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Sample records for absorbing optical materials

  1. Absorbing Boundary Conditions For Optical Pulses In Dispersive, Nonlinear Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present results in computational nonlinear optics. An algorithm will be described that provides absorbing boundary conditions for optical pulses in dispersive, nonlinear materials. A new numerical absorber at the boundaries has been developed that is responsive to the spectral content of the pulse. Also, results will be shown of calculations of 2-D electromagnetic nonlinear waves computed by directly integrating in time the nonlinear vector Maxwell's equations. The results will include simulations of "light bullet" like pulses. Here diffraction and dispersion will be counteracted by nonlinear effects. Comparisons will be shown of calculations that use the standard boundary conditions and the new ones.

  2. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  3. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials and methods of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, Seth (Inventor); Perry, Joseph (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions capable of simultaneous two-photon absorption and higher order absorptivities are disclosed. Many of these compositions are compounds satisfying the formulae D-.PI.-D, A-.PI.-A, D-A-D and A-D-A, wherein D is an electron donor group, A is an electron acceptor group and .PI. comprises a bridge of .pi.-conjugated bonds connecting the electron donor groups and electron acceptor groups. In A-D-A and D-A-D compounds, the .pi. bridge is substituted with electron donor groups and electron acceptor groups, respectively. Also disclosed are methods that generate an electronically excited state of a compound, including those satisfying one of these formulae. The electronically excited state is achieved in a method that includes irradiating the compound with light. Then, the compound is converted to a multi-photon electronically excited state upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of light. The sum of the energies of all of the absorbed photons is greater than or equal to the transition energy from a ground state of the compound to the multi-photon excited state. The energy of each absorbed photon is less than the transition energy between the ground state and the lowest single-photon excited state of the compound is less than the transition energy between the multi-photon excited state and the ground state.

  4. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  5. Two-Photon or Higher-Order Absorbing Optical Materials for Generation of Reactive Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  6. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials for generation of reactive species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  7. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials for generation of reactive species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  8. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials and methods of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, Seth (Inventor); Perry, Joseph (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Compositions capable of simultaneous two-photon absorption and higher order absorptivities are provided. Compounds having a donor-pi-donor or acceptor-pi-acceptor structure are of particular interest, where the donor is an electron donating group, acceptor is an electron accepting group, and pi is a pi bridge linking the donor and/or acceptor groups. The pi bridge may additionally be substituted with electron donating or withdrawing groups to alter the absorptive wavelength of the structure. Also disclosed are methods of generating an excited state of such compounds through optical stimulation with light using simultaneous absorption of photons of energies individually insufficient to achieve an excited state of the compound, but capable of doing so upon simultaneous absorption of two or more such photons. Applications employing such methods are also provided, including controlled polymerization achieved through focusing of the light source(s) used.

  9. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  10. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  11. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  12. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  13. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  14. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  15. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  16. Optical limiting materials

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.; Mattes, Benjamin R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Heeger, Alan J.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Smilowitz, Laura B.; Klimov, Victor I.; Cha, Myoungsik; Sariciftci, N. Serdar; Hummelen, Jan C.

    1998-01-01

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  17. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  18. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  19. Solar absorber material reflectivity measurements at temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bonometti, J.A.; Hawk, C.W.

    1999-07-01

    Assessment of absorber shell material properties at high operating temperatures is essential to the full understanding of the solar energy absorption process in a solar thermal rocket. A review of these properties, their application and a new experimental methodology to measure them at high temperatures is presented. The direct application for the research is absorber cavity development for a Solar Thermal Upper Stage (STUS). High temperature measurements, greater than 1,000 Kelvin, are difficult to obtain for incident radiation upon a solid surface that forms an absorber cavity in a solar thermal engine. The basic material properties determine the amount of solar energy that is absorbed, transmitted or reflected and are dependent upon the material's temperature. This investigation developed a new approach to evaluate the material properties (i.e., reflectivity, absorptive) of the absorber wall and experimentally determined them for rhenium and niobium sample coupons. The secular reflectivity was measured both at room temperature and at temperatures near 1,000 Kelvin over a range of angles from 0 to 90 degrees. The same experimental measurements were used to calculate the total reflectivity of the sample by integrating the recorded intensities over a hemisphere. The test methodology used the incident solar energy as the heating source while directly measuring the reflected light (an integrated value over all visible wavelengths). Temperature dependence on total reflectivity was found to follow an inverse power function of the material's temperature.

  20. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2016-07-12

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  1. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-28

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  2. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  3. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  4. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-06-17

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  5. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2016-07-12

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  6. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variations from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.

  7. Method of designing layered sound absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalla, Youssef; Panneton, Raymond

    2002-11-01

    A widely used model for describing sound propagation in porous materials is the Johnson-Champoux-Allard model. This rigid frame model is based on five geometrical properties of the porous medium: resistivity, porosity, tortuosity, and viscous and thermal characteristic lengths. Using this model and with the knowledge of such properties for different absorbing materials, the design of a multiple layered system can be optimized efficiently and rapidly. The overall impedance of the layered systems can be calculated by the repeated application of single layer impedance equation. The knowledge of the properties of the materials involved in the layered system and their physical meaning, allows to perform by computer a systematic evaluation of potential layer combinations rather than do it experimentally which is time consuming and always not efficient. The final design of layered materials can then be confirmed by suitable measurements. A method of designing the overall acoustic absorption of multiple layered porous materials is presented. Some aspects based on the material properties, for designing a flat layered absorbing system are considered. Good agreement between measured and computed sound absorption coefficients has been obtained for the studied configurations. [Work supported by N.S.E.R.C. Canada, F.C.A.R. Quebec, and Bombardier Aerospace.

  8. Evaluation of Metal Absorber Materials for Beyond Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seongchul; Kim, Jung Sik; Lee, Jae Uk; Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jung Hwan; Ahn, Jinho

    2015-11-01

    In addition to the development of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), studies on beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography (BEUVL), which uses radiation with a wavelength of 6.7 nm, are in progress for their application in high-volume manufacturing. The BEUV wavelength, which is much shorter than the EUV wavelength, improves the resolution of patterned features. However, suitable materials for the mask stack of BEUVL are still under development. In this study, the applicability of metallic materials, such as Ni, Co, Ir, W, and Ta, as the absorber in a binary-intensity BEUVL mask was evaluated. The mask-imaging properties were simulated by adopting a thickness that ensured a reflectivity of <1% for each material. Furthermore, we used a multilayered La/B mirror--which exhibited a high reflectivity at a wavelength of 6.7 nm--because BEUV light is absorbed by most materials, and therefore uses reflective optics as desired. The numerical aperture (NA), angle of incidence, and demagnification factor were 0.5 and 0.6, 6 degrees, and 8x, respectively. We confirmed that a line-and-space pattern with a half-pitch of 11 nm can be patterned with metallic absorbers by using a high NA. PMID:26726569

  9. Evaluation of Metal Absorber Materials for Beyond Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seongchul; Kim, Jung Sik; Lee, Jae Uk; Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jung Hwan; Ahn, Jinho

    2015-11-01

    In addition to the development of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), studies on beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography (BEUVL), which uses radiation with a wavelength of 6.7 nm, are in progress for their application in high-volume manufacturing. The BEUV wavelength, which is much shorter than the EUV wavelength, improves the resolution of patterned features. However, suitable materials for the mask stack of BEUVL are still under development. In this study, the applicability of metallic materials, such as Ni, Co, Ir, W, and Ta, as the absorber in a binary-intensity BEUVL mask was evaluated. The mask-imaging properties were simulated by adopting a thickness that ensured a reflectivity of <1% for each material. Furthermore, we used a multilayered La/B mirror--which exhibited a high reflectivity at a wavelength of 6.7 nm--because BEUV light is absorbed by most materials, and therefore uses reflective optics as desired. The numerical aperture (NA), angle of incidence, and demagnification factor were 0.5 and 0.6, 6 degrees, and 8x, respectively. We confirmed that a line-and-space pattern with a half-pitch of 11 nm can be patterned with metallic absorbers by using a high NA.

  10. Optical analysis of solar energy tubular absorbers.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, C; Sokolov, M

    1982-11-15

    The energy absorbed by a solar energy tubular receiver element for a single incident ray is derived. Two types of receiver elements were analyzed: (1) an inner tube with an absorbing coating surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube, and (2) a semitransparent inner tube filled with an absorbing fluid surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube. The formation of ray cascades in the semitransparent tubes is considered. A numerical simulation to investigate the influence of the angle of incidence, sizing, thickness, and coefficient of extinction of the tubes was performed. A comparison was made between receiver elements with and without cover tubes. Ray tracing analyses in which rays were followed within the tubular receiver element as well as throughout the rest of the collector were performed for parabolic and circular trough concentrating collectors.

  11. The optical properties of using graphene as a saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keschl, Nathan; Schibli, Thomas; Lee, Chien-Chung; Xie, Wanyan

    2012-10-01

    Graphene, a single-atom layer of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice, has been on the forefront of research since it's discovery in 2005 [1]. Although it has many applications, my research is specialized in the field of utilizing the graphene as a saturable absorber for mode-locking lasers. Currently, the most common method to mode-lock a laser is by using a Semi-conductor Saturable Absorber Mirror (SESAM). Graphene is a substitute for SESAMs with pulse generation as low as 260 fs [2]. However, graphene will begin to ``burn'' as the laser approaches the intensity it needs to mode-lock. We have experimented with various methods of protecting the graphene from burning so it can be used at higher intensity domains.[4pt] [1] A. K. Geim, K. S. Novoselov, ``The rise of graphene.'' Nat Mater. 2007/03//print[0pt] [2] G. Acosta, J.S. Bunch, C.C. Lee, T.R. Schibli, ``Ultra-Short Optical Pulse Generation with Single-Layer Graphene.'' Journal of Nonlinear Optical Physics and Materials, Volume 19, Issue 04, pp. 767-771. 00/2010.

  12. Tunable enhanced optical absorption of graphene using plasmonic perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yijun; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-01-26

    Enhancement and manipulation of light absorption in graphene is a significant issue for applications of graphene-based optoelectronic devices. In order to achieve this purpose in the visible region, we demonstrate a design of a graphene optical absorber inspired by metal-dielectric-metal metamaterial for perfect absorption of electromagnetic waves. The optical absorbance ratios of single and three atomic layer graphene are enhanced up to 37.5% and 64.8%, respectively. The graphene absorber shows polarization-dependence and tolerates a wide range of incident angles. Furthermore, the peak position and bandwidth of graphene absorption spectra are tunable in a wide wavelength range through a specific structural configuration. These results imply that graphene in combination with plasmonic perfect absorbers have a promising potential for developing advanced nanophotonic devices.

  13. Tunable enhanced optical absorption of graphene using plasmonic perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yijun; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement and manipulation of light absorption in graphene is a significant issue for applications of graphene-based optoelectronic devices. In order to achieve this purpose in the visible region, we demonstrate a design of a graphene optical absorber inspired by metal-dielectric-metal metamaterial for perfect absorption of electromagnetic waves. The optical absorbance ratios of single and three atomic layer graphene are enhanced up to 37.5% and 64.8%, respectively. The graphene absorber shows polarization-dependence and tolerates a wide range of incident angles. Furthermore, the peak position and bandwidth of graphene absorption spectra are tunable in a wide wavelength range through a specific structural configuration. These results imply that graphene in combination with plasmonic perfect absorbers have a promising potential for developing advanced nanophotonic devices.

  14. Novel Ultraviolet Light Absorbing Polymers For Optical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doddi, Namassivaya; Yamada, Akira; Dunks, Gary B.

    1988-07-01

    Ultraviolet light absorbing monomers have been developed that can be copolymerized with acrylates. The composition of the resultant stable copolymers can be adjusted to totally block the transmission of light below about 430 nm. Fabrication of lenses from the materials is accomplished by lathe cutting and injection molding procedures. These ultraviolet light absorbing materials are non-mutagenic and non-toxic and are currently being used in intraocular lenses.

  15. Development of optical tools for the characterization of selective solar absorber at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Philemon; Braillon, Julien; Delord, Christine; Raccurt, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for characterization of this solar absorber in condition of use that is to say in air and at elevated temperature. In this paper we present two new optical test benches developed for optical characterization of solar absorbers in condition of use up to 800°C. The first equipment is an integrated sphere with heated sample holder which measures the hemispherical reflectance between 280 and 2500 nm to calculate the solar absorbance at high temperature. The second optical test bench measures the emittance of samples up to 1000°C in the range of 1.25 to 28.57 µm. Results of high temperature measurements on a series of metallic absorbers with selective coating and refractory material for high thermal receiver are presented.

  16. The Workshop on Microwave-Absorbing Materials for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Isidoro Campisi

    1993-05-01

    A workshop on the physics and applications of microwave-absorbing materials in accelerators and related systems was held at CEBAF February 22-24, 1993. The gathering brought together about 150 scientists and representatives of industries from all over the world. The main topics of discussion were the properties of ''absorbing'' materials and how the stringent conditions in an accelerator environment restrict the choice of usable material.

  17. Organic nonlinear optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umegaki, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it became clear that organic compounds with delocalized pi electrons show a great nonlinear optical response. Especially, secondary nonlinear optical constants of more than 2 digits were often seen in the molecular level compared to the existing inorganic crystals such as LiNbO3. The crystallization was continuously tried. Organic nonlinear optical crystals have a new future as materials for use in the applied physics such as photomodulation, optical frequency transformation, opto-bistabilization, and phase conjugation optics. Organic nonlinear optical materials, e.g., urea, O2NC6H4NH2, I, II, are reviewed with 50 references.

  18. Infrared fiber optic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  19. Structural and optical properties of copper-coated substrates for solar thermal absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratesi, Stefano; De Lucia, Maurizio; Meucci, Marco; Sani, Elisa

    2016-10-01

    Spectral selectivity, i.e. merging a high absorbance at sunlight wavelengths to a low emittance at the wavelengths of thermal spectrum, is a key characteristics for materials to be used for solar thermal receivers. It is known that spectrally selective absorbers can raise the receiver efficiency for all solar thermal technologies. Tubular sunlight receivers for parabolic trough collector (PTC) systems can be improved by the use of spectrally selective coatings. Their absorbance is increased by deposing black films, while the thermal emittance is minimized by the use of properly-prepared substrates. In this work we describe the intermediate step in the fabrication of black-chrome coated solar absorbers, namely the fabrication and characterization of copper coatings on previously nickel-plated stainless steel substrates. We investigate the copper surface features and optical properties, correlating them to the coating thickness and to the deposition process, in the perspective to assess optimal conditions for solar absorber applications.

  20. Thermally Resilient, Broadband Optical Absorber from UV to IR Derived from Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Coles, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Optical absorber coatings have been developed from carbon-based paints, metal blacks, or glassy carbon. However, such materials are not truly black and have poor absorption characteristics at longer wavelengths. The blackness of such coatings is important to increase the accuracy of calibration targets used in radiometric imaging spectrometers since blackbody cavities are prohibitively large in size. Such coatings are also useful potentially for thermal detectors, where a broadband absorber is desired. Au-black has been a commonly used broadband optical absorber, but it is very fragile and can easily be damaged by heat and mechanical vibration. An optically efficient, thermally rugged absorber could also be beneficial for thermal solar cell applications for energy harnessing, particularly in the 350-2,500 nm spectral window. It has been demonstrated that arrays of vertically oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs), specifically multi-walled-carbon- nanotubes (MWCNTs), are an exceptional optical absorber over a broad range of wavelengths well into the infrared (IR). The reflectance of such arrays is 100x lower compared to conventional black materials, such as Au black in the spectral window of 350-2,500 nm. Total hemispherical measurements revealed a reflectance of approximately equal to 1.7% at lambda approximately equal to 1 micrometer, and at longer wavelengths into the infrared (IR), the specular reflectance was approximately equal to 2.4% at lambda approximately equal to 7 micrometers. The previously synthesized CNTs for optical absorber applications were formed using water-assisted thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD), which yields CNT lengths in excess of 100's of microns. Vertical alignment, deemed to be a critical feature in enabling the high optical absorption from CNT arrays, occurs primarily via the crowding effect with thermal CVD synthesized CNTs, which is generally not effective in aligning CNTs with lengths less than 10 m. Here it has been shown that the

  1. Optical tomography by the temporally extrapolated absorbance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro; Eda, Hideo; Tsunazawa, Yoshio; Takada, Michinosuke; Yamada, Yukio; Nishimura, Goro; Tamura, Mamoru

    1996-01-01

    The concept of the temporally extrapolated absorbance method (TEAM) for optical tomography of turbid media has been verified by fundamental experiments and image reconstruction. The TEAM uses the time-resolved spectroscopic data of the reference and object to provide projection data that are processed by conventional backprojection. Optical tomography images of a phantom consisting of axisymmetric double cylinders were experimentally obtained with the TEAM and time-gating and continuous-wave (CW) methods. The reconstructed TEAM images are compared with those obtained with the time-gating and CW methods and are found to have better spatial resolution.

  2. Uniaxial absorbing media: conditions for refraction in the direction of the optical axis.

    PubMed

    Diñeiro, J M; Alberdi, C; Hernández, B; Sáenz, C

    2013-03-01

    When a plane wave is incident from an isotropic medium into a uniaxial transparent medium so that the ordinary wave propagates in the direction of the optical axis, the extraordinary wave will also propagate in the same direction and with the same refractive index. We will show that this is not the case when the second medium is a uniaxial absorbing material. In this work, we will state a clear and precise interpretation of the meaning of propagation in the direction of the optical axis in the case of uniaxial absorbing media. Assuming that the ordinary wave is refracted in the direction of the optical axis we will analyze the refraction of the extraordinary wave and we will compare it with the case of transparent media. The necessary conditions to have both ordinary and extraordinary waves refracted in the direction of the optical axis will be obtained.

  3. Schlieren photography to study sound interaction with highly absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Nico F; Degrieck, Joris; Leroy, Oswald

    2005-06-01

    Strong absorption of sound is often caused by the conversion of sound energy into heat. When this happens, it is not possible to study the interaction of sound with the absorbing material by means of reflected sound characteristics, because there is no reflected sound. Detecting for example the distance that sound travels in a strongly absorbing material, can be done by heat detection systems. However, the presence of temperature detectors in such materials interferes with the sound field and is therefore not really suitable. Infrared measurements are a possible option. Another option is the use of Schlieren photography for simultaneous visualization of sound and heat. This technique is briefly outlined with a 3 MHz sound beam incident on a highly absorbing sponge. PMID:15950023

  4. Thin films of copper antimony sulfide: A photovoltaic absorber material

    SciTech Connect

    Ornelas-Acosta, R.E.; Shaji, S.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K.; Krishnan, B.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • CuSbS{sub 2} thin films were prepared by heating Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers. • Analyzed the structure, composition, optical, and electrical properties. • PV structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag were formed at different conditions. • The PV parameters (J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF) were evaluated from the J–V characteristics. • J{sub sc}: 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, V{sub oc}:187–323 mV, FF: 0.27–0.48 were obtained. - Abstract: In this work, we report preparation and characterization of CuSbS{sub 2} thin films by heating glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers and their use as absorber material in photovoltaic structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag. The Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films of 600 nm were prepared by chemical bath deposition on which copper thin films of 50 nm were thermally evaporated, and the glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu multilayers were heated in vacuum at different temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of orthorhombic CuSbS{sub 2} after heating the precursor layers. Studies on identification and chemical state of the elements were done using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical band gap of the CuSbS{sub 2} thin films was 1.55 eV and the thin films were photoconductive. The photovoltaic parameters of the devices using CuSbS{sub 2} as absorber and CdS as window layer were evaluated from the J–V curves, yielding J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF values in the range of 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, 187–323 mV, and 0.27–0.48, respectively, under illumination of AM1.5 radiation.

  5. Absorbed XFEL Dose in the Components of the LCLS X-Ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2010-12-03

    There is great concern that the short, intense XFEL pulse of the LCLS will damage the optics that will be placed into the beam. We have analyzed the extent of the problem by considering the anticipated materials and position of the optical components in the beam path, calculated the absorbed dose as a function of photon energy, and compared these doses with the expected doses required (i) to observe rapid degradation due to thermal fatigue, (ii) to reach the melting temperature, or (iii) to actually melt the material. We list the materials that are anticipated to be placed into the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) beam line, their positions, and the absorbed dose, and compare this dose with anticipated damage thresholds.

  6. Sound-absorbing slabs and structures based on granular materials (bound and unbound). [energy absorbing efficiency of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre-Lazar, S.; Popeea, G.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorbing slabs and structures made up of bound or unbound granular materials are considered and how to manufacture these elements at the building site. The raw material is a single grain powder (sand, expanded blast furnace slag, etc.) that imparts to the end products an apparent porosity of 25-45% and an energy dissipation within the structure leading to absorption coefficients that can be compared with those of mineral wool and urethane.

  7. The changes in optical absorbance of ZrO2 thin film with the rise of the absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abayli, D.; Baydogan, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, zirconium oxide (ZrO2) thin film samples prepared by sol-gel method were irradiated using Co-60 radioisotope as gamma source. Then, it was investigated the ionizing effect on optical properties of ZrO2 thin film samples with the rise of the absorbed dose. The changes in the optical absorbance of ZrO2 thin films were determined by using optical transmittance and the reflectance measurements in the range between 190 - 1100 nm obtained from PG Instruments T80 UV-Vis spectrophotometer.

  8. The effects of optical scattering on pulsed photoacoustic measurement in weakly absorbing liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zuomin; Myllylä, Risto

    2001-12-01

    In this article, a photoacoustic technique, excited by a pulsed diode laser, is used in a study of optically absorbing and scattering liquids. The article discusses the effects of optical scattering on the photoacoustic source and signal. In the empirical part, varying amounts of milk and carbon powder were added to water to control the absorption and scattering coefficients of the resulting liquids. The results showed that scattering increases the duration of the photoacoustic signal while decreasing the signal amplitude to some degree. This paper also shows a quite simple method for measuring the scattering coefficient in weakly absorbing materials using a PZT transducer, which can be used to determine the concentration of highly scattering compositions in some cases.

  9. Application of Absorbable Hemostatic Materials Observed in Thyroid Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Ming; Liang, Zhen-Zhen; Song, Yan

    2016-05-01

    To observe the application effects of the absorbable hemostatic materials in thyroid operation. Methods: From May 2014 to January 2015, 100 patients with thyroid surgery in our university affiliated hospital were selected as the research object. Randomly divided into experimental group and control group, 50 cases in each group. Application of absorbable hemostatic hemostatic materials in the experimental group during the operation, the control group using the traditional mechanical methods of hemostasis hemostasis to observe the operation time, bleeding volume, postoperative drainage volume, complications and hospital stay of the two groups. Results: The operation time, bleeding volume, postoperative drainage and hospital stay in the experimental group were significantly lower in the study group than in the control group, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P< 0.05); The satisfaction of patients in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group, the difference was statistically significant in the two groups (P < 0.05); There was no significant difference in the incidence of wound bleeding complications between the study group and the control group (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Absorbable hemostatic materials can effectively shorten the operation time, reduce intraoperative blood loss and postoperative drainage, reduce the length of hospital stay and improve the success rate of surgery and patient satisfaction, which is worthy to be popularized in clinical thyroid surgery.

  10. Negative Refraction in a Uniaxial Absorbent Dielectric Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Yu, Ching-Wei; Lin, Chin-Te

    2009-01-01

    Refraction of light from an isotropic dielectric medium to an anisotropic dielectric material is a complicated phenomenon that can have several different characteristics not usually discussed in electromagnetics textbooks for undergraduate students. With a simple problem wherein the refracting material is uniaxial with its optic axis normal to the…

  11. An `H'-shape three-dimensional meta-material used in honeycomb structure absorbing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Daqing; Kang, Feiyu; Zhou, Zhuohui; Cheng, Hongfei; Ding, Heyan

    2015-03-01

    An `H'-shape three-dimensional meta-material structure which loaded on the sidewall of honeycomb structure absorbing material was designed and fabricated in this project. The simulation results demonstrated a super-wide absorption band below -10 dB between 2.3 and 18 GHz, which expanded 7 GHz compared with the absorber without meta-material. The relative impedance curve was analyzed, which showed that the meta-material has little impact on the impedance-matching characteristics of the honeycomb structure absorbing material. We further studied the distribution of both electronic field energy and magnetic field energy. The former one indicated that the low-frequency absorption peaks could easily be moved by adjusting the parameters of the parallel-plate capacitors which generate electric resonance, and the latter one illustrated that the three-dimensional meta-material could generate magnetic resonance between units which would not exist in two-dimensional meta-material. Then we verified the simulation results through experiment which display a similar absorbing curve. The differences between simulation results and experiment results were caused by the addition substrate of the meta-material, which could not be eliminated in this experiment. However, it still implied that we can obtain a meta-material absorber that has a super-wide absorbing band if we can put the meta-material on the sidewall of the honeycomb without attachments.

  12. Fiber optic moisture sensor with moisture-absorbing reflective target

    DOEpatents

    Kirkham, Randy R.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  13. [Shaping of electron radiation fields using homogeneous absorbent materials].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M; Reis, A; Kraft, M

    1990-01-01

    Proof of shielding and forming by absorbers was done in water phantom dosimetrically. Alterations of isodose course were measured in dependence of primary energy, as well as of thickness and density of the absorber materials. Piacryl or aluminium are not suitable for forming of irregular electron fields. They only effect a reduction of therapeutic range. For primary energies of 10.0 less than or equal to MeV less than or equal to E0- less than or equal to 20.0 MeV lead rubber and wood metal are to recommended in a thickness of less than or equal to 10 mm or less than or equal to 8 mm respectively.

  14. Porphyrin Based Near Infrared-Absorbing Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiwen

    The conservation and transformation of energy is essential to the survival of mankind, and thus concerns every modern society. Solar energy, as an everlasting source of energy, holds one of the key solutions to some of the most urgent problems the world now faces, such as global warming and the oil crisis. Advances in technologies utilizing clean, abundant solar energy, could be the steering wheel of our societies. Solar cells, one of the major advances in converting solar energy into electricity, are now capturing people's interest all over the globe. While solar cells have been commercially available for many years, the manufacturing of solar cells is quite expensive, limiting their broad based implementation. The cost of solar cell based electricity is 15-50 cents per kilowatt hour (¢/kwh), depending on the type of solar cell, compared to 0.7 ¢/kwh for fossil fuel based electricity. Clearly, decreasing the cost of electricity from solar cells is critical for their wide spread deployment. This will require a decrease in the cost of light absorbing materials and material processing used in fabricating the cells. Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) utilize organic materials such as polymers and small molecules. These devices have the advantage of being flexible and lower cost than conventional solar cells built from inorganic semiconductors (e.g. silicon). The low cost of OPVs is tied to lower materials and fabrication costs of organic cells. However, the current power conversion efficiencies of OPVs are still below 15%, while convention crystalline Si cells have efficiencies of 20-25%. A key limitation in OPVs today is their inability to utilize the near infrared (NIR) portion of the solar spectrum. This part of the spectrum comprises nearly half of the energy in sunlight that could be used to make electricity. The first and foremost step in conversion solar energy conversion is the absorption of light, which nature has provided us optimal model of, which is

  15. Optical polarizer material

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, Christopher A.

    1999-01-01

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  16. Optical polarizer material

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  17. Organic Materials For Optical Switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1993-01-01

    Equations predict properties of candidate materials. Report presents results of theoretical study of nonlinear optical properties of organic materials. Such materials used in optical switching devices for computers and telecommunications, replacing electronic switches. Optical switching potentially offers extremely high information throughout in compact hardware.

  18. Smart materials optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2014-08-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional or `smart' composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation as well. Moreover, since the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and 3D printing. The technology therefore holds promise for development of a new generation of lightweight, compact `smart' telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  19. Conducting-polymer-based radar-absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Vo-Van; Turner, Ben D.; Muscat, Richard F.; Russo, M. S.

    1997-11-01

    The controllability of conductivity and the ease of manufacturing/coating of conducting polymers enable tailor- made dielectric loss components for radar absorbing materials (RAM). Different polypyrrole (PPy) based RAM, e.g. paint/rubber containing PPy powder and PPy coated structural phenolic foams with a gradient of impedance, have been examined. Reflection loss strongly depends on thickness and complex permittivity of the material. For a single layer material, the optimum values of the real part, (epsilon) ', and imaginary part, (epsilon) ", of the complex permittivity required to achieve a minimum reflectivity at a given sample thickness are found by theoretical calculations. The conductivity of the PPy powder is controlled to obtain RAM with lowest reflectivity according to the calculated optimum values of (epsilon) ' and (epsilon) ". A paint panel containing 2 wt% of the PPy powder with a thickness of 2.5 mm exhibits a reflectivity less than $minus 10 dB over 12 to 18 GHz. Blending and milling in the manufacturing process can destroy the original fibrous shape of PPy aggregates leading to low absorbing performances. PPy can be coated on rigid or flexible open cell foams to provide a lightweight broadband RAM. In particular, a coating technique on phenolic foams (12 - 15 mm thick) with a pore size of micrometer order has been developed to generate a gradient of conductivity across the foam thickness. The PPy coated foams are broadband RAM.

  20. Development of optical tool for the characterization of selective solar absorber tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braillon, Julien; Stollo, Alessio; Delord, Christine; Raccurt, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    In the Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies, selective solar absorbers, which have a cylindrical geometry, are submitted to strong environmental constraints. The degradation of their optical properties (total solar absorbance and total emittance) has a direct impact on the performances. In order to know optical properties of absorber tubes, we present in this article a new optical tool developed by our laboratory which fit onto commercial spectrometers. Total solar absorbance and total emittance are calculated from total reflectance spectra measured by UV-Vis and IR spectrophotometry. To verify and validate the measurement method, we performed a comparative study between flat and cylindrical samples with same surface properties.

  1. Optical architecture design for detection of absorbers embedded in visceral fat

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Robert; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Optically absorbing ducts embedded in scattering adipose tissue can be injured during laparoscopic surgery. Non-sequential simulations and theoretical analysis compare optical system configurations for detecting these absorbers. For absorbers in deep scattering volumes, trans-illumination is preferred instead of diffuse reflectance. For improved contrast, a scanning source with a large area detector is preferred instead of a large area source with a pixelated detector. PMID:24877008

  2. Optical architecture design for detection of absorbers embedded in visceral fat.

    PubMed

    Francis, Robert; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2014-05-01

    Optically absorbing ducts embedded in scattering adipose tissue can be injured during laparoscopic surgery. Non-sequential simulations and theoretical analysis compare optical system configurations for detecting these absorbers. For absorbers in deep scattering volumes, trans-illumination is preferred instead of diffuse reflectance. For improved contrast, a scanning source with a large area detector is preferred instead of a large area source with a pixelated detector. PMID:24877008

  3. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  4. Optically Excited Surface Polaritons Using Strongly Absorbing Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuzi

    1991-08-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The results of several experiments, performed using the Otto configuration and infrared radiation to excite such modes supported at the surface of several transition metals having strong absorption at the wavelength, proves that even if the active medium has very strong absorption, a surface polariton can still be excited. Experiments, which use the Kretschmann configuration to measure the permittivity and thickness of the thin active film deposited on the prism together with the use of the hybrid Otto-Kretschmann geometry to excite the interaction between a surface plasmon - and a surface exciton-polariton have also been performed. These show the strong influences of the large imaginary component of the permittivity of the active medium. A detailed analysis of the surface modes of a thin slab of material of dielectric constant epsilon _2(= epsilon_{r2 } + iepsilon_{i2 }) surrounded symmetrically by dielectric media is also presented in this thesis. We also find that a long range surface mode may arise from the coupling between two surfaces which individually cannot support a surface mode. These are a pair of special coupled-surface modes which may exist below a certain critical film thickness and which have two separate propagation vectors each with the same field symmetry. It is also found that the inverse situation may pertain. The analysis has also been extended to practical situations with weakly absorbing surrounding media and to circumstances where the dielectric constants of the surrounding media are slightly different. The role played by the imaginary part of the permittivity of the active layers in a multi-layered geometry is discussed. The redistribution of the field in the multi-layered structure explains why a long range surface polariton can be supported on very strongly absorbing films and the effect from the prism coupling may introduce a lower loss of a LRSEP than one of its uncoupled

  5. Boron-copper neutron absorbing material and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry

    1991-01-01

    A composite, copper clad neutron absorbing material is comprised of copper powder and boron powder enriched with boron 10. The boron 10 content can reach over 30 percent by volume, permitting a very high level of neutron absorption. The copper clad product is also capable of being reduced to a thickness of 0.05 to 0.06 inches and curved to a radius of 2 to 3 inches, and can resist temperatures of 900.degree. C. A method of preparing the material includes the steps of compacting a boron-copper powder mixture and placing it in a copper cladding, restraining the clad assembly in a steel frame while it is hot rolled at 900.degree. C. with cross rolling, and removing the steel frame and further rolling the clad assembly at 650.degree. C. An additional sheet of copper can be soldered onto the clad assembly so that the finished sheet can be cold formed into curved shapes.

  6. Thin absorber EUV photomask based on mixed Ni and TaN material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Derrick; Bagge, Patrick; Khaw, Ian; Sun, Lei; Wood, Obert; Chen, Yulu; Kim, Ryoung-han; Qi, Zhengqing John; Shi, Zhimin

    2016-05-01

    Lithographic patterning at the 7 and 5 nm nodes will likely require EUV (λ=13.5 nm) lithography for many of the critical levels. All optical elements in an EUV scanner are reflective which requires the EUV photomask to be illuminated at an angle to its normal. Current scanners have an incidence of 6 degree, but future designs will be <6 degrees for high-NA systems. Non-telecentricity has been shown to cause H-V bias due to shadowing, pattern shift through focus, and image contrast lost due to apodization by the reflective mask coating. A thinner EUV absorber can dramatically reduce these issues. Ni offers better EUV absorption than Ta-based materials, which hold promise as a thinner absorber candidate. Unfortunately, the challenge of etching Ni has prevented its adoption into manufacturing. We propose a new absorber material that infuses Ni nanoparticles into the TaN host medium, allowing for the use of established Ta etching chemistry. A thinner is absorber is created due to the enhanced absorption properties of the Ni-Ta nano-composite material. Finite integral method and effective medium theory-based transfer matrix method have been independently developed to analyze the performance of the nano-composite absorption layer. We show that inserting 15% volume fraction Ni nanoparticles into 40-nm of TaN absorber material can reduce the reflection below 2% over the EUV range. Numerical simulations confirm that the reduced reflectivity is due to the increased absorption of Ni, while scattering only contributes to approximately 0.2% of the reduction in reflectivity.

  7. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-16

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-01

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm2.

  9. Basic optics of effect materials.

    PubMed

    Jones, Steven A

    2010-01-01

    Effect materials derive their color and effect primarily from thin-film interference. Effect materials have evolved over the decades from simple guanine crystals to the complex multilayer optical structures of today. The development of new complex effect materials requires an understanding of the optics of effect materials. Such an understanding would also benefit the cosmetic formulator as these new effect materials are introduced. The root of this understanding begins with basic optics. This paper covers the nature of light, interference of waves, thin-film interference, color from interference, and color travel.

  10. Investigation of MEMS bi-material sensors with metamaterial absorbers for THz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Fabio; Grbovic, Dragoslav; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2014-06-01

    There has been a continued interest in the terahertz (THz) imaging due to penetration and non-ionizing properties. Realtime imaging in this spectral range has been demonstrated using infrared microbolometer technology with external illumination by quantum cascade lasers (QCL). However, to achieve high sensitivity, it is necessary to develop focal plane arrays using enhanced THz-absorbing materials. One attractive option to achieve real time THz imaging is MEMS bi-material sensor with embedded metamaterial absorbers, consisting of a periodic array of metallic squared elements separated from a homogeneous metallic ground plane by a dielectric layer. We have demonstrated that the metamaterial films can be designed using standard MEMS materials such as silicon oxide (SiOx), silicon oxinitrate (SiOxNy) and aluminum (Al), to achieve nearly 100 % resonant absorption matched to the illumination source, while providing structural support, desired thermomechanical properties and access to external optical readout. The metamaterial structure absorbs the incident THz radiation and transfers the heat to bi-material microcantilevers that are connected to the substrate, which acts as a heat sink, via thermal insulating legs. A temperature gradient builds up in the legs, allowing the overall structure to deform proportionally to the absorbed power. The amount of deformation can be probed by measuring the displacement of a laser beam reflected from the sensor's metallic ground plane. Several sensor configurations have been designed, fabricated and characterized to optimize responsivity, speed of operation and minimize structural residual stress. Measured figures of merit indicate that the THz MEMS sensors have a great potential for real-time imaging.

  11. Scattering in optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Musikant, S.

    1983-01-01

    Topics discussed include internal scattering and surface scattering, environmental effects, and various applications. Papers are presented on scattering in ZnSe laser windows, the far-infrared reflectance spectra of optical black coatings, the effects of standard optical shop practices on scattering, and the damage susceptibility of ring laser gyro class optics. Attention is also given to the infrared laser stimulated desorption of pyridine from silver surfaces, to electrically conductive black optical paint, to light scattering from an interface bubble, and to the role of diagnostic testing in identifying and resolving dimensional stability problems in electroplated laser mirrors.

  12. Alternative materials to cadmium for neutron absorbers in safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Corey R; Geist, William H; West, James D

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium is increasingly difficult to use in safeguards applications because of rising cost and increased safety regulations. This work examines the properties of two materials produced by Ceradyne, inc. that present alternatives to cadmium for neutron shielding. The first is an aluminum metal doped with boron and the second is a boron carbide powder, compressed into a ceramic. Both are enriched in the {sup 10}B isotope. Two sheets of boron doped aluminum (1.1 mm and 5.2mm thick) and one sheet of boron carbide (8.5mm thick) were provided by Ceradyne for testing. An experiment was designed to test the neutron absorption capabilities of these three sheets against two different thicknesses of cadmium (0.6mm and 1.6mm thick). The thinner piece of aluminum boron alloy (1.1mm) performed as well as the cadmium pieces at absorbing neutrons. The thicker aluminum-boron plate provided more shielding than the cadmium sheets and the boron carbide performed best by a relatively large margin. Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code modeling of the experiment was performed to provide validaLed computational tools for predicting the behavior of systems in which these materials may be incorporated as alternatives to cadmium. MCNPX calculations predict that approximately 0.17mm of the boron carbide is equivalent to 0.6mm of cadmium. There are drawbacks to these materials that need to be noted when considering using them as replacements for cadmium. Notably, they may need to be thicker than cadmium, and are not malleable, requiring machining to fit any curved forms.

  13. Nanostructured thin film-based near-infrared tunable perfect absorber using phase-change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocer, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured thin film absorbers embedded with phase-change thermochromic material can provide a large level of absorption tunability in the near-infrared region. Vanadium dioxide was employed as the phase-change material in the designed structures. The optical absorption properties of the designed structures with respect to the geometric and material parameters were systematically investigated using finite-difference time-domain computations. Absorption level of the resonance wavelength in the near-IR region was tuned from the perfect absorption level to a low level (17%) with a high positive dynamic range of near-infrared absorption intensity tunability (83%). Due to the phase transition of vanadium dioxide, the resonance at the near-infrared region is being turned on and turned off actively and reversibly under the thermal bias, thereby rendering these nanostructures suitable for infrared camouflage, emitters, and sensors.

  14. On the physical and geometrical properties responsible for the highly absorbing nature of black materials in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Steven Robert

    Black surfaces are of paramount importance in the design of terrestrial and space-borne optical systems. Optical designers can choose from a variety of black materials to suppress reflected and scattered stray light. Among these applications are the suppression of unwanted reflection or scattering of light in optical systems, solar collectors, blackbody absorbers, thermal insulators, telescope housing and baffles where stray light reduction is vital, and cold stops and light shields for infrared detectors. The physical mechanisms responsible for understanding the highly absorbing nature of black materials in the infrared spectral region are investigated in this dissertation. We present experimental data on the optical, surface, and constituent properties of black materials. In addition, we developed unique optical instrumentation to characterize the hemispherical reflectance and scattering properties of these materials as a function of incident angle and state of polarization. We compared the experimental data to theoretical rough surface scattering models to understand the absorption mechanisms of these black materials and found good agreement. Furthermore, results from a new, highly absorbing black material in the infrared wavelength regime, known as carbon aerogels, are presented and shown to be superior or equivalent to existing black materials used by optical designers. In addition, we presented a new cylindrical-spherical cavity enclosure and calculated the apparent emissivity along the bounding surfaces of this new cavity enclosure. To our knowledge, this was the first calculation of the apparent emissivity for a cavity enclosure with obscuration. Finally, we proposed several improvements for each individual black material in order to achieve even higher absorption levels.

  15. Phantoms for diffuse optical imaging based on totally absorbing objects, part 2: experimental implementation.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Di Ninni, Paola; Zaccanti, Giovanni; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Mazurenka, Mikhail; Macdonald, Rainer; Sassaroli, Angelo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We present the experimental implementation and validation of a phantom for diffuse optical imaging based on totally absorbing objects for which, in the previous paper [J. Biomed. Opt.18(6), 066014, (2013)], we have provided the basic theory. Totally absorbing objects have been manufactured as black polyvinyl chloride (PVC) cylinders and the phantom is a water dilution of intralipid-20% as the diffusive medium and India ink as the absorber, filled into a black scattering cell made of PVC. By means of time-domain measurements and of Monte Carlo simulations, we have shown the reliability, the accuracy, and the robustness of such a phantom in mimicking typical absorbing perturbations of diffuse optical imaging. In particular, we show that such a phantom can be used to generate any absorption perturbation by changing the volume and position of the totally absorbing inclusion.

  16. Solar absorber material stability under high solar flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, A.; Zajac, G.; Smith, G. B.

    1982-04-01

    Solar absorbing Black Chrome coatings have been exposed to high temperatures (350-400 C) under high solar fluxes (0.4 to 2.0 MW/sq m) to test for their stability under actual operating conditions. Field tests at the White Sands Solar Furnace have shown higher stability than expected from oven tested samples. Laboratory studies utilizing spectrally selective concentrated solar simulated radiation have indicated that the cause of the higher stability under solar irradiation is photo-stimulated desorption of oxygen bearing species at the absorber surface and resultant reduced oxidation of the absorber.

  17. Extrinsic chirality: Tunable optically active reflectors and perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plum, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three-dimensional (3D) chiral media can exhibit optical activity for transmitted waves, but optical activity for reflected waves is negligible. This work shows that mirror asymmetry of the experimental arrangement—extrinsic 3D chirality—leads to giant optical activity for reflected waves with fundamentally different characteristics. It is demonstrated experimentally that extrinsically 3D-chiral illumination of a lossy metasurface backed by a mirror enables tunable circular dichroism and circular birefringence as well as perfect absorption of circularly polarized waves. In contrast, such polarization phenomena vanish for conventional optically active media backed by a mirror.

  18. Optically controlled in-line graphene saturable absorber for the manipulation of pulsed fiber laser operation.

    PubMed

    Gene, Jinhwa; Park, Nam Hun; Jeong, Hwanseong; Choi, Sun Young; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il; Kim, Byoung Yoon

    2016-09-19

    We demonstrate an optically tunable graphene saturable absorber to manipulate the laser operation in pulsed fiber laser system. Owing to the strongly enhanced evanescent field interaction with monolayer graphene, we could realize an efficient control of modulation depth in the graphene saturable absorber by optical means through cross absorption modulation method. By integrating the tunable graphene saturable absorber into the fiber laser system, we could switch the laser operation from Q-switching through Q-switched mode-locking to continuous wave mode-locking by adjusting only the optical power of the control beam. In addition, we realized a hybrid Q-switching of fiber laser by periodical modulation of the absorption of the graphene saturable absorber, where we observed that the repetition rate of the Q-switched laser could be continuously tuned according to the modulation frequency of the applied external signal. PMID:27661873

  19. Millimeter wave complex dielectric permittivity and complex magnetic permeability measurements of absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachov, Igor Ivanovich

    2000-09-01

    This dissertation presents new methods for characterization of materials in the millimeter wave range. Historically, this has been the most difficult part of the electromagnetic spectrum for accurate measurements of material properties. New instrumentation has now been developed for operation in this frequency band. The new techniques developed in the course of this work allowed precise measurement of dielectric properties as well as the separation of magnetic properties from dielectric in the millimeter wave range. A new quasi-optical spectrometer with a waveguide reference channel has been designed and built for the precision measurement of the real part of dielectric permittivity of medium and highly absorbing materials over an extended W-band frequency range (70-118 GHz). A new method of phase measurement with this unique unbalanced quasi-optical waveguide bridge spectrometer has been developed. The phase of the electromagnetic wave transmitted through the specimen can be measured accurately, leading to the determination of the real part of the complex dielectric permittivity of moderate and highly absorbing dielectric materials with high precision. A simple quasi-optical transmission configuration of the spectrometer, a single free space channel provides the transmittance data with a high resolution from which the spectra of the imaginary part of dielectric permittivity of materials are evaluated accurately. A backward wave oscillator (BWO) is used as the source of tunable coherent radiation for the spectrometer. The high output power of the BWO and the high sensitivity of the receiver system, which employs a specially constructed liquid helium cooled InSb detector, enable adequate sensitivity in transmission for highly absorbing materials. Systematic study of dielectric and magnetic properties of various materials has been performed with the quasi-optical free space method in the millimeter wave range from 34GHz to 117GHz for the first time. Specific results

  20. Photothermally tunable silicon-microring-based optical add-drop filter through integrated light absorber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Shi, Yuechun; Lou, Fei; Chen, Yiting; Yan, Min; Wosinski, Lech; Qiu, Min

    2014-10-20

    An optically pumped thermo-optic (TO) silicon ring add-drop filter with fast thermal response is experimentally demonstrated. We propose that metal-insulator-metal (MIM) light absorber can be integrated into silicon TO devices, acting as a localized heat source which can be activated remotely by a pump beam. The MIM absorber design introduces less thermal capacity to the device, compared to conventional electrically-driven approaches. Experimentally, the absorber-integrated add-drop filter shows an optical response time of 13.7 μs following the 10%-90% rule (equivalent to a exponential time constant of 5 μs) and a wavelength shift over pump power of 60 pm/mW. The photothermally tunable add-drop filter may provide new perspectives for all-optical routing and switching in integrated Si photonic circuits. PMID:25401557

  1. Structure, optical properties and thermal stability of Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic spectrally selective solar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang-Hu; Wang, Cheng-Bing; Guo, Zhi-Ming; Geng, Qing-Fen; Theiss, Wolfgang; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Traditional metal-dielectric composite coating has found important application in spectrally selective solar absorbers. However, fine metal particles can easily diffuse, congregate, or be oxidized at high temperature, which causes deterioration in the optical properties. In this work, we report a new spectrally selective solar absorber coating, composed of low Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(L)-WC) layer, high Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(H)-WC layer) and Al2O3 antireflection layer. The features of our work are: 1) compared with the metal-dielectric composites concept, Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic successfully achieves the all-ceramic concept, which exhibits a high solar absorptance of 0.94 and a low thermal emittance of 0.08, 2) Al2O3 and WC act as filler material and host material, respectively, which are different from traditional concept, 3) Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic solar absorber coating exhibits good thermal stability at 600 °C. In addition, the solar absorber coating is successfully modelled by a commercial optical simulation programme, the result of which agrees with the experimental results.

  2. Knitted radar absorbing materials (RAM) based on nickel-cobalt magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teber, Ahmet; Unver, Ibrahim; Kavas, Huseyin; Aktas, Bekir; Bansal, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    There has been a long-standing interest in the development of flexible, lightweight, thin, and reconfigurable radar absorbing materials (RAM) for military applications such as camouflaging ground-based hardware against airborne radar observation. The use of polymeric Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fabrics as a host matrix for magnetic metal nano-particles (either at the yarn-stage or after weaving the fabric) for shielding and absorbing applications has been described in the literature. In our experimental investigation, the relative concentrations of Nickel and Cobalt as well as the coating time are varied with a view to optimizing the microwave absorption characteristics of the resulting PAN-based composite material in the radar-frequency bands (X, Ku, and K). It is found that the PAN samples with the shortest coating time have the best return losses (under -20 dB return loss over a moderate bandwidth).

  3. New Electromagnetic Absorbers Composed of Left-handed and Right-handed Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Weihai; Xu, Shanjia

    2008-08-01

    New double-layered electromagnetic absorbers are presented in this paper. The new absorbers composed of one lossy left-handed material absorbing layer and one impedance matching layer consisted of lossless right-handed material. It is indicated that the reflection loss of below -20dB can be obtained in the frequency range 7GHz 13GHz. Power attenuation achieving -50dB of narrow frequency band electromagnetic absorbers can also be obtained by modulate permittivity of right-handed material. Furthermore, the thickness of the whole absorbing structure is only 2mm, which is particularly helpful in some practical applications. The presented results are of reference significance for accurate design of the new electromagnetic absorbers and of practical prospects for stealth technology.

  4. Satellite material contaminant optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. E.; Bertrand, W. T.; Seiber, B. L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, P. M.; Holt, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. Presented here are infrared (4000 to 700 cm(-1)) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K geranium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contents determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  5. Satellite material contaminant optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Bertrand, W. T.; Seiber, B. L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, P. M.

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. Presented here are infrared (4000 to 700/cm) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K germanium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contents determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing, and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  6. Satellite material contaminant optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Bertrand, W. T.; Seiber, B. L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, P. M.; Holt, J. D.

    1990-03-01

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. Presented here are infrared (4000 to 700 cm(-1)) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K germanium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contents determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  7. Satellite Material Contaminant Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bobby E.; Bertrand, William T.; Seiber, Bryan L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, Patrick M.; Holt, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. This paper presents infrared (4000 to 700 cm-1) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K geranium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contants determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  8. Optical closure study on light-absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, Andreas; Bundke, Ulrich; Freedman, Andrew; Onasch, Timothy B.; Massoli, Paola; Andrews, Elizabeth; Hallar, Anna G.

    2014-05-01

    The in situ measurement of atmospheric aerosol optical properties is an important component of quantifying climate change. In particular, the in-situ measurement of the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA), which is the ratio of aerosol scattering to aerosol extinction, is identified as a key challenge in atmospheric sciences and climate change research. Ideally, the complete set of aerosol optical properties is measured through optical closure studies which simultaneous measure aerosol extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients. The recent development of new optical instruments have made real-time in situ optical closure studies attainable, however, many of these instruments are state-of-the-art but not practical for routine monitoring. In our studies we deployed a suit of well-established and recently developed instruments including the cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) method for aerosol light extinction, multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) for aerosol light absorption, and an integrating nephelometer (NEPH) for aerosol light scattering measurements. From these directly measured optical properties we calculated light absorption from extinction minus scattering (difference method), light extinction from scattering plus absorption, and aerosol single-scattering albedo from combinations CAPS + MAAP, NEPH + PSAP, NEPH + MAAP, CAPS + NEPH. Closure studies were conducted for laboratory-generated aerosols composed of various mixtures of black carbon (Regal 400R pigment black, Cabot Corp.) and ammonium sulphate, urban aerosol (Billerica, MA), and background aerosol (Storm Peak Lab.). Key questions addressed in our closure studies are: (1) how well can we measure aerosol light absorption by various methods, and (2) how well can we measure the aerosol single-scattering albedo by various instrument combinations? In particular we investigated (3) whether the combination of a CAPS and NEPH provides a reasonable

  9. Nanophase and Composite Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This talk will focus on accomplishments, current developments, and future directions of our work on composite optical materials for microgravity science and space exploration. This research spans the order parameter from quasi-fractal structures such as sol-gels and other aggregated or porous media, to statistically random cluster media such as metal colloids, to highly ordered materials such as layered media and photonic bandgap materials. The common focus is on flexible materials that can be used to produce composite or artificial materials with superior optical properties that could not be achieved with homogeneous materials. Applications of this work to NASA exploration goals such as terraforming, biosensors, solar sails, solar cells, and vehicle health monitoring, will be discussed.

  10. The role of lanthanides in optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    A survey is presented of the use of the lanthanides as chemical components in transmitting optical materials and as activators in materials for luminescent, electro-optic, magneto-optic, and various photosensitive applications.

  11. Materials Discovery: Informatic Strategies for Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2007-01-15

    Information-based materials discovery offers a structured method to evolve materials signatures based upon their physical properties, and to direct searches using performance-based criteria. In this current paper, we focus on the crystal structure aspects of an optical material and construct an information-based model to determine the proclivity of a particular AB composition to exhibit multiple crystal system behavior. Exploratory data methods used both supervised (support-vector machines) and unsupervised (disorder-reduction and principal-component) classification methods for structural signature development; revealing complementary valid signatures. Examination of the relative contributions of the materials chemistry descriptors within these signatures indicates a strong role for Mendeleev number chemistry which must be balanced against the cationic/anionic radius ratio and electronegativity differences of constituents within the unit cell.

  12. Boron cage compound materials and composites for shielding and absorbing neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2014-03-04

    Boron cage compound-containing materials for shielding and absorbing neutrons. The materials include BCC-containing composites and compounds. BCC-containing compounds comprise a host polymer and a BCC attached thereto. BCC-containing composites comprise a mixture of a polymer matrix and a BCC filler. The BCC-containing materials can be used to form numerous articles of manufacture for shielding and absorbing neutrons.

  13. Optical design of nanowire absorbers for wavelength selective photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Mokkapati, S.; Saxena, D.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2015-01-01

    We propose the optical design for the absorptive element of photodetectors to achieve wavelength selective photo response based on resonant guided modes supported in semiconductor nanowires. We show that the waveguiding properties of nanowires result in very high absorption efficiency that can be exploited to reduce the volume of active semiconductor compared to planar photodetectors, without compromising the photocurrent. We present a design based on a group of nanowires with varying diameter for multi-color photodetectors with small footprint. We discuss the effect of a dielectric shell around the nanowires on the absorption efficiency and present a simple approach to optimize the nanowire diameter-dielectric shell thickness for maximizing the absorption efficiency. PMID:26469227

  14. Measurements of the light-absorbing material inside cloud droplets and its effect on cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Clarke, A. D.; Warren, Stephen G.; Radke, L. F.; Charleson, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    Most of the measurements of light-absorbing aerosol particles made previously have been in non-cloudy air and therefore provide no insight into aerosol effects on cloud properties. Here, researchers describe an experiment designed to measure light absorption exclusively due to substances inside cloud droplets, compare the results to related light absorption measurements, and evaluate possible effects on the albedo of clouds. The results of this study validate those of Twomey and Cocks and show that the measured levels of light-absorbing material are negligible for the radiative properties of realistic clouds. For the measured clouds, which appear to have been moderately polluted, the amount of elemental carbon (EC) present was insufficient to affect albedo. Much higher contaminant levels or much larger droplets than those measured would be necessary to significantly alter the radiative properties. The effect of the concentrations of EC actually measured on the albedo of snow, however, would be much more pronounced since, in contrast to clouds, snowpacks are usually optically semi-infinite and have large particle sizes.

  15. Optical Spectroscopy of New Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1993-01-01

    Composites are currently used for a rapidly expanding number of applications including aircraft structures, rocket nozzles, thermal protection of spacecraft, high performance ablative surfaces, sports equipment including skis, tennis rackets and bicycles, lightweight automobile components, cutting tools, and optical-grade mirrors. Composites are formed from two or more insoluble materials to produce a material with superior properties to either component. Composites range from dispersion-hardened alloys to advanced fiber-reinforced composites. UV/VIS and FTIR spectroscopy currently is used to evaluate the bonding between the matrix and the fibers, monitor the curing process of a polymer, measure surface contamination, characterize the interphase material, monitor anion transport in polymer phases, characterize the void formation (voids must be minimized because, like cracks in a bulk material, they lead to failure), characterize the surface of the fiber component, and measure the overall optical properties for energy balances.

  16. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the cost of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.

  17. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the costmore » of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.« less

  18. Electrically tunable metasurface perfect absorbers for ultrathin mid-infrared optical modulators.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yu; Shankar, Raji; Kats, Mikhail A; Song, Yi; Kong, Jing; Loncar, Marko; Capasso, Federico

    2014-11-12

    Dynamically reconfigurable metasurfaces open up unprecedented opportunities in applications such as high capacity communications, dynamic beam shaping, hyperspectral imaging, and adaptive optics. The realization of high performance metasurface-based devices remains a great challenge due to very limited tuning ranges and modulation depths. Here we show that a widely tunable metasurface composed of optical antennas on graphene can be incorporated into a subwavelength-thick optical cavity to create an electrically tunable perfect absorber. By switching the absorber in and out of the critical coupling condition via the gate voltage applied on graphene, a modulation depth of up to 100% can be achieved. In particular, we demonstrated ultrathin (thickness < λ0/10) high speed (up to 20 GHz) optical modulators over a broad wavelength range (5-7 μm). The operating wavelength can be scaled from the near-infrared to the terahertz by simply tailoring the metasurface and cavity dimensions. PMID:25310847

  19. Detection of Organic Compounds in Water by an Optical Absorbance Method

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chihoon; Eom, Joo Beom; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optical method which allows determination of the organic compound concentration in water by measurement of the UV (ultraviolet) absorption at a wavelength of 250 nm~300 nm. The UV absorbance was analyzed by means of a multiple linear regression model for estimation of the total organic carbon contents in water, which showed a close correlation with the UV absorbance, demonstrating a high adjusted coefficient of determination, 0.997. The comparison of the TOC (total organic carbon) concentrations for real samples (tab water, sea, and river) calculated from the UV absorbance spectra, and those measured by a conventional TOC analyzer indicates that the higher the TOC value the better the agreement. This UV absorbance method can be easily configured for real-time monitoring water pollution, and built into a compact system applicable to industry areas. PMID:26742043

  20. Optical spectroscopy of novel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijnders, Anjan A.

    Optical Spectroscopy is a well-established experimental technique for the study of solids, gasses, and liquids. This thesis focuses on two broad topics related to optical spectroscopy; experimental instrumentation, and its application to novel materials. The first half of the thesis discusses the design and construction of a novel, multifunctional magneto-optical spectroscopy apparatus with exceptional repeatability. Included are the operating principles of FTIR reflectance and transmittance spectroscopy, and the optical ray-tracing design, physical design, and characterization of a custom built magneto-optical spectroscopy apparatus. The second half of the thesis discusses the experimental results of a comprehensive spectroscopic study of Topological Insulators and thermoelectric Pb0.77Sn0.23Se. Topological Insulators (TIs) are a recently discovered phase of matter in which highly conductive free carriers are found on the surface of small band-gap insulators. A challenge in TI research is the experimental isolation of conductive surface states from the bulk states, which are frequently plagued by residual conductivity due to impurities. In this work, optical spectroscopy is used to simultaneously probe the bulk and surface states to study their individual optical properties, in addition to their coupling. Using variable temperature, crystal orientation, and a broad frequency range, we identify compounds with the most resistive bulk states, and provide new insights into carrier dynamics, surface state conductance suppression as a function of temperature, and practical material optimization guidelines for application purposes. A comprehensive optical investigation of Pb0.77Sn0.23Se is also discussed. This is a promising thermoelectric, which exhibits a temperature dependent band inversion, associated with a topological phase transition. We find clear evidence for this band inversion, and find a bulk carrier lifetime dominated by electron-acoustic phonon scattering

  1. Optical absorbance measurements and photoacoustic evaluation of freeze-thawed polyvinyl-alcohol vessel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabul, M. U.; Heres, H. M.; Rutten, M.; van de Vosse, F.; Lopata, R.

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral photoacoustic (MPA) imaging is a promising tool for the diagnosis of atherosclerotic carotids. Excitation of different constituents of a plaque with different wavelengths of the light may provide morphological information to evaluate plaque vulnerability. Preclinical validation of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) imaging requires a comprehensive phantom study. In this study, the design of optically realistic vessel phantoms for photoacoustics was examined by characterizing their optical properties for different dye concentrations, and comparing those to PA measurements. Four different concentrations of Indian ink and molecular dye were added to a 15 wt% PVA and 1 wt% orgasol mixture. Next, the homogeneously mixed gels were subjected to five freeze - thaw cycles to increase the stiffness of vessel phantoms (rinner = 2:5mm, router = 4mm). For each cycle, the optical absorbance was measured between 400 nm 990 nm using a plate reader. Additionally, photoacoustic responses of each vessel phantom at 808 nm were tested with a novel, hand-held, integrated PA probe. Measurements show that the PA signal intensity increases with the optical absorber concentration (0.3 to 0.9) in close agreement with the absorbance measurements. The freeze - thaw process has no significant effect on PA intensity. However, the total attenuation of optical energy increases after each freeze-thaw cycle, which is primarily due to the increase in the scattering coefficient. In future work, the complexity of these phantoms will be increased to examine the feasibility of distinguishing different constituents with MPA imaging.

  2. Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, Clifford K.; Pacheco, James E.

    2014-08-08

    A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annualmore » thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.« less

  3. Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Clifford K.; Pacheco, James E.

    2014-08-08

    A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

  4. 3D-Printing ‘Smarter’ Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-08-29

    Foams are, by nature, disordered materials studded with air pockets of varying sizes. Lack of control over the material’s architecture at the micrometer or nanometer scale can make it difficult to adjust the foam’s basic properties. But Eric Duoss and a team of Livermore researchers are using additive manufacturing to develop “smarter” silicone cushions. By architecting the structure at the micro scale, they are able to control macro-scale properties previously unachievable with foam materials.

  5. Method of Synthesizing a Novel Absorbent Titanosilicate Material (UPRM-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo (Inventor); Primera-Pedrozo, Jose N (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A titanium silicate variant named UPRM-5 was prepared using tetraethylammonium hydroxide as a structure-directing agent (SDA). Successful detemplation was achieved via ion exchange with NH4Cl. Effective functionalization was obtained after ion exchanging the detemplated material using SrCl2 and BaCl2. Adsorption of CO2 at 25 deg C in Sr(-) and Ba-UPRM-5 materials activated at different temperatures. For low partial pressures, the observed CO2 adsorption capacities increased as follows: NH4-UPRM-5 less than Sr-UPRM-5 less than Ba-UPRM-5. Both the Sr(-) and Ba-UPRM-5 materials exhibited outstanding selectivity for CO2 over CH4, N2 and O2.

  6. A comprehensive simulation model of the performance of photochromic films in absorbance-modulation-optical-lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Apratim; Helms, Phillip L.; Andrew, Trisha L.; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Optical lithography is the most prevalent method of fabricating micro-and nano-scale structures in the semiconductor industry due to the fact that patterning using photons is fast, accurate and provides high throughput. However, the resolution of this technique is inherently limited by the physical phenomenon of diffraction. Absorbance-Modulation-Optical Lithography (AMOL), a recently developed technique has been successfully demonstrated to be able to circumvent this diffraction limit. AMOL employs a dual-wavelength exposure system in conjunction with spectrally selective reversible photo-transitions in thin films of photochromic molecules to achieve patterning of features with sizes beyond the far-field diffraction limit. We have developed a finite-element-method based full-electromagnetic-wave solution model that simulates the photo-chemical processes that occur within the thin film of the photochromic molecules under illumination by the exposure and confining wavelengths in AMOL. This model allows us to understand how the material characteristics influence the confinement to sub-diffraction dimensions, of the transmitted point spread function (PSF) of the exposure wavelength inside the recording medium. The model reported here provides the most comprehensive analysis of the AMOL process to-date, and the results show that the most important factors that govern the process, are the polarization of the two beams, the ratio of the intensities of the two wavelengths, the relative absorption coefficients and the concentration of the photochromic species, the thickness of the photochromic layer and the quantum yields of the photoreactions at the two wavelengths. The aim of this work is to elucidate the requirements of AMOL in successfully circumventing the far-field diffraction limit.

  7. Electrokinetic profiles of nonowoven cotton for absorbent incontinence material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper discusses recent work on cotton/synthetic nonwovens, their electrokinetic analysis, and their potential use in incontinence materials. Electrokinetic analysis is useful in exploring fiber surface polarity properties, and it is a useful tool to render a snap shot of the role of fiber char...

  8. Experimental verification of reconstructed absorbers embedded in scattering media by optical power ratio distribution.

    PubMed

    Yamaoki, Toshihiko; Hamada, Hiroaki; Matoba, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Experimental investigation to show the effectiveness of the extraction method of absorber information in a scattering medium by taking the output power ratio distribution is presented. In the experiment, two metallic wires sandwiched by three homogeneous scattering media are used as absorbers in transmission geometry. The output power ratio distributions can extract the influence of the absorbers to enhance the optical signal. The peak position of the output power ratio distributions agree with the results suggested by numerical simulation. From the reconstructed results of tomography in the scattering media, we have confirmed that the tomographic image of two wires can distinguish them successfully from 41×21 output power ratio distributions by using continuous-wave light. PMID:27607261

  9. Inorganic-organic solar cells based on quaternary sulfide as absorber materials.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tiantian; Liu, Zhifeng; Yan, Weiguo; Liu, Junqi; Zhang, Xueqi

    2015-12-14

    We report a novel promising quaternary sulfide (CuAgInS) to serve as a semiconductor sensitizer material in the photoelectrochemical field. In this study, CuAgInS (CAIS) sulfide sensitized ZnO nanorods were fabricated on ITO substrates through a facile and low-cost hydrothermal chemical method and applied on photoanodes for solar cells for the first time. The component and stoichiometry were key factors in determining the photoelectric performance of CAIS sulfide, which were controlled by modulating their reaction time. ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 nanoarrays exhibit an enhanced optical and photoelectric performance and the power conversion efficiency of ITO/ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2/P3HT/Pt solid-state solar cell was up to 1.80%. The remarkable performance stems from improved electron transfer, a higher efficiency of light-harvesting and appropriate band gap alignment at the interface of the ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 NTs. The research indicates that CAIS as an absorbing material has enormous potential in solar cell systems.

  10. Inorganic-organic solar cells based on quaternary sulfide as absorber materials.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tiantian; Liu, Zhifeng; Yan, Weiguo; Liu, Junqi; Zhang, Xueqi

    2015-12-14

    We report a novel promising quaternary sulfide (CuAgInS) to serve as a semiconductor sensitizer material in the photoelectrochemical field. In this study, CuAgInS (CAIS) sulfide sensitized ZnO nanorods were fabricated on ITO substrates through a facile and low-cost hydrothermal chemical method and applied on photoanodes for solar cells for the first time. The component and stoichiometry were key factors in determining the photoelectric performance of CAIS sulfide, which were controlled by modulating their reaction time. ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 nanoarrays exhibit an enhanced optical and photoelectric performance and the power conversion efficiency of ITO/ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2/P3HT/Pt solid-state solar cell was up to 1.80%. The remarkable performance stems from improved electron transfer, a higher efficiency of light-harvesting and appropriate band gap alignment at the interface of the ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 NTs. The research indicates that CAIS as an absorbing material has enormous potential in solar cell systems. PMID:26553746

  11. Influence of inhomogeneity of optical absorbers on optoacoustic signals: a comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertsch, A. G.; Jaeger, M.; Bush, N. L.; Frenz, M.; Bamber, J. C.

    2009-02-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging allows optical absorption contrast to be visualised using thermoelastically generated ultrasound. To date, optoacoustic theory has been applied to homogeneously absorbing tissue models that may describe, for example, large vessels filled with blood, where the whole target will act as a coherent source of sound. Here we describe a new model in which the optical absorbers are distributed inhomogeneously, as appropriate to describe microvasculature, or perhaps the distribution of molecularly targeted OA contrast agents inside a tumour. The degree of coherence over the resulting distributed acoustic source is influenced by parameters that describe the scale of the inhomogeneity, such as the sizes of the absorbers and the distances between them. To investigate the influence of these parameters on OA image appearance, phantoms with homogeneously and imhomogeneously absorbing regions were built and imaged. Simulations of the same situation were conducted using a time domain acoustic propagation method. Both simulations and experiments showed that introducing inhomogeneity of absorption produces more complete images of macroscopic targets than are obtained with a homogeneous absorption. Image improvement and target detectability were found to reach a maximum at an intermediate value of the length-scale of the inhomogeneity that was similar to the axial resolution of the acoustic receiver employed. As the scale of inhomogeneity became finer than this the target's detectability and appearance began to revert to that for homogeneous absorption. Further understanding of this topic is believed to be important for optimising the design of clinical optoacoustic imaging systems.

  12. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  13. Session: CSP Advanced Systems: Optical Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.

    2008-04-01

    The Optical Materials project description is to characterize advanced reflector, perform accelerated and outdoor testing of commercial and experimental reflector materials, and provide industry support.

  14. Efficient graphene saturable absorbers on D-shaped optical fiber for ultrashort pulse generation

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, J. D.; Steinberg, D.; Saito, L. A. M.; de Oliveira, R. E. P.; Cárdenas, A. M.; de Souza, E. A. Thoroh

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated a method to construct high efficiency saturable absorbers based on the evanescent light field interaction of CVD monolayer graphene deposited on side-polished D-shaped optical fiber. A set of samples was fabricated with two different core-graphene distances (0 and 1 μm), covered with graphene ranging between 10 and 25 mm length. The mode-locking was achieved and the best pulse duration was 256 fs, the shortest pulse reported in the literature with CVD monolayer graphene in EDFL. As result, we find a criterion between the polarization relative extinction ratio in the samples and the pulse duration, which relates the better mode-locking performance with the higher polarization extinction ratio of the samples. This criterion also provides a better understanding of the graphene distributed saturable absorbers and their reproducible performance as optoelectronic devices for optical applications. PMID:26856886

  15. The physical properties of black carbon and other light-absorbing material emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Yokelson, R. J.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fortner, E.; Onasch, T. B.; Akagi, S. K.; Taylor, J.; Coe, H.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol emitted from fires absorbs light, leading to visibility degradation as well as regional and global climate impacts. Fires also emit a wide range of trace gases and particulates that can interact with emitted BC and alter its optical properties and atmospheric lifetime. Non-BC particulate species emitted by fires can also scatter and absorb light, leading to additional effects on visibility. Recent work has shown that certain organic species can absorb light strongly at shorter wavelengths, giving it a brown or yellow color. This material has been classified as brown carbon, though it is not yet well defined. Land managers must find a balance between the negative impacts of prescribed fire emissions on visibility and air quality and the need to prevent future catastrophic wildfire as well as manage ecosystems for habitat restoration or other purposes. This decision process requires accurate assessments of the visibility impacts of fire emissions, including BC and brown carbon, which in turn depend on their optical properties. We present recent laboratory and aircraft measurements of black carbon and aerosol optical properties emitted from biomass burning. All measurement campaigns included a single particle soot photometer (SP2) instrument capable of providing size-resolved measurements of BC mass and number distributions and mixing state, which are needed to separate the BC and brown carbon contributions to total light absorption. The laboratory experiments also included a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer that provided accurate measurements of aerosol light absorption. The laboratory systems also characterized emissions after they had been treated with a thermal denuder to remove semi-volatile coatings, allowing an assessment of the role of non-BC coatings on bulk aerosol optical properties. Emissions were also aged in an environmental smog chamber to examine the role of secondary aerosol production on aerosol optical properties.

  16. On the use of a loudspeaker for measuring the viscoelastic properties of sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Doutres, Olivier; Dauchez, Nicolas; Génevaux, Jean-Michel; Lemarquand, Guy

    2008-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility to use an electrodynamic loudspeaker to determine viscoelastic properties of sound-absorbing materials in the audible frequency range. The loudspeaker compresses the porous sample in a cavity, and a measurement of its electrical impedance allows one to determine the mechanical impedance of the sample: no additional sensors are required. Viscoelastic properties of the material are then estimated by inverting a 1D Biot model. The method is applied to two sound-absorbing materials (glass wool and polymer foam). Results are in good agreement with the classical compression quasistatic method.

  17. Development of a Weldable Neutron Absorbing Structural Material

    SciTech Connect

    R. E. Mizia; W. L. Hurt; C. V. Robino; J. N. DuPont

    2006-04-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Laboratory, coordinates and integrates national efforts in management and disposal of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel. These management functions include development of standardized systems for packaging, storage, treatment, transport, and long-term disposal in the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Nuclear criticality control measures are needed in these systems to avoid restrictive fissile loading limits because of the enrichment and total quantity of fissile material in some types of the DOE spent nuclear fuel. This paper will outline the results to date of a metallurgical development program that is investigating the alloying of gadolinium into a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy matrix. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section and low solubility in the expected repository environment. The nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy family was chosen for its known corrosion performance, mechanical properties, and weldability. The workflow of this program includes chemical composition definition, primary melting and secondary refining studies, ingot conversion process evaluations, mechanical/physical properties and corrosion testing, welding studies, and national consensus codes, and standards work.

  18. Absorber Materials for Transition-Edge Sensor X-ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Bandler, Simon; Brekosky, Regis; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Fred; Sadleir, Jack; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Porter, F. Scott; Smith, Stephen; Saab, Tarek; Sadleir, Jac,

    2007-01-01

    Arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) can provide high spatial and energy resolution necessary for x-ray astronomy. High quantum efficiency and uniformity of response can be achieved with a suitable absorber material, in which absorber x-ray stopping power, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity are relevant parameters. Here we compare these parameters for bismuth and gold. We have fabricated electroplated gold, electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, and evaporated gold/evaporated bismuth 8x8 absorber arrays and find that a correlation exists between the residual resistance ratio (RRR) and thin film microstructure. This finding indicates that we can tailor absorber material conductivity via microstructure alteration, so as to permit absorber thermalization on timescales suitable for high energy resolution x-ray microcalorimetry. We show that by incorporating absorbers possessing large grain size, including electroplated gold and electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, into our current Mo/Au TES, devices with tunable heat capacity and energy resolution of 2.3 eV (gold) and 2.1 eV (gold/bismuth) FWHM at 6 keV have been fabricated.

  19. Thin absorber extreme ultraviolet photomask based on Ni-TaN nanocomposite material.

    PubMed

    Hay, Darrick; Bagge, Patrick; Khaw, Ian; Sun, Lei; Wood, Obert; Chen, Yulu; Kim, Ryoung-Han; Qi, Zhengqing John; Shi, Zhimin

    2016-08-15

    We study the use of random nanocomposite material as a photomask absorber layer for the next generation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. By introducing nickel nanoparticles (NPs) randomly into a TaN host, the nanocomposite absorber layer can greatly reduce the reflectivity as compared with the standard TaN layer of the same thickness. Finite integral simulations show that the reduction in the reflectivity is mainly due to the enhanced absorption by the Ni NPs. The fluctuation in reflectivity induced by scattering and random position of the NPs is found to be on the order of 0.1%. Based on these observations, we build an effective medium model for the nanocomposite absorber layer and use the transfer matrix method to identify optimal absorber designs that utilize cavity effects to reduce the required volume fraction of Ni NPs. We further perform a process simulation and show that our approach can greatly reduce the HV bias in the lithography process. PMID:27519090

  20. Study of earth abundant tco and absorber materials for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Tejas

    In order to make photovoltaic power generation a sustainable venture, it is necessary to use cost-effective materials in the manufacture of solar cells. In this regard, AZO (Aluminum doped Zinc Oxide) and CZTS (Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide) have been studied for their application in thin film solar cells. While AZO is a transparent conducting oxide, CZTS is a photovoltaic absorber. Both AZO and CZTS consist of earth abundant elements and are non-toxic in nature. Highly transparent and conductive AZO thin films were grown using RF sputtering. The influence of deposition parameters such as working pressure, RF power, substrate temperature and flow rate on the film characteristics was investigated. The as-grown films had a high degree of preferred orientation along the (002) direction which enhanced at lower working pressures, higher RF powers and lower substrate temperatures. Williamson-Hall analysis on the films revealed that as the working pressure was increased, the nature of stress and strain gradually changed from being compressive to tensile. The fall in optical transmission of the films was a consequence of free carrier absorption resulting from enhanced carrier density due to incorporation of Al atoms or oxygen vacancies. The optical and electrical properties of the films were described well by the Burstein-Moss effect. CZTS absorber layers were grown using ultrasonic spray pyrolysis at a deposition temperature of 350 C and subsequently annealed in a sulfurization furnace. Measurements from XRD and Raman spectra confirmed the presence of pure single phase Cu2ZnSnS4. Texture analysis of as-deposited and annealed CZTS films indicated that the (112) plane which is characteristic of the kesterite phase was preferred. The grain size increased from 50 nm to 100 nm on conducting post-deposition annealing. CZTS films with stoichiometric composition yielded a band gap of 1.5 eV, which is optimal for solar energy conversion. The variation of tin in the film changed its

  1. Models for the optical simulations of fractal aggregated soot particles thinly coated with non-absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Light absorption enhancement of aged soot aerosols is highly sensitive to the morphologies and mixing states of soot aggregates and their non-absorbing coatings, such as organic materials. The quantification of these effects on the optical properties of thinly coated soot aerosols is simulated using an effective model with fixed volume fractions. Fractal aggregated soot was simulated using the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) algorithm and discretized into soot dipoles. The dipoles of non-absorbing aerosols, whose number was fixed by the volume fraction, were further generated from the neighboring random edge dipoles. Their optical properties were calculated using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method and were compared with other commonly used models. The optical properties of thinly coated soot calculated using the fixed volume fraction model are close to (less than ~10% difference) the results of the fixed coating thickness model, except their asymmetry parameters (up to ~25% difference). In the optical simulations of thinly coated soot aerosols, this relative difference of asymmetry parameters and phase functions between these realistic models may be notable. The realizations of the fixed volume fraction model may introduce smaller variation of optical results than those of the fixed coating thickness model. Moreover, the core-shell monomers model and homogeneous aggregated spheres model with the Maxwell-Garnett (MG) theory may underestimate (up to ~20%) the cross sections of thinly coated soot aggregates. The single core-shell sphere model may largely overestimate (up to ~150%) the cross sections and single scattering albedo of thinly coated soot aggregates, and it underestimated (up to ~60%) their asymmetry parameters. It is suggested that the widely used single core-shell sphere approximation may not be suitable for the single scattering calculations of thinly coated soot aerosols.

  2. Self-stabilizing optical clock pulse-train generator using SOA and saturable absorber for asynchronous optical packet processing.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Ryo

    2013-05-01

    We propose a novel, self-stabilizing optical clock pulse-train generator for processing preamble-free, asynchronous optical packets with variable lengths. The generator is based on an optical loop that includes a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and a high-extinction spin-polarized saturable absorber (SA), with the loop being self-stabilized by balancing out the gain and absorption provided by the SOA and SA, respectively. The optical pulse train is generated by tapping out a small portion of a circulating seed pulse. The convergence of the generated pulse energy is enabled by the loop round-trip gain function that has a negative slope due to gain saturation in the SOA. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of the SOA is effectively suppressed by the SA, and a backward optical pulse launched into the SOA enables overcoming the carrier-recovery speed mismatch between the SOA and SA. Without external control for the loop gain, a stable optical pulse train consisting of more than 50 pulses with low jitter is generated from a single 10-ps seed optical pulse even with a variation of 10 dB in the seed pulse intensity. PMID:23669927

  3. Near-ideal optical metamaterial absorbers with super-octave bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Bossard, Jeremy A; Lin, Lan; Yun, Seokho; Liu, Liu; Werner, Douglas H; Mayer, Theresa S

    2014-02-25

    Nanostructured optical coatings with tailored spectral absorption properties are of interest for a wide range of applications such as spectroscopy, emissivity control, and solar energy harvesting. Optical metamaterial absorbers have been demonstrated with a variety of customized single band, multiple band, polarization, and angular configurations. However, metamaterials that provide near unity absorptivity with super-octave bandwidth over a specified optical wavelength range have not yet been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we show a broadband, polarization-insensitive metamaterial with greater than 98% measured average absorptivity that is maintained over a wide ± 45° field-of-view for mid-infrared wavelengths between 1.77 and 4.81 μm. The nearly ideal absorption is realized by using a genetic algorithm to identify the geometry of a single-layer metal nanostructure array that excites multiple overlapping electric resonances with high optical loss across greater than an octave bandwidth. The response is optimized by substituting palladium for gold to increase the infrared metallic loss and by introducing a dielectric superstrate to suppress reflection over the entire band. This demonstration advances the state-of-the-art in high-performance broadband metamaterial absorbers that can be reliably fabricated using a single patterned layer of metal nanostructures. PMID:24472069

  4. Improving impact resistance of ceramic materials by energy absorbing surface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, H. P.; Seretsky, J.

    1974-01-01

    Energy absorbing surface layers were used to improve the impact resistance of silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics. Low elastic modulus materials were used. In some cases, the low elastic modulus was achieved using materials that form localized microcracks as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy, thermal expansion differences between phases, or phase transformations. In other cases, semi-vitreous or vitreous materials were used. Substantial improvements in impact resistance were observed at room and elevated temperatures.

  5. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-09-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed.

  6. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed. PMID:27582317

  7. Phantoms for diffuse optical imaging based on totally absorbing objects, part 1: basic concepts

    PubMed Central

    Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Macdonald, Rainer; Sassaroli, Angelo; Zaccanti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The design of inhomogeneous phantoms for diffuse optical imaging purposes using totally absorbing objects embedded in a diffusive medium is proposed and validated. From time-resolved and continuous-wave Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that a given or desired perturbation strength caused by a realistic absorbing inhomogeneity of a certain absorption and volume can be approximately mimicked by a small totally absorbing object of a so-called equivalent black volume (equivalence relation). This concept can be useful in two ways. First, it can be exploited to design realistic inhomogeneous phantoms with different perturbation strengths simply using a set of black objects with different volumes. Further, it permits one to grade physiological or pathological changes on a reproducible scale of perturbation strengths given as equivalent black volumes, thus facilitating the performance assessment of clinical instruments. A set of plots and interpolating functions to derive the equivalent black volume corresponding to a given absorption change is provided. The application of the equivalent black volume concept for grading different optical perturbations is demonstrated for some examples. PMID:23778947

  8. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-09-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed.

  9. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed. PMID:27582317

  10. Preparation of steel slag porous sound-absorbing material using coal powder as pore former.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare a porous sound-absorbing material using steel slag and fly ash as the main raw material, with coal powder and sodium silicate used as a pore former and binder respectively. The influence of the experimental conditions such as the ratio of fly ash, sintering temperature, sintering time, and porosity regulation on the performance of the porous sound-absorbing material was investigated. The results showed that the specimens prepared by this method had high sound absorption performance and good mechanical properties, and the noise reduction coefficient and compressive strength could reach 0.50 and 6.5MPa, respectively. The compressive strength increased when the dosage of fly ash and sintering temperature were raised. The noise reduction coefficient decreased with increasing ratio of fly ash and reducing pore former, and first increased and then decreased with the increase of sintering temperature and time. The optimum preparation conditions for the porous sound-absorbing material were a proportion of fly ash of 50% (wt.%), percentage of coal powder of 30% (wt.%), sintering temperature of 1130°C, and sintering time of 6.0hr, which were determined by analyzing the properties of the sound-absorbing material. PMID:26456608

  11. Preparation of steel slag porous sound-absorbing material using coal powder as pore former.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare a porous sound-absorbing material using steel slag and fly ash as the main raw material, with coal powder and sodium silicate used as a pore former and binder respectively. The influence of the experimental conditions such as the ratio of fly ash, sintering temperature, sintering time, and porosity regulation on the performance of the porous sound-absorbing material was investigated. The results showed that the specimens prepared by this method had high sound absorption performance and good mechanical properties, and the noise reduction coefficient and compressive strength could reach 0.50 and 6.5MPa, respectively. The compressive strength increased when the dosage of fly ash and sintering temperature were raised. The noise reduction coefficient decreased with increasing ratio of fly ash and reducing pore former, and first increased and then decreased with the increase of sintering temperature and time. The optimum preparation conditions for the porous sound-absorbing material were a proportion of fly ash of 50% (wt.%), percentage of coal powder of 30% (wt.%), sintering temperature of 1130°C, and sintering time of 6.0hr, which were determined by analyzing the properties of the sound-absorbing material.

  12. Absorbent Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A superabsorbent fabric developed by Johnson Space Center and described in Tech Briefs was adapted by Honeywell and fabricated into special containment devices used on Navy "smart" torpedos. The superabsorbent fabric can sequester up to 400 times its own weight in water and protects the torpedo electronic controls from possible short circuiting by deepwater hull seepage.

  13. Acoustic behavior of a fibrous bulk material. [Kevlar 29 sound absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical model is presented describing the acoustic behavior of Kevlar 29, a bulk absorbing material. The model is based on an approximate solution to the one-dimensional equations representing conservation of fluctuating mass, momentum and energy. By treating the material as a momentum sink, theoretical expressions of the material complex propagation constants and characteristic impedance were derived in terms of a single constant. Evaluating the constant at a single frequency for a particular specimen, excellent agreement between prediction and measurement was achieved for a large range of sound frequencies and material porosities and thicknesses. Results show that Kevlar 29 absorbs sound efficiently even at low frequencies. This is explained in terms of a frequency dependent material phase speed.

  14. Measured Wavelength-Dependent Absorption Enhancement of Internally Mixed Black Carbon with Absorbing and Nonabsorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    You, Rian; Radney, James G; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Optical absorption spectra of laboratory generated aerosols consisting of black carbon (BC) internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials (ammonium sulfate, AS, and sodium chloride, NaCl) and BC with a weakly absorbing brown carbon surrogate derived from humic acid (HA) were measured across the visible to near-IR (550 to 840 nm). Spectra were measured in situ using a photoacoustic spectrometer and step-scanning a supercontinuum laser source with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. BC had a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) of 7.89 ± 0.25 m(2) g(-1) at λ = 550 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 1.03 ± 0.09 (2σ). For internally mixed BC, the ratio of BC mass to the total mass of the mixture was chosen as 0.13 to mimic particles observed in the terrestrial atmosphere. The manner in which BC mixed with each material was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AS/BC and HA/BC particles were fully internally mixed, and the BC was both internally and externally mixed for NaCl/BC particles. The AS/BC, NaCl/BC, and HA/BC particles had AAEs of 1.43 ± 0.05, 1.34 ± 0.06, and 1.91 ± 0.05, respectively. The observed absorption enhancement of mixed BC relative to the pure BC was wavelength dependent for AS/BC and decreased from 1.5 at λ = 550 nm with increasing wavelength while the NaCl/BC enhancement was essentially wavelength independent. For HA/BC, the enhancement ranged from 2 to 3 and was strongly wavelength dependent. Removal of the HA absorption contribution to enhancement revealed that the enhancement was ≈1.5 and independent of wavelength. PMID:27359341

  15. Broadband optical absorbance spectroscopy using a whispering gallery mode microsphere resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, Sarah L.; Zhang, Jiangquan; Shelton, Robert K.; Bruce, Nellie M. K.; Gupta, Sachin; Keen, Steven L.; Tillman, Jeremy W.; Wald, Lara B.; Strecker, Brian N.; Rosenberger, A. T.; Davidson, Roy R.; Chen, Wei; Donovan, Kevin G.; Hryniewicz, John V.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate the ability to excite and monitor many whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of a microsphere resonator simultaneously in order to make broadband optical absorbance measurements. The 340μm diameter microsphere is placed in a microfluidic channel. A hemispherical prism is used for coupling the WGMs into and out of the microsphere. The flat surface of the prism seals the microfluidic channel. The slight nonsphericity in the microsphere results in coupling to precessed modes whose emission is spatially separated from the reflected excitation light. The evanescent fields of the light trapped in WGMs interact with the surrounding environment. The change in transmission observed in the precessed modes is used to determine the absorbance of the surrounding environment. In contrast to our broadband optical absorbance measurements, previous WGM sensors have used only a single narrow mode to measure properties such as refractive index. With the microfluidic cell, we have measured the absorbance of solutions of dyes (lissamine green B, sunset yellow, orange G, and methylene blue), aromatic molecules (benzylamine and benzoic acid), and biological molecules (tryptophan, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and o-phospho-L-tyrosine) at visible and ultraviolet wavelengths. The microsphere surface was reacted with organosilane molecules to attach octadecyl groups, amino groups, and fluorogroups to the surface. Both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions were observed between the analytes and the microsphere surface, as indicated by changes in the measured effective pathlength with different organosilanes. For a given analyte and coated microsphere, the pathlength measurement was repeatable within a few percent. Methylene blue dye had a very strong interaction with the surface and pathlengths of several centimeters were measured. Choosing an appropriate surface coating to interact with a specific analyte should result in the highest sensitivity detection.

  16. Food-processes wastewaters treatment using food solid-waste materials as adsorbents or absorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapti, Ilaira; Georgopoulos, Stavros; Antonopoulou, Maria; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Papadaki, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The wastewaters generated by olive-mills during the production of olive oil, wastewaters from a dairy and a cow-farm unit and wastewaters from a small food factory have been treated by means of selected materials, either by-products of the same units, or other solid waste, as absorbents or adsorbents in order to identify the capacity of those materials to remove organic load and toxicity from the aforementioned wastewaters. The potential of both the materials used as absorbents as well as the treated wastewaters to be further used either as fertilizers or for agricultural irrigation purposes are examined. Dry olive leaves, sheep wool, rice husks, etc. were used either in a fixed-bed or in a stirred batch arrangemen,t employing different initial concentrations of the aforementioned wastewaters. The efficiency of removal was assessed using scpectrophotometric methods and allium test phytotoxicity measurements. In this presentation the response of each material employed is shown as a function of absorbent/adsorbent quantity and kind, treatment time and wastewater kind and initial organic load. Preliminary results on the potential uses of the adsorbents/absorbents and the treated wastewaters are also shown. Keywords: Olive-mill wastewaters, dairy farm wastewaters, olive leaves, zeolite, sheep wool

  17. Optically Active Hybrid Materials Constructed from Helically Substituted Polyacetylenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanyu; Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Functional materials derived from synthetic helical polymers are attracting increasing interest. Helically substituted polyacetylenes (HSPAs) are especially interesting as typical artificial helical polymers. In recent years, we designed and prepared a series of functional materials based on HSPAs and inorganic materials. The target is to establish some novel hybrid materials that combine the superior properties of both. The examined inorganic materials include silica, graphene, and magnetic Fe3 O4 nanoparticles. Such new functional materials hold great promise and are expected to find practical applications, for instance, as chiral absorbents, chiral sensors, chiral selectors for inducing enantioselective crystallization, chiral catalysts towards asymmetric catalysis, and chiral carriers for enantioselective release. The Personal Account summarizes our major achievements in preparing optically active hybrid materials. We hope it will speed up progress in chiral-related research areas.

  18. Optical trapping and rotation of airborne absorbing particles with a single focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing

    2014-03-01

    We measure the periodic circular motion of single absorbing aerosol particles that are optically trapped with a single focused Gaussian beam and rotate around the laser propagation direction. The scattered light from the trapped particle is observed to be directional and change periodically at 0.4-20 kHz. The instantaneous positions of the moving particle within a rotation period are measured by a high-speed imaging technique using a charge coupled device camera and a repetitively pulsed light-emitting diode illumination. The centripetal acceleration of the trapped particle as high as ˜20 times the gravitational acceleration is observed and is attributed to the photophoretic forces.

  19. Optical trapping and rotation of airborne absorbing particles with a single focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing

    2014-03-10

    We measure the periodic circular motion of single absorbing aerosol particles that are optically trapped with a single focused Gaussian beam and rotate around the laser propagation direction. The scattered light from the trapped particle is observed to be directional and change periodically at 0.4–20 kHz. The instantaneous positions of the moving particle within a rotation period are measured by a high-speed imaging technique using a charge coupled device camera and a repetitively pulsed light-emitting diode illumination. The centripetal acceleration of the trapped particle as high as ∼20 times the gravitational acceleration is observed and is attributed to the photophoretic forces.

  20. Realizing thin electromagnetic absorbers for wide incidence angles from commercially available planar circuit materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, Brian B; Whites, Kieth W; Radway, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    In this study, recent work on engineering R-card surface resistivity with printed metallic patterns is extended to the design of thin electromagnetic absorbers. Thin electromagnetic absorbers for wide incidence angles and both polarizations have recently been computationally verified by Luukkonen et al.. These absorbers are analytically modeled high-impedance surfaces with capacitive arrays of square patches implemented with relatively high dielectric constant and high loss substrate. However, the advantages provided by the accurate analytical model are largely negated by the need to obtain high dielectric constant material with accurately engineered loss. Fig. I(c) illustrates full-wave computational results for an absorber without vias engineered as proposed by Luukkonen et al.. Unique values for the dielectric loss are required for different center frequencies. Parameters for the capacitive grid are D=5.0 mm and w=O.l mm for a center frequency of 3.36 GHz. The relative permittivity and thickness is 9.20(1-j0.234) and 1=3.048 mm. Consider a center frequency of5.81 GHz and again 1=3.048 mm, the required parameters for the capacitive grid are D=2.0 mm and w=0.2 mm where the required relative permittivity is now 9.20(1-j0.371) Admittedly, engineered dielectrics are themselves a historically interesting and fruitful research area which benefits today from advances in monolithic fabrication using direct-write of dielectrics with nanometer scale inclusions. However, our objective in the present study is to realize the advantages of the absorber proposed by Luukkonen et al. without resort to engineered lossy dielectrics. Specifically we are restricted to commercially available planer circuit materials without use of in-house direct-write technology or materials engineering capability. The materials considered here are TMM 10 laminate with (35 {mu}lm copper cladding with a complex permittivity 9.20-j0.0022) and Ohmegaply resistor conductor material (maximum 250 {Omega

  1. Laser ablation of absorbing liquids under transparent cover: acoustical and optical monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, A. A.; Il'ichev, N. N.; Pivovarov, P. A.; Sidorin, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Phase transition induced with infrared (λ = 2920 nm and λ = 2940 nm) nanosecond laser pulses in strongly absorbing liquids (water, ethanol) under transparent solid cover is investigated with the help of acoustical and optical monitoring. LiNbO3 transducer is used for registration of pressure pulses generated in irradiated liquids. Optical signals due to scattering and specular reflection of probing optical beams are explored with the schemes involving total internal reflection and interference effects. Combination of these two optical diagnostic methods permits for the first time to show that irradiation of covered liquids leads to vapor cavity formation which is divided from the cover with thin (submicron) liquid film despite the fact that radiation intensity maximum is located just at the liquid-plate boundary. The cavity formation is due to explosive boiling which occurs when the superheated liquid reaches its superheating limit in near critical region. After the first acoustical signal, the second signal is observed with several hundreds microseconds time delay which is caused by the vapor cavity collapse. Some results of optical and acoustical diagnostics in the case of free liquid surface are also presented.

  2. Cold tests of HOM absorber material for the ARIEL eLINAC at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, P.; Laxdal, R. E.; Zvyagintsev, V.; Chao, Y. C.; Amini, B.

    2014-01-01

    At TRIUMF development of a 50 MeV electron accelerator is well under way. Five 1.3 GHz, superconducting 9-cell cavities will accelerate 10 mA electrons to a production target to produce rare isotopes. Each cavity will provide 10 MV accelerating voltage. Plans to upgrade the accelerator in the future to a small ring with ERL capabilities requires that the shunt impedance of the dipole higher order modes to be less than 10 MΩ . The design of the accelerator incorporates beam line absorbers to reduce the shunt impedance of potentially dangerous dipole modes. The performance of the absorber is dependant on its electrical conductivity at the operational temperature. Measurements of the electrical conductivity in RF fields of a sample of the proposed beam line absorber material at room temperature and at its operational temperature will be presented for frequencies between 1.3 and 2.4 GHz.

  3. Determination of optical parameters and thickness of weakly absorbing thin films from reflectance and transmittance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutavichus, Vitaly P.; Filippov, Valery V.; Huzouski, Vitali H.

    2006-07-01

    A method for determining the optical constants and the thickness of weakly absorbing thin films on substrates is proposed. In this method only the reflectance and transmittance spectra obtained at a single arbitrary angle of incidence are used, provided that the former reveals several interference extrema. The calculation procedure is based on relatively simple relations suitable for the programmed realization and does not call for the prescription of the initial values of the parameters to be determined. The method proposed is fairly accurate and allows one to uniquely solve the inverse problem of spectrophotometry. The optical constants and the thickness of an AsxSey film formed on a glass substrate have been determined by the proposed method in the visible region of the spectrum.

  4. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lumin; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  5. Plasmonic materials based on ZnO films and their potential for developing broadband middle-infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Kesim, Yunus E. Battal, Enes; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-07-15

    Noble metals such as gold and silver have been extensively used for plasmonic applications due to their ability to support plasmons, yet they suffer from high intrinsic losses. Alternative plasmonic materials that offer low loss and tunability are desired for a new generation of efficient and agile devices. In this paper, atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown ZnO is investigated as a candidate material for plasmonic applications. Optical constants of ZnO are investigated along with figures of merit pertaining to plasmonic waveguides. We show that ZnO can alleviate the trade-off between propagation length and mode confinement width owing to tunable dielectric properties. In order to demonstrate plasmonic resonances, we simulate a grating structure and computationally demonstrate an ultra-wide-band (4–15 μm) infrared absorber.

  6. Optical properties and aging of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Jiumeng; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Wise, Matthew; Caylor, Ryan; Imholt, Felisha; Selimovic, Vanessa; Shilling, John E.

    2016-10-14

    The light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA) commonly referred to as “brown carbon” (BrC) has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its potential to affect atmospheric radiation balance, especially in the ultraviolet region and thus impact photochemical processes. A growing amount of data has indicated that BrC is prevalent in the atmosphere, which has motivated numerous laboratory and field studies; however, our understanding of the relationship between the chemical composition and optical properties of BrC remains limited. We conducted chamber experiments to investigate the effect of various volatile organic carbon (VOC) precursors, NOx concentrations, photolysis time, and relative humidity (RH) on the light absorptionmore » of selected secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Light absorption of chamber-generated SOA samples, especially aromatic SOA, was found to increase with NOx concentration, at moderate RH, and for the shortest photolysis aging times. The highest mass absorption coefficient (MAC) value is observed from toluene SOA products formed under high-NOx conditions at moderate RH, in which nitro-aromatics were previously identified as the major light-absorbing compounds. BrC light absorption is observed to decrease with photolysis time, correlated with a decline of the organic nitrate fraction of SOA. SOA formed from mixtures of aromatics and isoprene absorb less visible (Vis) and ultraviolet (UV) light than SOA formed from aromatic precursors alone on a mass basis. However, the mixed SOA absorption was underestimated when optical properties were predicted using a two-product SOA formation model, as done in many current climate models. Further investigation, including analysis on detailed mechanisms, are required to explain the discrepancy.« less

  7. Optical properties and aging of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Wise, Matthew; Caylor, Ryan; Imholt, Felisha; Selimovic, Vanessa; Shilling, John E.

    2016-10-01

    The light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA) commonly referred to as "brown carbon" (BrC) has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its potential to affect atmospheric radiation balance, especially in the ultraviolet region and thus impact photochemical processes. A growing amount of data has indicated that BrC is prevalent in the atmosphere, which has motivated numerous laboratory and field studies; however, our understanding of the relationship between the chemical composition and optical properties of BrC remains limited. We conducted chamber experiments to investigate the effect of various volatile organic carbon (VOC) precursors, NOx concentrations, photolysis time, and relative humidity (RH) on the light absorption of selected secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Light absorption of chamber-generated SOA samples, especially aromatic SOA, was found to increase with NOx concentration, at moderate RH, and for the shortest photolysis aging times. The highest mass absorption coefficient (MAC) value is observed from toluene SOA products formed under high-NOx conditions at moderate RH, in which nitro-aromatics were previously identified as the major light-absorbing compounds. BrC light absorption is observed to decrease with photolysis time, correlated with a decline of the organic nitrate fraction of SOA. SOA formed from mixtures of aromatics and isoprene absorb less visible (Vis) and ultraviolet (UV) light than SOA formed from aromatic precursors alone on a mass basis. However, the mixed SOA absorption was underestimated when optical properties were predicted using a two-product SOA formation model, as done in many current climate models. Further investigation, including analysis on detailed mechanisms, are required to explain the discrepancy.

  8. Interior radiances in optically deep absorbing media. 3: Scattering from Haze L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Plass, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    The interior radiances are calculated within an optically deep absorbing medium scattering according to the Haze L phase function. The dependence on the solar zenith angle, the single scattering albedo, and the optical depth within the medium is calculated by the matrix operator method. The development of the asymptotic angular distribution of the radiance in the diffusion region is illustrated through a number of examples; it depends only on the single scattering albedo and on the phase function for single scattering. The exact values of the radiance in the diffusion region are compared with values calculated from the approximate equations proposed by Van de Hulst. The variation of the radiance near the lower boundary of an optically thick medium is illustrated with examples. The attenuation length is calculated for various single scattering albedos and compared with the corresponding values for Rayleigh scattering. The ratio of the upward to the downward flux is found to be remarkably constant within the medium. The heating rate is calculated and found to have a maximum value at an optical depth of two within a Haze L layer when the sun is at the zenith.

  9. Molecules and metals in the distant universe: Sub-mm and optical spectroscopy of quasar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sean Stephen

    In order to gain a complete understanding of galaxy formation and evolution, knowledge of the atomic and molecular gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) is required. Absorption-line spectroscopy of quasars offer a powerful and luminosity independent probe of gas to high redshifts. The sub-Damped Lyman-alpha systems (sub-DLAs; 19.0 < log NHI < 20.3), and Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs; 20.3 < log NHI), are the highest neutral hydrogen column density quasar absorbers contain most of the neutral gas available for star formation in the high-redshift Universe. This thesis presents photometric measurements of 10 quasars absorbers with redshifts 0.652 < zabs < 3.104 taken with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) on Herschel. Of these 10 objects, 3 showed fluxes > 1 Jy. In addition spectra for 5 other quasars with DLAs (0.524 < zabs < 1.173) were taken with SPIRE and Heterodyne Instrument for the far-infrared (HIFI) on Herschel. These observations, in the far-IR and sub-mm bands, were optimized for detection of molecular lines of CO, 13CO, C 18O, H2O, HCO, and the forbidden transitions of [C II] and [N II]. Two targets, the DLA towards PKS0420-014 at z = 0.633 and the DLA towards AO0235+164 at z = 0.524, had a tentative detection of C18O, and another, the DLA towards TXS0827+243 at z = 0.52476, had a tentative detection of HCO. There were a number of other 3 sigma limits, with at least one limit for each of the 5 systems. In addition to the DLAs, 2 super-DLAs (with z = 2.5036 and z = 2.045) were observed using the echellette mode on Keck Echellette Spectrograph and Imager (ESI). These observations, in the optical and ultraviolet wavelengths, were optimized to detect metal lines. Both absorbers show remarkably similar metallicities of ~ -1.3 to ~ -1.4 dex and comparable, definitive depletion levels, as judged from [Fe/Zn] and [Ni/Zn]. One of the absorbers shows supersolar [S/Zn] and [Si/Zn]. Using potential detections of weak Ly-alpha emission at the

  10. Benzodipyrrole-based Donor-Acceptor-type Boron Complexes as Tunable Near-infrared-Absorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-07-20

    Benzodipyrrole-based donor-acceptor boron complexes were designed and synthesized as near-infrared-absorbing materials. The electron-rich organic framework combined with the Lewis acidic boron co-ordination enabled us to tune the LUMO energy level and the HOMO-LUMO gap (i.e.,the absorption wavelength) by changing the organic acceptor units, the number of boron atoms, and the substituents on the boron atoms.

  11. A Titanium Nitride Absorber for Controlling Optical Crosstalk in Horn-Coupled Aluminum LEKID Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarrick, H.; Flanigan, D.; Jones, G.; Johnson, B. R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bradford, K.; Bryan, S.; Cantor, R.; Che, G.; Day, P.; Doyle, S.; Leduc, H.; Limon, M.; Mauskopf, P.; Miller, A.; Mroczkowski, T.; Tucker, C.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the design and measured performance of a titanium nitride (TiN) mesh absorber we are developing for controlling optical crosstalk in horn-coupled lumped-element kinetic inductance detector (LEKID) arrays for millimeter wavelengths. This absorber was added to the fused silica anti-reflection coating attached to previously characterized, 20-element prototype arrays of LEKIDs fabricated from thin-film aluminum on silicon substrates. To test the TiN crosstalk absorber, we compared the measured response and noise properties of LEKID arrays with and without the TiN mesh. For this test, the LEKIDs were illuminated with an adjustable, incoherent electronic millimeter-wave source. Our measurements show that the optical crosstalk in the LEKID array with the TiN absorber is reduced by 66 % on average, so the approach is effective and a viable candidate for future kilo-pixel arrays.

  12. Decontamination of skin exposed to nanocarriers using an absorbent textile material and PEG-12 dimethicone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Baier, G.; Landfester, K.; Frazier, L.; Gefeller, H.; Wunderlich, U.; Gross, I.; Rühl, E.; Knorr, F.

    2014-11-01

    The removal of noxious particulate contaminants such as pollutants derived from particle-to-gas conversions from exposed skin is essential to avoid the permeation of potentially harmful substances into deeper skin layers via the stratum corneum or the skin appendages and their dispersion throughout the circulatory system. This study is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of using the silicone glycol polymer PEG-12 dimethicone and an absorbent textile material to remove fluorescing hydroxyethyl starch nanocapsules implemented as model contaminants from exposed porcine ear skin. Using laser scanning microscopy, it could be shown that while the application and subsequent removal of the absorbent textile material alone did not result in sufficient decontamination, the combined application with PEG-12 dimethicone almost completely eliminated the nanocapsules from the surface of the skin. By acting as a wetting agent, PEG-12 dimethicone enabled the transfer of the nanocapsules into a liquid phase which was taken up by the absorbent textile material. Only traces of fluorescence remained detectable in several skin furrows and follicular orifices, suggesting that the repeated implementation of the procedure may be necessary to achieve total skin surface decontamination.

  13. Phase-contrast imaging of weakly absorbing materials using hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. J.; Gao, D.; Gureyev, T. E.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.

    1995-02-01

    IMAGING with hard X-rays is an important diagnostic tool in medicine, biology and materials science. Contact radiography and tomography using hard X-rays provide information on internal structures that cannot be obtained using other non-destructive methods. The image contrast results from variations in the X-ray absorption arising from density differences and variations in composition and thickness of the object. But although X-rays penetrate deeply into carbon-based compounds, such as soft biological tissue, polymers and carbon-fibre composites, there is little absorption and therefore poor image contrast. Here we describe a method for enhancing the contrast in hard X-ray images of weakly absorbing materials by resolving phase variations across the X-ray beam1-4. The phase gradients are detected using diffraction from perfect silicon crystals. The diffraction properties of the crystal determine the ultimate spatial resolution in the image; we can readily obtain a resolution of a fraction of a millimetre. Our method shows dramatic contrast enhancement for weakly absorbing biological and inorganic materials, compared with conventional radiography using the same X-ray energy. We present both bright-field and dark-field phase-contrast images, and show evidence of contrast reversal. The method should have the clinical advantage of good contrast for low absorbed X-ray dose.

  14. Reflective and refractive optical materials for earth and space applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 4, 5, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedl, Max J. (Editor); Hale, Robert R. (Editor); Parsonage, Thomas B. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses beryllium mirror design and fabrication, production of aspheric beryllium optical surfaces by HIP consolidation, the control of thermally induced porosity for the fabrication of beryllium optics, fine-grained beryllium optical coatings, light-absorbing beryllium baffle materials, and advanced broadband baffle materials. Also discussed are radiation-resistant optical glasses, a catalog of IR and cryooptical properties of selected materials, durable metal-dielectric mirror coatings, the optical stability of diffuse reflectance materials, and optical filters for space applications.

  15. Partial Pressures for Several In-Se Compositions from Optical Absorbance of the Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brebrick, R. F.; Su, Ching-Hua

    2001-01-01

    The optical absorbance of the vapor phase over various In-Se compositions between 33.3-60.99 at.% Se and 673-1418 K was measured and used to obtain the partial pressures of Se2(g) and In2Se(g). The results are in agreement with silica Bourdon gauge measurements for compositions between 50-61 at.%, but significantly higher than those from Knudsen cell and simultaneous Knudsen-torsion cell measurements. It is found that 60.99 at.% Se lies outside the sesquiselenide homogeneity range and 59.98 at.% Se lies inside and is the congruently melting composition. The Gibbs energy of formation of the liquid from its pure liquid elements between 1000-1300 K is essentially independent of temperature and falls between -36 to -38 kJ per g atomic weight for 50 and 56% Se at 1200 and 1300 K.

  16. Partial Pressures of In-Se from Optical Absorbance of the Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brebrick, R. F.; Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The optical absorbance of the vapor phase over various In-Se compositions between 33.3 and 61 atomic percent and 673 and 1418K has been measured and used to obtain the partial pressures of Se2(g) and In2Se(g). The results are in agreement with silica Bourdon gage measurements for compositions between 50 and 61 atomic percent but significantly higher than those from Knudsen cell and simultaneous Torsion-Knudsen cell measurements. The sequiselenide is found to sublime incongruently. Congruent vaporization occurs for the liquid above 1000 K between 50.08 and 56 at. percent Se. The Gibbs energy of formation of the liquid from its pure liquid elements between 1000 and 1300K is essentially independent of temperature and falls between -36 and -38 kJ per gram atomic weight for 50 and 56 percent Se at 1200 and 1300K.

  17. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Zeigler, J.M.

    1993-04-20

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  18. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Zeigler, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  19. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Zeigler, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  20. Evaluation of polypropylene and poly (butylmethacrylate-co-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) nonwoven material as oil absorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Xiao, Changfa; Xu, Naiku

    2013-06-01

    Polypropylene (PP) and poly(butylmethacrylate-co-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PBMA-co-HEMA) nonwoven materials as oil absorbents have been fabricated for the first time via melt blown method. As-prepared nonwovens were investigated in terms of mass per unit area, density, air permeability, contact angle, and morphology observations for fiber diameter distribution and single fiber surface by a field emission scanning electron microscope. The nonwovens are demonstrated as fast and efficient absorbents for various kinds of oils with oil absorbency up to seven to ten times their own weight. The nonwovens show excellent water repulsion but superoleophilic properties. The measured contact angles for water and toluene are more than 127° and ca. 0°, respectively. The addition of PBMA-co-HEMA makes the nonwoven surface more hydrophobic while conserving superoleophilicity. Compared with PP nonwoven, broad diameter distribution of the blend nonwoven is attributed to poor melt fluidity of PBMA-co-HEMA. In terms of single fiber, coarse surface and the presence of point-like convexities lead to the fibers being more readily wetted by oil. More interesting, oil-water separation and oil recovery can be easily carried out by filter and absorption-desorption process, the recovered materials contained hardly any oil droplet and could be reused for next cycles. PMID:23238599

  1. Super water-absorbing new material from chitosan, EDTA and urea.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Abathodharanan; Dhamodharan, Raghavachari

    2015-12-10

    A new, super water-absorbing, material is synthesized by the reaction between chitosan, EDTA and urea and named as CHEDUR. CHEDUR is probably formed through the crosslinking of chitosan molecules (CH) with the EDTA-urea (EDUR) adduct that is formed during the reaction. CHEDUR as well as the other products formed in control reactions are characterized extensively. CHEDUR exhibits a very high water uptake capacity when compared with chitosan, chitosan-EDTA adduct, as well as a commercial diaper material. A systematic study was done to find the optimum composition as well as reaction conditions for maximum water absorbing capacity. CHEDUR can play a vital role in applications that demand the rapid absorption and slow release of water such as agriculture, as a three in one new material for the slow release of urea, water and other metal ions that can be attached through the EDTA component. The other potential advantage of CHEDUR is that it can be expected to degrade in soil based on its chitosan backbone. The new material with rapid and high water uptake could also find potential applications as biodegradable active ingredient of the diaper material.

  2. Super water-absorbing new material from chitosan, EDTA and urea.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Abathodharanan; Dhamodharan, Raghavachari

    2015-12-10

    A new, super water-absorbing, material is synthesized by the reaction between chitosan, EDTA and urea and named as CHEDUR. CHEDUR is probably formed through the crosslinking of chitosan molecules (CH) with the EDTA-urea (EDUR) adduct that is formed during the reaction. CHEDUR as well as the other products formed in control reactions are characterized extensively. CHEDUR exhibits a very high water uptake capacity when compared with chitosan, chitosan-EDTA adduct, as well as a commercial diaper material. A systematic study was done to find the optimum composition as well as reaction conditions for maximum water absorbing capacity. CHEDUR can play a vital role in applications that demand the rapid absorption and slow release of water such as agriculture, as a three in one new material for the slow release of urea, water and other metal ions that can be attached through the EDTA component. The other potential advantage of CHEDUR is that it can be expected to degrade in soil based on its chitosan backbone. The new material with rapid and high water uptake could also find potential applications as biodegradable active ingredient of the diaper material. PMID:26428133

  3. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range.

    PubMed

    González, M; Crespo, M; Baselga, J; Pozuelo, J

    2016-05-19

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials.

  4. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range.

    PubMed

    González, M; Crespo, M; Baselga, J; Pozuelo, J

    2016-05-19

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials. PMID:27152472

  5. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, T.W.

    1983-12-21

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  6. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  7. Modeling of optically controlled reflective bistability in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, L.

    2015-05-01

    Bistability switching between two optical signals has been studied theoretically utilizing the concept of cross absorption modulation in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber (VCSSA). The probe beam is fixed at a wavelength other than the low power cavity resonance wavelength, which exhibits bistable characteristic by controlling the power of a pump beam (λpump≠λprobe). The cavity nonlinear effects that arises simultaneously from the excitonic absorption bleaching, and the carrier induced nonlinear index change has been considered in the model. The high power absorption in the active region introduces thermal effects within the nonlinear cavity due to which the effective cavity length changes. This leads to a red-shift of the cavity resonance wavelength, which results a change in phase of the optical fields within the cavity. In the simulation, the phase-change due to this resonance shifting is considered to be constant over time, and it assumes the value corresponding to the maximum input power. Further, an initial phase detuning of the probe beam has been considered to investigate its effect on switching. It is observed from the simulated results that, the output of the probe beam exhibits either clockwise or counter-clockwise bistability, depending on its initial phase detuning.

  8. A Phosphorus Phthalocyanine Formulation with Intense Absorbance at 1000 nm for Deep Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Depeng; Zhang, Yumiao; Chitgupi, Upendra; Geng, Jumin; Wang, Yuehang; Zhang, Yuzhen; Cook, Timothy R.; Xia, Jun; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Although photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) operates with high spatial resolution in biological tissues deeper than other optical modalities, light scattering is a limiting factor. The use of longer near infrared wavelengths reduces scattering. Recently, the rational design of a stable phosphorus phthalocyanine (P-Pc) with a long wavelength absorption band beyond 1000 nm has been reported. Here, we show that when dissolved in liquid surfactants, P-Pc can give rise to formulations with absorbance of greater than 1000 (calculated for a 1 cm path length) at wavelengths beyond 1000 nm. Using the broadly accessible Nd:YAG pulse laser emission output of 1064 nm, P-Pc could be imaged through 11.6 cm of chicken breast with PACT. P-Pc accumulated passively in tumors following intravenous injection in mice as observed by PACT. Following oral administration, P-Pc passed through the intestine harmlessly, and PACT could be used to non-invasively observe intestine function. When the contrast agent placed under the arm of a healthy adult human, a PACT transducer on the top of the arm could readily detect P-Pc through the entire 5 cm limb. Thus, the approach of using contrast media with extreme absorption at 1064 nm readily enables high quality optical imaging in vitro and in vivo in humans at exceptional depths. PMID:27022416

  9. A Phosphorus Phthalocyanine Formulation with Intense Absorbance at 1000 nm for Deep Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Depeng; Zhang, Yumiao; Chitgupi, Upendra; Geng, Jumin; Wang, Yuehang; Zhang, Yuzhen; Cook, Timothy R; Xia, Jun; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2016-01-01

    Although photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) operates with high spatial resolution in biological tissues deeper than other optical modalities, light scattering is a limiting factor. The use of longer near infrared wavelengths reduces scattering. Recently, the rational design of a stable phosphorus phthalocyanine (P-Pc) with a long wavelength absorption band beyond 1000 nm has been reported. Here, we show that when dissolved in liquid surfactants, P-Pc can give rise to formulations with absorbance of greater than 1000 (calculated for a 1 cm path length) at wavelengths beyond 1000 nm. Using the broadly accessible Nd:YAG pulse laser emission output of 1064 nm, P-Pc could be imaged through 11.6 cm of chicken breast with PACT. P-Pc accumulated passively in tumors following intravenous injection in mice as observed by PACT. Following oral administration, P-Pc passed through the intestine harmlessly, and PACT could be used to non-invasively observe intestine function. When the contrast agent placed under the arm of a healthy adult human, a PACT transducer on the top of the arm could readily detect P-Pc through the entire 5 cm limb. Thus, the approach of using contrast media with extreme absorption at 1064 nm readily enables high quality optical imaging in vitro and in vivo in humans at exceptional depths.

  10. Hybrid materials for optics and photonics.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Benedicte; Innocenzi, Plinio

    2011-02-01

    The interest in organic-inorganic hybrids as materials for optics and photonics started more than 25 years ago and since then has known a continuous and strong growth. The high versatility of sol-gel processing offers a wide range of possibilities to design tailor-made materials in terms of structure, texture, functionality, properties and shape modelling. From the first hybrid material with optical functional properties that has been obtained by incorporation of an organic dye in a silica matrix, the research in the field has quickly evolved towards more sophisticated systems, such as multifunctional and/or multicomponent materials, nanoscale and self-assembled hybrids and devices for integrated optics. In the present critical review, we have focused our attention on three main research areas: passive and active optical hybrid sol-gel materials, and integrated optics. This is far from exhaustive but enough to give an overview of the huge potential of these materials in photonics and optics (254 references).

  11. The NuSTAR View of Reflecting and Absorbing Circumnuclear Material in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    The physical conditions and precise geometry of the accreting circumnuclear material in the vicinity of supermassive black holes remain open and critical questions. Between July 2012 and February 2013, NuSTAR and XMM-Newton performed four long-look joint observations of the type 1.8 Seyfert, NGC 1365. We have analyzed the variable absorption seen in these observations in order to characterize the geometry of the absorbing material. Two of the observations caught NGC 1365 in an unusually low absorption state, revealing complexity in the multi-layer absorbers which had previously been hidden, including a the Compton-thick torus, BLR clouds, and a patchy absorber with a variable column around 1022 cm-2 and a line of sight covering fraction of 0.3-0.9 which responds directly to the intrinsic source flux, possibly due to a wind geometry. We have also analyzed two NuSTAR observations of NGC 7582, a well-studied X-ray bright Seyfert 2 with moderately heavy highly variable absorption and strong reflection spectral features. Changes in the spectral shape and high reflection fractions have led to competing explanations: 1) the central X-ray source partially “shut off”, decreasing in intrinsic luminosity, with a delayed decrease in reflection features due to the light-crossing time of the Compton-thick material or 2) the source became more heavily obscured, with only a portion of the power law continuum leaking through. The high quality of the NuSTAR spectra above 10 keV give us the best look at the reflection hump to date and allow us to test these two scenarios.

  12. Field-Sensitive Materials for Optical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Little, Mark

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of investigation is to develop the fundamental materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics that are essential for industry, NASA, and DOD (Department of Defense) applications such as: membrane optics, filters for LIDARs (Light Detection and Ranging), windows for sensors and probes, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras, light valves, light switches, flat-panel displays, etc. The proposed idea is based on the quantum-dots (QD) array or thin-film of field-sensitive Stark and Zeeman materials and the bound excitonic state of organic crystals that will offer optical adaptability and reconfigurability. Major tasks are the development of concept demonstration article and test data of field-controlled spectrally smart active optics (FCSAO) for optical multi-functional capabilities on a selected spectral range.

  13. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials - Part 2: Commodity plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-09-15

    In this series of two papers, various polymeric materials are investigated as to their potential applicability as absorber materials for solar thermal collectors. While Part 1 of this paper series deals with the aging behavior of engineering plastics, including two amorphous polymers (PPE + PS) and (PC) and two semi-crystalline polymers (two types of PA12), the present Part 2 treats the aging behavior of semi-crystalline so-called ''commodity'' plastics (two types of crosslinked polyethylene (PE-X) and two types of polypropylene (PP)). As in Part 1, the focus of the investigation is to study the aging behavior of these materials under maximum operating conditions (80 C in water up to 16,000 h) and stagnation conditions (140 C in air up to 500 h) typical for northern climate. The materials supplied or produced as polymer films were first characterized in the unaged state and then for different states of aging by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and by mechanical tensile tests. DSC was applied primarily to obtain information on physical aging phenomena, whereas SEC analysis was used to characterize chemical degradation of the materials. In addition, physical and chemical aging were both analyzed via the small and large strain mechanical behavior. Comparing the two aging conditions in hot air and hot water, a rather stable mechanical performance profile was found for both PP types over the investigated aging time, which was interpreted in terms of competing physical and chemical aging mechanisms. Analogously such competing mechanisms were also inferred for one of the PE-X materials, while the other exhibited substantial degradation in terms of strain-to-break values for both aging conditions. In principle, both PP and PE-X are promising candidates for black absorber applications in northern climates if proper measures against overheating are taken and when adequately modified. (author)

  14. Optical Properties of Moderately-Absorbing Organic and Mixed Organic/Inorganic Particles at Very High Humidities

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tami C; Rood, Mark J; Brem, Benjamin T; Mena-Gonzalez, Francisco C; Chen, Yanju

    2012-04-16

    Relative humidity (RH) affects the water content of an aerosol, altering its ability to scatter and absorb light, which is important for aerosol effects on climate and visibility. This project involves in situ measurement and modeling of aerosol optical properties including absorption, scattering and extinction at three visible wavelengths (467, 530, 660 nm), for organic carbon (OC) generated by pyrolysis of biomass, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and their mixtures at controlled RH conditions. Novel components of this project include investigation of: (1) Changes in all three of these optical properties at scanned RH conditions; (2) Optical properties at RH values up to 95%, which are usually extrapolated instead of measured; and (3) Examination of aerosols generated by the pyrolysis of wood, which is representative of primary atmospheric organic carbon, and its mixture with inorganic aerosol. Scattering and extinction values were used to determine light absorption by difference and single scattering albedo values. Extensive instrumentation development and benchmarking with independently measured and modeled values were used to obtain and evaluate these new results. The single scattering albedo value for a dry absorbing polystyrene microsphere benchmark agreed within 0.02 (absolute value) with independently published results at 530 nm. Light absorption by a nigrosin (sample light-absorbing) benchmark increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Closure modeling with Mie theory was able to reproduce this increase with the linear volume average (LVA) refractive index mixing rule for this water soluble compound. Absorption by biomass OC aerosol increased by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.7 and 2.3 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at 467 nm and 530 nm, but there was no detectable absorption at 660 nm. Additionally, the spectral dependence of absorption by OC that was observed with filter measurements was confirmed qualitatively

  15. ABSORBANCE, ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT, AND APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD: A COMMENT ON AMBIGUITY IN THE USE OF THESE OPTICAL CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several important optical terms such as "absorbance" and "absorption coefficient" are frequently used ambiguously in the current peer-reviewed literature. Since they are important terms that are required to derive other quantities such as the "apparent quantum yield" of photoprod...

  16. Picosecond optical limiting in reverse saturable absorbers: a theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepkowicz, Richard; Kobyakov, Andrey; Hagan, David J.; van Stryland, Eric W.

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally study absorption of picosecond laser pulses in materials described by a four-level system that exhibit reverse saturable absorption (RSA). Using an approximate solution to the rate equations, we derive, analyze, and verify, numerically and experimentally, a single dynamical equation for the spatial evolution of the pulse fluence that includes both the rate equations and the propagation equation. This analytical approach considerably simplifies the study of optical limiting with picosecond pulses and helps to predict the behavior of the nonlinear transmittance, the level of output signal clamping, and a possible turnover from RSA to saturable absorption that restricts the performance of optical limiters based on RSA. The results obtained can also be used to characterize RSA materials by the pump-probe technique.

  17. Nonlinear optical transmission of cyanobacteria-derived optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Edward H.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Zhao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Cyanobacteria-derived optical materials for optical limiting applications have been studied in this work. Six samples have been prepared from cyanobacteria including cyanobacteria suspension in water, extracts in water, methanol, and N,N-dimethylformamide, and pyrolyzed cyanobacteria (PCYB) dispersed in dsDNA (sodium salt from salmon testes) solution and sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, respectively. The extracts contain phycocyanin, chlorophyll a, and carotenoids as measured by optical absorption spectroscopy, while the PCYB is a nanostructural composite composed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoringes, and multilayer graphenes, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. The optical limiting responses of the samples have been measured at 532 and 756 nm. The PCYB in dsDNA solution has the best limiting performance out of all the cyanobacteria-derived samples. It outperforms carbon black suspension standard at 532 nm and is a broadband limiter, which makes it attractive for optical limiting applications.

  18. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials - Part 1: Engineering plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-09-15

    In this series of two papers, various polymeric materials are investigated as to their potential applicability as absorber materials for solar thermal collectors. The focus of the investigation is to study the aging behavior of these materials under maximum operating conditions (80 C in water up to 16,000 h) and stagnation conditions (140 C in air up to 500 h) typical for northern climate. The materials supplied or produced as polymer films were first characterized in the unaged state and then for different states of aging by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and by mechanical tensile tests. Physical aging phenomena were studied by DSC, SEC analysis provided information on chemical degradation of the materials. In addition, physical and chemical aging were both analyzed via the small and large strain mechanical behavior. While the present Part 1 of this paper series deals with the aging behavior of engineering plastics, including two amorphous polymers (a polyphenylene ether polystyrene blend (PPE + PS) and polycarbonate (PC)) and two semi-crystalline polymers (two types of polyamide 12 (PA12)), the aging behavior of so-called ''commodity'' plastics (PE and PP) is the subject of Part 2. Comparing the two aging conditions, the amorphous materials (PPE + PS and PC) turned out to be more prone to physical and chemical aging at 140 C in air. In contrast, the semi-crystalline PA12 materials were more strongly affected by exposure to water at 80 C, although to different degrees, depending on the modification. (author)

  19. Scientists Identify New Quaternary Materials for Solar Cell Absorbers (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Research provides insight for exploring use of earth-abundant quaternary semiconductors for large-scale solar cell applications. For large-scale solar electricity generation, it is critical to find new material that is Earth abundant and easily manufactured. Previous experimental studies suggest that Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} could be a strong candidate absorber materials for large-scale thin-film solar cells due to its optimal bandgap, high adsorption coefficient, and ease of synthesis. However, due to the complicated nature of the quaternary compound, it is unclear whether other quaternary compounds have physical properties suitable for solar cell application. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Fudan University, and University College London have performed systematic searches of quaternary semiconductors using a sequential cation mutation method in which the material properties of the quaternary compounds can be derived and understood through the evolution from the binary, to ternary, and to quaternary compounds. The searches revealed that in addition to Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4}, Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} are also suitable quaternary materials for solar cell absorbers. Through the extensive study of defect and alloy properties of these materials, the researchers propose that to maximize solar cell performance, growth of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} under Cu-poor/Zn-rich conditions will be optimal and the formation of Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} alloy will be beneficial in improving solar cell performance.

  20. Terahertz material characterization for nonreciprocal integrated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mičica, Martin; Postava, Kamil; Vanwolleghem, Mathias; Horák, Tomáś; Lampin, Jean François; Pištora, Jaromír.

    2015-05-01

    Interest in nonreciprocal terahertz (THz) integrated optics makes necessity to look for new materials active in this region and precisely characterize their optical properties. In this paper we present important aspects of the methods for determination of optical functions in far infrared (FIR) and THz spectral range. The techniques are applied to polyethylene cyclic olefin copolymer (Topas) and hexaferrites (BaFe12O19, SrFe12O19). Topas is promising material in integrated optics for THz radiation, thanks to its low absorption in this region. On the other hand, hexaferrites with its magneto-optic properties can be used for nonreciprocal integrated optic parts and radiation control. Samples were studied by THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in spectral range 2 - 100 cm-1 by transmission and reflection. Advantage of presented THz time domain spectroscopy is measurement of the electric field wavefunction, which allows to obtain both the amplitude and phase spectra. In results we provide measured data, processing, and final computed optical properties of Topas and hexaferrites which reveal interesting optical behaviour in THz spectral range.

  1. Electro-optic modulator material

    DOEpatents

    Adams, John J.; Ebbers, Chris A.

    2005-02-22

    An electro-optic device for use with a laser beam. A crystal has a first face and a second face. Means are provided for applying a voltage across the crystal to obtain a net phase retardation on the polarization of the laser beam when the laser beam is passed through the crystal. In one embodiment the crystal is composed of a compound having the chemical formula ReAe40(BO3)3 where: RE consists of one or more of the following elements La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu and two other elements Y and Sc; and where Ae is from the list of Ca, Sr, or Ba.

  2. Thermally-Resilient, Broadband Optical Absorber from UV-to-IR Derived from Carbon Nanostructures and Method of Making the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor); Coles, James B. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A monolithic optical absorber and methods of making same. The monolithic optical absorber uses an array of mutually aligned carbon nanotubes that are grown using a PECVD growth process and a structure that includes a conductive substrate, a refractory template layer and a nucleation layer. Monolithic optical absorbers made according to the described structure and method exhibit high absorptivity, high site densities (greater than 10.sup.9 nanotubes/cm.sup.2), very low reflectivity (below 1%), and high thermal stability in air (up to at least 400.degree. C.). The PECVD process allows the application of such absorbers in a wide variety of end uses.

  3. Results of the Workshop on Microwave-Absorbing Materials for Accelerators (MAMA): A Personal View

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I E

    1993-04-01

    The first workshop on the properties and uses of special materials for absorption of microwaves in particle accelerators was held at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, February 22-24, 1993. The meeting's purpose was to review the advances of ceramic and materials science and to describe the accelerator projects the success of which strongly depends on the existence and availability of microwave-absorbing materials with special characteristics. Scientists from various branches of physics, materials science, microwave engineering, accelerator physics and from national and international laboratories, from universities and industries participated in this gathering. This interdisciplinary meeting brought new people and new ideas together which in the future will bloom into better understanding of general materials and of physical processes and eventually to collaborative efforts to design and produce custom made materials. This paper describes the major topics covered in the workshop and is a personal elaboration of the author on the future possibilities opened by this interaction.

  4. Efficient positioning of absorbing material in complex systems by using the Patch Transfer Function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totaro, N.; Guyader, J. L.

    2012-06-01

    Given the need to decrease energy consumption in the automobile industry, vehicle weight has become an important issue. Regarding acoustic comfort, the weight of noise reduction devices must be minimized inside vehicle compartments. Consequently, these devices, for example those using poro-elastic materials, must be designed carefully to maximize their influence on noise reduction. The present paper describes a method developed to obtain an efficient positioning of a given surface (or mass) of absorbing material characterized by its surface impedance. This technique is based on the Patch Transfer Function method used to couple complex vibro-acoustic sub-domains and which has been successfully applied in the European ViSPeR and Silence projects. First, a numerical analysis of the possibilities of this method is performed on a non-rectangular cavity with rigid walls after which an experimental validation of this numerical analysis is performed to evaluate the accuracy of the method under real conditions.

  5. Stationary, harmonic, and pulsed operations of an optically bistable laser with saturable absorber. I

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, P.; Erneux, T.

    1984-10-01

    We study the semiclassical equations for a laser with a saturable absorber in the mean-field limit, assuming homogeneously broadened two-level atoms, for a set of parameters where the system displays optical bistability and time-periodic solutions. In the first part the bifurcation diagram for stationary and periodic solutions is obtained by numerical integration. Two different classes of stable periodic solutions arise: small-amplitude solutions and passive Q switching. We observe hysteresis domains involving up to three solutions (stationary and/or periodic). We also discuss the validity of some standard approximations and show that even in the absence of detuning the phases play an important role. We also discuss the influence of the initial conditions whose symmetry properties induce important modifications of the bifurcation diagram. In the second part we introduce an alternative adiabatic elimination scheme which allows us to construct the small-amplitude periodic solutions over nearly their whole range of existence. We then study these solutions near the Hopf bifurcation from which they emerge and derive analytic conditions for their stability. When they are stable, we also give the conditions under which a secondary Hopf bifurcation will occur, leading to quasiperiodic solutions.

  6. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Crespo, M.; Baselga, J.; Pozuelo, J.

    2016-05-01

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials.Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Scheme of hydrogenated derivative of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (HDGEBA) and m-xylylenediamine; X-ray diffractograms of pristine CNT

  7. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  8. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to

  9. Neutron-Absorbing Coatings for Safe Storage of Fissile Materials with Enhanced Shielding & Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J; Farmer, J; Lee, C; Fischer, L; Boussoufi, M; Liu, B; Egbert, H

    2007-07-03

    Neutron-absorbing Fe-based amorphous-metal coatings have been developed that are more corrosion resistant than other criticality-control materials, including Al-B{sub 4}C composites, borated stainless steels, and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys. The presence of relatively high concentration of boron in these coatings not only enhances its neutron-absorption capability, but also enables these coatings to exist in the amorphous state. Exceptional corrosion resistance has been achieved with these Fe-based amorphous-metal alloys through additions of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten. The addition of rare earth elements such as yttrium has lowered the critical cooling rate of these materials, thereby rendering them more easily processed. Containers used for the storage of nuclear materials, and protected from corrosion through the application of amorphous metal coatings, would have greatly enhanced service lives, and would therefore provide greater long-term safety. Amorphous alloy powders have been successfully produced in multi-ton quantities with gas atomization, and applied to several half-scale spent fuel storage containers and criticality control structures with the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. Salt fog testing and neutron radiography of these prototypes indicates that such an approach is viable for the production of large-scale industrial-scale facilities and containers. The use of these durable neutron-absorbing materials to coat stainless steel containers and storage racks, as well as vaults, hot-cell facilities and glove boxes could substantially reduce the risk of criticality in the event of an accident. These materials are particularly attractive for shielding applications since they are fire proof. Additionally, layers of other cold and thermal sprayed materials that include carbon and/or carbides can be used in conjunction with the high-boron amorphous metal coatings for the purpose of moderation. For example, various carbides, including boron

  10. Photorefractive materials for optical storage and display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. R.; Kim, D. M.; Rabson, T. A.; Tittel, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    Real-time data storage and processing using optical techniques have been considered in recent years. Of particular interest are photosensitive electro-optic crystals which permit volume storage in the form of phase holograms, by means of a charge transfer process. A survey of the state of the art of such holographic memories is presented. The physical mechanism responsible for the formation of phase holograms in such crystals is discussed. Attention is focused on various aspects of materials characterization, development and utilization. Experimental reversible holographic read-write memory systems with fast random access and high storage capacity employing this new class of photosensitive materials have already been demonstrated.

  11. Manifestation of optical activity in different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, A. F.; Golovina, T. G.; Konstantinov, K. K.

    2014-07-01

    Various manifestations of optical activity (OA) in crystals and organic materials are considered. Examples of optically active enantiomorphic and nonenantiomorphic crystals of 18 symmetry classes are presented. The OA of enantiomorphic organic materials as components of living nature (amino acids, sugars, and proteins) is analyzed. Questions related to the origin of life on earth are considered. Examples of differences in the enantiomers of drugs are shown. The consequences of replacing conventional left-handed amino acids with additionally right-handed amino acids for living organisms are indicated.

  12. Review of Mid- to High-Temperature Solar Selective Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the concentrating solar power (CSP) systems using solar absorbers to convert concentrated sunlight to thermal electric power. It is possible to achieve solar absorber surfaces for efficient photothermal conversion having high solar absorptance (a) for solar radiation and a low thermal emittance (e) at the operational temperature. A low reflectance (?'' 0) at wavelengths (?) 3 mm and a high reflectance (?'' 1) at l 3 mm characterize spectrally selective surfaces. The operational temperature ranges of these materials for solar applications can be categorized as low temperature (T< 100 C), mid-temperature (100 C< T< 400 C), and high-temperature (T> 400 C). High- and mid-temperature applications are needed for CSP applications. For CSP applications, the ideal spectrally selective surface would be low-cost and easy to manufacture, chemically and thermally stable in air at elevated operating temperatures (T= 500 C), and have a solar absorptance= 0.98 and a thermal emittance= 0.05 at 500 C.

  13. Comparative analysis of absorbance calculations for integrated optical waveguide configurations by use of the ray optics model and the electromagnetic wave theory.

    PubMed

    Mendes, S B; Saavedra, S S

    2000-02-01

    Focusing on the use of planar waveguides as platforms for highly sensitive attenuated total reflection spectroscopy of organic thin films, we extend the ray optics model to provide absorbance expressions for the case of dichroic layers immobilized on the waveguide surface. Straightforward expressions are derived for the limiting case of weakly absorbing, anisotropically oriented molecules in the waveguide-cladding region. The second major focus is on the accuracy of the ray optics model. This model assumes that the introduction of absorbing species, either in the bulk cladding or as an adlayer on the waveguide surface, only causes a small perturbation to the original waveguide-mode profile. We investigate the accuracy of this assumption and the conditions under which it is valid. A comparison to an exact calculation by use of the electromagnetic wave theory is implemented, and the discrepancy of the ray optics model is determined for various waveguide configurations. We find that in typical situations in which waveguide-absorbance measurements are used to study organic thin films (k(l)/n(l) optics and the exact calculations is only a few percent (2-3%).

  14. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Paquin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.

  15. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Pang, Yi

    1992-05-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

  16. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Pang, Yi

    1993-10-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

  17. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsooodi, S; Yi Pang.

    1993-10-19

    A polymeric material is described which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6].

  18. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Pang, Y.

    1992-05-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6]/hv.

  19. Optical materials based on molecular nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Patra, A; Chandaluri, Ch G; Radhakrishnan, T P

    2012-01-21

    A major part of contemporary nanomaterials research is focused on metal and semiconductor nanoparticles, constituted of extended lattices of atoms or ions. Molecular nanoparticles assembled from small molecules through non-covalent interactions are relatively less explored but equally fascinating materials. Their unique and versatile characteristics have attracted considerable attention in recent years, establishing their identity and status as a novel class of nanomaterials. Optical characteristics of molecular nanoparticles capture the essence of their nanoscale features and form the basis of a variety of applications. This review describes the advances made in the field of fabrication of molecular nanoparticles, the wide spectrum of their optical and nonlinear optical characteristics and explorations of the potential applications that exploit their unique optical attributes.

  20. Perovskite oxides for visible-light-absorbing ferroelectric and photovoltaic materials.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Ilya; West, D Vincent; Torres, Maria; Gou, Gaoyang; Stein, David M; Wu, Liyan; Chen, Guannan; Gallo, Eric M; Akbashev, Andrew R; Davies, Peter K; Spanier, Jonathan E; Rappe, Andrew M

    2013-11-28

    Ferroelectrics have recently attracted attention as a candidate class of materials for use in photovoltaic devices, and for the coupling of light absorption with other functional properties. In these materials, the strong inversion symmetry breaking that is due to spontaneous electric polarization promotes the desirable separation of photo-excited carriers and allows voltages higher than the bandgap, which may enable efficiencies beyond the maximum possible in a conventional p-n junction solar cell. Ferroelectric oxides are also stable in a wide range of mechanical, chemical and thermal conditions and can be fabricated using low-cost methods such as sol-gel thin-film deposition and sputtering. Recent work has shown how a decrease in ferroelectric layer thickness and judicious engineering of domain structures and ferroelectric-electrode interfaces can greatly increase the current harvested from ferroelectric absorber materials, increasing the power conversion efficiency from about 10(-4) to about 0.5 per cent. Further improvements in photovoltaic efficiency have been inhibited by the wide bandgaps (2.7-4 electronvolts) of ferroelectric oxides, which allow the use of only 8-20 per cent of the solar spectrum. Here we describe a family of single-phase solid oxide solutions made from low-cost and non-toxic elements using conventional solid-state methods: [KNbO3]1 - x[BaNi1/2Nb1/2O3 - δ]x (KBNNO). These oxides exhibit both ferroelectricity and a wide variation of direct bandgaps in the range 1.1-3.8 electronvolts. In particular, the x = 0.1 composition is polar at room temperature, has a direct bandgap of 1.39 electronvolts and has a photocurrent density approximately 50 times larger than that of the classic ferroelectric (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti)O3 material. The ability of KBNNO to absorb three to six times more solar energy than the current ferroelectric materials suggests a route to viable ferroelectric semiconductor-based cells for solar energy conversion and

  1. Crosslinked polyimide electro-optic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Kosc, T.Z.; Singer, K.D.; Beuhler, A.J.; Wargowski, D.A.; Cahill, P.A.; Seager, C.H.; Meinhardt, M.B.; Ermer, S.

    1995-11-15

    We report studies of the optical and electro-optic properties of guest--host polymeric nonlinear optical materials based on aromatic, fluorinated, fully imidized, organic soluble, thermally, and photochemically crosslinkable, guest--host polyimides. We have introduced temperature stable nonlinear optical chromophores into these polyimides and studied optical losses, electric field poling, electro-optic properties, and orientational stability. We measured electro-optic coefficients of 5.5 and 12.0 pm/V for ((2,6-Bis(2-(3-(9-(ethyl)carbazolyl))ethenyl)4H-pyran-4-ylidene)propanedinitrile) (4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p -dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran) DCM-doped guest--host systems at 800 nm using a poling field of 1.3 MV/cm. Poling induced nonlinearities in single-layer films were in agreement with the oriented gas model, but were lower in three-layer films due to voltage division across the layers. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. The hybrid of SnO2 nanoparticle and polypyrrole aerogel: an excellent electromagnetic wave absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Dai, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Wanchun; Wu, Fan; Xie, Aming

    2016-07-01

    As a kind of costless and lightweight material, SnO2 nanoparticles@polypyrrole hybrid aerogels have been synthesized and displayed electromagnetic wave absorbing (EWA) performance. Only with 10 wt% of nano-SnO2 filler loading in wax, effective EWA bandwidth of the hybrid aerogel can reach 7.28 GHz which is the widest lightweight EWA material among the reported absorbents. Through the regulation of sample thicknesses, effective EWA at lower frequencies can also be achieved. It was demonstrated that this aerogel can be used as an effective lightweight broadband EWA material.

  3. Combining linear polarization spectroscopy and the Representative Layer Theory to measure the Beer-Lambert law absorbance of highly scattering materials.

    PubMed

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (Vis-NIR) Spectroscopy is a powerful non destructive analytical method used to analyze major compounds in bulk materials and products and requiring no sample preparation. It is widely used in routine analysis and also in-line in industries, in-vivo with biomedical applications or in-field for agricultural and environmental applications. However, highly scattering samples subvert Beer-Lambert law's linear relationship between spectral absorbance and the concentrations. Instead of spectral pre-processing, which is commonly used by Vis-NIR spectroscopists to mitigate the scattering effect, we put forward an optical method, based on Polarized Light Spectroscopy to improve the absorbance signal measurement on highly scattering samples. This method selects part of the signal which is less impacted by scattering. The resulted signal is combined in the Absorption/Remission function defined in Dahm's Representative Layer Theory to compute an absorbance signal fulfilling Beer-Lambert's law, i.e. being linearly related to concentration of the chemicals composing the sample. The underpinning theories have been experimentally evaluated on scattering samples in liquid form and in powdered form. The method produced more accurate spectra and the Pearson's coefficient assessing the linearity between the absorbance spectra and the concentration of the added dye improved from 0.94 to 0.99 for liquid samples and 0.84-0.97 for powdered samples. PMID:25467494

  4. Combining linear polarization spectroscopy and the Representative Layer Theory to measure the Beer-Lambert law absorbance of highly scattering materials.

    PubMed

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (Vis-NIR) Spectroscopy is a powerful non destructive analytical method used to analyze major compounds in bulk materials and products and requiring no sample preparation. It is widely used in routine analysis and also in-line in industries, in-vivo with biomedical applications or in-field for agricultural and environmental applications. However, highly scattering samples subvert Beer-Lambert law's linear relationship between spectral absorbance and the concentrations. Instead of spectral pre-processing, which is commonly used by Vis-NIR spectroscopists to mitigate the scattering effect, we put forward an optical method, based on Polarized Light Spectroscopy to improve the absorbance signal measurement on highly scattering samples. This method selects part of the signal which is less impacted by scattering. The resulted signal is combined in the Absorption/Remission function defined in Dahm's Representative Layer Theory to compute an absorbance signal fulfilling Beer-Lambert's law, i.e. being linearly related to concentration of the chemicals composing the sample. The underpinning theories have been experimentally evaluated on scattering samples in liquid form and in powdered form. The method produced more accurate spectra and the Pearson's coefficient assessing the linearity between the absorbance spectra and the concentration of the added dye improved from 0.94 to 0.99 for liquid samples and 0.84-0.97 for powdered samples.

  5. A comparison of the shock-absorbing properties of cervical disc prosthesis bearing materials

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Michael C.; Jacobsen, Stephen; Metcalf, Newton; Sasso, Rick; Ching, Randal P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Data Cervical arthroplasty offers theoretical advantages over traditional spinal fusion, including elimination of adjacent segment disease and elimination of the risk of pseudoarthrosis formation. Initial studies of cervical arthroplasty have shown promising results, however, the ideal design characteristics for disc replacement constructs have not been determined. The current study seeks to quantify the differences in the shock absorption characteristics of three commonly used materials in cervical disc arthroplasty. Methods Three different nucleus materials, polyurethane (PU), polyethylene (PE) and a titanium-alloy (Ti) were tested in a humidity- and temperature-controlled chamber. Ten of each nucleus type underwent three separate mechanical testing protocols to measure 1) dynamic stiffness, 2) quasi-static stiffness, 3) energy absorption, and 4) energy dissipation. The results were compared using analysis of variance. Results PU had the lowest mean dynamic stiffness (435 ± 13 N/mm, P < .0001) and highest energy absorption (19.4 ± 0.1 N/mm, P < .0001) of all three nucleus materials tested. PU was found to have significantly higher energy dissipation (viscous damping ratio 0.017 ± 0,001, P < .0001) than the PE or TI nuclei. PU had the lowest quasi-static stiffness (598 ± 23 N/mm, P < .0001) of the nucleus materials tested. A biphasic response curve was observed for all of the PU nuclei tests. Conclusions Polyurethane absorbs and dissipates more energy and is less stiff than either polyethylene or titanium. Level of Evidence Basic Science/Biomechanical Study. Clinical Relevance This study characterizes important differences in biomechanical properties of materials that are currently being used for different cervical disc prostheses. PMID:25802668

  6. Optical pulling of airborne absorbing particles and smut spores over a meter-scale distance with negative photophoretic force

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jinda; Hart, Adam G.; Li, Yong-qing

    2015-04-27

    We demonstrate optical pulling of single light-absorbing particles and smut spores in air over a meter-scale distance using a single collimated laser beam based on negative photophoretic force. The micron-sized particles are pulled towards the light source at a constant speed of 1–10 cm/s in the optical pulling pipeline while undergoing transverse rotation at 0.2–10 kHz. The pulled particles can be manipulated and precisely positioned on the entrance window with an accuracy of ∼20 μm, and their chemical compositions can be characterized with micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Optical activity and ultraviolet absorbance detection of dansyl L-amino acids separated by gradient liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    Many scientific investigations (e.g., geochronology, pharmaceuticals) have the need to determine enantiometric ratios of amino acids and other compounds. It has been reported that OA/UV or OA/RI (refractive index) are ideal methods for the determination of enantiomeric ratios without the need for chiral columns, chiral eluents, or diasteromer preparation. Unfortunately, only three amino acids are naturally UV absorbing (254 nm), and RI sensitivity for amino acids is low. Derivatization by several methods (o-phthalaldehyde, dansyl, phenylisothiocyanate, fluorescamine, 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene, and phenylthiohydantoin) renders all amino acids UV absorbing and makes UV or fluorescence viable techniques for amino acids determinations. A previously neglected aspect of derivatization is the effect on optical activity. These highly polar groups influence the chiral center of amino acids drastically (electronic and steric effects). The shifting of the absorption band to the proximity of the wavelength used for OA measurements further enhances the importance of the substituent. The authors report here the determination of 17 dansyl amino acids in a mixture by UV absorbance and optical activity. This involves gradient elution. Previously, the optical activity detector (OAD) has been used only with isocratic HPLC.

  8. Dielectric characterization of a nonlinear optical material.

    PubMed

    Lunkenheimer, P; Krohns, S; Gemander, F; Schmahl, W W; Loidl, A

    2014-01-01

    Batisite was reported to be a nonlinear optical material showing second harmonic generation. Using dielectric spectroscopy and polarization measurements, we provide a thorough investigation of the dielectric and charge-transport properties of this material. Batisite shows the typical characteristics of a linear lossy dielectric. No evidence for ferro- or antiferroelectric polarization is found. As the second-harmonic generation observed in batisite points to a non-centrosymmetric structure, this material is piezoelectric, but most likely not ferroelectric. In addition, we found evidence for hopping charge transport of localized charge carriers and a relaxational process at low temperatures. PMID:25109553

  9. Optical electronegativity and refractive index of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, R. R.; Nazeer Ahammed, Y.; Rama Gopal, K.; Raghuram, D. V.

    1998-05-01

    Simple correlations between the energy gap, optical electronegativity and the refractive index are given for various classes of materials such as semiconductors, insulators and oxides. There has been no report in the literature on the direct estimation of optical electronegativity for the wide variety of materials using energy gap values. The present method performance is compared with Moss and Ravindra's relationships. A simple analysis on the average percentage deviation for low and high n value materials is also presented. The average percentage deviation in the present approach reveals that the method proposed proves its identity and soundness compared to that of Moss and Ravindra's relationships. A good agreement is observed between the computed and literature values of refractive indices.

  10. Foam-based optical absorber for high-power laser radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadurai, Krishna; Cromer, Christopher L.; Li, Xiaoyu; Mahajan, Roop L.; Lehman, John H

    2007-12-01

    We report damage threshold measurements of novel absorbers comprised of either liquid-cooled silicon carbide or vitreous carbon foams. The measurements demonstrate damage thresholds up to 1.6x104 W/cm2 at an incident circular spot size of 2 mm with an absorbance of 96% at 1.064 {mu}m. We present a summary of the damage threshold as a function of the water flow velocity and the absorbance measurements. We also present a qualitative description of a damage mechanism based on a two-phase heat transfer between the foam and the flowing water.

  11. New nonlinear optical material: glycine sodium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, M. Narayan; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2002-02-01

    Single crystals of glycine sodium nitrate (GSN), a semiorganic nonlinear optical material has been grown from solution by slow evaporation at ambient temperature. The solubility of GSN has been determined in water. Formation of the new crystal has been confirmed by powder XRD pattern and IR spectra. GSN crystallises in monoclinic system with cell parameters a=14.323(4) Å, b=5.2575(8) Å, c=9.1156(14) Å, β=119.030(18)°, space group Cc. The optical second harmonic generation conversion efficiency of GSN was determined using Kurtz powder technique and found to be two times that of KDP.

  12. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  13. Electro-optical, UV absorbance, and UV photoluminescence analysis of Se95In5 chalcogenide glass microparticle doped ferroelectric liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap Singh, Dharmendra; Kumar Gupta, Swadesh; Pandey, Shivani; Singh, Kedar; Manohar, Rajiv

    2014-06-01

    The dandelion like Se95In5 chalcogenide glass microparticle (CGMPs) doped ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) has been investigated. The electro-optical parameters of the pure and doped FLC were carried out as a function of applied voltage. The experimental response time and polarization curves for the Se95In5 CGMPs doped FLC have also been theoretically fitted. The presence of Se95In5 CGMPs affects the molecular dynamics of the FLC molecules, which was proved by the Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The UV absorbance of the pure FLC material has been enhanced in the presence of CGMPs, which is analogous to the coupling between phonons of CGMPs and radiation field. The photoluminescence (PL) of the pure FLC has also been enhanced and blue shifted with the addition of Se95In5 CGMPs. The enhanced PL is attributed to the constructive interaction between low energy phonons of the CGMPs and incident photons of the monochromatic light in the LC medium. The blue shifting of PL emission is due to the enhanced optical band gap of the Se95In5 CGMPs doped FLC. The enhancement in the optical band gap of the CGMPs doped FLC was explained by the model of density states in the composite. Ultra-violet lasing, UV filtering, and optical band gap engineering are the possible applications of the investigated Se95In5 CGMPs doped FLC material.

  14. The Effects of an Absorbing Smoke Layer on MODIS Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Optical Property Retrievals and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Clouds, aerosols, and their interactions are widely considered to be key uncertainty components in our current understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and radiation budget. The work presented here is focused on the quasi-permanent marine boundary layer . (MBL) clouds off the southern Atlantic coast of Africa and the effects on MODIS cloud optical property retrievals (MOD06) of an overlying absorbing smoke layer. During much of August and September, a persistent smoke layer resides over this region, produced from extensive biomass burning throughout the southern African savanna. The resulting absorption, which increases with decreasing wavelength, potentially introduces biases into the MODIS cloud optical property retrievals of the underlying MBL clouds. This effect is more pronounced in the cloud optical thickness retrievals, which over ocean are derived from the wavelength channel centered near 0.86 micron (effective particle size retrievals are derived from the longer-wavelength near-IR channels at 1.6, 2.1, and 3.7 microns). Here, the spatial distributions of the scalar statistics of both the cloud and aerosol layers are first determined from the CALIOP 5 km layer products. Next, the MOD06 look-up tables (LUTs) are adjusted by inserting an absorbing smoke layer of varying optical thickness over the cloud. Retrievals are subsequently performed for a subset of MODIS pixels collocated with the CALIOP ground track, using smoke optical thickness from the CALIOP 5km aerosol layer product to select the appropriate LUT. The resulting differences in cloud optical property retrievals due to the inclusion of the smoke layer in the LUTs will be examined. In addition, the direct radiative forcing of this smoke layer will be investigated from the perspective of the cloud optical property retrieval differences.

  15. Comparison of amorphous silicon absorber materials: Light-induced degradation and solar cell efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckelberger, M.; Despeisse, M.; Bugnon, G.; Schüttauf, J.-W.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.

    2013-10-01

    Several amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposition conditions have been reported to produce films that degrade least under light soaking when incorporated into a-Si:H solar cells. However, a systematic comparison of these a-Si:H materials has never been presented. In the present study, different plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition conditions, yielding standard low-pressure VHF a-Si:H, protocrystalline, polymorphous, and high-pressure RF a-Si:H materials, are compared with respect to their optical properties and their behavior when incorporated into single-junction solar cells. A wide deposition parameter space has been explored in the same deposition system varying hydrogen dilution, deposition pressure, temperature, frequency, and power. From the physics of layer growth, to layer properties, to solar cell performance and light-induced degradation, a consistent picture of a-Si:H materials that are currently used for a-Si:H solar cells emerges. The applications of these materials in single-junction, tandem, and triple-junction solar cells are discussed, as well as their deposition compatibility with rough substrates, taking into account aspects of voltage, current, and charge collection. In sum, this contributes to answering the question, "Which material is best for which type of solar cell?"

  16. Coupling Hollow Fe3O4-Fe Nanoparticles with Graphene Sheets for High-Performance Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Material.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bin; Zhu, Chunling; Li, Chunyan; Zhang, Xitian; Chen, Yujin

    2016-02-17

    We developed a strategy for coupling hollow Fe3O4-Fe nanoparticles with graphene sheets for high-performance electromagnetic wave absorbing material. The hollow Fe3O4-Fe nanoparticles with average diameter and shell thickness of 20 and 8 nm, respectively, were uniformly anchored on the graphene sheets without obvious aggregation. The minimal reflection loss RL values of the composite could reach -30 dB at the absorber thickness ranging from 2.0 to 5.0 mm, greatly superior to the solid Fe3O4-Fe/G composite and most magnetic EM wave absorbing materials recently reported. Moreover, the addition amount of the composite into paraffin matrix was only 18 wt %.

  17. Effect of reference spectra in spectral fitting to discriminate enzyme-activatable photoacoustic probe from intrinsic optical absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Takeshi; Okawa, Shinpei; Iwatate, Ryu J.; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Ishihara, Miya

    2016-03-01

    Multispectral photoacoustic (MS-PA) imaging has been researched to image molecular probes in the presence of strong background signals produced from intrinsic optical absorbers. Spectral fitting method (SFM) discriminates probe signals from background signals by fitting the PA spectra that are calculated from MS-PA images to reference spectra of the probe and background, respectively. Because hemoglobin is a dominant optical absorber in visible to near-infrared wavelength range, absorption spectra of hemoglobin have been widely used as reference background spectra. However, the spectra of background signals produced from heterogeneous biological tissue differ from the reference background spectra due to presence of other intrinsic optical absorbers and effect of optical scattering. Due to the difference, the background signals partly remain in the probe images. To image the probe injected in subcutaneous tumors of mice clearly, we added the melanosome absorption spectrum to the reference background spectra because skin contains nonnegligible concentration of melanosome and the spectrum is very similar to the scattering spectrum of biological tissue. The probe injected in the subcutaneous tumor of mice was an enzyme-activatable probe which show their original colors only in the presence of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, an enzyme associated with cancer. The probes have been successfully used for rapid fluorescence imaging of cancer. As a result of MS-PA imaging, by considering the melanosome absorption spectrum, the background signals were successfully suppressed and then clearer probe image was obtained. Our MS-PA imaging method afforded successful imaging of tumors in mice injected with activatable PA probes.

  18. Yb- and Er-doped fiber laser Q-switched with an optically uniform, broadband WS2 saturable absorber

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, M.; Hu, Guohua; Hu, Guoqing; Howe, R. C. T.; Chen, L.; Zheng, Z.; Hasan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a ytterbium (Yb) and an erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser Q-switched by a solution processed, optically uniform, few-layer tungsten disulfide saturable absorber (WS2-SA). Nonlinear optical absorption of the WS2-SA in the sub-bandgap region, attributed to the edge-induced states, is characterized by 3.1% and 4.9% modulation depths with 1.38 and 3.83 MW/cm2 saturation intensities at 1030 and 1558 nm, respectively. By integrating the optically uniform WS2-SA in the Yb- and Er-doped laser cavities, we obtain self-starting Q-switched pulses with microsecond duration and kilohertz repetition rates at 1030 and 1558 nm. Our work demonstrates broadband sub-bandgap saturable absorption of a single, solution processed WS2-SA, providing new potential efficacy for WS2 in ultrafast photonic applications. PMID:26657601

  19. Yb- and Er-doped fiber laser Q-switched with an optically uniform, broadband WS2 saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Hu, Guohua; Hu, Guoqing; Howe, R C T; Chen, L; Zheng, Z; Hasan, T

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a ytterbium (Yb) and an erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser Q-switched by a solution processed, optically uniform, few-layer tungsten disulfide saturable absorber (WS2-SA). Nonlinear optical absorption of the WS2-SA in the sub-bandgap region, attributed to the edge-induced states, is characterized by 3.1% and 4.9% modulation depths with 1.38 and 3.83 MW/cm(2) saturation intensities at 1030 and 1558 nm, respectively. By integrating the optically uniform WS2-SA in the Yb- and Er-doped laser cavities, we obtain self-starting Q-switched pulses with microsecond duration and kilohertz repetition rates at 1030 and 1558 nm. Our work demonstrates broadband sub-bandgap saturable absorption of a single, solution processed WS2-SA, providing new potential efficacy for WS2 in ultrafast photonic applications. PMID:26657601

  20. Incorporation of Integral Fuel Burnable Absorbers Boron and Gadolinium into Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Clad Material

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, K.; Renk, T.J.; Lahoda, E.J.; Corradini, M.L

    2004-12-14

    Long-lived fuels require the use of higher enrichments of 235U or other fissile materials. Such high levels of fissile material lead to excessive fuel activity at the beginning of life. To counteract this excessive activity, integral fuel burnable absorbers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly. The two commonly used IFBA elements are gadolinium, which is added as gadolinium-oxide to the UO2 powder, and boron, which is applied as a zirconium-diboride coating on the UO2 pellets using plasma spraying or chemical vapor deposition techniques. The incorporation of IFBA into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be very costly because of their small volume and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. Other manufacturing issues that impact cost and performance are maintaining the correct levels of dosing, the reduction in fuel melting point due to gadolinium-oxide additions, and parasitic neutron absorption at fuel's end-of-life. The goal of the proposed research is to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of boron or gadolinium into the outer surface of the fuel cladding material rather than as an additive to the fuel pellets. This paradigm shift will allow for the introduction of the IFBA in a non-nuclear regulated environment and will obviate the necessity of additional handling and processing of the fuel pellets. This could represent significant cost savings and potentially lead to greater reproducibility and control of the burnable fuel in the early stages of the reactor operation. The surface alloying is being performed using the IBEST (Ion Beam Surface Treatment) process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. IBEST involves the delivery of energetic ion beam pulses onto the surface of a material, near-surface melting, and rapid solidification. The non-equilibrium nature of such processing allows for surface

  1. A Novel, Real-Valued Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Radar Absorbing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, John Michael

    2004-01-01

    A novel, real-valued Genetic Algorithm (GA) was designed and implemented to minimize the reflectivity and/or transmissivity of an arbitrary number of homogeneous, lossy dielectric or magnetic layers of arbitrary thickness positioned at either the center of an infinitely long rectangular waveguide, or adjacent to the perfectly conducting backplate of a semi-infinite, shorted-out rectangular waveguide. Evolutionary processes extract the optimal physioelectric constants falling within specified constraints which minimize reflection and/or transmission over the frequency band of interest. This GA extracted the unphysical dielectric and magnetic constants of three layers of fictitious material placed adjacent to the conducting backplate of a shorted-out waveguide such that the reflectivity of the configuration was 55 dB or less over the entire X-band. Examples of the optimization of realistic multi-layer absorbers are also presented. Although typical Genetic Algorithms require populations of many thousands in order to function properly and obtain correct results, verified correct results were obtained for all test cases using this GA with a population of only four.

  2. Active Optical Metasurfaces Based on Defect-Engineered Phase-Transition Materials.

    PubMed

    Rensberg, Jura; Zhang, Shuyan; Zhou, You; McLeod, Alexander S; Schwarz, Christian; Goldflam, Michael; Liu, Mengkun; Kerbusch, Jochen; Nawrodt, Ronny; Ramanathan, Shriram; Basov, D N; Capasso, Federico; Ronning, Carsten; Kats, Mikhail A

    2016-02-10

    Active, widely tunable optical materials have enabled rapid advances in photonics and optoelectronics, especially in the emerging field of meta-devices. Here, we demonstrate that spatially selective defect engineering on the nanometer scale can transform phase-transition materials into optical metasurfaces. Using ion irradiation through nanometer-scale masks, we selectively defect-engineered the insulator-metal transition of vanadium dioxide, a prototypical correlated phase-transition material whose optical properties change dramatically depending on its state. Using this robust technique, we demonstrated several optical metasurfaces, including tunable absorbers with artificially induced phase coexistence and tunable polarizers based on thermally triggered dichroism. Spatially selective nanoscale defect engineering represents a new paradigm for active photonic structures and devices.

  3. Study of thermal effects and optical properties of an innovative absorber in integrated collector storage solar water heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Yaser; Alimardani, Kazem; Ziapour, Behrooz M.

    2015-10-01

    Solar passive water heaters are potential candidates for enhanced heat transfer. Solar water heaters with an integrated water tank and with the low temperature energy resource are used as the simplest and cheapest recipient devices of the solar energy for heating and supplying hot water in the buildings. The solar thermal performances of one primitive absorber were determined by using both the experimental and the simulation model of it. All materials applied for absorber such as the cover glass, the black colored sands and the V shaped galvanized plate were submerged into the water. The water storage tank was manufactured from galvanized sheet of 0.0015 m in thickness and the effective area of the collector was 0.67 m2. The absorber was installed on a compact solar water heater. The constructed flat-plate collectors were tested outdoors. However the simulation results showed that the absorbers operated near to the gray materials and all experimental results showed that the thermal efficiencies of the collector are over than 70 %.

  4. Calculation of the weighting functions for the reconstruction of absorbing inhomogeneities in tissue by time-resolved optical projections

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, A B; Vlasov, V V

    2014-08-31

    We report a new method for determining the weighting functions to reconstruct absorbing inhomogeneities in tissue by perturbation time-domain diffuse optical tomography using the transmission geometry of a flat layer. The method is based on an analytical approach to the calculation of the weighting functions for a semi-infinite scattering medium and on the use of the original method of an equivalent inverse source in order to obtain weight distributions for the flat layer geometry. The correctness of the proposed method of the weighting function calculation is evaluated by a numerical experiment on the reconstruction of absorbing inhomogeneities. It is shown that the perturbation reconstruction model based on the proposed weighting function calculation method allows the inhomogeneities smaller than 0.3 cm and ∼0.4 cm, located respectively in the transverse and longitudinal directions to the probe light direction, to be resolved in the centre of an 8-cm-thick object. (laser biophotonics)

  5. Rice straw-wood particle composite for sound absorbing wooden construction materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han-Seung; Kim, Dae-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2003-01-01

    In this study, rice straw-wood particle composite boards were manufactured as insulation boards using the method used in the wood-based panel industry. The raw material, rice straw, was chosen because of its availability. The manufacturing parameters were: a specific gravity of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8, and a rice straw content (10/90, 20/80, and 30/70 weight of rice straw/wood particle) of 10, 20, and 30 wt.%. A commercial urea-formaldehyde adhesive was used as the composite binder, to achieve 140-290 psi of bending modulus of rupture (MOR) with 0.4 specific gravity, 700-900 psi of bending MOR with 0.6 specific gravity, and 1400-2900 psi of bending MOR with a 0.8 specific gravity. All of the composite boards were superior to insulation board in strength. Width and length of the rice straw particle did not affect the bending MOR. The composite boards made from a random cutting of rice straw and wood particles were the best and recommended for manufacturing processes. Sound absorption coefficients of the 0.4 and 0.6 specific gravity boards were higher than the other wood-based materials. The recommended properties of the rice straw-wood particle composite boards are described, to absorb noises, preserve the temperature of indoor living spaces, and to be able to partially or completely substitute for wood particleboard and insulation board in wooden constructions. PMID:12653275

  6. Evaluating a novel application of optical fibre evanescent field absorbance: rapid measurement of red colour in winegrape homogenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, Peter G.; Bradbury, Ronald; Lamb, David W.

    Silica optical fibres were used to measure colour (mg anthocyanin/g fresh berry weight) in samples of red wine grape homogenates via optical Fibre Evanescent Field Absorbance (FEFA). Colour measurements from 126 samples of grape homogenate were compared against the standard industry spectrophotometric reference method that involves chemical extraction and subsequent optical absorption measurements of clarified samples at 520 nm. FEFA absorbance on homogenates at 520 nm (FEFA520h) was correlated with the industry reference method measurements of colour (R2 = 0.46, n = 126). Using a simple regression equation colour could be predicted with a standard error of cross-validation (SECV) of 0.21 mg/g, with a range of 0.6 to 2.2 mg anthocyanin/g and a standard deviation of 0.33 mg/g. With a Ratio of Performance Deviation (RPD) of 1.6, the technique when utilizing only a single detection wavelength, is not robust enough to apply in a diagnostic sense, however the results do demonstrate the potential of the FEFA method as a fast and low-cost assay of colour in homogenized samples.

  7. Refractory plasmonics with titanium nitride: broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Guler, Urcan; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Guan, Jianguo; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2014-12-17

    A high-temperature stable broadband plasmonic absorber is designed, fabricated, and optically characterized. A broadband absorber with an average high absorption of 95% and a total thickness of 240 nm is fabricated, using a refractory plasmonic material, titanium nitride. This absorber integrates both the plasmonic resonances and the dielectric-like loss. It opens a path for the interesting applications such as solar thermophotovoltaics and optical circuits.

  8. [Design and Preparation of Plant Bionic Materials Based on Optical and Infrared Features Simulation].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao-jun; Lu, Xu-liang; Pan, Jia-liang; Zhang, Shuan-qin

    2015-07-01

    Due to the life characteristics such as physiological structure and transpiration, plants have unique optical and infrared features. In the optical band, because of the common effects of chlorophyll and water, plant leafs show spectral reflectance characteristics change in 550, 680, 1400 and 1900 nm significantly. In the infrared wave band, driven by transpiration, plants could regulate temperature on their own initiative, which make the infrared characteristics of plants different from artificial materials. So palnt bionic materials were proposed to simulate optical and infrared characteristics of plants. By analyzing formation mechanism of optical and infrared features about green plants, the component design and heat-transfer process of plants bionic materials were studied, above these the heat-transfer control formulation was established. Based on water adsorption/release compound, optical pigments and other man-made materials, plant bionic materials preparation methods were designed which could simulate the optical and infrared features of green plants. By chemical casting methods plant bionic material films were prepared, which use polyvinyl alcohol as film forming and water adsorption/release compound, and use optical pigments like chrome green and macromolecule yellow as colouring materials. The research conclusions achieved by testings figured out: water adsorption/release testing showed that the plant bionic materials with a certain thickness could absorb 1.3 kg water per square meter, which could satisfy the water usage of transpiration simulation one day; the optical and infrared simulated effect tests indicated that the plant bionic materials could preferably simulate the spectral reflective performance of green plants in optical wave band (380-2500 nm, expecially in 1400 and 1900 nm which were water absorption wave band of plants), and also it had similar daily infrared radiation variations with green plants, daily average radiation temperature

  9. [Design and Preparation of Plant Bionic Materials Based on Optical and Infrared Features Simulation].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao-jun; Lu, Xu-liang; Pan, Jia-liang; Zhang, Shuan-qin

    2015-07-01

    Due to the life characteristics such as physiological structure and transpiration, plants have unique optical and infrared features. In the optical band, because of the common effects of chlorophyll and water, plant leafs show spectral reflectance characteristics change in 550, 680, 1400 and 1900 nm significantly. In the infrared wave band, driven by transpiration, plants could regulate temperature on their own initiative, which make the infrared characteristics of plants different from artificial materials. So palnt bionic materials were proposed to simulate optical and infrared characteristics of plants. By analyzing formation mechanism of optical and infrared features about green plants, the component design and heat-transfer process of plants bionic materials were studied, above these the heat-transfer control formulation was established. Based on water adsorption/release compound, optical pigments and other man-made materials, plant bionic materials preparation methods were designed which could simulate the optical and infrared features of green plants. By chemical casting methods plant bionic material films were prepared, which use polyvinyl alcohol as film forming and water adsorption/release compound, and use optical pigments like chrome green and macromolecule yellow as colouring materials. The research conclusions achieved by testings figured out: water adsorption/release testing showed that the plant bionic materials with a certain thickness could absorb 1.3 kg water per square meter, which could satisfy the water usage of transpiration simulation one day; the optical and infrared simulated effect tests indicated that the plant bionic materials could preferably simulate the spectral reflective performance of green plants in optical wave band (380-2500 nm, expecially in 1400 and 1900 nm which were water absorption wave band of plants), and also it had similar daily infrared radiation variations with green plants, daily average radiation temperature

  10. The optical materials update. Volume 1, No. 1, Winter 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This update presents SunLab`s current efforts to develop low-cost, high-performance advanced optical materials for solar thermal applications. The SunLab team conducts basic research and analysis on the fundamental properties that influence material performance;tests, characterizes and evaluates candidate materials; and collaborates with the solar and materials industries to develop, and test optical materials.

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on selected optical materials: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

    1992-07-30

    This report gives an overview of the effects of ionizing radiation on optical materials that may be used in spacecraft sensors. It introduces the relevant phenomena and indicates were more detailed information can be found. The topics covered include radiation induced absorption in ultraviolet transmitting materials, ordinary optical glasses, cerium stabilized optical glasses, and infrared transmitting materials; bleaching and annealing, and radioluminesence.

  12. Analysis of the effect of different absorber materials and loading on the shielding effectiveness of a metallic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, S.; Karcoon, H.; Dickmann, S.; Rambousky, R.

    2015-11-01

    Metallic rooms as part of a complex system, like a ship, are necessarily connected electromagnetically via apertures and cables to the outside. Therefore, their electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (SE) is limited by ventilation openings, cable feed-throughs and door gaps. Thus, electronic equipment inside these rooms is susceptible to outer electromagnetic threats like IEM (Intentional Electromagnetic Interference). Dielectric or magnetic absorber inside such a screened room can be used in order to prevent the SE from collapsing at the resonant frequencies. In this contribution, the effect of different available absorber materials is compared, as well as other properties like weight and workability. Furthermore, parameter variations of the absorber as well as the effect of loading in form of metallic and dielectric structures on the SE are analyzed.

  13. Use of electrochromic materials in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammler, Daniel R.; Yelton, William G.; Sweatt, William C.; Verley, Jason C.

    2005-08-01

    Electrochromic (EC) materials are used in "smart" windows that can be darkened by applying a voltage across an EC stack on the window. The associated change in refractive index (n) in the EC materials might allow their use in tunable or temperature-insensitive Fabry-Perot filters and transmissive-spatial-light-modulators (SLMs). The authors are conducting a preliminary evaluation of these materials in many applications, including target-in-the-loop systems. Data on tungsten oxide, WO3, the workhorse EC material, indicate that it's possible to achieve modest changes in n with only slight increases in absorption between the visible and ~10 μm. This might enable construction of a tunable Fabry-Perot filter consisting of an active EC layer (e.g. WO3) and a proton conductor (e.g.Ta2O5) sandwiched between two gold electrodes. A SLM might be produced by replacing the gold with a transparent conductor (e.g. ITO). This SLM would allow broad-band operation like a micromirror array. Since it's a transmission element, simple optical designs like those in liquid-crystal systems would be possible. Our team has fabricated EC stacks and characterized their switching speed and optical properties (n, k). We plan to study the interplay between process parameters, film properties, and performance characteristics associated with the FP-filter and then extend what we learn to SLMs. Our goals are to understand whether the changes in absorption associated with changes in n are acceptable, and whether it's possible to design an EC-stack that's fast enough to be interesting. We'll present our preliminary findings regarding the potential viability of EC materials for target-in-the-loop applications.

  14. Electro-optic polymers: Materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derose, Christopher Todd

    Electro-optic (EO) polymers are an attractive alternative to inorganic nonlinear materials. EO polymers with a Pockel's coefficient, r33, greater than 320 pm/V have been recently demonstrated. In addition to their high EO activity, EO polymers have the additional benefit that their dielectric constants at optical and millimeter wave frequencies are closely matched which allow for bandwidths which are limited only by the resistive losses of traveling wave electrodes. The amorphous nature of the host polymer makes heterogeneous integration of the materials on any substrate possible. The devices which will have the most immediate impact based on these recent materials developments are EO waveguide modulators. Performance benchmarks of less than 6 dB insertion loss, sub-volt Vpi and greater than 100 GHz bandwidth have been achieved separately however, the challenge of achieving all of these benchmarks in a single device has not yet been met. The aim of this dissertation is to optimize passive materials to achieve efficient in device poling of EO polymers, optimize the chromophore loading of the active polymers and to optimize waveguide modulators for device performance within a particular system, analog RF photonic links. These optimizations were done by defining figures of merit for the materials and modulators. This research strategy has led to significant improvements in poling efficiency as well as modulators with record low insertion losses which maintain a low Vpi on the order of 1--2 Volts. Using this optimization strategy and state of the art EO polymers, devices which meet or surpass the benchmark performance values in all categories are expected in the near future.

  15. Use of electrochromic materials in adaptive optics.

    SciTech Connect

    Kammler, Daniel R.; Sweatt, William C.; Verley, Jason C.; Yelton, William Graham

    2005-07-01

    Electrochromic (EC) materials are used in 'smart' windows that can be darkened by applying a voltage across an EC stack on the window. The associated change in refractive index (n) in the EC materials might allow their use in tunable or temperature-insensitive Fabry-Perot filters and transmissive-spatial-light-modulators (SLMs). The authors are conducting a preliminary evaluation of these materials in many applications, including target-in-the-loop systems. Data on tungsten oxide, WO{sub 3}, the workhorse EC material, indicate that it's possible to achieve modest changes in n with only slight increases in absorption between the visible and {approx}10 {micro}m. This might enable construction of a tunable Fabry-Perot filter consisting of an active EC layer (e.g. WO{sub 3}) and a proton conductor (e.g.Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) sandwiched between two gold electrodes. A SLM might be produced by replacing the gold with a transparent conductor (e.g. ITO). This SLM would allow broad-band operation like a micromirror array. Since it's a transmission element, simple optical designs like those in liquid-crystal systems would be possible. Our team has fabricated EC stacks and characterized their switching speed and optical properties (n, k). We plan to study the interplay between process parameters, film properties, and performance characteristics associated with the FP-filter and then extend what we learn to SLMs. Our goals are to understand whether the changes in absorption associated with changes in n are acceptable, and whether it's possible to design an EC-stack that's fast enough to be interesting. We'll present our preliminary findings regarding the potential viability of EC materials for target-in-the-loop applications.

  16. UV absorbing zwitterionic pyridinium-tetrazolate: exceptional transparency/optical nonlinearity trade-off.

    PubMed

    Beverina, Luca; Sanguineti, Alessandro; Battagliarin, Glauco; Ruffo, Riccardo; Roberto, Dominique; Righetto, Stefania; Soave, Raffaella; Lo Presti, Leonardo; Ugo, Renato; Pagani, Giorgio A

    2011-01-01

    We present relevant results dealing with the transparency/optical nonlinearity trade-off in high-frequency electro-optic applications. The very simple, stable and high optical gap chromophore, the zwitterion 1-methyl-4-(tetrazol-5-ate)pyridinium, represents the best transparency/optical nonlinearity trade-off so far described in the literature. We rationalize this remarkable performance in the framework of the Bond Length Alternation theory by means of a multidisciplinary approach including: single crystal X-ray structure, Electric Field Induced Second-Harmonic Generation, solvatochromism, electrochemistry and thermal analyses.

  17. Development of FeCoB/Graphene Oxide based microwave absorbing materials for X-Band region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta; Chandra Nayak, Ganesh; Sahu, S. K.; Oraon, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    This work explored the microwave absorption capability of Graphene Oxide and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB for stealth technology. Epoxy based microwave absorbing materials were prepared with 30% loading of Graphene Oxide, FeCoB alloy and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB. Graphene Oxide and FeCoB were synthesized by Hummer's and Co-precipitation methods, respectively. The filler particles were characterized by FESEM, XRD and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer techniques. Permittivity, permeability and reflection loss values of the composite absorbers were measured with vector network analyzer which showed a reflection loss value of -7.86 dB, at 10.72 GHz, for single layered Graphene Oxide/Epoxy based microwave absorbers which can be correlated to the absorption of about 83.97% of the incident microwave energy. Reflection loss value of FeCoB/Epoxy based microwave absorber showed -13.30 dB at 11.67 GHz, which corresponded to maximum absorption of 93.8%. However, reflection loss values of Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB/Epoxy based single-layer absorber increased to -22.24 dB at 12.4 GHz which corresponds to an absorption of 99% of the incident microwave energy.

  18. Optical dynamic deformation measurements at translucent materials.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Katrin; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Kuschmierz, Robert; Leithold, Christoph; Fischer, Andreas; Czarske, Jürgen

    2015-02-15

    Due to their high stiffness-to-weight ratio, glass fiber-reinforced polymers are an attractive material for rotors, e.g., in the aerospace industry. A fundamental understanding of the material behavior requires non-contact, in-situ dynamic deformation measurements. The high surface speeds and particularly the translucence of the material limit the usability of conventional optical measurement techniques. We demonstrate that the laser Doppler distance sensor provides a powerful and reliable tool for monitoring radial expansion at fast rotating translucent materials. We find that backscattering in material volume does not lead to secondary signals as surface scattering results in degradation of the measurement volume inside the translucent medium. This ensures that the acquired signal contains information of the rotor surface only, as long as the sample surface is rough enough. Dynamic deformation measurements of fast-rotating fiber-reinforced polymer composite rotors with surface speeds of more than 300 m/s underline the potential of the laser Doppler sensor.

  19. Electrodynamics analysis on coherent perfect absorber and phase-controlled optical switch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianjie; Duan, Shaoguang; Chen, Y C

    2012-05-01

    A coherent perfect absorber is essentially a specially designed Fabry-Perot interferometer, which completely extinguishes the incident coherent light. The one- and two-beam coherent perfect absorbers have been analyzed using classical electrodynamics by considering index matching in layered structures to totally suppress reflections. This approach presents a clear and physically intuitive picture for the principle of operation of a perfect absorber. The results show that the incident beam(s) must have correct phases and amplitudes, and the real and imaginary parts of the refractive indices of the media in the interferometer must satisfy a well-defined relation. Our results are in agreement with those obtained using the S-matrix analysis. However, the results were obtained solely based on the superposition of waves from multiple reflections without invoking the concept of time reversal as does the S-matrix approach. Further analysis shows that the two-beam device can be configured to function as a phase-controlled three-state switch.

  20. Smart Optical Material Characterization System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for characterizing optical materials, using steps and equipment for generating a coherent laser light, filtering the light to remove high order spatial components, collecting the filtered light and forming a parallel light beam, splitting the parallel beam into a first direction and a second direction wherein the parallel beam travelling in the second direction travels toward the material sample so that the parallel beam passes through the sample, applying various physical quantities to the sample, reflecting the beam travelling in the first direction to produce a first reflected beam, reflecting the beam that passes through the sample to produce a second reflected beam that travels back through the sample, combining the second reflected beam after it travels back though the sample with the first reflected beam, sensing the light beam produced by combining the first and second reflected beams, and processing the sensed beam to determine sample characteristics and properties.

  1. Optical and Casimir effects in topological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Justin H.

    Two major electromagnetic phenomena, magneto-optical effects and the Casimir effect, have seen much theoretical and experimental use for many years. On the other hand, recently there has been an explosion of theoretical and experimental work on so-called topological materials, and a natural question to ask is how such electromagnetic phenomena change with these novel materials. Specifically, we will consider are topological insulators and Weyl semimetals. When Dirac electrons on the surface of a topological insulator are gapped or Weyl fermions in the bulk of a Weyl semimetal appear due to time-reversal symmetry breaking, there is a resulting quantum anomalous Hall effect (2D in one case and bulk 3D in the other, respectively). For topological insulators, we investigate the role of localized in-gap states which can leave their own fingerprints on the magneto-optics and can therefore be probed. We have shown that these states resonantly contribute to the Hall conductivity and are magneto-optically active. For Weyl semimetals we investigate the Casimir force and show that with thickness, chemical potential, and magnetic field, a repulsive and tunable Casimir force can be obtained. Additionally, various values of the parameters can give various combinations of traps and antitraps. We additionally probe the topological transition called a Lifshitz transition in the band structure of a material and show that in a Casimir experiment, one can observe a non-analytic "kink'' in the Casimir force across such a transition. The material we propose is a spin-orbit coupled semiconductor with large g-factor that can be magnetically tuned through such a transition. Additionally, we propose an experiment with a two-dimensional metal where weak localization is tuned with an applied field in order to definitively test the effect of diffusive electrons on the Casimir force---an issue that is surprisingly unresolved to this day. Lastly, we show how the time-continuous coherent state

  2. Optical Characterization of Window Materials for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Clark, Natalie; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    An optical metrology laboratory has been developed to characterize the optical properties of optical window materials to be used for aerospace applications. Several optical measurement systems have been selected and developed to measure spectral transmittance, haze, clarity, birefringence, striae, wavefront quality, and wedge. In addition to silica based glasses, several optical lightweight polymer materials and transparent ceramics have been investigated in the laboratory. The measurement systems and selected empirical results for non-silica materials are described. These measurements will be used to form the basis of acceptance criteria for selection of window materials for future aerospace vehicle and habitat designs.

  3. Investigation of Insulator and Semiconductor Optical Materials for Photonic Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jeffrey Edward

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation will focus on the characterization of two photonic materials; (1) the potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) family of crystals used for optical harmonic generation and (2) the two general forms of nanoscale silicon --"porous silicon" and isolated silicon nanocrystals that shows fascinating luminescent properties. Four main topics concerning the porous/nanocrystalline silicon research will be presented. First, a distinct difference in the optical properties is found between porous silicon (on silicon wafers) and isolated silicon nanocrystals taken directly from porous silicon wafers. Second, the luminescence of the smallest nanocrystals is found to extend much further into the blue (400-450 nm) end of the spectrum than the common porous silicon luminescence. Third, the photoluminescence decay dynamics of the nanocrystalline system are found not only to be significantly different from the porous silicon system but also aid in elucidating the luminescence mechanism in both systems. Forth, the luminescence of the nanocrystals as a function of the input intensity point to a unique saturation effect and a coupling between the red and blue luminescence. The investigations of KDP and its isomorphs found and characterized a new class of transient electronic defects generated with ultraviolet photons. At room temperatures, the defect forms within 1.6 +/- 0.4 ps after UV two-photon excitation, decays nonexponentially in ~10-20 s, and absorbs from the UV to the near IR. The absorption spectra consist of two broad absorbing transitions centered at ~ 545 nm and ~410 nm. The 545 nm transition is unpolarized while the 410 nm transition is slightly polarized. The defect is identified as a HPO _sp{4}{-} radical and discussion of the formation and decay mechanisms based on intrabond and interbond protonic transport within the hydrogen bond network is presented. These results plus critical examination of defects studies of x-irradiated KDP, KD^*P, and ADP at low

  4. Suppression of nano-absorbing precursors and damage mechanism in optical coatings for 3ω mirrors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Qi, Hongji; Zhang, Weili; Sun, Jian; Chai, Yingjie; Tu, Feifei; Zhao, Jiaoling; Yu, Zhen; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Meiping; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2016-03-15

    Damage precursors in the 3ω (351 nm) mirror for a high-power laser system are investigated as well as the relevant damage mechanisms. The precursors are classified into two ensembles according to the different laser resistance and damage features. The former is nano-absorbing precursors, which are sensitive to the standing wave electric field and vulnerable to the laser irradiation. The latter is submicrometer nodular defects, which have higher laser resistance and are sensitive to the adhesion strength between the fluoride coatings and oxide coatings. The damage due to nano-absorbing precursors is efficiently suppressed with the double stack design that screens the electric field in the oxides. Currently, the nodular seed is major originating from the Al2O3/SiO2 stack. Even for the same defect type and mirror, the final damage features are dependent on the local mechanical properties at the irradiation location. The investigations of the damage mechanisms provide a direction to further improve the laser-induced damage threshold of the 3ω mirror.

  5. Optical techniques for determining dynamic material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    Miniature plates are laser-launched with a 10-Joule Nd:YAG for one-dimensional (1-D) impacts on to target materials much like gas gun experiments and explosive plane wave plate launch. By making the experiments small, flyer plates (3 mm diameter x 50 micron thick) and targets (10 mm diameter x 200 micron thick), 1-D impact experiments can be performed in a standard laser-optical laboratory with minimum confinement and collateral damage. The laser-launched plates do not require the traditional sabot on gas guns nor the explosives needed for explosive planewave lenses, and as a result are much more amenable to a wide variety of materials and applications. Because of the small size very high pressure gradients can be generated with relative ease. The high pressure gradients result in very high strains and strain rates that are not easily generated by other experimental methods. The small size and short shock duration (1 - 20 ns) are ideal for dynamically measuring bond strengths of micron-thick coatings. Experimental techniques, equipment, and dynamic material results are reported.

  6. Broadband negative optical constants in composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, S.; Rostami, A.; Rostami, G.; Dolatyari, M.

    2015-04-01

    Capability of flexible composite substrates, consisting of randomly distributed nanoparticles in polymeric host medium, to illustrate negative effective permittivity and permeability in the mid infrared wavelengths (3-5 μm) is investigated. To produce negative permittivity in the desired wavelength range, we proposed a structure in which plasmonic nanoparticles (doped semiconductors or metallic nanoparticles) are inserted inside polytetrafluoroethylene as the low refractive index polymeric medium. Also, the optical properties of the structures including core/shell nanoparticles in polytetrafluoroethylene host (with polytetrafluoroethylene as core material and dielectric shells possessing higher refractive index compared to refractive index of the host medium) are investigated. It is shown that, high refractive index dielectric shells result in negative μeff in these structures. As a basic idea, to obtain negative optical constants in broad wavelength range, superposition of the mentioned nanoparticles in the polymeric host is examined. The advantages and limitations of the proposed structure are carefully investigated. Moreover, based on the simulation results, we will introduce flexible media that simultaneously display negative permittivity and permeability in the wavelength range of interest. Capability of two types of composites (the first one contains mixture of plasmonic nanoparticles with polymer-dielectric core-shell nanoparticles and the second one includes metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticles in the polymeric host) to produce both negative effective parameters in the desired wavelength range are investigated and compared together. Finally a polymeric medium with random distribution of core-shell (metal-dielectric) nanoparticles and plasmonic nanoparticles is introduced as an optimal medium to illustrate negative optical constants in mid infrared wavelengths. Clausius-Mossotti formula is used to calculate the effective parameters.

  7. Plasmonic Biofoam: A Versatile Optically Active Material.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Luan, Jingyi; Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2016-01-13

    Owing to their ability to confine and manipulate light at the nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures are highly attractive for a broad range of applications. While tremendous progress has been made in the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled plasmonic nanostructures, their integration with other materials and application in solid-state is primarily through their assembly on rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, which limits the plasmonically active space to a few nanometers above the substrate. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to create plasmonically active three-dimensional biofoams by integrating plasmonic nanostructures with highly porous biomaterial aerogels. We demonstrate that plasmonic biofoam is a versatile optically active platform that can be harnessed for numerous applications including (i) ultrasensitive chemical detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering; (ii) highly efficient energy harvesting and steam generation through plasmonic photothermal heating; and (iii) optical control of enzymatic activity by triggered release of biomolecules encapsulated within the aerogel. Our results demonstrate that 3D plasmonic biofoam exhibits significantly higher sensing, photothermal, and loading efficiency compared to conventional 2D counterparts. The design principles and processing methodology of plasmonic aerogels demonstrated here can be broadly applied in the fabrication of other functional foams. PMID:26630376

  8. Damage thresholds in laser irradiated optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guignard, F.; Autric, M.; Baudinaud, V.

    1997-12-01

    An experimental study on the damage induced by laser irradiation on different materials, borosilicate glass, fused silicate, moulded and stretched polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), has been performed. The irradiation source is a 1KJ pulsed cold cathode electron gun preionized TEA CO{sub 2} laser. Damage mechanisms are controlled by the in-depth absorption of the 10,6 {mu}m radiation according to the Beer-Lambert law. The heating of the interaction area gives rise to thermal or thermo-mechanical damages. PMMA is damaged following a boiling process. Stretched PMMA is fractured first, releasing stresses, then boiled like moulded PMMA at higher energy. BK7 crazed after the irradiation due to thermomechanical stresses, silicate melt and vaporized. Optical damages have been characterized by measuring the contrast transfer function through the irradiated samples.

  9. Symposium on New Materials for Nonlinear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Seth R.

    1991-01-01

    The New Materials for Nonlinear Optics Symposium was held at the American Chemical Society National Meeting, in Boston on April 22 to 26, 1990. The meeting was a success. Throughout the week the average attendance was over 150 people/session. Several speakers had attendance over 300. The ACS organized a press conference about the meeting, held on Wednesday April 25, 1990 at 2 pm. At the time, the organizers devoted considerable time to educating the press about the importance of NLO research and the potential impact the NLO devices will have on the average person. The American Chemical Society is publishing an ACS Symposium Series monograph edited by the symposium organizers, to provide a permanent record of the proceeding of this meeting.

  10. Bistable optical devices with laser diodes coupled to absorbers of narrow spectral bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y

    1994-06-20

    An optical signal inverter was demonstrated with a combination of the following two effects: One is the decrease of the transmission of an Er-doped YAG crystal with increasing red shift of a laser diode resulting from an increase in the injection current, and the other is a negative nonlinear absorption in which the transmission decreases inversely with increasing laser intensity. Because a hysteresis characteristic exists in the relationship between the wavelength and the injection current of the laser diode, an optical bistability was observed in this system.

  11. Optically actuated thermocapillary movement of gas bubbles on an absorbing substrate.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Aaron T; Jamshidi, Arash; Valley, Justin K; Hsu, Hsan-Yin; Wu, Ming C

    2007-08-14

    The authors demonstrate an optical manipulation mechanism of gas bubbles for microfluidic applications. Air bubbles in a silicone oil medium are manipulated via thermocapillary forces generated by the absorption of a laser in an amorphous silicon thin film. In contrast to previous demonstrations of optically controlled thermally driven bubble movement, transparent liquids can be used, as the thermal gradient is formed from laser absorption in the amorphous silicon substrate, and not in the liquid. A variety of bubbles with volumes ranging from 19 pl to 23 nl was transported at measured velocities of up to 1.5 mm/s.

  12. Direct optical imaging of structural inhomogeneities in crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Grigorev, A M

    2016-05-10

    A method for optical imaging of structural inhomogeneities in crystalline materials is proposed, based on the differences in the optical properties of the structural inhomogeneity and the homogeneous material near the fundamental absorption edge of the crystalline material. The method can be used to detect defects in both semiconductors and insulators.

  13. Optical-Fiber-Based, Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Spectrometer for Thin-Film Absorber Characterization and Analysis of TRPL Data for CdS/CdTe Interface: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kuciauskas, D.; Duenow, J. N.; Kanevce, A.; Li, J. V.; Young, M. R.; Dippo, P.; Levi, D. H.

    2012-06-01

    We describe the design of a time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectrometer for rapid semiconductor absorber characterization. Simplicity and flexibility is achieved by using single optical fiber to deliver laser pulses and to collect photoluminescence. We apply TRPL for characterization of CdS/CdTe absorbers after deposition, CdCl2 treatment, Cu doping, and back contact formation. Data suggest this method could be applied in various stages of PV device processing. Finally, we show how to analyze TRPL data for CdS/CdTe absorbers by considering laser light absorption depth and intermixing at CdS/CdTe interface.

  14. Smart Materials for Electromagnetic and Optical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Prashanth

    dissertation demonstrates GaN as a candidate material well suited for novel microelectromechanical systems. The potential of GaN for MEMS is demonstrated via the design, analysis, fabrication, testing and characterization of an optical microswitch device actuated by piezoelectric and electrostrictive means. The piezoelectric and electrostrictive properties of GaN and its differences from common piezoelectrics are discussed before elaborating on the device configuration used to implement the microswitch device. Next, the development of two recent fabrication technologies, Photoelectrochemical etch and Bias-enabled Dark Electrochemical etch, used to realize the 3-dimensional device structure in GaN are described in detail. Finally, an ultra-low-cost, laser-based, non-contact approach to test and characterize the microswitch device is described, followed by the device testing results.

  15. Influence of nanoscale temperature rises on photoacoustic generation: Discrimination between optical absorbers based on thermal nonlinearity at high frequency

    PubMed Central

    Simandoux, Olivier; Prost, Amaury; Gateau, Jérôme; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate thermal-based nonlinear photoacoustic generation as a mean to discriminate between different types of absorbing particles. The photoacoustic generation from solutions of dye molecules and gold nanospheres (same optical densities) was detected using a high frequency ultrasound transducer (20 MHz). Photoacoustic emission was observed with gold nanospheres at low fluence for an equilibrium temperature around 4 °C, where the linear photoacoustic effect in water vanishes, highlighting the nonlinear emission from the solution of nanospheres. The photoacoustic amplitude was also studied as a function of the equilibrium temperature from 2 °C to 20 °C. While the photoacoustic amplitude from the dye molecules vanished around 4 °C, the photoacoustic amplitude from the gold nanospheres remained significant over the whole temperature range. Our preliminary results suggest that in the context of high frequency photoacoustic imaging, nanoparticles may be discriminated from molecular absorbers based on nanoscale temperature rises. PMID:25893167

  16. Influence of nanoscale temperature rises on photoacoustic generation: Discrimination between optical absorbers based on thermal nonlinearity at high frequency.

    PubMed

    Simandoux, Olivier; Prost, Amaury; Gateau, Jérôme; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate thermal-based nonlinear photoacoustic generation as a mean to discriminate between different types of absorbing particles. The photoacoustic generation from solutions of dye molecules and gold nanospheres (same optical densities) was detected using a high frequency ultrasound transducer (20 MHz). Photoacoustic emission was observed with gold nanospheres at low fluence for an equilibrium temperature around 4 °C, where the linear photoacoustic effect in water vanishes, highlighting the nonlinear emission from the solution of nanospheres. The photoacoustic amplitude was also studied as a function of the equilibrium temperature from 2 °C to 20 °C. While the photoacoustic amplitude from the dye molecules vanished around 4 °C, the photoacoustic amplitude from the gold nanospheres remained significant over the whole temperature range. Our preliminary results suggest that in the context of high frequency photoacoustic imaging, nanoparticles may be discriminated from molecular absorbers based on nanoscale temperature rises.

  17. Quantum-Kinetic Approach to Deriving Optical Bloch Equations for Light Emitters in a Weakly Absorbing Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladush, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    We obtained the system of Maxwell-Bloch equations (MB) that describe the interaction of cw laser with optically active impurity centers (particles) embedded in a dielectric material. The dielectric material is considered as a continuous medium with sufficient laser detuning from its absorption lines. The model takes into account the effects associated with both the real and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of the material. MB equations were derived within a many-particle quantum-kinetic formalism, which is based on Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for reduced density matrices and correlation operators of material particles and the quantized radiation field modes. It is shown that this method is beneficial to describe the effects of individual and collective behavior of the light emitters and requires no phenomenological procedures. It automatically takes into account the characteristics associated with the presence of non-resonant and resonant particles filling the space between the optical centers.

  18. A Two-Step Absorber Deposition Approach To Overcome Shunt Losses in Thin-Film Solar Cells: Using Tin Sulfide as a Proof-of-Concept Material System.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Vera; Chakraborty, Rupak; Rekemeyer, Paul H; Hartman, Katy; Brandt, Riley E; Polizzotti, Alex; Yang, Chuanxi; Moriarty, Tom; Gradečak, Silvija; Gordon, Roy G; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-08-31

    As novel absorber materials are developed and screened for their photovoltaic (PV) properties, the challenge remains to reproducibly test promising candidates for high-performing PV devices. Many early-stage devices are prone to device shunting due to pinholes in the absorber layer, producing "false-negative" results. Here, we demonstrate a device engineering solution toward a robust device architecture, using a two-step absorber deposition approach. We use tin sulfide (SnS) as a test absorber material. The SnS bulk is processed at high temperature (400 °C) to stimulate grain growth, followed by a much thinner, low-temperature (200 °C) absorber deposition. At a lower process temperature, the thin absorber overlayer contains significantly smaller, densely packed grains, which are likely to provide a continuous coating and fill pinholes in the underlying absorber bulk. We compare this two-step approach to the more standard approach of using a semi-insulating buffer layer directly on top of the annealed absorber bulk, and we demonstrate a more than 3.5× superior shunt resistance Rsh with smaller standard error σRsh. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements indicate a lower density of pinholes in the SnS absorber bulk when using the two-step absorber deposition approach. We correlate those findings to improvements in the device performance and device performance reproducibility.

  19. A Two-Step Absorber Deposition Approach To Overcome Shunt Losses in Thin-Film Solar Cells: Using Tin Sulfide as a Proof-of-Concept Material System.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Vera; Chakraborty, Rupak; Rekemeyer, Paul H; Hartman, Katy; Brandt, Riley E; Polizzotti, Alex; Yang, Chuanxi; Moriarty, Tom; Gradečak, Silvija; Gordon, Roy G; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-08-31

    As novel absorber materials are developed and screened for their photovoltaic (PV) properties, the challenge remains to reproducibly test promising candidates for high-performing PV devices. Many early-stage devices are prone to device shunting due to pinholes in the absorber layer, producing "false-negative" results. Here, we demonstrate a device engineering solution toward a robust device architecture, using a two-step absorber deposition approach. We use tin sulfide (SnS) as a test absorber material. The SnS bulk is processed at high temperature (400 °C) to stimulate grain growth, followed by a much thinner, low-temperature (200 °C) absorber deposition. At a lower process temperature, the thin absorber overlayer contains significantly smaller, densely packed grains, which are likely to provide a continuous coating and fill pinholes in the underlying absorber bulk. We compare this two-step approach to the more standard approach of using a semi-insulating buffer layer directly on top of the annealed absorber bulk, and we demonstrate a more than 3.5× superior shunt resistance Rsh with smaller standard error σRsh. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements indicate a lower density of pinholes in the SnS absorber bulk when using the two-step absorber deposition approach. We correlate those findings to improvements in the device performance and device performance reproducibility. PMID:27494110

  20. Electromagnetic property of SiO2-coated carbonyl iron/polyimide composites as heat resistant microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyu; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhou, Wancheng; Luo, Fa

    2015-02-01

    Heat resistant microwave absorbing materials were prepared by compression molding method, using polyimide resin as matrix and SiO2 coated carbonyl iron (CI) as filler. The SiO2 coated CI particles were prepared by Stober process. The microwave absorbing properties and the effect of heat treatment on the electromagnetic properties of SiO2 coated CI/polyimide composites were investigated. When the content of SiO2 coated CI is 60 wt%, the value of minimum reflection loss decreases from -25 dB to -33 dB with the thickness increases from 1.5 mm to 2.1 mm. According to the thermal-gravimetric analyses (TGA) curves, the polyimide matrix can be used at 300 °C for long time. The complex permittivity of the composites slightly increases while the complex permeability almost keeps constant after heat treatment at 300 °C for 10 h, which indicating that the composites can be used at elevated temperature as microwave absorbing materials at the same time have good heat resistance and microwave absorption.

  1. Retrospective study of absorbable gelatin sponge soaked in triamicinolone acetonide as interpositioning material in temporomandibular joint ankylosis in 350 patients

    PubMed Central

    Pal, U.S.; Singh, Nimisha; Malkunje, Laxman R.; Singh, R.K.; Dhasmana, Satish; Yadav, Arvind Kumar; Chand, Sharad

    2012-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of absorbable gelatin sponge soaked in triamcinolone acetonide as an interposition material in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Materials and methods This retrospective study was conducted in 350 patients of TMJ ankylosis who visited our outpatient department between 2000 and 2010, and were treated by the same surgeon. Patients were randomly divided into two groups, where in group 1, absorbable gelatin sponge soaked with triamcinolone acetonide was interposed in the surgical gap created after arthroplasty and in group 2, temporalis fascia was interposed. Preoperative assessment included history and physical examination, along with cause of ankylosis, Postoperative observation were undertaken for maximum mouth opening (MMO), facial nerve paralysis and recurrence. Results At one year follow-up, in group 1 MMO ranged from 35 to 45 mm with no case of re-ankylosis while in the other group 25–43 mm, with re-ankylosis in 20 patients (13.69%). Conclusion The findings of this study showed successful management of TMJ ankylosis using absorbable gelatin sponge soaked in triamcinolone acetonide in cases which did not require condylar reconstruction. PMID:25737875

  2. A facile fabrication of chemically converted graphene oxide thin films and their uses as absorber materials for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelifard, Mehdi; Darudi, Hosein

    2016-07-01

    There is a great interest in the use of graphene sheets in thin film solar cells with low-cost and good-optoelectronic properties. Here, the production of absorbent conductive reduced graphene oxide (RGO) thin films was investigated. RGO thin films were prepared from spray-coated graphene oxide (GO) layers at various substrate temperature followed by a simple hydrazine-reducing method. The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical characterizations of graphene oxide (GO) and RGO thin films were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a phase shift from GO to RGO due to hydrazine treatment, in agreement with the FTIR spectra of the layers. FESEM images clearly exhibited continuous films resulting from the overlap of graphene nanosheets. The produced low-cost thin films had high absorption coefficient up to 1.0 × 105 cm-1, electrical resistance as low as 0.9 kΩ/sq, and effective optical band gap of about 1.50 eV, close to the optimum value for solar conversion. The conductive absorbent properties of the reduced graphene oxide thin films would be useful to develop photovoltaic cells.

  3. Thermally stable J-type phthalocyanine dimers as new non-linear absorbers for low-threshold optical limiters.

    PubMed

    Tolbin, Alexander Yu; Savelyev, Mikhail S; Gerasimenko, Alexander Yu; Tomilova, Larisa G; Zefirov, Nikolay S

    2016-06-21

    The possibility of developing new advanced optical limiters of laser radiation at 532 nm with low limiting thresholds has been demonstrated on thermally stable phthalocyanine J-type dimeric complexes of Mg, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co. A new "threshold" model based on radiative transfer phenomena in nonlinear optical media was suggested for the exact definition of nonlinear absorption coefficient β and optical limiting threshold Ic. This model allows the determination of the optical characteristics of the limiter in the same active material with layers of different thicknesses, as well as the use of different parameters of laser radiation, such as cross-sectional spatial profiles of the laser beam and shapes of the laser pulse over time. The maximum value of the nonlinear absorption coefficient (β = 360 cm GW(-1)) and the lowest limiting threshold (Ic = 0.03 J cm(-2)) were estimated for a J-type zinc phthalocyanine dimer. PMID:27241278

  4. The Quest for the Ultimate Nonlinear Optical Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagenais, M.

    1990-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * From Infancy to the Real World * Highly Efficient Nonlinear Optical Materials for Switching and Processing * The Era of Pragmatism * Conclusion * References

  5. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  6. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  7. Development of High Band Gap Absorber and Buffer Materials for Thin Film Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Dan

    2011-12-01

    CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) device efficiencies are the highest of the thin film absorber materials (vs. CdTe, alpha-Si, CuInSe2). However, the band gap of the highest efficiency CIGS cells deviates from the expected ideal value predicted by models [1]. Widening the band gap to the theoretically ideal value is one way to increase cell efficiencies. Widening the band gap can be accomplished in two ways; by finding a solution to the Ga-related defects which limit the open circuit voltage at high Ga ratios, or by utilizing different elemental combinations to form an alternative high band gap photoactive Cu-chalcopyrite (which includes any combination of the cations Cu, Al, Ga, and In along with the anions S, Se, and Te). This thesis focuses on the second option, substituting aluminum for gallium in the chalcopyrite lattice to form a CuInAlSe2 (CIAS) film using a sputtering and selenization approach. Both sequential and co-sputtering of metal precursors is performed. Indium was found to be very mobile during both sputtering processes, with a tendency to diffuse to the film surface even when deposited as the base layer in a sequential sputtering process. Elemental diffusion was controlled to a degree using thicker Cu top layer in co-sputtering. The greater thermal conductivity of stainless steel foil (16 W/mK) vs. glass (0.9-1.3 W/mK) can also be used to limit indium diffusion, by keeping the substrate cooler during sputtering. In both sputtering methods aluminum is deposited oxygen-free by capping the film with a Cu capping layer in combination with controlling the indium diffusion. Selenization of metal precursor films is completed using two different techniques. The first is a thermal evaporation approach from a heated box source (method 1 -- reactive thermal evaporation (RTE-Se)). The second is batch selenization using a heated tube furnace (method 2 -- batch selenization). Some batch selenized precursors were capped with ˜ 1mum of selenium. In both selenization methods

  8. Unsymmetrical squaraines for nonlinear optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Chen, Chin-Ti (Inventor); Cheng, Lap-Tak (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Compositions for use in non-linear optical devices. The compositions have first molecular electronic hyperpolarizability (.beta.) either positive or negative in sign and therefore display second order non-linear optical properties when incorporated into non-linear optical devices.

  9. Mechanical and optical characterization of bio-nanocomposite from pineapple leaf fiber material for food packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikmatin, Siti; Rudwiyanti, Jerry R.; Prasetyo, Kurnia W.; Yedi, Dwi A.

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of Bio-nanocomposite material that was derived from pineapple leaf fiber as filler and tapioca starch with plasticizer glycerol as a matrix for food packaging can reduce the use of plastic that usually was made from petroleum materials. It is important to develop and producethis environmental friendly plastic because of limited availability of petroleum nowadays. The process of synthesize and characterization tapioca starch with the plasticizer glycerol bionanocomposites using print method had been conducted. There were 3 samples with different filler concentration variation; 3%, 4% and 5%.The results of mechanical test from each sample showed that bio-nanocomposite with 5% filler concentration was the optimum sample with 4.6320 MPa for tensile strength test and 24.87% for the elongation test. Based on the result of optical test for each sample was gained that along with the increasing of concentration filler would make the absorbance value of the sample became decreased, bio-nanocomposite with 5% filler concentration had several peaks with low absorbance values. The first peak was in 253 nm of wavelength regionwith absorbance of 0.131%, and the second peak was in 343 nmwavelength region and absorbance was 0.087%.

  10. Optical band gaps of organic semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, José C. S.; Taveira, Ricardo J. S.; Lima, Carlos F. R. A. C.; Mendes, Adélio; Santos, Luís M. N. B. F.

    2016-08-01

    UV-Vis can be used as an easy and forthright technique to accurately estimate the band gap energy of organic π-conjugated materials, widely used as thin films/composites in organic and hybrid electronic devices such as OLEDs, OPVs and OFETs. The electronic and optical properties, including HOMO-LUMO energy gaps of π-conjugated systems were evaluated by UV-Vis spectroscopy in CHCl3 solution for a large number of relevant π-conjugated systems: tris-8-hydroxyquinolinatos (Alq3, Gaq3, Inq3, Al(qNO2)3, Al(qCl)3, Al(qBr)3, In(qNO2)3, In(qCl)3 and In(qBr)3); triphenylamine derivatives (DDP, p-TTP, TPB, TPD, TDAB, m-MTDAB, NPB, α-NPD); oligoacenes (naphthalene, anthracene, tetracene and rubrene); oligothiophenes (α-2T, β-2T, α-3T, β-3T, α-4T and α-5T). Additionally, some electronic properties were also explored by quantum chemical calculations. The experimental UV-Vis data are in accordance with the DFT predictions and indicate that the band gap energies of the OSCs dissolved in CHCl3 solution are consistent with the values presented for thin films.

  11. Possibility of using Zn as the quantum absorber for a laser-cooled neutral atomic optical frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangfu; Ye, Anpei

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed investigation of the laser cooling and trapping of the Zn atom, and various schemes employing the S10-P30 transition, induced by nuclear magnetic moment or applied fields, as the clock transition. Using numerical simulations, the deceleration of Zn by a Zeeman slower and its capture by a magneto-optical trap (MOT) are analyzed, and the corresponding parameters are determined. The linear loss rate and the coefficient for two-body collisional loss in the MOT are discussed. To prove the feasibility of the intercombination line cooling, one-dimensional semiclassical Monte Carlo simulations are performed. Multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock and multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock approaches are employed to calculate the hyperfine-induced S10-P30 transition. Up to now, various schemes inducing the S10-P30 transition in bosonic isotopes have been proposed for alkaline-earth-metal atoms and Yb. Their applicability for Zn are investigated, and the corresponding parameters of Zn are calculated. Our results show that the Zn atom, either fermionic or bosonic, is a potential candidate for the quantum absorber used in laser-cooled neutral atomic optical frequency standard.

  12. Mid- and far-infrared spectroscopy of ices: optical constants and integrated absorbances.

    PubMed

    Hudgins, D M; Sandford, S A; Allamandola, L J; Tielens, A G

    1993-06-01

    Laboratory spectra through the mid-infrared (4000 to 500 cm-1 [2.5-20 micrometers]) have been used to calculate the optical constants (n and k) and integrated absorption coefficients (A) for a variety of pure and mixed molecular ices of relevance to astrophysics. The ices studied were H2O, CH3OH, CO2, OCS, CH4, CO2 + CH4, CO2 + OCS, CO + CH4, CO + OCS, O2 + CH4, O2 + OCS, N2 + CH4, N2 + OCS, H2O + CH4, H2O + OCS, and H2O + CH3OH + CO + NH3. In addition, the measurements have been extended through the far-infrared (500 to 50 cm-1 [20-200 micrometers]) for the H2O, CH3OH, and H2O + CH3OH + CO + NH3 ices.

  13. Characterization of optical material parameters for EUV Lithography applications at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubis, Christian; Haase, Anton; Soltwisch, Victor; Scholze, Frank

    2015-09-01

    EUV Lithography now reaches the fab floor. The technology ramp up and integration with existing processes will require evolutionary steps in many aspects of the technology. For instance will it be necessary to reduce 3D mask effects like shadowing e.g. by introducing a thinner absorber structure. Continuous progress will be based on using new materials, adapted multilayers, and new reticle designs. Many of these developments are based on simulations and computer models for the design of the required structures and thus require data on the optical properties of the materials involved. In particular when addressing the reticle where the optical function is the target value. Using its more than 25 years of expertise in EUV metrology1, PTB operates instrumentation for reflectometry and scatterometry2 in the EUV and adjacent wavelength ranges and can provide the data for the determination of optical material parameters for individual thin layers. The need for sound optical parameter characterization for the development of alternative EUV materials was thoroughly motivated during the 2015 SPIE Advanced Lithography conference3. The data required is not readily available from databases, as thin film properties - depending on their deposition method and interfaces - may deviate significantly from standard bulk data4. Therefore, better optical constants and a continuous availability of the associated measurement tools are vital for further progress in EUV reticle and optical system design. The ability to vary relevant parameters like wavelength, angle of incidence (AOI), the plane of incidence and polarization is a prerequisite to gather sufficient data to model optical constants. We give details on PTB's measurement capabilities and accessible parameter space for optical material parameter characterization and show some representative data and results.

  14. Quantitation of absorbed or deposited materials on a substrate that measures energy deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Patrick G.; Bakajin, Olgica; Vogel, John S.; Bench, Graham

    2005-01-18

    This invention provides a system and method for measuring an energy differential that correlates to quantitative measurement of an amount mass of an applied localized material. Such a system and method remains compatible with other methods of analysis, such as, for example, quantitating the elemental or isotopic content, identifying the material, or using the material in biochemical analysis.

  15. Optical Spectroscopy of Nano Materials and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenhao

    In this thesis, nanostructures and nanomaterials ranging from 3D to OD will be studied compresively, by using optical methods. Firstly, for 3D and 2D nanomaterials, nanoporous zeolite crystals, such as AFI and AEL are introduced as host materials to accommodate diatomic iodine molecules. Polarized Raman spectroscopy is utilized to identify the two configurations of iodine molecules to stay in the channels of AEL: the lying mode (the bond of the two atoms is parallel to the direction of the channels) and the standing mode (the bond is perpendicular to the direction of the channels). The lying mode and standing mode are switchable and can be well controlled by the amount of water molecules inside the crystal, revealed by both molecule dynamics simulation and experiment observation. With more water molecules inside, iodine molecules choose to stay in the standing mode, while with less water molecules, iodine molecules prefer to lie along the channel. Therefore, the configurations of molecules could be precisely controlled, globally by the surrounding pressure and temperature, and locally by the laser light. Ii is believed that this easy and reversible control of single molecule will be valuable in nanostructured devices, such as molecular sieving or molecular detection. Secondly, for 1D case, the PL spectrum of ZnO nanowire under uniaxial strain is studied. When a ZnO nanowire is bent, besides the lattice constant induced bandgap change on the tensile and compressive sides, there is a piezoelectric field generated along the cross section. This piezoelectric potential, together with the bandgap changes induced by the deformation, will redistribute the electrons excited by incident photons from valence band to conduction band. As a result, the electrons occupying the states at the tensile side will largely outnumbered the ones at the compressive side. Therefore, the PL spectrum we collected at the whole cross section will manifest a redshift, other than the peak

  16. NIF Optical Materials and Fabrication Technologies: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H; Hawley-Fedder, R; Stolz, C J; Menapace, J A; Borden, M R; Whitman, P; Yu, J; Runkel, M; Riley, M; Feit, M; Hackel, R

    2004-02-23

    The high-energy/high-power section of the NIF laser system contains 7360 meter-scale optics. Advanced optical materials and fabrication technologies needed to manufacture the NIF optics have been developed and put into production at key vendor sites. Production rates are up to 20 times faster and per-optic costs 5 times lower than could be achieved prior to the NIF. In addition, the optics manufactured for NIF are better than specification giving laser performance better than the design. A suite of custom metrology tools have been designed, built and installed at the vendor sites to verify compliance with NIF optical specifications. A brief description of the NIF optical wavefront specifications for the glass and crystal optics is presented. The wavefront specifications span a continuous range of spatial scale-lengths from 10 {micro}m to 0.5 m (full aperture). We have continued our multi-year research effort to improve the lifetime (i.e. damage resistance) of bulk optical materials, finished optical surfaces and multi-layer dielectric coatings. New methods for post-processing the completed optic to improve the damage resistance have been developed and made operational. This includes laser conditioning of coatings, glass surfaces and bulk KDP and DKDP and well as raster and full aperture defect mapping systems. Research on damage mechanisms continues to drive the development of even better optical materials.

  17. Using Classical Dispersion Analysis to Extract Peak Parameters, Optical Constants from IR Lab Absorbance Spectra: Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, Karly M.; Dijkstra, C. R.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Speck, A. K.

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory measurements quantifying the effect of Fe substituting for Mg in olivine are needed to distinguish compositional from temperature effects in observational data. Because most olivine samples are too small to acquire reflectivity data used to obtain the optical functions n(λ) and k(λ) needed for radiative transfer models, we apply the principle that classical dispersion theory may be used to determine peak positions, widths, strengths, and n and k estimates from absorption spectra of thin film samples. We study room temperature absorption spectra of a large suite of olivines evenly spaced across Mg and Fe compositions, and isotropic and anisotropic minerals with varying hardness and numbers of spectral bands. For olivine, adding accounting for asymmetric peak shapes does not substantially alter estimates of peak position but increases the error on FWHM and oscillator strengths. Values from classical dispersion fits match published n and k derived from reflectivity (better agreement in k) when the dust proxy is soft and the thickness of the sample is independently constrained. Electronic data and peak parameter trends for the laboratory olivine absorption spectra and the viability of the extracted n and k are discussed with regard to astronomy.

  18. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  19. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  20. Laser-Induced Surface Damage of Optical Materials: Absorption Sources, Initiation, Growth, adn Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Papernov, S.; Schmid, A.W.

    2009-04-07

    Susceptibility to laser damage of optical-material surfaces originates from the nature of the surface as a transitional structure between optical-material bulk and its surroundings. As such, it requires technological processing to satisfy figure and roughness requirements and is also permanently subjected to environmental exposure. Consequently, enhanced absorption caused by mechanical structural damage or incorporation and sorption of microscale absorbing defects, even layers of organic materials, is always characteristic for optical-material surfaces. In this review physics of interaction of pulsed-laser radiation with surface imperfections for different types of optical materials (metals, semiconductors, dielectrics, etc.), mechanisms of damage initiation, damage morphology, and damage-site growth under repetitive pulse irradiation are discussed. Consideration is also given here to the surface treatments leading to the reduction of damage initiation sites, such as laser cleaning and conditioning, removal of the surface layers affected by the grinding/polishing process, and mitigation of the damage growth at already formed damage sites.

  1. Advanced magneto-optical materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shaoying

    The magneto-optical materials with both high Faraday rotation and high transmittance capabilities are greatly desired in high speed switches, isolators, and visible imaging systems. In this thesis work, new magneto-optical materials that possess both high Faraday effect and high transmittance in the visible range of the spectrum were studied and synthesized. New Bismuth iron gallium garnet thin-films (Bi3Fe4Ga 1O12, BIGG) have been successfully deposited on gadolinium gallium garnet substrates with a pulsed laser deposition technique in our lab. X-ray diffraction analyses have proven that the BIGG films are of good epitaxial quality with a lattice constant close to 12.61+/-0.01Á. The bandwidth of BIGG's transmittance spectrum has been extended and its left edge has been shifted about 50nm towards the shorter wavelengths relative to those of Bi3Fe5O12 (BIG) films. The BIGG film is more transparent than a BIG film although BIGG's Faraday rotation angle is slightly less than that of a BIG film. The figure of merit of the BIGG garnet film has reached 16.5°, which is about 1.8 times that of a typical BIG film. Currently, the switches using BIGG films were tested and a 2.4 ns response time had been reached with a phi1 mm circular aperture at the wavelength of 532 nm. Iron Borate (FeBO3) is another material that is far superior in terms of the transmittance in the visible spectrum at room temperature to most garnet materials. The FeBO3 is one of the orthoferrites with a large natural birefringence for the light propagated along the magnetization direction. The effect of birefringence on Faraday rotation reduced the maximum obtainable rotation. In order to eliminate the birefringence and further improve the transmittance, a high energy ball-milling technique was used to synthesize FeBO3 nanoparticles. Our numerical simulation shows the nanoparticles could eliminate the birefringence, and concurrently keep the intrinsic Faraday rotation. After milling and centrifuging

  2. Optical Storage and Retrieval of Library Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folen, Doris R.; Stackpole, Laurie E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the newly installed optical disk storage system at the Naval Research Laboratory's Research Library and Technical Information Center. Planning and design of the system, the conversion of 140,000 reports to optical disk, the information retrieval process, and future plans are covered. (Contains nine references.) (KRN)

  3. Scientific Applications of Optical Instruments to Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Microgravity is a unique environment for materials and biotechnology processing. Microgravity minimizes or eliminates some of the effects that occur in one g. This can lead to the production of new materials or crystal structures. It is important to understand the processes that create these new materials. Thus, experiments are designed so that optical data collection can take place during the formation of the material. This presentation will discuss scientific application of optical instruments at MSFC. These instruments include a near-field scanning optical microscope, a miniaturized holographic system, and a phase-shifting interferometer.

  4. Graphical computational method for active materials in simulation of optical electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potasek, M.; Parilov, E.; Beeson, K.

    2014-03-01

    Traditional numerical analyses of laser beam transmission through "active" nonlinear materials have involved many assumptions that narrow their general applicability. As more complex optical phenomena are widely employed in research and industry, it is necessary to expand the use of numerical simulation methods. Historically, laser-matter interactions have involved calculations of "classical" wave propagation by Maxwell's equations and photon absorption through rate equations using numerous approximations. We describe a novel numerical modeling framework that adapts itself for simulation of different types of active materials provided by a simple graphical input. Our framework combines classical electric field propagation with "active" photon absorption kinetics using computational active photonic building blocks (APBB). It allows investigating a plane electromagnetic wave propagating through generic organic or inorganic photoactive materials; while, "active" photo-transitions are implemented using the APBB algorithm on the user interface. To date we have used the method in multiphoton absorbers, upconversion, semiconductor quantum dots, rare earth ions, organic chromophores, singlet oxygen formation, energy transfer, and optically-induced chemical reactions. We will demonstrate the method with applications of amplification in rare-earth ions and multiple two-photon absorbers materials in tandem.

  5. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-09-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  6. Laser And Nonlinear Optical Materials For Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA remote sensing missions involving laser systems and their economic impact are outlined. Potential remote sensing missions include: green house gasses, tropospheric winds, ozone, water vapor, and ice cap thickness. Systems to perform these measurements use lanthanide series lasers and nonlinear devices including second harmonic generators and parametric oscillators. Demands these missions place on the laser and nonlinear optical materials are discussed from a materials point of view. Methods of designing new laser and nonlinear optical materials to meet these demands are presented.

  7. Properties of Optical and Laser-Related Materials: A Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikogosyan, David N.

    2003-05-01

    Properties of Optical and Laser-Related Materials-A Handbook offers the reader a self-contained, concise and up-to-date collection of the key properties of 125 of the most common and important optical materials used in modern optics, laser physics and technology, spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy, nonlinear optics, quantum electronics and laser applications. This comprehensive volume presents not only the classical properties but also those that have appeared in the three decades since the invention of the laser. The presentation of the material is given in a clear tabular form with more than 1000 references. A wide variety of readers, ranging from workers in both industry and academia, to lecturers and students at postgraduate and undergraduate levels, will find Properties of Optical and Laser-Related Materials-A Handbook an invaluable resource.

  8. Absorption-induced scattering and surface plasmon out-coupling from absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Petoukhoff, Christopher E; O'Carroll, Deirdre M

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between absorbers and plasmonic metasurfaces can give rise to unique optical properties not present for either of the individual materials and can influence the performance of a host of optical sensing and thin-film optoelectronic applications. Here we identify three distinct mode types of absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces: localized and propagating surface plasmons and a previously unidentified optical mode type called absorption-induced scattering. The extinction of the latter mode type can be tuned by controlling the morphology of the absorber coating and the spectral overlap of the absorber with the plasmonic modes. Furthermore, we show that surface plasmons are backscattered when the crystallinity of the absorber is low but are absorbed for more crystalline absorber coatings. This work furthers our understanding of light-matter interactions between absorbers and surface plasmons to enable practical optoelectronic applications of metasurfaces.

  9. Absorption-induced scattering and surface plasmon out-coupling from absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Petoukhoff, Christopher E.; O'Carroll, Deirdre M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between absorbers and plasmonic metasurfaces can give rise to unique optical properties not present for either of the individual materials and can influence the performance of a host of optical sensing and thin-film optoelectronic applications. Here we identify three distinct mode types of absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces: localized and propagating surface plasmons and a previously unidentified optical mode type called absorption-induced scattering. The extinction of the latter mode type can be tuned by controlling the morphology of the absorber coating and the spectral overlap of the absorber with the plasmonic modes. Furthermore, we show that surface plasmons are backscattered when the crystallinity of the absorber is low but are absorbed for more crystalline absorber coatings. This work furthers our understanding of light–matter interactions between absorbers and surface plasmons to enable practical optoelectronic applications of metasurfaces. PMID:26271900

  10. Atmospheric particulate matter levels, chemical composition and optical absorbing properties in Camagüey, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Barja, Boris; Mogo, Sandra; Cachorro, Victoria E; Antuña, Juan Carlos; Estevan, Rene; Rodrigues, Ana; de Frutos, Ángel

    2013-02-01

    chemical and optical absorption characterization in Cuba. In addition to the regional interest, the presented values can be directly used by those working with absorption, forcing by aerosols and radiative transfer calculations in general. Also, these data can be used as input in Global Climate Models.

  11. Environments stressful to optical materials in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musikant, S.; Malloy, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft in low earth orbit experience a variety of environments which are potentially damaging to materials and to optical systems including electronic controls and components. The low earth orbit (typically 400 km) has a significantly different set of environments than higher orbits. The environments vary not only with altitude but also with inclination. This paper deals with the environment that the Space Station Freedom will experience and with some of the effects on the materials and electronic components that will comprise the optical systems on the station. Specific optical systems are not addressed but the information presented is general and does apply to optical systems.

  12. Exploiting Mycosporines as Natural Molecular Sunscreens for the Fabrication of UV-Absorbing Green Materials.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Susana C M; Alonso-Varona, Ana; Palomares, Teodoro; Zubillaga, Verónica; Labidi, Jalel; Bulone, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Ultraviolet radiations have many detrimental effects in living organisms that challenge the stability and function of cellular structures. UV exposure also alters the properties and durability of materials and affects their lifetime. It is becoming increasingly important to develop new biocompatible and environmentally friendly materials to address these issues. Inspired by the strategy developed by fish, algae, and microorganisms exposed to UV radiations in confined ecosystems, we have constructed novel UV-protective materials that exclusively consist of natural compounds. Chitosan was chosen as the matrix for grafting mycosporines and mycosporine-like amino acids as the functional components of the active materials. Here, we show that these materials are biocompatible, photoresistant, and thermoresistant, and exhibit a highly efficient absorption of both UV-A and UV-B radiations. Thus, they have the potential to provide an efficient protection against both types of UV radiations and overcome several shortfalls of the current UV-protective products. In practice, the same concept can be applied to other biopolymers than chitosan and used to produce multifunctional materials. Therefore, it has a great potential to be exploited in a broad range of applications in living organisms and nonliving systems. PMID:26168193

  13. Exploiting Mycosporines as Natural Molecular Sunscreens for the Fabrication of UV-Absorbing Green Materials.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Susana C M; Alonso-Varona, Ana; Palomares, Teodoro; Zubillaga, Verónica; Labidi, Jalel; Bulone, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Ultraviolet radiations have many detrimental effects in living organisms that challenge the stability and function of cellular structures. UV exposure also alters the properties and durability of materials and affects their lifetime. It is becoming increasingly important to develop new biocompatible and environmentally friendly materials to address these issues. Inspired by the strategy developed by fish, algae, and microorganisms exposed to UV radiations in confined ecosystems, we have constructed novel UV-protective materials that exclusively consist of natural compounds. Chitosan was chosen as the matrix for grafting mycosporines and mycosporine-like amino acids as the functional components of the active materials. Here, we show that these materials are biocompatible, photoresistant, and thermoresistant, and exhibit a highly efficient absorption of both UV-A and UV-B radiations. Thus, they have the potential to provide an efficient protection against both types of UV radiations and overcome several shortfalls of the current UV-protective products. In practice, the same concept can be applied to other biopolymers than chitosan and used to produce multifunctional materials. Therefore, it has a great potential to be exploited in a broad range of applications in living organisms and nonliving systems.

  14. Determination of optical constants n and k of thin films from absorbance data using Kramers-Kronig relationship.

    PubMed

    Rocha, W R M; Pilling, S

    2014-04-01

    We present a code, called NKABS, to determine optical constants (complex refractive index) of thin films directly from the absorbance data in the infrared. The code is written in the Python language, which is more accurate and faster than previous methods in the literature. For solving the Kramers-Kronig relationship, we used the Maclaurin's methodology. Unlike other codes, which found convergence in 30-40 iterations, the NKABS reach the convergence in just 4 or 5 iterations. Additionally, to evaluate the error, this code calculates the MAPE (Mean Absolute Percentage Error) and the chi-square χ(2). The typical MAPE error obtained using NKABS is less than 1×10(-3)%. To illustrate the functionality of this code, we calculate the optical constants in the infrared spectral region of 28 different samples of astrophysical interest at different temperatures (10-300K), which simulates molecules in space environments, mostly the ones called astrophysical ices. The samples were obtained from the condensation of pure gases (e.g. CO, CO2, NH3, SO2), from the sublimation in vacuum of pure liquids (e.g. water, acetone, acetonitrile, acetic acid, formic acid, ethanol and methanol) and from mixtures of different species (e.g. H2O:CO2, H2O:CO:NH3, H2O:CO2:NH3:CH4). Additionally films of solid biomolecules samples of astrochemistry/astrobiology interest (e.g. glycine, adenine) were probed. The code and the data-base obtained here are available on-line. The NKABS can also be employed to calculate refractive index of processed samples (by heating or radiation). Such data and the refractive index of virgin samples are required as input in several astrophysical models that calculate the radiative transfer in dusty astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks and circumstellar environments as well as dense molecular clouds.

  15. A new optical method coupling light polarization and Vis-NIR spectroscopy to improve the measured absorbance signal's quality of soil samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2014-05-01

    Visible - Near-infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIRS) is now commonly used to measure different physical and chemical parameters of soils, including carbon content. However, prediction model accuracy is insufficient for Vis-NIRS to replace routine laboratory analysis. One of the biggest issues this technique is facing up to is light scattering due to soil particles. It causes departure in the assumed linear relationship between the Absorbance spectrum and the concentration of the chemicals of interest as stated by Beer-Lambert's Law, which underpins the calibration models. Therefore it becomes essential to improve the metrological quality of the measured signal in order to optimize calibration as light/matter interactions are at the basis of the resulting linear modeling. Optics can help to mitigate scattering effect on the signal. We put forward a new optical setup coupling linearly polarized light with a Vis-NIR spectrometer to free the measured spectra from multi-scattering effect. The corrected measured spectrum was then used to compute an Absorbance spectrum of the sample, using Dahm's Equation in the frame of the Representative Layer Theory. This method has been previously tested and validated on liquid (milk+ dye) and powdered (sand + dye) samples showing scattering (and absorbing) properties. The obtained Absorbance was a very good approximation of the Beer-Lambert's law absorbance. Here, we tested the method on a set of 54 soil samples to predict Soil Organic Carbon content. In order to assess the signal quality improvement by this method, we built and compared calibration models using Partial Least Square (PLS) algorithm. The prediction model built from new Absorbance spectrum outperformed the model built with the classical Absorbance traditionally obtained with Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance. This study is a good illustration of the high influence of signal quality on prediction model's performances.

  16. Systematic optimization of polymeric electro-optic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Larry R.; Robinson, Bruce H.; Steier, William H.; Zhang, Cheng H.; Todorova, Galina

    2000-11-01

    Chromophore-containing polymeric electro-optic materials must satisfy many requirements before they can be considered for use in applications at telecommunication wavelengths (1.3 and 1.55 microns). These include large macroscopic electro-optic activity, low optical loss, and stability (thermal, chemical, and photochemical). Such materials must be capable of being integrated with silica fiber optics and semiconductor electronics. We discuss design of chromophores not only for large hyperpolarizability but also for low optical loss and for thermal and photochemical stability. The processing of these materials to maximize electro-optic activity while minimizing processing- associated optical loss is discussed. Device structures appropriate for minimizing insertion loss are discussed, as is the fabrication of such dvices and three-dimensional active/passive optical circuits. The identification of new structure/function relationships provide design criteria for future improvements as well as permitting better definition of the performance limitations that can be expected for polymeric electro-optic materials prepared by electric field poling methods.

  17. Optical band gap of NpO2 and PuO2 from optical absorbance of epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark McCleskey, T.; Bauer, Eve; Jia, Quanxi; Burrell, Anthony K.; Scott, Brian L.; Conradson, Steven D.; Mueller, Alex; Roy, Lindsay; Wen, Xiaodong; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Martin, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    We report a solution based synthesis of epitaxial thin films of neptunium oxide and plutonium oxide. Actinides represent a challenge to first principle calculations due to features that arise from f orbital interactions. Conventional semi-local density functional theory predicts NpO2 and PuO2 to be metallic, when they are well known insulators. Improvements in theory are dependent on comparison with accurate measurements of material properties, which in turn demand high-quality samples. The high melting point of actinide oxides and their inherent radioactivity makes single crystal and epitaxial film formation challenging. We report on the preparation of high quality epitaxial actinide films. The films have been characterized through a combination of X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure (XANES and EXAFS) measurements. We report band gaps of 2.80 ± 0.1 eV and 2.85 ± 0.1 eV at room temperature for PuO2 and NpO2, respectively, and compare our measurements with state-of-the-art calculations.

  18. Prediction of the niche effect for single flat panels with or without attached sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Sgard, Franck; Atalla, Noureddine; Nélisse, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The sound transmission loss (STL) of a test sample measured in sound transmission facilities is affected by the opening in which it is located. This is called the niche effect. This paper uses a modal approach to study the STL of a rectangular plate with or without an attached porous material located inside a box-shaped niche. The porous material is modeled as a limp equivalent fluid. The proposed model is validated by comparison with finite element/boundary element computations. Using a condensation of the pressure fields in the niche, the niche effect is interpreted in terms of a modification of the modal blocked pressure fields acting on the panel induced by the front cavity and by a modification of the radiation efficiency of the panel modes due to the presence of the back cavity. The modal approach is then used to investigate the impact of (1) the presence of a porous material attached to the panel on the niche effect and (2) the niche effect on the assessment of the porous material insertion loss. A simplified model for the porous material based on a transfer matrix approach is also proposed to predict the STL of the system and its validity is discussed.

  19. Prediction of the niche effect for single flat panels with or without attached sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Sgard, Franck; Atalla, Noureddine; Nélisse, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The sound transmission loss (STL) of a test sample measured in sound transmission facilities is affected by the opening in which it is located. This is called the niche effect. This paper uses a modal approach to study the STL of a rectangular plate with or without an attached porous material located inside a box-shaped niche. The porous material is modeled as a limp equivalent fluid. The proposed model is validated by comparison with finite element/boundary element computations. Using a condensation of the pressure fields in the niche, the niche effect is interpreted in terms of a modification of the modal blocked pressure fields acting on the panel induced by the front cavity and by a modification of the radiation efficiency of the panel modes due to the presence of the back cavity. The modal approach is then used to investigate the impact of (1) the presence of a porous material attached to the panel on the niche effect and (2) the niche effect on the assessment of the porous material insertion loss. A simplified model for the porous material based on a transfer matrix approach is also proposed to predict the STL of the system and its validity is discussed. PMID:25618044

  20. Optical waveguide solar energy system for lunar material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Senior, C.L.; Shoji, J.M.; Waldron, R.D.

    1995-11-01

    This paper summarizes the study on the optical waveguide (OW) solar energy system for lunar material processing. In the OW solar energy system, solar radiation is collected by the concentrator which transfers the concentrated solar radiation to the OW transmission line consisting of low-loss optical fibers and related optical components. The OW line transmits the high intensity solar radiation to the thermal reactor of the lunar materials processing plant. Based on the results discussed in this paper the authors conclude that the OW solar energy system is a viable concept which can effectively utilize solar energy for lunar material processing.

  1. Overlapping illusions by transformation optics without any negative refraction material.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-01-11

    A novel method to achieve an overlapping illusion without any negative refraction index material is introduced with the help of the optic-null medium (ONM) designed by an extremely stretching spatial transformation. Unlike the previous methods to achieve such an optical illusion by transformation optics (TO), our method can achieve a power combination and reshape the radiation pattern at the same time. Unlike the overlapping illusion with some negative refraction index material, our method is not sensitive to the loss of the materials. Other advantages over existing methods are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to verify the performance of the proposed devices.

  2. Overlapping illusions by transformation optics without any negative refraction material

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to achieve an overlapping illusion without any negative refraction index material is introduced with the help of the optic-null medium (ONM) designed by an extremely stretching spatial transformation. Unlike the previous methods to achieve such an optical illusion by transformation optics (TO), our method can achieve a power combination and reshape the radiation pattern at the same time. Unlike the overlapping illusion with some negative refraction index material, our method is not sensitive to the loss of the materials. Other advantages over existing methods are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to verify the performance of the proposed devices. PMID:26751285

  3. Exposure effects on the optical properties of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Sarah; Cathcart, J. Michael; Harrell, J. Timothy

    2008-04-01

    Georgia Tech recently initiated a weathering effects measurement program to monitor the optical properties of several common building materials. A set of common building materials were placed outdoors and optical property measurements made over a series of weeks to assess the impact of exposure on these properties. Both reflectivity and emissivity measurements were made. Materials in this program included aluminum flashing, plastic sheets, bricks, roof shingles, and tarps. This paper will discuss the measurement approach, experimental setup, and present preliminary results from the optical property measurements.

  4. A summary of measurements of permittivities and permeabilities of some microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgeon, W. A.; Elrayess, M.; Dorsey, P.; Vittoria, C.

    1990-05-01

    This report presents results of measurements of permittivities and permeabilities of assorted materials collected by the U.S. Army Office of Low Observables Technology and Applications (LOTA), and by the U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL). The samples fell into the following categories: (1) Pure materials (Teflon, plexiglasses and casting plastic); (2) Metal-coated microspheres; (3) Carbospheres, both uncoated and metal coated; (4) Ferrites; (5) Magnetic metal flake; (6) Ceramic matrix composites; and (7) A standard paint. The data and its limitations and plans for additional testing are presented in the text. The most interesting results were obtained for a Rockwell Ferrite and for a 50/50 ferronickel flake which showed magnetic loss from 2 to 18 GHz.

  5. Characterization of porous glass-ceramic material as absorber of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmina, O.; Suslyaev, V.; Dushkina, M.; Semukhin, B.

    2015-04-01

    Investigations of a foam glass-ceramic material synthesized from raw siliceous earth material by the two-stage method at temperatures below 950°C have demonstrated the improvement of its physic mechanical properties in comparison with foam glass synthesized from glass cullet. This material actively interacts with microwaves and can be used for the development of protective screens reducing the adverse effect of microwaves on biological objects, anechoic chambers, and rooms with low level of electromagnetic background noise. Spectra of the transmission and absorption coefficients and of the complex dielectric permittivity for frequencies in the range 26-260 GHz are presented. The observed effects demonstrate the existence of regions with partial and total reflection arising on the glass-pore boundary and of the microwave interaction with ultradisperse carbon particles that remain after foaming with incomplete frothier transition from the soot to the gas phase.

  6. On the Prediction of the Nonlinear Absorption in Reverse Saturable Absorbing Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A.; Day, Paul N.; Kennel, Joshua C.

    2001-03-01

    In our continuing efforts to design materials that exhibit reverse saturable absorption (RSA), we systematically examine the ability of the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method using local, nonlocal, and hybrid functionals, to predict the experimental nonlinear absorption for a variety of organic and organometallic molecular systems, including a number of free-base porphyrins, phthalocyanine and their metal complexes. The ground and triplet-triplet excitation energies, as well as the oscillator strengths are calculated, indicating good agreement with experiment. We conclude that the TDDFT approach with a hybrid functional provides good estimates for the nonlinear absorption of RSA materials.

  7. Performance of protective polymeric coatings for nonlinear optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Smith, D.J.; Bevin, A.A.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jacobs, S.D.

    1988-09-01

    KDP, KD*P, and LiNbO/sub 3/, three nonlinear optical materials that have been difficult to coat, are treated with polymeric surface layers. These layers hermetically seal the hygroscopic crystal surfaces. Their optical properties, thermal compatibility, high-power laser damage behavior, abrasive resistance, and suitability for overcoating with traditional, dielectric antireflection multilayers are reported.

  8. Optical correlators with fast updating speed using photorefractive semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Gregory; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    The performance of an updatable optical correlator which uses a photorefractive semiconductor to generate real-time matched filters is discussed. The application of compound semiconductors makes possible high-speed operation and low optical input intensities. The Bragg diffraction is considered, along with the speed and power characteristics of these materials. Experimental results on photorefractive GaAs are presented.

  9. Analysis of SnS2 hyperdoped with V proposed as efficient absorber material.

    PubMed

    Seminovski, Yohanna; Palacios, Pablo; Wahnón, Perla

    2014-10-01

    Intermediate-band materials can improve the photovoltaic efficiency of solar cells through the absorption of two subband-gap photons that allow extra electron-hole pair formations. Previous theoretical and experimental findings support the proposal that the layered SnS2 compound, with a band-gap of around 2 eV, is a candidate for an intermediate-band material when it is doped with a specific transition-metal. In this work we characterize vanadium doped SnS2 using density functional theory at the dilution level experimentally found and including a dispersion correction combined with the site-occupancy-disorder method. In order to analyze the electronic characteristics that depend on geometry, two SnS2 polytypes partially substituted with vanadium in symmetry-adapted non-equivalent configurations were studied. In addition the magnetic configurations of vanadium in a SnS2 2H-polytype and its comparison with a 4H-polytype were also characterized. We demonstrate that a narrow intermediate-band is formed, when these dopant atoms are located in different layers. Our theoretical predictions confirm the recent experimental findings in which a paramagnetic intermediate-band material in a SnS2 2H-polytype with 10% vanadium concentration is obtained. PMID:25204457

  10. Materials for aerospace/large optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, W. W.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of carbon fiber composite technology mirrors for astronomical observations is briefly addressed. Technical developments needed to assure the performance of lacquer-coated optics are summarized. A 10-meter monolithic mirror and larger segmented mirrors could be made with this technology.

  11. Carbon nanotube-based functional materials for optical limiting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Ying; Liu, Ying; Doyle, James; He, Nan; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Bai, Jinrui; Blau, Werner J

    2007-01-01

    Optical limiting is an important application of nonlinear optics, useful for the protection of human eyes, optical elements, and optical sensors from intense laser pulses. An optical limiter is such a device that strongly attenuates high intensity light and potentially damaging light such as focused laser beams, whilst allowing for the high transmission of ambient light. Optical limiting properties of carbon nanotube suspensions, solubilized carbon nanotubes, small molecules doped carbon nanotubes and polymer/carbon nanotube composites have been reviewed. The optical limiting responses of carbon nanotube suspensions are shown to be dominated by nonlinear scattering as a result of thermally induced solvent-bubble formation and sublimation of the nanotubes, while the solubilized carbon nanotubes optically limit through nonlinear absorption mechanism and exhibit significant solution-concentration-dependent optical limiting responses. In the former case the optical limiting results are independent of nanotube concentrations at the same linear transmittance as that of the solubilized systems. Many efforts have been invested into the research of polymer/carbon nanotube composites in an attempt to allow for the fabrication of films required for the use of nanotubes in a real optical limiting application. The higher carbon nanotube content samples block the incident light more effectively at higher incident energy densities or intensities. The optical limiting mechanism of these composite materials is quite complicated. Besides nonlinear scattering contribution to the optical limiting, there may also be other contributions e.g., nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction, electronic absorption and others to the optical limiting. Further improvements in the optical limiting efficiency of the composites and in the dispersion and alignment properties of carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix could be realized by variation of both nanostructured guest and polymer host, and by

  12. Scaleable photovoltaic absorber materials within the Cu-Sb-S system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Adam; Tumas, William; Ginley, David; Wolden, Colin; Zakutayev, Andriy; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Collaboration; Colorado School of Mines Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The Cu-Sb-S system contains four ternary compounds which may hold promise for scalable, non-toxic, and efficient solar photoconversion. Like similar compounds CuInSe2, CIGS, and CZTS, the Cu-Sb-S compounds are predicted to offer high absorption coefficients, and electrically benign grain boundaries. Antimony, instead of indium or gallium, has the advantage of lower cost and greater availability, as well as theoretically predicted better photon absorption. It also has a potential advantage over CZTS, as the Cu-V-S compound avoids the deep traps associated with antisite defects. Here, we synthesize two compounds within the Cu-Sb-S system, Cu12Sb4S14 (tetrahedrite) and CuSbS2 (chalcostibite), by combinatorial RF magnetron co-sputtering from Cu2S and Sb2S3 targets. Chalcostibite films were found to have good optical and electrical properties, with a steep absorption onset at 1.5eV, high absorption coefficient (>105 cm-1), good carrier concentration (p =1017 cm-3) and mobility (0.2 cm2/V-s). Chalcostibite growth conditions were therefore further optimized and it was found that an overflux of vapor phase Sb2S3 allowed strict control of stoichiometry for better device integration. Sunshot Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to NREL.

  13. Chemistry away from local equilibrium: shocking high-energy and energy absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    In this presentation I will describe reactive molecular dynamics and coarse grain simulations of shock induced chemistry. MD simulations of the chemical reactions following the shock-induced collapse of cylindrical pores in the high-energy density material RDX provide the first atomistic picture of the shock to deflagration transition in nanoscale hotspots. We find that energy localization during pore collapse leads to ultra-fast, multi-step chemical reactions that occur under non-equilibrium conditions. The formation of exothermic products during the first few picoseconds of the process prevents the hotspot from quenching, and within 30 ps a deflagration wave develops. Quite surprisingly, an artificial hot-spot matching the shock-induced one in size and thermodynamic conditions quenches; providing strong evidence that the dynamic nature of the loading plays a role in determining the criticality of the hotspot. To achieve time and lengths beyond what is possible in MD we developed a mesoscale model that incorporates chemical reactions at a coarse-grained level. We used this model to explore shock propagation on materials that can undergo volume-reducing, endothermic chemical reactions. The simulations show that such chemical reactions can attenuate the shockwave and characterize how the characteristics of the chemistry affect this behavior. We find that the amount of volume collapse and the activation energy are critical to weaken the shock, whereas the endothermicity of the reactions plays only a minor role. As in the reactive MD simulations, we find that the non-equilibrium state following the shock affects the nucleation of chemistry and, thus, the timescales for equilibration between various degrees of freedom affect the response of the material.

  14. Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H.; Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G.

    2010-05-21

    This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

  15. Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H.; Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G.

    2010-05-01

    This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely 40K, 232Th and 238U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

  16. Scientists Identify New Family of Iron-Based Absorber Materials for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Use of Earth-abundant materials in solar absorber films is critical for expanding the reach of photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The use of Earth-abundant and inexpensive Fe in PV was proposed more than 25 years ago in the form of FeS{sub 2} pyrite - fool's gold. Unfortunately, the material has been plagued by performance problems that to this day are both persistent and not well understood. Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oregon State University, working collaboratively in the Center for Inverse Design, an Energy Frontier Research Center, have uncovered several new insights into the problems of FeS{sub 2}. They have used these advances to propose and implement design rules that can be used to identify new Fe-containing materials that can circumvent the limitations of FeS{sub 2} pyrite. The team has identified that it is the unavoidable metallic secondary phases and surface defects coexisting near the FeS{sub 2} thin-film surfaces and grain boundaries that limit its open-circuit voltage, rather than the S vacancies in the bulk, which has long been commonly assumed. The materials Fe{sub 2}SiS{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}GeS{sub 4} hold considerable promise as PV absorbers. The ternary Si compound is especially attractive, as it contains three of the more abundant low-cost elements available today. The band gap (E{sub g} = 1.5 eV) from both theory and experiment is higher than those of c-Si and FeS{sub 2}, offering better absorption of the solar spectrum and potentially higher solar cell efficiencies. More importantly, these materials do not have metallic secondary phase problems as seen in FeS{sub 2}. High calculated formation energies of donor-type defects are consistent with p-type carriers in thin films and are prospects for high open-circuit voltages in cells.

  17. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-08-09

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications.

  18. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-01-01

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications. PMID:27501762

  19. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-08-01

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications.

  20. Tunable microwave absorbing nano-material for X-band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Imran; Naseem, Shahzad; Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem; Khan, M. A.; Niaz, Shanawer; Rana, M. U.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of rare earth elements substitution in Sr1.96RE0.04Co2Fe27.80Mn0.2O46 (RE=Ce, Gd, Nd, La and Sm) X-type hexagonal ferrites prepared by using sol gel autocombustion method was studied. The XRD and FTIR analysis show the single phase of the prepared material. The lattice constants a (Å) and c (Å) varies with the additives. The particle size measured by Scherer formula for all the samples varies in the range of 54-100 nm and confirmed by the TEM analysis. The average grain size measured by SEM analysis lies in the range of 0.672-1.01 μm for all the samples. The Gd-substituted ferrite has higher value of coercivity (526.06 G) among all the samples which could be a good material for longitudinal recording media. The results also indicate that the Gd-substituted sample has maximum reflection loss of -25.2 dB at 11.878 GHz, can exhibit the best microwave absorption properties among all the substituted samples. Furthermore, the minimum value of reflection loss shifts towards the lower and higher frequencies with the substitution of rare earth elements which confirms that the microwave absorption properties can be tuned with the substitution of rare earth elements in pure ferrites. The peak value of attenuation constant at higher frequency agrees well the reflection loss data.

  1. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-01-01

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications. PMID:27501762

  2. Spacecraft materials guide. [including: encapsulants and conformal coatings; optical materials; lubrication; and, bonding and joining processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staugaitis, C. L. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Materials which have demonstrated their suitability for space application are summarized. Common, recurring problems in encapsulants and conformal coatings, optical materials, lubrication, and bonding and joining are noted. The subjects discussed include: low density and syntactic foams, electrical encapsulants; optical glasses, interference filter, mirrors; oils, greases, lamillar lubricants; and, soldering and brazing processes.

  3. Surface Modification of Fuel Cladding Materials with Integral Fuel BUrnable Absorber Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Todd Allen; Jesse Gudmundson; Benjamin Maier

    2008-11-03

    Integral fuel burnable absorgers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly to counteract excessive reactivity. These IFBA elements (usually boron or gadolinium) are presently incorporated in the U)2 pellets either by mixing in the pellets or as coatings on the pellet surface. In either case, the incorporation of ifba into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be costly and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. The goal of this NEER research project was to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of IFBA element boron at the surface of the fuel cladding material.

  4. Preparation and low-frequency microwave-absorbing properties of MWCNTs/Co-Ni/Fe3O4 hybrid material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shao-Wei; Yuan, Chao-Jun; Jia, Cai-Xia; Ma, Ke-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-04-01

    MWCNTs/Co-Ni/Fe3O4 hybrid material has been successfully prepared by electroless plating and coprecipitation method, which is applied to the low-frequency microwave absorption. Their surface morphology, structure, magnetism and electromagnetic properties in the low-frequency range of 1-4GHz were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and vector network analyzer. Results indicated that magnetic Co-Ni/Fe3O4 particles were attached on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes successfully. The saturation magnetization of MWCNTs/Co-Ni/Fe3O4 hybrid materials was 68.6emu/g and the coercivity is 17.9 Oe. The electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties analysis in the low-frequency range of 1-4GHz indicated that the hybrid material exhibited excellent magnetic loss and the maximum reflection loss could reach ‑13.57dB at 1.51GHz with 1.05GHz bandwidth below ‑5dB.

  5. Advances in nonlinear optical materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The recent progress in the application of nonlinear techniques to extend the frequency of laser sources has come from the joint progress in laser sources and in nonlinear materials. A brief summary of the progress in diode pumped solid state lasers is followed by an overview of progress in nonlinear frequency extension by harmonic generation and parametric processes. Improved nonlinear materials including bulk crystals, quasiphasematched interactions, guided wave devices, and quantum well intersubband studies are discussed with the idea of identifying areas of future progress in nonlinear materials and devices.

  6. Optimization of doubly Q-switched lasers with both an acousto-optic modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dechun; Zhao Shengzhi; Li Guiqiu; Yang Kejian

    2007-08-20

    A doubly Q-switched laser with both an acousto-optic (AO) modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber can obtain a more symmetric and shorter pulse with high pulse peak power, which has been experimentally proved. The key parameters of an optimally coupled doubly Q-switched laser with both an AO modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber are determined, and a group of general curves are generated for what we believe is the first time, when the single-photon absorption (SPA) and two-photon absorption (TPA) processes of GaAs are combined, and the Gaussian spatial distributions of the intracavity photon density and the initial population-inversion density as well as the influence of the AO Q-switch are considered. These key parameters include the optimal normalized coupling parameter, the optimal normalized GaAs saturable absorber parameters, and the normalized parameters of the AO Q-switch, which can maximize the output energy. Meanwhile, the corresponding normalized energy, the normalized peak power, and the normalized pulse width are given. The curves clearly show the dependence of the optimal key parameters on the parameters of the gain medium, the GaAs saturable absorber,the AO Q-switch, and the resonator. Sample calculations for a diode-pumpedNd3+:YVO4 laser with both an AO modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber are presented to demonstrate the use of the curves and the relevant formulas.

  7. Optimization of doubly Q-switched lasers with both an acousto-optic modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Yang, Kejian

    2007-08-20

    A doubly Q-switched laser with both an acousto-optic (AO) modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber can obtain a more symmetric and shorter pulse with high pulse peak power, which has been experimentally proved. The key parameters of an optimally coupled doubly Q-switched laser with both an AO modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber are determined, and a group of general curves are generated for what we believe is the first time, when the single-photon absorption (SPA) and two-photon absorption (TPA) processes of GaAs are combined, and the Gaussian spatial distributions of the intracavity photon density and the initial population-inversion density as well as the influence of the AO Q-switch are considered. These key parameters include the optimal normalized coupling parameter, the optimal normalized GaAs saturable absorber parameters, and the normalized parameters of the AO Q-switch, which can maximize the output energy. Meanwhile, the corresponding normalized energy, the normalized peak power, and the normalized pulse width are given. The curves clearly show the dependence of the optimal key parameters on the parameters of the gain medium, the GaAs saturable absorber, the AO Q-switch, and the resonator. Sample calculations for a diode-pumped Nd3+:YVO4 laser with both an AO modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber are presented to demonstrate the use of the curves and the relevant formulas.

  8. Novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Optical materials in the optical printed circuit board are required to overcome soldering process. In detail, the material should not have absorption and shape changes after several tens of seconds heating at around 250°C. For such application field, we have developed a novel organic-inorganic hybrid material having a high thermal stability and low absorption at telecom wavelength. The material is designed to UV and/or Thermal curable resin, and soluble to popular organic solvents. We fabricated a rigid optical waveguides on a SiO2/Si wafers by UV lithography. The size of waveguide was 40 μm in width, 30 μm in height, and 7 cm in length. Optical attenuation of the waveguide measured by the cut back method was 0.1 dB/cm at 850 nm, 0.29 dB/cm at 1310 nm, and 0.45 dB/cm at 1550 nm. These values are good low attenuation for the Near-IR optical communication. The 5% weight loss temperature of the UV cured material was 402°C. The waveguide showed almost no attenuation increase even after 1min heating at 300°C. In addition, the material is having a high refractive index of n=1.60 at 633 nm and a low curing shrinkage of 4.7%. We have demonstrated to fabricate a bulk body sample by UV curing, and obtained high uniformity cured materials with 5 mm-thick and 1 cm-diameter. From these properties, the developed organic-inorganic material is expected to be beneficial for the optical interconnection such as micro lenses and optical packages.

  9. Application of Novel Nonlinear Optical Materials to Optical Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Partha P.

    1999-01-01

    We describe wave mixing and interactions in nonlinear photorefractive polymers and disodium flourescein. Higher diffracted orders yielding forward phase conjugation can be generated in a two-wave mixing geometry in photorefractive polymers, and this higher order can be used for image edge enhancement and correlation. Four-wave mixing and phase conjugation is studied using nonlinear disodium floureschein, and the nature and properties of gratings written in this material are investigated.

  10. Transfer matrix method applied to the parallel assembly of sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Verdière, Kévin; Panneton, Raymond; Elkoun, Saïd; Dupont, Thomas; Leclaire, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    The transfer matrix method (TMM) is used conventionally to predict the acoustic properties of laterally infinite homogeneous layers assembled in series to form a multilayer. In this work, a parallel assembly process of transfer matrices is used to model heterogeneous materials such as patchworks, acoustic mosaics, or a collection of acoustic elements in parallel. In this method, it is assumed that each parallel element can be modeled by a 2 × 2 transfer matrix, and no diffusion exists between elements. The resulting transfer matrix of the parallel assembly is also a 2 × 2 matrix that can be assembled in series with the classical TMM. The method is validated by comparison with finite element (FE) simulations and acoustical tube measurements on different parallel/series configurations at normal and oblique incidence. The comparisons are in terms of sound absorption coefficient and transmission loss on experimental and simulated data and published data, notably published data on a parallel array of resonators. From these comparisons, the limitations of the method are discussed. Finally, applications to three-dimensional geometries are studied, where the geometries are discretized as in a FE concept. Compared to FE simulations, the extended TMM yields similar results with a trivial computation time.

  11. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Carson, Richard F.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  12. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

    1993-01-05

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  13. Optical materials for space based laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Armagan, G.; Byvik, C. E.; Albin, S.

    1989-01-01

    The design features and performance characteristics of a sensitized holmium laser applicable to differential lidar and Doppler windshear measurements are presented, giving attention to the optimal choice of sensitizing/activating dopant ions. This development of a 2-micron region eye-safe laser, where holmium is sensitized by either hulium or erbium, has called for interionic energy transfer processes whose rate will not result in gain-switched pulses that are excessively long for atmospheric lidar and Doppler windshear detection. The application of diamond films for optical component hardening is noted.

  14. Experimental study of optical storage characteristics of photochromic material: pyrrylfulgide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Chen, Yi; Han, Yong; Wang, Congmin; Wang, Yingli; Menke, Neimule; Chen, Guofu; Fan, Meigong

    2003-04-01

    Optical data storage is a frontier in the information science. Currently, there are mainly two kinds of storage materials, i.e., thermal-optic and photonic materials. The storage methods are divided into serial and parallel modes. In the market, the mature technique is CD-RW, which uses the thermal-optic material and serial method. The storage density of the CD-RW is restricted by the size of material particles, the conduction of heat, etc. Besides, the recording speed is seriously limited by the process of heating. Photonic materials and parallel method will be the trend in the optical data storage. Because it is based on the photon reaction on the molecule scale, the storage density and speed will be greatly increased. In this paper, a new kind of organic photochromic material -- pyrrylfulgide was studied. A parallel optical data storage system was established. Using the pyrrylfulgide/PMMA film as a recording medium, micro-images and binary digital information could be recorded, readout and erased in this parallel system. The recorded information on the film can be kept for at least 8 months in dark at room temperature. So far, the storage density is 3 x 107 bit/cm2.

  15. Numerical model for thermal parameters in optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yoichi; Taira, Takunori

    2016-04-01

    Thermal parameters of optical materials, such as thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, temperature coefficient of refractive index play a decisive role for the thermal design inside laser cavities. Therefore, numerical value of them with temperature dependence is quite important in order to develop the high intense laser oscillator in which optical materials generate excessive heat across mode volumes both of lasing output and optical pumping. We already proposed a novel model of thermal conductivity in various optical materials. Thermal conductivity is a product of isovolumic specific heat and thermal diffusivity, and independent modeling of these two figures should be required from the viewpoint of a clarification of physical meaning. Our numerical model for thermal conductivity requires one material parameter for specific heat and two parameters for thermal diffusivity in the calculation of each optical material. In this work we report thermal conductivities of various optical materials as Y3Al5O12 (YAG), YVO4 (YVO), GdVO4 (GVO), stoichiometric and congruent LiTaO3, synthetic quartz, YAG ceramics and Y2O3 ceramics. The dependence on Nd3+-doping in laser gain media in YAG, YVO and GVO is also studied. This dependence can be described by only additional three parameters. Temperature dependence of thermal expansion and temperature coefficient of refractive index for YAG, YVO, and GVO: these are also included in this work for convenience. We think our numerical model is quite useful for not only thermal analysis in laser cavities or optical waveguides but also the evaluation of physical properties in various transparent materials.

  16. Materials figure of merit for achromatic gradient index (GRIN) optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beadie, G.; Mait, J. N.; Flynn, R. A.; Milojkovic, P.

    2016-05-01

    A new figure of merit is developed for ranking pairs of materials as candidates for gradient index (GRIN) optics capable of good color correction. The approach leverages recent work which derives a connection in GRIN lenses between the optical properties of constituent materials and the wavelength dependence of the lens power. We extend the analysis here, the effectiveness of which is evidenced by a simulated f/3 GRIN lens with diffraction-limited performance over the visible spectrum, using the top material pair selected out of a database of >60,000 possible candidates.

  17. Physically based parameterizations of the short-wave radiative characteristics of weakly absorbing optically thick media: application to liquid-water clouds.

    PubMed

    Kokhanovsky, A A; Nakajima, T; Zege, E P

    1998-07-20

    We propose the physically based parameterization of the radiative characteristics of liquid-water clouds as functions of the wavelength, effective radius, and refractive index of particles, liquid-water path, ground albedo, and solar and observation angles. The formulas obtained are based on the approximate analytical solutions of the radiative transfer equation for optically thick, weakly absorbing layers and the geometrical optics approximation for local optical characteristics of cloud media. The accuracy of the approximate formulas was studied with an exact radiative transfer code. The relative error of the approximate formula for the reflection function at nadir observations was less then 15% for an optical thickness larger than 10 and a single-scattering albedo larger than 0.95.

  18. Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

    1995-05-02

    The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

  19. Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Son, Sehwan; Lin, Hong-Cheu

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4'-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidene) phenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl) 4'-[(4'-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it.

  20. Magnetic smart material application to adaptive x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Graham, Michael E.; Vaynman, Semyon; Cao, J.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2010-09-01

    We discuss a technique of shape modification that can be applied to thin walled ({100-400 micron thickness) electroformed replicated optics or slumped glass optics to improve the near net shape of the mirror as well as the midfrequency ripple. The process involves sputter deposition of a magnetic smart material (MSM) film onto a permanently magnetic material. The MSM material exhibits strains about 400 times stronger than ordinary ferromagnetic materials. The deformation process involves a magnetic write head which traverses the surface, and under the guidance of active metrology feedback, locally magnetizes the surface to impart strain where needed. Designs and basic concepts as applied to space borne X-ray optics will be described.

  1. Synthesis and characterisation of Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide (CZTS) compound for absorber material in solar-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheraj, Vipul; Patel, K. K.; Patel, S. J.; Shah, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The development of thin-film semiconductor compounds, such as Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS), has caused remarkable progress in the field of thin-film photovoltaics. However, the scarcity and the increasing prices of indium impose the hunt for alternative materials. The Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide (CZTS) is one of the promising emerging materials with Kesterite-type crystal structure and favourable material properties like high absorption co-efficient and direct band-gap. Moreover, all the constituent elements of CZTS are non-toxic and aplenty on the earth-crust, making it a potential candidate for the thin-film photovoltaics. Here we report the synthesis of CZTS powder from its constituent elements, viz. copper, zinc, tin and sulphur, in an evacuated Quartz ampoule at 1030 K temperature. The sulphur content in the raw mixture in the ampoule was varied and optimised in order to attain the desired atomic stoichiometry of the compound. The synthesised powder was characterised by X-Ray diffraction technique (XRD), Raman Scattering Spectroscopy, Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-Ray (EDAX) and UV-Visible Absorption Spectra. The XRD Patterns of the synthesised compound show the preferred orientation of (112), (220) and (312) planes, confirming the Kesterite structure of CZTS. The chemical composition of the powder was analysed by EDAX and shows good atomic stoichiometry of the constituent elements in the CZTS compound. The UV-Vis absorption spectra confirm the direct band-gap of about 1.45 eV, which is quite close to the optimum value for the semiconductor material as an absorber in solar-cells.

  2. Acentric lattice electro-optic materials by rational design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Larry; Robinson, Bruce; Jen, Alex; Ried, Philip; Eichinger, Bruce; Sullivan, Philip; Akelaitis, Andrew; Bale, Denise; Haller, Marnie; Luo, Jingdong; Liu, Sen; Liao, Yi; Firestone, Kimberly; Bhatambrekar, Nishant; Bhattacharjee, Sanchali; Sinness, Jessica; Hammond, Scott; Buker, Nicholas; Snoeberger, Robert; Lingwood, Mark; Rommel, Harry; Amend, Joe; Jang, Sei-Hum; Chen, Antao; Steier, William

    2005-08-01

    Quantum and statistical mechanical calculations have been used to guide the improvement of the macroscopic electro-optic activity of organic thin film materials to values greater than 300 pm/V at telecommunication wavelengths. Various quantum mechanical methods (Hartree-Fock, INDO, and density functional theory) have been benchmarked and shown to be reliable for estimating trends in molecular first hyperpolarizability, β, for simple variation of donor, bridge, and acceptor structures of charge-transfer (dipolar) chromophores. β values have been increased significantly over the past five years and quantum mechanical calculations suggest that they can be further significantly improved. Statistical mechanical calculations, including pseudo-atomistic Monte Carlo calculations, have guided the design of the super/supramolecular structures of chromophores so that they assemble, under the influence of electric field poling, into macroscopic lattices with high degrees of acentric order. Indeed, during the past year, chromophores doped into single- and multi-chromophore-containing dendrimer materials to form binary glasses have yielded thin films that exhibit electro-optic activities at telecommunication wavelengths of greater than 300 pm/V. Such materials may be viewed as intermediate between chromophore/polymer composites and crystalline organic chromophore materials. Theory suggests that further improvements of electro-optic activity are possible. Auxiliary properties of these materials, including optical loss, thermal and photochemical stability, and processability are discussed. Such organic electro-optic materials have been incorporated into silicon photonic circuitry for active wavelength division multiplexing, reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexing, and high bandwidth optical rectification. A variety of all-organic devices, including stripline, cascaded prism, Fabry-Perot etalon, and ring microresonator devices, have been fabricated and evaluated.

  3. Identification and characterization of aging products in the glyoxal/ammonium sulfate system - implications for light-absorbing material in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, C. J.; Jakob, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-02-01

    In this study we report the identification of bicyclic imidazoles in aqueous aerosol mimics using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. 2,2´-Biimidazole was identified to be a major contributor to the 280 nm absorbance band observed in mixtures of glyoxal and ammonium sulfate, despite the fact that its production rate is two orders of magnitude lower than the previously reported production rates of imidazole or imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde. The molar absorptivity of 2,2´-biimidazole was determined to be (36 690±998) M-1 cm-1. This demonstrates the necessity of molecular product identification at trace levels to enable a better understanding of relevant absorbing species. Additionally the formation of lower polarity products including formamides of imidazoles is proposed. The role of imidazoles and other light-absorbing species in the formation of SOA and optical properties of SOA is discussed and potentially interesting fields for future investigations are outlined.

  4. Identification and characterization of aging products in the glyoxal/ammonium sulfate system - implications for light-absorbing material in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, C. J.; Jakob, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-07-01

    In this study we report the identification of bicyclic imidazoles in aqueous aerosol mimics using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. 2,2'-Biimidazole was identified to be a major contributor to the 280 nm absorbance band observed in mixtures of glyoxal and ammonium sulfate, despite the fact that its production rate is two orders of magnitude lower than the previously reported production rates of imidazole or imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde. The molar absorptivity of 2,2'-biimidazole was determined to be (36 690 ± 998) M-1 cm-1. This demonstrates the necessity of molecular product identification at trace levels to enable a better understanding of relevant absorbing species. Additionally, the formation of lower polarity products including formamides of imidazoles is proposed. The role of imidazoles and other light-absorbing species in the formation of SOA and optical properties of SOA is discussed and potentially interesting fields for future investigations are outlined.

  5. Holographic Optical Elements Using Polyvinyl Carbazole Holographic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Kuwayamo, T.; Taniguchi, N.

    1986-06-01

    We developed a new holographic material: polyvinyl carbazore material. The advantage or the material over conventional DCC material is that it has high durability against humidity and transparency. Some optical properties of the material and some applications are presented. We have already installed the holographic display element using polyvinyl carbazole in a commercialized 8mm movie camera. The letters "END" are displayed on an imaging plane of the finder system by using an image plane hologram. We also present the holographic lens of which aberration is well corrected at laser diode wavelength. We made this holographic lens using a new aberration correcting method.

  6. Ultralight Weight Optical Systems Using Nano-Layered Synthesized Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie; Breckinridge, James

    2014-01-01

    Optical imaging is important for many NASA science missions. Even though complex optical systems have advanced, the optics, based on conventional glass and mirrors, require components that are thick, heavy and expensive. As the need for higher performance expands, glass and mirrors are fast approaching the point where they will be too large, heavy and costly for spacecraft, especially small satellite systems. NASA Langley Research Center is developing a wide range of novel nano-layered synthesized materials that enable the development and fabrication of ultralight weight optical device systems that enable many NASA missions to collect science data imagery using small satellites. In addition to significantly reducing weight, the nano-layered synthesized materials offer advantages in performance, size, and cost.

  7. A comparison of three preparations of cytochrome c oxidase. Optical absorbance spectra, EPR spectra and reaction towards ligands.

    PubMed

    Lodder, A L; van Gelder, B F

    1994-06-28

    Three preparations of cytochrome c oxidase, the preparation as traditionally prepared in our laboratory as described by Van Buuren (1992; PhD Thesis, University of Amsterdam), a preparation according to Volpe and Caughey (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 61 (1974) 502-509) and a preparation of 'fast' cytochrome c oxidase (Brandt, U., Schägger, H. and Von Jagow, G. (1989) Eur. J. Biochem. 182, 705-711), are compared in their reaction with cyanide and carbon monoxide. The reaction with cyanide is nearly as fast for the Van Buuren preparation as for the 'fast' preparation, but much slower for the Volpe-Caughey preparation. Mixed-valence cytochrome c oxidase (cytochrome a3 and CuB reduced with carbon monoxide bound and cytochrome a and CuA oxidized) is prepared by anaerobic incubation with carbon monoxide. With the Van Buuren preparation complete formation of the species takes 4 h, whereas with the Volpe-Caughey preparation it takes 20 h. Longer incubation under CO results in partial reduction of cytochrome a and CuA. With the 'fast' preparation mixed-valence cytochrome c oxidase is formed after more than one day of incubation with CO, but it is stable for at least 3 days. The presence of oxidized cytochrome c did enhance the reactivity towards cyanide and towards carbon monoxide in cytochrome c oxidase of all three preparations. Furthermore, optical and EPR spectra of the preparations of cytochrome c oxidase are compared. The Volpe-Caughey preparation has an intense g' = 12 EPR-signal, the Van Buuren preparation has hardly any g' = 12 signal and the 'fast' preparation has no g' = 12 signal. In the 'fast' preparation the low-spin heme signal is shifted (from g = 3.00 to g = 2.97). The absorbance spectra of the three preparations in the Soret region are similar with a maximum at 424 nm. Only the 'fast' preparation as isolated was completely oxidized, whereas the other preparations were partially reduced. It was concluded that differences in the reaction of cytochrome c

  8. All-optical implementation of ASCII by use of nonlinear material for optical encoding of necessary symbols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Shantanu K.; Mukhopadhyay, Sourangshu

    2005-06-01

    We propose a simple all-optical technique for digital encoding of ASCII. The method accommodates a digital encoding system by using the optical tree architecture and a nonlinear-material-based optical switching operation.

  9. Optical fiber sensors for materials and structures characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, D. K.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The final technical report on Optical Fiber Sensors for Materials and Structures Characterization, covering the period August 1990 through August 1991 is presented. Research programs in the following technical areas are described; sapphire optical fiber sensors; vibration analysis using two-mode elliptical core fibers and sensors; extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer development; and coatings for fluorescent-based sensor. Research progress in each of these areas was substantial, as evidenced by the technical publications which are included as appendices.

  10. Nanorod Material Developed for Use as an Optical Sensor Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical sensors are becoming increasingly important in the development of new nonintrusive or embedded sensors. The use of light and material optical properties helps us measure unknown parameters such as temperature, pressure, flow, or chemical species. The focus of this work is to develop new nanostructure platforms upon which optical sensors can be constructed. These nanorods are synthesized oxides that form a base structure to which luminescent sensing dyes or dopants can be attached or embedded. The nanorod structure allows for a much greater open area than closed or polymer-based sensors do, enabling a much faster contact of the measured species with the luminescent sensor and, thus, a potentially faster measurement.

  11. Optical properties of plastic materials for medical vision applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanova, N. G.; Kasarova, S. N.; Nikolov, I. D.

    2012-12-01

    Several types of optical polymer materials suitable for ophthalmic or medical vision applications have been studied. We have measured refractive indices of studied plastics at various wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Important optical characteristics as Abbe numbers, dispersion coefficients and curves, principal and relative partial dispersion have been evaluated. Calculated refractometric data at many laser emission wavelengths used for medical surgery, therapy and diagnostics is included. As an example of a medical vision application of plastics, optical design of a micro-triplet for use in disposable endoscopes is presented.

  12. Fabrication and optical properties of pyrene-Eu hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Xu, Bo; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui

    2013-02-01

    Lanthanide-containing organic-inorganic hybrid materials have drawn much attention in the research of materials with multifunctional and modulated optical properties. Here, large area pyrene-Eu hybrid nanostructures constructed of a large amount of nanowires are successfully fabricated through physical vapor codeposition method at low temperature (77 K). Further optical property characterizations indicate that the pyrene-Eu hybrid nanostructures exhibit enhanced green light emission under blue light excitation compared with other fabricated samples (pyrene nanostructures, Eu nanoparticles, and pyrene/Cu hybrid nanostructures). The results indicate the occurrence of an energy transfer process from the sensitizing pyrene nanostructures to Eu. Pyrene-Eu hybrid nanostructures with unique photoluminescence properties may have promising applications in phosphors, light-emitting device, and UV-vis photo sensor. The results also prove that the physical vapor codeposition method is an effective way for design of organic-inorganic hybrid materials with controllable and tunable optical properties.

  13. Optical Properties of Fullerene-Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying

    In this dissertation I have presented results of my optical studies of fullerene-based solids: pristine solid C_{60}, alkali-metal (M) doped C_{60} rm(M_6C_{60}) and phototransformed C_{60}.. Raman scattering and infrared spectroscopy were used to study the vibrational modes and it was found that modes observed experimentally were intramolecular modes whose frequencies were found in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions for an isolated C_ {60} molecule. Weaker, numerous second -order IR and Raman scattering lines are observed, and are found to be very narrow, which also supports a molecular picture for solid C_{60}.. Doping C_{60} films with alkali metals up to the saturated stoichiometry rm M_6C_{60} produces a vibrational spectrum which is similar to pristine solid C_{60}. Furthermore, the rm M_6C_{60} Raman spectra are found insensitive to the mass and size of the particular ion (e.g., K, Rb, or Cs), indicating a weak coupling of the C_{60} ^{6-} and M^{+ } sublattices. The crystal field was observed to split the five-fold degenerate H_{ rm g} modes, however. Optical absorption/reflection spectroscopy for solid C_{60} in the ultra violet (UV), visible (vis) and infrared (IR) range were carried out on thin films on transparent substrates. Careful analysis of data have led to a quantitative determination of the dielectric function varepsilon(omega)= varepsilon_1(omega)+{rm i }varepsilon_2(omega) for C_{60} from 0.05-6 eV. The low frequency dielectric constant was found to be varepsilon_1(0) = 4.0, and an electronic absorption edge is observed at 1.7 eV, with three strong bands in the range 2-5 eV. Without the vibronic coupling between excited electronic and vibrational states, the parity selection rule would have forbidden transitions between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), and this 1.7 eV edge would not have been detected. Finally, results of studies of the phototransformation of solid C

  14. Enantiomeric analysis of beta-pinene and limonene by direct coupling of reversed phase liquid chromatography and gas chromatography using absorbents as packing materials.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gema; Ruiz del Castillo, Maria Luisa; Herraiz, Marta

    2007-11-01

    A method based on the use of absorbents as packing materials inside the interface of the online coupling between RPLC and GC is proposed for the enantiomeric analysis of beta-pinene and limonene in essential oils. For that purpose, a comparison of the RSD, detection limit and recovery provided by two absorbents and one adsorbent is included in this study. The results found in this work proved the validity of absorbents as packing materials in online RPLC-GC to determine minor compounds in complex matrices. In particular, PDMS seemed to be specially useful to analyse nonpolar compounds, such as beta-pinene and limonene, since it provided higher sensitivity for this kind of compounds. The developed method was applied to the evaluation of the natural and non-natural character of commercial essential oils by means of the determination of the enantiomeric composition of beta-pinene and limonene.

  15. Optimization of peak power of doubly Q-switched lasers with both an acousto-optic modulator and a Cr4+-doped saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dechun; Zhao Shengzhi; Li Guiqiu; Yang Kejian

    2006-08-01

    A doubly Q-switched laser can obtain a shorter pulse with a stable repetition rate and high pulse peak power, which has been experimentally proved. By taking into account the Gaussian spatial distributions of the intracavity photon density and the initial population-inversion density as well as the influence of the acousto-optic (AO) Q switch, we introduce the coupled rate equations for a doubly Q-switched laser with both an AO modulator and a Cr4+-doped saturable absorber. These coupled rate equations are solved numerically. The key parameters of an optimally coupled doubly Q-switched laser are determined based on maximizing the peak power, which include the optimal normalized coupling parameter, the optimal normalized saturable absorber parameters, and the normalized parameters of the AO Q switch. The optimal normalized peak power, the corresponding normalized energy, and the normalized pulse width are also given, and a group of general curves are generated for the first time to our knowledge. The curves can give us a good understanding of the dependence of the optimal key parameters on the parameters of the gain medium, the saturable absorber, the AO Q switch, the resonator, and the spatial distributions of the intracavity photon density. The optimal calculations for a diode-pumped Nd3+:YVO4 laser with both an AO modulator and a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber are presented to demonstrate the use of the curves and the related formulas.

  16. Study of the antifungal potential of novel cellulose/copper composites as absorbent materials for fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Amparo; Lloret, Elsa; Picouet, Pierre; Fernandez, Avelina

    2012-08-17

    Cellulose/copper composites with antifungal properties have been synthesized by physical/chemical methods. Physical treatments by heat or by a combination of heat and UV radiation provided composites with metallic copper and excellent interfacial adhesion; in contrast, chemical reduction with borohydride generated small although partially aggregated copper oxide nanoparticles. Copper micro/nano-particles and copper ions (Cu(2+)) were released from the cellulose matrix at an adequate rate to achieve a strong antimicrobial activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae in in vitro experiments. Moreover, the copper oxide composites showed an excellent antifungal activity in pineapple and melon juice, reducing about 4 log cycles the loads of spoilage-related yeasts and moulds. The metallic copper composites reduced in 4 log cycles the load of yeasts and moulds in pineapple juice, although their antifungal activity was weaker in contact with melon juice. Copper loaded absorbent materials could be selectively implemented during the shelf-life of minimally processed fruits to reduce the number of spoilage-related microorganisms in the drip.

  17. Evaluation of absorbed dose in irradiated sugar-containing plant material (peony roots) by an ESR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between electron spin resonance (ESR) signal intensity of irradiated plant materials and sugar content was investigated by spectral analysis using peony roots. A weak background signal near g=2.005 was observed in the roots. After a 10 kGy irradiation, the ESR line broadened and the intensity increased, and the spectral characteristics were similar to a typical spectrum of irradiated food containing crystalline sugars. The free radical concentration was nearly stable 30 days after irradiation. The spectrum of peony root 30 days after irradiation was simulated using the summation of the intensities of six assumed components: radical signals derived from (a) sucrose, (b) glucose, (c) fructose, (d) cellulose, (e) the background signal near g=2.005 and (f) unidentified component. The simulated spectra using the six components were in agreement with the observed sample spectra. The intensity of sucrose radical signal in irradiated samples increased proportionally up to 20 kGy. In addition, the intensity of sucrose radical signals was strongly correlated with the sucrose contents of the samples. The results showed that the radiation sensitivity of sucrose in peony roots was influenced little by other plant constituents. There was also a good correlation between the total area of the spectra and the sucrose content, because the sucrose content was higher than that of other sugars in the samples. In peony roots, estimation of the absorbed dose from the ESR signal intensity may be possible by a calibration method based on the sucrose content.

  18. Long-duration orbital effects on optical coating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzig, Howard; Toft, Albert R.; Fleetwood, Charles M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    We flew specimens of eight different optical coating materials in low earth orbit as part of the Long Duration Exposure Facility manifest to determine their ability to withstand exposure to the residual atomic 0 and other environmental effects at those altitudes. We included samples of Al, Au, Ir, Os, Pt, Al + MgF2, Al + SiO(x), and chemical-vapor-deposited SiC, representing reflective optical applications from the vacuum ultraviolet through the visible portions of the spectrum. We found that the majority of the materials suffered sufficient reflectance degradation to warrant careful consideration in the design of future space-flight instrumentation.

  19. A new method to retrieve spectral absorption coefficient of highly-scattering and weakly-absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.

    2016-03-01

    A significant uncertainty in the absorption coefficient of highly scattering dispersed materials is typical in the spectral ranges of very weak absorption. The traditional way to identify the main absorption and scattering characteristics of semi-transparent materials is based on spectral measurements of normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance for the material sample. Unfortunately this way cannot be used in the case of in vivo measurements of optical properties of biological tissues. A method suggested in the present paper is based on thermal response to the periodic radiative heating of the open surface of a semi-transparent material. It is shown that the period of a variation of the surface temperature is sensitive to the value of an average absorption coefficient in the surface layer. As a result, the monochromatic external irradiation combined with the surface temperature measurements can be used to retrieve the spectral values of absorption coefficient. Possible application of this method to porous semi-transparent ceramics is considered. An example problem is also solved to illustrate the applicability of this method to human skin. The approach suggested enables one to estimate an average absorption coefficient of human skin of a patient just before the thermal processing.

  20. Optical fiber sensors for characterization of materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, Richard O.; Murphy, Kent A.

    1994-08-01

    Optical fiber systems have been developed during the past twenty-five years for primary applications in the high speed digital communication of information. Using much of the same rapidly-developing technology optical fiber sensor systems have been developed during the past fifteen years for the measurement of a wide range of physical observables and applications in aerospace and hydrospace, civil structures and biomedical instrumentation systems. The major advantage of optical fiber sensor methods over conventional sensor systems is the all-dielectric nature of the fiber and the intrinsic avoidance of electromagnetic interference and ground loops that plague wire and metal-based sensing networks. For physical property measurements in smart materials where actuator elements and arrays are driven by high voltage electrical signals, such immunity is especially important. Another major advantage is the operation of fiber sensors above the temperatures at which most conventional sensor instrumentation will not operate. Such operation allows the use of properly designed fiber sensors in situ for the analysis of the fabrication conditions of smart materials, as well as their performance in high temperature environments. Sensor elements incorporated into the material during fabrication may in some cases be used for material evaluation post processing. This paper briefly suggests the use of such optical fiber sensor elements during the fabrication, inservice lifetimes and damage and degradation phases of smart material and structural systems.

  1. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 6th ASTM Symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1975-03-01

    The Sixth ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado on 22-23 May 1974. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard thirty-one papers on topics relating to laser induced damage in crystalline and nonlinear optical materials, at dielectric surfaces, and in thin film coatings as well as discussions of damage problems in the ir region due both to cw and pulsed irradiation. In addition, several reports on the theoretical analysis of laser-materials interaction relative to the damage progress were given, along with tabulations of fundamental materials properties of importance in evaluation of optical material response to high-power laser radiation. Attention was given to high-power laser system design considerations that relate to improved system performance and reliability when various damage mechanisms are operable in such systems. A workshop on the machining of optics was held, and nine papers on various facets of the topic were presented dealing with machining procedures, surface characterization of machined elements, coating of machined components, and the polishing and damage resistance of polished, coated, and bare metal reflectors. PMID:20134954

  2. Laser-assisted manufacturing of micro-optical volume elements for enhancing the amount of light absorbed by solar cells in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peharz, Gerhard; Kuna, Ladislav; Leiner, Claude

    2015-03-01

    The laser-generation of micro-optical volume elements is a promising approach to decrease the optical shadowing of front side metal contacts of solar cells. Focusing a femtosecond laser beam into the volume of the encapsulation material causes a local modification its optical constants. Suchlike fabricated micro-optical elements can be used to decrease the optical shadowing of the front side metallization of c-Si solar cells. Test samples comprising of a sandwich structure of a glass sheet with metallic grid-lines, an Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant and another glass sheet were manufactured in order to investigate the optical performance of the volume optics. Transmission measurements show that the shadowing of the metalling grid-lines is substantially decreased by the micro-optical volume elements created in the EVA bulk right above the grid-fingers. A detailed investigation of the optical properties of these volume elements was performed: (i) experimentally on the basis of goniometric measurements, as well as (ii) theoretically by applying optical modelling and optimization procedures. This resulted in a better understanding of the effectiveness of the optical volume elements in decreasing the optical shadowing of metal grid lines on the active cell surfaces. Moreover, results of photovoltaic mini-modules with incorporated micro-optical volume elements are presented. Results of optical simulation and Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) experiments show that the losses due to the grid fingers can be reduced by about 50%, when using this fs-laser structuring approach for the fabrication of micro-optical volume elements in the EVA material.

  3. Optical Waveguide Solar Energy System for Lunar Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, T.; Case, J. A.; Senior, C. L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses results of our work on development of the Optical Waveguide (OW) Solar Energy System for Lunar Materials Processing. In the OW system as shown, solar radiation is collected by the concentrator which transfers the concentrated solar radiation to the OW transmission line consisting of low-loss optical fibers. The OW line transmits the solar radiation to the thermal reactor of the lunar materials processing plant. The feature of the OW system are: (1) Highly concentrated solar radiation (up to 104 suns) can be transmitted via flexible OW lines directly into the thermal reactor for materials processing: (2) Solar radiation intensity or spectra can be tailored to specific materials processing steps; (3) Provide solar energy to locations or inside of enclosures that would not otherwise have an access to solar energy; and (4) The system can be modularized and can be easily transported to and deployed at the lunar base.

  4. Porphyrins as Second Order Nonlinear Optical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Homer

    Because of the unusually high thermal and chemical stability of porphyrins as well as their very large pi-conjugated systems, three classes of high beta-value push-pull porphyrins were synthesized and subsequently successfully engineered into Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films for a systematic evaluation of porphyrins as chi^{(2)} materials. Class I explored the effects of the number of donor-acceptor groups on the porphyrin periphery (i.e., H_2(an_3P), H_2 (cis-a_2n_2P), H_2(a_3nP), H _2(a_4P) where a = 4-(N-octadecylamido)phenyl or 4-(N-octadecyl-amino)phenyl; n = 4-nitrophenyl; P = 5,10,15,20 substituted tetraarylporphyrinate (2-).). Class II examined the effect of varying the strength of cis-substituted donor-acceptor pairs on the porphyrin periphery (i.e., H_2(cis-a_2n _2P), H_2(cis-c _2p_2P), and H_2 (cis-h_2py_2P) where c = 4-(2-cholesteryloxy)-ethoxyphenyl; h = 4-hydroxyphenyl or 4-methoxyphenyl; and py = 4-pyridyl or 4-(N-octadecyl) pyridiniumyl). Class III looked at the respone of a heterosubstituted bis- push-pull cerium sandwich porphyrin complex, (Ce ^{IV}(TPyP)(TMeP)) ^{4+}I_4 (where Py = 4-(N-octadecyl)pyridiniumyl and Me = 4-methoxyphenyl). Characterization of the porphyrin LB films reveals rather surprising behavior. The isotherm data show that the mean molecular area of the porphyrins increase smoothly from 80-200A as the number of aliphatic chains increase around the porphyrin periphery from one to four. In addition, based on UV-visible linear dichroism, all of the porphyrin films possess C _{infty v} symmetry and adopt a tilt angle, theta, of about 33^circ with respect to the fused quartz substrate. The proposed fixed orientation model suggests that the interporphyrin pi -pi interactions dominate the porphyrin orientation while the number of aliphatic chains around the porphyrin periphery determines the porphyrin's packing density in the LB film. After these monolayers were transferred to fused quartz substrates, the chi^{(2)} response of these

  5. [Study on optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in rainwater by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and absorbance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-yue; Guo, Wei-dong; Long, Ai-min; Chen, Shao-yong

    2010-09-01

    The optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were determined in rain samples collected in Xiamen Island, during a rainy season in 2007, using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy associated with UV-Vis absorbance spectra. Results showed that the absorbance spectra of CDOM in rain samples decreased exponentially with wavelength. The absorbance coefficient at 300 nm [a(300)] ranged from 0.27 to 3.45 m(-1), which would be used as an index of CDOM abundance, and the mean value was 1.08 m(-1). The content of earlier stage of precipitation events was higher than that of later stage of precipitation events, which implied that anthropogenic sources or atmospheric pollution or air mass types were important contributors to CDOM levels in precipitation. EEMs spectra showed 4 types of fluorescence signals (2 humic-like fluorescence peaks and 2 protein-like fluorescence peaks) in rainwater samples, and there were significant positive correlations of peak A with C and peak B with S, showing their same sources or some relationship of the two humic-like substance and the two protein-like substance. The strong positive correlations of the two humic-like fluorescence peaks with a(300), suggested that the chromophores responsible for absorbance might be the same as fluorophores responsible for fluorescence. Results showed that the presence of highly absorbing and fluorescing CDOM in rainwater is of significant importance in atmospheric chemistry and might play a previously unrecognized role in the wavelength dependent spectral attenuation of solar radiation by atmospheric waters.

  6. Probing Magnetic Materials Using Synchrotron Radiation and Phase Retarding Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jonathan

    2007-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool in the study of magnetic materials. The utility of x-ray measurements arises from the fact that the resonant and polarization properties observed near core-level resonances probe the valence-electron spin and orbital properties in an element specific manner. Critical to enabling such studies, however, has been the ability to easily manipulate the polarization of the x-ray beam. Circularly polarized x-rays pay a particularly important role, due to their coupling to the net ferromagnetic moment in a material. This talk will focus on how phase retarding optical elements can be used to tailor the focus on how phase retarding optical elements can be used to tailor the x-ray beam polarization in order to enable various types of magnetic measurements. Examples of magnetic spectroscopy, scattering, and imaging measurements employing such optics will be presented.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Rational design of organic electro-optic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, L. R.

    2003-05-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations are used to optimize the molecular first hyperpolarizability of organic chromophores and statistical mechanical calculations are used to optimize the translation of molecular hyperpolarizability to macroscopic electro-optic activity (to values of greater than 100 pm V-1 at telecommunications wavelengths). Macroscopic material architectures are implemented exploiting new concepts in nanoscale architectural engineering. Multi-chromophore-containing dendrimers and dendronized polymers not only permit optimization of electro-optic activity but also of auxiliary properties including optical loss (both absorption and scattering), thermal and photochemical stability and processability. New reactive ion etching and photolithographic techniques permit the fabrication of three-dimensional optical circuitry and the integration of that circuitry with semiconductor very-large-scale integration electronics and silica fibre optics. Electro-optic devices have been fabricated exploiting stripline, cascaded prism and microresonator device structures. Sub-1 V drive voltages and operational bandwidths of greater than 100 GHz have been demonstrated. Both single-and double-ring microresonators have been fabricated for applications such as active wavelength division multiplexing. Free spectral range values of 1 THz and per channel modulation bandwidths of 15 GHz have been realized permitting single-chip data rates of 500 Gb s-1. Other demonstrated devices include phased array radar, optical gyroscopes, acoustic spectrum analysers, ultrafast analog/digital converters and ultrahigh bandwidth signal generators.

  8. Optical supercavitation in soft matter.

    PubMed

    Conti, C; DelRe, E

    2010-09-10

    We investigate theoretically, numerically, and experimentally nonlinear optical waves in an absorbing out-of-equilibrium colloidal material at the gelification transition. At a sufficiently high optical intensity, absorption is frustrated and light propagates into the medium. The process is mediated by the formation of a matter-shock wave due to optically induced thermodiffusion and largely resembles the mechanism of hydrodynamical supercavitation, as it is accompanied by a dynamic phase-transition region between the beam and the absorbing material.

  9. Are Extracted Materials Truly Representative of Original Samples? Impact of C18 Extraction on CDOM Optical and Chemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Andrea A; Del Vecchio, Rossana; Zhang, Yi; Subramaniam, Ajit; Blough, Neil V

    2016-01-01

    Some properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) can be easily measured directly on whole waters, while others require sample concentration and removal of natural salts. To increase CDOM content and eliminate salts, solid phase extraction (SPE) is often employed. Biases following extraction and elution are inevitable, thus raising the question of how truly representative the extracted material is of the original. In this context, we investigated the wavelength dependence of extraction efficiency for C18 cartridges with respect to CDOM optical properties using samples obtained from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) and the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean (EAO). Further, we compared the optical changes of C18 extracts and the corresponding whole water following chemical reduction with sodium borohydride (NaBH4). C18 cartridges preferentially extracted long-wavelength absorbing/emitting material for samples impacted by riverine input. Extraction efficiency overall decreased with offshore distance away from riverine input. Spectral slopes of C18-OM samples were also almost always lower than those of their corresponding CDOM samples supporting the preferential extraction of higher molecular weight absorbing material. The wavelength dependence of the optical properties (absorption, fluorescence emission, and quantum yield) of the original water samples and their corresponding extracted material were very similar. C18 extracts and corresponding water samples further exhibited comparable optical changes following NaBH4 reduction, thus suggesting a similarity in nature (structure) of the optically active extracted material, independent of geographical locale. Altogether, these data suggested a strong similarity between C18 extracts and corresponding whole waters, thus indicating that extracts are representative of the CDOM content of original waters.

  10. Are Extracted Materials Truly Representative of Original Samples? Impact of C18 Extraction on CDOM Optical and Chemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Andrea A.; Del Vecchio, Rossana; Zhang, Yi; Subramaniam, Ajit; Blough, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Some properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) can be easily measured directly on whole waters, while others require sample concentration and removal of natural salts. To increase CDOM content and eliminate salts, solid phase extraction (SPE) is often employed. Biases following extraction and elution are inevitable, thus raising the question of how truly representative the extracted material is of the original. In this context, we investigated the wavelength dependence of extraction efficiency for C18 cartridges with respect to CDOM optical properties using samples obtained from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) and the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean (EAO). Further, we compared the optical changes of C18 extracts and the corresponding whole water following chemical reduction with sodium borohydride (NaBH4). C18 cartridges preferentially extracted long-wavelength absorbing/emitting material for samples impacted by riverine input. Extraction efficiency overall decreased with offshore distance away from riverine input. Spectral slopes of C18-OM samples were also almost always lower than those of their corresponding CDOM samples supporting the preferential extraction of higher molecular weight absorbing material. The wavelength dependence of the optical properties (absorption, fluorescence emission, and quantum yield) of the original water samples and their corresponding extracted material were very similar. C18 extracts and corresponding water samples further exhibited comparable optical changes following NaBH4 reduction, thus suggesting a similarity in nature (structure) of the optically active extracted material, independent of geographical locale. Altogether, these data suggested a strong similarity between C18 extracts and corresponding whole waters, thus indicating that extracts are representative of the CDOM content of original waters. PMID:26904536

  11. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  12. 3D Printing Optical Engine for Controlling Material Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chang, Kuang-Po; Wu, Ping-Han; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Ching-Chih; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Horng, Ji-Bin; Tsau, Fang-Hei

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during melting and resolidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure and consequently the resuling property. However, the cooling rate of a selective laser melting (SLM) production is restricted by a preset optimal parameter of a good dense product. The head room for locally manipulating material property in a process is marginal. In this study, we invent an Optical Engine for locally controlling material microstructure in a SLM process. It develops an invovative method to control and adjust thermal history of the solidification process to gain desired material microstucture and consequently drastically improving the quality. Process parameters selected locally for specific materials requirement according to designed characteristics by using thermal dynamic principles of solidification process. It utilize a technique of complex laser beam shape of adaptive irradiation profile to permit local control of material characteristics as desired. This technology could be useful for industrial application of medical implant, aerospace and automobile industries.

  13. Precise dispersion equations of absorbing filter glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichel, S.; Biertümpfel, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The refractive indices versus wavelength of optical transparent glasses are measured at a few wavelengths only. In order to calculate the refractive index at any wavelength, a so-called Sellmeier series is used as an approximation of the wavelength dependent refractive index. Such a Sellmeier representation assumes an absorbing free (= loss less) material. In optical transparent glasses this assumption is valid since the absorption of such transparent glasses is very low. However, optical filter glasses have often a rather high absorbance in certain regions of the spectrum. The exact description of the wavelength dependent function of the refractive index is essential for an optimized design for sophisticated optical applications. Digital cameras use an IR cut filter to ensure good color rendition and image quality. In order to reduce ghost images by reflections and to be nearly angle independent absorbing filter glass is used, e.g. blue glass BG60 from SCHOTT. Nowadays digital cameras improve their performance and so the IR cut filter needs to be improved and thus the accurate knowledge of the refractive index (dispersion) of the used glasses must be known. But absorbing filter glass is not loss less as needed for a Sellmeier representation. In addition it is very difficult to measure it in the absorption region of the filter glass. We have focused a lot of effort on measuring the refractive index at specific wavelength for absorbing filter glass - even in the absorption region. It will be described how to do such a measurement. In addition we estimate the use of a Sellmeier representation for filter glasses. It turns out that in most cases a Sellmeier representation can be used even for absorbing filter glasses. Finally Sellmeier coefficients for the approximation of the refractive index will be given for different filter glasses.

  14. Optical materials technology for energy efficiency and solar energy conversion XI: Selective materials, concentrators and reflectors, transparent insulation and superwindows; Proceedings of the Meeting, Toulouse, France, May 18, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot-Le Goff, Anne; Granqvist, Claes-Goran; Lampert, Carl M.

    1992-11-01

    The present conference discusses selective solar absorbers (SAs), selectively transmitting materials, solar concentrators and reflectors, and transparent insulators and superwindows. Attention is given to SAs produced through substituted magnetite-based coatings, the properties of spectrally selective Nb films, a Co-Cd solar-selective black coating, regular and random surface microstructures as antireflection coatings for solar absorbers, and the optical and electrical properties of doped RF-sputtered SnO(x) films. Also treated are the role of suspected films in insulated glass units, the optical properties of angle-dependent light-control film, LED nonimaging optics, combined optics for light concentration and trapping in photovoltaics, bulk and surface light-scattering from transparent silica aerogel, evacuated glazing, and a phase-diffractive coating for daylight control. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  15. Evaluation of material dispersion using a nanosecond optical pulse radiator.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, M; Ohmori, Y; Miya, T

    1979-07-01

    To study the material dispersion effects on graded-index fibers, a method for measuring the material dispersion in optical glass fibers has been developed. Nanosecond pulses in the 0.5-1.7-microm region are generated by a nanosecond optical pulse radiator and grating monochromator. These pulses are injected into a GeO(2)-P(2)0(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber. Relative time delay changes between different wavelengths are used to determine material dispersion, core glass refractive index, material group index, and optimum profile parameter of the graded-index fiber. From the measured data, the optimum profile parameter on the GeO(2)-P(2)O(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber could be estimated to be 1.88 at 1.27 microm of the material dispersion free wavelength region and 1.82 at 1.55 microm of the lowest-loss wavelength region in silica-based optical fiber waveguides.

  16. Optical Properties of Selective Emitter Materials for Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of new "selective emitter" materials for possible use in high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic power systems. These are systems which directly convert heat to radiation at a wavelength closely matched to the bandgap energy of the solar cell. Candidate materials which have strong absorption lines fairly close to the bandgap of good solar-cell materials were chosen for study. Their emittance was measured as a function of wavelength to evaluate their promise as selective TPV emitters. Useful and informative results were obtained. Some of these results were presented at a January 1996 solar energy conference of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  17. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  18. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 7th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1976-06-01

    The Seventh ERDA-ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, on 29-31 July 1975. These Symposia are held as part of the activities in ASTM Subcommittee II on Lasers and Laser Materials, which is charged with the responsibilities of formulating standards and test procedures for laser materials, components, and devices. The Chairman of Subcommittee II is Haynes Lee, of Owens-Illinois, Inc. Co-chairmen for the Damage Symposia are Arthur Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory and Alexander J. Glass of Law-rence Livermore Laboratory. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard forty-five papers on topics relating fabrication procedures to laser induced damage in optical materials; on metal mirrors; in ir window materials; the multipulse, wavelength, and pulse length dependence of damage thresholds; damage in dielectric films and at exposed surfaces; as well as theoretical discussions on avalanche ionization and multiphoton processes of importance at shorter wavelengths. Of particular importance were the scaling relations developed from several parametric studies relating fundamental properties (refractive index, surface roughness etc.) to the damage threshold. This year many of the extrinsic influences tending to reduce a materials damage resistance were isolated such that measures of their egregious nature could be quantified. Much still needs to be accomplished to improve processing and fabrication procedures to allow a measurable approach to a materials intrinsic strength to be demonstrated.

  19. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  20. Highly Non-Linear Optical (NLO) organic crystals and films. Electrooptical organic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Samuel P.; Rosenberger, Franz; Matthews, John

    1987-01-01

    Devices employing nonlinear optics (NLO) hold great promise for important applications in integrated optics, optical information processing and telecommunications. Properly designed organics possess outstanding optical and electrooptical properties which will substantially advance many technologies including electrooptical switching, optical amplification for communications, and parallel processing for hybrid optical computers. A brief comparison of organic and inorganic materials is given.

  1. Programmable multiport optical circuits in opaque scattering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Simon R.; Huisman, Thomas J.; Wolterink, Tom A. W.; Mosk, Allard P.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2015-02-01

    We propose and experimentally verify a method to program the effective transmission matrix of general multiport linear optical circuits in random multiple-scattering materials by phase modulation of incident wavefronts. We demonstrate the power of our method by programming linear optical circuits in white paint layers with 2 inputs and 2 outputs, and 2 inputs and 3 outputs. Using interferometric techniques we verify our ability to program any desired phase relation between the outputs. The method works in a deterministic manner and can be directly applied to existing wavefront-shaping setups without the need of measuring a transmission matrix or to rely on sensitive interference measurements.

  2. Programmable multiport optical circuits in opaque scattering materials.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Simon R; Huisman, Thomas J; Wolterink, Tom A W; Mosk, Allard P; Pinkse, Pepijn W H

    2015-02-01

    We propose and experimentally verify a method to program the effective transmission matrix of general multiport linear optical circuits in random multiple-scattering materials by phase modulation of incident wavefronts. We demonstrate the power of our method by programming linear optical circuits in white paint layers with 2 inputs and 2 outputs, and 2 inputs and 3 outputs. Using interferometric techniques we verify our ability to program any desired phase relation between the outputs. The method works in a deterministic manner and can be directly applied to existing wavefront-shaping setups without the need of measuring a transmission matrix or to rely on sensitive interference measurements.

  3. Controllable optical black hole in left-handed materials.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qiang; Chen, Jing; Shen, Nian-Hai; Cheng, Chen; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2010-02-01

    Halting and storing light by infinitely decelerating its speed, in the absence of any form of external control, is extremely di+/-cult to imagine. Here we present a theoretical prediction of a controllable optical black hole composed of a planar left-handed material slab. We reveal a criterion that the effective round-trip propagation length in one zigzag path is zero, which brings light to a complete standstill. Both theory and ab initio simulation demonstrate that this optical black hole has degrees flexible controllability for the speed of light. Surprisingly, the ab initio simulations reveal that our scheme has degrees flexible controllability for swallowing, holding, and releasing light. PMID:20174039

  4. Anomalous nonlinear absorption in epsilon-near-zero materials: optical limiting and all-optical control.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, M A; de Ceglia, D; Scalora, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We investigate nonlinear absorption in films of epsilon-near-zero materials. The combination of large local electric fields at the fundamental frequency and material losses at the harmonic frequencies induce unusual intensity-dependent phenomena. We predict that the second-order nonlinearity of a low-damping, epsilon-near-zero slab produces an optical limiting effect that mimics a two-photon absorption process. Anomalous absorption profiles that depend on low permittivity values at the pump frequency are also predicted for third-order nonlinearities. These findings suggest new opportunities for all-optical light control and novel ways to design reconfigurable and tunable nonlinear devices.

  5. Space optical materials and space qualification of optics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Robert R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference on space optical materials discusses current metals and nonmetals-related processing R&D efforts, investigations of space optical effects, and the spaceborne qualification of optical components and systems. Attention is given to CVD SiC for optical applications, optical materials for space-based lasers, the high-efficiency acoustooptic and optoelectronic crystalline material Tl3AsSe3, HIPed Be for low-scatter cryogenic optics, durable solar-reflective surfacing for Be optics, thermal effects on Be mirrors, contamination effects on optical surfaces in the monolayer regime, and IR background signature survey experiment results. Also discussed are the contamination-control program for the EUE instrument, an optical multipass radiation system for the heating of levitated samples, optical sample-position sensing for electrostatic levitation, and the qualification of space lighting systems.

  6. Space optical materials and space qualification of optics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Robert R.

    1989-10-01

    The present conference on space optical materials discusses current metals and nonmetals-related processing R&D efforts, investigations of space optical effects, and the spaceborne qualification of optical components and systems. Attention is given to CVD SiC for optical applications, optical materials for space-based lasers, the high-efficiency acoustooptic and optoelectronic crystalline material Tl3AsSe3, HIPed Be for low-scatter cryogenic optics, durable solar-reflective surfacing for Be optics, thermal effects on Be mirrors, contamination effects on optical surfaces in the monolayer regime, and IR background signature survey experiment results. Also discussed are the contamination-control program for the EUE instrument, an optical multipass radiation system for the heating of levitated samples, optical sample-position sensing for electrostatic levitation, and the qualification of space lighting systems.

  7. Polymer materials as modified optical fiber cladding for chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianming

    An intrinsic fiber optic chemical sensor has been designed and developed by using a polymer material as a modified fiber cladding. The sensor is constructed by replacing a certain portion of the original cladding with a chemically sensitive material, specifically, polyaniline or polypyrrole. Both the light absorption coefficient and the refractive index of the polymers change upon the exposure to different chemical vapors. These changes induce the optical intensity modulation of the fiber optic sensor. Polyaniline or polypyrrole is coated as the modified cladding by either spin-cast or in-situ deposition method for sensing HCl, NH3, H 2O2, and H4N2 vapors. All sensors show rapid and strong response to the chemical vapors. Thus, these sensors demonstrate that polyaniline and polypyrrole are viable candidate materials for the detection of volatile toxic gases. Sensors exhibit better performance when correct parameters, such as modification area, in-situ deposition time, and spin-rate, are used in the cladding modification process. The reversibility of the sensor depends on the reaction between the modified cladding material and the chemical vapors. Polyaniline cladding has better reversibility than polypyrrole. The optimized sensor response and sensitivity can be achieved by selecting an incident light with suitable wavelength, power, and incident angle.

  8. Optically stimulated luminescence: Searching for new dosimetric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, E. M.; Yukihara, E. G.

    2006-09-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is increasingly being used as a dosimetric technique in various fields such as medical, environmental and space dosimetry, and sediment and archaeological dating. Nevertheless few compounds are suitable as OSL materials. In this work, a survey was made of various insulators, searching for candidates for new OSL dosimeters. Natural and synthetic crystals and glasses from numerous sources are included. Luminescence was stimulated with blue LEDs (470 nm) and with IR laser (830 nm) provided by an automatic reader. Irradiation was performed with a 90Sr/ 90Y beta source, and the emitted light was measured with a photomultiplier tube, protected with suitable optical filters. Thermoluminescence (TL) of the samples was also measured, with the same equipment, to evaluate the thermal and optical stability of the defects related to OSL and TL. Among the various investigated materials, Al 2O 3:Cr, Mg, Fe, MgAl 2O 4 spinels, Mg 2SiO 4:Tb, and natural fluorite show potential as OSL dosimeters. Some materials, as barium aluminoborate glasses, although showing intense OSL signals, present a high fading at room temperature. In that situation the OSL signal is related to low temperature TL peaks that also fade at room temperature. None of the investigated materials was specially prepared to be used as an OSL dosimeter, which means that work can be done, mainly in the impurity nature and content, in order to improve OSL signals and to overcome some of the shortcomings that were noticed.

  9. Optical quantitation of absorbers in variously shaped turbid media based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law. A new approach to optical computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Y; Urakami, T

    1998-02-01

    To determine the concentrations of an absorber in variously shaped turbid media such as human tissue, we propose analytical expressions for diffuse re-emission in time and frequency domains, based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law that holds true when we trace a zigzag photon path in the medium. Our expressions are implicit for the scattering properties, the volume shape, and the source-detector separation. We show that three observables are sufficient to determine the changes in the concentration and the absolute concentrations of an absorber in scattering media as long as the scattering property remains constant. The three observables are: the re-emission, the mean pathlength or group delay, and the extinction coefficient of the absorber. We also show that our equations can be extended to describe photon migration in nonuniform media. The validity of the predictions is confirmed by measuring a tissue-like phantom.

  10. Flexible transparent metal/polymer composite materials based on optical resonant laminate structures.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sudarshan; Choi, Jihoon; Porter, Lisa; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2013-05-22

    Suitable design of periodic metal/polymer composite materials is shown to facilitate resonant tunneling of light at absorbing wavelengths and to provide a means to significantly reduce optical absorption losses in polymer-based metallodielectric composite structures. The conditions for resonant tunneling are established based on the concept of "photonic band edge alignment" in 1D-periodic systems. For the particular case of a four-layer gold/polystyrene laminate structure, it is shown that the matching of the lower band edge of the 1D-periodic structure with the plasma frequency of the metal component facilitates the increase of optical transmission by about 500% as compared to monolithic film structures of equal total thickness. The effect of sheet thickness on the optical properties of thin metal films is determined and shown to be an important prerequisite for the reliable prediction of resonant metallodielectric structures. The resonant 1D-periodic metal/polymer heterostructures are shown to retain the flexural stability of the polymer matrix and thus could find application as flexible transparent conductors in areas such as "plastic electronics".

  11. Solar concentrator/absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Collector/energy converter, consisting of dual-slope optical concentrator and counterflow thermal energy absorber, is attached to multiaxis support structure. Efficient over wide range of illumination levels, device may be used to generate high temperature steam, serve as solar powered dryer, or power absorption cycle cooler.

  12. Optical materials technology for energy efficiency and solar energy conversion VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 18, 19, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, Carl M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in optical materials for energy conversion are discussed in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to transparent IR reflectors and large-area deposition technology; optical switching materials; holographic films and reflector technology; and absorbers, photovoltaics, and solar materials. Topics addressed include bendable Ag-based low-emissivity coating on glass, plasma oxidation of Ag and Zn in low-emissivity stacks, smart window coatings, improved colored-state reflectivity in lithiated WO3 films, photochromic and thermochromic pigments for solar absorbing-reflecting coatings, the design and optimization of holographic solar concentrators, the properties of black cobalt coatings, and interface states and Fermi-level pinning in CdSe thin-film solar cells.

  13. Diffused holographic information storage and retrieval using photorefractive optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Deanna Kay

    Holography offers a tremendous opportunity for dense information storage, theoretically one bit per cubic wavelength of material volume, with rapid retrieval, of up to thousands of pages of information simultaneously. However, many factors prevent the theoretical storage limit from being reached, including dynamic range problems and imperfections in recording materials. This research explores new ways of moving closer to practical holographic information storage and retrieval by altering the recording materials, in this case, photorefractive crystals, and by increasing the current storage capacity while improving the information retrieved. As an experimental example of the techniques developed, the information retrieved is the correlation peak from an optical recognition architecture, but the materials and methods developed are applicable to many other holographic information storage systems. Optical correlators can potentially solve any signal or image recognition problem. Military surveillance, fingerprint identification for law enforcement or employee identification, and video games are but a few examples of applications. A major obstacle keeping optical correlators from being universally accepted is the lack of a high quality, thick (high capacity) holographic recording material that operates with red or infrared wavelengths which are available from inexpensive diode lasers. This research addresses the problems from two positions: find a better material for use with diode lasers, and reduce the requirements placed on the material while maintaining an efficient and effective system. This research found that the solutions are new dopants introduced into photorefractive lithium niobate to improve wavelength sensitivities and the use of a novel inexpensive diffuser that reduces the dynamic range and optical element quality requirements (which reduces the cost) while improving performance. A uniquely doped set of 12 lithium niobate crystals was specified and

  14. Microwave Processing for Advance Electro-Optic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, L.A.

    2000-06-01

    This project addressed the technical and scientific goals of developing new methods for the formation of striation-free single crystals of potassium tantalate niobate. This solid-solution system has the potential for serving as a general electro-optic material with a wide range of optical applications. The performance of the material is, however, severely limited by the effects of compositional inhomogeneity that is generally induced during the single crystal growth process due to the nature of the binary phase diagram of the mixed tantalatehiobate system. Single-crystal boules of potassium tantalate niobate (KTa{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 3} or KTN) with varying tantalum-to-niobium ratios (or values of x) were grown under a variety of experimental conditions. The resulting single crystals were characterized in terms of their compositional homogeneity and optical quality. Single crystals were grown using both the most-favorable established set of growth parameters as well as in the presence of programmed oscillatory temperature variations. The purpose of these deliberately induced variations was to introduce controlled compositional variations and associated optical striations in the solid-solution single crystals. The overall objective of the effort was to utilize microwave heating and processing methods to treat the inhomogeneous single crystals for the purpose of eliminating the compositional variations that lead to striations and the associated varying changes in the refractive index of the material. In order to realize the ultimate goal of the effort, it was necessary to develop methods that would lead to the effective coupling of the microwave field to the KTN single crystals. Achieving the technical and commercial goals of this effort would have made it possible to introduce an important new electro-optic product into the market place, to improve our fundamental understanding of solid-state diffusion processes in general (and of microwave-assisted thermal

  15. Light scattering by dust particles (PROGRA2 experiment): size and structure effects for transparent and absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.-B.; Lasue, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2007-08-01

    1- Introduction Cometary and possibly interplanetary dust particles seem to be mainly made of agglomerates of submicron and micron-sized grains. These particles are among the most primitive in our solar system. Regoliths on asteroidal and planetary surfaces seem to be loose materials produced by impinging meteorites on the surface of small bodies. Comparing their physical properties is thus fundamental to understand their evolution. To interpret remote observations of solar light scattered by dust particles and regoliths, it is necessary to use numerical and experimental simulations [1,2,3]. 2- PROGRA2 experiment PROGRA2 instruments are polarimeters; the light sources are two randomly polarized lasers (632.8 nm and 543.5 nm). Levitating particles (in microgravity or lifted by an air-draught) are studied by imaging polarimetry. Details on the instruments can be found in [4,5]. 3- Samples Two kinds of samples are studied: compact particles in the (1-400) micrometer size range and fluffy aggregates in the same size range, made from submicron and micronsized grains. The materials are transparent silica and absorbing carbon. Some deposited particles are huge agglomerates of micron-sized grains produced by random ballistic deposition of single grains [6,7] or produced by evaporation of mixtures in alcohol of fluffy aggregates of submicron-sized grains. Two samples are made of silica spheres coated by a carbonaceous black compound. Cometary analogues are mixtures of silica and amorphous carbon or Mg-Fe silicates mixed with amorphous carbon. 4- Results Phase curves and their main parameters (negative polarization at small phase angles and maximum polarization, Pmax, at 90-100° phase angle) for the different materials will be compared and related to the physical properties. For example, it is well known by numerical simulations and/or by experiments that the maximum polarization decreases when the size (submicrometer range) of the grains increases [2,8,9]. An inverse rule

  16. Image density property of optical information recording microcapsule material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Weidong; Li, Xiaowei; Li, Xinzheng; Fu, Guangsheng

    2009-05-01

    The microcapsules can act as novel optical functional material in which the optical recording substance such as color-forming substance, photoinitiator and prepolymer are encapsulated. In this paper, the microcapsules with average particle diameter of 300nm are prepared with interfacial polymerization method. The optical responding character of the microcapsule is analyzed based on IR spectra and image density technique. Results show that the microcapsule material encapsulated prepolymer TMPTA and photoinitiator Irgacure-ITX, TPO has thermal phase-change at 140°C, at which the penetrability of the microcapsule has the highest efficiency. With the increase of exposure time, the reduction in absorption intensities of the prepolymer TMPTA are observed at 1635cm-1 of C=C stretching and 898cm-1 of C-H stretching on the C=C molecular bond. Such a result can be ascribed to the double bond cleavage process of the prepolymer TMPTA is initiated by the optical-exposed photoinitiator, and superpolymer network is formed. The image density contrast between the unexposed and exposed microcapsule is enhanced with exposure time increased.

  17. Magnetomotive nanoparticle transducers for optical rheology of viscoelastic materials.

    PubMed

    Crecea, Vasilica; Oldenburg, Amy L; Liang, Xing; Ralston, Tyler S; Boppart, Stephen A

    2009-12-01

    The availability of a real-time non-destructive modality to interrogate the mechanical properties of viscoelastic materials would facilitate many new investigations. We introduce a new optical method for measuring elastic properties of samples which employs magnetite nanoparticles as perturbative agents. Magnetic nanoparticles distributed in silicone-based samples are displaced upon probing with a small external magnetic field gradient and depth-resolved optical coherence phase shifts allow for the tracking of scatterers in the sample with nanometer-scale sensitivity. The scatterers undergo underdamped oscillations when the magnetic field is applied step-wise, allowing for the measurement of the natural frequencies of oscillation of the samples. Validation of the measurements is accomplished using a commercial indentation apparatus to determine the elastic moduli of the samples. This real-time non-destructive technique constitutes a novel way of probing the natural frequencies of viscoelastic materials in which magnetic nanoparticles can be introduced.

  18. New lightweight x-ray optics: alternative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulinova, M.; Hudec, R.; Sik, J.; Lorenc, M.; Pina, L.; Semencova, V.

    2009-05-01

    Future space X-ray astronomy and astrophysics projects require accurate but light and high throughput multiple nested X-ray optics. The Czech Republic started being the full member of ESA in November, 2008 and the participant in the innovative technology developments for the new space mission represents the natural continuation of the efforts of the Czech team in development of innovative X-ray telescopes, focusing on particular demands and requirements of a concrete project, with emphasis on fully new and light-weight technologies. We will report not only on silicon or glass but also on other alternative materials such as SiC or glossy carbon, which could be considered as suitable materials for the producing of precise light weight X-ray optics due to their physical and chemical properties.

  19. Optical Sensors for Biomolecules Using Nanoporous Sol-Gel Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Jonathan; Zhou, Jing C.; Lan, Esther H.; Dunn, Bruce; Gillman, Patricia L.; Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An important consideration for space missions to Mars is the ability to detect biosignatures. Solid-state sensing elements for optical detection of biological entities are possible using sol-gel based biologically active materials. We have used these materials as optical sensing elements in a variety of bioassays, including immunoassays and enzyme assays. By immobilizing an appropriate biomolecule in the sol-gel sensing element, we have successfully detected analytes such as amino acids and hormones. In the case of the amino acid glutamate, the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase was the immobilized molecule, whereas in the case of the hormone cortisol, an anti-cortisol antibody was immobilized in the sensing element. In this previous work with immobilized enzymes and antibodies, excellent sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated in a variety of formats including bulk materials, thin films and fibers. We believe that the sol-gel approach is an attractive platform for bioastronautics sensing applications because of the ability to detect a wide range of entities such as amino acids, fatty acids, hopanes, porphyrins, etc. The sol-gel approach produces an optically transparent 3D silica matrix that forms around the biomolecule of interest, thus stabilizing its structure and functionality while allowing for optical detection. This encapsulation process protects the biomolecule and leads to a more "rugged" sensor. The nanoporous structure of the sol-gel matrix allows diffusion of small target molecules but keeps larger, biomolecules immobilized in the pores. We are currently developing these biologically active sol-gel materials into small portable devices for on-orbit cortisol detection

  20. Final Report: Imaging of Buried Nanoscale Optically Active Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-07-05

    This is a final report covering work done at University of Maryland to develop a Ballistic Electron Emission Luminescence (BEEL) microscope. This technique was intended to examine the carrier transport and photon emission in deeply buried optically-active layers and thereby provide a means for materials science to unmask the detailed consequences of experimentally controllable growth parameters, such as quantum dot size, statistics and orientation, and defect density and charge recombination pathways.

  1. Heating of optical materials by pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, E. I.; Sakyan, A. S.; Starchenko, Aleksey N.; Goryachkin, Dmitri A.

    1998-12-01

    The results are presented on experimental investigations of action onto an optical glass BK-7 and some other materials of a CO2 laser radiation with the pulse duration of 20 - 70 microsecond(s) and the energy density of 0.1 - 3 J/cm2. The dynamics of a thermal response, temperature of heating and emissivity of irradiated glass samples are under consideration. The results obtained can be used in imaging techniques for objects selection.

  2. Advances in optical property measurements of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the instruments and experimental approaches, used for measuring the optical properties of thermal control systems, are presented. The instruments' use in studies concerning the effects of combined contaminants and space environment on these materials, and in the qualification of hardware for spacecraft, are described. Instruments for measuring the solar absorptance and infrared emittance offer improved speed, accuracy and data handling. A transient method for directly measuring material infrared emittance is described. It is shown that oxygen exposure before measuring the solar absorptance should be avoided.

  3. Towards 3-D laser nano patterning in polymer optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Patricia J.; Perrie, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Progress towards 3-D subsurface structuring of polymers using femtosecond lasers is presented. Highly localised refractive index changes can be generated deep in transparent optical polymers without pre doping for photosensitisation or post processing by annealing. Understanding the writing conditions surpasses the limitations of materials, dimensions and chemistry, to facilitate unique structures entirely formed by laser-polymeric interactions to overcome materials, dimensional, refractive index and wavelength constraints.. Numerical aperture, fluence, temporal pulselength, wavelength and incident polarisation are important parameters to be considered, in achieving the desired inscription. Non-linear aspects of multiphoton absorption, plasma generation, filamentation and effects of incident polarisation on the writing conditions will be presented.

  4. Optical/Dielectric Properties of Inhomogeneous Optical Material: A New Method of Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, C. L.; Lamb, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    A new method, based on Effective mean Field Theory, is proposed for the evaluation of the optical/dielectric properties of inhomogeneous materials, in which the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function are determined by solving a simultaneous non-linear equation.

  5. Material selection for lightweight optical components in fieldable military optical test set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell E.; Ahmad, Anees; Lewis, George R.; George, Gene

    1994-10-01

    Material selection and suitable low cost manufacturing processes for production of rugged man-portable lightweight optical test set components are described. Field requirements for an ultra lightweight optical test set comprised of an off-axis two mirror collimator plus source and detector optics mandated selection of extremely stable materials. The requirements include temporal, thermal and mechanical performance suitable for portable and transportable military applications. The environmental stability requirement includes operating over a temperature range of 130 degrees fahrenheit. Also military shock and vibration requirements for transportable equipment are imposed on the entire test set. The total weight budget is 5 pounds for the mirrors and the large supporting structure. The structure volume is only about 1% of the occupied space. A near-net fabrication process such as casting or HIP fabrication was required. A comparison of materials and manufacturing methods has resulted in the selection of a hypereutectic aluminum alloy containing 23% by weight silicon with stabilizing elements. This material can be cast and heat treated to produce uniform properties at low cost. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is much lower than other aluminum alloys and the modulus of elasticity is 50% higher. The alloy was machined with conventional tools and plated with nickel phosphorous of the same CTE to produce stable optics.

  6. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 5. Optical materials. Part 3. Applications, coatings, and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes the uses, coatings, and fabrication of laser materials. Topics considered include: optical waveguide materials; optical storage materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; laser crystals; laser glasses; quantum counter materials; thin films and coatings; multilayer dielectric coatings; graded-index surfaces and films; optical materials fabrication; fabrication techniques; fabrication procedures for specific materials.

  7. Techniques for nonlinear optical characterization of materials: a review.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Cid B; Gomes, Anderson S L; Boudebs, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Various techniques to characterize the nonlinear (NL) optical response of centro-symmetric materials are presented and evaluated with emphasis on the relationship between the macroscopic measurable quantities and the microscopic properties of photonic materials. NL refraction and NL absorption of the materials are the phenomena of major interest. The dependence of the NL refraction and NL absorption coefficients on the nature of the materials was studied as well as on the laser excitation characteristics of wavelength, intensity, spatial profile, pulse duration and pulses repetition rate. Selected experimental results are discussed and illustrated. The various techniques currently available were compared and their relative advantages and drawbacks were evaluated. Critical comparisons among established techniques provided elements to evaluate their accuracies and sensitivities with respect to novel methods that present improvements with respect to the conventional techniques.

  8. Development of Optical Diagnostic Techniques for Microgravity Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung Stephen

    1999-01-01

    Materials processing including crystal growth, either under a gravity environment on ground or a microgravity environment in space, involves complicated phenomena of fluid motions in gas or liquid phases as well as interaction of various species. To obtain important physical insight, it is very necessary to provide gross-field optical diagnostics for monitoring various physical properties. Materials processing inhibits easy access by ordinary instruments and thus characterizing gross-field physical properties is very challenging. Typical properties of importance can be fluid velocity, temperature, and species concentration for fluids, and surface topology and defects for solids. Observing surface grow rate during crystal growth is also important. Material microstructures, i.e., integrity of crystal structures, is strongly influenced by the existence of thermally-induced flow as well as local nucleation of particles during solidification, which may act in many detrimental ways. In both ground-based and microgravity experiments, the nature of product property changes resulting from three-dimensional fluid or particle motions need be characterized. Gross-field diagnostics is thus required to identify their effects on product defects and process deficiencies. The quantitative visualization techniques can also be used for validation of numerical modeling. For optical nonintrusive gross-field diagnostic techniques, two approaches were developed as summer projects. One optical approach allows us to provide information of species concentration and temperature for monitoring in real time. The other approach, that is, the concept which is formulated for detection of surface topography measurement can provide unprecedented spatial resolution during crystal growth.

  9. Development of manufacturing technologies for hard optical ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, Edward; DeFisher, Scott; Cahill, Mike; Wolfs, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Hard ceramic optical materials such as sapphire, ALON, Spinel, or PCA can present a significant challenge in manufacturing precision optical components due to their tough mechanical properties. These are also the same mechanical properties that make them desirable materials when used in harsh environments. Premature tool wear or tool loading during the grinding process is a common result of these tough mechanical properties. Another challenge is the requirement to create geometries that conform to the platforms they reside in, but still achieve optical window tolerances for wavefront. These shapes can be complex and require new technologies to control sub aperture finishing techniques in a deterministic fashion. In this paper we will present three technologies developed at OptiPro Systems to address the challenges associated with these materials and complex geometries. The technologies presented will show how Ultrasonic grinding can reduce grinding load by up to 50%, UltraForm Finishing (UFF) and UltraSmooth Finishing (USF) technologies can accurately figure and finish these shapes, and how all of them can be controlled deterministically, with utilizing metrology feedback, by a new Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software package developed by OptiPro called ProSurf.

  10. Optical properties of graphene-based materials in transparent polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrak, Osman; Ionita, Mariana; Demirci, Emrah; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2016-08-01

    Different aspects of graphene-based materials (GBMs) and GBM-nanocomposites have been investigated due to their intriguing features; one of these features is their transparency. Transparency of GBMs has been of an interest to scientists and engineers mainly with regard to electronic devices. In this study, optical transmittance of structural, purpose-made nanocomposites reinforced with GBMs was analyzed to lay a foundation for optical microstructural characterization of nanocomposites in future studies. Two main types of GBM reinforcements were studied, graphene oxide (GO) and graphite nanoplates (GNPs). The nanocomposites investigated are GO/poly(vinyl alcohol), GO/sodium alginate, and GNP/epoxy with different volume fractions of GBMs. Together with UV-visible spectrophotometry, image-processing-assisted micro and macro photography were used to assess the transparency of GBMs embedded in the matrices. The micro and macro photography methods developed were proven to be an alternative way of measuring light transmittance of semi-transparent materials. It was found that there existed a linear relationship between light absorbance and a volume fraction of GBMs embedded in the same type of polymer matrices, provided that the nanocomposites of interest had the same thicknesses. This suggests that the GBM dispersion characteristics in the same type of polymer are similar and any possible change in crystal structure of polymer due to different volumetric contents of GBM does not have an effect on light transmittance of the matrices. The study also showed that the same types of GBMs could display different optical properties in different matrix materials. The results of this study will help to develop practical microstructural characterization techniques for GBM-based nanocomposites.

  11. Computational Code to Determinate the Optical Constants of Materials with Atrophysical Importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    Several environments in the interstellar medium (ISM) are composed by dust grains (e.g. silicates), that in somewhere can be covered by astrophysical ices (frozen molecular species). The presence of this materials inside dense and cold regions in space such as molecular clouds and circumstellar disks around young stars is proven by space telescopes (e. g. Herschel, Spitzer, ISO) using infrared spectroscopy. In such environments, molecules such as H _{2}O, CO, CO _{2}, NH _{3}, CH _{3}OH among others, may exist in the solid phase and constitute what we call as the interstellar ices. In this work we present a code called NKABS (acronym for “N and K determination from ABSorbance data”) to calculate the optical constants of materials with astrophysical importance directly from absorbance data in the infrared. It is a free code, developed in Python Programing Language, available for Windows (®) operating system. The parameters obtained using the NKABS code are essentials to perform studies involving computational modeling of star forming regions in the infrared. The experimental data have been obtained using a high vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratorio de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP). The samples used to calculate the optical constants presented here, were obtained from the condensation of pure gases (e.g. CO, CO _{2} , NH _{3} , SO _{2}), from the sublimation in vacuum of pure liquids (e.g. water, acetone, acetonitrile, acetic acid, formic acid, ethanol and methanol) and from mixtures of different species (e.g. H _{2}O:CO _{2}, H _{2}O:CO:NH _{3}, H _{2}O:CO _{2}:NH _{3}:CH _{4}). Additionally films of solid biomolecules samples of astrochemistry/astrobiology interest (e.g. glycine, adenine) were probed. The NKABS code may also calculate the optical constants of materials processed by the radiation, a scenario very common in star forming regions. Authors would like to thanks the agencies FAPESP (JP#2009/18304-0 and PHD#2013/07657-5), FVE

  12. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Optical materials, Part 1 - Nonlinear optical properties/radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines the nonlinear optical properties of laser materials. The physical radiation effects on laser materials are also considered. Topics considered include: nonlinear optical properties; nonlinear and harmonic generation materials; two-photon absorption; nonlinear refractive index; stimulated Raman scattering; radiation damage; crystals; and glasses.

  13. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 4. Optical materials, Part 2 - Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines the optical properties of laser materials. Topics considered include: fundamental properties; transmitting materials; crystals; glasses; plastics; filter materials; mirror and reflector materials; polarizer materials; special properties; linear electrooptic materials; magnetooptic materials; elastooptic materials; photorefractive materials; and liquid crystals.

  14. Physics of electromagnetic and material stresses in optical manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Brandon A.; Sheppard, Cheyenne J.

    2015-08-01

    Modeling the dynamics of optical manipulation experiments relies upon a precise mathematical representation of electromagnetic fields and the interpretation of optical momentum and stresses in materials. However, the momentum of light within media has been an issue of debate over the past century. Multiple energy-momentum models have been advanced, each, under certain conditions, agreeing with experimental observation and mathematically consistent with classical electromagnetism. The modern view is that the various formulations of electrodynamics represent different divisions of the total energy-momentum tensor, with the separation of field and matter being ambiguous. Recently, a proposed view of photon momentum identified two leading forms as the kinetic and canonical momenta. The Abraham momentum is responsible for the overall center-of-mass translation of a material, while the Minkowski momentum is responsible for translations with respect to the surrounding medium. However, the Abraham momentum corresponds to multiple, unique electromagnetic energy-momentum tensors that attempt to separate field from material responses (e.g. Abraham, Chu, and Einstein-Laub). However, only the form of the kinetic momentum density has been revealed, while the formulation that uniquely separates the kinetic stress tensor has remained ambiguous. In this correspondence, multiple formulations are considered within the framework of relativistic electrodynamics. We apply various mathematical techniques to identify the kinetic subsystem of electrodynamics. While optical manipulation is usually modeled using a stationary medium approximation, the lessons from relativistic electrodynamics reveal a specific distribution of electromagnetic stress in media. The physics of optical and static manipulation of dielectric particles are described within this framework.

  15. Laser-Induced Damage Threshold and Certification Procedures for Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This document provides instructions for performing laser-induced-damage-threshold tests and pass-fail certification tests on optical materials used in pulsed-laser systems. The optical materials to which these procedures apply include coated and uncoated optical substrates, laser crystals, Q-switches, polarizers, and other optical components employed in pulsed-laser systems.

  16. On the possibility of detecting an absorbing object in a strongly scattering medium using the method of continuous optical sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolin, L. S.

    1997-10-01

    We have studied the possibility of using the method of double-position optical sounding for observation of inhomogeneities in an absorption index of a turbid medium at very large optical depths where the light field becomes isotropic. Formulas for calculating the image inhomogeneity, its contrast, signal-to-noise ratio, sighting distance, and an optimal “radiator-receiver” base have been obtained. We propose a system of double-position sounding with a rotary base, which allows us to improve the probability of detecting an inhomogeneity and finding its location with a higher accuracy. We show that the method of continuous optical sounding can be used for observation of inhomogeneities in living tissues at depths of several tens of transport paths.

  17. Thickness identification of two-dimensional materials by optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying Ying; Gao, Ren Xi; Ni, Zhen Hua; He, Hui; Guo, Shu Peng; Yang, Huan Ping; Cong, Chun Xiao; Yu, Ting

    2012-12-14

    Two-dimensional materials, e.g. graphene and molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2)), have attracted great interest in recent years. Identification of the thickness of two-dimensional materials will improve our understanding of their thickness-dependent properties, and also help with scientific research and applications. In this paper, we propose to use optical imaging as a simple, quantitative and universal way to identify the thickness of two-dimensional materials, i.e. mechanically exfoliated graphene, nitrogen-doped chemical vapor deposition grown graphene, graphene oxide and mechanically exfoliated MoS(2). The contrast value can easily be obtained by reading the red (R), green (G) and blue (B) values at each pixel of the optical images of the sample and substrate, and this value increases linearly with sample thickness, in agreement with our calculation based on the Fresnel equation. This method is fast, easily performed and no expensive equipment is needed, which will be an important factor for large-scale sample production. The identification of the thickness of two-dimensional materials will greatly help in fundamental research and future applications.

  18. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  19. Determination of caffeine and caffeine-related metabolites in ephedra-containing standard reference materials using liquid chromatography with absorbance detection and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jeanice B; Sharpless, Katherine E; Mitvalsky, Staci; Roman, Mark; Yen, James; Satterfield, Mary B

    2007-01-01

    The concentrations of caffeine and caffeine-related compounds in 2 ephedra-containing reference materials have been determined by 3 independent methods with measurements performed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and a collaborating laboratory. Results from the 3 methods were used for value assignment of caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline in these Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). The methods used at NIST to determine the concentration levels of caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline in SRM 3243 Ephedra-Containing Solid Oral Dosage Form and SRM 3244 Ephedra-Containing Protein Powder used reversed-phase liquid chromatography with absorbance detection and tandem mass spectrometry. These reference materials are part of the first suite in a series of NIST SRMs that provide concentration values for multiple components in dietary supplements. These SRMs are primarily intended for method validation and for use as control materials to support the analysis of dietary supplements and similar materials.

  20. Mode-specific study of nanoparticle-mediated optical interactions in an absorber/metal thin film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Binxing; Woo, Joseph; Kong, Michael; O'Carroll, Deirdre M.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the electromagnetic interaction between a single gold nanoparticle and a thin gold substrate separated by a sub-50 nm-thick optically absorptive polythiophene spacer layer. Single-particle dark-field scattering spectra show distinct resonance features assigned to four different modes: a horizontal image dipole coupling mode, a vertical image dipole coupling mode and horizontal and vertical coupling modes between localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) and surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Relatively broadband spectral tuning of the modes can be achieved by modification of the thickness of either the absorptive spacer or the underlying metal film. Dark-field images also reveal the existence of particles for which the signal of the horizontal image dipole coupling mode is suppressed. This is attributed to partial-embedding of gold nanoparticles into the polythiophene spacer and leads to higher scattered light intensities at longer wavelengths. Full-field electromagnetic simulations show good agreement with the experimental results for the various sample conditions. Strong local electric field confinement at longer wavelengths in the polythiophene spacer, due to the vertical image dipole coupling mode and a LSPR-SPP coupling mode, is also observed in simulations and contributes to absorption enhancement in the spacer. Furthermore, we find absorption enhancement in the semiconducting polythiophene spacer increases with decreasing thickness, indicating the increased light trapping ability of the gold nanoparticles for ultra-thin semiconductor layers. The need for ever-thinner semiconductor layers in optoelectronic devices requires effective light trapping at deeply-subwavelength scales. This work demonstrates that light trapping in sub-50 nm-thick semiconductor layers is possible using a ``sphere-on-plane'' system and offers insight into how coupling modes can be manipulated in this system.We present an

  1. Computational Modeling of Ultrafast Pulse Propagation in Nonlinear Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Agrawal, Govind P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    There is an emerging technology of photonic (or optoelectronic) integrated circuits (PICs or OEICs). In PICs, optical and electronic components are grown together on the same chip. rib build such devices and subsystems, one needs to model the entire chip. Accurate computer modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in semiconductors is necessary for the successful development of PICs. More specifically, these computer codes would enable the modeling of such devices, including their subsystems, such as semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers in which there is femtosecond pulse propagation. Here, the computer simulations are made by solving the full vector, nonlinear, Maxwell's equations, coupled with the semiconductor Bloch equations, without any approximations. The carrier is retained in the description of the optical pulse, (i.e. the envelope approximation is not made in the Maxwell's equations), and the rotating wave approximation is not made in the Bloch equations. These coupled equations are solved to simulate the propagation of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductor materials. The simulations describe the dynamics of the optical pulses, as well as the interband and intraband.

  2. Photorefractive damage mechanisms in electro-optic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliburton, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    Point defects in lithium niobate and related electro-optic materials were characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption, thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL), and diffusion techniques. In LiNbO3, EPR was used to investigate a radiation-induced trapped-hole center. This new S = 1/2 defect is stable at 77 K but thermally decays near 150 K. Its EPR spectrum exhibits a complex hyperfine equally with three 93 Nb nuclei. It was suggested that the hole is equally shared by a set of three equivalent oxygen ions adjacent to a cation vacancy. The photo-induced redistribution of charge was characterized in Bi12GeO20 and Bi12SiO20 crystals. Optical excitation at 77 K converts Fe (3+) ions to Fe(2+) ions. The source of electrons (i.e., the hole traps) may be other impurities or intrinsic defects such as vacancies or anti-site cations. The intrinsic defects such as vacancies or anti-site cations. The Fe(3+) recovery during warming correlates with thermoluminescence peaks at 145, 165, and 245 K. Results suggest that Fe(3+) ions may play an important role in the photorefractive effect in these materials. In LiTaO3, the EPR spectrum of Ta(4+) ions were investigated. The diffusion coefficients of deuterium in single crystals of LiTaO3 were measured by monitoring the growth of OD (-) infrared absorption bands.

  3. Triboluminescent Materials for Smart Optical Damage Sensors for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Mohan D.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Miller, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Triboluminescence is light that is produced by pressure, friction or mechanical shock. New composite materials are constantly being reengi neered in an effort to make lightweight spacecrafts for various NASA missions. For these materials there is interest in monitoring the con dition of the composite in real time to detect any delamination or cr acking due to damage, fatigue or external forces. Methods of periodic inspection of composite structures for mechanical damage such as ult rasonic testing are rather mature. However, there is a need to develop a new technique of damage detection for composites, which could dete ct cracking or delamination from any desired location within a materi al structure in real time. This could provide a valuable tool in the confident use of composite materials for various space applications. Recently, triboluminnescent materials have been proposed as smart sen sors of structural damage. To sense the damage, these materials can b e epoxy bonded or coated in a polymer matrix or embedded in a composi te host structure. When the damage or fracture takes place in the hos t structure, it will lead to the fracture of triboluminescent crystal s resulting in a light emission. This will warn, in real time, that a structural damage has occurred. The triboluminescent emission of the candidate phosphor has to be sufficiently bright, so that the light signal reaching from the point of fracture to the detector through a fiber optic cable is sufficiently strong to be detected. There are a large number of triboluminescent materials, but few satisfy the above criterion. Authors have synthesized a Eu based organic material know n as Europium tetrakis (dibenzoylmethide) triethylammonium .(EuD(sub 4)TEA), one of the bright triboluminescent materials, which is a pote ntial candidate for application as a damage sensor and could be made into a wireless sensor with the addition of microchip, antenna and el ectronics. Preliminary results on the synthesis and

  4. Optical Probes For Continuous Fabry-Perot Velocimetry Inside Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D; Wade, J; Garza, R; Avara, G; Crabtree, T; Rivera, A; Hare, D; Tolar, D; Bratton, B

    2004-08-11

    We have used velocimetry for many years at LLNL to measure velocity-time histories of surfaces in dynamic experiments. We have developed and now use special instrumentation to make continuous shock-velocity measurements inside of materials. The goal is to extend the field of velocimetry into a new area of application in shock physics. At the last Congress we reported the successful use of our new filter system for selectively eliminating most of the non- Doppler-shifted light. We showed one record of a fiber embedded inside an explosive making a continuous detonation velocity-time history. At that time it was difficult to obtain complete records. We have now carried out over 65 inexpensive experiments usually using small cylinders or rectangular blocks of explosives or metals. Most were started by detonating a 25 mm diam by 25 mm long cylinder of Comp B explosive to drive a shock into an adjacent material of similar dimensions, using our embedded fiber probes. In contrast to surface velocimetry, embedded measurements involve detailed hydrodynamic considerations in order to result in a successful record. Calculations have guided us in understanding of various failed and successful experiments. The homogeneity of the explosive, poor contact, the materials used in the cladding and core of the fiber optic probes, and the shock speeds to be covered all greatly affect the success of an experiment. For example, a poor contact between the optical fiber and its environment causes severe loss of data. Non-symmetric air gaps on one side of the fiber cause 3 dimensional hydrodynamic effects which cause the shock wave in the fiber core to be too steeply angled to reflect light. We have recently developed and successfully used a special probe to usually overcome this limitation. We have custom designed several unique types of fiber-optic probes for specialty applications, using both solid and liquid core materials, to extend the usable shock-velocity range.

  5. Optical Studies on Antimonide Superlattice Infrared Detector Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Liao, Anna; Keo, Sam; Lee, Michael C.; Nguyen, Jean; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the material quality and optical properties of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices are investigated using transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The influence of the material quality on the intensity of the luminescence and on the electrical properties of the detectors is studied and a good correlation between the photodetector current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the PL intensity is observed. Studies of the temperature dependence of the PL reveal that Shockley-Read-Hall processes are limiting the minority carrier lifetime in both the mid-IR wavelength and the long-IR wavelength detector material studied. These results demonstrate that PL spectroscopy is a valuable tool for optimization of infrared detectors.

  6. Voigt waves in electro-optic homogenized composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.

    2014-08-01

    A study was undertaken into Voigt wave propagation in a homogenized composite material (HCM). The HCM investigated arose from a porous electro-optic host material infiltrated by a fluid of refractive index na, considered in the long-wavelength regime. The extended Bruggeman homogenization formalism was employed to estimate the constitutive parameters of the HCM. In principle, the directions which support Voigt wave propagation in the HCM may be controlled by means of an applied dc electric field; and the degree of control may be sensitive to the porosity of the host material, the shapes, sizes and orientations of the pores, as well as the refractive index na. Here the theoretical methodology is presented; numerical results are presented elsewhere.

  7. Two-dimensional material-based saturable absorbers: towards compact visible-wavelength all-fiber pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhengqian; Wu, Duanduan; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian; Xu, Shuo; Zhu, Chunhui; Wang, Fengqiu; Sun, Zhipei; Zhang, Han

    2016-01-14

    Passive Q-switching or mode-locking by placing a saturable absorber inside the laser cavity is one of the most effective and popular techniques for pulse generation. However, most of the current saturable absorbers cannot work well in the visible spectral region, which seriously impedes the progress of passively Q-switched/mode-locked visible pulsed fibre lasers. Here, we report a kind of visible saturable absorber-two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs, e.g. WS2, MoS2, MoSe2), and successfully demonstrate compact red-light Q-switched praseodymium (Pr(3+))-doped all-fibre lasers. The passive Q-switching operation at 635 nm generates stable laser pulses with ∼200 ns pulse duration, 28.7 nJ pulse energy and repetition rate from 232 to 512 kHz. This achievement is attributed to the ultrafast saturable absorption of these layered TMDs in the visible region, as well as the compact and all-fibre laser-cavity design by coating a dielectric mirror on the fibre end facet. This work may open a new route for next-generation high-performance pulsed laser sources in the visible (even ultraviolet) range. PMID:26658877

  8. Estimating absorbing black carbon and organic carbon optical properties from AERONET and MISR data over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Ramanathan, V.; Huang, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The radiative forcing due to carbonaceous aerosols is one of the largest source of uncertainties in global and regional climate change. Black carbon and organic carbon from biomass and fossil fuel are two major types of carbonaceous aerosols. In this study we use available ground based and satellite observations to infer the optical properties of black and organic carbon. NASA's AERONET and MISR data over East Asia provide the observational basis. We use the spectral variations in the observed aerosol extinction optical depth and absorption optical depth to categorize the optical properties including their mixing state with other aerosols such as dust and other inorganic aerosols. We create 8 different categories of aerosol mixtures: Dust, Biomass Burning, Fossil Fuel, Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Dust with Biomass Burning, Mixed Dust with Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Biomass Burning with Fossil Fuel, and Mixed Dust, Biomass Burning, with Fossil Fuel, over the following 6 regions of East Asia: Nepal, Gobi, North Industrial China, South Industrial China, Southeast Asia, and Korea/Japan. Our results are compared with independent surface observations over China using Aethalometers and Single Particle Soot Photometers.

  9. Nonlinear optical properties of organic materials: A theoretical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1991-01-01

    Replacement of electronic switching circuits in computing and telecommunication systems with purely optical devices offers the potential for extremely high throughput and compact information processing systems. The potential application of organic materials containing molecules with large nonresonant nonlinear effects in this area have triggered intensive research during the last decade. Interest on this area was due to two facts: (1) that many organic materials show nonlinearities that are orders of magnitude larger than those of conventional inorganic materials such as lithium niobate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate; and (2) that organic materials show much flexibility in terms of molecular designs. Some of the desirable characteristics that these materials should have are that they be transparent to the frequency of the incident laser and its second or third harmonic, that they have a high damage threshold, and, in the case of second-order effects, that their crystal structure or molecular orientation be accentric. Since polymeric assemblages can enhance the nonlinear response of organic molecules severalfold, efforts have been directed toward the synthesis of thin films with interpenetrating lattices of electroactive molecules. The goal of this theoretical investigation is to predict the magnitude of the molecular polarizabilities of organic molecules that could be incorporated into films. These calculations are intended to become a powerful tool to assist material scientists in screening for the best candidates for optical applications. The procedure that was developed for the present calculations is based on the static-field approach, and is a modification to the method developed by Dewar and Stewart, 1984 for calculating molecular linear polarizabilities.

  10. Optical properties of (nanometer MCM-41)-(malachite green) composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Zhai, Qing-Zhou; Zou, Ming-Qiang

    2010-11-01

    Nanosized materials loaded with organic dyes are of interest with respect to novel optical applications. The optical properties of malachite green (MG) in MCM-41 are considerably influenced by the limited nanoporous channels of nanometer MCM-41. Nanometer MCM-41 was synthesized by tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as the source of silica and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) as the template. The liquid-phase grafting method has been employed for incorporation of the malachite green molecules into the channels of nanometer MCM-41. A comparative study has been carried out on the adsorption of the malachite green into modified MCM-41 and unmodified MCM-41. The modified MCM-41 was synthesized using a silylation reagent, trimethychlorosilane (TMSCl), which functionalized the surface of nanometer MCM-41 for proper host-guest interaction. The prepared (nanometer MCM-41)-MG samples have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption technique at 77 K, Raman spectra and luminescence studies. In the prepared (nanometer MCM-41)-MG composite materials, the frameworks of the host molecular sieve were kept intact and the MG located inside the pores of MCM-41. Compared with the MG, it is found that the prepared composite materials perform a considerable luminescence. The excitation and emission spectra of MG in both modified MCM-41 and unmodified MCM-41 were examined to explore the structural effects on the optical properties of MG. The results of luminescence spectra indicated that the MG molecules existed in monomer form within MCM-41. However, the luminescent intensity of MG incorporated in the modified MCM-41 are higher than that of MG encapsulated in unmodified MCM-41, which may be due to the anchored methyl groups on the channels of the nanometer MCM-41 and the strong host-guest interactions. The steric effect from the pore size of the host materials is significant. Raman

  11. Advances in optical materials for large aperture lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stokowski, S.E.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Marchi, F.T.; Swain, J.E.; Wallerstein, E.P.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1981-12-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is using large aperture Nd: glass lasers to investigate the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion. In our experiments high power laser light is focussed onto a small (100 to 500 micron) target containing a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture. During the short (1 to 5 ns) laser pulse the fuel is compressed and heated, resulting in fusion reactions. The generation and control of the powerful laser pulses for these experiments is a challenging scientific and engineering task, which requires the development of new optical materials, fabrication techniques, and coatings. LLNL with the considerable cooperation and support from the optical industry, where most of the research and development and almost all the manufacturing is done, has successfully applied several new developments in these areas.

  12. Research on lunar materials. [optical, chemical, and electrical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, T.

    1978-01-01

    Abstracts of 14 research reports relating to investigations of lunar samples are presented. The principal topics covered include: (1) optical properties of surface and core samples; (2) chemical composition of the surface layers of lunar grains: Auger electron spectroscopy of lunar soil and ground rock samples; (3) high frequency electrical properties of lunar soil and rock samples and their relevance for the interpretation of lunar radar observations; (4) the electrostatic dust transport process; (5) secondary electron emission characteristics of lunar soil samples and their relevance to the dust transportation process; (6) grain size distribution in surface soil and core samples; and (7) the optical and chemical effects of simulated solar wind (2keV proton and a particle radiation) on lunar material.

  13. Enhanced optical limiting effects of graphene materials in polyimide

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yao; Feng, Miao; Zhan, Hongbing

    2014-04-28

    Three different graphene nanostructure suspensions of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONSs), graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs), and graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) are prepared and characterized. Using a typical two-step method, the GONSs, GONRs, and GOQDs are incorporated into a polyimide (PI) matrix to synthesize graphene/PI composite films, whose nonlinear optical (NLO) and optical limiting (OL) properties are investigated at 532 nm in the nanosecond regime. The GONR suspension exhibits superior NLO and OL effects compared with those of GONSs and GOQDs because of its stronger nonlinear scattering and excited-state absorption. The graphene/PI composite films exhibit NLO and OL performance superior to that of their corresponding suspensions, which is attributed primarily to a combination of nonlinear mechanisms, charge transfer between graphene materials and PI, and the matrix effect.

  14. Small optical gap molecules and polymers: using theory to design more efficient materials for organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Recent improvements in the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells have been derived through a combination of new materials, processing, and device designs. A key factor has also been quantum-chemical studies that have led to a better understanding not only of the intrinsic electronic and optical properties of the materials but also of the physical processes that take place during the photovoltaic effect. In this chapter we review some recent quantum-chemical investigations of donor-acceptor copolymers, systems that have found wide use as the primary absorbing and hole-transport materials in bulk-heterojunction solar cells. We underline a number of current limitations with regard to available electronic structure methods and in terms of the understanding of the processes involved in solar cell operation. We conclude with a brief outlook that discusses the need to develop multiscale simulation methods that combine quantum-chemical techniques with large-scale classically-based simulations to provide a more complete picture.

  15. Triboluminescent Materials for Smart Optical Damage Sensors for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Penn, B. G.; Miller, J.; Sadate, S.; Batra, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    There is a need to develop a new technique of damage detection for composites, which could detect cracking or delamination from any desired location within a material structure in real time. Recently, triboluminescent materials have been proposed as smart sensors of structural damage. To sense the damage, these materials can be epoxy bonded, coated in a polymer matrix, or embedded in a composite host structure. When the damage or fracture takes place in the host structure, the resultant fracture of triboluminescent crystals creates a light emission. This will warn in real time that structural damage has occurred. The triboluminescent emission of the candidate phosphor has to be bright enough that the light reaching from the point of fracture to the detector through a fiber optic cable is detectable. There are a large number of triboluminescent materials, but few satisfy the above criterion. The authors have synthesized an organic material known as Europium tetrakis (dibenzoylmethide) triethylammonium (EuD4TEA), which is a potential candidate for application as a damage sensor and could be made into a wireless sensor with the addition of microchip, antenna, and electronics. Preliminary results on the synthesis and characterization of this material are presented.

  16. Phantom materials mimicking the optical properties in the near infrared range for non-invasive fetal pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Ley, Sebastian; Stadthalter, Miriam; Link, Dietmar; Laqua, Daniel; Husar, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An optical phantom of the maternal abdomen during pregnancy is an appropriate test environment to evaluate a non-invasive system for fetal pulse oximetry. To recreate the optical properties of maternal tissue, fetal tissue and blood suitable substitutes are required. For this purpose, phantom materials are used, which consist of transparent silicone or water as host material. Cosmetic powder and India ink are investigated as absorbing materials, whereas titanium dioxide particles are examined as scattering medium. Transmittance and reflectance measurements of the samples were performed in the spectral range from 600 nm to 900 nm using integrating sphere technique. The scattering and absorption coefficients and the anisotropy factor were determined using Kubelka-Munk theory. The results were used to compute the required mixture ratios of the respective components to replicate the optical properties of maternal tissue, fetal tissue and blood, and corresponding samples were produced. Their optical properties were investigated in the same manner as mentioned above. The results conform to the values of various types of tissues and blood given in the scientific literature.

  17. Time-domain reflectance diffuse optical tomography with Mellin-Laplace transform for experimental detection and depth localization of a single absorbing inclusion.

    PubMed

    Puszka, Agathe; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Derouard, Jacques; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-04-01

    We show how to apply the Mellin-Laplace transform to process time-resolved reflectance measurements for diffuse optical tomography. We illustrate this method on simulated signals incorporating the main sources of experimental noise and suggest how to fine-tune the method in order to detect the deepest absorbing inclusions and optimize their localization in depth, depending on the dynamic range of the measurement. To finish, we apply this method to measurements acquired with a setup including a femtosecond laser, photomultipliers and a time-correlated single photon counting board. Simulations and experiments are illustrated for a probe featuring the interfiber distance of 1.5 cm and show the potential of time-resolved techniques for imaging absorption contrast in depth with this geometry.

  18. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  19. Material optimization for electro-optic modulation and cascading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Jorge; Darracq, Bruno; Canva, Michael; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille H.; Chaput, Frederic; Lahlil, Khalid; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Brun, Alain; Levy, Yves

    2000-11-01

    A large effort has been devoted to the preparation of organic polymeric materials for electro-optic modulation and more recently for cascading based processes. These materials contain push-pull chromophores either incorporated as guest in a high Tg polymeric matrix (doped polymers) or grafted onto the polymeric matrix. These systems present several advantages but require significant improvement at the molecular level- by designing optimized chromophores with very large molecular figure of merit specific to each application targeted. The sol-gel route was used to prepare hybrid organic-inorganic materials, for the fabrication of amorphous solids of various shapes (bulk, think films...). The results obtained on optimized chromophore-doped poled thin films emphasize that intermolecular interactions have to be taken into account, as already pointed out by Dalton and coworkers. By combining a molecular engineering strategy for getting large molecular figure of merit and by controlling the intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions via both tuning the push-pull chromophore concentration and the incorporation screening carbazole moieties in high concentration. This strategy allows us to obtain a r33 of about 50 pm/V at 831 nm for a new optimized chromophore structure. In parallel, these thin films are being processed to be used as passive components for integrated optics.

  20. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  1. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  2. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  3. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-09-12

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  4. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  5. Nondestructive metrology of layered polymeric optical materials using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianing; Meemon, Panomsak; Lee, Kye-Sung; Xu, Ke; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, there has been an ever-growing interest in exploring novel, highly efficient optical materials to develop compact and effective optical components. The design and fabrication of high-performance optics require nondestructive metrology techniques to inspect the samples. We have investigated the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to nondestructively characterize layered polymeric materials. Using a swept-source OCT system with a wavelength range of 1.25 - 1.41 μm, we achieved micron-scale three-dimensional visualization of the interior structures and details of the layered polymers. The 3D OCT imaging also enabled accurate identification of the locations of defects within the samples. Based on the imaging data, nondestructive metrology of the thickness of each observed layer was accomplished and the obtained layer thickness profiles over depth offered valuable feedback to the manufacturing process. Our results correlated well with light microscope observance, however caused no surface damage in comparison. In this paper we present the technique of nondestructive metrology enabled by OCT and discuss the experimental results on typical layered polymeric samples.

  6. Optical computing and nonlinear materials; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 11-13, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Peyghambarian, N.

    1988-01-01

    Various papers on optical computing and nonlinear materials are presented. The general topics discussed include: optical computing architectures, optical switching with nonlinear etalons, nonlinear optical computing and interconnection, optoelectronic devices for computing, and new nonlinear materials for computing. Also examined are: semiconductor optical nonlinearities, GaAs and multiple quantum well optical nonlinearities, optical interconnects, and logic and symbolic computing.

  7. Electrochromic material and electro-optical device using same

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, S.F.; Rauh, R.D.

    1992-01-14

    An oxidatively coloring electrochromic layer of composition M[sub y]CrO[sub 2+x] (0.33[le]y[le]2.0 and x[le]2) where M=Li, Na or K with improved transmittance modulation, improved thermal and environmental stability, and improved resistance to degradation in organic liquid and polymeric electrolytes. The M[sub y]CrO[sub 2+x] provides complementary optical modulation to cathodically coloring materials in thin-film electrochromic glazings and electrochromic devices employing polymeric Li[sup +] ion conductors. 12 figs.

  8. Electrochromic material and electro-optical device using same

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1992-01-01

    An oxidatively coloring electrochromic layer of composition M.sub.y CrO.sub.2+x (0.33.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.2.0 and x.ltoreq.2) where M=Li, Na or K with improved transmittance modulation, improved thermal and environmental stability, and improved resistance to degradation in organic liquid and polymeric electrolytes. The M.sub.y CrO.sub.2+x provides complementary optical modulation to cathodically coloring materials in thin-film electrochromic glazings and electrochromic devices employing polymeric Li.sup.+ ion conductors.

  9. Nonlinear optical effects in colloidal carbon nanohorns—a new optical limiting material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengler, Stefanie; Muller, Olivier; Hege, Cordula; Eberle, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many carbon based nanomaterials exhibit nonlinear optical response over a large wavelength range when irradiated with intense laser light what makes them promising candidates for optical limiting purposes. Besides nonlinear absorption some of these well studied nanostructures like carbon nanotubes or carbon black owe their prominent limiting efficiency particularly to induced nonlinear scattering. In this paper, our investigations on carbon nanohorns are presented—a new and very promising nonlinear optical material. It offers excellent properties like a low optical limiting threshold and a high nonlinear attenuation when tested with nanosecond laser pulses at wavelengths of 532 nm or 1064 nm. At moderate irradiation levels near the nonlinear threshold our measurements performed on colloidal carbon nanohorns reveal broadband nonlinear absorption as the dominant optical limiting effect. Towards higher irradiation levels significant nonlinear scattering takes place as a secondary process. In contrast to 532 nm, at 1064 nm nonlinear scattering is less strong even at high irradiation levels and the nonlinear response is dominated by nonlinear absorption.

  10. Optical fiber sensors for damage analysis in aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, Paul; May, Russell; Claus, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Under this grant, fiber optic sensors were investigated for use in the nondestructive evaluation of aging aircraft. Specifically, optical fiber sensors for detection and location of impacts on a surface, and for detection of corrosion in metals were developed. The use of neural networks was investigated for determining impact location by processing the output of a network of fiberoptic strain sensors distributed on a surface. This approach employs triangulation to determine location by comparing the arrival times at several sensors, of the acoustic signal generated by the impact. For this study, a neural network simulator running on a personal computer was used to train a network using a back-propagation algorithm. Fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) strain sensors are attached to or embedded in the surface, so that stress waves emanating from an impact can be detected. The ability of the network to determine impact location by time-or-arrival of acoustic signals was assessed by comparing network outputs with actual experimental results using impacts on a panel instrumented with optical fiber sensors. Using the neural network to process the sensor outputs, the impact location can be inferred to centimeter range accuracy directly from the arrival time data. In addition, the network can be trained to determine impact location, regardless of material anisotropy. Results demonstrate that a back-propagation network identifies impact location for an anisotropic graphite/bismaleimide plate with the same accuracy as that for an isotropic aluminum plate. Two different approaches were investigated for the development of fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection in metals, both utilizing optical fiber sensors with metal coatings. In the first approach, an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric fiber optic strain sensor was placed under tensile stress, and while in the resulting strained position, a thick coating of metal was applied. Due to an increase in

  11. Fiber optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer for research of optical material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, Albert H.; Salikhov, Aydar I.

    2009-12-01

    For carrying out of measurement of refractive index of new materials and research of nonlinear effects use of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer is offered. In action principles of all interferometers are identical, they differ only in the way of coherent waves reception. Mach-Zehnder interferometer is one of Zhamen interferometer versions. Advantage given interferometer is that the distance between ways of distribution of coherent waves can be made as much as big. In given article results on stand working out on base of Mach-Zehnder interferometer for exact definition of refractive index of optical materials are presented.

  12. Optical method for determining the mechanical properties of a material

    DOEpatents

    Maris, H.J.; Stoner, R.J.

    1998-12-01

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample, comprising the steps of: (a) acquiring data from the sample using at least one probe beam wavelength to measure, for times less than a few nanoseconds, a change in the reflectivity of the sample induced by a pump beam; (b) analyzing the data to determine at least one material property by comparing a background signal component of the data with data obtained for a similar delay time range from one or more samples prepared under conditions known to give rise to certain physical and chemical material properties; and (c) analyzing a component of the measured time dependent reflectivity caused by ultrasonic waves generated by the pump beam using the at least one determined material property. The first step of analyzing may include a step of interpolating between reference samples to obtain an intermediate set of material properties. The material properties may include sound velocity, density, and optical constants. In one embodiment, only a correlation is made with the background signal, and at least one of the structural phase, grain orientation, and stoichiometry is determined. 14 figs.

  13. Optical method for determining the mechanical properties of a material

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample, comprising the steps of: (a) acquiring data from the sample using at least one probe beam wavelength to measure, for times less than a few nanoseconds, a change in the reflectivity of the sample induced by a pump beam; (b) analyzing the data to determine at least one material property by comparing a background signal component of the data with data obtained for a similar delay time range from one or more samples prepared under conditions known to give rise to certain physical and chemical material properties; and (c) analyzing a component of the measured time dependent reflectivity caused by ultrasonic waves generated by the pump beam using the at least one determined material property. The first step of analyzing may include a step of interpolating between reference samples to obtain an intermediate set of material properties. The material properties may include sound velocity, density, and optical constants. In one embodiment, only a correlation is made with the background signal, and at least one of the structural phase, grain orientation, and stoichiometry is determined.

  14. Estimate of the Impact of Absorbing Aerosol Over Cloud on the MODIS Retrievals of Cloud Optical Thickness and Effective Radius Using Two Independent Retrievals of Liquid Water Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Eric M.; Harshvardhan; Platnick, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Two independent satellite retrievals of cloud liquid water path (LWP) from the NASA Aqua satellite are used to diagnose the impact of absorbing biomass burning aerosol overlaying boundary-layer marine water clouds on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) retrievals of cloud optical thickness (tau) and cloud droplet effective radius (r(sub e)). In the MODIS retrieval over oceans, cloud reflectance in the 0.86-micrometer and 2.13-micrometer bands is used to simultaneously retrieve tau and r(sub e). A low bias in the MODIS tau retrieval may result from reductions in the 0.86-micrometer reflectance, which is only very weakly absorbed by clouds, owing to absorption by aerosols in cases where biomass burning aerosols occur above water clouds. MODIS LWP, derived from the product of the retrieved tau and r(sub e), is compared with LWP ocean retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E), determined from cloud microwave emission that is transparent to aerosols. For the coastal Atlantic southern African region investigated in this study, a systematic difference between AMSR-E and MODIS LWP retrievals is found for stratocumulus clouds over three biomass burning months in 2005 and 2006 that is consistent with above-cloud absorbing aerosols. Biomass burning aerosol is detected using the ultraviolet aerosol index from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite. The LWP difference (AMSR-E minus MODIS) increases both with increasing tau and increasing OMI aerosol index. During the biomass burning season the mean LWP difference is 14 g per square meters, which is within the 15-20 g per square meter range of estimated uncertainties in instantaneous LWP retrievals. For samples with only low amounts of overlaying smoke (OMI AI less than or equal to 1) the difference is 9.4, suggesting that the impact of smoke aerosols on the mean MODIS LWP is 5.6 g per square meter. Only for scenes with OMI aerosol index greater than 2 does the

  15. Low temperature thermal expansion measurements on optical materials.

    PubMed

    Browder, J S; Ballard, S S

    1969-04-01

    A three-terminal capacitance type dilatometer has been developed for investigating the thermal expansion of optical materials at low temperatures. The method is applicable when only small sample lengths (13 mm or less) are available. The thermal expansion coefficients of six polycrystalline materials (the Irtrans) and of one nonoxide glass have been determined in the range from room temperature down to about 60 K. Minute changes of the length of a sample produce a change of the spacing of a parallel plate capacitor with guard ring; the resulting change of capacitance is measured on a highly sensitive bridge. The expansion coefficients are then determined by relating the change of capacitance to the change of dimensions of the sample.

  16. (Bio)hybrid materials based on optically active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Härtling, Thomas; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we provide an overview of current investigations on optically active particles (nanodiamonds, upconversion phospors) for biohybrid and sensing applications. Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds gain attention in various application elds such as microelectronics, optical monitoring, medicine, and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity and extreme hardness, the carbon surface and its various functional groups enable diverse chemical and biological surface functionalization. At Fraunhofer IKTS-MD we develop a customization of material surfaces via integration of chemically modi ed nanodiamonds at variable surfaces, e.g bone implants and pipelines. For the rst purpose, nanodiamonds are covalently modi ed at their surface with amino or phosphate functionalities that are known to increase adhesion to bone or titanium alloys. The second type of surface is approached via mechanical implementation into coatings. Besides nanodiamonds, we also investigate the properties of upconversion phosphors. In our contribution we show how upconversion phosphors are used to verify sterilization processes via a change of optical properties due to sterilizing electron beam exposure.

  17. Organometallic acetylides of Pt(II), Au(I) and Hg(II) as new generation optical power limiting materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gui-Jiang; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2011-05-01

    Within the scope of nonlinear optics, optical power limiting (OPL) materials are commonly regarded as an important class of compounds which can protect the delicate optical sensors or human eyes from sudden exposure to damaging intense laser beams. Recent efforts have been devoted to developing organometallic acetylide complexes, dendrimers and polymers as high performance OPL materials of the next generation which can favorably optimize the optical limiting/transparency trade-off issue. These metallated materials offer a new avenue towards a new family of highly transparent homo- and heterometallic optical limiters with good solution processability which outperform those of current state-of-the-art visible-light-absorbing competitors such as fullerenes, metalloporphyrins and metallophthalocyanines. This critical review aims to provide a detailed account on the recent advances of these novel OPL chromophores. Their OPL activity was shown to depend strongly on the electronic characters of the aryleneethynylene ligand and transition metal moieties as well as the conjugation chain length of the compounds. Strategies including copolymerization with other transition metals, change of structural geometry, use of a dendritic platform and variation of the type and content of transition metal ions would strongly govern their photophysical behavior and improve the resulting OPL responses. Special emphasis is placed on the structure-OPL response relationships of these organometallic acetylide materials. The research endeavors for realizing practical OPL devices based on these materials have also been presented. This article concludes with perspectives on the current status of the field, as well as opportunities that lie just beyond its frontier (106 references).

  18. New Optical Sensing Materials for Application in Marine Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S.; Klimant, I.

    2012-04-01

    Optical chemosensors are versatile analytical tools which find application in numerous fields of science and technology. They proved to be a promising alternative to electrochemical methods and are applied increasingly often in marine research. However, not all state-of-the- art optical chemosensors are suitable for these demanding applications since they do not fully fulfil the requirements of high luminescence brightness, high chemical- and photochemical stability or their spectral properties are not adequate. Therefore, development of new advanced sensing materials is still of utmost importance. Here we present a set of novel optical sensing materials recently developed in the Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry which are optimized for marine applications. Particularly, we present new NIR indicators and sensors for oxygen and pH which feature high brightness and low level of autofluorescence. The oxygen sensors rely on highly photostable metal complexes of benzoporphyrins and azabenzoporphyrins and enable several important applications such as simultaneous monitoring of oxygen and chlorophyll or ultra-fast oxygen monitoring (Eddy correlation). We also developed ulta-sensitive oxygen optodes which enable monitoring in nM range and are primary designed for investigation of oxygen minimum zones. The dynamic range of our new NIR pH indicators based on aza-BODIPY dyes is optimized for the marine environment. A highly sensitive NIR luminescent phosphor (chromium(III) doped yttrium aluminium borate) can be used for non-invasive temperature measurements. Notably, the oxygen, pH sensors and temperature sensors are fully compatible with the commercially available fiber-optic readers (Firesting from PyroScience). An optical CO2 sensor for marine applications employs novel diketopyrrolopyrrol indicators and enables ratiometric imaging using a CCD camera. Oxygen, pH and temperature sensors suitable for lifetime and ratiometric imaging of analytes

  19. LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL AFTERGLOWS: BIASES IN THE SWIFT SAMPLE AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Thoene, C. C.; Jakobsson, P.; Bjoernsson, G.; De Cia, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Nardini, M.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Christensen, L.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a sample of 77 optical afterglows (OAs) of Swift detected gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which spectroscopic follow-up observations have been secured. Our first objective is to measure the redshifts of the bursts. For the majority (90%) of the afterglows, the redshifts have been determined from the spectra. We provide line lists and equivalent widths (EWs) for all detected lines redward of Ly{alpha} covered by the spectra. In addition to the GRB absorption systems, these lists include line strengths for a total of 33 intervening absorption systems. We discuss to what extent the current sample of Swift bursts with OA spectroscopy is a biased subsample of all Swift detected GRBs. For that purpose we define an X-ray-selected statistical sample of Swift bursts with optimal conditions for ground-based follow-up from the period 2005 March to 2008 September; 146 bursts fulfill our sample criteria. We derive the redshift distribution for the statistical (X-ray selected) sample and conclude that less than 18% of Swift bursts can be at z > 7. We compare the high-energy properties (e.g., {gamma}-ray (15-350 keV) fluence and duration, X-ray flux, and excess absorption) for three subsamples of bursts in the statistical sample: (1) bursts with redshifts measured from OA spectroscopy; (2) bursts with detected optical and/or near-IR afterglow, but no afterglow-based redshift; and (3) bursts with no detection of the OA. The bursts in group (1) have slightly higher {gamma}-ray fluences and higher X-ray fluxes and significantly less excess X-ray absorption than bursts in the other two groups. In addition, the fractions of dark bursts, defined as bursts with an optical to X-ray slope {beta}{sub OX} < 0.5, is 14% in group (1), 38% in group (2), and >39% in group (3). For the full sample, the dark burst fraction is constrained to be in the range 25%-42%. From this we conclude that the sample of GRBs with OA spectroscopy is not representative for all Swift bursts, most likely due

  20. Polymeric variable optical attenuators based on magnetic sensitive stimuli materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pedro, S.; Cadarso, V. J.; Ackermann, T. N.; Muñoz-Berbel, X.; Plaza, J. A.; Brugger, J.; Büttgenbach, S.; Llobera, A.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically-actuable, polymer-based variable optical attenuators (VOA) are presented in this paper. The design comprises a cantilever which also plays the role of a waveguide and the input/output alignment elements for simple alignment, yet still rendering an efficient coupling. Magnetic properties have been conferred to these micro-opto-electromechanical systems (MOEMS) by implementing two different strategies: in the first case, a magnetic sensitive stimuli material (M-SSM) is obtained by a combination of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and ferrofluid (FF) in ratios between 14.9 wt % and 29.9 wt %. An M-SSM strip under the waveguide-cantilever, defined with soft lithography (SLT), provides the required actuation capability. In the second case, specific volumes of FF are dispensed at the end of the cantilever tip (outside the waveguide) by means of inkjet printing (IJP), obtaining the required magnetic response while holding the optical transparency of the waveguide-cantilever. In the absence of a magnetic field, the waveguide-cantilever is aligned with the output fiber optics and thus the intrinsic optical losses can be obtained. Numerical simulations, validated experimentally, have shown that, for any cantilever length, the VOAs defined by IJP present lower intrinsic optical losses than their SLT counterparts. Under an applied magnetic field (Bapp), both VOA configurations experience a misalignment between the waveguide-cantilever and the output fiber optics. Thus, the proposed VOAs modulate the output power as a function of the cantilever displacement, which is proportional to Bapp. The experimental results for the three different waveguide-cantilever lengths and six different FF concentrations (three per technology) show maximum deflections of 220 µm at 29.9 wt % of FF for VOASLT and 250 µm at 22.3 wt % FF for VOAIJP, at 0.57 kG for both. These deflections provide maximum actuation losses of 16.1 dB and 18.9 dB for the VOASLT and VOAIJP

  1. Nonlinear optics and carrier dynamics in nanostructured and two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Ryan J.

    significant role. Probing the graphene at intermediate photon energies enables the investigation of the nonlinear optical properties in the graphene as its electron system is heated by the intense pump pulse. By simultaneously measuring the reflected and transmitted terahertz light, a precise determination of the pump-induced change in absorption can be made. We observe that as the intensity of the terahertz radiation is increased, the optical properties of the graphene change from interband, semiconductor-like absorption, to a more metallic behavior with increased intraband processes. This transition reveals itself in our measurements as an increase in the terahertz transmission through the graphene at low fluence, followed by a decrease in transmission and the onset of a large, photo-induced reflection as fluence is increased. A hybrid optical-thermodynamic model successfully describes our observations and predicts this transition will persist across mid- and far-infrared frequencies. This study further demonstrates the important role that reflection plays since the absorption saturation intensity (an important figure of merit for graphene-based saturable absorbers) can be underestimated if only the transmitted light is considered. These findings are expected to contribute to the development of new optoelectronic devices designed to operate in the mid- and far-infrared frequency range. Lastly we discuss recent work with black phosphorus, a two-dimensional material that has recently attracted interest due to its high mobility and direct, configurable band gap (300 meV to 2eV), depending on the number of atomic layers comprising the sample. In this work we examine the pump-induced change in optical transmission of mechanically exfoliated black phosphorus flakes using a two-color optical pump-probe measurement. The time-resolved data reveal a fast pump-induced transparency accompanied by a slower absorption that we attribute to Pauli blocking and free-carrier absorption

  2. Automated, in-water determination of colored dissolved organic material and phytoplankton community structure using the optical phytoplankton discriminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Gary J.; Millie, David F.; Moline, Mark A.; Lohrenz, Steven E.; Schofield, Oscar M.

    2011-06-01

    Optical Phytoplankton Discriminator (OPD, a.k.a. BreveBuster) determines colored dissolved organic material (CDOM) absorption spectra and particulate light absorbance spectra. The CDOM absorption spectra and correlation coefficients (referred to as 'similarity indexes') between the particulate absorbance spectra and known phytoplankton classes are available in real-time. Post-deployment processing calculates the best fit of multiple absorbance spectra from known phytoplankton taxonomic classes. Through this process the OPD provides an estimate of the phytoplankton community chlorophyll distribution among the classes included in the fit process. The major components of the OPD include: a liquid-waveguide capillary cell (LWCC), a fiber-optic spectrometer, a tungsten-deuterium fiber-optic light and a 0.2 micrometer pore cross-flow filter. In-water operation of the OPD began in May 2003. Since that date 25 of these instruments have been deployed on a variety of autonomous underwater vehicles, buoys, piers, channel markers and boats and ships. It has been utilized in CDOM studies off the New Jersey coast, in HAB monitoring efforts in the Gulf of Mexico and the Great Lakes, and in phytoplankton community structure studies in the Galapagos Islands and the Mediterranean Sea. Most recently, it has been deployed to Veracruz, Mexico for HAB monitoring. Presently, several OPD's operating on Slocum gliders and coastal buoys make up a local HAB observatory south of Tampa Bay, Florida, partially supported by the NOAA/IOOS through GCOOS. This presentation will detail the OPD's capabilities and report results from several of the deployments listed above. The ongoing effort to effectively visualize 4-D phytoplankton community structure will be discussed.

  3. Nonlinear optical materials: Synthesis, characterizations, thermal stability and electro-optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Fengxian . E-mail: fxqiuchem@163.com; Xu Hongliang; Cao Yonglin; Jiang Yan; Zhou Yuming; Liu Juzheng; Zhang Xuping

    2007-03-15

    Two series of thermal stable polyimides and polyimide/silica hybrid materials have been synthesized. The silica content in the hybrid materials was varied from 0 to 22.5 wt.% and SiO{sub 2} phase was well dispersed in the polymer matrix. The glass transition temperature (T {sub g}) and the decomposition temperature (T {sub d}) were in the range 226-382 deg. C and 345-499 deg. C, respectively, for materials. The polymer solutions could be spin coated on the indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass or other substrates to form optical quality thin films. The electro-optic coefficients ({gamma} {sub 33}) at the wavelength of 832 nm for polymer thin films poled were in the range of 12-25 pm/V and the values remained well (retained > 85% for more than 100 h). The heat capacities of some materials were in the range of 0.9755-1.1821 J K{sup -1} g{sup -1} for the temperature 273 and 363 K. No thermal anomaly was found in this temperature range. Most of them showed high thermal stability.

  4. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  5. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  6. Laser induced damage in optical materials: eleventh ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1980-07-15

    The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30-31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September-1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  7. Autogenic synthesis of SnO{sub 2} materials and their structural, electrochemical, and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Pol, V.G.; Calderon-Moreno, J.M.; Thackeray, M.M.

    2012-12-15

    During autogenic reactions, organometallic precursors are decomposed above their critical temperature within an enclosed chamber at high temperatures and pressures. It has recently been established that such reactions can be used to synthesize carbon-coated metal oxide and metal phosphate nanoparticles. These materials are of interest as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this paper, we report the autogenic fabrication of a carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} product and a carbon-free SnO{sub 2} product after removal of the carbon coating by combustion. The major objectives of the study were to monitor any beneficial effects that carbon-coated electrodes containing a lithium alloying element such as Sn might have in improving the electrical connectivity between electrode particles, which expand and contract significantly on lithiation and delithiation, and their utility in lithium cells. Specifically, we report the compositional, structural and morphological properties, and electrochemical behavior of carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} electrodes. Given the importance of the optical properties of SnO{sub 2}, we also describe the effects of the carbon coating on the optical absorbance and photoluminescence of autogenically-prepared SnO{sub 2} materials. - Graphical abstract: One-step, solvent-free autogenic reactions yield nanosized SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles, uniformly coated and interconnected by 2-4 nm carbon layers, with improved electrochemical performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Distinctive autogenic process synthesized SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles coated with 2-4 nm carbon layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon coating improved capacity retention and cycling stability of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon coating quenched photoluminescence of SnO{sub 2} component in SnO{sub 2}-C composite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autogenic approach is extremely versatile, holds promise for designing new nanoarchitectures.

  8. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  9. Laser-induced damage in optical materials: sixteenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Guenther, A H; Milam, D; Newnam, B E

    1987-03-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, CO, 15-17 Oct. 1984. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Approximately 180 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives from England, France, The Netherlands, Scotland, and West Germany. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6,microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin-film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. Harold E. Bennett of the U.S. Naval Weapons Center, Arthur H. Guenther of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, David Milam of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the Symposium.

  10. Optical characteristics and visual appearance for artwork materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radis, M.; Iacomussi, P.; Aghemo, C.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate experimentally how well available metrics are able to evaluate how lighting sources affect the perception of visual attributes of artworks exhibited, providing useful indications for works of art exhibition designers. The study considers objective investigations on optical material properties (i.e. spectral reflection factor) compared to subjective tests on colour attributes evaluation of artworks lighted by common lamps (incandescent and fluorescent lamps) and LED lighting sources. Commission International Eclairage (CIE) developed several mathematical methods to predict colour rendering of lighting source, as well visual attributes of materials, but are only an approximation of the material appearance: too many parameters of influence, subjects expectancy included, influence the appearance. In artwork exhibition visual appearance is of fundamental importance and currently no reliable and robust appearance model is available. Comparing objective evaluations and subjective results for lighting set up comparable to works of art exhibition, will provide useful indications on the applicability of colorimetric calculation to artwork exhibition when LED are involved. Visual attributes (hue, saturation, brightness…) of six different colours under LED and not-LED sources at the same Correlate Colour Temperature were compared to the associate objective characteristics calculated from the spectral reflectance. The results show that the perception of visual attributes differs from objective data when SSL sources are involved and when colours are perceived in complex samples: in some cases the visual system is not coherent with the suggestions arising from the calculations.

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of the diffuse transmission of light through highly concentrated absorbing and scattering materials. Part I: Monte-Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressel, L.; Reich, O.

    2014-10-01

    In many technical materials and commercial products like sunscreen or paint high particle and absorber concentrations are present. An important parameter for slabs of these materials is the diffuse transmission of light, which quantifies the total amount of directly and diffusely transmitted light. Due to the high content of scattering particles not only multiple scattering but also additional dependent scattering occurs. Hence, simple analytical models cannot be applied to calculate the diffuse transmission. In this work a Monte-Carlo program for the calculation of the diffuse transmission of light through dispersions in slab-like geometry containing high concentrations of scattering particles and absorbers is presented and discussed in detail. Mie theory is applied for the calculation of the scattering properties of the samples. Additionally, dependent scattering is considered in two different models, the well-known hard sphere model in the Percus-Yevick approximation (HSPYA) and the Yukawa model in the Mean Spherical Approximation (YMSA). Comparative experiments will show the accurateness of the program as well as its applicability to real samples [1].

  12. Damage thresholds in laser-irradiated optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignard, Franck; Autric, Michel L.; Baudinaud, Vincent

    1997-05-01

    An experimental study on the damage induced by laser irradiation on different materials, borosilicate glass, fused silicate, molded and stretched polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), has been performed. The irradiation source is a 1KL pulsed cold cathode electron gun preionized TEA CO2 laser. Damage mechanisms are controlled by the in-depth absorption of the 10.6 micrometers radiation according to the Beer-Lambert law. PMMA is damaged following a boiling process. Stretched PMMA is fractured first, releasing stresses, then boiled like molded PMMA at a higher energy. BK7 crazed after the irradiation due to thermomechanical stresses, silicate melt and vaporized. Optical damages have been characterized by measuring the contrast transfer function through the irradiated samples.

  13. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures and Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Allison, Sidney G.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in materials and structures by performing temperature measurements with fiber Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of structures with subsurface defects or thickness variations. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. The data obtained from grating sensors were further analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with those from conventional thermography techniques. Limitations of the technique were investigated using both experimental and numerical simulation techniques. Methods for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  14. Application of ICP-OES to the determination of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin films used as absorber materials in solar cell devices.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Caballero, Raquel; Guillén, Cecilia; Gutiérrez, María Teresa; Rucandio, María Isabel

    2005-05-01

    CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 [CIGS; x=Ga/(In+Ga)] thin films are among of the best candidates as absorber materials for solar cell applications. The material quality and main properties of the polycrystalline absorber layer are critically influenced by deviations in the stoichiometry, particularly in the Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratio. In this work a simple, sensitive and accurate method has been developed for the quantitative determination of these thin films by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The proposed method involves an acid digestion of the samples to achieve the complete solubilization of CIGS, followed by the analytical determination by ICP-OES. A digestion procedure with 50% HNO3 alone or in the presence of 10% HCl was performed to dissolve those thin films deposited on glass or Mo-coated glass substrates, respectively. Two analytical lines were selected for each element (Cu 324.754 and 327.396 nm, Ga 294.364 and 417.206 nm, In 303.936 and 325.609 nm, Se 196.090 and 203.985 nm, and Mo 202.030 and 379.825 nm) and a study of spectral interferences was performed which showed them to be suitable, since they offered a high sensitivity and no significant inter-element interferences were detected. Detection limits for all elements at the selected lines were found to be appropriate for this kind of application, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 1.5% for all elements with the exception of Se (about 5%). The Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratios obtained from the application of this method to CIGS thin films were consistent with the study of the structural and morphological properties by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:15702309

  15. Application of ICP-OES to the determination of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin films used as absorber materials in solar cell devices.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Caballero, Raquel; Guillén, Cecilia; Gutiérrez, María Teresa; Rucandio, María Isabel

    2005-05-01

    CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 [CIGS; x=Ga/(In+Ga)] thin films are among of the best candidates as absorber materials for solar cell applications. The material quality and main properties of the polycrystalline absorber layer are critically influenced by deviations in the stoichiometry, particularly in the Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratio. In this work a simple, sensitive and accurate method has been developed for the quantitative determination of these thin films by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The proposed method involves an acid digestion of the samples to achieve the complete solubilization of CIGS, followed by the analytical determination by ICP-OES. A digestion procedure with 50% HNO3 alone or in the presence of 10% HCl was performed to dissolve those thin films deposited on glass or Mo-coated glass substrates, respectively. Two analytical lines were selected for each element (Cu 324.754 and 327.396 nm, Ga 294.364 and 417.206 nm, In 303.936 and 325.609 nm, Se 196.090 and 203.985 nm, and Mo 202.030 and 379.825 nm) and a study of spectral interferences was performed which showed them to be suitable, since they offered a high sensitivity and no significant inter-element interferences were detected. Detection limits for all elements at the selected lines were found to be appropriate for this kind of application, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 1.5% for all elements with the exception of Se (about 5%). The Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratios obtained from the application of this method to CIGS thin films were consistent with the study of the structural and morphological properties by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  16. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic and Polymeric Thin Film Materials of Potential for Microgravity Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin; Witherow, William K.; Bank, Curtis; Shields, Angela; Hicks, Rosline; Ashley, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we will take a closer look at the state of the art of polydiacetylene, and metal-free phthalocyanine films, in view of the microgravity impact on their optical properties, their nonlinear optical properties and their potential advantages for integrated optics. These materials have many attractive features with regard to their use in integrated optical circuits and optical switching. Thin films of these materials processed in microgravity environment show enhanced optical quality and better molecular alignment than those processed in unit gravity. Our studies of these materials indicate that microgravity can play a major role in integrated optics technology. Polydiacetylene films are produced by UV irradiation of monomer solution through an optical window. This novel technique of forming polydiacetylene thin films has been modified for constructing sophisticated micro-structure integrated optical patterns using a pre-programmed UV-Laser beam. Wave guiding through these thin films by the prism coupler technique has been demonstrated. The third order nonlinear parameters of these films have been evaluated. Metal-free phthalocyanine films of good optical quality are processed in our laboratories by vapor deposition technique. Initial studies on these films indicate that they have excellent chemical, laser, and environmental stability. They have large nonlinear optical parameters and show intrinsic optical bistability. This bistability is essential for optical logic gates and optical switching applications. Waveguiding and device making investigations of these materials are underway.

  17. Flouescence reference materials used for optical and biophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Otterman, C.; Klahn, J.; Enseling, D.; Korb, T.; Resch-Genger, U.; Hoffmann, K.; Schweizer, S.; Selling, J.; Kynast, U.; Koberling, F.; Rupertus, V.

    2007-07-01

    Fluorescence techniques are known for their high sensitivity and are widely used as analytical tools and detection methods for product and process control, material sciences, environmental and bio-technical analysis, molecular genetics, cell biology, medical diagnostics, and drug screening. According to DIN/ISO 17025 certified standards are used for fluorescence diagnostics having the drawback of giving relative values for fluorescence intensities only. Therefore reference materials for a quantitative characterization have to be related directly to the materials under investigation. In order to evaluate these figures it is necessary to calculate absolute numbers like absorption/excitation cross sections and quantum yield. This can be done for different types of dopands in different materials like glass, glass ceramics, crystals or nano crystalline material embedded in polymer matrices. Based on the optical spectroscopy data we will discuss options for characteristic doped glasses and glass ceramics with respect to scattering and absorption regime. It has shown recently for YAG:Ce glass ceramics that for a proper determination of the quantum efficiency in these highly scattering media a reference material with similar scattering and fluorescent properties is required. This may be performed using the emission decay measurement diagnostics, where the decay time is below 100 ns. In this paper we present first results of these aspects using well performing LUMOGEN RED organic pigments for a comparison of mainly transparent glass with glass ceramics doped with various amounts of dopands e.g. ions of raw earth elements and transition metals. The LUMOGEN red is embedded in silica and polyurethane matrices. Characterisations on wavelength accuracy and lifetime for different environmental conditions (temperature, UV irradiation) have been performed. Moreover intensity patterns and results for homogeneity, isotropy, photo and thermal stability will be discussed. In a next

  18. Materials for imaging acousto-optic tunable filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam

    2014-05-01

    Research and development of robust compact hyperspectral imagers that can acquire both spectral and spatial features from a scene of interest is of utmost importance for standoff detection of targets as well as chemical and biological agents and backgrounds. Hyperspectral imagers can acquire images with a large number of narrow spectral bands and take advantage of the characteristic spectral signatures of different materials making up the scene. At the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), we are developing hyperspectral imagers based on acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) that can provide adaptive no-moving-parts imagers from the ultraviolet (UV) to the long wave infrared (LWIR) to acquire a two-dimensional spectral image and build up a two-dimensional image cube as a function of time instead of using traditional grating or prism based approach that requires relative motion between sensor and scene. Here, we will review the development of different imaging AOTFs operating from the UV to the LWIR based on a variety of birefringent materials and include the spectral imaging carried out with these filters including both with single and double piezoelectric transducers. We will also include the theoretical background needed to carry out the filter design and discuss development of mercurous halide crystals that can be used to develop AOTFs operating over a wide spectral region from the visible to the LWIR.

  19. Surface imaging of metallic material fractures using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Hutiu, Gheorghe; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Demian, Dorin; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-09-10

    We demonstrate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to perform topography of metallic surfaces after being subjected to ductile or brittle fracturing. Two steel samples, OL 37 and OL 52, and an antifriction Sn-Sb-Cu alloy were analyzed. Using an in-house-built swept source OCT system, height profiles were generated for the surfaces of the two samples. Based on such profiles, it can be concluded that the first two samples were subjected to ductile fracture, while the third one was subjected to brittle fracture. The OCT potential for assessing the surface state of materials after fracture was evaluated by comparing OCT images with images generated using an established method for such investigations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis of cause of fracture is essential in response to damage of machinery parts during various accidents. Currently the analysis is performed using SEM, on samples removed from the metallic parts, while OCT would allow in situ imaging using mobile units. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the OCT capability to replace SEM has been demonstrated. SEM is a more costly and time-consuming method to use in the investigation of surfaces of microstructures of metallic materials.

  20. Surface imaging of metallic material fractures using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Hutiu, Gheorghe; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Demian, Dorin; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-09-10

    We demonstrate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to perform topography of metallic surfaces after being subjected to ductile or brittle fracturing. Two steel samples, OL 37 and OL 52, and an antifriction Sn-Sb-Cu alloy were analyzed. Using an in-house-built swept source OCT system, height profiles were generated for the surfaces of the two samples. Based on such profiles, it can be concluded that the first two samples were subjected to ductile fracture, while the third one was subjected to brittle fracture. The OCT potential for assessing the surface state of materials after fracture was evaluated by comparing OCT images with images generated using an established method for such investigations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis of cause of fracture is essential in response to damage of machinery parts during various accidents. Currently the analysis is performed using SEM, on samples removed from the metallic parts, while OCT would allow in situ imaging using mobile units. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the OCT capability to replace SEM has been demonstrated. SEM is a more costly and time-consuming method to use in the investigation of surfaces of microstructures of metallic materials. PMID:25321671

  1. Chemically enhanced D96N-mutant bacteriorhodopsin film as an advanced optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Bing; Li, Baofang; Jiang, Long

    2002-01-01

    The combination of the genetic engineering and chemical additive has been used in an attempt to obtain much longer M-state lifetime of bacteriorhodopsin-PVA film. Different compositions of D96N-mutant bacteriorhodopsin-PVA film with the diaza-15-crown-5 (1,4,10-trioxa-7,13- diazacyclopentadecane) additive were prepared and their spectral and kinetic transformation were investigated by absorbance spectroscopy. As the molecular ratio of BRD96N/diaza-15-crown-5 ranging from 1:50 - 1:150, the decay of the M-state was slowed down gradually. The fitting of the M-state decay kinetics curves needs a three-exponential- function to get sufficiently small residuals. At the highest additive concentration, the photochromism time of BRD96N film could last as long as one and a half hours. This provides a benefit to the BRD96N as a candidate material for optical applications under ambient conditions.

  2. Low-resolution Spectroscopy of Gamma-ray Burst Optical Afterglows: Biases in the Swift Sample and Characterization of the Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jakobsson, P.; Prochaska, J. X.; Malesani, D.; Ledoux, C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Nardini, M.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wiersema, K.; Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Chen, H.-W.; Thöne, C. C.; Björnsson, G.; Bloom, J. S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Christensen, L.; De Cia, A.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gorosabel, J.; Graham, J. F.; Jaunsen, A. O.; Jensen, B. L.; Kann, D. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levan, A. J.; Maund, J.; Masetti, N.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Palazzi, E.; Perley, D. A.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Schady, P.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; Watson, D. J.; Xu, D.; Augusteijn, T.; Grundahl, F.; Telting, J.; Quirion, P.-O.

    2009-12-01

    most dusty sight lines. This should be taken into account when determining, e.g., the redshift or metallicity distribution of GRBs and when using GRBs as a probe of star formation. Finally, we characterize GRB absorption systems as a class and compare them to QSO absorption systems, in particular the damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs). On average GRB absorbers are characterized by significantly stronger EWs for H I as well as for both low and high ionization metal lines than what is seen in intervening QSO absorbers. However, the distribution of line strengths is very broad and several GRB absorbers have lines with EWs well within the range spanned by QSO-DLAs. Based on the 33 z > 2 bursts in the sample, we place a 95% confidence upper limit of 7.5% on the mean escape fraction of ionizing photons from star-forming galaxies. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs 275.D-5022 (PI: Chincarini), 075.D-0270 (PI: Fynbo), 077.D-0661 (PI: Vreeswijk), 077.D-0805 (PI: Tagliaferri), 177.A-0591 (PI: Hjorth), 078.D-0416 (PI: Vreeswijk), 079.D-0429 (PI: Vreeswijk), 080.D-0526 (PI: Vreeswijk), 081.A-0135 (PI: Greiner), 281.D-5002 (PI: Della Valle), and 081.A-0856 (PI: Vreeswijk). Also based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Some of the data obtained herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck foundation.

  3. Laser induced damage in optical materials: twelfth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1981-09-01

    The twelfth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30 Sept.-l Oct., 1980. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-l, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific research. Over 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and West Germany. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning materials and measurements, mirrors and surfaces, thin films, and finally fundamental mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power systems. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the symposium. The thirteenth annual symposium is scheduled for 17-18 Nov. 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  4. Optical materials and process technology for energy efficiency and solar applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, August 23-25, 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    The topics discussed include the optical properties of transparent and heat-reflecting indium-tin-oxide film, the production of low emittance oxide/metal/oxide films on glass, transparent and heat reflecting oxide and nitride films, indium-tin oxide transparent/conducting film deposition by sputtering, the spectral and angular selectivity of obliquely deposited films electrochromic materials and devices, and the chemical vapor deposition of samarium chalcogenides. Also considered are the continuous production of thin film amorphous silicon solar cells, a fluorescent planar concentrator, materials for radiative cooling to low temperatures, the environmental responses of solar-reflective surfaces, the use of metal-filled colored stainless steel as a high temperature selective absorber, and stability problems encountered with oxidized copper solar absorbers.

  5. Simulation, fabrication and characterization of THz metamaterial absorbers.

    PubMed

    Grant, James P; McCrindle, Iain J H; Cumming, David R S

    2012-12-27

    Metamaterials (MM), artificial materials engineered to have properties that may not be found in nature, have been widely explored since the first theoretical(1) and experimental demonstration(2) of their unique properties. MMs can provide a highly controllable electromagnetic response, and to date have been demonstrated in every technologically relevant spectral range including the optical(3), near IR(4), mid IR(5) , THz(6) , mm-wave(7) , microwave(8) and radio(9) bands. Applications include perfect lenses(10), sensors(11), telecommunications(12), invisibility cloaks(13) and filters(14,15). We have recently developed single band(16), dual band(17) and broadband(18) THz metamaterial absorber devices capable of greater than 80% absorption at the resonance peak. The concept of a MM absorber is especially important at THz frequencies where it is difficult to find strong frequency selective THz absorbers(19). In our MM absorber the THz radiation is absorbed in a thickness of ~ λ/20, overcoming the thickness limitation of traditional quarter wavelength absorbers. MM absorbers naturally lend themselves to THz detection applications, such as thermal sensors, and if integrated with suitable THz sources (e.g. QCLs), could lead to compact, highly sensitive, low cost, real time THz imaging systems.

  6. Simulation, Fabrication and Characterization of THz Metamaterial Absorbers

    PubMed Central

    Grant, James P.; McCrindle, Iain J.H.; Cumming, David R.S.

    2012-01-01

    Metamaterials (MM), artificial materials engineered to have properties that may not be found in nature, have been widely explored since the first theoretical1 and experimental demonstration2 of their unique properties. MMs can provide a highly controllable electromagnetic response, and to date have been demonstrated in every technologically relevant spectral range including the optical3, near IR4, mid IR5 , THz6 , mm-wave7 , microwave8 and radio9 bands. Applications include perfect lenses10, sensors11, telecommunications12, invisibility cloaks13 and filters14,15. We have recently developed single band16, dual band17 and broadband18 THz metamaterial absorber devices capable of greater than 80% absorption at the resonance peak. The concept of a MM absorber is especially important at THz frequencies where it is difficult to find strong frequency selective THz absorbers19. In our MM absorber the THz radiation is absorbed in a thickness of ~ λ/20, overcoming the thickness limitation of traditional quarter wavelength absorbers. MM absorbers naturally lend themselves to THz detection applications, such as thermal sensors, and if integrated with suitable THz sources (e.g. QCLs), could lead to compact, highly sensitive, low cost, real time THz imaging systems. PMID:23299442

  7. Simulation, fabrication and characterization of THz metamaterial absorbers.

    PubMed

    Grant, James P; McCrindle, Iain J H; Cumming, David R S

    2012-01-01

    Metamaterials (MM), artificial materials engineered to have properties that may not be found in nature, have been widely explored since the first theoretical(1) and experimental demonstration(2) of their unique properties. MMs can provide a highly controllable electromagnetic response, and to date have been demonstrated in every technologically relevant spectral range including the optical(3), near IR(4), mid IR(5) , THz(6) , mm-wave(7) , microwave(8) and radio(9) bands. Applications include perfect lenses(10), sensors(11), telecommunications(12), invisibility cloaks(13) and filters(14,15). We have recently developed single band(16), dual band(17) and broadband(18) THz metamaterial absorber devices capable of greater than 80% absorption at the resonance peak. The concept of a MM absorber is especially important at THz frequencies where it is difficult to find strong frequency selective THz absorbers(19). In our MM absorber the THz radiation is absorbed in a thickness of ~ λ/20, overcoming the thickness limitation of traditional quarter wavelength absorbers. MM absorbers naturally lend themselves to THz detection applications, such as thermal sensors, and if integrated with suitable THz sources (e.g. QCLs), could lead to compact, highly sensitive, low cost, real time THz imaging systems. PMID:23299442

  8. Research on testing the nonlinear optical performance of nonlinear optical materials based on the effect of second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Xuan; Wei, Yong; Huang, Cheng-Hui; Zhuang, Feng-Jiang; Zhang, Ge; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper the authors report a research on testing the nonlinear optical performance of optical materials in visible and infrared band. Based on the second order nonlinear optic principle and the photoelectric signal detection technology, the authors have proposed a new testing scheme in which a infrared OPO laser and a method for separating the beams arising from frequency matching and the light produced by other optical effects were used. The OPO laser is adopted as light source to avoid the error of measurement caused by absorption because the double frequency signal of the material is in the transmittance band Our research work includes testing system composition, operational principle and experimental method. The experimental results of KTP, KDP, AGS tested by this method were presented. In the experiment several new infrared non-linear materials were found. This method possesses the merits of good stability and reliability, high sensitivity, simple operation and good reproducibility, which can effectively make qualitative and semi-quantitative test for optical material's nonlinear optical properties from visible to infrared. This work provides an important test -method for the research on second order nonlinear optical materials in visible, infrared and ultraviolet bands.

  9. Use of co-combustion bottom ash to design an acoustic absorbing material for highway noise barriers.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Celia; Leiva, Carlos; Vilches, Luis F; Cifuentes, Héctor

    2013-11-01

    The present study aims to determine and evaluate the applicability of a new product consisting of coal bottom ash mixed with Portland cement in the application of highway noise barriers. In order to effectively recycle the bottom ash, the influence of the grain particle size of bottom ash, the thickness of the panel and the combination of different layers with various particle sizes have been studied, as well as some environmental properties including leachability (EN-12457-4, NEN-7345) and radioactivity tests. Based on the obtained results, the acoustic properties of the final composite material were similar or even better than those found in porous concrete used for the same application. According to this study, the material produced presented no environmental risk. PMID:23916843

  10. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO{sub 2}-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    SciTech Connect

    Blazejowski, J.; Gruzdiewa, L.; Rulewski, J.; Lampe, F.W.

    1995-05-15

    The absorption of three lines [{ital P}(20), 944.2 cm{sup {minus}1}; {ital P}(14), 949.2 cm{sup {minus}1}; and {ital R}(24), 978.5 cm{sup {minus}1}] of the pulsed CO{sub 2} laser (00{sup 0}1--10{sup 0}0 transition) by SiH{sub 4} was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO{sub 2} laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer--Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer--Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials.

  11. Effect of zeolite nano-materials and artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) leaf extract on increase in urinary clearance of systematically absorbed nicotine.

    PubMed

    Malekshah, R E; Mahjub, R; Rastgarpanah, M; Ghorbani, M; Partoazar, A R; Mehr, S E; Dehpour, A R; Dorkoosh, F A

    2012-12-01

    Nicotine, the main pharmacologically active component in tobacco and cigarette, has some toxic effects and also high potential for addiction. In this study, the effect of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) and zeolite nano-materials on urinary excretion of nicotine and consequently elimination of systematically absorbed nicotine was investigated. A simple, valid and highly sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method has been developed for determination of nicotine in rat urine according to guidelines for bioanalysis.It was found that nano-zeolites can cause increase in urinary concentration of nicotine due to its high surface adsorption. Artichoke leaf extract can cause increase in urinary excretion of nicotine in longer post administration times. It was observed that co-administration of nanozeolites and the leaf extract has the synergetic effect on increasing the urinary excretion of nicotine. PMID:23196970

  12. Effect of zeolite nano-materials and artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) leaf extract on increase in urinary clearance of systematically absorbed nicotine.

    PubMed

    Malekshah, R E; Mahjub, R; Rastgarpanah, M; Ghorbani, M; Partoazar, A R; Mehr, S E; Dehpour, A R; Dorkoosh, F A

    2012-12-01

    Nicotine, the main pharmacologically active component in tobacco and cigarette, has some toxic effects and also high potential for addiction. In this study, the effect of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) and zeolite nano-materials on urinary excretion of nicotine and consequently elimination of systematically absorbed nicotine was investigated. A simple, valid and highly sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method has been developed for determination of nicotine in rat urine according to guidelines for bioanalysis.It was found that nano-zeolites can cause increase in urinary concentration of nicotine due to its high surface adsorption. Artichoke leaf extract can cause increase in urinary excretion of nicotine in longer post administration times. It was observed that co-administration of nanozeolites and the leaf extract has the synergetic effect on increasing the urinary excretion of nicotine.

  13. Comparison of the molecular mass and optical properties of colored dissolved organic material in two rivers and coastal waters by flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Zanardi-Lamardo, Eliete; Clark, Catherine D; Moore, Cynthia A; Zika, Rod G

    2002-07-01

    Colored dissolved organic material (CDOM) is an important sunlight absorbing substance affecting the optical properties of natural waters. However, little is known about its structural and optical properties mainly due to its complex matrix and the limitation of the techniques available. A comparison of two southwestern Florida rivers [the Caloosahatchee River (CR) and the Shark River (SR)] was done in terms of molecular mass (MM) and diffusion coefficients (D). The novel technique Frit inlet/frit outlet-flow field-flow fractionation (FIFO-FIFFF) with absorbance and fluorescence detectors was used to determine these properties. The SR receives organic material from the Everglades. By contrast, the CR arises from Lake Okeechobee in central Florida, receiving anthropogenic inputs, farming runoff, and natural organics. Both rivers discharge to the Gulf of Mexico. Fluorescence identified, for both rivers, two different MM distributions in low salinity water samples: the first was centered at approximately 1.7 kDa (CR) and approximately 2 kDa (SR); the second centered at approximately 13 kDa for both rivers, which disappeared gradually in the river plumes to below detection limit in coastal waters. Absorbance detected only one MM distribution centered at approximately 2 kDa (CR) and 2.2-2.4 kDa (SR). Fluorescence in general peaked at a lower MM than absorbance, suggesting a different size distribution for fluorophores vs chromophores. A photochemical study showed that, after sunlight, irradiated freshwater samples have similar characteristics to more marine waters, including a shift in MM distribution of chromophores. The differences observed between the rivers in the optical characteristics, MM distributions, and D values suggest that the CDOM sources, physical, and photochemical degradation processes are different for these two rivers.

  14. An Innovative Context-Based Module to Introduce Students to the Optical Properties of Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, I.; Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Sassi, E.

    2011-01-01

    A context-based module to introduce secondary school students to the study of the optical properties of materials and geometric optics is presented. The module implements an innovative teaching approach in which the behaviour of the chosen application, in this article, the optical fibre, is iteratively explored and modelled by means of a…

  15. Thermally Stable Heterocyclic Imines as New Potential Nonlinear Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesterov, Volodymyr V.; Antipin, Mikhail Y.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Moore, Craig E.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.

    2004-01-01

    In the course of a search for new thermostable acentric nonlinear optical crystalline materials, several heterocyclic imine derivatives were designed, with the general structure D-pi-A(D'). Introduction of a donor amino group (D') into the acceptor moiety was expected to bring H-bonds into their crystal structures, and so to elevate their melting points and assist in an acentric molecular packing. Six heterocycle-containing compounds of this type were prepared, single crystals were grown for five of them, and these crystals were characterized by X-ray analysis. A significant melting temperature elevation was found for all of the synthesized compounds. Three of the compounds were also found to crystallize in acentric space groups. One of the acentric compounds is built as a three-dimensional H-bonded molecular network. In the other two compounds, with very similar molecular structure, the molecules form one-dimensional H-bonded head-to-head associates (chains). These chains are parallel in two different crystallographic directions and form very unusual interpenetrating chain patterns in an acentric crystal. Two of the compounds crystallized with centrosymmetric molecular packing.

  16. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials. DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.

  17. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials.more » DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.« less

  18. Analysis of nonlinear optical properties in donor–acceptor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Paul N.; Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A.

    2014-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to calculate nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, including the first and second hyperpolarizabilities as well as the two-photon absorption cross-section, for the donor-acceptor molecules p-nitroaniline and dimethylamino nitrostilbene, and for respective materials attached to a gold dimer. The CAMB3LYP, B3LYP, PBE0, and PBE exchange-correlation functionals all had fair but variable performance when compared to higher-level theory and to experiment. The CAMB3LYP functional had the best performance on these compounds of the functionals tested. However, our comprehensive analysis has shown that quantitative prediction of hyperpolarizabilities is still a challenge, hampered by inadequate functionals, basis sets, and solvation models, requiring further experimental characterization. Attachment of the Au{sub 2}S group to molecules already known for their relatively large NLO properties was found to further enhance the response. While our calculations show a modest enhancement for the first hyperpolarizability, the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability is predicted to be more than an order of magnitude.

  19. Optical spectroscopies of materials from orbital-dependent approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabo, Ismaila; Ferretti, Andrea; Cococcioni, Matteo; Marzari, Nicola

    2013-03-01

    Electronic-structure calculations based upon density-functional theory (DFT) have been fruitful in diverse areas of materials science. Despite their exceptional success and widespread use, a range of spectroscopic properties fall beyond the scope of existing DFT approximations. Failures of DFT calculations in describing electronic and optical phenomena take root in the lack of piecewise linearity of approximate functionals. This known deficiency reverberates negatively on the spectroscopic description of systems involving fractionally occupied or spatially delocalized electronic states, such as donor-acceptor organic heterojunctions and heavy-metal organometallic complexes. In this talk, I will present a class of orbital-dependent density-functional theory (OD-DFT) methods that are derived from a multidensity formulation of the electronic-structure problem and that restore the piecewise linearity of the total energy via Koopmans' theorem. Such OD-DFT electronic-structure approximations are apt at describing full orbital spectra within a few tenths of an electron-volt relative to experimental photoemission spectroscopies and with the additional benefit of providing appreciably improved total energies for molecular systems with fractional occupations.

  20. Optical and thermal properties of some indolenine cyanine dyes used as optical recording materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuqing; Chen, Ping; Zheng, Deshui; Okasaki, Tsuneki; Hayami, Masaaki

    1998-08-01

    Compact Disc Recordable (CD-R) and Digital Versatile Disc Recordable (DVD-R) are discs where enormous mounts of digital data can be recorded. The reflection, absorption and transmission rate of laser beam in the layer of CD-R at 780 nm and DVD-R at 650 nm with no reflecting layer were numerically calculated and optical properties of a dye film was measured. The results indicate that it is preferable to use dye as the recording media with n and k value in the range of 2.0 to 2.8 and 0.02 to 0.22, respectively. Thermal properties of these dye materials were analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorie method. The decomposition temperature of dyes were varied from 200 to 300 degree(s)C resulted from different methine length, substitutes and counter anions. The optical recording mechanism of CD-R and DVD-R were also briefly discussed based on the above results.