisovalent and lattice-matched semiconductor alloys. PMID:22769022

  10. Novel Solution Process for Fabricating Ultra-Thin-Film Absorber Layers in Fe2SiS4 and Fe2GeS4 Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Orefuwa, Samuel A.; Lai, Cheng-Yu; Dobson, Kevin D.; Ni, Chaoying; Radu, Daniela R.

    2014-05-12

    Fe2SiS4 and Fe2GeS4 crystalline materials posses direct bandgaps of ~1.55 and ~1.4 eV respectively and an absorption coefficient larger than 10^5 cm–1; their theoretical potential as solar photovoltaic absorbers has been demonstrated. However, no solar devices that employ either Fe2SiS4 or Fe2GeS4 have been reported to date. In the presented work, nanoprecursors to Fe2SiS4 and Fe2GeS4 have been fabricated and employed to build ultra-thin-film layers via spray coating and rod coating methods. Temperature-dependent X-Ray diffraction analyses of nanoprecursors coatings show an unprecedented low temperature for forming crystalline Fe2SiS4 and Fe2GeS4. Fabricating of ultra-thin-film photovoltaic devices utilizing Fe2SiS4 and Fe2GeS4 as solar absorber material is presented.

  11. Raman and Photoluminescence Studies of In-plane Anisotropic Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Anupum

    This thesis presents systematic studies on angle dependent Raman and Photoluminescence (PL) of a new class of layered materials, Transition Metal Trichalcogenides (TMTCs), which are made up of layers possessing anisotropic structure within the van-der-Waals plane. The crystal structure of individual layer of MX3 compounds consists of aligned nanowire like 1D chains running along the b-axis direction. The work focuses on the growth of two members of this family - ZrS3 and TiS3 - through Chemical Vapor Transport Method (CVT), with consequent angle dependent Raman and PL studies which highlight their in-plane optically anisotropic properties. Results highlight that the optical properties of few-layer flakes are highly anisotropic as evidenced by large PL intensity variation with polarization direction (in ZrS3) and an intense variation in Raman intensity with variation in polarization direction (in both ZrS3 and TiS3). Results suggest that light is efficiently absorbed when E-field of the polarized incident excitation laser is polarized along the chain (b-axis). It is greatly attenuated and absorption is reduced when field is polarized perpendicular to the length of 1D-like chains, as wavelength of the exciting light is much longer than the width of each 1D chain. Observed PL variation with respect to the azimuthal flake angle is similar to what has been previously observed in 1D materials like nanowires. However, in TMTCs, since the 1D chains interact with each other, it gives rise to a unique linear dichroism response that falls between 2D and 1D like behavior. These results not only mark the very first demonstration of high PL polarization anisotropy in 2D systems, but also provide a novel insight into how interaction between adjacent 1D-like chains and the 2D nature of each layer influences the overall optical anisotropy of Quasi-1D materials. The presented results are anticipated to have impact in technologies involving polarized detection, near-field imaging

  12. Chemistry away from local equilibrium: shocking high-energy and energy absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    In this presentation I will describe reactive molecular dynamics and coarse grain simulations of shock induced chemistry. MD simulations of the chemical reactions following the shock-induced collapse of cylindrical pores in the high-energy density material RDX provide the first atomistic picture of the shock to deflagration transition in nanoscale hotspots. We find that energy localization during pore collapse leads to ultra-fast, multi-step chemical reactions that occur under non-equilibrium conditions. The formation of exothermic products during the first few picoseconds of the process prevents the hotspot from quenching, and within 30 ps a deflagration wave develops. Quite surprisingly, an artificial hot-spot matching the shock-induced one in size and thermodynamic conditions quenches; providing strong evidence that the dynamic nature of the loading plays a role in determining the criticality of the hotspot. To achieve time and lengths beyond what is possible in MD we developed a mesoscale model that incorporates chemical reactions at a coarse-grained level. We used this model to explore shock propagation on materials that can undergo volume-reducing, endothermic chemical reactions. The simulations show that such chemical reactions can attenuate the shockwave and characterize how the characteristics of the chemistry affect this behavior. We find that the amount of volume collapse and the activation energy are critical to weaken the shock, whereas the endothermicity of the reactions plays only a minor role. As in the reactive MD simulations, we find that the non-equilibrium state following the shock affects the nucleation of chemistry and, thus, the timescales for equilibration between various degrees of freedom affect the response of the material.

  13. Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H.; Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G.

    2010-05-21

    This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

  14. Scientists Identify New Family of Iron-Based Absorber Materials for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Use of Earth-abundant materials in solar absorber films is critical for expanding the reach of photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The use of Earth-abundant and inexpensive Fe in PV was proposed more than 25 years ago in the form of FeS{sub 2} pyrite - fool's gold. Unfortunately, the material has been plagued by performance problems that to this day are both persistent and not well understood. Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oregon State University, working collaboratively in the Center for Inverse Design, an Energy Frontier Research Center, have uncovered several new insights into the problems of FeS{sub 2}. They have used these advances to propose and implement design rules that can be used to identify new Fe-containing materials that can circumvent the limitations of FeS{sub 2} pyrite. The team has identified that it is the unavoidable metallic secondary phases and surface defects coexisting near the FeS{sub 2} thin-film surfaces and grain boundaries that limit its open-circuit voltage, rather than the S vacancies in the bulk, which has long been commonly assumed. The materials Fe{sub 2}SiS{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}GeS{sub 4} hold considerable promise as PV absorbers. The ternary Si compound is especially attractive, as it contains three of the more abundant low-cost elements available today. The band gap (E{sub g} = 1.5 eV) from both theory and experiment is higher than those of c-Si and FeS{sub 2}, offering better absorption of the solar spectrum and potentially higher solar cell efficiencies. More importantly, these materials do not have metallic secondary phase problems as seen in FeS{sub 2}. High calculated formation energies of donor-type defects are consistent with p-type carriers in thin films and are prospects for high open-circuit voltages in cells.

  15. Active millimeter wave detection of concealed layers of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, N. J.; Baker, J. G.; Rezgui, N. D.; Southgate, M.; Alder, J. F.

    2007-04-01

    Extensive work has been published on millimetre wave active and passive detection and imaging of metallic objects concealed under clothing. We propose and demonstrate a technique for revealing the depth as well as the outline of partially transparent objects, which is especially suited to imaging layer materials such as explosives and drugs. The technique uses a focussed and scanned FMCW source, swept through many GHz to reveal this structure. The principle involved is that a parallel sided dielectric slab produces reflections at both its upper and lower surfaces, acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer. This produces a pattern of alternating reflected peaks and troughs in frequency space. Fourier or Burg transforming this pattern into z-space generates a peak at the thickness of the irradiated sample. It could be argued that though such a technique may work for single uniform slabs of dielectric material, it will give results of little or no significance when the sample both scatters the incident radiation and gives erratic reflectivities due to its non-uniform thickness and permittivity . We show results for a variety of materials such as explosive simulants, powder and drugs, both alone and concealed under clothing or in a rucksack, which display strongly directional reflectivities at millimeter wavelengths, and whose location is well displayed by a varying thickness parameter as the millimetre beam is scanned across the target. With this system we find that samples can easily be detected at standoff distances of at least 4.6m.

  16. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-01-01

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications. PMID:27501762

  17. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-01-01

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications. PMID:27501762

  18. Tunable microwave absorbing nano-material for X-band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Imran; Naseem, Shahzad; Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem; Khan, M. A.; Niaz, Shanawer; Rana, M. U.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of rare earth elements substitution in Sr1.96RE0.04Co2Fe27.80Mn0.2O46 (RE=Ce, Gd, Nd, La and Sm) X-type hexagonal ferrites prepared by using sol gel autocombustion method was studied. The XRD and FTIR analysis show the single phase of the prepared material. The lattice constants a (Å) and c (Å) varies with the additives. The particle size measured by Scherer formula for all the samples varies in the range of 54-100 nm and confirmed by the TEM analysis. The average grain size measured by SEM analysis lies in the range of 0.672-1.01 μm for all the samples. The Gd-substituted ferrite has higher value of coercivity (526.06 G) among all the samples which could be a good material for longitudinal recording media. The results also indicate that the Gd-substituted sample has maximum reflection loss of -25.2 dB at 11.878 GHz, can exhibit the best microwave absorption properties among all the substituted samples. Furthermore, the minimum value of reflection loss shifts towards the lower and higher frequencies with the substitution of rare earth elements which confirms that the microwave absorption properties can be tuned with the substitution of rare earth elements in pure ferrites. The peak value of attenuation constant at higher frequency agrees well the reflection loss data.

  19. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-08-01

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications.

  20. Characterization and optimization of OLED materials and layer sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Becker, Edo; Benstem, Torsten; Johannes, Hans-Hermann; Metzdorf, Dirk; Neuner, H.; Schoebel, Joerg

    2001-02-01

    In recent years, considerable effort has been put into the development of light emitting devices based on evaporated layers of organic semiconductors. To date, matrix displays consisting of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been brought into marketable commodity. OLED matrix displays offer high contrast, wide viewing angle and a broad temperature range at low power consumption. In contrast to polymer devices, OLEDs are processed in ultrahigh vacuum systems. The organic source materials are sublimated from effusion cells. Due to the sensitivity of organic thin films, device structuring by conventional etching techniques is not feasible and alternative structuring techniques were developed. Electrical current in organic devices is limited by the low conductivity of organic semiconductors and by energy barriers at the metal-organic semiconductor interface. Photoelectric measurements facilitate the determination of barrier height differences between various electrode setups. Further insight in the energy band alignment at organic heterointerfaces are gained by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). In addition to widely employed electrical (I-V, C-V) and optical (P-I) measurements, thermally stimulated current (TSC) and luminescence (TSL) allow the characterization and a more detailed understanding of carrier traps and charge transport in organic devices. Energy transfer in a doped OLED emitting layer can be investigated by time-resolved photoluminescence measurements.

  1. Surface Modification of Fuel Cladding Materials with Integral Fuel BUrnable Absorber Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Todd Allen; Jesse Gudmundson; Benjamin Maier

    2008-11-03

    Integral fuel burnable absorgers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly to counteract excessive reactivity. These IFBA elements (usually boron or gadolinium) are presently incorporated in the U)2 pellets either by mixing in the pellets or as coatings on the pellet surface. In either case, the incorporation of ifba into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be costly and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. The goal of this NEER research project was to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of IFBA element boron at the surface of the fuel cladding material.

  2. Hot carrier solar cell absorbers: investigation of carrier cooling properties of candidate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conibeer, G.; Shrestha, Santosh; Huang, Shujuan; Patterson, Robert; Xia, Hongze; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Pengfei; Gupta, Neeti; Smyth, Suntrana; Liao, Yuanxun; Lin, Shu; Wang, Pei; Dai, Xi; Chung, Simon; Yang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yi

    2015-09-01

    The hot carrier cell aims to extract the electrical energy from photo-generated carriers before they thermalize to the band edges. Hence it can potentially achieve a high current and a high voltage and hence very high efficiencies up to 65% under 1 sun and 86% under maximum concentration. To slow the rate of carrier thermalisation is very challenging, but modification of the phonon energies and the use of nanostructures are both promising ways to achieve some of the required slowing of carrier cooling. A number of materials and structures are being investigated with these properties and test structures are being fabricated. Initial measurements indicate slowed carrier cooling in III-Vs with large phonon band gaps and in multiple quantum wells. It is expected that soon proof of concept of hot carrier devices will pave the way for their development to fully functioning high efficiency solar cells.

  3. Layered cathode materials for lithium ion rechargeable batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Sun-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2007-04-17

    A number of materials with the composition Li.sub.1+xNi.sub..alpha.Mn.sub..beta.Co.sub..gamma.M'.sub..delta.O.sub.2-- zF.sub.z (M'=Mg,Zn,Al,Ga,B,Zr,Ti) for use with rechargeable batteries, wherein x is between about 0 and 0.3, .alpha. is between about 0.2 and 0.6, .beta. is between about 0.2 and 0.6, .gamma. is between about 0 and 0.3, .delta. is between about 0 and 0.15, and z is between about 0 and 0.2. Adding the above metal and fluorine dopants affects capacity, impedance, and stability of the layered oxide structure during electrochemical cycling.

  4. Preparation and low-frequency microwave-absorbing properties of MWCNTs/Co-Ni/Fe3O4 hybrid material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shao-Wei; Yuan, Chao-Jun; Jia, Cai-Xia; Ma, Ke-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-04-01

    MWCNTs/Co-Ni/Fe3O4 hybrid material has been successfully prepared by electroless plating and coprecipitation method, which is applied to the low-frequency microwave absorption. Their surface morphology, structure, magnetism and electromagnetic properties in the low-frequency range of 1-4GHz were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and vector network analyzer. Results indicated that magnetic Co-Ni/Fe3O4 particles were attached on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes successfully. The saturation magnetization of MWCNTs/Co-Ni/Fe3O4 hybrid materials was 68.6emu/g and the coercivity is 17.9 Oe. The electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties analysis in the low-frequency range of 1-4GHz indicated that the hybrid material exhibited excellent magnetic loss and the maximum reflection loss could reach ‑13.57dB at 1.51GHz with 1.05GHz bandwidth below ‑5dB.

  5. 1.06 μm Q-switched ytterbium-doped fiber laser using few-layer topological insulator Bi₂Se₃ as a saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhengqian; Huang, Yizhong; Weng, Jian; Cheng, Huihui; Lin, Zhiqing; Xu, Bin; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Huiying

    2013-12-01

    Passive Q-switching of an ytterbium-doped fiber (YDF) laser with few-layer topological insulator (TI) is, to the best of our knowledge, experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The few-layer TI: Bi₂Se₃ (2-4 layer thickness) is firstly fabricated by the liquid-phase exfoliation method, and has a low saturable optical intensity of 53 MW/cm² measured by the Z-scan technique. The optical deposition technique is used to induce the few-layer TI in the solution onto a fiber ferrule for successfully constructing the fiber-integrated TI-based saturable absorber (SA). By inserting this SA into the YDF laser cavity, stable Q-switching operation at 1.06 μm is achieved. The Q-switched pulses have the shortest pulse duration of 1.95 μs, the maximum pulse energy of 17.9 nJ and a tunable pulse-repetition-rate from 8.3 to 29.1 kHz. Our results indicate that the TI as a SA is also available at 1 μm waveband, revealing its potential as another broadband SA (like graphene). PMID:24514504

  6. Advanced Lithium Ion Battery Materials Prepared with Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanagh, Andrew S.

    As the world consumes the dwindling supply of fossil fuels, an alternative to gasoline powered vehicles will become necessary. Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are emerging as the dominant power source for portable electronics, and are seen as a promising energy source in the development of electric vehicles. Current LIB technology is not well suited for vehicles, increases in the energy density, power density and durability are needed before LIB are ready for widespread use in electric vehicles. LiCoO2 and graphite are the dominant cathode and anode active materials, respectively in LIBs. On the cathode side, instabilities in LiCoO 2 can lead to the deterioration of the LIB. Decomposition of electrolyte on the graphite anode surface to form a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) consumes lithium from the cathode resulting in a lower battery capacity. Instabilities in the in the SEI can result in catastrophic battery failure. Previous studies have employed metal oxides films, typically grown with wet chemical techniques, to stabilize LiCoO2 and mitigate the formation of the SEI on graphite. The thicknesses of films grown with wet chemical techniques was typically ˜50--1000 A. In order to achieve higher power densities, the particle size of LIB active materials is being scaled down. As active materials get smaller the mass contribution of a protective film can become a significant fraction of the total mass. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been used to grow ultra thin films of Al2O3 on LiCoO2 and graphite. By altering the interaction between the active material and the battery electrolyte it was possible to improve the stability of both LiCoO2 and graphite electrodes in LIBs. In the case of graphite, the Al2O3 film may be thought of as an artificial SEI. During the initial charge-discharge cycle of a LIB, the electrolyte decomposes on the anode to form the SEI. The formation of the SEI is believed to prevent further decomposition of the electrolyte on the anode surface

  7. Comparisons of Monte Carlo calculations with absorbed dose determinations in flat materials using high-current, energetic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Galloway, Richard A.; Heiss, Arthur H.; Logar, John R.

    2007-08-01

    International standards and guidelines for calibrating high-dose dosimetry systems to be used in industrial radiation processing recommend that dose-rate effects on dosimeters be evaluated under conditions of use. This is important when the irradiation relies on high-current electron accelerators, which usually provide very high dose-rates. However, most dosimeter calibration facilities use low-intensity gamma radiation or low-current electron accelerators, which deliver comparatively low dose-rates. Because of issues of thermal conductivity and response, portable calorimeters cannot be practically used with high-current accelerators, where product conveyor speeds under an electron beam can exceed several meters per second and the calorimeter is not suitable for use with product handling systems. As an alternative, Monte Carlo calculations can give theoretical estimates of the absorbed dose in materials with flat or complex configurations such that the results are independent of dose-rate. Monte Carlo results can then be compared to experimental dose determinations to see whether dose-rate effects in the dosimeters are significant. A Monte Carlo code has been used in this study to calculate the absorbed doses in alanine film dosimeters supported by flat sheets of plywood irradiated with electrons using incident energies extending from 1.0 MeV to 10 MeV with beam currents up to 30 mA. The same process conditions have been used for dose determinations with high-current electron beams using low dose-rate gamma calibrated alanine film dosimeters. The close agreement between these calculations and the dosimeter determinations indicates that the response of this type of dosimeter system is independent of the dose-rate, and provides assurance that Monte Carlo calculations can yield results with sufficient accuracy for many industrial applications.

  8. Broadband nonlinear optical response in multi-layer black phosphorus: an emerging infrared and mid-infrared optical material.

    PubMed

    Lu, S B; Miao, L L; Guo, Z N; Qi, X; Zhao, C J; Zhang, H; Wen, S C; Tang, D Y; Fan, D Y

    2015-05-01

    Black phosphorous (BP), the most thermodynamically stable allotrope of phosphorus, is a high-mobility layered semiconductor with direct band-gap determined by the number of layers from 0.3 eV (bulk) to 2.0 eV (single layer). Therefore, BP is considered as a natural candidate for broadband optical applications, particularly in the infrared (IR) and mid-IR part of the spectrum. The strong light-matter interaction, narrow direct band-gap, and wide range of tunable optical response make BP as a promising nonlinear optical material, particularly with great potentials for infrared and mid-infrared opto-electronics. Herein, we experimentally verified its broadband and enhanced saturable absorption of multi-layer BP (with a thickness of ~10 nm) by wide-band Z-scan measurement technique, and anticipated that multi-layer BPs could be developed as another new type of two-dimensional saturable absorber with operation bandwidth ranging from the visible (400 nm) towards mid-IR (at least 1930 nm). Our results might suggest that ultra-thin multi-layer BP films could be potentially developed as broadband ultra-fast photonics devices, such as passive Q-switcher, mode-locker, optical switcher etc. PMID:25969214

  9. Synthesis and characterisation of Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide (CZTS) compound for absorber material in solar-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheraj, Vipul; Patel, K. K.; Patel, S. J.; Shah, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The development of thin-film semiconductor compounds, such as Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS), has caused remarkable progress in the field of thin-film photovoltaics. However, the scarcity and the increasing prices of indium impose the hunt for alternative materials. The Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide (CZTS) is one of the promising emerging materials with Kesterite-type crystal structure and favourable material properties like high absorption co-efficient and direct band-gap. Moreover, all the constituent elements of CZTS are non-toxic and aplenty on the earth-crust, making it a potential candidate for the thin-film photovoltaics. Here we report the synthesis of CZTS powder from its constituent elements, viz. copper, zinc, tin and sulphur, in an evacuated Quartz ampoule at 1030 K temperature. The sulphur content in the raw mixture in the ampoule was varied and optimised in order to attain the desired atomic stoichiometry of the compound. The synthesised powder was characterised by X-Ray diffraction technique (XRD), Raman Scattering Spectroscopy, Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-Ray (EDAX) and UV-Visible Absorption Spectra. The XRD Patterns of the synthesised compound show the preferred orientation of (112), (220) and (312) planes, confirming the Kesterite structure of CZTS. The chemical composition of the powder was analysed by EDAX and shows good atomic stoichiometry of the constituent elements in the CZTS compound. The UV-Vis absorption spectra confirm the direct band-gap of about 1.45 eV, which is quite close to the optimum value for the semiconductor material as an absorber in solar-cells.

  10. Large-scale simulations of layered double hydroxide nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyveetil, Mary-Ann

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have the ability to intercalate a multitude of anionic species. Atomistic simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics have provided considerable insight into the behaviour of these materials. We review these techniques and recent algorithmic advances which considerably improve the performance of MD applications. In particular, we discuss how the advent of high performance computing and computational grids has allowed us to explore large scale models with considerable ease. Our simulations have been heavily reliant on computational resources on the UK's NGS (National Grid Service), the US TeraGrid and the Distributed European Infrastructure for Supercomputing Applications (DEISA). In order to utilise computational grids we rely on grid middleware to launch, computationally steer and visualise our simulations. We have integrated the RealityGrid steering library into the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) 1 . which has enabled us to perform re mote computational steering and visualisation of molecular dynamics simulations on grid infrastruc tures. We also use the Application Hosting Environment (AHE) 2 in order to launch simulations on remote supercomputing resources and we show that data transfer rates between local clusters and super- computing resources can be considerably enhanced by using optically switched networks. We perform large scale molecular dynamics simulations of MgiAl-LDHs intercalated with either chloride ions or a mixture of DNA and chloride ions. The systems exhibit undulatory modes, which are suppressed in smaller scale simulations, caused by the collective thermal motion of atoms in the LDH layers. Thermal undulations provide elastic properties of the system including the bending modulus, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios. To explore the interaction between LDHs and DNA. we use molecular dynamics techniques to per form simulations of double stranded, linear and plasmid DNA up

  11. Estimating the Direct Radiative Effect of Absorbing Aerosols Overlying Marine Boundary Layer Clouds in the Southeast Atlantic Using MODIS and CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2013-01-01

    Absorbing aerosols such as smoke strongly absorb solar radiation, particularly at ultraviolet and visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) wavelengths, and their presence above clouds can have considerable implications. It has been previously shown that they have a positive (i.e., warming) direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) when overlying bright clouds. Additionally, they can cause biased passive instrument satellite retrievals in techniques that rely on VIS/NIR wavelengths for inferring the cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (re) of underlying clouds, which can in turn yield biased above-cloud DARE estimates. Here we investigate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical property retrieval biases due to overlying absorbing aerosols observed by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and examine the impact of these biases on above-cloud DARE estimates. The investigation focuses on a region in the southeast Atlantic Ocean during August and September (2006-2011), where smoke from biomass burning in southern Africa overlies persistent marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds. Adjusting for above-cloud aerosol attenuation yields increases in the regional mean liquid COT (averaged over all ocean-only liquid clouds) by roughly 6%; mean re increases by roughly 2.6%, almost exclusively due to the COT adjustment in the non-orthogonal retrieval space. It is found that these two biases lead to an underestimate of DARE. For liquid cloud Aqua MODIS pixels with CALIOP-observed above-cloud smoke, the regional mean above-cloud radiative forcing efficiency (DARE per unit aerosol optical depth (AOD)) at time of observation (near local noon for Aqua overpass) increases from 50.9Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup-1) to 65.1Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup -1) when using bias-adjusted instead of nonadjusted MODIS cloud retrievals.

  12. Method for making photovoltaic devices using oxygenated semiconductor thin film layers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, James Neil; Albin, David Scott; Feldman-Peabody, Scott; Pavol, Mark Jeffrey; Gossman, Robert Dwayne

    2014-12-16

    A method for making a photovoltaic device is presented. The method includes steps of disposing a window layer on a substrate and disposing an absorber layer on the window layer. Disposing the window layer, the absorber layer, or both layers includes introducing a source material into a deposition zone, wherein the source material comprises oxygen and a constituent of the window layer, of the absorber layer or of both layers. The method further includes step of depositing a film that comprises the constituent and oxygen.

  13. Practical multi-featured perfect absorber utilizing high conductivity silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gok, Abdullah; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Bıyıklı, Necmi; Topallı, Kağan; Okyay, Ali K.

    2016-03-01

    We designed all-silicon, multi-featured band-selective perfect absorbing surfaces based on CMOS compatible processes. The center wavelength of the band-selective absorber can be varied between 2 and 22 μm while a bandwidth as high as 2.5 μm is demonstrated. We used a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer which consists of n-type silicon (Si) device layer, silicon dioxide (SiO2) as buried oxide layer, and n-type Si handle layer. The center wavelength and bandwidth can be tuned by adjusting the conductivity of the Si device and handle layers as well as the thicknesses of the device and buried oxide layers. We demonstrate proof-of-concept absorber surfaces experimentally. Such absorber surfaces are easy to microfabricate because the absorbers do not require elaborate microfabrication steps such as patterning. Due to the structural simplicity, low-cost fabrication, wide spectrum range of operation, and band properties of the perfect absorber, the proposed multi-featured perfect absorber surfaces are promising for many applications. These include sensing devices, surface enhanced infrared absorption applications, solar cells, meta-materials, frequency selective sensors and modulators.

  14. Effects of Cu/In compositional ratio on the characteristics of CuInS2 absorber layers prepared by sulfurization of metallic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Shin, Seung Wook; Han, Jun Hee; Lee, Jeong Yong; Kang, Myeong Gil; Agawane, G. L.; Yun, Jae Ho; Moon, Jong Ha; Kim, Jin Hyeok

    2012-04-01

    This paper investigates the effects of the Cu/In compositional ratio on morphological, structural and optical properties of CuInS2 (CIS) absorber layers formed by sulfurization of In/Cu stacked precursors. In/Cu stacked precursors were prepared on Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrates by DC magnetron sputtering method. The Cu/In compositional ratio in the precursor thin film was varied from 0.55 to 1.44. The as-deposited stacked precursor thin films were sulfurized using a tubular furnace annealing system in a mixture of N2 (95%) + H2S (5%) atmosphere at 450°C for 1 hour. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra results showed that the sulfurized thin films contained both tetragonal CIS and a Cu-based secondary phase, except for the film with a Cu/In compositional ratio of 0.55. Field emission-scanning electron microscopy study showed that the microstructure of the sulfurized CIS thin films became denser with increasing Cu/In compositional ratio. Optical properties of the CIS thin films showed that all the CIS thin films had a good absorption coefficient over 104 cm-1 in the visible region. The direct band gap energy of the sulfurized CIS thin films decreased from 1.39 eV to 1.08 eV with increasing Cu/In compositional ratio. These results demonstrated the effect of the Cu/In compositional ratio on the properties of the CIS thin films and the consequent importance of precisely controlling the metal ratio in the precursor film in order to control the properties of absorber layers in thin film solar cells.

  15. Spatial-frequency multiplication via absorbance modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.-Y.; Wallraff, Gregory M.; Menon, Rajesh

    2007-08-27

    The absorbance of a thin film of photochromic material can be reversibly modified by exposure to two different wavelengths, {lambda}{sub 1} and {lambda}{sub 2}. When such a film is illuminated by both wavelengths simultaneously, and the longer wavelength {lambda}{sub 2} possesses a node in its intensity distribution, then the absorbance of the layer can be made high except at an arbitrarily small region near the node. By exploiting the large nonlinearity introduced by this mechanism, combined with the reversibility of the absorbance of the photochromic layer, the authors demonstrate that spatial frequencies larger than those present in incident intensity distributions may be generated. They show photoresist exposures to demonstrate this technique.

  16. Aggregation and sinking behaviour of resuspended fluffy layer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, Kai; Forster, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The influence of pelagic diatom addition ( Skeletonema costatum) on aggregation dynamics of resuspended fluffy layer material containing natural microorganism assemblages (bacteria and pennate diatoms) was studied during two roller table experiments. Sediment samples were taken at a fine sand site (16 m water depth) located in Mecklenburg Bight, south-western Baltic Sea. Fluff was experimentally resuspended from sediment cores and aggregation processes with and without S. costatum were studied in rotating tanks. Total particulate matter was incorporated into artificial aggregates in equal shares after both roller table experiments. However, biogenic parameters (particulate organic carbon, particulate organic nitrogen, and carbohydrate equivalents), as well as cell numbers of bacteria and pennate diatoms were found in higher percentages in S. costatum aggregates compared to aggregates without S. costatum. Transparent exopolymer particles were apparently irrelevant in the aggregation process during both experiments. Settling velocities of S. costatum aggregates exceeding 1000 μm in diameter showed a significantly higher mean settling velocity compared to aggregates without S. costatum of the same size. The pronounced effect of pelagic diatoms on aggregation processes of fluff in terms of particle attributes, size, and therewith sinking velocities could be demonstrated and may lead to further insight into near bed particle transport in coastal waters.

  17. Use of co-combustion bottom ash to design an acoustic absorbing material for highway noise barriers.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Celia; Leiva, Carlos; Vilches, Luis F; Cifuentes, Héctor

    2013-11-01

    The present study aims to determine and evaluate the applicability of a new product consisting of coal bottom ash mixed with Portland cement in the application of highway noise barriers. In order to effectively recycle the bottom ash, the influence of the grain particle size of bottom ash, the thickness of the panel and the combination of different layers with various particle sizes have been studied, as well as some environmental properties including leachability (EN-12457-4, NEN-7345) and radioactivity tests. Based on the obtained results, the acoustic properties of the final composite material were similar or even better than those found in porous concrete used for the same application. According to this study, the material produced presented no environmental risk. PMID:23916843

  18. Process for forming one or more substantially pure layers in substrate material using ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Brown, David W.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a substantially pure layer of an implantable element in a substrate material by (a) selecting an implantable element and a substrate material to be implanted which, at the temperatures to be used, have limited mutual solubility in one another and do not form any intermediate phases with one another; (b) implanting a sufficient amount of the implantable element in the substrate material to permit formation of the desired substantially pure layer of the implantable element in the substrate material; and (c) annealing the implanted substrate material to form the desired layer. The annealing step may not be required if the desired layer was formed during the implantation.

  19. Multispectral metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; McCrindle, I J H; Li, C; Cumming, D R S

    2014-03-01

    We present the simulation, implementation, and measurement of a multispectral metamaterial absorber (MSMMA) and show that we can realize a simple absorber structure that operates in the mid-IR and terahertz (THz) bands. By embedding an IR metamaterial absorber layer into a standard THz metamaterial absorber stack, a narrowband resonance is induced at a wavelength of 4.3 μm. This resonance is in addition to the THz metamaterial absorption resonance at 109 μm (2.75 THz). We demonstrate the inherent scalability and versatility of our MSMMA by describing a second device whereby the MM-induced IR absorption peak frequency is tuned by varying the IR absorber geometry. Such a MSMMA could be coupled with a suitable sensor and formed into a focal plane array, enabling multispectral imaging. PMID:24690713

  20. Thin Perfect Absorbers for Electromagnetic Waves: Theory, Design, and Realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra'di, Y.; Simovski, C. R.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    With recent advances in nanophotonics and nanofabrication, considerable progress has been achieved in realizations of thin composite layers designed for full absorption of incident electromagnetic radiation, from microwaves to the visible. If the layer is structured at a subwavelength scale, thin perfect absorbers are usually called "metamaterial absorbers," because these composite structures are designed to emulate some material responses not reachable with any natural material. On the other hand, many thin absorbing composite layers were designed and used already in the time of the introduction of radar technology, predominantly as a means to reduce radar visibility of targets. In view of a wide variety of classical and new topologies of optically thin metamaterial absorbers and plurality of applications, there is a need for a general, conceptual overview of the fundamental mechanisms of full absorption of light or microwave radiation in thin layers. Here, we present such an overview in the form of a general theory of thin perfectly absorbing layers. Possible topologies of perfect metamaterial absorbers are classified based on their fundamental operational principles. For each of the identified classes, we provide design equations and give examples of particular realizations. The concluding section provides a summary and gives an outlook on future developments in this field.

  1. Evaluation of absorbed dose in irradiated sugar-containing plant material (peony roots) by an ESR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between electron spin resonance (ESR) signal intensity of irradiated plant materials and sugar content was investigated by spectral analysis using peony roots. A weak background signal near g=2.005 was observed in the roots. After a 10 kGy irradiation, the ESR line broadened and the intensity increased, and the spectral characteristics were similar to a typical spectrum of irradiated food containing crystalline sugars. The free radical concentration was nearly stable 30 days after irradiation. The spectrum of peony root 30 days after irradiation was simulated using the summation of the intensities of six assumed components: radical signals derived from (a) sucrose, (b) glucose, (c) fructose, (d) cellulose, (e) the background signal near g=2.005 and (f) unidentified component. The simulated spectra using the six components were in agreement with the observed sample spectra. The intensity of sucrose radical signal in irradiated samples increased proportionally up to 20 kGy. In addition, the intensity of sucrose radical signals was strongly correlated with the sucrose contents of the samples. The results showed that the radiation sensitivity of sucrose in peony roots was influenced little by other plant constituents. There was also a good correlation between the total area of the spectra and the sucrose content, because the sucrose content was higher than that of other sugars in the samples. In peony roots, estimation of the absorbed dose from the ESR signal intensity may be possible by a calibration method based on the sucrose content.

  2. A new method to retrieve spectral absorption coefficient of highly-scattering and weakly-absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.

    2016-03-01

    A significant uncertainty in the absorption coefficient of highly scattering dispersed materials is typical in the spectral ranges of very weak absorption. The traditional way to identify the main absorption and scattering characteristics of semi-transparent materials is based on spectral measurements of normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance for the material sample. Unfortunately this way cannot be used in the case of in vivo measurements of optical properties of biological tissues. A method suggested in the present paper is based on thermal response to the periodic radiative heating of the open surface of a semi-transparent material. It is shown that the period of a variation of the surface temperature is sensitive to the value of an average absorption coefficient in the surface layer. As a result, the monochromatic external irradiation combined with the surface temperature measurements can be used to retrieve the spectral values of absorption coefficient. Possible application of this method to porous semi-transparent ceramics is considered. An example problem is also solved to illustrate the applicability of this method to human skin. The approach suggested enables one to estimate an average absorption coefficient of human skin of a patient just before the thermal processing.

  3. CZTS absorber layer for thin film solar cells from electrodeposited metallic stacked precursors (Zn/Cu-Sn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. I.; Atici, O.; Lucotti, A.; Binetti, S.; Le Donne, A.; Magagnin, L.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, Kesterite-Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films were successfully synthesized from stacked bilayer precursor (Zn/Cu-Sn) through electrodeposition-annealing route. Adherent and homogeneous Cu-poor, Zn-rich stacked metal Cu-Zn-Sn precursors with different compositions were sequentially electrodeposited, in the order of Zn/Cu-Sn onto Mo foil substrates. Subsequently, stacked layers were soft annealed at 350 °C for 20 min in flowing N2 atmosphere in order to improve intermixing of the elements. Then, sulfurization was completed at 585 °C for 15 min in elemental sulfur environment in a quartz tube furnace with N2 atmosphere. Morphological, compositional and structural properties of the films were investigated using SEM, EDS and XRD methods. Raman spectroscopy with two different excitation lines (514.5 and 785 nm), has been carried out on the sulfurized films in order to fully characterize the CZTS phase. Higher excitation wavelength showed more secondary phases, but with low intensities. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) has also been performed on films showing well formed Kesterite CZTS along the film thickness as compositions of the elements do not change along the thickness. In order to investigate the electronic structure of the CZTS, Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy has been carried out on the films, whose results matched up with the literatures.

  4. Deposition of ultra thin CuInS₂ absorber layers by ALD for thin film solar cells at low temperature (down to 150 °C).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nathanaelle; Bouttemy, Muriel; Genevée, Pascal; Lincot, Daniel; Donsanti, Frédérique

    2015-02-01

    Two new processes for the atomic layer deposition of copper indium sulfide (CuInS₂) based on the use of two different sets of precursors are reported. Metal chloride precursors (CuCl, InCl₃) in combination with H2S imply relatively high deposition temperature (Tdep = 380 °C), and due to exchange reactions, CuInS₂ stoechiometry was only achieved by depositing In₂S3 layers on a CuxS film. However, the use of acac- metal precursors (Cu(acac)₂, In(acac)₃) allows the direct deposition of CuInS₂ at temperature as low as 150 °C, involving in situ copper-reduction, exchange reaction and diffusion processes. The morphology, crystallographic structure, chemical composition and optical band gap of thin films were investigated using scanning electronic microscope, x-ray diffraction under grazing incidence conditions, x-ray fluorescence, energy dispersive spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Films were implemented as ultra-thin absorbers in a typical CIS-solar cell architecture and allowed conversion efficiencies up to 2.8%. PMID:25586382

  5. Application of Mobility Spectrum Analysis to Modern Multi-layered IR Device Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexander Earl

    Modern detector materials used for infrared (IR) imaging purposes contain complex multi-layered architectures, making more robust characterization techniques necessary. In order to determine mutli-carrier transport properties in the presence of mixed conduction, variable-field Hall characterization can be performed and then analyzed using mobility spectrum analysis to extract parameters of interest. Transport parameters are expected to aid in modeling and simulation of materials and can be used in optimization of particular problem areas. The performances of infrared devices ultimately depend on transport mechanisms, so an accurate determination becomes paramount. This work focuses on the characterization of two materials at the forefront of IR detectors; incumbent, tried and true, HgCdTe technologies and emergent III-V based superlattice structures holding much promise for future detector purposes. Ex-situ doped long-wave planar devices and in-situ doped mid-wave dual-layer heterojunctions (P+/n architecture) HgCdTe structures are explored with regards to substrate choice, namely lattice-matched CdZnTe and lattice-mismatched Si or GaAs. A detailed study of scattering mechanisms reveal that growth on lattice-mismatched substrates leads to dislocation scattering limited mobility at low temperature, correlating with extrinsically limited minority carrier lifetime and excesses diode tunneling current, resulting in overall lower performance. Mobility spectrum analysis proves to be an effective diagnostic on performance as well as providing insight in surface, substrate-interface, and minority carrier transport. Two main issues limiting performance of III-V based superlattices are addressed; high residual doping backgrounds and surface passivation. Mobility spectrum analysis proves to be a reliable method of determining background doping levels. Modest improvements are obtained via post-growth thermal annealing, but results suggest future efforts should be placed upon

  6. Methods of Fabricating a Layer of Metallic Glass-Based Material Using Immersion and Pouring Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement layers of metallic glass-based materials. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a layer of metallic glass includes: applying a coating layer of liquid phase metallic glass to an object, the coating layer being applied in a sufficient quantity such that the surface tension of the liquid phase metallic glass causes the coating layer to have a smooth surface; where the metallic glass has a critical cooling rate less than 1000 K/s; and cooling the coating layer of liquid phase metallic glass to form a layer of solid phase metallic glass.

  7. Recent developments of smart electromagnetic absorbers based polymer-composites at gigahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Fadzidah Mohd.; Hashim, Mansor; Abbas, Zulkifly; Ismail, Ismayadi; Nazlan, Rodziah; Ibrahim, Idza Riati

    2016-05-01

    The rapid increase in electromagnetic interference has received a serious attention from researchers who responded by producing a variety of radar absorbing materials especially at high gigahertz frequencies. Ongoing investigation is being carried out in order to find the best absorbing materials which can fulfill the requirements for smart absorbing materials which are lightweight, broad bandwidth absorption, stronger absorption etc. Thus, to improve the absorbing capability, several important parameters need to be taken into consideration such as filler type, loading level, type of polymer matrix, physical thickness, grain sizes, layers and bandwidth. Therefore, this article introduces the electromagnetic wave absorption mechanisms and then reveals and reviews those parameters that enhance the absorption performance.

  8. Analyzing the functions of large glycoconjugates through the dissipative properties of their absorbed layers using the gel-forming mucin MUC5B as an example.

    PubMed

    Kesimer, Mehmet; Sheehan, John K

    2008-06-01

    Glyconjugates such as mucins, proteoglycans, and polysaccharides form the structural basis of protective cell-surface layers. In particular gel-forming mucins define a zone between the epithelial cell layer and the environment. Such molecules are of extreme molecular weight 5-100 x 10(6) and size (Rg 20-300 nm). On this account their biochemistry is inseparable from their physical biochemistry. Combining laser light scattering and quartz crystal mass balance with dissipation methods (QCM-D) we have investigated the properties of the MUC5B mucin and its cognate fragments when bound to a hydrophobic surface. MUC5B forms the basis of gels responsible for the protection of the oral cavity, lung, and cervical canal surfaces. Here we show, by analyzing dissipative interactions of hydrophobic, gold, and polystyrene surfaces, with the intact MUC5B molecule, its reduced subunits, and glycosylated tryptic fragments (obtained after reduction), the formation of 40- to 100-nm-thick highly structured, hydrated interfaces. These interfaces are dominated in their geometry and dissipative properties by the negatively charged carbohydrate-rich domains of the molecule, the naked protein domains being responsible for attachment. These carbohydrate-rich surfaces have well-defined absorptive properties and permit the entry and entrapment of albumin-coated micro-beads into the absorbed layer at and below a size of 60 nm. However beads larger than 100 nm are completely excluded from the surfaces. These absorptive phenomena correlate with large changes in film dissipation and thus may not only be important in biological functions, e.g. binding viruses, but could also be informative to the surfaces (often ciliated) onto which such mucus films are attached. PMID:18339669

  9. Graphene coated with controllable N-doped carbon layer by molecular layer deposition as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Shichao; Qin, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, graphene is coated with nitrogen-doped carbon layer, which is produced by a carbonization process of aromatic polyimide (PI) films deposited on the surfaces of graphene by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The utilization of MLD not only allows uniform coating of PI layers on the surfaces of pristine graphene without any surface treatment, but also enables homogenous dispersion of doped nitrogen atoms in the carbonized products. The as-prepared N-doped carbon layer coated graphene (NC-G) exhibited remarkable capacitance performance as electrode materials for supercapacitor, showing a high specific capacitance of 290.2 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, meanwhile maintaining good rate performance and stable cycle capability. The NC-G synthesized by this way represents an alternative promising candidate as electrode material for supercapacitors.

  10. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  11. Use of co-combustion bottom ash to design an acoustic absorbing material for highway noise barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, Celia; Leiva, Carlos; Vilches, Luis F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The particle size of bottom ash influenced the acoustic behavior of the barrier. • The best sound absorption coefficients were measured for larger particle sizes. • The maximum noise absorption is displaced to lower frequencies for higher thickness. • A noise barrier was designed with better properties than commercial products. • Recycling products from bottom ash no present leaching and radioactivity problems. - Abstract: The present study aims to determine and evaluate the applicability of a new product consisting of coal bottom ash mixed with Portland cement in the application of highway noise barriers. In order to effectively recycle the bottom ash, the influence of the grain particle size of bottom ash, the thickness of the panel and the combination of different layers with various particle sizes have been studied, as well as some environmental properties including leachability (EN-12457-4, NEN-7345) and radioactivity tests. Based on the obtained results, the acoustic properties of the final composite material were similar or even better than those found in porous concrete used for the same application. According to this study, the material produced presented no environmental risk.

  12. Noise and vibration level reduction by covering metal structures with layers of damping materials. [considering viscoelastic insulation layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rugina, I.; Paven, H. T. O.

    1974-01-01

    One of the most important methods of reducing the noise and vibration level is the damping of the secondary sources, such as metal plates, often used in vehicle structures, by means of covering materials with high internal viscosity. Damping layers are chosen at an optimum thickness corresponding to the frequency and temperature range in which a certain structure works. The structure's response corresponding to various real situations is analyzed by means of a measuring chain including electroacoustical or electromechanical transducers. The experimental results provide the dependence of the loss factor and damping transmission coefficient as a function of the damping layer thickness or of the frequency for various viscoelastic covering materials.

  13. Microstrip antennas on/in anisotropic material layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hung-Yu; Castaneda, Jesse A.; Nakatani, Akifumi

    1992-11-01

    Accurate fullwave analyses of microstrip dipoles on multi-layer substrates with generalized anisotropic permittivity and permeability have been developed. The solution to the problem of microstrip dipoles on/in gyrotropic substrates has been obtained. The potential of electronically shaped, scanned, and gain enhanced element factors with ferrite substrates has been theoretically demonstrated. The scattering and radiation problems were solved. The use of biased ferrite substrates to simultaneously reduce RCS and preserve antenna in-band gain has also been described. Infinite phased arrays of microstrip dipoles and probe-fed patches on general anisotropic multi-layer substrates have been analyzed. All the solutions involve the dyadic Green's function for the anisotropic layered structure and the application of the method of moments to an electric field integral equation.

  14. Layer response theory: Energetics of layered materials from semianalytic high-level theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, John F.; Gould, Tim; Lebègue, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    We present a readily computable semianalytic layer response theory (LRT) for analysis of cohesive energetics involving two-dimensional layers such as BN or graphene. The theory approximates the random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energy. Its RPA character ensures that the energy has the correct van der Waals asymptotics for well-separated layers, in contrast to simple pairwise atom-atom theories, which fail qualitatively for layers with zero electronic energy gap. At the same time, our theory is much less computationally intensive than the full RPA energy. It also gives accurate correlation energies near the binding minimum, in contrast to Lifshitz-type theory. We apply our LRT successfully to graphite and to BN, and to a graphene-BN heterostructure.

  15. Widely-tunable, passively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser with few-layer MoS2 saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yizhong; Luo, Zhengqian; Li, Yingyue; Zhong, Min; Xu, Bin; Che, Kaijun; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian

    2014-10-20

    We propose and demonstrate a MoS2-based passively Q-switched Er-doped fiber laser with a wide tuning range of 1519.6-1567.7 nm. The few-layer MoS2 nano-platelets are prepared by the liquid-phase exfoliation method, and are then made into polymer-composite film to construct the fiber-compatible MoS2 saturable absorber (SA). It is measured at 1560 nm wavelength, that such MoS2 SA has the modulation depth of ∼ 2% and the saturable optical intensity of ∼ 10 MW/cm(2). By further inserting the filmy MoS2-SA into an Er-doped fiber laser, stable Q-switching operation with a 48.1 nm continuous tuning from S- to C-waveband is successfully achieved. The shortest pulse duration and the maximum pulse energy are 3.3 μs and 160 nJ, respectively. The repetition rate and the pulse duration under different operation conditions have been also characterized. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first demonstration of MoS2 Q-switched, widely-tunable fiber laser. PMID:25401559

  16. Ultrathin and lightweight microwave absorbers made of mu-near-zero metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shuomin; He, Sailing

    2013-01-01

    We present a theory of perfect absorption in a bilayer model composed of a mu-near-zero (MNZ) metamaterial (MM) absorbing layer on a metallic substrate. Our analytical solutions reveal that a MM layer with a large purely imaginary permeability and a moderate permittivity backed by a metallic plane has a zero reflection at normal incidence when the thickness is ultrathin. The impedance-mismatched metamaterial absorber (MA) can be 77.3% thinner than conventional impedance-matched MAs with the same material loss in order to get the same absorption. A microwave absorber using double-layered spiral MMs with a thickness of only about one percent of the operating wavelength is designed and realized. An absorption efficiency above 93% at 1.74 GHz is demonstrated experimentally at illumination angles up to 60 degrees. Our absorber is 98% lighter than traditional microwave absorbers made of natural materials working at the same frequencies. PMID:23803861

  17. Ultrathin and lightweight microwave absorbers made of mu-near-zero metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shuomin; He, Sailing

    2013-01-01

    We present a theory of perfect absorption in a bilayer model composed of a mu-near-zero (MNZ) metamaterial (MM) absorbing layer on a metallic substrate. Our analytical solutions reveal that a MM layer with a large purely imaginary permeability and a moderate permittivity backed by a metallic plane has a zero reflection at normal incidence when the thickness is ultrathin. The impedance-mismatched metamaterial absorber (MA) can be 77.3% thinner than conventional impedance-matched MAs with the same material loss in order to get the same absorption. A microwave absorber using double-layered spiral MMs with a thickness of only about one percent of the operating wavelength is designed and realized. An absorption efficiency above 93% at 1.74 GHz is demonstrated experimentally at illumination angles up to 60 degrees. Our absorber is 98% lighter than traditional microwave absorbers made of natural materials working at the same frequencies. PMID:23803861

  18. Light scattering by dust particles (PROGRA2 experiment): size and structure effects for transparent and absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.-B.; Lasue, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2007-08-01

    1- Introduction Cometary and possibly interplanetary dust particles seem to be mainly made of agglomerates of submicron and micron-sized grains. These particles are among the most primitive in our solar system. Regoliths on asteroidal and planetary surfaces seem to be loose materials produced by impinging meteorites on the surface of small bodies. Comparing their physical properties is thus fundamental to understand their evolution. To interpret remote observations of solar light scattered by dust particles and regoliths, it is necessary to use numerical and experimental simulations [1,2,3]. 2- PROGRA2 experiment PROGRA2 instruments are polarimeters; the light sources are two randomly polarized lasers (632.8 nm and 543.5 nm). Levitating particles (in microgravity or lifted by an air-draught) are studied by imaging polarimetry. Details on the instruments can be found in [4,5]. 3- Samples Two kinds of samples are studied: compact particles in the (1-400) micrometer size range and fluffy aggregates in the same size range, made from submicron and micronsized grains. The materials are transparent silica and absorbing carbon. Some deposited particles are huge agglomerates of micron-sized grains produced by random ballistic deposition of single grains [6,7] or produced by evaporation of mixtures in alcohol of fluffy aggregates of submicron-sized grains. Two samples are made of silica spheres coated by a carbonaceous black compound. Cometary analogues are mixtures of silica and amorphous carbon or Mg-Fe silicates mixed with amorphous carbon. 4- Results Phase curves and their main parameters (negative polarization at small phase angles and maximum polarization, Pmax, at 90-100° phase angle) for the different materials will be compared and related to the physical properties. For example, it is well known by numerical simulations and/or by experiments that the maximum polarization decreases when the size (submicrometer range) of the grains increases [2,8,9]. An inverse rule

  19. Layered materials with improved magnesium intercalation for rechargeable magnesium ion cells

    DOEpatents

    Doe, Robert Ellis; Downie, Craig Michael; Fischer, Christopher; Lane, George Hamilton; Morgan, Dane; Nevin, Josh; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin Aslaug; Eaglesham, David

    2016-07-26

    Electrochemical devices which incorporate cathode materials that include layered crystalline compounds for which a structural modification has been achieved which increases the diffusion rate of multi-valent ions into and out of the cathode materials. Examples in which the layer spacing of the layered electrode materials is modified to have a specific spacing range such that the spacing is optimal for diffusion of magnesium ions are presented. An electrochemical cell comprised of a positive intercalation electrode, a negative metal electrode, and a separator impregnated with a nonaqueous electrolyte solution containing multi-valent ions and arranged between the positive electrode and the negative electrode active material is described.

  20. Layered materials with improved magnesium intercalation for rechargeable magnesium ion cells

    DOEpatents

    Doe, Robert E.; Downie, Craig M.; Fischer, Christopher; Lane, George H.; Morgan, Dane; Nevin, Josh; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin A.; Eaglesham, David

    2016-01-19

    Electrochemical devices which incorporate cathode materials that include layered crystalline compounds for which a structural modification has been achieved which increases the diffusion rate of multi-valent ions into and out of the cathode materials. Examples in which the layer spacing of the layered electrode materials is modified to have a specific spacing range such that the spacing is optimal for diffusion of magnesium ions are presented. An electrochemical cell comprised of a positive intercalation electrode, a negative metal electrode, and a separator impregnated with a nonaqueous electrolyte solution containing multi-valent ions and arranged between the positive electrode and the negative electrode active material is described.

  1. Layered materials with improved magnesium intercalation for rechargeable magnesium ion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, Robert Ellis; Downie, Craig Michael; Fischer, Christopher; Lane, George Hamilton; Morgan, Dane; Nevin, Josh; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin Aslaug; Eaglesham, David

    2015-10-27

    Electrochemical devices which incorporate cathode materials that include layered crystalline compounds for which a structural modification has been achieved which increases the diffusion rate of multi-valent ions into and out of the cathode materials. Examples in which the layer spacing of the layered electrode materials is modified to have a specific spacing range such that the spacing is optimal for diffusion of magnesium ions are presented. An electrochemical cell comprised of a positive intercalation electrode, a negative metal electrode, and a separator impregnated with a nonaqeuous electrolyte solution containing multi-valent ions and arranged between the positive electrode and the negative electrode active material is described.

  2. Iron Chalcogenide Photovoltaic Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Liping; Lany, Stephan; Kykyneshi, Robert; Jieratum, Vorranutch; Ravichandran, Ram; Pelatt, Brian; Altschul, Emmeline; Platt, Heather A. S.; Wager, John F.; Keszler, Douglas A.; Zunger, Alex

    2011-08-10

    An integrated computational and experimental study of FeS₂ pyrite reveals that phase coexistence is an important factor limiting performance as a thin-film solar absorber. This phase coexistence is suppressed with the ternary materials Fe₂SiS₄ and Fe₂GeS₄, which also exhibit higher band gaps than FeS₂. Thus, the ternaries provide a new entry point for development of thin-film absorbers and high-efficiency photovoltaics.

  3. Process for forming one or more substantially pure layers in substrate material using ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Brown, David W.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a substantially pure monocrystalline layer of an implantable element in a monocrystalline substrate material by (a) selecting an implantable element and a monocrystalline substrate material to be implanted which, at the temperatures to be used, have limited mutual solubility in one another and do not form any intermediate phases with one another; (b) implanting a sufficient amount of the implantable element in the substrate material to permit formation of the desired substantially pure layer of the implantable element in the substrate material; and (c) annealing the implanted substrate material to form the desired layer. The annealing step may not be required if the desired layer was formed during the implantation. Also disclosed is an article made by the process.

  4. Process for forming one or more substantially pure layers in substrate material using ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Musket, R.G.; Brown, D.W.; Munir, Z.A.

    1990-12-11

    A process is disclosed for forming a substantially pure layer of an implantable element in a substrate material by (a) selecting an implantable element and a substrate material to be implanted which, at the temperatures to be used, have limited mutual solubility in one another and do not form any intermediate phases with one another; (b) implanting a sufficient amount of the implantable element in the substrate material to permit formation of the desired substantially pure layer of the implantable element in the substrate material; and (c) annealing the implanted substrate material to form the desired layer. The annealing step may not be required if the desired layer was formed during the implantation. 2 figs.

  5. Dependence of Yb-169 absorbed dose energy correction factors on self-attenuation in source material and photon buildup in water

    SciTech Connect

    Medich, David C.; Munro, John J. III

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Absorbed dose energy correction factors, used to convert the absorbed dose deposited in a LiF thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) into the clinically relevant absorbed dose to water, were obtained for both spherical volumetric sources and for the model 4140 HDR Yb-169 source. These correction factors have a strong energy dependence below 200 keV; therefore, spectral changes were quantified as Yb-169 photons traveled through both source material (Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and water with the corresponding absorbed dose energy correction factors, f(r,{theta}), calculated as a function of location in a phantom. Methods: Using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation program, the Yb-169 spectrum emerging from spherical Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} sources (density 6.9 g/cm{sup 3}) with radii between 0.2 and 0.9 mm were analyzed and their behavior compared against those for a point-source. The absorbed dose deposited to both LiF and H{sub 2}O materials was analyzed at phantom depths of 0.1-10 cm for each source radius and the absorbed dose energy correction factor calculated as the ratio of the absorbed dose to water to that of LiF. Absorbed dose energy correction factors for the Model 4140 Yb-169 HDR brachytherapy source similarly were obtained and compared against those calculated for the Model M-19 Ir-192 HDR source. Results: The Yb-169 average spectral energy, emerging from Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} spherical sources 0.2-0.9 mm in radius, was observed to harden from 7% to 29%; as these photons traveled through the water phantom, the photon average energy softened by as much as 28% at a depth of 10 cm. Spectral softening was dependent on the measurement depth in the phantom. Energy correction factors were found to vary both as a function of source radius and phantom depth by as much as 10% for spherical Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} sources. The Model 4140 Yb-169 energy correction factors depended on both phantom depth and reference angle and were found to vary by more than 10% between

  6. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  7. Effect of post-deposition annealing on the growth of Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin films for a solar cell absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, G. Suresh; Kishore Kumar, Y. B.; Uday Bhaskar, P.; Sundara Raja, V.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of substrate temperature and post-deposition annealing on the growth and properties of Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin films, a potential candidate for a solar cell absorber layer, is investigated. The substrate temperature (Ts) is chosen to be in the range 523-673 K and the annealing temperature (Tpa) is kept at 723 K. Powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of as-deposited films revealed that the films deposited at Ts = 523 K and 573 K contain Cu2-xSe as a secondary phase. Single phase, polycrystalline Cu2ZnSnSe4 films are obtained at Ts = 623 K and films deposited at Ts = 673 K have ZnSe as a secondary phase along with Cu2ZnSnSe4. Direct band gap of as-deposited CZTSe films is found to lie between 1.40 eV and 1.65 eV depending on Ts. XRD patterns of post-deposition annealed films revealed that the films deposited at Ts = 523-623 K are single phase CZTSe and films deposited at Ts = 673 K still contain ZnSe secondary phase. CZTSe films are found to exhibit kesterite structure with the lattice parameters a = 0.568 nm and c = 1.136 nm. Optical absorption studies of post-deposition annealed films show that there is a slight increase in the band gap on annealing, due to decrease in the Cu content. Electrical resistivity of the films is found to lie in the range 0.02-2.6 Ω cm depending on Ts.

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition of Bismuth Vanadates for Solar Energy Materials.

    PubMed

    Stefik, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of porous nanocomposites is key to the advancement of energy conversion and storage devices that interface with electrolytes. Bismuth vanadate, BiVO4 , is a promising oxide for solar water splitting where the controlled fabrication of BiVO4 layers within porous, conducting scaffolds has remained a challenge. Here, the atomic layer deposition of bismuth vanadates is reported from BiPh3 , vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide, and water. The resulting films have tunable stoichiometry and may be crystallized to form the photoactive scheelite structure of BiVO4 . A selective etching process was used with vanadium-rich depositions to enable the synthesis of phase-pure BiVO4 after spinodal decomposition. BiVO4 thin films were measured for photoelectrochemical performance under AM 1.5 illumination. The average photocurrents were 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode using a hole-scavenging sulfite electrolyte. The capability to deposit conformal bismuth vanadates will enable a new generation of nanocomposite architectures for solar water splitting. PMID:27246652

  9. Spray-assisted layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly of anisotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Souvik; Suarez Martinez, Pilar; Kavarthapu, Avanti; Lutkenhaus, Jodie

    2015-03-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly has gained tremendous interest as it allows one to incorporate a large variety of molecules with nano-scale precision and very good reproducibility. In addition to charged polymers, the technique has become extremely popular to fabricate tailor-made thin films containing anisotropic nanomaterials (e.g., graphene oxide sheets). The challenge is that a standard protocol to fabricate ``all-polyelectrolyte'' LbL films may not necessarily give rise to satisfactory film growth when applied to LbL assembly where one of the adsorbing components is an anisotropic nanomaterial. Therefore, in this contribution, we combine polymers and anisotropic nanomaterials via dip- and spray-assisted LbL assembly and investigate the effect of charge density, exfoliation, concentration etc. of the components on the growth behavior and the film quality. The end result is a conformal, pin-hole free coating on model substrates (glass, silicon, metal) over a large area.

  10. Application of the thin electrolyte layer technique to corrosion testing of dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, Martin

    Proper simulation of the oral environment for the corrosion testing of dental materials is crucial for determining corrosion rates and mechanisms correctly. In this study, the thin electrolyte layer technique (TET) was characterized and employed to investigate the importance of the chemical composition of the testing environment on the outcome of electrochemical tests. The thickness of the electrolyte layer in TET is only 0.5 mm and contains only 20 muL of electrolyte. This arrangement simulates the physical characteristics of the oral environment and facilitates testing in human saliva. Oxygen availability for reduction on the sample surface was determined, using cathodic polarization of Pt in borate buffer, to be lower in TET than in traditional (bulk electrolyte) techniques. Appreciable differences were found during polarization experiments on 316 L SS in saline and artificial saliva. Oxygen content was found to play a significant role in the corrosivity of various species contained in artificial saliva. Potentiodynamic polarization employing human saliva in TET on 316L SS proved to be very different from tests performed in artificial saliva. This was believed to be due to the presence of organic species, specifically proteins, contained in human saliva. This was further confirmed by cyclic polarization and corrosion current measurements of four commercial nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloys with varying amounts of Be. For this phase of the experiment, artificial saliva (AS), AS with 1% albumin, AS with 1% of mucin and parotid human saliva were employed as electrolytes. The results obtained in the various electrolytes depended on the composition, microstructure, stability of passive film, and the presence of casting porosity of the alloys tested. Proteins had insignificant effect on alloys with highly stable passive films, whereas, corrosion rates increased substantially in those alloys with compromised passive film formation. Proteins, especially mucin, lowered the

  11. Effect of Capping Front Layer Materials on the Penetration Resistance of Q&T Steel Welded Joints Against 7.62-mm Armor-Piercing Projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Parameswaran, P.

    2013-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of capping front layers on the ballistic performance of shielded metal arc-welded armor steel joints which were fabricated with a chromium carbide-rich hardfaced middle layer on the buttered/beveled edge. Two different capping front layer materials were chosen for achieving better ballistic performance, namely, low hydrogen ferritic (LHF) and austenitic stainless steel (SS) fillers. On the other hand, the bottom layers are welded with SS filler for both joints. The consequent sandwiched joint served the dual purpose of weld integrity and penetration resistance of the bullet. It is observed that the penetration resistance is due to the high hardness of the hardfacing layer on the one hand and the energy-absorbing capacity of the soft backing SS weld deposits on the other hand. The complementary effect of layers successfully provided resistance to the projectile penetration. On a comparative analysis, the joint fabricated using the LHF filler capping front layer offered superior ballistic performance with respect to depth of penetration. This is mainly due to the presence of acicular ferrite along the bainitic structure in the LHF capping front layer, which caused a shallow hardness gradient along the weld center line.

  12. Cellulose-silver nanoparticle hybrid materials to control spoilage-related microflora in absorbent pads located in trays of fresh-cut melon.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Avelina; Picouet, Pierre; Lloret, Elsa

    2010-08-15

    The antimicrobial activity of newly developed cellulose-silver nanoparticle hybrid materials was investigated during storage of minimally processed "Piel de Sapo" melon. Silver nanoparticles were produced after in-situ reduction by physical methods of 1% silver nitrate adsorbed on cellulose fibres; they accounted between 5 and 35 nm diameter, and were not aggregated. Fresh-cut melon pieces were stored for 10 days at 4 degrees C under natural modified atmosphere packaging, in presence or absence of silver loaded absorbent pads. The evolution of headspace gas composition, quality parameters, and the antimicrobial activity against spoilage-related microorganisms were investigated. The cellulose-silver nanoparticle hybrid materials released silver ions after melon juice impregnated the pad. The released silver ions were particularly useful to control the population of spoilage-related microorganisms in cellulose based absorbent pads in contact with vegetable matrices, showing a low chelating effect against silver ions; the lag phases of the microorganisms were considerably incremented and microbial loads in the pads remained in average approx. 3 log(10) CFU/g below the control during the investigated storage period. Furthermore, the presence of silver loaded absorbent pads retarded the senescence of the melon cuts, presenting remarkably lower yeast counts, lower degrees Brix values, and a juicier appearance after 10 days of storage. PMID:20656367

  13. Three-dimensional textures and defects of soft material layering revealed by thermal sublimation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dong Ki; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Dae Seok; Oh, Seong Dae; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Clark, Noel A.; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Layering is found and exploited in a variety of soft material systems, ranging from complex macromolecular self-assemblies to block copolymer and small-molecule liquid crystals. Because the control of layer structure is required for applications and characterization, and because defects reveal key features of the symmetries of layered phases, a variety of techniques have been developed for the study of soft-layer structure and defects, including X-ray diffraction and visualization using optical transmission and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and SEM and transmission electron microscopy, including freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy. Here, it is shown that thermal sublimation can be usefully combined with such techniques to enable visualization of the 3D structure of soft materials. Sequential sublimation removes material in a stepwise fashion, leaving a remnant layer structure largely unchanged and viewable using SEM, as demonstrated here using a lamellar smectic liquid crystal. PMID:24218602

  14. Heat transfer from localized absorbing defects to the host coating material in HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Papernov, S.; Schmid, A.W.

    1997-12-01

    Finite-element analysis was applied in calculating the heat-transfer effects from localized absorbing defects to the host coating material in multilayer HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} system, irradiated by 1-ns laser pulses. Thermoconductivity was considered the major heat-transfer mechanism. A comparison with high-resolution laser-damage morphology studies carried out by means of atomic-force microscopy allowed estimating peak temperatures reached by the absorbing defects. These peak-temperature values as well as the lateral length scales of the empirically found laser-damage features point toward the importance of radiative energy transfer from the heated defect as the driving mechanism of laser-damage initiation.

  15. Radionuclide separations using pillared layered materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, A.

    1995-08-31

    The objective of this project is to prepare an all inorganic strontium specific sorbent or ion exchanger for the removal of highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions. A series of clays and layered titanates were pillared and calcined to convert their essentially two dimensional structure to three dimensional porous structures with high surface areas. The pillaring agents were alumina, zirconia, chromia and silica based. The pillared clays, particularly those containing Zr pillars, achieved moderate (Kd as high at 13,700 ml/g with V:m = 28) selectivities for Sr{sup 2+}. In contrast, the silica pillared titanates showed exceptional affinities for Sr{sup 2+} with Kd values in excess of 100,000 ml/g in 5M NaNO{sup 3} + 1M NaOH. These latter results suggest a more detailed study of the pillared titanates in the presence of simulants closely resembling real waste solutions.

  16. Development of high-performance tri-layer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owe-Yang, D. C.; Yano, Toshiharu; Ueda, Takafumi; Iwabuchi, Motoaki; Ogihara, Tsutomu; Shirai, Shozo

    2008-03-01

    As chip size and pattern size continue to shrink, the thickness of photo resist is getting thinner and thinner. One of the major reasons is to prevent the small resist features from collapse. It's very challenging to get enough etch resistance from such thin resist thickness. An approach of Si-tri-layer stack which consists of resist, Si ARC (Si contenting anti-reflection coating), organic underlayer from top to bottom has been adopted by many IC makers in the manufacturing of 45 nm node. Even higher resist etching selectivity is needed for 32 nm node. Si ARC, of Si content as high as 43%, provides good etch selectivity. At the same time, tri-layer also provides good control over reflectivity in high NA immersion lithography. However, there are several well know issues concern Si-rich ARC. Resist compatibility and shelf life are on top of the list. An aim of our development work was to overcome those issues in order to produce manufacturing-worthy Si-rich ARC. Several synthesis methods were investigated to form Si-rich ARC film with different properties. Collapse of resist patterns is used as an indicator of lithographic compatibility. Lithographic performance was checked by accelerated shelf life tests at high temperature in order to predict the shelf life at room temperature. It was found that adhesion between resist and Si-rich ARC is improved when contact angle of Si-rich ARC is increased to more than 60 degree. Certain synthesis methods improve shelf life. After optimization of film properties and synthesis methods of Si-rich ARC, SHB-A940 series have best litho compatibility and shelf life is six months at storage temperature below 10°C.

  17. Growth of Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystallites on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays as Novel Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cell Structure via the Successive-Ion-Layer-Adsorption-Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoran; Demopoulos, George P

    2015-10-21

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is an environmentally benign semiconductor with excellent optoelectronic properties that attracts a lot of interest in thin film photovoltaics. In departure from that conventional configuration, we fabricate and test a novel absorber-conductor structure featuring in situ successive-ion-layer-adsorption-reaction (SILAR)-deposited CZTS nanocrystallites as a light absorber on one-dimensional TiO2 (rutile) nanorods as an electron conductor. The effectiveness of the nanoscale heterostructure in visible light harvesting and photoelectron generation is demonstrated with an initial short circuit current density of 3.22 mA/cm(2) and an internal quantum efficiency of ∼60% at the blue light region, revealing great potential in developing CZTS extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells. PMID:26422062

  18. Computational synthesis of single-layer GaN on refractory materials

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Arunima K.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2014-08-04

    The synthesis of single-layer materials relies on suitable substrates. In this paper, we identify suitable substrates for the stabilization and growth of single-layer GaN and characterize the effect of the substrate on the electronic structure of single-layer GaN. We identify two classes of epitaxial substrates, refractory metal diborides and transition-metal dichalcogenides. We find that the refractory diborides provide epitaxial stabilization for the growth and functionalization of single layer GaN. We show that chemical interactions of single layer GaN with the diboride substrates result in n-type doping of the single-layer GaN. Transition-metal dichalcogenides, on the other hand, although epitaxially matched, cannot provide sufficient thermodynamic stabilization for the growth of single layer GaN. Nonetheless, energy band alignments of GaN/metal chalcogenides show that they make good candidates for heterostructures.

  19. Three-layer knitted materials for protective clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielicka, E.; Janicka, J.; Kozminska, R.; Walak, A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of investigating multifunctional 3D knitted materials dedicated for protective clothing were presented. The 3D design structures were made on a circular knitting machine using yarns with flame retardant or electrostatic properties. The functionality imparted to each of the assortments developed was verified during the tests in accredited laboratories as well as by assessing their biophysical properties. Based on the analysis of the test results, a beneficial effect of the raw materials and the 3D structure of knitted fabrics were demonstrated. Designed garments could be useful as individual protection clothing for workers exposed to harmful occupational environment factors, such as heat and static electricity. The study was conducted within the project EUREKA E! 5799 BATAN “Multifunctional knitted fabrics with barrier properties for clothing”.

  20. Charge Transport in Field-Effect Transistors based on Layered Materials and their Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jatinder

    In the quest for energy efficiency and device miniaturization, the research in using atomically thin materials for device applications is gaining momentum. The electronic network in layered materials is different from 3D counterparts. It is due to the interlayer couplings and density of states because of their 2D nature. Therefore, understanding the charge transport in layered materials is fundamental to explore the vast opportunities these ultra-thin materials offer. Hence, the challenges targeted in the thesis are: (1) understanding the charge transport in layered materials based on electronic network of quantum and oxide capacitances, (2) studying thickness dependence, ranging from monolayer to bulk, of full range-characteristics of field-effect transistor (FET) based on layered materials, (3) investigating the total interface trap charges to achieve the ultimate subthreshold slope (SS) theoretically possible in FETs, (4) understanding the effect of the channel length on the performance of layered materials, (5) understanding the effect of substrate on performance of the TMDC FETs and studying if the interface of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs)/hexagonalboron nitride (h-BN) can have less enough trap charges to observe ambipolar behavior, (6) Exploring optoelectronic properties in 2D heterostructures that includes understanding graphene/WS2 heterostructure and its optoelectronic applications by creating a p-n junction at the interface. The quality of materials and the interface are the issues for observing and extracting clean physics out of these layered materials and heterostructures. In this dissertation, we realized the use of quantum capacitance in layered materials, substrate effects and carrier transport in heterostructure.

  1. Layer-by-layer assembly of zeolite imidazolate framework-8 as coating material for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qishu; Xuan, Han; Zhang, Kehua; Ding, Yi; Xu, Qin

    2016-08-01

    In this work, open-tubular capillary column coated with zeolite imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) nanocrystals was prepared by a layer-by-layer method. The coating was formed by growing ZIF-8 nanocrystals on either bare fused silica capillary wall or the capillary column premodified with amino groups. The shape and the thickness of the coating formed by using these two methods were almost the same. However, the coverage of the ZIF-8 crystals on the bare fused silica capillary wall was higher than that on the capillary column premodified with amino groups. The ZIF-8 coated capillary column was evaluated for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography. The effect of pH value, buffer concentration, and applied voltage on the separation of phenols was investigated. Good separation of nine phenolic isomers was achieved because of the strong interaction between unsaturated Zn sites and phenols. The column performance for o-nitrophenol was as high as 208 860 plates m(-1) . The run-to-run, day-to-day, and column-to-column reproducibility of retention time and resolution for p-nitrophenol and o-nitrophenol were very good with RSDs of less than 6.5%. PMID:27174427

  2. Geologic Evolution of Mars' North Polar Layered Deposits and Related Materials from Mars Odyssey THEMIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasavada, A. R.; Richardson, M. I.; Byrne, S.; Ivanov, A. B.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of a thick sequence of horizontal layers of ice-rich material at Mars north pole, dissected by troughs and eroding at its margins, is undoubtedly telling us something about the evolution of Mars climate we just don't know what yet. The North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) most likely formed as astronomically driven climate variations led to the deposition of conformable, areally extensive layers of ice and dust over the polar region. More recently, the balance seems to have fundamentally shifted to net erosion, as evidenced by the many troughs within the NPLD and the steep, arcuate scarps present near its margins, both of which expose layering.

  3. High Curie temperature drive layer materials for ion-implanted magnetic bubble devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Wolfe, R.; Blank, S. L.; Nelson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ion implantation of bubble garnets can lower the Curie temperature by 70 C or more, thus limiting high temperature operation of devices with ion-implanted propagation patterns. Therefore, double-layer materials were made with a conventional 2-micron bubble storage layer capped by an ion-implantable drive layer of high Curie temperature, high magnetostriction material. Contiguous disk test patterns were implanted with varying doses of a typical triple implant. Quality of propagation was judged by quasistatic tests on 8-micron period major and minor loops. Variations of magnetization, uniaxial anisotropy, implant dose, and magnetostriction were investigated to ensure optimum flux matching, good charged wall coupling, and wide operating margins. The most successful drive layer compositions were in the systems (SmDyLuCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and (BiGdTmCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and had Curie temperatures 25-44 C higher than the storage layers.

  4. Low-frequency interlayer vibration modes in two-dimensional layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jianting; Dong, Shan; Zhang, Anmin; Zhang, Qingming

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials have been attracted tremendous research interest because of their novel photoelectric properties. If a single atomic layer instead of individual atoms is taken as a rigid motion object, two unique interlayer vibrations, i.e. compression/breathing and shear motions, at ultra-low frequencies can be expected and actually have been observed in many layered materials. The vibrations stem from the interlayer van der Waals interaction and can be well described by a conventional linear-chain model in most cases. The vibration frequencies strongly depend on layer thickness, which enables an accurate determination of layer numbers. A quick and nondestructive determination of flake thickness is particularly important for the materials, since the physical properties can be dramatically changed in the cases of several atomic layers. As a measure of interlayer coupling, the low-frequency modes are also sensitive to the stacking methods of atomic layers and the overlapping of different kinds of 2D materials. This allows the modes to play a key role in the applications like van der Waals heterojunctions. In this paper, we will give a brief review on the experimental observations and theoretical understanding of the interlayer modes in several typical 2D systems, as well as their actual and potential applications.

  5. Anomalous elastic buckling of layered crystalline materials in the absence of structure slenderness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Manrui; Liu, Yilun; Zhe Liu, Jefferson; Wang, Lifeng; Zheng, Quanshui

    2016-03-01

    Layered crystalline materials, such as graphene, boron nitride, tungsten sulfate, phosphorene, etc., have attracted enormous attentions, due to their unique crystal structures and superior mechanical, thermal, and physical properties. Making use of mechanical buckling is a promising route to control their structural morphology and thus tune their physical properties, giving rise to many novel applications. In this paper, we employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and theoretical modeling to study the compressive buckling of a column made of layered crystalline materials with the crystal layers parallel to the compressive direction. We find that the mechanical buckling of the layered crystalline materials exhibits two anomalous and counter-intuitive features as approaching the zero slenderness ratio. First, the critical buckling strain εcr has a finite value that is much lower than the material's elastic limit strain. A continuum mechanics model (by homogenizing the layered materials) is proposed for the εcr, which agrees well with the results of MD simulations. We find that the εcr solely depends on elastic constants without any structural dimension, which appears to be an intrinsic material property and thus is defined as intrinsic buckling strain (IBS), εcrIBS , in this paper. Second, below a certain nanoscale length, l0, in the compressive direction (e.g., about 20 nm for graphite), the critical buckling strain εcr shows a size effect, i.e., increasing as the column length L decreases. To account for the size effect, inspired by our recently developed multi-beam shear model (Liu et al., 2011), a bending energy term of individual crystal layer is introduced in our continuum model. The theoretical model of εcr agrees well with the size effects observed in MD simulations. This study could lay a ground for engineering layered crystalline materials in various nano-materials and nano-devices via mechanical buckling.

  6. Research on resistance properties of conductive layer materials of microchannel plate film dynode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ling-ling; Duanmu, Qingduo; Yang, Ji-kai; Wang, Guo-zheng

    2015-03-01

    Silicon Microchannel Plate - MCP - is a new image multiplier devices based semiconductor process technology. Compared with the traditional glass MCP, Silicon MCP has an advantage in technology that the dynode materials and the substrate materials are separate. At the same time, the dynode preparation process and the microchannel arrays are also separate. Two different dynode conductive layer films are prepared: polysilicon conductive films prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) and AZO thin films coated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The conductive films coated by ALD are superior to dynode conductive films prepared by LPCVD. By comparing the resistivity of conductive polysilicon thin film and AZO thin film of different Al concentrations doped, AZO thin film of different Al concentrations doped is a more suitable conductive layer dynode material to satisfy the MCP conductive layer resistivity requirements.

  7. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  8. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  9. An analysis of creep crack growth of interface cracks in layered/graded materials

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1997-07-01

    In this study, the growth behavior of interface cracks in bimaterials and in layered materials resulting from the creep cavitation was studied. The growth model includes the effects of material deposition resulting from the growth of creep cavities on the crack tip stress fields. The results indicate that in layered materials under identical applied loading, the location of the interface crack strongly influence the amplitude of the stress field at steady-state. Due to large variation in the distribution of the stresses ahead of the interface cracks at creep regime, depending upon the crack location, the creep crack growth rates will be significantly different from each other under identical loading for a given layered material.

  10. Theoretical and experimental study of the diffuse transmission of light through highly concentrated absorbing and scattering materials. Part I: Monte-Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressel, L.; Reich, O.

    2014-10-01

    In many technical materials and commercial products like sunscreen or paint high particle and absorber concentrations are present. An important parameter for slabs of these materials is the diffuse transmission of light, which quantifies the total amount of directly and diffusely transmitted light. Due to the high content of scattering particles not only multiple scattering but also additional dependent scattering occurs. Hence, simple analytical models cannot be applied to calculate the diffuse transmission. In this work a Monte-Carlo program for the calculation of the diffuse transmission of light through dispersions in slab-like geometry containing high concentrations of scattering particles and absorbers is presented and discussed in detail. Mie theory is applied for the calculation of the scattering properties of the samples. Additionally, dependent scattering is considered in two different models, the well-known hard sphere model in the Percus-Yevick approximation (HSPYA) and the Yukawa model in the Mean Spherical Approximation (YMSA). Comparative experiments will show the accurateness of the program as well as its applicability to real samples [1].

  11. Contribution of material's surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Masafumi; Steski, Dannie; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C(6+) ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation. PMID:26931982

  12. Optimisation of the material properties of indium tin oxide layers for use in organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Doggart, P.; Bristow, N.; Kettle, J.

    2014-09-14

    The influence of indium tin oxide [(In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Sn), ITO] material properties on the output performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices has been modelled and investigated. In particular, the effect of altering carrier concentration (n), thickness (t), and mobility (μ{sub e}) in ITO films and their impact on the optical performance, parasitic resistances and overall efficiency in OPVs was studied. This enables optimal values of these parameters to be calculated for solar cells made with P3HT:PC{sub 61}BM and PCPDTBT:PC{sub 71}BM active layers. The optimal values of n, t and μ{sub e} are not constant between different OPV active layers and depend on the absorption spectrum of the underlying active layer material system. Consequently, design rules for these optimal values as a function of donor bandgap in bulk-heterojunction active layers have been formulated.

  13. Application of ICP-OES to the determination of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin films used as absorber materials in solar cell devices.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Caballero, Raquel; Guillén, Cecilia; Gutiérrez, María Teresa; Rucandio, María Isabel

    2005-05-01

    CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 [CIGS; x=Ga/(In+Ga)] thin films are among of the best candidates as absorber materials for solar cell applications. The material quality and main properties of the polycrystalline absorber layer are critically influenced by deviations in the stoichiometry, particularly in the Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratio. In this work a simple, sensitive and accurate method has been developed for the quantitative determination of these thin films by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The proposed method involves an acid digestion of the samples to achieve the complete solubilization of CIGS, followed by the analytical determination by ICP-OES. A digestion procedure with 50% HNO3 alone or in the presence of 10% HCl was performed to dissolve those thin films deposited on glass or Mo-coated glass substrates, respectively. Two analytical lines were selected for each element (Cu 324.754 and 327.396 nm, Ga 294.364 and 417.206 nm, In 303.936 and 325.609 nm, Se 196.090 and 203.985 nm, and Mo 202.030 and 379.825 nm) and a study of spectral interferences was performed which showed them to be suitable, since they offered a high sensitivity and no significant inter-element interferences were detected. Detection limits for all elements at the selected lines were found to be appropriate for this kind of application, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 1.5% for all elements with the exception of Se (about 5%). The Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratios obtained from the application of this method to CIGS thin films were consistent with the study of the structural and morphological properties by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:15702309

  14. Direct grafting of anti-fouling polyglycerol layers to steel and other technically relevant materials.

    PubMed

    Weber, Theresa; Bechthold, Maren; Winkler, Tobias; Dauselt, John; Terfort, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    Direct grafting of hyperbranched polyglycerol (PG) layers onto the oxide surfaces of steel, aluminum, and silicon has been achieved through surface-initiated polymerization of 2-hydroxymethyloxirane (glycidol). Optimization of the deposition conditions led to a protocol that employed N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as the solvent and temperatures of 100 and 140 °C, depending on the substrate material. In all cases, a linear growth of the PG layers could be attained, which allows for control of film thickness by altering the reaction time. At layer thicknesses >5 nm, the PG layers completely suppressed the adhesion of albumin, fibrinogen, and globulin. These layers were also at least 90% bio-repulsive for two bacteria strains, E. coli and Acinetobacter baylyi, with further improvement being observed when the PG film thickness was increased to 17 nm (up to 99.9% bio-repulsivity on silicon). PMID:23856542

  15. Analysis of Photothermal Characterization of Layered Materials: Design of Optimal Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Kevin D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper numerical calculations are presented for the steady-periodic temperature in layered materials and functionally-graded materials to simulate photothermal methods for the measurement of thermal properties. No laboratory experiments were performed. The temperature is found from a new Green s function formulation which is particularly well-suited to machine calculation. The simulation method is verified by comparison with literature data for a layered material. The method is applied to a class of two-component functionally-graded materials and results for temperature and sensitivity coefficients are presented. An optimality criterion, based on the sensitivity coefficients, is used for choosing what experimental conditions will be needed for photothermal measurements to determine the spatial distribution of thermal properties. This method for optimal experiment design is completely general and may be applied to any photothermal technique and to any functionally-graded material.

  16. Material properties and field-effect transistor characteristics of hybrid organic/graphene active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Lee, Jongho; Chowdhury, Sk. Fahad; Akinwande, Deji; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2012-10-01

    We report on the material properties and device characteristics of field-effect transistors (FETs) consisting of hybrid mono-layer graphene/organic semiconductor active layers. By capping with selected organic and polymeric layers, transformation of the electronic characteristics of mono-layer graphene FETs was observed. The off-state current is reduced while the on-state current and field-effect mobility are either unaffected or increased after depositing π-conjugated organic semiconductors. Significantly, capping mono-layer graphene FETs with fluoropolymer improved the on-off current ratio from 5 to 10 as well as increased the field-effect mobility by factor of two compared to plain graphene FETs. Removal of π-conjugated organic semiconductors or fluoropolymer from graphene FETs results in a return to the original electronic properties of mono-layer graphene FETs. This suggests that weak reversible electronic interactions between graphene and π-conjugated organic semiconductors/fluoropolymer favorably tune the material and electrical characteristics of mono-layer graphene.

  17. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, G.N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are disclosed. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. 6 figs.

  18. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, Gary N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  19. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic-impedance measurements. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-06-10

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are presented. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  20. Different materials as a cathode modification layer on the impact of organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jian; Huang, Qiuyan; Yu, Junsheng; Jiang, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    Organic thin film solar cells based on conjugated polymer or small molecules have showed an interesting approach to energy conversion since Tang reported a single donor-accepter hetero-junction solar cell. The power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells has increased steadily over last decade. Small-molecular weight organic double heterojunction donor-acceptor layer organic solar cells (OSC) with a structure of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/CuPc(200Å)/C60(400Å)/x/Ag(1000Å), using CuPc(copper Phthalocyanine)as donor layer, and Alq3(8-Hydroxyquinoline aluminum salt), BCP(Bromocresol purple sodium salt) and Bphen(4'7-diphyenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) as cathode modification layer, respectively were fabricated. The performance of OSC was studied as a function of the different materials as an cathode modification layer to optimize the structure. The current-voltage characteristic of the solar cell under AM1.5 solar illumination at an intensity of 100 mw/cm2 showed that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) was dependent of the different materials of the cathode modification layer. the efficiency along with the different materials as an cathode modification layer will diminish under that standard solar illumination(AM1.5)was obtained. Using a double heterostructure of ITO/CuPc(200Å)/C60(400Å)/Alq3(60Å)/Ag(1000Å) with high-vacuum evaporation technology, the efficiency was 0.587%.the efficiency was 0.967% when the material of the cathode modification layer was BCP, with the structure of ITO/CuPc(200Å)/C60(400Å)/BCP(35Å)/Ag(1000Å), and the efficiency was 0.742% when the material of the cathode modification layer was Bphen, with the structure of ITO/CuPc(200Å)/C60(400Å)/ Bphen(50Å)/Ag(1000Å).Using different materials as a cathode modification layer, it can be seen that the material which matches the energy level could even eventually be able to improve the energy conversion efficiency more.

  1. Vertically stacked multi-heterostructures of layered materials for logic transistors and complementary inverters

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Jong; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Hailong; Chen, Yu; Wang, Yang; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2014-01-01

    The layered materials such as graphene have attracted considerable interest for future electronics. Here we report the vertical integration of multi-heterostructures of layered materials to enable high current density vertical field-effect transistors (VFETs). An n-channel VFET is created by sandwiching few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as the semiconducting channel between a monolayer graphene and a metal thin film. The VFETs exhibit a room temperature on-off ratio >103, while at same time deliver a high current density up to 5,000 A/cm2, sufficient for high performance logic applications. This study offers a general strategy for the vertical integration of various layered materials to obtain both p- and n-channel transistors for complementary logic functions. A complementary inverter with larger than unit voltage gain is demonstrated by vertically stacking the layered materials of graphene, Bi2Sr2Co2O8 (p-channel), graphene, MoS2 (n-channel), and metal thin film in sequence. The ability to simultaneously achieve high on-off ratio, high current density, and logic integration in the vertically stacked multi-heterostructures can open up a new dimension for future electronics to enable three-dimensional integration. PMID:23241535

  2. Process for forming one or more substantially pure layers in substrate material using ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.; Brown, D.W.; Munir, Z.A.

    1990-12-31

    The method comprises selecting an implantable element and a substrate material to be implanted which, at the implant/anneal temperatures, have limited mutual solubility and have no intermediate phases formed. In an example, Be is implanted with 11 {times}10{sup 17} Al/cm{sup 2} at 200 keV and then annealed for 1 h at 500 C. Rutherford backscattering shows that layer formation occurred during the anneal. SEM shows rectangular Be defects in the Al layer. Other examples of implantable elements and suitable substrate materials are tabulated. 6 figs, 1 table. (DLC)

  3. Visible light broadband perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X. L.; Meng, Q. X.; Yuan, C. X.; Zhou, Z. X.; Wang, X. O.

    2016-03-01

    The visible light broadband perfect absorbers based on the silver (Ag) nano elliptical disks and holes array are studied using finite difference time domain simulations. The semiconducting indium silicon dioxide thin film is introduced as the space layer in this sandwiched structure. Utilizing the asymmetrical geometry of the structures, polarization sensitivity for transverse electric wave (TE)/transverse magnetic wave (TM) and left circular polarization wave (LCP)/right circular polarization wave (RCP) of the broadband absorption are gained. The absorbers with Ag nano disks and holes array show several peaks absorbance of 100% by numerical simulation. These simple and flexible perfect absorbers are particularly desirable for various potential applications including the solar energy absorber.

  4. Antifouling and Antibacterial Multifunctional Polyzwitterion/Enzyme Coating on Silicone Catheter Material Prepared by Electrostatic Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    PubMed

    Vaterrodt, Anne; Thallinger, Barbara; Daumann, Kevin; Koch, Dereck; Guebitz, Georg M; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilms on indwelling medical devices generally causes high risks for adverse complications such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections. In this work, a strategy for synthesizing innovative coatings of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catheter material, using layer-by-layer assembly with three novel functional polymeric building blocks, is reported, i.e., an antifouling copolymer with zwitterionic and quaternary ammonium side groups, a contact biocidal derivative of that polymer with octyl groups, and the antibacterial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) producing enzyme cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH). CDH oxidizes oligosaccharides by transferring electrons to oxygen, resulting in the production of H2O2. The design and synthesis of random copolymers which combine segments that have antifouling properties by zwitterionic groups and can be used for electrostatically driven layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly at the same time were based on the atom-transfer radical polymerization of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and subsequent partial sulfobetainization with 1,3-propane sultone followed by quaternization with methyl iodide only or octyl bromide and thereafter methyl iodide. The alternating multilayer systems were formed by consecutive adsorption of the novel polycations with up to 50% zwitterionic groups and of poly(styrenesulfonate) as the polyanion. Due to its negative charge, enzyme CDH was also firmly embedded as a polyanionic layer in the multilayer system. This LbL coating procedure was first performed on prefunctionalized silicon wafers and studied in detail with ellipsometry as well as contact angle (CA) and zetapotential (ZP) measurements before it was transferred to prefunctionalized PDMS and analyzed by CA and ZP measurements as well as atomic force microscopy. The coatings comprising six layers were stable and yielded a more neutral and hydrophilic surface than did PDMS, the polycation with 50% zwitterionic groups having the largest

  5. Investigation of Materials for Boundary Layer Control in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braafladt, Alexander; Lucero, John M.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2013-01-01

    During operation of the NASA Glenn Research Center 15- by 15-Centimeter Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), a significant, undesirable corner flow separation is created by the three-dimensional interaction of the wall and floor boundary layers in the tunnel corners following an oblique-shock/ boundary-layer interaction. A method to minimize this effect was conceived by connecting the wall and floor boundary layers with a radius of curvature in the corners. The results and observations of a trade study to determine the effectiveness of candidate materials for creating the radius of curvature in the SWT are presented. The experiments in the study focus on the formation of corner fillets of four different radii of curvature, 6.35 mm (0.25 in.), 9.525 mm (0.375 in.), 12.7 mm (0.5 in.), and 15.875 mm (0.625 in.), based on the observed boundary layer thickness of 11.43 mm (0.45 in.). Tests were performed on ten candidate materials to determine shrinkage, surface roughness, cure time, ease of application and removal, adhesion, eccentricity, formability, and repeatability. Of the ten materials, the four materials which exhibited characteristics most promising for effective use were the heavy body and regular type dental impression materials, the basic sculpting epoxy, and the polyurethane sealant. Of these, the particular material which was most effective, the heavy body dental impression material, was tested in the SWT in Mach 2 flow, and was observed to satisfy all requirements for use in creating the corner fillets in the upcoming experiments on shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction.

  6. Epitaxial Bi2 FeCrO6 Multiferroic Thin Film as a New Visible Light Absorbing Photocathode Material.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Huang, Wei; Mi, Zetian; Serpone, Nick; Nechache, Riad; Rosei, Federico

    2015-08-26

    Ferroelectric materials have been studied increasingly for solar energy conversion technologies due to the efficient charge separation driven by the polarization induced internal electric field. However, their insufficient conversion efficiency is still a major challenge. Here, a photocathode material of epitaxial double perovskite Bi(2) FeCrO(6) multiferroic thin film is reported with a suitable conduction band position and small bandgap (1.9-2.1 eV), for visible-light-driven reduction of water to hydrogen. Photoelectrochemical measurements show that the highest photocurrent density up to -1.02 mA cm(-2) at a potential of -0.97 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode is obtained in p-type Bi(2) FeCrO(6) thin film photocathode grown on SrTiO(3) substrate under AM 1.5G simulated sunlight. In addition, a twofold enhancement of photocurrent density is obtained after negatively poling the Bi(2) FeCrO(6) thin film, as a result of modulation of the band structure by suitable control of the internal electric field gradient originating from the ferroelectric polarization in the Bi(2) FeCrO(6) films. The findings validate the use of multiferroic Bi(2) FeCrO(6) thin films as photocathode materials, and also prove that the manipulation of internal fields through polarization in ferroelectric materials is a promising strategy for the design of improved photoelectrodes and smart devices for solar energy conversion. PMID:25988512

  7. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system. PMID:23145601

  8. Experimental flame speed in multi-layered nano-energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Manesh, Navid Amini; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2010-03-15

    This paper deals with the reaction of dense Metastable Intermolecular Composite (MIC) materials, which have a higher density than conventional energetic materials. The reaction of a multilayer thin film of aluminum and copper oxide has been studied by varying the substrate material and thicknesses. The in-plane speed of propagation of the reaction was experimentally determined using a time of- flight technique. The experiment shows that the reaction is completely quenched for a silicon substrate having an intervening silica layer of less than 200 nm. The speed of reaction seems to be constant at 40 m/s for silica layers with a thickness greater than 1 {mu}m. Different substrate materials such as glass and photoresist were also used. (author)

  9. A novel nanocomposite material prepared by intercalating photoresponsive dendrimers into a layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Nishimoto, Shunsuke; Kameshima, Yoshikazu; Matsukawa, Junpei; Fujita, Yasuhiko; Takaguchi, Yutaka; Matsuda, Motohide; Miyake, Michihiro

    2010-02-15

    A novel combination for an inorganic-organic nanocomposite material was demonstrated. Anthryl dendron, i.e., poly(amidoamine) dendron with an anthracene chromophore group at the focal point, was incorporated in the interlayer space of ZnAl-NO{sub 3} type layered double hydroxide (LDH) through an anion-exchange reaction. The photoabsorption and fluorescence properties of the resulting material were different from those of the bare anthryl dendron molecule. It was suggested that the change in photochemical properties was due to the organization and pi-pi interaction of anthracene chromophores within the interlayer of the LDH. - Graphical abstract: A novel inorganic-organic nanocomposite material, a layered double hydroxide (LDH) containing photoresponsive dendrimers in the interlayer space, was successfully prepared through an ion-exchange reaction. The resulting material exhibited unique photochemical properties, compared to those of the bare photoresponsive dendrimer molecule.

  10. Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2013-02-26

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  11. Mixed-layered bismuth--oxygen--iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2015-01-06

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  12. Nanotubes from Misfit Layered Compounds: A New Family of Materials with Low Dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Panchakarla, Leela S; Radovsky, Gal; Houben, Lothar; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Tenne, Reshef

    2014-11-01

    Nanotubes that are formed from layered materials have emerged to be exciting one-dimensional materials in the last two decades due to their remarkable structures and properties. Misfit layered compounds (MLC) can be produced from alternating assemblies of two different molecular slabs with different periodicities with the general formula [(MX)1+x]m[TX2]n (or more simply MS-TS2), where M is Sn, Pb, Bi, Sb, rare earths, T is Sn, Nb, Ta, Ti, V, Cr, and so on, and X is S, Se. The presence of misfit stresses between adjacent layers in MLC provides a driving force for curling of the layers that acts in addition to the elimination of dangling bonds. The combination of these two independent forces leads to the synthesis of misfit layered nanotubes, which are newcomers to the broad field of one-dimensional nanostructures and nanotubes. The synthesis, characterization, and microscopic details of misfit layered nanotubes are discussed, and directions for future research are presented. PMID:26278742

  13. A novel broadband waterborne acoustic absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changxian; Wen, Weibin; Huang, Yixing; Chen, Mingji; Lei, Hongshuai; Fang, Daining

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we extended the ray tracing theory in polar coordinate system, and originally proposed the Snell-Descartes law in polar coordinates. Based on these theories, a novel broadband waterborne acoustic absorber device was proposed. This device is designed with gradient-distributing materials along radius, which makes the incidence acoustic wave ray warps. The echo reduction effects of this device were investigated by finite element analysis, and the numerical results show that the reflectivity of acoustic wave for the new device is lower than that of homogenous and Alberich layers in almost all frequency 0-30 kHz at the same loss factor.

  14. High temperature materials synthesis without heat: Oxide layer growth on electronic materials using high-kinetic-energy atomic oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffbauer, M.A.; Cross, J.B.; Archuleta, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors examined thin-film materials-synthesis processes in which chemical reactions are initiated using high-kinetic-energy neutral atomic species instead of high temperatures. The research is aimed at producing device-quality insulating oxide layers on semiconductor materials. Thick, uniform, and fully oxidized insulating layers of unprecedented quality are formed on gallium arsenide by exposure of wafer substrates to a high kinetic-energy ({approximately}3eV) neutral atomic-oxygen beam. The nonthermal oxidation process does not disrupt the crystalline order of the substrate and no detectable elemental arsenic is produced at the oxide/gallium arsenide interface.

  15. Free-edge stress analysis of functionally graded material layered biocomposite laminates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-10-01

    A stress function based theory is proposed to obtain free-edge stress distributions for three-dimensional, orthotropic, linearly elastic rectangular biocomposite laminates with surface-bonded functionally graded materials (FGM). The assumed stress fields automatically satisfy the pointwise equilibrium equation, as well as traction-free and free edge boundary conditions. The complementary virtual work principle, followed by the general eigenvalue solution procedure, is used to obtain 3-D free edge stress states. A typical stacking sequence of composite laminate is used as numerical investigation with surface bonded FGMs. It is shown that with proper exponential factor of FGMs, the interlaminar stresses at the FGM layer interface can be reduced significantly, in return to prevent debonding of FGM layers. This approach can be useful in the design of functionally graded material layered biocomposite structures. PMID:25942808

  16. A generic, computerized nuclear materials accountability system (NucMAS) and its layered products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jr, J M

    1989-01-01

    NucMAS provides a material balance area with a computerized data management system for nuclear materials accountability. NucMAS is a generic application. It handles the data management and reporting functions for different processing facilities by storing all process-specific information as data rather than procedure. A NucMAS application is configured for each facility it supports. NucMAS and its layered products are compatible with three types of data clients. Core NucMAS has a screen-oriented user interface to support the accountability clerk as a client. Accountability clerks enter data from operating logs and laboratory analyses one to three days after actual processing. Layered products support process operators and automated systems as near-real-time and real-time data clients. The core and layered products use a data-driven approach which results in software that is configurable and maintainable. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Effect of zeolite nano-materials and artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) leaf extract on increase in urinary clearance of systematically absorbed nicotine.

    PubMed

    Malekshah, R E; Mahjub, R; Rastgarpanah, M; Ghorbani, M; Partoazar, A R; Mehr, S E; Dehpour, A R; Dorkoosh, F A

    2012-12-01

    Nicotine, the main pharmacologically active component in tobacco and cigarette, has some toxic effects and also high potential for addiction. In this study, the effect of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) and zeolite nano-materials on urinary excretion of nicotine and consequently elimination of systematically absorbed nicotine was investigated. A simple, valid and highly sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method has been developed for determination of nicotine in rat urine according to guidelines for bioanalysis.It was found that nano-zeolites can cause increase in urinary concentration of nicotine due to its high surface adsorption. Artichoke leaf extract can cause increase in urinary excretion of nicotine in longer post administration times. It was observed that co-administration of nanozeolites and the leaf extract has the synergetic effect on increasing the urinary excretion of nicotine. PMID:23196970

  18. A fluorescent, photochromic and thermochromic trifunctional material based on a layered metal-viologen complex.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fang; Qiu, Li-Xia; Zhou, Liang-Liang; Sun, Yan-Qiong; You, Yi

    2015-11-14

    The azide anion as an energy acceptor and an electron donor has been introduced into a metal-viologen compound to form a 2D layered viologen-based trifunctional material, which exhibits the rare discolored function of reversible photochromism and thermochromism. Interestingly, its fluorescence can be switched by visible light irradiation and heating in air. PMID:26445888

  19. Combustion of layers inorganic systems under rotation to produce composite and gradient materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurakhmetov, B.; Sergaziyev, A.; Sabirov, N.; Baideldonova, A.; Mukhina, L.; Ksandopulo, G.

    2016-04-01

    The new way of production of gradient materials is presented. Course of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis reactions in layered systems under the influence of centrifugal force and some methods of analysis of the process and products of reaction is described.

  20. CuSbS2: a promising semiconductor photo-absorber material for quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhifeng; Huang, Jiajun; Han, Jianhuan; Hong, Tiantian; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zhihua

    2016-06-22

    A facile, low-cost, simple solution-based process for preparing novel promising chalcostibite CuSbS2 sensitized ZnO nanorod arrays, and the application of these as photoanodes of semiconductor quantum dot sensitized inorganic-organic solar cells (QDSSCs) is reported for the first time. ZnO/CuSbS2 nanofilms were designed and prepared through a simple successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and heat treatment process by employing ZnO nanorods as reactive templates. Novel efficient QDSSCs based on the ZnO/CuSbS2 nanofilms plus a solid electrolyte of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) were formed, and a power conversion efficiency of 1.61% was achieved. The excellent photoelectric performance is attributed to the improved light absorption efficiency, widened light absorption region, ideal band gap value, and high speed electron injection and transportation. The results demonstrate that a novel ternary sensitizer (I-V-VI2) can be synthesized via a low-cost method as described here and has great promising potential as a sensitizer in solar cells. PMID:27297190

  1. Effects of material properties on laser-induced bubble formation in absorbing liquids and on submerged targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, HanQun; Casperson, Lee W.; Shearin, Alan; Paisley, Dennis L.; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of blood clots in a fluid-filled blood vessel is accomplished by an explosive evaporation process. The resulting vapor bubble rapidly expands and collapses to disrupt the thrombus (blood clot). The hydrodynamic pressures following the bubble expansion and collapse can also be used as a driving force to deliver clot-dissolving agents into thrombus for enhancement of laser thrombolysis. Thus, the laser-induced bubble formation plays an important role in the thrombus removal process. In this study the effects of material properties on laser-induced cavitation bubbles formed in liquids and on submerged targets have been visualized with a microsecond strobe or high speed framing camera.

  2. Thermophysical Properties of Mars' North Polar Layered Deposits and Related Materials from Mars Odyssey THEMIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasavada, A. R.; Richardson, M. I.; Byrne, S.; Ivanov, A. B.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of a thick sequence of horizontal layers of ice-rich material at Mars north pole, dissected by troughs and eroding at its margins, is undoubtedly telling us something about the evolution of Mars climate [1,2] we just don t know what yet. The North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) most likely formed as astronomically driven climate variations led to the deposition of conformable, areally extensive layers of ice and dust over the polar region. More recently, the balance seems to have fundamentally shifted to net erosion, as evidenced by the many troughs within the NPLD and the steep, arcuate scarps present near its margins, both of which expose layering. We defined a number of Regions of Interest ROI) for THEMIS to target as part of the Mars Odyssey Participating Scientist program. We use these THEMIS data in order to understand the morphology and color/thermal properties of the NPLD and related materials over relevant (i.e., m to km) spatial scales. We have assembled color mosaics of our ROIs in order to map the distribution of ices, the different layered units, dark material, and underlying basement. The color information from THEMIS is crucial for distinguishing these different units which are less distinct on Mars Orbiter Camera images. We wish to understand the nature of the marginal scarps and their relationship to the dark material. Our next, more ambitious goal is to derive the thermophysical properties of the different geologic materials using THEMIS and Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer TES) data.

  3. Initial plasma formation by laser radiation acting on absorbing materials for a planar geometry of expansion of the plasma formed

    SciTech Connect

    Min'ko, L.Y.; Chivel', Y.A.; Chumakov, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental studies of nonstationary processes of initial plasma formation as well as with the elucidation of the role of the erosion and air plasmas in the formation of the screening plasma flame. To this end, the authors performed complex experiments using high-speed shadow, photo and spectrographic methods, as well as the methods of photoelectric recording of the incident and reflected laser radiation together with time-referencing of the apparatus complex to within 20 nsec using a specially developed generator of synchronous electrical and light pulses. Specific measurements were performed primarily for determining the dependence of the time of the initial plasma formation and development of screening on the power density of the LR and the chemical composition of the plasma-forming material.

  4. Extracting material parameters from x-ray attenuation: a CT feasibility study using kilovoltage synchrotron x-rays incident upon low atomic number absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kirby, B J; Davis, J R; Grant, J A; Morgan, M J

    2003-10-21

    The work reported here is a feasibility study of the extraction of material parameters from measurements of the linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of low atomic number absorbers. Computed tomography (CT) scans of small samples containing several liquids and solids were carried out with synchrotron radiation at the Australian National Beamline Facility (BL 20B) in Japan. Average values of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient were extracted for each material for x-ray energies ranging from 11 keV to 20.5 keV. The electron density was estimated by applying results derived from a parametrization of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient first developed by Jackson and Hawkes and extended for this work. Average estimates for the electron density of triethanolamine and acetic acid were made to within +5.3% of the actual value. Other materials examined included furfuraldehyde, perspex and teflon, for which average estimates of the electron density were less than 10% in excess of the calculated value. PMID:14620065

  5. Extracting material parameters from x-ray attenuation: a CT feasibility study using kilovoltage synchrotron x-rays incident upon low atomic number absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, B. J.; Davis, J. R.; Grant, J. A.; Morgan, M. J.

    2003-10-01

    The work reported here is a feasibility study of the extraction of material parameters from measurements of the linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of low atomic number absorbers. Computed tomography (CT) scans of small samples containing several liquids and solids were carried out with synchrotron radiation at the Australian National Beamline Facility (BL 20B) in Japan. Average values of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient were extracted for each material for x-ray energies ranging from 11 keV to 20.5 keV. The electron density was estimated by applying results derived from a parametrization of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient first developed by Jackson and Hawkes and extended for this work. Average estimates for the electron density of triethanolamine and acetic acid were made to within +5.3% of the actual value. Other materials examined included furfuraldehyde, perspex and teflon, for which average estimates of the electron density were less than 10% in excess of the calculated value.

  6. Characterization and MCNP simulation of neutron energy spectrum shift after transmission through strong absorbing materials and its impact on tomography reconstructed image.

    PubMed

    Hachouf, N; Kharfi, F; Boucenna, A

    2012-10-01

    An ideal neutron radiograph, for quantification and 3D tomographic image reconstruction, should be a transmission image which exactly obeys to the exponential attenuation law of a monochromatic neutron beam. There are many reasons for which this assumption does not hold for high neutron absorbing materials. The main deviations from the ideal are due essentially to neutron beam hardening effect. The main challenges of this work are the characterization of neutron transmission through boron enriched steel materials and the observation of beam hardening. Then, in our work, the influence of beam hardening effect on neutron tomographic image, for samples based on these materials, is studied. MCNP and FBP simulation are performed to adjust linear attenuation coefficients data and to perform 2D tomographic image reconstruction with and without beam hardening corrections. A beam hardening correction procedure is developed and applied based on qualitative and quantitative analyses of the projections data. Results from original and corrected 2D reconstructed images obtained shows the efficiency of the proposed correction procedure. PMID:22871438

  7. Effect of base layer materials on physiological and perceptual responses to exercise in personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Denise L; Arena, Logan; DeBlois, Jacob P; Haller, Jeannie M; Hultquist, Eric M; Lefferts, Wesley K; Russell, Tim; Wu, Annie; Fehling, Patricia C

    2014-05-01

    Ten men (non-firefighters) completed a 110 min walking/recovery protocol (three 20-min exercise bouts, with recovery periods of 10, 20, and 20 min following successive bouts) in a thermoneutral laboratory while wearing firefighting personal protective equipment over one of four base layers: cotton, modacrylic, wool, and phase change material. There were no significant differences in changes in heart rate, core temperature, rating of perceived exertion, thermal discomfort, and thermal strain among base layers. Sticking to skin, coolness/hotness, and clothing humidity sensation were more favorable (p < 0.05) for wool compared with cotton; no significant differences were identified for the other 7 clothing sensations assessed. Separate materials performance testing of the individual base layers and firefighting ensembles (base layer + turnout gear) indicated differences in thermal protective performance and total heat loss among the base layers and among ensembles; however, differences in heat dissipation did not correspond with physiological responses during exercise or recovery. PMID:23849898

  8. Influence of Structural Parameters on a Novel Metamaterial Absorber Structure at K-band Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuong, Tran Manh; Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Tuan, Le Anh

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterials nowadays continue to gain attention thanks to their special electromagnetic characteristics. An increasing number of studies are being conducted on the absolute electromagnetic absorber configurations of high impedance surface materials at a certain frequency band. These configurations are usually fabricated with a layer of metal structure based on a dielectric sheet. In this study, we present an optimal design of a novel electromagnetic absorber metamaterial configuration working at a 23-GHz frequency range (K band).

  9. Shear bond strengths of an indirect composite layering material to a tribochemically silica-coated zirconia framework material.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Taro; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Kubochi, Kei; Shinohara, Mitsuyo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated shear bond strengths of a layering indirect composite material to a zirconia framework material treated with tribochemical silica coating. Zirconia disks were divided into two groups: ZR-PRE (airborne-particle abrasion) and ZR-PLU (tribochemical silica coating). Indirect composite was bonded to zirconia treated with one of the following primers: Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CCP), Clearfil Mega Bond Primer with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (MGP+Act), ESPE-Sil (SIL), Estenia Opaque Primer, MR. Bond, Super-Bond PZ Primer Liquid A with Liquid B (PZA+PZB), and Super-Bond PZ Primer Liquid B (PZB), or no treatment. Shear bond testing was performed at 0 and 20,000 thermocycles. Post-thermocycling shear bond strengths of ZR-PLU were higher than those of ZR-PRE in CCP, MGP+Act, SIL, PZA+PZB, and PZB groups. Application of silane yielded better durable bond strengths of a layering indirect composite material to a tribochemically silica-coated zirconia framework material. PMID:27252003

  10. Electrical and materials characterization of tungsten-titanium diffusion barrier layers and alloyed silver metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Shekhar Kumar

    With the constant miniaturization of semiconductor devices, research is always ongoing to obtain the best materials and/or materials systems which fulfill all the requirements of an ideal interconnect. Silver (Ag) and silver based alloys are front runners among other metals and alloys being investigated. Ag has a low electrical resistivity (1.59 micro-ohm-centimeters for bulk), very high thermal conductivity (4.25 Watt per centimeters per Kelvin), and has better electromigration resistance than aluminum (Al). In the pure form, however, it has several drawbacks (e.g., a tendency to diffuse in silicon substrate at higher temperatures, inadequate adhesion to silicon dioxide, poor corrosion resistance, and agglomeration at higher temperatures). These drawbacks can be circumvented by the addition of diffusion barrier layers and/or alloying in silver. The present study investigates both routes to make silver a legitimate interconnect material. Initially this study focuses on thermal stability and behavior of tungsten-titanium (W-Ti) barrier layers for Ag metallization. It is shown that Ag thin films are thermally stable up to 650 degrees centigrade with the presence of W-Ti under layers. The effect of a W-Ti layer on the {111} texture formation in Ag thin film is also evaluated in detail. Insertion of a thin W-Ti over layer on Ag thin films is investigated with respect to their thermal stability. This research also evaluates the diffusion of Ag into silicon dioxide and W-Ti barriers. This project shows that W-Ti is an effective barrier layer for silver metallization. Later, the study investigates the effect of Cu addition in silver metallization and its impact on electromigration resistance. It is shown that Cu addition enhances the electromigration lifetime for silver metallization.

  11. Improvement of lithium storage performance of Sn-alloy anode materials by a polypyrrole protective layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Wen, Zhaoyin; Liu, Yu; Jin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The SnO2-based anode with improved reversible capacity and cyclability was achieved by employing a protective layer composed of crosslinked polypyrrole nanowires. Scanning electron microscopy measurement was performed to characterize the surface and cross section morphology of electrodes before and after cycling. The crosslinked polypyrrole nanowire protective layer with good elasticity adhered to the SnO2 surface could form a network, leading to buffer the volumetric swelling of active materials during the lithiation/delithiation process. A good cycling stability and an excellent rate capability of the modified electrode were achieved.

  12. Metallic layered composite materials produced by explosion welding: Structure, properties, and structure of the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'tseva, L. A.; Tyushlyaeva, D. S.; Mal'tseva, T. V.; Pastukhov, M. V.; Lozhkin, N. N.; Inyakin, D. V.; Marshuk, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure, morphology, and microhardness of the transition zone in multilayer metallic composite joints are studied, and the cohesion strength of the plates to be joined, the mechanical properties of the formed composite materials, and fracture surfaces are analyzed. The materials to be joined are plates (0.1-1 mm thick) made of D16 aluminum alloy, high-strength maraging ZI90-VI (03Kh12N9K4M2YuT) steel, BrB2 beryllium bronze, and OT4-1 titanium alloy. Composite materials made of different materials are shown to be produced by explosion welding. The dependence of the interface shape (smooth or wavelike) on the physicomechanical properties of the materials to be joined is found. The formation of a wavelike interface is shown to result in the formation of intense-mixing regions in transition zones. Possible mechanisms of layer adhesion are discussed.

  13. Highly efficient gate-tunable photocurrent generation in vertical heterostructures of layered materials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Zhou, Hailong; Yin, Anxiang; Li, Zheng; Huang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Layered materials of graphene and MoS2, for example, have recently emerged as an exciting material system for future electronics and optoelectronics. Vertical integration of layered materials can enable the design of novel electronic and photonic devices. Here, we report highly efficient photocurrent generation from vertical heterostructures of layered materials. We show that vertically stacked graphene–MoS2–graphene and graphene–MoS2–metal junctions can be created with a broad junction area for efficient photon harvesting. The weak electrostatic screening effect of graphene allows the integration of single or dual gates under and/or above the vertical heterostructure to tune the band slope and photocurrent generation. We demonstrate that the amplitude and polarity of the photocurrent in the gated vertical heterostructures can be readily modulated by the electric field of an external gate to achieve a maximum external quantum efficiency of 55% and internal quantum efficiency up to 85%. Our study establishes a method to control photocarrier generation, separation and transport processes using an external electric field. PMID:24162001

  14. Dark material in the polar layered deposits and dunes on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Vasavada, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    Viking infrared thermal mapping and bistatic radar data suggest that the bulk density of the north polar erg material is much lower than that of the average Martian surface or of dark dunes at lower latitudes. We have derived a thermal inertia of 245-280 J m-2 s-1/2 K-1 (5.9-6.7 ?? 10-3 cal cm-2 s-1/2 K-1) for the Proctor dune field and 25-150 J m-2 s-1/2 K-1 (0.6-3.6 ?? 10-3 cal cm-2 s-1/2 K-1) for the north polar erg. The uniqueness of the thermophysical properties of the north polar erg material may be due to a unique polar process that has created them. The visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of the erg suggests that the dark material may be composed of basalt or ferrous clays. These data are consistent with the dark material being composed of basaltic ash or filamentary sublimate residue (FSR) particles derived from erosion of the layered deposits. Dark dust may be preferentially concentrated at the surface of the layered deposits by the formation of FSR particles upon sublimation of water ice. Further weathering and erosion of these areas of exposed layered deposits may form the dark, saltating material that is found in both polar regions. Dark FSR particles may saltate for great distances before eventually breaking down into dust grains, re-mixing with the global dust reservoir, and being recycled into the polar layered deposits via atmospheric suspension. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. [A biomechanical study of anterior cruciate ligaments reconstructed with patella tendons augmented by absorbable artificial materials. A biomechanical study in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using an absorbable artificial material in rabbits. Experimental studies were carried out on 58 New Zealand white rabbits. After total resection of ACL, 22 knees were reconstructed with patella tendons alone (non-augmented group) and 27 knees with patella tendons augmented by polyglactin 910 mesh (augmented group). The animals were sacrificed for biomechanical testing at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 weeks, respectively, after the operation. The stiffness of reconstructed ACL in the augmented group showed a mean of 26.58 +/- 5.78 N/mm at 8 weeks, and that of the non-augmented group 16.47 +/- 11.34 N/mm. There were significant differences between the augmented and non-augmented groups (p < 0.05). The ultimate load and energy of the reconstructed ACL were also significantly higher in the augmented group than in the non-augmented group at 8 weeks. The mean elastic module was higher in the augmented than in the non-augmented group, but the differences were not significant. The mean tan delta of both groups was significantly higher than that of the normal ACL at 24 weeks. These results suggests that polyglactin 910 mesh induces earlier maturation of transplanted patella tendons biomechanically, and may be a useful material for ACL reconstruction. PMID:9656706

  16. Electrochemical reactions of layered niobate material as novel anode for sodium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Hideki; Nose, Masafumi; Nakanishi, Shinji; Iba, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The electrochemical performances of layered niobium oxide materials were investigated for the first time as novel anode active materials for the sodium-ion battery. The layered niobate with the formula KNb3O8 was synthesized by a solid-state reaction and has been evaluated as an anode electrode by a cyclic voltammetry technique and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests. The crystal structure of KNb3O8 contains the NbO6 octahedral units and potassium alkali-metal ions interlayer to form the layered structure. KNb3O8 has a redox reaction around 1 V vs. Na/Na+ and has a reversible capacity of 104 mAh/g corresponding to the 1.7 Na+ insertion/extraction in the KNb3O8 structure. The Nb K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) shows that the Nb oxidation state is converted from Nb5+ to Nb4+ during the Na+ insertion stage, and reversibly recovered to Nb5+ during the Na+ extraction stage. This is the first report that the layered niobate of KNb3O8 reversibly reacts with Na+ at the potential around 1 V vs. Na/Na+ via the Nb5+/4+ redox reaction.

  17. Optical fiber sensor layer embedded in smart composite material and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiao Wen; Liang, Da Kai; Li, Dongsheng

    2006-10-01

    A composite structure health monitoring system with optical fiber sensors is an important development in smart materials and structures. But it is difficult to embed a network of distributed optical fiber sensors in a smart composite structure, and the most effective method would be integrating the network of sensors with the polyimide film as a layer, called the optical fiber sensor layer, and then embedding the layer with optical fiber sensors in the composite material. This paper introduces three methods of making a distributed optical fiber sensor layer with polyimide. The first is to sandwich optical fiber sensors in two polyimide films. The second is to deposit the network of sensors in polyimide solution, and dry the polyimide solution. The last is to build thin-film optical waveguides and optical sensors by using fluorinated polyimide, which is expected to have high integration and high reliability. Some tests indicate that there is a little influence on the mechanical performance of the structure; however, optical fiber sensor built-in polyimide films work very well.

  18. Extremely Efficient Liquid Exfoliation and Dispersion of Layered Materials by Unusual Acoustic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Joong Tark; Jang, Jeong In; Kim, Haena; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Yoo, Hyung Keun; Woo, Jong Seok; Choi, Sua; Kim, Ho Young; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Cho, Kilwon; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2014-01-01

    Layered materials must be exfoliated and dispersed in solvents for diverse applications. Usually, highly energetic probe sonication may be considered to be an unfavourable method for the less defective exfoliation and dispersion of layered materials. Here we show that judicious use of ultrasonic cavitation can produce exfoliated transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets extraordinarily dispersed in non-toxic solvent by minimising the sonolysis of solvent molecules. Our method can also lead to produce less defective, large graphene oxide nanosheets from graphite oxide in a short time (within 10 min), which show high electrical conductivity (>20,000 S m−1) of the printed film. This was achieved by adjusting the ultrasonic probe depth to the liquid surface to generate less energetic cavitation (delivered power ~6 W), while maintaining sufficient acoustic shearing (0.73 m s−1) and generating additional microbubbling by aeration at the liquid surface. PMID:24875584

  19. New layered metal oxides as positive electrode materials for room-temperature sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lin-Qin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Quan

    2015-03-01

    In order to achieve better Na storage performance, most layered oxide positive electrode materials contain toxic and expensive transition metals Ni and/or Co, which are also widely used for lithium-ion batteries. Here we report a new quaternary layered oxide consisting of Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ti transition metals with O3-type oxygen stacking as a positive electrode for room-temperature sodium-ion batteries. The material can be simply prepared by a high-temperature solid-state reaction route and delivers a reversible capacity of 94 mAh/g with an average storage voltage of 3.2 V. This paves the way for cheaper and non-toxic batteries with high Na storage performance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51222210 and 11234013) and the One Hundred Talent Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Extremely Efficient Liquid Exfoliation and Dispersion of Layered Materials by Unusual Acoustic Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Joong Tark; Jang, Jeong In; Kim, Haena; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Yoo, Hyung Keun; Woo, Jong Seok; Choi, Sua; Kim, Ho Young; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Cho, Kilwon; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2014-05-01

    Layered materials must be exfoliated and dispersed in solvents for diverse applications. Usually, highly energetic probe sonication may be considered to be an unfavourable method for the less defective exfoliation and dispersion of layered materials. Here we show that judicious use of ultrasonic cavitation can produce exfoliated transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets extraordinarily dispersed in non-toxic solvent by minimising the sonolysis of solvent molecules. Our method can also lead to produce less defective, large graphene oxide nanosheets from graphite oxide in a short time (within 10 min), which show high electrical conductivity (>20,000 S m-1) of the printed film. This was achieved by adjusting the ultrasonic probe depth to the liquid surface to generate less energetic cavitation (delivered power ~6 W), while maintaining sufficient acoustic shearing (0.73 m s-1) and generating additional microbubbling by aeration at the liquid surface.

  1. Sound transmission through double cylindrical shells lined with porous material under turbulent boundary layer excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Bhaskar, Atul; Zhang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shell lined with poroelastic material in the core, excited by pressure fluctuations due to the exterior turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Biot's model is used to describe the sound wave propagating in the porous material. Three types of constructions, bonded-bonded, bonded-unbonded and unbonded-unbonded, are considered in this study. The power spectral density (PSD) of the inner shell kinetic energy is predicted for two turbulent boundary layer models, different air gap depths and three types of polyimide foams, respectively. The peaks of the inner shell kinetic energy due to shell resonance, hydrodynamic coincidence and acoustic coincidence are discussed. The results show that if the frequency band over the ring frequency is of interest, an air gap, even if very thin, should exist between the two elastic shells for better sound insulation. And if small density foam has a high flow resistance, a superior sound insulation can still be maintained.

  2. Near-infrared spectroscopy of the adult head: effect of scattering and absorbing obstructions in the cerebrospinal fluid layer on light distribution in the tissue.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, H; Delpy, D T

    2000-09-01

    Previous modeling of near-infrared (NIR) light distribution in models of the adult head incorporating a clear nonscattering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer have shown the latter to have a profound effect on the resulting photon measurement density function (PMDF). In particular, the presence of the CSF limits the PMDF largely to the outer cortical gray matter with little signal contribution from the deeper white matter. In practice, the CSF is not a simple unobstructed clear layer but contains light-scattering membranes and is crossed by various blood vessels. Using a radiosity-diffusion finite-element model, we investigated the effect on the PMDF of introducing intrusions within the clear layer. The results show that the presence of such obstructions does not significantly increase the light penetration into the brain tissue, except immediately adjacent to the obstruction and that its presence also increases the light sampling of the adjacent skull tissues, which would lead to additional contamination of the NIR spectroscopy signal by the surface tissue layers. PMID:18350064

  3. Single-Layered Hittorf's Phosphorus: A Wide-Bandgap High Mobility 2D Material.

    PubMed

    Schusteritsch, Georg; Uhrin, Martin; Pickard, Chris J

    2016-05-11

    We propose here a two-dimensional material based on a single layer of violet or Hittorf's phosphorus. Using first-principles density functional theory, we find it to be energetically very stable, comparable to other previously proposed single-layered phosphorus structures. It requires only a small energetic cost of approximately 0.04 eV/atom to be created from its bulk structure, Hittorf's phosphorus, or a binding energy of 0.3-0.4 J/m(2) per layer, suggesting the possibility of exfoliation in experiments. We find single-layered Hittorf's phosphorus to be a wide band gap semiconductor with a direct band gap of approximately 2.5 eV, and our calculations show it is expected to have a high and highly anisotropic hole mobility with an upper bound lying between 3000-7000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). These combined properties make single-layered Hittorf's phosphorus a very good candidate for future applications in a wide variety of technologies, in particular for high frequency electronics, and optoelectronic devices operating in the low wavelength blue color range. PMID:27110837

  4. Single-Layered Hittorf's Phosphorus: A Wide-Bandgap High Mobility 2D Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schusteritsch, Georg; Uhrin, Martin; Pickard, Chris J.

    2016-05-01

    We propose here a two-dimensional material based on a single layer of violet or Hittorf's phosphorus. Using first-principles density functional theory, we find it to be energetically very stable, comparable to other previously proposed single-layered phosphorus structures. It requires only a small energetic cost of approximately $0.04~\\text{eV/atom}$ to be created from its bulk structure, Hittorf's phosphorus, or a binding energy of $0.3-0.4~\\text{J/m}^2$ per layer, suggesting the possibility of exfoliation in experiments. We find single-layered Hittorf's phosphorus to be a wide band gap semiconductor with a direct band gap of approximately $2.5$~eV and our calculations show it is expected to have a high and highly anisotropic hole mobility with an upper bound lying between $3000-7000$~cm$^2$V$^{-1}$s$^{-1}$. These combined properties make single-layered Hittorf's phosphorus a very good candidate for future applications in a wide variety of technologies, in particular for high frequency electronics, and optoelectronic devices operating in the low wavelength blue color range.

  5. Layer-dependent wall properties of abdominal aortic aneurysms: Experimental study and material characterization.

    PubMed

    Sassani, Sophia G; Kakisis, John; Tsangaris, Sokrates; Sokolis, Dimitrios P

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical testing and in-depth characterization of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall from fifteen patients undergoing open surgery was performed to establish the layer-dependent tissue properties that are non-available in the literature. Quantitative microscopic evaluation was performed to identify the spatial organization of collagen-fiber network. Among a number of candidate models, the four-fiber family (microstructure-motivated) model, especially that including dispersions of fiber angles about the main directions, was superior to the Fung- and Gasser-type models in the fitting quality allowed, though it presented a practical difficulty in parameter estimation, so that an analysis was conducted aiding the identification of a more specific diagonal- and circumferential-fiber family model for all three layers. The adventitia was stiffer and stronger than the other layers, owing to its increased collagen content, and its contribution to the response of the intact wall was augmented being under greater residual tension than the media, whereas the intima was under residual compression. All layers were stiffer circumferentially than longitudinally, due to preferential collagen arrangement along that axis. The histologically-guided material characterization of layered wall presented herein is expected to assist clinical decision, by developing reliable criteria to predict the rupture risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms, and optimize endovascular interventions. PMID:26011656

  6. Review on the Raman spectroscopy of different types of layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Tan, Qing-Hai; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Shi, Wei; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional layered materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have been under intensive investigation. The rapid progress of research on graphene and TMDs is now stimulating the exploration of different types of layered materials (LMs). Raman spectroscopy has shown its great potential in the characterization of layer numbers, interlayer coupling and layer-stacking configurations and will benefit the future explorations of other LMs. Lattice vibrations or Raman spectra of many LMs in bulk have been discussed since the 1960s. However, different results were obtained because of differences or limitations in the Raman instruments at early stages. The developments of modern Raman spectroscopy now allow us to revisit the Raman spectra of these LMs under the same experimental conditions. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, there were limitations in detailed reviews on the Raman spectra of these different LMs. Here, we provide a review on Raman spectra of various LMs, including semiconductors, topological insulators, insulators, semi-metals and superconductors. We firstly introduce a unified method based on symmetry analysis and polarization measurements to assign the observed Raman modes and characterize the crystal structure of different types of LMs. Then, we revisit and update the positions and assignments of vibration modes by re-measuring the Raman spectra of different types of LMs and by comparing our results to those reported in previous papers. We apply the recent advances on the interlayer vibrations of graphene and TMDs to these various LMs and obtain their shear modulus. The observation of the shear modes of LMs in bulk facilitates an accurate and fast characterization of layer numbers during preparation processes in the future by a robust layer-number dependency on the frequencies of the shear modes. We also summarize the recent advances on the layer-stacking dependence on the intensities of interlayer shear vibrations

  7. Analysis of Counterfeit Coated Tablets and Multi-Layer Packaging Materials Using Infrared Microspectroscopic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Winner, Taryn L; Lanzarotta, Adam; Sommer, André J

    2016-06-01

    An effective method for detecting and characterizing counterfeit finished dosage forms and packaging materials is described in this study. Using attenuated total internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging, suspect tablet coating and core formulations as well as multi-layered foil safety seals, bottle labels, and cigarette tear tapes were analyzed and compared directly with those of a stored authentic product. The approach was effective for obtaining molecular information from structures as small as 6 μm. PMID:27068491

  8. Absorber coatings' degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report is intended to document some of the Los Alamos efforts that have been carried out under the Department of Energy (DOE) Active Heating and Cooling Materials Reliability, Maintainability, and Exposure Testing program. Funding for these activities is obtained directly from DOE although they represent a variety of projects and coordination with other agencies. Major limitations to the use of solar energy are the uncertain reliability and lifetimes of solar systems. This program is aimed at determining material operating limitations, durabilities, and failure modes such that materials improvements can be made and lifetimes can be extended. Although many active and passive materials and systems are being studied at Los Alamos, this paper will concentrate on absorber coatings and degradation of these coatings.

  9. Preparation of thin layer materials with macroporous microstructure for SOFC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-López, D.; Ruiz-Morales, J. C.; Peña-Martínez, J.; Canales-Vázquez, J.; Núñez, P.

    2008-04-01

    A facile and versatile method using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres as pore formers has been developed to prepare thin layer oxide materials with controlled macroporous microstructure. Several mixed oxides with fluorite and perovskite-type structures, i.e. doped zirconia, ceria, ferrites, manganites, and NiO-YSZ composites have been prepared and characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry. The synthesised materials are nanocrystalline and present a homogeneous pore distribution and relatively high specific surface area, which makes them interesting for SOFC and catalysis applications in the intermediate temperature range.

  10. Hybrid organic inorganic materials: Layered hydroxy double salts intercalated with substituted thiophene monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronto, Jairo; Leroux, Fabrice; Dubois, Marc; Taviot-Gueho, Christine; Valim, João Barros

    2006-05-01

    The present paper describes the synthesis and characterization of Layered Hydroxy Double Salts (HDSs) containing substituted thiophene anions (2-thiophenecarboxylate, 3-thiophenecarboxylate, and 3-thiopheneacetate). The HDSs host was synthesized via hydrothermal method and the organic anions were incorporated between the sheets by anion-exchange reaction. The materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal gravimetric (TG) analysis and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. For the 2D-hybrid materials, the basal spacing is found to be consistent with the formation of bilayers of the intercalated organic monomers. For the hybrid material formed after intercalation of 3-thiopheneacetate anion, the ESR signals suggest that the monomers connect each other directly forming small oligomers, whereas this process is not occurring for the two other monomers presenting short alkyl chain. The TG analyses show different stages of thermal decomposition between HDSs host and 2D-hybrid materials, underlining the enhanced thermal stability of the hybrid assembly.

  11. [Abrasion resistance of dental materials. 3. Surface quality study of Evicrol by wear measurements at different layer depths].

    PubMed

    Tappe, A; Eichhorn, T

    1980-04-01

    Abrasion determinations in various layer depths showed that the layer of the filling material Evicrol directly under the matrix-hardened surface is more abrasion-resistant than the matrix- hardened surface. From this it is concluded that it is good practice to overfill in making restorations of Evicrol and to remove a certain layer of material (approximately 0.25 mm, according to Fraunhofer). PMID:6935842

  12. Atomically thin two-dimensional materials as hole extraction layers in organolead halide perovskite photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yu Geun; Kwon, Ki Chang; Le, Quyet Van; Hong, Kootak; Jang, Ho Won; Kim, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Atomically thin two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and graphene oxide (GO) are used as hole extraction layers (HEL) in organolead halide perovskites solar cells (PSCs) instead of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HEL. MoS2 and WS2 layers with a polycrystalline structure were synthesized by a chemical deposition method using a uniformly spin-coated (NH4)MoS4 and (NH4)WS4 precursor solution. GO was synthesized by the oxidation of natural graphite powder using Hummers' method. The work functions of MoS2, WS2, and GO are measured to be 5.0, 4.95, and 5.1 eV, respectively. The X-ray diffraction spectrum indicated that the synthesized perovskite material is CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. The PSCs with the p-n junction structure were fabricated based on the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite layer. The power conversion efficiencies of the MoS2, WS2, and GO-based PSCs were 9.53%, 8.02%, and 9.62%, respectively, which are comparable to those obtained from PEDOT:PSS-based devices (9.93%). These results suggest that two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and GO can be promising candidates for the formation of HELs in the PSCs.

  13. Structural investigation and microwave characteristics of (Ba0.2La0.8)Fe0.2Mn0.4Ti0.4O3 absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaf, Azwar; Adi, Wisnu Ari

    2014-03-01

    Synthesis and characterization of (Ba0.2La0.8)Fe0.2Mn0.4Ti0.4O3 absorbing material by mechanical alloying process has been performed. The absorbing material was prepared by oxide materials, namely BaCO3, La2O3, TiO2, Fe2O3, and MnCO3. The mixture was milled for 10 h and then sintered at a temperature of 1000 ° C for 10 h. The refinement results of x-ray diffraction pattern of lanthanum manganite substituted with barium showed that the sample consisted of two phases, namely, La0.9125MnO3 phase which has a structure monoclinic (I12/a1) with lattice parameters a = 5.527(1) Å, b = 5.572(1) Å and c = 7.810(1) Å, α = γ = 90° and β = 89.88(5)°, the unit cell volume of V = 240.57(8) Å3, and the atomic density of ρ = 6.238 gr.cm-3. The microstructure analyses showed that the particle shapes was polygonal with the varied particle sizes of 1 ˜ 3 μm distributed homogeneously on the surface of the samples. The results of the electromagnetic wave absorption curve analysis by using a vector network analyzer (VNA) showed that the sample can absorb microwaves in the frequency range of 8-15 GHz with a very wide absorption bandwidth. It indicates that the as prepared absorber presents potential absorbing property in X and Ku-band. We concluded that the (Ba0.2La0.8)Fe0.2Mn0.4Ti0.4O3 material can be applied as a candidate absorber material of microwaves or electromagnetic wave.

  14. Thermal conversion of an Fe3O4@metal-organic framework: a new method for an efficient Fe-Co/nanoporous carbon microwave absorbing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingmiao; Ji, Guangbin; Liu, Wei; Quan, Bin; Liang, Xiaohui; Shang, Chaomei; Cheng, Yan; Du, Youwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel FeCo nanoparticle embedded nanoporous carbon composite (Fe-Co/NPC) was synthesized via in situ carbonization of dehydro-ascorbic acid (DHAA) coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulated in a metal-organic framework (zeolitic imidazolate framework-67, ZIF-67). The molar ratio of Fe/Co significantly depends on the encapsulated content of Fe3O4 in ZIF-67. The composites filled with 50 wt% of the Fe-Co/NPC-2.0 samples in paraffin show a maximum reflection loss (RL) of -21.7 dB at a thickness of 1.2 mm; in addition, a broad absorption bandwidth for RL < -10 dB which covers from 12.2 to 18 GHz can be obtained, and its minimum reflection loss and bandwidth (RL values exceeding -10 dB) are far greater than those of commercial carbonyl iron powder under a very low thickness (1-1.5 mm). This study not only provides a good reference for future preparation of carbon-based lightweight microwave absorbing materials but also broadens the application of such kinds of metal-organic frameworks.A novel FeCo nanoparticle embedded nanoporous carbon composite (Fe-Co/NPC) was synthesized via in situ carbonization of dehydro-ascorbic acid (DHAA) coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulated in a metal-organic framework (zeolitic imidazolate framework-67, ZIF-67). The molar ratio of Fe/Co significantly depends on the encapsulated content of Fe3O4 in ZIF-67. The composites filled with 50 wt% of the Fe-Co/NPC-2.0 samples in paraffin show a maximum reflection loss (RL) of -21.7 dB at a thickness of 1.2 mm; in addition, a broad absorption bandwidth for RL < -10 dB which covers from 12.2 to 18 GHz can be obtained, and its minimum reflection loss and bandwidth (RL values exceeding -10 dB) are far greater than those of commercial carbonyl iron powder under a very low thickness (1-1.5 mm). This study not only provides a good reference for future preparation of carbon-based lightweight microwave absorbing materials but also broadens the application of such kinds of metal-organic frameworks. Electronic

  15. Hyperuniformity of critical absorbing states.

    PubMed

    Hexner, Daniel; Levine, Dov

    2015-03-20

    The properties of the absorbing states of nonequilibrium models belonging to the conserved directed percolation universality class are studied. We find that, at the critical point, the absorbing states are hyperuniform, exhibiting anomalously small density fluctuations. The exponent characterizing the fluctuations is measured numerically, a scaling relation to other known exponents is suggested, and a new correlation length relating to this ordering is proposed. These results may have relevance to photonic band-gap materials. PMID:25839254

  16. Hyperuniformity of Critical Absorbing States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexner, Daniel; Levine, Dov

    2015-03-01

    The properties of the absorbing states of nonequilibrium models belonging to the conserved directed percolation universality class are studied. We find that, at the critical point, the absorbing states are hyperuniform, exhibiting anomalously small density fluctuations. The exponent characterizing the fluctuations is measured numerically, a scaling relation to other known exponents is suggested, and a new correlation length relating to this ordering is proposed. These results may have relevance to photonic band-gap materials.

  17. Broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber using a phase-change metamaterial at visible frequencies.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chen-wei; Simpson, Robert E; Zhang, Lei; Cryan, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    We report a broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber with wide-angle near unity absorbance in the visible regime. Our structure is composed of an array of thin Au squares separated from a continuous Au film by a phase change material (Ge2Sb2Te5) layer. It shows that the near perfect absorbance is flat and broad over a wide-angle incidence up to 80° for either transverse electric or magnetic polarization due to a high imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of Ge2Sb2Te5. The electric field, magnetic field and current distributions in the absorber are investigated to explain the physical origin of the absorbance. Moreover, we carried out numerical simulations to investigate the temporal variation of temperature in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer and to show that the temperature of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 can be raised from room temperature to > 433 K (amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition temperature) in just 0.37 ns with a low light intensity of 95 nW/μm(2), owing to the enhanced broadband light absorbance through strong plasmonic resonances in the absorber. The proposed phase-change metamaterial provides a simple way to realize a broadband perfect absorber in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions and is important for a number of applications including thermally controlled photonic devices, solar energy conversion and optical data storage. PMID:24492415

  18. Broadband Polarization-Independent Perfect Absorber Using a Phase-Change Metamaterial at Visible Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chen-wei; Simpson, Robert E.; Zhang, Lei; Cryan, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber with wide-angle near unity absorbance in the visible regime. Our structure is composed of an array of thin Au squares separated from a continuous Au film by a phase change material (Ge2Sb2Te5) layer. It shows that the near perfect absorbance is flat and broad over a wide-angle incidence up to 80° for either transverse electric or magnetic polarization due to a high imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of Ge2Sb2Te5. The electric field, magnetic field and current distributions in the absorber are investigated to explain the physical origin of the absorbance. Moreover, we carried out numerical simulations to investigate the temporal variation of temperature in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer and to show that the temperature of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 can be raised from room temperature to > 433 K (amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition temperature) in just 0.37 ns with a low light intensity of 95 nW/μm2, owing to the enhanced broadband light absorbance through strong plasmonic resonances in the absorber. The proposed phase-change metamaterial provides a simple way to realize a broadband perfect absorber in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions and is important for a number of applications including thermally controlled photonic devices, solar energy conversion and optical data storage. PMID:24492415

  19. New Material Development for Surface Layer and Surface Technology in Tribology Science to Improve Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, R.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Jamari, Jamari; Schipper, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the development of new material and surface technology in tribology and its contribution to energy efficiency. Two examples of the economic benefits, resulted from the optimum tribology in the transportation sector and the manufacturing industry are discussed. The new materials are proposed to modify the surface property by laminating the bulk material with thin layer/coating. Under a suitable condition, the thin layer on a surface can provide a combination of good wear, a low friction and corrosion resistance for the mechanical components. The innovation in layer technology results molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), diamond like carbon (DLC), cubic boron nitride (CBN) and diamond which perform satisfactory outcome. The application of the metallic coatings to carbon fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) has the capacity to provide considerable weight and power savings for many engineering components. The green material for lubricant and additives such as the use of sunflower oil which possesses good oxidation resistance and the use of mallee leaves as bio-degradable solvent are used to answer the demand of the environmentally friendly material with good performance. The tribology research implementation for energy efficiency also touches the simple things around us such as: erasing the laser-print in a paper with different abrasion techniques. For the technology in the engineering surface, the consideration for generating the suitable surface of the components in running-in period has been discussed in order to prolong the components life and reduce the machine downtime. The conclusion, tribology can result in reducing manufacturing time, reducing the maintenance requirements, prolonging the service interval, improving durability, reliability and mechanical components life, and reducing harmful exhaust emission and waste. All of these advantages will increase the energy efficiency and the economic benefits.

  20. Study of the interaction mechanisms between absorbed NO{sub 2} and por-Si/SnO{sub x} nanocomposite layers

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotov, V. V.; Kan, V. E. Makushenko, R. K.; Biryukov, M. Yu.; Ivlev, K. E.; Roslikov, V. E.

    2013-10-15

    The interaction mechanisms between NO{sub 2} molecules and the surface of por-Si/SnO{sub x} nanocomposites obtained by magnetron deposition and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance methods. The observed increase in the free carrier concentration in the por-Si/SnO{sub x} nanocomposite layers is explained by a change in the charge state of P{sub b} centers due to the formation of neutral 'surface defect-adsorbed NO{sub 2} molecule' complexes with free carrier generation in the crystallite bulk. In the nanocomposite layers grown by the CVD method, the increase in the free hole concentration during NO{sub 2} adsorption is much less pronounced in comparison with the composite grown by magnetron deposition, which is caused by the competing interaction channel of NO{sub 2} molecules with electrically neutral P{sub b} centers.

  1. Structural factors affecting lithium transport in lithium-excess layered cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fell, Christopher R.

    Lithium ion batteries have drawn significant attention as the principle energy storage device powering today's mobile electronic equipment. Despite the increased usage, the performance of current lithium ion battery technology falls short of the requirements needed for large format applications such as electric vehicles. The layered lithium-excess oxide compounds Li[NixLi1/3-2x/3Mn2/3-x/3]O2 are of interest as a new generation of cathode materials for high energy density lithium ion batteries. Efforts to achieve a better understanding of the electrochemistry of lithium-excess materials require the connection of crystal structure to electrochemical properties. In this dissertation, a combination of advanced characterization techniques was used as a tool to understand the intercalation mechanism of the layered lithium-excess transition metal oxide Li[NixLi1/3-2x/3Mn 2/3-x/3]O2. The research identified that synthesis influences the structure of the material specifically the surface of the particles. The formation of a hydroxide rich surface film decreases the electrochemical performance. Post synthesis modifications including high pressure and high temperature leads to the formation of a second layered phase in the bulk; however, the treated samples display good electrochemical properties. This result underlines the flexibility of the structure of Li[NixLi1/3-2x/3Mn 2/3-x/3]O2, a feature uncommon to other layered transition metal oxides. Surface characterization of the layered lithium-excess cathodes following electrochemical cycling revealed the formation of a new surface phase 1 to 5 nm thick as well as insight to the complex cation rearrangement process and phase transformation. This part of the research identified that significant changes occurred during electrochemical cycling; however did not identify when the transformations occurred. Investigation using in situ techniques during the first electrochemical cycle shows that the structure undergoes irreversible

  2. Stimuli-responsive hybrid materials: breathing in magnetic layered double hydroxides induced by a thermoresponsive molecule

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abellán, Gonzalo; Jordá, Jose Luis; Atienzar, Pedro; Varela, María; Jaafar, Miriam; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix; Ribera, Antonio; García, Hermenegildo; Coronado, Eugenio

    2014-12-04

    In this study, a hybrid magnetic multilayer material of micrometric size, with highly crystalline hexagonal crystals consisting of CoAl–LDH ferromagnetic layers intercalated with thermoresponsive 4-(4 anilinophenylazo)benzenesulfonate (AO5) molecules diluted (ratio 9 : 1) with a flexible sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been obtained. The resulting material exhibits thermochromism attributable to the isomerization between the azo (prevalent at room temperature) and the hydrazone (favoured at higher temperatures) tautomers, leading to a thermomechanical response. In fact, these crystals exhibited thermally induced motion triggering remarkable changes in the crystal morphology and volume. In situ variable temperature XRD of these thin hybrids shows thatmore » the reversible change into the two tautomers is reflected in a shift of the position of the diffraction peaks at high temperatures towards lower interlayer spacing for the hydrazone form, as well as a broadening of the peaks reflecting lower crystallinity and ordering due to non-uniform spacing between the layers. These structural variations between room temperature (basal spacing (BS) = 25.91 Å) and 100 °C (BS = 25.05 Å) are also reflected in the magnetic properties of the layered double hydroxide (LDH) due to the variation of the magnetic coupling between the layers. Finally and in conclusion, our study constitutes one of the few examples showing fully reversible thermo-responsive breathing in a 2D hybrid material. In addition, the magnetic response of the hybrid can be modulated due to the thermotropism of the organic component that, by influencing the distance and in-plane correlation of the inorganic LDH, modulates the magnetism of the CoAl–LDH sheets in a certain range.« less

  3. Stimuli-responsive hybrid materials: breathing in magnetic layered double hydroxides induced by a thermoresponsive molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Abellán, Gonzalo; Jordá, Jose Luis; Atienzar, Pedro; Varela, María; Jaafar, Miriam; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix; Ribera, Antonio; García, Hermenegildo; Coronado, Eugenio

    2014-12-04

    In this study, a hybrid magnetic multilayer material of micrometric size, with highly crystalline hexagonal crystals consisting of CoAl–LDH ferromagnetic layers intercalated with thermoresponsive 4-(4 anilinophenylazo)benzenesulfonate (AO5) molecules diluted (ratio 9 : 1) with a flexible sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been obtained. The resulting material exhibits thermochromism attributable to the isomerization between the azo (prevalent at room temperature) and the hydrazone (favoured at higher temperatures) tautomers, leading to a thermomechanical response. In fact, these crystals exhibited thermally induced motion triggering remarkable changes in the crystal morphology and volume. In situ variable temperature XRD of these thin hybrids shows that the reversible change into the two tautomers is reflected in a shift of the position of the diffraction peaks at high temperatures towards lower interlayer spacing for the hydrazone form, as well as a broadening of the peaks reflecting lower crystallinity and ordering due to non-uniform spacing between the layers. These structural variations between room temperature (basal spacing (BS) = 25.91 Å) and 100 °C (BS = 25.05 Å) are also reflected in the magnetic properties of the layered double hydroxide (LDH) due to the variation of the magnetic coupling between the layers. Finally and in conclusion, our study constitutes one of the few examples showing fully reversible thermo-responsive breathing in a 2D hybrid material. In addition, the magnetic response of the hybrid can be modulated due to the thermotropism of the organic component that, by influencing the distance and in-plane correlation of the inorganic LDH, modulates the magnetism of the CoAl–LDH sheets in a certain range.

  4. Strengthening of polymer ordered porous materials based on a layered nanocomposite internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Liping; Guo, Xieyou; Guo, Tianqi; Wang, Bin; Jiang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Ordered porous polymeric films attract more and more attention because they have many advantages and broad application prospects in many fields. But because of their large flexibility and poor mechanical properties, some of the scope for application is greatly limited. Inspired by the ordered pore structure of the honeycomb and the layered structure of natural nacre, we prepared an ordered porous polymer film with a layered structure in the pore wall by the solvent-evaporation-restriction assisted hard template method. Compared with other samples, this kind of film with the layered structure showed both excellent mechanical properties and good stability. This kind of film with high mechanical strength, is considered to have wide applications in the areas of separation, biomedicine, precision instruments, aerospace, environmental protection and so on.Ordered porous polymeric films attract more and more attention because they have many advantages and broad application prospects in many fields. But because of their large flexibility and poor mechanical properties, some of the scope for application is greatly limited. Inspired by the ordered pore structure of the honeycomb and the layered structure of natural nacre, we prepared an ordered porous polymer film with a layered structure in the pore wall by the solvent-evaporation-restriction assisted hard template method. Compared with other samples, this kind of film with the layered structure showed both excellent mechanical properties and good stability. This kind of film with high mechanical strength, is considered to have wide applications in the areas of separation, biomedicine, precision instruments, aerospace, environmental protection and so on. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM image of hexagonal silicon pillar templates, AFM images of clay platelets on a silicon substrate, photographs of free-standing gels, X-ray diffraction profiles for dried materials, FTIR and TGA of the samples, and

  5. Thermal conversion of an Fe₃O₄@metal-organic framework: a new method for an efficient Fe-Co/nanoporous carbon microwave absorbing material.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingmiao; Ji, Guangbin; Liu, Wei; Quan, Bin; Liang, Xiaohui; Shang, Chaomei; Cheng, Yan; Du, Youwei

    2015-08-14

    A novel FeCo nanoparticle embedded nanoporous carbon composite (Fe-Co/NPC) was synthesized via in situ carbonization of dehydro-ascorbic acid (DHAA) coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulated in a metal-organic framework (zeolitic imidazolate framework-67, ZIF-67). The molar ratio of Fe/Co significantly depends on the encapsulated content of Fe3O4 in ZIF-67. The composites filled with 50 wt% of the Fe-Co/NPC-2.0 samples in paraffin show a maximum reflection loss (RL) of -21.7 dB at a thickness of 1.2 mm; in addition, a broad absorption bandwidth for RL < -10 dB which covers from 12.2 to 18 GHz can be obtained, and its minimum reflection loss and bandwidth (RL values exceeding -10 dB) are far greater than those of commercial carbonyl iron powder under a very low thickness (1-1.5 mm). This study not only provides a good reference for future preparation of carbon-based lightweight microwave absorbing materials but also broadens the application of such kinds of metal-organic frameworks. PMID:26167763

  6. Truly Absorbed Microbial Protein Synthesis, Rumen Bypass Protein, Endogenous Protein, and Total Metabolizable Protein from Starchy and Protein-Rich Raw Materials: Model Comparison and Predictions.

    PubMed

    Parand, Ehsan; Vakili, Alireza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; van Duinkerken, Gert; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-07-29

    This study was carried out to measure truly absorbed microbial protein synthesis, rumen bypass protein, and endogenous protein loss, as well as total metabolizable protein, from starchy and protein-rich raw feed materials with model comparisons. Predictions by the DVE2010 system as a more mechanistic model were compared with those of two other models, DVE1994 and NRC-2001, that are frequently used in common international feeding practice. DVE1994 predictions for intestinally digestible rumen undegradable protein (ARUP) for starchy concentrates were higher (27 vs 18 g/kg DM, p < 0.05, SEM = 1.2) than predictions by the NRC-2001, whereas there was no difference in predictions for ARUP from protein concentrates among the three models. DVE2010 and NRC-2001 had highest estimations of intestinally digestible microbial protein for starchy (92 g/kg DM in DVE2010 vs 46 g/kg DM in NRC-2001 and 67 g/kg DM in DVE1994, p < 0.05 SEM = 4) and protein concentrates (69 g/kg DM in NRC-2001 vs 31 g/kg DM in DVE1994 and 49 g/kg DM in DVE2010, p < 0.05 SEM = 4), respectively. Potential protein supplies predicted by tested models from starchy and protein concentrates are widely different, and comparable direct measurements are needed to evaluate the actual ability of different models to predict the potential protein supply to dairy cows from different feedstuffs. PMID:26118653

  7. Optimization of X-ray Absorbers for TES Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, Naoko; Sadleir, John E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Saab, Tarek; Bandler, Simon; Kilbourne, Caroline; Chervenak, James; Talley, Dorothy; Finkbeiner, Fred; Brekosky, Regis

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal, electrical, and structural properties of Bi and BiCu films that are being developed as X-ray absorbers for transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter arrays for imaging X-ray spectroscopy. Bi could be an ideal material for an X-ray absorber due to its high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity, but it has a low thermal conductivity, which can result in position dependence of the pulses in the absorber. In order to improve the thermal conductivity, we added Cu layers in between the Bi layers. We measured electrical and thermal conductivities of the films around 0.1 K(sub 1) the operating temperature of the TES calorimeter, to examine the films and to determine the optimal thickness of the Cu layer. From the electrical conductivity measurements, we found that the Cu is more resistive on the Bi than on a Si substrate. Together with an SEM picture of the Bi surface, we concluded that the rough surface of the Bi film makes the Cu layer resistive when the Cu layer is not thick enough t o fill in the roughness. From the thermal conductivity measurements, we determined the thermal diffusion constant to be 2 x l0(exp 3) micrometers squared per microsecond in a film that consists of 2.25 micrometers of Bi and 0.1 micrometers of Cu. We measured the position dependence in the film and found that its thermal diffusion constant is too low to get good energy resolution, because of the resistive Cu layer and/or possibly a very high heat capacity of our Bi films. We show plans to improve the thermal diffusion constant in our BiCu absorbers.

  8. Large-Area Quality Control of Atomically-Thin Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, Craig Merten

    Fast progress in chemical vapor deposition of graphene and other quasi-two-dimensional layered materials such as topological insulators call for development of a reliable high-throughput method of layered materials identification and quality control. The number of atomic planes in graphene or other ultra-thin films has to be determined very fast and over large wafer-scale areas. The previously existed methods of accurate counting of the number of atomic planes in few-layer graphene were primarily based on micro-Raman spectroscopy. These methods were local, slow, and could not be scaled up to characterize the whole wafers. In this dissertation research I proposed and developed an automatic approach for graphene inspection over the wafer-size areas. The proposed method can be scaled up for industrial use. It is based on the image processing analysis of the pseudo-color contrasts uniquely assigned to each few-layer graphene region characterized by a specific number of atomic planes. The initial calibration of the technique is performed with the help of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The image processing is also used to account for the lighting non-uniformity of the samples. Implementation of the technique developed in this dissertation research reduces the cost and time required for graphene identification and quality assessment, and can become the next major impetus for practical applications of graphene, few-layer graphene and other atomically-thin films. The technique was tested on mechanically exfoliated graphene and then extended to the chemical-vapor-deposited graphene, and to bismuth telluride topological insulator thin films. The second part of the dissertation research deals with development of the electrostatic transfer process. The investigated approach allows one to transfer the patterned few-layer graphene films controllably to Si3N4 substrates compatible with other materials. The large-area quality control and graphene transfer techniques developed in this

  9. Review on the Raman spectroscopy of different types of layered materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Tan, Qing-Hai; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Shi, Wei; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-03-28

    Two-dimensional layered materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have been under intensive investigation. The rapid progress of research on graphene and TMDs is now stimulating the exploration of different types of layered materials (LMs). Raman spectroscopy has shown its great potential in the characterization of layer numbers, interlayer coupling and layer-stacking configurations and will benefit the future explorations of other LMs. Lattice vibrations or Raman spectra of many LMs in bulk have been discussed since the 1960s. However, different results were obtained because of differences or limitations in the Raman instruments at early stages. The developments of modern Raman spectroscopy now allow us to revisit the Raman spectra of these LMs under the same experimental conditions. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, there were limitations in detailed reviews on the Raman spectra of these different LMs. Here, we provide a review on Raman spectra of various LMs, including semiconductors, topological insulators, insulators, semi-metals and superconductors. We firstly introduce a unified method based on symmetry analysis and polarization measurements to assign the observed Raman modes and characterize the crystal structure of different types of LMs. Then, we revisit and update the positions and assignments of vibration modes by re-measuring the Raman spectra of different types of LMs and by comparing our results to those reported in previous papers. We apply the recent advances on the interlayer vibrations of graphene and TMDs to these various LMs and obtain their shear modulus. The observation of the shear modes of LMs in bulk facilitates an accurate and fast characterization of layer numbers during preparation processes in the future by a robust layer-number dependency on the frequencies of the shear modes. We also summarize the recent advances on the layer-stacking dependence on the intensities of interlayer shear vibrations

  10. Absorber for solar power.

    PubMed

    Powell, W R

    1974-10-01

    A simple, economical absorber utilizing a new principle of operation to achieve very low reradiation losses while generating temperatures limited by material properties of quartz is described. Its performance is analyzed and indicates approximately 90% thermal efficiency and 73% conversion efficiency for an earth based unit with moderately concentrated (~tenfold) sunlight incident. It is consequently compatible with the most economic of concentrator mirrors (stamped) or mirrors deployable in space. Space applications are particularly attractive, as temperatures significantly below 300 K are possible and permit even higher conversion efficiency. PMID:20134700

  11. Role of core support material in veneer failure of brittle layer structures.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Ilja; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Lawn, Brian R

    2007-07-01

    A study is made of veneer failure by cracking in all-ceramic crown-like layer structures. Model trilayers consisting of a 1 mm thick external glass layer (veneer) joined to a 0.5 mm thick inner stiff and hard ceramic support layer (core) by epoxy bonding or by fusion are fabricated for testing. The resulting bilayers are then glued to a thick compliant polycarbonate slab to simulate a dentin base. The specimens are subjected to cyclic contact (occlusal) loading with spherical indenters in an aqueous environment. Video cameras are used to record the fracture evolution in the transparent glass layer in situ during testing. The dominant failure mode is cone cracking in the glass veneer by traditional outer (Hertzian) cone cracks at higher contact loads and by inner (hydraulically pumped) cone cracks at lower loads. Failure is deemed to occur when one of these cracks reaches the veneer/core interface. The advantages and disadvantages of the alumina and zirconia core materials are discussed in terms of mechanical properties-strength and toughness, as well as stiffness. Consideration is also given to the roles of interface strength and residual thermal expansion mismatch stresses in relation to the different joining methods. PMID:17078086

  12. Intensifying the Casimir force between two silicon substrates within three different layers of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedzahedi, A.; Moradian, A.; Setare, M. R.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the Casimir force for a system composed of two thick slabs as substrates within three different homogeneous layers. We use the scattering approach along with the Matsubara formalism in order to calculate the Casimir force at finite temperature. First, we focus on constructing the reflection matrices and then we calculate the Casimir force for a water-lipid system. According to the conventional use of silicon as a substrate, we apply the formalism to calculate the Casimir force for layers of Au, VO2, mica, KCl and foam rubber on the thick slabs of silicon. Afterwards, introducing an increasing factor, we compare our results with Lifshitz force in the vacuum between two semispaces of silicon in order to illustrate the influence of the layers on intensifying the Casimir force. We also calculate the Casimir force between two slabs of the forementioned materials with finite thicknesses to indicate the substrate's role in increasing the obtained Casimir force. Our simple calculation is interesting since one can extend it along with the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis to systems containing inhomogeneous layers as good candidates for designing nanomechanical devices.

  13. InAs/GaInSb strained layer superlattice as an infrared detector material: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey L.

    2000-04-01

    The investigation of the InAs/Ga1-xInxSb strained layer superlattice (SLS) has been largely motivated by the promise of overcoming limitations of current mature high-performance IR detectors, such as those using HgCdTe and extrinsic silicon. It also offers fundamentally superior performance over other newly emerging III-V bandgap- engineered materials such as QWIPs. The inherent properties of the InAs/GaInSb SLS have identified it as an attractive alternative for niche VLWIR applications requiring high performance under low backgrounds at operating temperatures > 40K. If this material system proves to meet the stringent demands of VLWIR applications, it will most certainly play a significant role as an alternative materials for photovoltaic focal pane arrays operating in the LWIR and MWIR regimes as well. This paper is an overview of SLS technology development, and focuses on critical development needs as seen from the perspective of the IR detector industry.

  14. Strain-displacement relations for strain engineering in single-layer 2d materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midtvedt, Daniel; Lewenkopf, Caio H.; Croy, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the electromechanical coupling in single-layer 2d materials. For non-Bravais lattices, we find important corrections to the standard macroscopic strain-microscopic atomic-displacement theory. We put forward a general and systematic approach to calculate strain-displacement relations for several classes of 2d materials. We apply our findings to graphene as a study case, by combining a tight binding and a valence force-field model to calculate electronic and mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons under strain. The results show good agreement with the predictions of the Dirac equation coupled to continuum mechanics. For this long wave-limit effective theory, we find that the strain-displacement relations lead to a renormalization correction to the strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields. A similar renormalization is found for the strain-induced band-gap of black phosphorous. Implications for nanomechanical properties and electromechanical coupling in 2d materials are discussed.

  15. Nanoarchitectured materials composed of fullerene-like spheroids and disordered graphene layers with tunable mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang, Erik F; Yan, Hongping; Kono, Yoshio; Wen, Bin; Bai, Ligang; Shi, Feng; Zhang, Junfeng; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Park, Changyong; Wang, Yanbin; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    Type-II glass-like carbon is a widely used material with a unique combination of properties including low density, high strength, extreme impermeability to gas and liquid and resistance to chemical corrosion. It can be considered as a carbon-based nanoarchitectured material, consisting of a disordered multilayer graphene matrix encasing numerous randomly distributed nanosized fullerene-like spheroids. Here we show that under both hydrostatic compression and triaxial deformation, this high-strength material is highly compressible and exhibits a superelastic ability to recover from large strains. Under hydrostatic compression, bulk, shear and Young's moduli decrease anomalously with pressure, reaching minima around 1-2 GPa, where Poisson's ratio approaches zero, and then revert to normal behaviour with positive pressure dependences. Controlling the concentration, size and shape of fullerene-like spheroids with tailored topological connectivity to graphene layers is expected to yield exceptional and tunable mechanical properties, similar to mechanical metamaterials, with potentially wide applications. PMID:25648723

  16. Preparation of thin layer materials with macroporous microstructure for SOFC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero-Lopez, D.; Ruiz-Morales, J.C.; Pena-Martinez, J.; Canales-Vazquez, J.; Nunez, P.

    2008-04-15

    A facile and versatile method using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres as pore formers has been developed to prepare thin layer oxide materials with controlled macroporous microstructure. Several mixed oxides with fluorite and perovskite-type structures, i.e. doped zirconia, ceria, ferrites, manganites, and NiO-YSZ composites have been prepared and characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry. The synthesised materials are nanocrystalline and present a homogeneous pore distribution and relatively high specific surface area, which makes them interesting for SOFC and catalysis applications in the intermediate temperature range. - Graphical abstract: Thin films materials of mixed oxides with potential application in SOFC devices have been prepared with macroporous microstructure using PMMA microspheres as pore formers. Display Omitted.

  17. Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Asta, Mark D; Xin, Huolin L; Doeff, Marca M

    2014-01-01

    The present study sheds light on the long-standing challenges associated with high-voltage operation of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Using correlated ensemble-averaged high-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy and spatially resolved electron microscopy and spectroscopy, here we report structural reconstruction (formation of a surface reduced layer, to transition) and chemical evolution (formation of a surface reaction layer) at the surface of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 particles. These are primarily responsible for the prevailing capacity fading and impedance buildup under high-voltage cycling conditions, as well as the first-cycle coulombic inefficiency. It was found that the surface reconstruction exhibits a strong anisotropic characteristic, which predominantly occurs along lithium diffusion channels. Furthermore, the surface reaction layer is composed of lithium fluoride embedded in a complex organic matrix. This work sets a refined example for the study of surface reconstruction and chemical evolution in battery materials using combined diagnostic tools at complementary length scales. PMID:24670975

  18. Neutron reflectometry on highly absorbing films and its application to 10B4C-based neutron detectors

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, F.; Khaplanov, A.; Devishvili, A.; Schmidt, S.; Höglund, C.; Birch, J.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Gutfreund, P.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Van Esch, P.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool used for studies of surfaces and interfaces. The absorption in the typical studied materials is neglected and this technique is limited only to the reflectivity measurement. For strongly absorbing nuclei, the absorption can be directly measured by using the neutron-induced fluorescence technique which exploits the prompt particle emission of absorbing isotopes. This technique is emerging from soft matter and biology where highly absorbing nuclei, in very small quantities, are used as a label for buried layers. Nowadays, the importance of absorbing layers is rapidly increasing, partially because of their application in neutron detection; a field that has become more active also due to the 3He-shortage. We extend the neutron-induced fluorescence technique to the study of layers of highly absorbing materials, in particular 10B4C. The theory of neutron reflectometry is a commonly studied topic; however, when a strong absorption is present the subtle relationship between the reflection and the absorption of neutrons is not widely known. The theory for a general stack of absorbing layers has been developed and compared to measurements. We also report on the requirements that a 10B4C layer must fulfil in order to be employed as a converter in neutron detection. PMID:26997902

  19. Improving the efficiency of organic solar cells by varying the material concentration in the photoactive layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, Kevin Anthony

    Polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have been a rapidly improving technology over the past decade. To further improve the relatively low energy conversion efficiencies of these solar cells, several modifications need to be made to the overall device structure. Emerging technologies include cells that are fabricated with interfacial layers to facilitate charge transport, and tandem structures are being introduced to harness the absorption spectrum of polymers with varying bandgap energies. When new structures are implemented, each layer of the cell must be optimized in order for the entire device to function efficiently. The most volatile layer of these devices is the photoactive layer solution of poly-3(hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC 61BM). Even slight variations in pre-application and post-treatment will lead to large variations in the electrical, physical, and optical properties of the solar cell module. To improve the effectiveness of the photoactive layer, the material concentration of P3HT and PC61BM in the liquid phase, prior to application, was altered. The weight ratio of P3HT to PC61BM was kept at a constant 1 to 0.8, while the amounts of each dissolved in 2 mL of chlorobenzene were varied. Solar cells were fabricated, and J-V characterizations were performed to determine the electrical traits of the devices. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were done on the photoactive layer films to determine the physical characteristics of the films such as overall surface topology and RMS roughness. Also, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) was used to determine film thickness and extinction coefficient of the active layers. To further understand the optical properties of the polymer-fullerene blend, the absorption spectrum of the films were calculated through UV-VIS spectrophotometry. It was found that an increased concentration of the polymer-fullerene blend prior to application

  20. Real-time observation of Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cell absorber layer formation from nanoparticle precursors.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Roland; Walker, Bryce C; Schmidt, Sebastian S; Zander, Ole; Weber, Alfons; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Humberto; Just, Justus; Klaus, Manuela; Agrawal, Rakesh; Unold, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The selenization of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanocrystals is a promising route for the fabrication of low-cost thin film solar cells. However, the reaction pathway of this process is not completely understood. Here, the evolution of phase formation, grain size, and elemental distributions is investigated during the selenization of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanoparticle precursor thin films by synchrotron-based in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis as well as by ex situ electron microscopy. The precursor films are heated in a closed volume inside a vacuum chamber in the presence of selenium vapor while diffraction and fluorescence signals are recorded. The presented results reveal that during the selenization the cations diffuse to the surface to form large grains on top of the nanoparticle layer and the selenization of the film takes place through two simultaneous reactions: (1) a direct and fast formation of large grained selenides, starting with copper selenide which is subsequently transformed into Cu2ZnSnSe4; and (2) a slower selenization of the remaining nanoparticles. As a consequence of the initial formation of copper selenides at the surface, the subsequent formation of CZTSe starts under Cu-rich conditions despite an overall Cu-poor composition of the film. The implications of this process path for the film quality are discussed. Additionally, the proposed growth model provides an explanation for the previously observed accumulation of carbon from the nanoparticle precursor beneath the large grained layer. PMID:24068197

  1. Modification of electron states in CdTe absorber due to a buffer layer in CdTe/CdS solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorenko, Y. G. Major, J. D.; Pressman, A.; Phillips, L. J.; Durose, K.

    2015-10-28

    By application of the ac admittance spectroscopy method, the defect state energy distributions were determined in CdTe incorporated in thin film solar cell structures concluded on ZnO, ZnSe, and ZnS buffer layers. Together with the Mott-Schottky analysis, the results revealed a strong modification of the defect density of states and the concentration of the uncompensated acceptors as influenced by the choice of the buffer layer. In the solar cells formed on ZnSe and ZnS, the Fermi level and the energy position of the dominant deep trap levels were observed to shift closer to the midgap of CdTe, suggesting the mid-gap states may act as recombination centers and impact the open-circuit voltage and the fill factor of the solar cells. For the deeper states, the broadening parameter was observed to increase, indicating fluctuations of the charge on a microscopic scale. Such changes can be attributed to the grain-boundary strain and the modification of the charge trapped at the grain-boundary interface states in polycrystalline CdTe.

  2. Understanding the Anchoring Effect of Two-Dimensional Layered Materials for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianfan; Wang, Yapeng; Seh, Zhi Wei; Fu, Zhongheng; Zhang, Ruifeng; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-10

    Although the rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery system has attracted significant attention due to its high theoretical specific energy, its implementation has been impeded by multiple challenges, especially the dissolution of intermediate lithium polysulfide (Li2Sn) species into the electrolyte. Introducing anchoring materials, which can induce strong binding interaction with Li2Sn species, has been demonstrated as an effective way to overcome this problem and achieve long-term cycling stability and high-rate performance. The interaction between Li2Sn species and anchoring materials should be studied at the atomic level in order to understand the mechanism behind the anchoring effect and to identify ideal anchoring materials to further improve the performance of Li-S batteries. Using first-principles approach with van der Waals interaction included, we systematically investigate the adsorption of Li2Sn species on various two-dimensional layered materials (oxides, sulfides, and chlorides) and study the detailed interaction and electronic structure, including binding strength, configuration distortion, and charge transfer. We gain insight into how van der Waals interaction and chemical binding contribute to the adsorption of Li2Sn species for anchoring materials with strong, medium, and weak interactions. We understand why the anchoring materials can avoid the detachment of Li2S as in carbon substrate, and we discover that too strong binding strength can cause decomposition of Li2Sn species. PMID:25961805

  3. Few layer epitaxial germanene: a novel two-dimensional Dirac material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávila, María Eugenia; Le Lay, Guy

    2016-02-01

    Monolayer germanene, a novel graphene-like germanium allotrope akin to silicene has been recently grown on metallic substrates. Lying directly on the metal surfaces the reconstructed atom-thin sheets are prone to lose the massless Dirac fermion character and unique associated physical properties of free standing germanene. Here, we show that few layer germanene, which we create by dry epitaxy on a gold template, possesses Dirac cones thanks to a reduced interaction. This finding established on synchrotron-radiation-based photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy imaging and surface electron diffraction places few layer germanene among the rare two-dimensional Dirac materials. Since germanium is currently used in the mainstream Si-based electronics, perspectives of using germanene for scaling down beyond the 5 nm node appear very promising. Other fascinating properties seem at hand, typically the robust quantum spin Hall effect for applications in spintronics and the engineering of Floquet Majorana fermions by light for quantum computing.

  4. Few layer epitaxial germanene: a novel two-dimensional Dirac material.

    PubMed

    Dávila, María Eugenia; Le Lay, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Monolayer germanene, a novel graphene-like germanium allotrope akin to silicene has been recently grown on metallic substrates. Lying directly on the metal surfaces the reconstructed atom-thin sheets are prone to lose the massless Dirac fermion character and unique associated physical properties of free standing germanene. Here, we show that few layer germanene, which we create by dry epitaxy on a gold template, possesses Dirac cones thanks to a reduced interaction. This finding established on synchrotron-radiation-based photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy imaging and surface electron diffraction places few layer germanene among the rare two-dimensional Dirac materials. Since germanium is currently used in the mainstream Si-based electronics, perspectives of using germanene for scaling down beyond the 5 nm node appear very promising. Other fascinating properties seem at hand, typically the robust quantum spin Hall effect for applications in spintronics and the engineering of Floquet Majorana fermions by light for quantum computing. PMID:26860590

  5. Mono-layer BC2 a high capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardikar, Rahul; Samanta, Atanu; Han, Sang Soo; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Singh, Abhishek

    2015-04-01

    Mono-layer of graphene with high surface area compared to the bulk graphite phase, shows less Li uptake. The Li activity or kinetics can be modified via defects and/or substitutional doping. Boron and Nitrogen are the best known dopants for carbonaceous anode materials. In particular, boron doped graphene shows higher capacity and better Li adsorption compared to Nitrogen doped graphene. Here, using first principles density functional theory calculations, we study the spectrum of boron carbide (BCx) mono-layer phases in order to estimate the maximum gravimetric capacity that can be achieved by substitutional doping in graphene. Our results show that uniformly boron doped BC2 phase shows a high capacity of? 1400 mAh/g, much higher than previously reported capacity of BC3. Supported by Korea Institute of Science and Technology.

  6. Few layer epitaxial germanene: a novel two-dimensional Dirac material

    PubMed Central

    Dávila, María Eugenia; Le Lay, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Monolayer germanene, a novel graphene-like germanium allotrope akin to silicene has been recently grown on metallic substrates. Lying directly on the metal surfaces the reconstructed atom-thin sheets are prone to lose the massless Dirac fermion character and unique associated physical properties of free standing germanene. Here, we show that few layer germanene, which we create by dry epitaxy on a gold template, possesses Dirac cones thanks to a reduced interaction. This finding established on synchrotron-radiation-based photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy imaging and surface electron diffraction places few layer germanene among the rare two-dimensional Dirac materials. Since germanium is currently used in the mainstream Si-based electronics, perspectives of using germanene for scaling down beyond the 5 nm node appear very promising. Other fascinating properties seem at hand, typically the robust quantum spin Hall effect for applications in spintronics and the engineering of Floquet Majorana fermions by light for quantum computing. PMID:26860590

  7. Design and synthesis of a new layered thermoelectric material LaPbBiS3O.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yun-Lei; Ablimit, Abduweli; Zhai, Hui-Fei; Bao, Jin-Ke; Tang, Zhang-Tu; Wang, Xin-Bo; Wang, Nan-Lin; Feng, Chun-Mu; Cao, Guang-Han

    2014-10-20

    A new quinary oxysulfide LaPbBiS3O was designed and successfully synthesized via a solid-state reaction in a sealed evacuated quartz tube. This material, composed of stacked NaCl-like [M4S6] (where M = Pb, Bi) layers and fluorite-type [La2O2] layers, crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4/nmm with a = 4.0982(1) Å, c = 19.7754(6) Å, and Z = 2. Electrical resistivity and Hall effect measurements demonstrate that it is a narrow gap semiconductor with an activation energy of ∼17 meV. The thermopower and the figure of merit at room temperature were measured to be -52 μV/K and 0.23, respectively, which makes LaPbBiS3O and its derivatives be promising for thermoelectric applications. PMID:25272272

  8. Suitability of polystyrene as a functional barrier layer in coloured food contact materials.

    PubMed

    Genualdi, Susan; Addo Ntim, Susana; Begley, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Functional barriers in food contact materials (FCMs) are used to prevent or reduce migration from inner layers in multilayer structures to food. The effectiveness of functional barrier layers was investigated in coloured polystyrene (PS) bowls due to their intended condition of use with hot liquids such as soups or stew. Migration experiments were performed over a 10-day period using USFDA-recommended food simulants (10% ethanol, 50% ethanol, corn oil and Miglyol) along with several other food oils. At the end of the 10 days, solvent dyes had migrated from the PS bowls at 12, 1 and 31,000 ng cm(-)(2) into coconut oil, palm kernel oil and Miglyol respectively, and in coconut oil and Miglyol the colour change was visible to the human eye. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images revealed that the functional barrier was no longer intact for the bowls exposed to coconut oil, palm kernel oil, Miglyol, 10% ethanol, 50% ethanol and goat's milk. Additional tests showed that 1-dodecanol, a lauryl alcohol derived from palm kernel oil and coconut oil, was present in the PS bowls at an average concentration of 11 mg kg(-1). This compound is likely to have been used as a dispersing agent for the solvent dye and aided the migration of the solvent dye from the PS bowl into the food simulant. The solvent dye was not found in the 10% ethanol, 50% ethanol and goat's milk food simulants above their respective limits of detection, which is likely to be due to its insolubility in aqueous solutions. A disrupted barrier layer is of concern because if there are unregulated materials in the inner layers of the laminate, they may migrate to food, and therefore be considered unapproved food additives resulting in the food being deemed adulterated under the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act. PMID:25569333

  9. Visibility of atomically-thin layered materials buried in silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Ergun; Mukherjee, Bablu

    2015-11-13

    Recently, the coating of thin oxide or nitride film on top of crystals of atomically-thin layered material (ATLM) has been introduced, which benefits optical and electrical properties of the materials and shields them from environmental contact, and has important implications for optoelectronics applications of layered materials. By calculating the reflection contrast, we show the possibility of using an additional oxide film on top of ATLM with good average optical color contrast in broad- and narrow-band wavelength ranges. Our work presents a more comprehensive map of optical color contrast of various ATLMs including graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 when kept in a sandwich structure between two thin SiO2 films on a Si substrate. The average color contrasts of ATLMs with varying thicknesses of SiO2 films at three different wavelength ranges (i.e. broadband range, range for green filtering and range for red filtering) have been discussed with a summary of optimized thicknesses of the top and bottom oxide films in order to achieve the highest color contrast from the sandwich structures. PMID:26472489

  10. Investigation of negative coercivity in one layer formation of soft and hard magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tho, Luu Van; Kim, Cheol Gi; Kim, Chong Oh

    2008-04-01

    A single layer consists of CoFe soft and LaCoFeO hard magnetic materials was deposited using the cosputtering method. Microstructure analysis of the layer demonstrated that CoFe particles were surrounded by a LaCoFeO shell and the ratio of the thicknesses was dependent on the amount of La and on the O2/(Ar+O2) gas flow ratio used during sputtering. When the O2/(Ar+O2) gas flow ratio was increased from 7% to 13%, coercivity (Hc) along the hard axis decreased from 11.3Oe at 7% to -9.1Oe at 11%. At a gas flow ratio of 13%, the coercivity increased to 11.7Oe. The results of the present study show that negative coercivity Hc<0 is caused by interactions between two single domains of soft and hard magnetic materials. This interaction was modeled and described in detail using an extension of Heisenberg's model to the case of two domains. The results of the present study, demonstrating the conditions required to obtain negative Hc, can be applied to other pairs of soft-hard magnetic materials.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Layered Fiber Composite Structures Accounting for the Material's Microstructure and Delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, Bertram; Simon, Jaan-Willem; Reese, Stefanie

    2015-04-01

    The present paper focuses on composite structures which consist of several layers of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). For such layered composite structures, delamination constitutes one of the major failure modes. Predicting its initiation is essential for the design of these composites. Evaluating stress-strength relation based onset criteria requires an accurate representation of the through-the-thickness stress distribution, which can be particularly delicate in the case of shell-like structures. Thus, in this paper, a solid-shell finite element formulation is utilized which allows to incorporate a fully three-dimensional material model while still being suitable for applications involving thin structures. Moreover, locking phenomena are cured by using both the EAS and the ANS concept, and numerical efficiency is ensured through reduced integration. The proposed anisotropic material model accounts for the material's micro-structure by using the concept of structural tensors. It is validated by comparison to experimental data as well as by application to numerical examples.

  12. Atomic-scale friction modulated by potential corrugation in multi-layered graphene materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-03-21

    Friction is an important issue that has to be carefully treated for the fabrication of graphene-based nano-scale devices. So far, the friction mechanism of graphene materials on the atomic scale has not yet been clearly presented. Here, first-principles calculations were employed to unveil the friction behaviors and their atomic-scale mechanism. We found that potential corrugations on sliding surfaces dominate the friction force and the friction anisotropy of graphene materials. Higher friction forces correspond to larger corrugations of potential energy, which are tuned by the number of graphene layers. The friction anisotropy is determined by the regular distributions of potential energy. The sliding along a fold-line path (hollow-atop-hollow) has a relatively small potential energy barrier. Thus, the linear sliding observed in macroscopic friction experiments may probably be attributed to the fold-line sliding mode on the atomic scale. These findings can also be extended to other layer-structure materials, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) and graphene-like BN sheets.

  13. Backside defect printability for contact layer with different reticle blank material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Holfeld, Christian; Fischer, Daniel; Ackmann, Paul; Holfeld, Andre; Kurth, Karin; Sczyrba, Martin; Hertzsch, Tino; Seltmann, Rolf; Ho, Angeline; GN, Fang H.

    2012-11-01

    Backside defects are out of focus during wafer exposure by the mask thickness and cannot be directly imaged on wafer. However, backside defects will induce transmission variation during wafer exposure. When the size of backside defect is larger than 200 microns, the shadow of such particles will locally change the illumination conditions of the mask patterns and may result in a long range critical dimension (CD) variation on wafer depending on numerical aperture (NA) and pupil shape. Backside defects will affect both wafer CD and critical dimension uniformity (CDU), especially for two-dimensional (2D) structures. This paper focuses on the printability of backside defects on contact layer using annular and quadrupole illumination mode, as well as using different reticle blank material. It also targets for gaining better understanding of critical sizes of backside defects on contact layer for different reticle blanks. We have designed and manufactured two test reticles with repeating patterns of 28nm and 40nm technology node of contact layers. Programmed chrome defects of varying size are placed on the backside opposite to the repeating front side patterns in order to measure the spatial variation of transmission and wafer CD. The test mask was printed on a bare silicon wafer, and the printed features measured for size by spatial sampling. We have investigated two contact layers with different illumination conditions. One is advance binary with single exposure; another is phase shift mask with double exposure. Wafer CD variation for different backside defect sizes are demonstrated for the two contact layers. The comparison between backside defect size with inter-field and intra-field CD variation is also discussed.

  14. Operando Lithium Dynamics in the Li-Rich Layered Oxide Cathode Material via Neutron Diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Haodong; An, Ke; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Qian, Danna; Zhang, Minghao; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-04-06

    Neutron diffraction under operando battery cycling is used to study the lithium and oxygen dynamics of high Li-rich Li(Lix/3Ni(3/8-3x/8)Co(1/4-x/4)Mn(3/8+7x/24)O2 (x = 0.6, HLR) and low Li-rich Li(Lix/3Ni(1/3-x/3)Co(1/3-x/3)Mn(1/3+x/3)O2 (x = 0.24, LLR) compounds that exhibit different degrees of oxygen activation at high voltage. The measured lattice parameter changes and oxygen position show largely contrasting changes for the two cathodes where the LLR exhibits larger movement of oxygen and lattice contractions in comparison to the HLR that maintains relatively constant lattice parameters and oxygen position during the high voltage plateau until the end of charge. Density functional theory calculations show the presencemore » of oxygen vacancy during the high voltage plateau; changes in the lattice parameters and oxygen position are consistent with experimental observations. Lithium migration kinetics for the Li-rich material is observed under operando conditions for the first time to reveal the rate of lithium extraction from the lithium layer, and transition metal layer is related to the different charge and discharge characteristics. At the beginning of charging, the lithium extraction predominately occurs within the lithium layer. The lithium extraction from the lithium layer slows down and extraction from the transition metal layer evolves at a faster rate once the high voltage plateau is reached.« less

  15. Electronic and material characterization of silicon-germanium and silicon-germanium-carbon epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Jeffrey John

    This dissertation presents results of material and electronic characterization of strained SiGe and SiGeC epitaxial layers grown on (100) silicon using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition and Reduced Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition. Fabrication techniques for SiGe and SiGeC are also presented. Materials characterization of epitaxial SiGe and SiGeC was done to characterize crystallinity using visual, microscopic, and Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) characterization. Surface roughness was characterized and found to correspond roughly with epitaxial crystal quality. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to study epitaxial layer composition and thickness, requiring development of models for nSiGe and nSiGeC versus composition (the first published for nSiGeC) and generation of ellipsometric nomograms. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of epitaxial strain and relaxation showed Ge composition dominates the stress, although strain compensation due to C was observed. XRD, Raman, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) characterization were done to characterize substitutional C in SiGeC epitaxial layers, finding that C incorporation into SiGeC saturates for C contents >1%. Fabrication techniques for SiGe and SiGeC were examined. Low thermal budget processing of strained layers were investigated as well as fabrication techniques using advantageous material properties of SiGe and SiGeC. Ti/Al contacts were developed and characterized for electrical contact to SiGe and SiGeC. Schottky contacts of Pt silicide on SiGe and SiGeC was done; formation and resistivity were characterized. Four separate resistivity characterization structures have been fabricated using mesa-etch and Si etch-stop techniques. A NPN Heterojunction Bipolar transistor has been fabricated using successive mesa-etches and SiGe (or SiGeC) etch-stops. Electronic characterization of in-situ doped SiGe and SiGeC epitaxial layers was done to determine resistivity, mobility, and bandgap. Resistivities

  16. AFM investigation of effect of absorbed water layer structure on growth mechanism of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer on oxidized silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Zheng, Yanjun; Chen, Changfeng

    2016-06-01

    The growth mechanism of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer on a silicon oxide surface at various relative humidities has been investigated. Atomic force microscopy images show that excess water may actually hinder the nucleation and growth of OTS islands. A moderate amount of water is favorable for the nucleation and growth of OTS islands in the initial stage; however, the completion of the monolayer is very slow in the final stage. The growth of OTS islands on a low-water-content surface maintains a relatively constant speed and requires the least amount of time. The mobility of water molecules is thought to play an important role in the OTS monolayers, and a low-mobility water layer provides a steady condition for OTS monolayer growth.

  17. AFM investigation of effect of absorbed water layer structure on growth mechanism of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer on oxidized silicon.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaowei; Zheng, Yanjun; Chen, Changfeng

    2016-06-28

    The growth mechanism of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer on a silicon oxide surface at various relative humidities has been investigated. Atomic force microscopy images show that excess water may actually hinder the nucleation and growth of OTS islands. A moderate amount of water is favorable for the nucleation and growth of OTS islands in the initial stage; however, the completion of the monolayer is very slow in the final stage. The growth of OTS islands on a low-water-content surface maintains a relatively constant speed and requires the least amount of time. The mobility of water molecules is thought to play an important role in the OTS monolayers, and a low-mobility water layer provides a steady condition for OTS monolayer growth. PMID:27369535

  18. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, C.E.

    1979-08-29

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  19. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  20. Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposite materials: Morphological studies and potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Mary

    Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites, materials where layered silicates are molecularly dispersed in suitable polymer matrices, are of both scientific and commercial significance. The dramatic enhancements in tensile strength, heat and solvent resistance, as well as the decrease in gas permeability of the neat polymer matrix that can be achieved through the incorporation of small amounts of a suitable layered silicate are intricately linked to the nanocomposite morphology. In the current work, the morphological behavior of nanocomposite materials has been investigated by the fabrication and extensive characterization of a series of model experimental systems. The results from the experimental systems that were developed based on one of the theoretical models for morphology prediction in nanocomposites, provide useful insight into controlling nanocomposite morphology by tailoring various system parameters. The unique properties of nanocomposites also make them promising materials for use as electrolytes in lithium polymer batteries. Though an all-solid-state lithium polymer battery is attractive due to characteristics such as low safety risks in comparison with the conventional systems that contain liquid electrolytes, several challenges related to materials design have to be overcome in order to create materials that have good mechanical properties. Our work focuses on the development of a new class of nanocomposite electrolytes where the incorporation of lithium cation-exchanged nanoscale clay sheets into a suitable polymer matrix is expected to impart the inherent favorable characteristics of nanocomposites to the electrolyte. Additionally, this modification is expected to substantially eliminate the need for lithium salt dopants that are currently used to achieve significant conductivities and form what are essentially single-ion conductors. Extensive characterization of these electrolytes showed that properties were strongly dependent on nanocomposite

  1. Design and Optimization of Passive UHF RFID Tag Antenna for Mounting on or inside Material Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai

    There is great desire to employ passive UHF RFID tags for inventory tracking and sensing in a diversity of applications and environments. Owing to its battery-free operation, non-line-of sight detection, low cost, long read range and small form factor, each year billions of RFID tags are being deployed in retail, logistics, manufacturing, biomedical inventories, among many other applications. However, the performance of these RFID systems has not met expectations. This is because a tag's performance deteriorates significantly when mounted on or inside arbitrary materials. The tag antenna is optimized only for a given type of material at a certain location of placement, and detuning takes place when attached to or embedded in materials with dielectric properties outside the design range. Thereby, different customized tags may be needed for identifying objects even within the same class of products. This increases the overall cost of the system. Furthermore, conventional copper foil-based RFID tag antennas are prone to metal fatigue and wear, and cannot survive hostile environments where antennas could be deformed by external forces and failures occur. Therefore, it is essential to understand the interaction between the antenna and the material in the vicinity of the tag, and design general purpose RFID tag antennas possessing excellent electrical performance as well as robust mechanical structure. A particularly challenging application addressed here is designing passive RFID tag antennas for automotive tires. Tires are composed of multiple layers of rubber with different dielectric properties and thicknesses. Furthermore, metallic plies are embedded in the sidewalls and steel belts lie beneath the tread to enforce mechanical integrity. To complicate matters even more, a typical tire experiences a 10% stretching during the construction process. This dissertation focuses on intuitively understanding the interaction between the antenna and the material in the

  2. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications. PMID:23171130

  3. Proper restorative material selection, digital processes allow highly esthetic shade match combined with layered porcelain.

    PubMed

    Kahng, Luke S

    2014-03-01

    Today's digital technologies are affording dentists and laboratory technicians more control over material choices for creating restorations and fabricating dental prostheses. Digital processes can potentially enable technicians to create ideal marginal areas and account for the thickness and support of layering porcelain over substructures in the design process. In this case report of a restoration of a single central incisor, a number of issues are addressed that are central to using the newest digital technology. As demonstrated, shade selection is a crucial early step in any restorative case preparation. PMID:24773196

  4. Understanding the Origin of Enhanced Performances in Core-Shell and Concentration-Gradient Layered Oxide Cathode Materials.

    PubMed

    Song, Dawei; Hou, Peiyu; Wang, Xiaoqing; Shi, Xixi; Zhang, Lianqi

    2015-06-17

    Core-shell and concentration-gradient layered oxide cathode materials deliver superior electrochemical properties such as long cycle life and outstanding thermal stability. However, the origin of enhanced performance is not clear and seldom investigated until now. Here, a specific structured layered oxide (LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2) consisting of concentration-gradient core, transition layer, and stable outer shell, is designed and achieved from double-shelled precursors to overcome the great challenge by comparison with the normal layered LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2. As expected, the specific structured layered oxide displays excellent cycle life and thermal stability. After numerous cycles, the valence state of Ni and Co at normal layered oxide surface tends to a higher oxidation state than that of the specific structured oxide, and the spinel phase is observed on particle surface of normal layered oxide. Also, the deficient spinel/layered mixed phases lead to high surface film and charge-transfer resistance for normal layered oxide, whereas the specific structured one still remains a layered structure. Those results first illustrate the origin of improved electrochemical performance of layered core-shell and concentration-gradient cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26017733

  5. From spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide to porous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Laipan, Minwang; Zhu, Runliang; Chen, Qingze; Zhu, Jianxi; Xi, Yunfei; Ayoko, Godwin A; He, Hongping

    2015-12-30

    Adsorption has been considered as an efficient method for the treatment of dye effluents, but proper disposal of the spent adsorbents is still a challenge. This work attempts to provide a facile method to reutilize the spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-LDH) after the adsorption of orange II (OII). Herein, the spent hybrid was carbonized under the protection of nitrogen, and then washed with acid to obtain porous carbon materials. Thermogravimetric analysis results suggested that the carbonization could be well achieved above 600°C, as mass loss of the spent hybrid gradually stabilized. Therefore, the carbonization process was carried out at 600, 800, and 1000°C, respectively. Scanning electron microscope showed that the obtained carbon materials possessed a crooked flaky morphology. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption results showed that the carbon materials had large BET surface area and pore volume, e.g., 1426 m(2)/g and 1.67 cm(3)/g for the sample carbonized at 800°C. Moreover, the pore structure and surface chemistry compositions were tunable, as they were sensitive to the temperature. Toluene adsorption results demonstrated that the carbon materials had high efficiency in toluene removal. This work provided a facile approach for synthesizing porous carbon materials using spent Mg/Al-LDH. PMID:26257095

  6. OPTIMIZING A PORTABLE MICROWAVE INTERFERENCE SCANNING SYSTEM FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF MULTI-LAYERED DIELECTRIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K. F. Jr.; Little, J. R. Jr.; Ellingson, W. A.; Green, W.

    2010-02-22

    The projected microwave energy pattern, wave guide geometry, positioning methods and process variables have been optimized for use of a portable, non-contact, lap-top computer-controlled microwave interference scanning system on multi-layered dielectric materials. The system can be used in situ with one-sided access and has demonstrated capability of damage detection on composite ceramic armor. Specimens used for validation included specially fabricated surrogates, and ballistic impact-damaged specimens. Microwave data results were corroborated with high resolution direct-digital x-ray imaging. Microwave interference scanning detects cracks, laminar features and material properties variations. This paper presents the details of the system, the optimization steps and discusses results obtained.

  7. Holographic recording characteristics and applications of single-layer panchromatic dichromated gelatin material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Xu, Min; Chen, Ligong; Guo, Yongkang; Guo, Lurong

    2005-09-01

    A high-quality single-layer panchromatic dichromated gelatin material is achieved successfully by employing new types of multi-color photosensitizers and photochemical promoters to conventional photo-crosslinking gelatin system. Its holographic recording characteristics such as spectral response, the photosensitivity of three primary colors, spectral selectivity of volume reflection hologram, angular and wavelength selectivity of volume transmission hologram, are studied in detail. Using red, green and blue lasers, namely three primary colors, the bright volume transmission and reflection holograms can be recorded on the panchromatic material at the exposure level of 30 mJ/cm2. Some preliminary results of space, angle and wavelength multiplexing holographic storage for storing multiple binary and grey-tone optical images, are also reported in this paper.

  8. Comprehensive study on the light shielding potential of thermotropic layers for the development of new materials.

    PubMed

    Gruber, D P; Winkler, G; Resch, K

    2015-01-10

    In recent years thermotropic overheating protection glazings have been the focus for both solar thermal collector technology and architecture. A thermotropic glazing changes its light transmittance from highly transparent to light diffusing upon reaching a certain threshold temperature autonomously and reversibly. In thermotropic systems with fixed domains (TSFD) the scattering domains are embedded in a polymer matrix, which exhibits a sudden change of the refractive index upon reaching a threshold temperature. The aim of the present study was to comprehensively investigate the light shielding characteristics and potential of TSFD materials by applying simulation of light scattering in particle-filled layers. In random walk simulations a variety of parameters were varied systematically, and the effect on the light transmission behavior of TSFD was studied. The calculation steps of the simulation process are shown in detail. The simulations demonstrate that there is great potential for the production of functional materials with high overheating protection efficiency. PMID:25967611

  9. Rational design of new electrolyte materials for electrochemical double layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütter, Christoph; Husch, Tamara; Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Passerini, Stefano; Balducci, Andrea; Korth, Martin

    2016-09-01

    The development of new electrolytes is a centerpiece of many strategies to improve electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) devices. We present here a computational screening-based rational design approach to find new electrolyte materials. As an example application, the known chemical space of almost 70 million compounds is investigated in search of electrochemically more stable solvents. Cyano esters are identified as especially promising new compound class. Theoretical predictions are validated with subsequent experimental studies on a selected case. These studies show that based on theoretical predictions only, a previously untested, but very well performing compound class was identified. We thus find that our rational design strategy is indeed able to successfully identify completely new materials with substantially improved properties.

  10. Electrochemical Effects of Atomic Layer Deposition on Cathode Materials for Lithium Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Isaac David

    One of the greatest challenges of modern society is to stabilize a consistent energy supply that will meet our growing energy demand while decreasing the use of fossil fuels and the harmful green house gases which they produce. Developing reliable and safe solutions has driven research into exploring alternative energy sources for transportation including fuel cells, hydrogen storage, and lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). For the foreseeable future, though, rechargeable batteries appear to be the most practically viable power source. To deploy LIBs in next-generation vehicles, it is essential to develop electrodes with durability, high energy density, and high power. Unfortunately, the power capability of LIBs is generally hindered by Li+-ion diffusion in micrometer-sized materials and the formation of an insulating solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the surface of the active material. In addition, degradation of the battery material due to chemical and electrochemical reactions with the electrolyte lead to both capacity fade and safety concerns both at room and higher temperatures. The current study focuses on mitigating these issues for high voltage cathode materials by both using nanoscale particles to improve Li+-ion diffusion and using ultrathin nanoscale coatings to protect the battery materials from undesirable side reactions. The electrode material is coated with Al2O3 using atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a method to grow conformal thin films with atomic thickness (angstrom level control) using sequential, self-limiting surface reactions. First, nano-LiCoO 2 is employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of ALD coatings and demonstrates a profound increase in rate performance (>250% improvement) over generally employed micrometer-sized particles. Second, the cathode materials LiNi 0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2, LiNi0.33Mn 0.33Co0.33O2, LiMn2O4, and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 were used to demonstrate the benefits ALD coatings have on thermal runaway. The results show a

  11. Room temperature novel chemical synthesis of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) absorbing layer for photovoltaic application

    SciTech Connect

    Shinde, N.M.; Dubal, D.P.; Dhawale, D.S.; Lokhande, C.D.; Kim, J.H.; Moon, J.H.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and inexpensive method for the synthesis of CZTS films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural, morphological and optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Find great application in solar cells with efficiency 0.12%. -- Abstract: Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films have been prepared by a novel chemical successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. These films were annealed in vacuum at 673 K and further characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, electrical, and wettability studies. The X-ray diffraction studies showed the formation of kesterite structure of CZTS films. Scanning electron micrograph revealed the formation of densely packed, compact and large grained CZTS films. The CZTS films showed high optical absorption (10{sup 4} cm{sup -1}) exhibiting band gap energy of 1.55 eV. Wettability test revealed the hydrophilic nature of CZTS films. The CZTS thin films showed semiconducting behavior with p-type electrical conductivity. Further photovoltaic activity of these films was studied by forming the photoelectrochemical cell.

  12. Effect of band-aligned double absorber layers on photovoltaic characteristics of chemical bath deposited PbS/CdS thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho Yeon, Deuk; Chandra Mohanty, Bhaskar; Lee, Seung Min; Soo Cho, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the highest energy conversion efficiency and good stability of PbS thin film-based depleted heterojunction solar cells, not involving PbS quantum dots. The PbS thin films were grown by the low cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) process at relatively low temperatures. Compared to the quantum dot solar cells which require critical and multistep complex procedures for surface passivation, the present approach, leveraging the facile modulation of the optoelectronic properties of the PbS films by the CBD process, offers a simpler route for optimization of PbS-based solar cells. Through an architectural modification, wherein two band-aligned junctions are stacked without any intervening layers, an enhancement of conversion efficiency by as much as 30% from 3.10 to 4.03% facilitated by absorption of a wider range of solar spectrum has been obtained. As an added advantage of the low band gap PbS stacked over a wide gap PbS, the devices show stability over a period of 10 days.

  13. Effect of band-aligned double absorber layers on photovoltaic characteristics of chemical bath deposited PbS/CdS thin film solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Ho Yeon, Deuk; Chandra Mohanty, Bhaskar; Lee, Seung Min; Soo Cho, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the highest energy conversion efficiency and good stability of PbS thin film-based depleted heterojunction solar cells, not involving PbS quantum dots. The PbS thin films were grown by the low cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) process at relatively low temperatures. Compared to the quantum dot solar cells which require critical and multistep complex procedures for surface passivation, the present approach, leveraging the facile modulation of the optoelectronic properties of the PbS films by the CBD process, offers a simpler route for optimization of PbS-based solar cells. Through an architectural modification, wherein two band-aligned junctions are stacked without any intervening layers, an enhancement of conversion efficiency by as much as 30% from 3.10 to 4.03% facilitated by absorption of a wider range of solar spectrum has been obtained. As an added advantage of the low band gap PbS stacked over a wide gap PbS, the devices show stability over a period of 10 days. PMID:26394761

  14. Investigation of epitaxial silicon layers as a material for radiation hardened silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; CERN RD-48 ROSE Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    Epitaxial grown thick layers ({ge} 100 micrometers) of high resistivity silicon (Epi-Si) have been investigated as a possible candidate of radiation hardened material for detectors for high-energy physics. As grown Epi-Si layers contain high concentration (up to 2 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) of deep levels compared with that in standard high resistivity bulk Si. After irradiation of test diodes by protons (E{sub p} = 24 GeV) with a fluence of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, no additional radiation induced deep traps have been detected. A reasonable explanation is that there is a sink of primary radiation induced defects (interstitial and vacancies), possibly by as-grown defects, in epitaxial layers. The ``sinking`` process, however, becomes non-effective at high radiation fluences (10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}) due to saturation of epitaxial defects by high concentration of radiation induced ones. As a result, at neutron fluence of 1 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} the deep level spectrum corresponds to well-known spectrum of radiation induced defects in high resistivity bulk Si. The net effective concentration in the space charge region equals to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} after 3 months of room temperature storage and reveals similar annealing behavior for epitaxial as compared to bulk silicon.

  15. Investigation of epitaxial silicon layers as a material for radiation hardened silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.

    1997-11-01

    Epitaxial grown thick layers (>100 {mu}m) of high resistivity silicon (Epi-Si) have been investigated as a possible candidate of radiation hardened material for detectors for high-energy physics. As grown Epi-Si layers contain high concentration (up to 2{center_dot}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) of deep levels compared with that in standard high resistivity bulk Si. After irradiation of test diodes by protons (E{sub p} = 24 GeV) with a fluence of 1.5{center_dot}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, no additional radiation induced deep traps have been detected. A reasonable explanation is that there is a sink of primary radiation induced defects, in epitaxial layers. The {open_quotes}sinking{close_quotes} process, however, becomes non-effective at high radiation fluences (10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}) due to saturation of epitaxial defects by high concentration of radiation induced ones. As a result, at neutron fluence of 1{center_dot}10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2} the deep level spectrum corresponds to well-known spectrum of radiation induced defects in high resistivity bulk Si. The net effective concentration in the space charge region equals to 3{center_dot}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} after 3 months of room temperature storage and reveals similar annealing behavior for epitaxial as compared to bulk silicon.

  16. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron

    PubMed Central

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E.

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  17. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  18. Construction and evaluation of nitric oxide generating vascular graft material loaded with organoselenium catalyst via layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    An, Jun; Chen, SiYuan; Gao, JingChen; Zhang, Xu; Wang, YuanYuan; Li, YanDong; Mikhalovsky, Sergey; Kong, DeLing; Wang, ShuFang

    2015-08-01

    A new biomimetic material for artificial blood vessel with in situ catalytic generation of nitric oxide (NO) was prepared in this study. Organoselenium immobilized polyethyleneimine as NO donor catalyst and sodium alginate were alternately loaded onto the surface of electrospun polycaprolactone matrix via electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly. This material revealed significant NO generation when contacting NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Adhesion and spreading of smooth muscle cells were inhibited on this material in the presence of GSNO, while proliferation of endothelial cells was promoted. In vitro platelet adhesion and arteriovenous shunt experiments demonstrated good antithrombotic properties of this material, with inhibited platelet activation and aggregation, and prevention of acute thrombosis. This study may provide a new method of improving cellular function and antithrombotic property of vascular grafts. PMID:26014212

  19. Structured Metal Film as Perfect Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2014-03-01

    With standing U-shaped resonators, fish-spear-like resonator has been designed for the first time as the building block to assemble perfect absorbers. The samples have been fabricated with two-photon polymerization process and FTIR measurement results support the effectiveness of the perfect absorber design. In such a structure the polarization-dependent resonance occurs between the tines of the spears instead of the conventional design where the resonance occurs between the metallic layers separated by a dielectric interlayer. The incident light neither transmits nor reflects back which results in unit absorbance. The power of light is trapped between the tines of spears and finally be absorbed. The whole structure is covered with a continuous metallic layer with good thermo-conductance, which provides an excellent approach to deal with heat dissipation, is enlightening in exploring metamaterial absorbers.

  20. Novel composite materials synthesized by the high-temperature interaction of pyrrole with layered oxide matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Alexandru Cezar

    The initial goal of the research presented herein was to develop the very first synthetic metal---high-temperature superconductor ceramic composite material, in the specific form of a polypyrrole---Bi2Sr2CaCu 2O8+delta nanocomposite. In the course of scientific investigation, this scope was broadened to encompass structurally and compositionally similar layered bismuthates and simpler layered oxides. The latter substrates were prepared through novel experimental procedures that enhanced the chance of yielding nanostructured morphologies. The designed novel synthesis approaches yielded a harvest of interesting results that may be further developed upon their dissemination in the scientific community. High-temperature interaction of pyrrole with molybdenum trioxide substrates with different crystalline phases and morphologies led to the formation of the first members of a new class of heterogeneous microcomposites characterized by incomplete occupancy by the metal oxide core of the volume encapsulated by the rigid, amorphous permeable polymeric membrane that reproduces the volume of the initial grain of precursor substrate. The method may be applied for various heterogeneous catalyst substrates for the precise determination of the catalytically active crystallographic planes. In a different project, room-temperature, templateless impregnation of molybdenum trioxide substrates with different crystalline phases and morphologies by a large excess of silver (I) cations led to the formation of 1-D nanostructured novel Ag-Mo-O ternary phase in what may be the simplest experimental procedure available to date that has yielded a 1-D nanostructure, regardless the nature of the constituent material. Interaction of this novel ternary phase with pyrrole vapors at high reaction temperatures led to heterogeneous nanostructured composites that exhibited a silver nanorod core. Nanoscrolls of vanadium pentoxide xerogel were synthesized through a novel, facile reflux-based method that