Science.gov

Sample records for absorbing solar radiation

  1. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  2. Thin films with disordered nanohole patterns for solar radiation absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xing; Lou, Minhan; Bao, Hua; Zhao, C. Y.

    2015-06-01

    The radiation absorption in thin films with three disordered nanohole patterns, i.e., random position, non-uniform radius, and amorphous pattern, are numerically investigated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. Disorder can alter the absorption spectra and has an impact on the broadband absorption performance. Compared to random position and non-uniform radius nanoholes, amorphous pattern can induce a much better integrated absorption. The power density spectra indicate that amorphous pattern nanoholes reduce the symmetry and provide more resonance modes that are desired for the broadband absorption. The application condition for amorphous pattern nanoholes shows that they are much more appropriate in absorption enhancement for weak absorption materials. Amorphous silicon thin films with disordered nanohole patterns are applied in solar radiation absorbers. Four configurations of thin films with different nanohole patterns show that interference between layers in absorbers will change the absorption performance. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize the whole radiation absorbers although single thin film with amorphous pattern nanohole has reached optimal absorption.

  3. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-01-01

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities. PMID:26392542

  4. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-10-06

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities.

  5. Remote sensing of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, Ranga B.; Asrar, Ghassem; Tanre, Didier; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1992-01-01

    1D and 3D radiative-transfer models have been used to investigate the problem of remotely sensed determination of vegetated land surface-absorbed and reflected solar radiation. Calculations were conducted for various illumination conditions to determine surface albedo, soil- and canopy-absorbed photosynthetically active and nonactive radiation, and normalized difference vegetation index. Simple predictive models are developed on the basis of the relationships among these parameters.

  6. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  7. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-09-21

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. Whenmore » placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Lastly, our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities.« less

  8. Flower garden trees' ability to absorb solar radiation heat for local heat reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Syuhada, Ahmad; Hamdani

    2017-06-01

    Banda Aceh as an urban area tends to have a high air temperature than its rural surroundings. A simple way to cool Banda Aceh city is by planting urban vegetation such as home gardens or parks. In addition to aesthetics, urban vegetation plays an important role as a reducer of air pollution, oxygen producer, and reducer of the heat of the environment. To create an ideal combination of plants, knowledge about the ability of plants to absorb solar radiation heat is necessary. In this study, some types of flowers commonly grown by communities around the house, such as Michelia Champaka, Saraca Asoka, Oliander, Adenium, Codiaeum Variegatum, Jas Minum Sambac, Pisonia Alba, Variegata, Apium Graveolens, Elephantopus Scaber, Randia, Cordylin.Sp, Hibiscus Rosasinensis, Agave, Lili, Amarilis, and Sesamum Indicum, were examined. The expected benefit of this research is to provide information for people, especially in Banda Aceh, on the ability of each plant relationship in absorbing heat for thermal comfort in residential environments. The flower plant which absorbs most of the sun's heat energy is Hibiscus Rosasinensis (kembang sepatu) 6.2 Joule, Elephantopus Scaber.L (tapak leman) 4.l Joule. On the other hand, the lowest heat absorption is Oliander (sakura) 0.9 Joule.

  9. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  10. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  11. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGES

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; ...

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  12. Atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation derived from Nimbus 7 earth radiation budget data set, November 1985 to October 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Rutan, David; Bess, T. Dale

    1992-01-01

    An atlas of monthly mean global contour maps of albedo and absorbed solar radiation is presented for 21 months from Nov. 1985 to Oct. 1987. These data were retrieved from measurements made by the shortwave wide-field-of-view radiometer of the Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) instrument aboard the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. Profiles of zonal mean albedos and absorbed solar radiation were tabulated. These geographical distributions are provided as a resource for researchers studying the radiation budget of the Earth. The El Nino/Southern Oscillation event of 1986-1987 is included in this data set. This atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation extends to 12 years the period covered by two similar atlases: NASA RP-1230 (Jul. 1975 - Oct. 1978) and NASA RP-1231 (Nov. 1978 - Oct. 1985). These three compilations complement the atlases of outgoing longwave radiation by Bess and Smith in NASA RP-1185, RP-1186, and RP-1261, which were also based on the Nimbus 6 and 7 ERB data.

  13. Epidermal UV-A absorbance and whole-leaf flavonoid composition in pea respond more to solar blue light than to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Siipola, Sari M; Kotilainen, Titta; Sipari, Nina; Morales, Luis O; Lindfors, Anders V; Robson, T Matthew; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Plants synthesize phenolic compounds in response to certain environmental signals or stresses. One large group of phenolics, flavonoids, is considered particularly responsive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, here we demonstrate that solar blue light stimulates flavonoid biosynthesis in the absence of UV-A and UV-B radiation. We grew pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Meteor) outdoors, in Finland during the summer, under five types of filters differing in their spectral transmittance. These filters were used to (1) attenuate UV-B; (2) attenuate UV-B and UV-A < 370 nm; (3) attenuate UV-B and UV-A; (4) attenuate UV-B, UV-A and blue light; and (5) as a control not attenuating these wavebands. Attenuation of blue light significantly reduced the flavonoid content in leaf adaxial epidermis and reduced the whole-leaf concentrations of quercetin derivatives relative to kaempferol derivatives. In contrast, UV-B responses were not significant. These results show that pea plants regulate epidermal UV-A absorbance and accumulation of individual flavonoids by perceiving complex radiation signals that extend into the visible region of the solar spectrum. Furthermore, solar blue light instead of solar UV-B radiation can be the main regulator of phenolic compound accumulation in plants that germinate and develop outdoors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2014-07-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate the solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in order to understand and predict their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming that crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the results of random distribution of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and can be included in vegetation models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change. The code and a user's manual are provided as Supplement of the paper.

  15. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure, and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants for understanding and predicting their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the analytical solutions of random distributions of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and is suitable for ecological models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change.

  16. Absorber for solar power.

    PubMed

    Powell, W R

    1974-10-01

    A simple, economical absorber utilizing a new principle of operation to achieve very low reradiation losses while generating temperatures limited by material properties of quartz is described. Its performance is analyzed and indicates approximately 90% thermal efficiency and 73% conversion efficiency for an earth based unit with moderately concentrated (~tenfold) sunlight incident. It is consequently compatible with the most economic of concentrator mirrors (stamped) or mirrors deployable in space. Space applications are particularly attractive, as temperatures significantly below 300 K are possible and permit even higher conversion efficiency.

  17. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  18. Spatial and temporal variations of albedo and absorbed solar radiation during 2009 - 2016 from IKOR-M satellite program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherviakov, Maksim; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Spiryakhina, Anastasia; Shishkina, Elena; Surkova, Yana; Kulkova, Eugenia

    2017-04-01

    This report describes Earth's radiation budget IKOR-M satellite program which has been started in Russia. The first satellite "Meteor-M» No 1 of this project was put into orbit in September, 2009. The IKOR-M radiometer is a satellite instrument that measures reflected shortwave radiation (0.3-4.0 µm). It was created in Saratov State University and installed on Russian hydrometeorological satellites "Meteor-M" No 1 and No 2. Radiometer IKOR-M designed for satellite monitoring of the outgoing reflected short-wave radiation, which is one of the components of Earth's radiation budget. Such measurements can be used to derive Earth's surface albedo and absorbed solar radiation. This information also can be used in different models of long-term weather forecasts and in researches of climate change trends (Sklyarov et al., 2016). Satellite "Meteor-M" No 1 and No 2 are heliosynchronous that allows observing from North to South Poles. The basic products of data processing are given in the form of global maps of distribution outgoing short-wave radiation (OSR), albedo and absorbed solar radiation (ASR). Such maps were made for each month during observation period. The IKOR-M product archive is available online at all times. A searchable catalogue of data products is continually updated and users may search and download data products via the Earth radiation balance components research laboratory website (http://www.sgu.ru/structure/geographic/metclim/balans) as soon as they become available. Two series of measurements from two different IKOR-M are available. The first radiometer had worked from October, 2009 to August, 2014 and second - from August, 2014 to the present. Therefore, there is a period when both radiometers work at the same time. Top-of-atmosphere fluxes deduced from the "Meteor-M" No 1 measurements in August, 2014 show very good agreement with the fluxes determined from "Meteor-M" No 2 (Bogdanov et al., 2016). The effect of aging is investigated for first IKOR

  19. From Anti-greenhouse Effect of Solar Absorbers to Cooling Effect of Greenhouse Gases: A 1-D Radiative Convective Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shia, R.

    2012-12-01

    The haze layer in Titan's upper atmosphere absorbs 90% of the solar radiation, but is inefficient for trapping infrared radiation generated by the surface. Its existence partially compensates for the greenhouse warming and keeps the surface approximately 9°C cooler than would otherwise be expected from the greenhouse effect alone. This is the so called anti-greenhouse effect (McKay et al., 1991). This effect can be used to alleviate the warming caused by the increasing level of greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere. A one-dimensional radiative convective model (Kasting et al., 2009 and references listed there) is used to investigate the anti-greenhouse effect in the Earth atmosphere. Increasing of solar absorbers, e.g. aerosols and ozone, in the stratosphere reduces the surface solar flux and cool the surface. However, the absorption of the solar flux also increases the temperature in the upper atmosphere, while reduces the temperature at the surface. Thus, the temperature profile of the atmosphere changes and the regions with positive vertical temperature gradient are expanded. According to Shia (2010) the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases is directly related to the vertical temperature gradient. Under the new temperature profile increases of greenhouse gases should have less warming effect. When the solar absorbers keep increasing, eventually most of the atmosphere has positive temperature gradient and increasing greenhouse gases would cool the surface (Shia, 2011). The doubling CO2 scenario in the Earth atmosphere is simulated for different levels of solar absorbers using the 1-D RC model. The model results show that if the solar absorber increases to a certain level that less than 50% solar flux reaching the surface, doubling CO2 cools the surface by about 2 C. This means if the snowball Earth is generated by solar absorbers in the stratosphere, increasing greenhouse gases would make it freeze even more (Shia, 2011). References: Kasting, J. et al

  20. Influence of solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton on the thermal structure and circulation of the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Robert; Ueyoshi, Kyozo; Kampel, Milton

    2007-09-01

    Numerical experiments conducted with an ocean general ocean circulation model reveal the potential influence of solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton on the thermal structure and currents of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean. In the model, solar radiation penetration is parameterized explicitly as a function of chlorophyll-a concentration, the major variable affecting water turbidity in the open ocean. Two types of runs are performed, a clear water (control) run with a constant minimum chlorophyll-a concentration of 0.02 mgm -3, and a turbid water (chlorophyll) run with space- and time-varying chlorophyll-a concentration from satellite data. The difference between results from the two runs yields the biological effects. In the chlorophyll run, nutrients and biology production are implicitly taken into account, even though biogeochemical processes are not explicitly included, since phytoplankton distribution, prescribed from observations, is the result of those processes. Due to phytoplankton-radiation forcing, the surface temperature is higher by 1-2 K on average annually in the region of the North Equatorial current, the Northern part of the South Equatorial current, and the Caribbean system, and by 3-4 K in the region of the Guinea current. In this region, upwelling is reduced, and heat trapped in the surface layers by phytoplankton is not easily removed. The surface temperature is lower by 1 K in the Northern region of the Benguela current, due to increased upwelling. At depth, the equatorial Atlantic is generally cooler, as well as the eastern part of the tropical basin (excluding the region of the sub-tropical gyres). The North and South equatorial currents, as well as the Equatorial undercurrent, are enhanced by as much as 3-4 cms -1, and the circulation of the subtropical gyres is increased. Pole-ward heat transport is slightly reduced North of 35°N, suggesting that phytoplankton, by increasing the horizontal return flow in the subtropical region, may exert a

  1. Higher absorbed solar radiation partly offset the negative effects of water stress on the photosynthesis of Amazon forests during the 2015 drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xing; Xiao, Jingfeng; He, Binbin

    2018-04-01

    Amazon forests play an important role in the global carbon cycle and Earth’s climate. The vulnerability of Amazon forests to drought remains highly controversial. Here we examine the impacts of the 2015 drought on the photosynthesis of Amazon forests to understand how solar radiation and precipitation jointly control forest photosynthesis during the severe drought. We use a variety of gridded vegetation and climate datasets, including solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), the fraction of absorbed PAR (APAR), leaf area index (LAI), precipitation, soil moisture, cloud cover, and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in our analysis. Satellite-derived SIF observations provide a direct diagnosis of plant photosynthesis from space. The decomposition of SIF to SIF yield (SIFyield) and APAR (the product of PAR and fPAR) reveals the relative effects of precipitation and solar radiation on photosynthesis. We found that the drought significantly reduced SIFyield, the emitted SIF per photon absorbed. The higher APAR resulting from lower cloud cover and higher LAI partly offset the negative effects of water stress on the photosynthesis of Amazon forests, leading to a smaller reduction in SIF than in SIFyield and precipitation. We further found that SIFyield anomalies were more sensitive to precipitation and VPD anomalies in the southern regions of the Amazon than in the central and northern regions. Our findings shed light on the relative and combined effects of precipitation and solar radiation on photosynthesis, and can improve our understanding of the responses of Amazon forests to drought.

  2. Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Craig B.; Kutscher, Charles F.; Gawlik, Keith M.

    1997-01-01

    An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprising an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution.

  3. Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, C.B.; Kutscher, C.F.; Gawlik, K.M.

    1997-12-02

    An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprises an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution. 3 figs.

  4. Solar sustained plasma/absorber conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Krascella, N. L.; Kendall, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A space power system concept was evaluated which uses concentrated solar energy to heat a working fluid to temperatures as high as 4000 K. The high temperature working fluid could be used for efficient electric power production in advanced thermal or magnetohydrodynamic conversion cycles. Energy absorber configurations utilizing particles or cesium vapor absorber material were investigaed. Results of detailed radiant heat transfer calculations indicated approximately 86 percent of the incident solar energy could be absorbed within a 12-cm-dia flowing stream of gas borne carbon particles. Calculated total energy absorption in the cesium vapor seeded absorber configuration ranged from 34 percent to 64 percent of the incident solar energy. Solar flux concentration ratios of between approximately 3000 and 10,000 will be required to sustain absorber temperatures in the range from 3000 K to 4000 K.

  5. Robust optimization of a tandem grating solar thermal absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongin; Kim, Mingeon; Kang, Kyeonghwan; Lee, Ikjin; Lee, Bong Jae

    2018-04-01

    Ideal solar thermal absorbers need to have a high value of the spectral absorptance in the broad solar spectrum to utilize the solar radiation effectively. Majority of recent studies about solar thermal absorbers focus on achieving nearly perfect absorption using nanostructures, whose characteristic dimension is smaller than the wavelength of sunlight. However, precise fabrication of such nanostructures is not easy in reality; that is, unavoidable errors always occur to some extent in the dimension of fabricated nanostructures, causing an undesirable deviation of the absorption performance between the designed structure and the actually fabricated one. In order to minimize the variation in the solar absorptance due to the fabrication error, the robust optimization can be performed during the design process. However, the optimization of solar thermal absorber considering all design variables often requires tremendous computational costs to find an optimum combination of design variables with the robustness as well as the high performance. To achieve this goal, we apply the robust optimization using the Kriging method and the genetic algorithm for designing a tandem grating solar absorber. By constructing a surrogate model through the Kriging method, computational cost can be substantially reduced because exact calculation of the performance for every combination of variables is not necessary. Using the surrogate model and the genetic algorithm, we successfully design an effective solar thermal absorber exhibiting a low-level of performance degradation due to the fabrication uncertainty of design variables.

  6. Selective solar absorber emittance measurement at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Philémon; Braillon, Julien; Raccurt, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The characterization of a material in such condition is complicated and requires advanced apparatuses, and different measurement methods exist for the determination of the two quantities of relevance regarding an absorber, which are its emittance and its solar absorbance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for measure the emittance of this solar absorber at elevated temperature. In this paper, we present an optical bench developed for emittance measurement on absorbers is conditions of use. Results will be shown, with a discussion of some factors of influence over this measurement and how to control them.

  7. Thin film absorber for a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, William G.

    1985-01-01

    This invention pertains to energy absorbers for solar collectors, and more particularly to high performance thin film absorbers. The solar collectors comprising the absorber of this invention overcome several problems seen in current systems, such as excessive hardware, high cost and unreliability. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame with a thin film window bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber in accordance with the present invention is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. In a preferred embodiment, thin film layers are formed from a metal/plastic laminate. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. The absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  8. Development of an innovative solar absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, Gavin

    Solar thermal systems have great potential to replace or reduce the dependence of conventional fossil fuel based heating technologies required for space and water heating. Specifically solar domestic hot water systems can contribute 50-75% of the annual thermal load. To date residential users have been slow to purchase and install systems, primarily due to the large monetary investment required to purchase and install a system. Recent innovations in materials design and manufacturing techniques, offer opportunities for the development of absorber plate designs that have the potential to reduce cost, increase efficiency and reduce payback periods. Consequently, this design study was conducted in conjunction with industrial partners to develop an improved absorber based on roll bond manufacturing that can be produced at reduced cost with comparable or greater thermal efficiency.

  9. Optical analysis of solar energy tubular absorbers.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, C; Sokolov, M

    1982-11-15

    The energy absorbed by a solar energy tubular receiver element for a single incident ray is derived. Two types of receiver elements were analyzed: (1) an inner tube with an absorbing coating surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube, and (2) a semitransparent inner tube filled with an absorbing fluid surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube. The formation of ray cascades in the semitransparent tubes is considered. A numerical simulation to investigate the influence of the angle of incidence, sizing, thickness, and coefficient of extinction of the tubes was performed. A comparison was made between receiver elements with and without cover tubes. Ray tracing analyses in which rays were followed within the tubular receiver element as well as throughout the rest of the collector were performed for parabolic and circular trough concentrating collectors.

  10. Cu-In Halide Perovskite Solar Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin-Gang; Yang, Dongwen; Sun, Yuanhui; Li, Tianshu; Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Liping; Zunger, Alex

    2017-05-17

    The long-term chemical instability and the presence of toxic Pb in otherwise stellar solar absorber APbX 3 made of organic molecules on the A site and halogens for X have hindered their large-scale commercialization. Previously explored ways to achieve Pb-free halide perovskites involved replacing Pb 2+ with other similar M 2+ cations in ns 2 electron configuration, e.g., Sn 2+ or by Bi 3+ (plus Ag + ), but unfortunately this showed either poor stability (M = Sn) or weakly absorbing oversized indirect gaps (M = Bi), prompting concerns that perhaps stability and good optoelectronic properties might be contraindicated. Herein, we exploit the electronic structure underpinning of classic Cu[In,Ga]Se 2 (CIGS) chalcopyrite solar absorbers to design Pb-free halide perovskites by transmuting 2Pb to the pair [B IB + C III ] such as [Cu + Ga] or [Ag + In] and combinations thereof. The resulting group of double perovskites with formula A 2 BCX 6 (A = K, Rb, Cs; B = Cu, Ag; C = Ga, In; X = Cl, Br, I) benefits from the ionic, yet narrow-gap character of halide perovskites, and at the same time borrows the advantage of the strong Cu(d)/Se(p) → Ga/In(s/p) valence-to-conduction-band absorption spectra known from CIGS. This constitutes a new group of CuIn-based Halide Perovskite (CIHP). Our first-principles calculations guided by such design principles indicate that the CIHPs class has members with clear thermodynamic stability, showing direct band gaps, and manifesting a wide-range of tunable gap values (from zero to about 2.5 eV) and combination of light electron and heavy-light hole effective masses. Materials screening of candidate CIHPs then identifies the best-of-class Rb 2 [CuIn]Cl 6 , Rb 2 [AgIn]Br 6 , and Cs 2 [AgIn]Br 6 , having direct band gaps of 1.36, 1.46, and 1.50 eV, and theoretical spectroscopic limited maximal efficiency comparable to chalcopyrites and CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 . Our finding offers a new routine for designing new-type Pb-free halide perovskite solar

  11. Intensity and absorbed-power distribution in a cylindrical solar-pumped dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The internal intensity and absorbed-power distribution of a simplified hypothetical dye laser of cylindrical geometry is calculated. Total absorbed power is also calculated and compared with laboratory measurements of lasing-threshold energy deposition in a dye cell to determine the suitability of solar radiation as a pump source or, alternatively, what modifications, if any, are necessary to the hypothetical system for solar pumping.

  12. Solar radiation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. Presented here is a procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally, hourly and daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the sun with a special diode on the Viking cameras; and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation.

  13. Solar radiation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. Presented here is a procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally, hourly and daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the sun with a special diode on the Viking cameras; and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation.

  14. Colorful solar selective absorber integrated with different colored units.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feiliang; Wang, Shao-Wei; Liu, Xingxing; Ji, Ruonan; Li, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Yuwei; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-25

    Solar selective absorbers are the core part for solar thermal technologies such as solar water heaters, concentrated solar power, solar thermoelectric generators and solar thermophotovoltaics. Colorful solar selective absorber can provide new freedom and flexibility beyond energy performance, which will lead to wider utilization of solar technologies. In this work, we present a monolithic integration of colored solar absorber array with different colors on a single substrate based on a multilayered structure of Cu/TiN(x)O(y)/TiO(2)/Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2). A colored solar absorber array with 16 color units is demonstrated experimentally by using combinatorial deposition technique via changing the thickness of SiO(2) layer. The solar absorptivity and thermal emissivity of all the color units is higher than 92% and lower than 5.5%, respectively. The colored solar selective absorber array can have colorful appearance and designable patterns while keeping high energy performance at the same time. It is a new candidate for a number of solar applications, especially for architecture integration and military camouflage.

  15. Analysis of solar water heater with parabolic dish concentrator and conical absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamohan, G.; Kumar, P.; Anwar, M.; Mohanraj, T.

    2017-06-01

    This research focuses on developing novel technique for a solar water heating system. The novel solar system comprises a parabolic dish concentrator, conical absorber and water heater. In this system, the conical absorber tube directly absorbs solar radiation from the sun and the parabolic dish concentrator reflects the solar radiations towards the conical absorber tube from all directions, therefore both radiations would significantly improve the thermal collector efficiency. The working fluid water is stored at the bottom of the absorber tubes. The absorber tubes get heated and increases the temperature of the working fluid inside of the absorber tube and causes the working fluid to partially evaporate. The partially vaporized working fluid moves in the upward direction due to buoyancy effect and enters the heat exchanger. When fresh water passes through the heat exchanger, temperature of the vapour decreases through heat exchange. This leads to condensation of the vapour and forms liquid phase. The working fluid returns to the bottom of the collector absorber tube by gravity. Hence, this will continue as a cyclic process inside the system. The proposed investigation shows an improvement of collector efficiency, enhanced heat transfer and a quality water heating system.

  16. Workshop Report on Managing Solar Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Lee (Compiler); Caldeira, Ken (Compiler); Chatfield, Robert (Compiler); Langhoff, Stephanie (Compiler)

    2007-01-01

    The basic concept of managing Earth's radiation budget is to reduce the amount of incoming solar radiation absorbed by the Earth so as to counterbalance the heating of the Earth that would otherwise result from the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The workshop did not seek to decide whether or under what circumstances solar radiation management should be deployed or which strategies or technologies might be best, if it were deployed. Rather, the workshop focused on defining what kinds of information might be most valuable in allowing policy makers more knowledgeably to address the various options for solar radiation management.

  17. Development of optical tools for the characterization of selective solar absorber at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Philemon; Braillon, Julien; Delord, Christine; Raccurt, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for characterization of this solar absorber in condition of use that is to say in air and at elevated temperature. In this paper we present two new optical test benches developed for optical characterization of solar absorbers in condition of use up to 800°C. The first equipment is an integrated sphere with heated sample holder which measures the hemispherical reflectance between 280 and 2500 nm to calculate the solar absorbance at high temperature. The second optical test bench measures the emittance of samples up to 1000°C in the range of 1.25 to 28.57 µm. Results of high temperature measurements on a series of metallic absorbers with selective coating and refractory material for high thermal receiver are presented.

  18. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. R., Jr.; Tada, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting the degradation of a solar array in a space radiation environment. Solar cell technology which emphasizes the cell parameters that degrade in a radiation environment, is discussed along with the experimental techniques used in the evaluation of radiation effects. Other topics discussed include: theoretical aspects of radiation damage, methods for developing relative damage coefficients, nature of the space radiation environment, method of calculating equivalent fluence from electron and proton energy spectrums and relative damage coefficients, and comparison of flight data with estimated degradation.

  19. Solar radiation measurement project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Xavier solar radiation measurement project and station are described. Measurements of the total solar radiation on a horizontal surface from an Eppley pyranometer were collected into computer data files. Total radiation in watt hours was converted from ten minute intervals to hourly intervals. Graphs of this total radiation data are included. A computer program in Fortran was written to calculate the total extraterrestrial radiation on a horizontal surface for each day of the month. Educational and social benefits of the project are cited.

  20. Experimental investigations of the performance of a solar air collector with latent heat thermal storage integrated with the solar absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvat, P.; Pech, O.; Hejcik, J.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with experimental investigations of the performance of a solar air collector with latent heat thermal storage integrated with the solarabsorber. The main purpose of heat storage in solar thermal systems is to store heat when the supply of solar heat exceeds demand and release it when otherwise. A number of heat storage materials can be used for this purpose; the phase change materials among them. Short-term latent heat thermal storage integrated with the solar absorber can stabilize the air temperature at the outlet of the collector on cloudy days when solar radiation intensity incident on a solar collector fluctuates significantly. Two experimental front-and-back pass solar air collectors of the same dimensions have been built for the experimental investigations. One collector had a "conventional" solar absorber made of a metal sheet while the solar absorber of the other collector consisted of containers filled with organic phase change material. The experimental collectors were positioned side by side during the investigations to ensure the same operating conditions (incident solar radiation, outdoor temperature).

  1. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Bue, Grant C.

    2012-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust nonventing system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA s Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare s Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. This water vapor is then captured by solid LiCl in the LCAR with a high enthalpy of absorption, resulting in sufficient temperature lift to reject heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the LCAR would be heated up and dried in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A engineering development prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The LCAR was able to stably reject 75 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  2. Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Arthur J.; Ginder, John M.; Roe, Mitchell G.; Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

  3. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Solar cell theory cells are manufactured, and how they are modeled mathematically is reviewed. The interaction of energetic charged particle radiation with solar cells is discussed in detail and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Finally, an extensive body of data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence is presented.

  4. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  5. Characterization of selective solar absorber under high vacuum.

    PubMed

    Russo, Roberto; Monti, Matteo; di Giamberardino, Francesco; Palmieri, Vittorio G

    2018-05-14

    Total absorption and emission coefficients of selective solar absorbers are measured under high vacuum conditions from room temperature up to stagnation temperature. The sample under investigation is illuminated under vacuum @1000W/m 2 and the sample temperature is recorded during heat up, equilibrium and cool down. During stagnation, the absorber temperature exceeds 300°C without concentration. Data analysis allows evaluating the solar absorptance and thermal emittance at different temperatures. These in turn are useful to predict evacuated solar panel performances at operating conditions.

  6. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenso, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Cupples, Scott

    2011-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust non-venting system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's lithium chloride Heat Pump Radiator (HPR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. The SEAR is evacuated at the onset of operations and thereafter, the water vapor absorption rate of the HPR maintains a low pressure environment for the SWME to evaporate effectively. This water vapor captured by solid LiCl in the HPR with a high enthalpy of absorption, results in sufficient temperature lift to reject most of the heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the HPR would be heated up in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A one-fourth scale prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The HPR was able to stably reject 60 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  7. Design of wide-angle solar-selective absorbers using aperiodic metal-dielectric stacks.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Nicholas P; Pincon, Olivier; Agrawal, Mukul; Peumans, Peter

    2009-12-07

    Spectral control of the emissivity of surfaces is essential in applications such as solar thermal and thermophotovoltaic energy conversion in order to achieve the highest conversion efficiencies possible. We investigated the spectral performance of planar aperiodic metal-dielectric multilayer coatings for these applications. The response of the coatings was optimized for a target operational temperature using needle-optimization based on a transfer matrix approach. Excellent spectral selectivity was achieved over a wide angular range. These aperiodic metal-dielectric stacks have the potential to significantly increase the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic and solar thermal conversion systems. Optimal coatings for concentrated solar thermal conversion were modeled to have a thermal emissivity <7% at 720K while absorbing >94% of the incident light. In addition, optimized coatings for solar thermophotovoltaic applications were modeled to have thermal emissivity <16% at 1750K while absorbing >85% of the concentrated solar radiation.

  8. Decadal Variations in Surface Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, M.

    2007-05-01

    Satellite estimates provide some information on the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the planet back to the 1980s. The amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth surface can be traced further back in time, untill the 1960s at widespread locations and into the first half of the 20th Century at selected sites. These surface sites suggest significant decadal variations in solar radiation incident at the surface, with indication for a widespread dimming from the 1960s up to the mid 1980s, and a recovery thereafter. Indications for changes in surface solar radiation may also be seen in observatinal records of diurnal temperature range, which provide a better global coverage than the radiation measurrements. Trends in diurnal temperature ranges over global land surfaces show, after decades of decline, a distinct tendency to level off since the mid 1980s. This provides further support for a significant shift in surface solar radiation during the 1980s. There is evidence that the changes in surface solar radiation are linked to associated changes in atmospheric aerosol. Variations in scattering sulfur and absorbing black carbon aerosols are in line with the variations in surface solar radiation. This suggests that at least a part of the variations in surface solar radiation should also be seen in the clear sky planetary albedo. Model simulations with a GCM which includes a sophisticated interactive treatment of aerosols and their emission histories (ECHAM5 HAM), can be used to address this issue. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing the reversal from dimming to brightening under cloud-free conditions in many parts of the world, in line with observational evidence. Associated changes can also be seen in the clear sky planetary albedo, albeit of smaller magnitude.

  9. Multifunctional Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    A system for non-venting thermal control for spacesuits was built by integrating two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's flexible version of the Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). This SEAR system was tested in relevant thermal vacuum conditions. These tests show that a 1 sq m radiator having about three times as much absorption media as in the test article would be required to support a 7 hour spacewalk. The serial flow arrangement of the LCAR of the flexible version proved to be inefficient for venting non-condensable gas (NCG). A different LCAR packaging arrangement was conceived wherein the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) housing would be made with a high-strength carbon fiber composite honeycomb, the cells of which would be filled with the chemical absorption media. This new packaging reduce the mass and volume impact of the SEAR on the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) compared to the flexible design. A 0.2 sq m panel with flight-like honeycomb geometry is being constructed and will be tested in thermal and thermal vacuum conditions. Design analyses forecast improved system performance and improved NCG control. A flight-like regeneration system also is also being built and tested. Design analyses for the structurally integrated prototype as well as the earlier test data show that SEAR is not only practical for spacesuits but also has useful applications in spacecraft thermal control.

  10. Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Stephan, Ryan; Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    A system for non-venting thermal control for spacesuits was built by integrating two previously developed technologies, namely NASA s Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare s flexible version of the Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). This SEAR system was tested in relevant thermal vacuum conditions. These tests show that a 1 m2 radiator having about three times as much absorption media as in the test article would be required to support a 7 hour spacewalk. The serial flow arrangement of the LCAR of the flexible version proved to be inefficient for venting non-condensable gas (NCG). A different LCAR packaging arrangement was conceived wherein the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) housing would be made with a high-strength carbon fiber composite honeycomb, the cells of which would be filled with the chemical absorption media. This new packaging reduces the mass and volume impact of the SEAR on the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) compared to the flexible design. A 0.2 sq m panel with flight-like honeycomb geometry is being constructed and will be tested in thermal and thermal vacuum conditions. Design analyses forecast improved system performance and improved NCG control. A flight-like regeneration system also is also being built and tested. Design analyses for the structurally integrated prototype as well as the earlier test data show that SEAR is not only practical for spacesuits but also has useful applications in spacecraft thermal control.

  11. High temperature solar energy absorbing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, J.M.; Schmitt, C.R.; Abbatiello, L.A.

    A solar collector having an improved coating is provided. The coating is a plasma-sprayed coating comprising a material having a melting point above 500/sup 0/C at which it is stable and selected from the group of boron carbide, boron nitride, metals and metal oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides, and silicates. The coatings preferably have a porosity of about 15 to 25% and a thickness of less than 200 micrometers. The coatings can be provided by plasma-spraying particles having a mean diameter of about 10 to 200 micrometers.

  12. Tuning Transpiration by Interfacial Solar Absorber-Leaf Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shendong; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Weichao; Xu, Ning; Hu, Xiaozhen; Li, Xiuqiang; Lv, Guangxin; Zheng, Qinghui; Zhu, Shining; Wang, Zhenlin; Zhu, Jia

    2018-02-01

    Plant transpiration, a process of water movement through a plant and its evaporation from aerial parts especially leaves, consumes a large component of the total continental precipitation (≈48%) and significantly influences global water distribution and climate. To date, various chemical and/or biological explorations have been made to tune the transpiration but with uncertain environmental risks. In recent years, interfacial solar steam/vapor generation is attracting a lot of attention for achieving high energy transfer efficiency. Various optical and thermal designs at the solar absorber-water interface for potential applications in water purification, seawater desalination, and power generation appear. In this work, the concept of interfacial solar vapor generation is extended to tunable plant transpiration by showing for the first time that the transpiration efficiency can also be enhanced or suppressed through engineering the solar absorber-leaf interface. By tuning the solar absorption of membrane in direct touch with green leaf, surface temperature of green leaf will change accordingly because of photothermal effect, thus the transpiration efficiency as well as temperature and relative humidity in the surrounding environment will be tuned. This tunable transpiration by interfacial absorber-leaf engineering can open an alternative avenue to regulate local atmospheric temperature, humidity, and eventually hydrologic cycle.

  13. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  14. Solar ultraviolet radiation cataract.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Despite being a treatable disease, cataract is still the leading cause for blindness in the world. Solar ultraviolet radiation is epidemiologically linked to cataract development, while animal and in vitro studies prove a causal relationship. However, the pathogenetic pathways for the disease are not fully understood and there is still no perfect model for human age related cataract. This non-comprehensive overview focus on recent developments regarding effects of solar UV radiation wavebands on the lens. A smaller number of fundamental papers are also included to provide a backdrop for the overview. Future studies are expected to further clarify the cellular and subcellular mechanisms for UV radiation-induced cataract and especially the isolated or combined temporal and spatial effects of UVA and UVB in the pathogenesis of human cataract. Regardless of the cause for cataract, there is a need for advances in pharmaceutical or other treatment modalities that do not require surgical replacement of the lens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Simple device measures solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Simple inexpensive thermometer, insolated from surroundings by transparent glass or plastic encasement, measures intensities of solar radiation, or radiation from other sources such as furnaces or ovens. Unit can be further modified to accomplish readings from remote locations.

  16. Characteristics of absorbing aerosols during winter foggy period over the National Capital Region of Delhi: Impact of planetary boundary layer dynamics and solar radiation flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, S.; Tiwari, S.; Mishra, A.; Singh, S.; Hopke, Philip K.; Singh, Surender; Attri, S. D.

    2017-05-01

    Severe air pollution in the northern India coupled with the formation of secondary pollutants results in severe fog conditions during the winter. Black carbon (BC) and particulate matter (PM2.5) play a vital role within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) to degrade atmospheric visibility. These species were continuously monitored during the winter of 2014 in the National Capital Region (NCR) of Delhi. The average BC concentration was 8.0 ± 3.1 μg/m3 with the January mean (11.1 ± 5.4 μg/m3) approximately two times higher than February (5.9 ± 2.1 μg/m3). The average PM2.5 concentration was 137 ± 67 μg/m3 with monthly area-average maximum and minima in December and February, respectively. Higher concentrations of BC at 10:00 local standard time LST (8.5 μg/m3) and 22:00 LST (9.7 μg/m3) were consistently observed and assigned to morning and evening rush-hour traffic across Delhi. Daily average solar fluxes, varied between 17.9 and 220.7 W/m2 and had a negative correlation (r = - 0.5) with BC during fog episodes. Ventilation coefficient (VC) reduced from 'no fog' to fog phase over Palam Airport (PLM) (0.49) times and Hindon Airport (HND) (0.28) times and from fog to prolonged fog (> 14 h) phase over PLM (0.35) times and HND (0.41) times, respectively, indicating high pollution over the NCR of Delhi. Ground measurements showed that daily mean aerosol optical depth at 500 nm (AOD500) varied between 0.32 and 1.18 with mean AOD500 nm being highest during the prolonged fog (> 14 h) episodes (0.98 ± 0.08) consistent with variations in PM2.5 and BC. Angstrom exponent (α) and Angstrom turbidity coefficient (β) were found to be > 1 and 0.2, respectively, during fog showing the dominance of fine mode particles in the atmosphere.

  17. Mechanically Robust, Stretchable Solar Absorbers with Submicron-Thick Multilayer Sheets for Wearable and Energy Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Jin; Jung, Dae-Han; Kil, Tae-Hyeon; Kim, Sang Hyeon; Lee, Ki-Suk; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Choi, Won Jun; Baik, Jeong Min

    2017-05-31

    A facile method to fabricate a mechanically robust, stretchable solar absorber for stretchable heat generation and an enhanced thermoelectric generator (TEG) is demonstrated. This strategy is very simple: it uses a multilayer film made of titanium and magnesium fluoride optimized by a two-dimensional finite element frequency-domain simulation, followed by the application of mechanical stresses such as bending and stretching to the film. This process produces many microsized sheets with submicron thickness (∼500 nm), showing great adhesion to any substrates such as fabrics and polydimethylsiloxane. It exhibits a quite high light absorption of approximately 85% over a wavelength range of 0.2-4.0 μm. Under 1 sun illumination, the solar absorber on various stretchable substrates increased the substrate temperature to approximately 60 °C, irrespective of various mechanical stresses such as bending, stretching, rubbing, and even washing. The TEG with the absorber on the top surface also showed an enhanced output power of 60%, compared with that without the absorber. With an incident solar radiation flux of 38.3 kW/m 2 , the output power significantly increased to 24 mW/cm 2 because of the increase in the surface temperature to 141 °C.

  18. High-efficiency solar-thermophotovoltaic system equipped with a monolithic planar selective absorber/emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Makoto; Kohiyama, Asaka; Yugami, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-efficiency solar-thermophotovoltaic system (STPV) using a monolithic, planar, and spectrally selective absorber/emitter. A complete STPV system using gallium antimonide (GaSb) cells was designed and fabricated to conduct power generation tests. To produce a high-efficiency STPV, it is important to match the thermal radiation spectrum with the sensitive region of the GaSb cells. Therefore, to reach high temperatures with low incident power, a planar absorber/emitter is incorporated for controlling the thermal radiation spectrum. This multilayer coating consists of thin-film tungsten sandwiched by yttria-stabilized zirconia. The system efficiency is estimated to be 16% when accounting for the optical properties of the fabricated absorber/emitter. Power generation tests using a high-concentration solar simulator show that the absorber/emitter temperature peaks at 1640 K with an incident power density of 45 W/cm2, which can be easily obtained by low-cost optics such as Fresnel lenses. The conversion efficiency became 23%, exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit for GaSb, with a bandgap of 0.67 eV. Furthermore, a total system efficiency of 8% was obtained with the view factor between the emitter and the cell assumed to be 1.

  19. Spray CVD for Making Solar-Cell Absorber Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) processes of a special type have been investigated for use in making CuInS2 absorber layers of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells from either of two subclasses of precursor compounds: [(PBu3) 2Cu(SEt)2In(SEt)2] or [(PPh3)2Cu(SEt)2 In(SEt)2]. The CuInS2 films produced in the experiments have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and four-point-probe electrical tests.

  20. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  1. Contactless efficient two-stage solar concentrator for tubular absorber.

    PubMed

    Benítez, P; García, R; Miñano, J C

    1997-10-01

    The design of a new type of two-mirror solar concentrator for a tubular receiver, the XX concentrator, is presented. The main feature of the XX is that it has a sizable gap between the secondary mirror and the absorber and it still achieves concentrations close to the thermodynamic limit with high collection efficiencies. This characteristic makes the XX unique and, contrary to current two-stage designs, allows for the location of the secondary outside the evacuated tube. One of the XX concentrators presented achieves an average flux concentration within +/-0.73 deg of 91.1% of the thermodynamic limit with a collection efficiency of 96.8% (i.e., 3.2% of the rays incident on the primary mirror within +/-0.73 deg are rejected). Another XX design is 92.5% efficient and receives 95.1% of the maximum concentration. These values are the highest reported for practical concentrators, to our knowledge. The gap between the absorber and the secondary mirror is 6.8 and 10.5 times the absorber radius for each concentrator. Moreover the rim angle of the primary mirror is 98.8 and 104.4 deg in each case, which is of interest for the collector's good mechanical stability.

  2. Light Absorbers and Catalysts for Solar to Fuel Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornienko, Nikolay I.

    Increasing fossil fuel consumption and the resulting consequences to the environment has propelled research into means of utilizing alternative, clean energy sources. Solar power is among the most promising of renewable energy sources but must be converted into an energy dense medium such as chemical bonds to render it useful for transport and energy storage. Photoelectrochemistry (PEC), the splitting of water into oxygen and hydrogen fuel or reducing CO 2 to hydrocarbon fuels via sunlight is a promising approach towards this goal. Photoelectrochemical systems are comprised of several components, including light absorbers and catalysts. These parts must all synergistically function in a working device. Therefore, the continual development of each component is crucial for the overall goal. For PEC systems to be practical for large scale use, the must be efficient, stable, and composed of cost effective components. To this end, my work focused on the development of light absorbing and catalyst components of PEC solar to fuel converting systems. In the direction of light absorbers, I focused of utilizing Indium Phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) as photocathodes. I first developed synthetic techniques for InP NW solution phase and vapor phase growth. Next, I developed light absorbing photocathodes from my InP NWs towards PEC water splitting cells. I studied cobalt sulfide (CoSx) as an earth abundant catalyst for the reductive hydrogen evolution half reaction. Using in situ spectroscopic techniques, I elucidated the active structure of this catalyst and offered clues to its high activity. In addition to hydrogen evolution catalysts, I established a new generation of earth abundant catalysts for CO2 reduction to CO fuel/chemical feedstock. I first worked with molecularly tunable homogeneous catalysts that exhibited high selectivity for CO2 reduction in non-aqueous media. Next, in order to retain molecular tunability while achieving stability and efficiency in aqueous

  3. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to their emitter/absorber interfaces, especially for high-efficiency cells with improved bulk properties. When interface defect states are located at efficient recombination energies, performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e. defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV /= 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and leadmore » to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a 'cliff' (.delta..EC < 0 eV) is likely to allow many holes in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. In addition, a thin and highly-doped emitter can invert the absorber, form a large hole barrier, and decrease device performance losses due to high interface defect density. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. Other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ..delta..EC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be better candidates for the CdTe-cell emitter.« less

  4. Performance of a Multifunctional Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Phillips, Scott; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR) is a nonventing thermal control subsystem that combines a Space Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) with a Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). The LCAR is a heat pump radiator that absorbs water vapor produced in the SWME. Because of the very low water vapor pressure at equilibrium with lithium chloride solution, the LCAR can absorb water vapor at a temperature considerably higher than the SWME, enabling heat rejection sufficient for most EVA activities by thermal radiation from a relatively small area radiator. Prior SEAR prototypes used a flexible LCAR that was designed to be installed on the outer surface of a portable life support system (PLSS) backpack. This paper describes a SEAR subsystem that incorporates a very compact LCAR. The compact, multifunctional LCAR is built in the form of thin panels that can also serve as the PLSS structural shell. We designed and assembled a 2 ft² prototype LCAR based on this design and measured its performance in thermal vacuum tests when supplied with water vapor by a SWME. These tests validated our models for SEAR performance and showed that there is enough area available on the PLSS backpack shell to enable rejection of metabolic heat from the LCAR. We used results of these tests to assess future performance potential and suggest approaches for integrating the SEAR system with future space suits.

  5. Performance of a Multifunctional Space Evaporator- Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR) is a nonventing thermal control subsystem that combines a Space Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) with a Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). The LCAR is a heat pump radiator that absorbs water vapor produced in the SWME. Because of the very low water vapor pressure at equilibrium with lithium chloride solution, the LCAR can absorb water vapor at a temperature considerably higher than the SWME, enabling heat rejection by thermal radiation from a relatively small area radiator. Prior SEAR prototypes used a flexible LCAR that was designed to be installed on the outer surface of a portable life support system (PLSS) backpack. This paper describes a SEAR subsystem that incorporates a very compact LCAR. The compact, multifunctional LCAR is built in the form of thin panels that can also serve as the PLSS structural shell. We designed and assembled a 2 sq ft prototype LCAR based on this design and measured its performance in thermal vacuum tests when supplied with water vapor by a SWME. These tests validated our models for SEAR performance and showed that there is enough area available on the PLSS backpack shell to enable heat rejection from the LCAR.

  6. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95 percent of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50 percent of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73 percent of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  7. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a LANDSAT MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95% of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50% of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73% of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  8. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao, E-mail: tsong241@gmail.com; Sites, James R.; Kanevce, Ana

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔE{sub C} ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interfacemore » defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔE{sub C}, often referred to as a “spike,” creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔE{sub C} ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a “cliff” (ΔE{sub C} < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔE{sub C} of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔE{sub C

  9. Absorbed photosynthetically active radiation of steppe vegetation and sun-view geometry effects on APAR estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, E. A.; Blad, B. L.; Mesarch, M. A.; Hays, C. J.; Deering, D. W.; Eck, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    Instantaneous fractions of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) were measured at the Streletskaya Steppe Reserve in conjunction with canopy bidirectional-reflected radiation measured at solar zenith angles ranging between 37 and 74 deg during the Kursk experiment (KUREX-91). APAR values were higher for KUREX-91 than those for the first ISLSCP field experiment (FIFE-89) and the amount of APAR of a canopy was a function of solar zenith angle, decreasing as solar zenith angle increased at the resrve. Differences in absorption are attributed to leaf area index (LAI) and leaf angle distribution and subsequently transmitted radiation interactions. LAIs were considerably higher at the reserve than those at the FIFE site. Leaf angle distributions of the reserve approach a uniform distribution while distributions at the FIFE site more closely approximate erectophile distributions. Reflected photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) components at KUREX-91 and FIFE-89 were similar in magnitude and in their response to solar zenith angle. Transmitted PAR increased with increasing solar zenith angle at KUREX-91 and decreased with increasing solar zenith angle at FIFE-89. Transmitted PAR at FIFE-89 was considerably larger than those at KUREX-91.

  10. Semiconductor-based Multilayer Selective Solar Absorber for Unconcentrated Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Nathan H.; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Shanhui

    Solar thermal energy conversion has attracted substantial renewed interest due to its applications in industrial heating, air conditioning, and electricity generation. Achieving stagnation temperatures exceeding 200 °C, pertinent to these technologies, with unconcentrated sunlight requires spectrally selective absorbers with exceptionally low emissivity in the thermal wavelength range and high visible absorptivity for the solar spectrum. In this Communication, we then report a semiconductor-based multilayer selective absorber that exploits the sharp drop in optical absorption at the bandgap energy to achieve a measured absorptance of 76% at solar wavelengths and a low emittance of approximately 5% at thermal wavelengths. In fieldmore » tests, we obtain a peak temperature of 225 °C, comparable to that achieved with state-of-the-art selective surfaces. Furthemore, with straightforward optimization to improve solar absorption, our work shows the potential for unconcentrated solar thermal systems to reach stagnation temperatures exceeding 300 °C, thereby eliminating the need for solar concentrators for mid-temperature solar applications such as supplying process heat« less

  11. Semiconductor-based Multilayer Selective Solar Absorber for Unconcentrated Solar Thermal Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nathan H; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Shanhui; Minnich, Austin J

    2017-07-13

    Solar thermal energy conversion has attracted substantial renewed interest due to its applications in industrial heating, air conditioning, and electricity generation. Achieving stagnation temperatures exceeding 200 °C, pertinent to these technologies, with unconcentrated sunlight requires spectrally selective absorbers with exceptionally low emissivity in the thermal wavelength range and high visible absorptivity for the solar spectrum. In this Communication, we report a semiconductor-based multilayer selective absorber that exploits the sharp drop in optical absorption at the bandgap energy to achieve a measured absorptance of 76% at solar wavelengths and a low emittance of approximately 5% at thermal wavelengths. In field tests, we obtain a peak temperature of 225 °C, comparable to that achieved with state-of-the-art selective surfaces. With straightforward optimization to improve solar absorption, our work shows the potential for unconcentrated solar thermal systems to reach stagnation temperatures exceeding 300 °C, thereby eliminating the need for solar concentrators for mid-temperature solar applications such as supplying process heat.

  12. Semiconductor-based Multilayer Selective Solar Absorber for Unconcentrated Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas, Nathan H.; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Shanhui; ...

    2017-07-13

    Solar thermal energy conversion has attracted substantial renewed interest due to its applications in industrial heating, air conditioning, and electricity generation. Achieving stagnation temperatures exceeding 200 °C, pertinent to these technologies, with unconcentrated sunlight requires spectrally selective absorbers with exceptionally low emissivity in the thermal wavelength range and high visible absorptivity for the solar spectrum. In this Communication, we then report a semiconductor-based multilayer selective absorber that exploits the sharp drop in optical absorption at the bandgap energy to achieve a measured absorptance of 76% at solar wavelengths and a low emittance of approximately 5% at thermal wavelengths. In fieldmore » tests, we obtain a peak temperature of 225 °C, comparable to that achieved with state-of-the-art selective surfaces. Furthemore, with straightforward optimization to improve solar absorption, our work shows the potential for unconcentrated solar thermal systems to reach stagnation temperatures exceeding 300 °C, thereby eliminating the need for solar concentrators for mid-temperature solar applications such as supplying process heat« less

  13. On the radiative effects of light-absorbing impurities on snowpack evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, M.; Tuzet, F.; Lafaysse, M.; Arnaud, L.; Picard, G.; Lejeune, Y.; Lamare, M.; Morin, S.; Voisin, D.; Di Mauro, B.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of light absorbing impurities in snow strongly decreases snow reflectance leading to an increase in the amount of solar energy absorbed by the snowpack. This effect is also known as impurities direct radiative effect. The change in the amount of energy absorbed by the snowpack modifies the temperature profile inside the snowpack and in turn snow metamorphism (impurities indirect radiative effects). In this work, we used the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus with an explicit representation of snow light-absorbing impurities content (Tuzet et al., 2017) fed by medium-resolution ALADIN-Climate atmospheric model to represent dust and black carbon atmospheric deposition fluxes. The model is used at two sites: Col de Porte (medium elevation site in the French Alps) and Torgnon (high elevation site in the Italian Alps). The simulations are compared to in-situ observations and used to quantify the effects of light-absorbing impurities on snow melt rate and timing. The respective parts of the direct and indirect radiative effects of light-absorbing impurities in snow are also computed for the two sites, emphasizing the need to account for the interactions between snow metamorphism and LAI radiative properties, to accurately predict the effects of light-absorbing impurities in snow. Moreover, we describe how automated hyperspectral reflectance can be used to estimate effective impurities surface content in snow. Finally we demonstrate how these reflectances measurements either from in situ or satellite data can be used via an assimilation scheme to constrain snowpack ensemble simulations and better predict the snowpack state and evolution.

  14. Survey of selective solar absorbers and their limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Mattox, D.M.; Sowell, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    A number of selective absorber coating systems with high solar absorptance exist which may be used in the mid-temperature range. Some of the systems are more chemically and thermally stable than others. Unfortunately, there are large gaps in the stability data for a large number of the systems. In an inert environment, the principle degradation mechanisms are interdiffusion between the layers or phases and changes in surface morphology. These degradation mechanisms would be minimized by using refractory metals and compounds for the absorbing layer and using refractory materials or diffusion barriers for the underlayer. For use in a reactive environment,more » the choice of materials is much more restrictive since internal chemical reactions can change phase compositions and interfacial reactions can lead to loss of adhesion. For a coating process to be useful, it is necessary to determine what parameters influence the performance of the coating and the limits to these parameters. This process sensitivity has a direct influence on the production process controls necessary to produce a good product. Experience with electroplated black chrome has been rather disappointing. Electroplating should be a low cost deposition process but the extensive bath analysis and optical monitoring necessary to produce a thermally stable produce for use to 320/sup 0/C has increased cost signficantly. 49 references.« less

  15. Radiative forcing and rapid adjustment of absorbing aerosols in the Pearl River Delta Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Yim, S. H. L.; Lau, G.

    2016-12-01

    Part of organic carbon defined as brown carbon (BrC) has been found to absorb solar radiation, especially in near-ultraviolet and blue bands, but their radiation impact is far less understood than black carbon (BC). Rapid adjustment thought to occur within a few weeks, induced by aerosol radiative effect and thereby alter cloud cover or other climate components. These effects are particularly pronounced for absorbing aerosols. The data gathered is from an online coupled model, WRF-Chem. A two-simulation test is conducted from July 8 to July 15. The baseline simulation doesn't account for aerosol-radiation interactions, whereas the sensitivity run includes it. The differences between these two simulations represent total effects of the aerosol instantaneous radiative forcing and subsequent rapid adjustment. In Figure 1, without cloud effect (clear sky), at the top of atmosphere (TOA), the SW radiation changes are negative in the PRD region, representing an overall cooling effect of aerosols. However, in the atmosphere (ATM), aerosols heat the atmosphere by absorbing incoming solar radiation with an average of 2.4 W/m2 (Table 1). After including rapid adjustment (all sky), the radiation change pattern becomes significantly different, especially at TOA and surface (SFC). This may be caused by cloud cover change due to rapid adjustment. The magnitude of SW radiation changes for all sky at all levels is smaller than that for clear sky. This result suggests the rapid adjustment counteracts the instantaneous radiative forcing of aerosols. At TOA, the cooling effect of the aerosol is 74% lower for all sky compared with clear sky, highlighting an overall warming effect of rapid adjustment in the PRD region. Aerosol-induced changes (W/m2) TOA ATM SFC Clear Sky -9.2 2.4 -11.6 All Sky -2.4 1.9 -4.3 Table 1. Aerosol-induced averaged changes in shortwave radiation due to aerosol-radiation interactions in the Pearl River Delta. The test shows the rapid adjustment of aerosols

  16. A concentrated solar cavity absorber with direct heat transfer through recirculating metallic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, M. R. I., E-mail: islamrabiul@yahoo.com; Saha, Manabendra, E-mail: manabendra.saha@adelaide.edu.au, E-mail: manab04me@gmail.com; Beg, R. A.

    A recirculating flow solar particle cavity absorber (receiver) is modeled to investigate the flow behavior and heat transfer characteristics of a novel developing concept. It features a continuous recirculating flow of non-reacting metallic particles (black silicon carbide) with air which are used as a thermal enhancement medium. The aim of the present study is to numerically investigate the thermal behavior and flow characteristics of the proposed concept. The proposed solar particle receiver is modeled using two phase discrete particle model (DPM), RNG k-flow model and discrete ordinate (DO) radiation model. Numerical analysis is carried out considering a solar receiver withmore » only air and the mixture of non-reacting particles and air as a heat transfer as well as heat carrying medium. The parametric investigation is conducted considering the incident solar flux on the receiver aperture and changing air flow rate and recirculation rate inside the receiver. A stand-alone feature of the recirculating flow solar particle receiver concept is that the particles are directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation monotonously through recirculating flow inside the receiver and results in efficient irradiation absorption and convective heat transfer to air that help to achieve high temperature air and consequently increase in thermal efficiency. This paper presents, results from the developed concept and highlights its flow behavior and potential to enhance the heat transfer from metallic particles to air by maximizing heat carrying capacity of the heat transfer medium. The imposed milestones for the present system will be helpful to understand the radiation absorption mechanism of the particles in a recirculating flow based receiver, the thermal transport between the particles, the air and the cavity, and the fluid dynamics of the air and particle in the cavity.« less

  17. GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    History of GaAs solar cell development is provided. Photovoltaic equations are described along with instrumentation techniques for measuring solar cells. Radiation effects in solar cells, electrical performance, and spacecraft flight data for solar cells are discussed. The space radiation environment and solar array degradation calculations are addressed.

  18. High-Capacity Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Phillips, Scott; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions will require advanced life support technology that can operate across a wide range of applications and environments. Thermal control systems for space suits and spacecraft will need to meet critical requirements for water conservation and multifunctional operation. This paper describes a Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) that has been designed to meet performance requirements for future life support systems. A SEAR system comprises a lithium chloride absorber radiator (LCAR) for heat rejection coupled with a space water membrane evaporator (SWME) for heat acquisition. SEAR systems provide heat pumping to minimize radiator size, thermal storage to accommodate variable environmental conditions, and water absorption to minimize use of expendables. We have built and tested a flight-like, high-capacity LCAR, demonstrated its performance in thermal vacuum tests, and explored the feasibility of an ISS demonstration test of a SEAR system. The new LCAR design provides the same cooling capability as prior LCAR prototypes while enabling over 30% more heat absorbing capacity. Studies show that it should be feasible to demonstrate SEAR operation in flight by coupling with an existing EMU on the space station.

  19. High-Capacity Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Phillips, Scott; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions will require advanced life support technology that can operate across a wide range of applications and environments. Thermal control systems for space suits and spacecraft will need to meet critical requirements for water conservation and adaptability to highly variable thermal environments. This paper describes a Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) that has been designed to meet performance requirements for future life support systems. A SEAR system comprises a lithium chloride absorber radiator (LCAR) for heat rejection coupled with a space water membrane evaporator (SWME) for heat acquisition. SEAR systems provide heat pumping to minimize radiator size, thermal storage to accommodate variable environmental conditions, and water absorption to minimize use of expendables. We have built and tested a flightlike, high-capacity LCAR, demonstrated its performance in thermal vacuum tests, and explored the feasibility of an ISS demonstration test of a SEAR system. The new LCAR design provides the same cooling capability as prior LCAR prototypes while enabling over 30% more heat absorbing capacity. Studies show that it should be feasible to demonstrate SEAR operation in flight by coupling with an existing EMU on the space station.

  20. The Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on the Fraction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veroustraete, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol pollution attracts a growing interest from atmospheric scientists with regard to their impact on health, the global climate and vegetation stress. A hypothesis, less investigated, is whether atmospheric aerosol interactions in the solar radiation field affect the amount of radiation absorbed by vegetation canopies and hence terrestrial vegetation productivity. Typically, aerosols affect vegetation canopy radiation absorption efficiency by altering the physical characteristics of solar radiation incoming on for example a forest canopy. It has been illustrated, that increasing mixing ratio's of atmospheric particulate matter lead to a higher fraction of diffuse sunlight as opposed to direct sunlight. It can be demonstrated, based on the application of atmospheric (MODTRAN) and leaf/canopy radiative transfer (LIBERTY/SPRINT) models, that radiation absorption efficiency in the PAR band of Picea like forests increases with increasing levels of diffuse radiation. It can be documented - on a theoretical basis - as well, that increasing aerosol loads in the atmosphere, induce and increased canopy PAR absorption efficiency. In this paper it is suggested, that atmospheric aerosols have to be taken into account when estimating vegetation gross primary productivity (GPP). The results suggest that Northern hemisphere vegetation CO2 uptake magnitude may increase with increasing atmospheric aerosol loads. Many climate impact scenario's related to vegetation productivity estimates, do not take this phenomenon into account. Boldly speaking, the results suggest a larger sink function for terrestrial vegetation than generally accepted. Keywords: Aerosols, vegetation, fAPAR, CO2 uptake, diffuse radiation.

  1. Solar radiation in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ólafsson, Haraldur; Cataldi, Maxime; Zehouf, Hafsa; Pálmason, Bolli

    2014-05-01

    Short wave radiation has been observed at several locations in Iceland in recent years. The observations reveal that there is large spatial variability in the incoming radiation. There are indications of a coast-to-inland gradient and there is much greater radiation at central-inland locations than further west as well in the far east. The results are in line with Markús Á. Einarsson's reports where estimation of radiation was based on manned cloud observations shortly after the middle of the 20th century. Values of radiation retrieved from the operational simulations of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) compare in general well with the observations.

  2. Solar Radiation Alert System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    18 December 2007). 19. HAARP , The Hgh Frequency Actve Auroral Research Program. Glossary of Solar and Geophysical Terms. Avalable at...www.haarp.alaska.edu/ haarp /glos.html (accessed: 4 September 2007). 13 20. IZMIRAN. Pushkov Insttute of Terrestral Mag- netsm, Ionosphere and Radowave

  3. Structural and optical properties of copper-coated substrates for solar thermal absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratesi, Stefano; De Lucia, Maurizio; Meucci, Marco; Sani, Elisa

    2016-10-01

    Spectral selectivity, i.e. merging a high absorbance at sunlight wavelengths to a low emittance at the wavelengths of thermal spectrum, is a key characteristics for materials to be used for solar thermal receivers. It is known that spectrally selective absorbers can raise the receiver efficiency for all solar thermal technologies. Tubular sunlight receivers for parabolic trough collector (PTC) systems can be improved by the use of spectrally selective coatings. Their absorbance is increased by deposing black films, while the thermal emittance is minimized by the use of properly-prepared substrates. In this work we describe the intermediate step in the fabrication of black-chrome coated solar absorbers, namely the fabrication and characterization of copper coatings on previously nickel-plated stainless steel substrates. We investigate the copper surface features and optical properties, correlating them to the coating thickness and to the deposition process, in the perspective to assess optimal conditions for solar absorber applications.

  4. SORCE: Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Rottman, Gary; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: Understanding the Sun's influence on the Earth; How the Sun affect Earth's climate; By how much does the Sun's radiation very; Understanding Solar irradiance; History of Solar irradiance observations; The SORCE mission; How do the SORCE instruments measure solar radiation; Total irradiance monitor (TIM); Spectral irradiance monitor (SIM); Solar stellar irradiance comparison experiment (SOLSTICE); XUV photometer system (XPS).

  5. Effects of morphology on the radiative properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols with different aging status.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tianhai; Wu, Yu; Chen, Hao

    2014-06-30

    Light absorbing carbon aerosols play a substantial role in climate change through radiative forcing, which is the dominant absorber of solar radiation. Radiative properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols are strongly dependent on the morphological factors and the mixing mechanism of black carbon with other aerosol components. This study focuses on the morphological effects on the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. Three types aerosols with different aging status such as freshly emitted BC particles, thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols, heavily coated light absorbing carbon aerosols are studied. Our study showed that morphological factors change with the aging of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols to result in a dramatic change in their optical properties. The absorption properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols can be enhanced approximately a factor of 2 at 0.67 um, and these enhancements depend on the morphological factors. A larger shell/core diameter ratio of volume-equivalent shell-core spheres (S/C), which indicates the degree of coating, leads to stronger absorption. The enhancement of absorption properties accompanies a greater enhancement of scattering properties, which is reflected in an increase in single scattering albedo (SSA). The enhancement of single scattering albedo due to the morphological effects can reach a factor of 3.75 at 0.67 μm. The asymmetry parameter has a similar yet smaller enhancement. Moreover, the corresponding optical properties of shell-and-core model determined by using Lorenz -Mie solutions are presented for comparison. We found that the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosol can differ fundamentally from those calculated for the Mie theory shell-and-core model, particularly for thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols. Our studies indicate that the complex morphology

  6. Imperfectly geometric shapes of nanograting structures as solar absorbers with superior performance for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huu, Nghia; Cada, Michael; Pištora, Jaromír

    2014-03-10

    The expectation of perfectly geometric shapes of subwavelength grating (SWG) structures such as smoothness of sidewalls and sharp corners and nonexistence of grating defects is not realistic due to micro/nanofabrication processes. This work numerically investigates optical properties of an optimal solar absorber comprising a single-layered silicon (Si) SWG deposited on a finite Si substrate, with a careful consideration given to effects of various types of its imperfect geometry. The absorptance spectra of the solar absorber with different geometric shapes, namely, the grating with attached nanometer-sized features at the top and bottom of sidewalls and periodic defects within four and ten grating periods are investigated comprehensively. It is found that the grating with attached features at the bottom absorbs more energy than both the one at the top and the perfect grating. In addition, it is shown that the grating with defects in each fourth period exhibits the highest average absorptance (91%) compared with that of the grating having defects in each tenth period (89%), the grating with attached features (89%), and the perfect one (86%). Moreover, the results indicate that the absorptance spectrum of the imperfect structures is insensitive to angles of incidence. Furthermore, the absorptance enhancement is clearly demonstrated by computing magnetic field, energy density, and Poynting vector distributions. The results presented in this study prove that imperfect geometries of the nanograting structure display a higher absorptance than the perfect one, and provide such a practical guideline for nanofabrication capabilities necessary to be considered by structure designers.

  7. Self-assembly of highly efficient, broadband plasmonic absorbers for solar steam generation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Tan, Yingling; Ji, Dengxin; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Pei; Xu, Jun; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Yu, Zongfu; Zhu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    The study of ideal absorbers, which can efficiently absorb light over a broad range of wavelengths, is of fundamental importance, as well as critical for many applications from solar steam generation and thermophotovoltaics to light/thermal detectors. As a result of recent advances in plasmonics, plasmonic absorbers have attracted a lot of attention. However, the performance and scalability of these absorbers, predominantly fabricated by the top-down approach, need to be further improved to enable widespread applications. We report a plasmonic absorber which can enable an average measured absorbance of ~99% across the wavelengths from 400 nm to 10 μm, the most efficient and broadband plasmonic absorber reported to date. The absorber is fabricated through self-assembly of metallic nanoparticles onto a nanoporous template by a one-step deposition process. Because of its efficient light absorption, strong field enhancement, and porous structures, which together enable not only efficient solar absorption but also significant local heating and continuous stream flow, plasmonic absorber-based solar steam generation has over 90% efficiency under solar irradiation of only 4-sun intensity (4 kW m(-2)). The pronounced light absorption effect coupled with the high-throughput self-assembly process could lead toward large-scale manufacturing of other nanophotonic structures and devices.

  8. Estimating solar radiation for plant simulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, T.; French, V.; Leduc, S.

    1985-01-01

    Five algorithms producing daily solar radiation surrogates using daily temperatures and rainfall were evaluated using measured solar radiation data for seven U.S. locations. The algorithms were compared both in terms of accuracy of daily solar radiation estimates and terms of response when used in a plant growth simulation model (CERES-wheat). Requirements for accuracy of solar radiation for plant growth simulation models are discussed. One algorithm is recommended as being best suited for use in these models when neither measured nor satellite estimated solar radiation values are available.

  9. Organometal Halide Perovskite Solar Absorbers and Ferroelectric Nanocomposites for Harvesting Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettiarachchi, Chaminda Lakmal

    Organometal halide perovskite absorbers such as methylammonium lead iodide chloride (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx), have emerged as an exciting new material family for photovoltaics due to its appealing features that include suitable direct bandgap with intense light absorbance, band gap tunability, ultra-fast charge carrier generation, slow electron-hole recombination rates, long electron and hole diffusion lengths, microsecond-long balanced carrier mobilities, and ambipolarity. The standard method of preparing CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite precursors is a tedious process involving multiple synthesis steps and, the chemicals being used (hydroiodic acid and methylamine) are quite expensive. This work describes a novel, single-step, simple, and cost-effective solution approach to prepare CH3NH3PbI3-xClx thin films by the direct reaction of the commercially available CH3NH 3Cl (or MACl) and PbI2. A detailed analysis of the structural and optical properties of CH3NH3PbI3-xCl x thin films deposited by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition is presented. Optimum growth conditions have been identified. It is shown that the deposited thin films are highly crystalline with intense optical absorbance. Charge carrier separation of these thin films can be enhanced by establishing a local internal electric field that can reduce electron-hole recombination resulting in increased photo current. The intrinsic ferroelectricity in nanoparticles of Barium Titanate (BaTiO3 -BTO) embedded in the solar absorber can generate such an internal field. A hybrid structure of CH3NH 3PbI3-xClx perovskite and ferroelectric BTO nanocomposite FTO/TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3-xClx : BTO/P3HT/Cu as a new type of photovoltaic device is investigated. Aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition process that is scalable to large-scale manufacturing was used for the growth of the multilayer structure. TiO 2 and P3HT with additives were used as ETL and HTL respectively. The growth process of the solar absorber layer includes the

  10. Self-assembly of highly efficient, broadband plasmonic absorbers for solar steam generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; Tan, Yingling; Ji, Dengxin; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Pei; Xu, Jun; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Yu, Zongfu; Zhu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The study of ideal absorbers, which can efficiently absorb light over a broad range of wavelengths, is of fundamental importance, as well as critical for many applications from solar steam generation and thermophotovoltaics to light/thermal detectors. As a result of recent advances in plasmonics, plasmonic absorbers have attracted a lot of attention. However, the performance and scalability of these absorbers, predominantly fabricated by the top-down approach, need to be further improved to enable widespread applications. We report a plasmonic absorber which can enable an average measured absorbance of ~99% across the wavelengths from 400 nm to 10 μm, the most efficient and broadband plasmonic absorber reported to date. The absorber is fabricated through self-assembly of metallic nanoparticles onto a nanoporous template by a one-step deposition process. Because of its efficient light absorption, strong field enhancement, and porous structures, which together enable not only efficient solar absorption but also significant local heating and continuous stream flow, plasmonic absorber–based solar steam generation has over 90% efficiency under solar irradiation of only 4-sun intensity (4 kW m−2). The pronounced light absorption effect coupled with the high-throughput self-assembly process could lead toward large-scale manufacturing of other nanophotonic structures and devices. PMID:27152335

  11. The Potential of Heat Collection from Solar Radiation in Asphalt Solar Collectors in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddu, Salmia; Talib, Siti Hidayah Abdul; Itam, Zarina

    2016-03-01

    The implementation of asphalt solar collectors as a means of an energy source is being widely studied in recent years. Asphalt pavements are exposed to daily solar radiation, and are capable of reaching up to 70°C in temperature. The potential of harvesting energy from solar pavements as an alternative energy source in replace of non-renewable energy sources prone to depletion such as fuel is promising. In Malaysia, the sun intensity is quite high and for this reason, absorbing the heat from sun radiation, and then utilizing it in many other applications such as generating electricity could definitely be impressive. Previous researches on the different methods of studying the effect of heat absorption caused by solar radiation prove to be quite old and inaffective. More recent findings, on the otherhand, prove to be more informative. This paper focuses on determining the potential of heat collection from solar radiation in asphalt solar collectors using steel piping. The asphalt solar collector model constructed for this research was prepared in the civil engineering laboratory. The hot mixed asphalt (HMA) contains 10% bitumen mixed with 90% aggregates of the total size of asphalt. Three stainless steel pipes were embedded into the interior region of the model according to the design criteria, and then put to test. Results show that harvesting energy from asphalt solar collectors proves highly potential in Malaysia due its the hot climate.

  12. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for 18F-BPA PET.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yuzuru; Kurihara, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Yasui, Naoko; Honda, Naoki; Igaki, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Background Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a molecular radiation therapy approach based on the 10 B (n, α) 7 Li nuclear reaction in cancer cells. In BNCT, delivery of 10 B in the form of 4-borono-phenylalanine conjugated with fructose (BPA-fr) to the cancer cells is important. The PET tracer 4-borono-2-18F-fluoro-phenylalanine (FBPA) has been used to predict the accumulation of BPA-fr before BNCT. Purpose To determine the biodistribution and dosimetric parameters in 18F-BPA PET/CT studies. Material and Methods Human biokinetic data were obtained during clinical 18F-BPA PET studies between February and June 2015 at one institution. Nine consecutive patients were studied prospectively. The internal radiation dose was calculated on the basis of radioactivity data from blood, urine, and normal tissue of the heart, liver, spleen, kidney, and other parts of the body at each time point using OLINDA/EXM1.1 program. We compared our calculations with published 18F-FDG data. Results Adult patients (3 men, 3 women; age range, 28-68 years) had significantly smaller absorbed doses than pediatric patients (3 patients; age range, 5-12 years) ( P = 0.003). The mean effective dose was 57% lower in adult patients compared with pediatric patients. Mean effective doses for 18F-BPA were 25% lower than those for 18F-FDG presented in International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) publication 106. Conclusion We found significant differences in organ absorbed doses for 18F-BPA against those for 18F-FDG presented in ICRP publication 106. Mean effective doses for 18F-BPA were smaller than those for 18F-FDG in the publication by 0.5-38% (mean difference, 25%).

  13. Seasonal Evolution and Interannual Variability of the Local Solar Energy Absorbed by the Arctic Sea Ice-Ocean System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Markus, Thorsten; Schwieger, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The melt season of the Arctic sea ice cover is greatly affected by the partitioning of the incident solar radiation between reflection to the atmosphere and absorption in the ice and ocean. This partitioning exhibits a strong seasonal cycle and significant interannual variability. Data in the period 1998, 2000-2004 were analyzed in this study. Observations made during the 1997-1998 SHEBA (Surface HEat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) field experiment showed a strong seasonal dependence of the partitioning, dominated by a five-phase albedo evolution. QuikSCAT scatterometer data from the SHEBA region in 1999-2004 were used to further investigate solar partitioning in summer. The time series of scatterometer data were used to determine the onset of melt and the beginning of freezeup. This information was combined with SSM/I-derived ice concentration, TOVS-based estimates of incident solar irradiance, and SHEBA results to estimate the amount of solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system for these years. The average total solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system from April through September was 900 MJ m(sup -2). There was considerable interannual variability, with a range of 826 to 1044 MJ m(sup -2). The total amount of solar energy absorbed by the ice and ocean was strongly related to the date of melt onset, but only weakly related to the total duration of the melt season or the onset of freezeup. The timing of melt onset is significant because the incident solar energy is large and a change at this time propagates through the entire melt season, affecting the albedo every day throughout melt and freezeup.

  14. Development of a carbonaceous selective absorber for solar thermal energy collection and process for its formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, John D.

    1989-02-01

    The main goal of the US Department of Energy supported part of this project is to develop information about controlling the complicated chemical processes involved in the formation of a carbonaceous selective absorber and learn what equipment will allow production of this absorber commercially. The work necessary to accomplish this goal is not yet complete. Formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber in the conveyor oven tried so far has been unsatisfactory, because the proper conditions for applying the carbonaceous coating in each conveyor oven fabricated, either have been difficult to obtain, or have been difficult to maintain over an extended period of time. A new conveyor oven is nearing completion which is expected to allow formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber on absorber tubes in a continuous operation over many days without the necessity of cleaning the conveyor oven or changing the thickness of the electroplated nickel catalyst to compensate for changes in the coating environment in the oven. Work under this project concerned with forming and sealing glass panels to test ideas on evacuated glass solar collector designs and production have been generally quite satisfactory. Delays in completion of the selective absorber work, has caused postponement of the fabrication of a small prototype evacuated glass solar collector panel. Preliminary cost estimates of the selective absorber and solar collector panel indicate that this collector system should be lower in cost than evacuated solar collectors now on the market.

  15. Superlattice photonic crystal as broadband solar absorber for high temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Rinnerbauer, Veronika; Shen, Yichen; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Schäffler, Friedrich; Celanovic, Ivan

    2014-12-15

    A high performance solar absorber using a 2D tantalum superlattice photonic crystal (PhC) is proposed and its design is optimized for high-temperature energy conversion. In contrast to the simple lattice PhC, which is limited by diffraction in the short wavelength range, the superlattice PhC achieves solar absorption over broadband spectral range due to the contribution from two superposed lattices with different cavity radii. The superlattice PhC geometry is tailored to achieve maximum thermal transfer efficiency for a low concentration system of 250 suns at 1500 K reaching 85.0% solar absorptivity. In the high concentration case of 1000 suns, the superlattice PhC absorber achieves a solar absorptivity of 96.2% and a thermal transfer efficiency of 82.9% at 1500 K, amounting to an improvement of 10% and 5%, respectively, versus the simple square lattice PhC absorber. In addition, the performance of the superlattice PhC absorber is studied in a solar thermophotovoltaic system which is optimized to minimize absorber re-emission by reducing the absorber-to-emitter area ratio and using a highly reflective silver aperture.

  16. Radiation energy receiver for laser and solar propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rault, D. F. G.; Hertzberg, A.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of remotely heating a rocket propellant with a high intensity radiant energy flux is especially attractive due to its high specific impulse and large payload mass capabilities. In this paper, a radiation receiver-thruster which is especially suited to the particular thermodynamic and spectral characteristics of highly concentrated solar energy is proposed. In this receiver, radiant energy is volumetrically absorbed within a hydrogen gas seeded with alkali metal vapors. The alkali atoms and molecules absorb the radiant flux and, subsequently, transfer their internal excitation to hydrogen molecules through collisional quenching. It is shown that such a radiation receiver would outperform a blackbody cavity type receiver in both efficiency and maximum operating temperatures. A solar rocket equipped with such a receiver-thruster would deliver thrusts of several hundred newtons at a specific impulse of 1000 seconds.

  17. GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The handbook discusses the history of GaAs solar cell development, presents equations useful for working with GaAs solar cells, describes commonly used instrumentation techniques for assessing radiation effects in solar cells and fundamental processes occurring in solar cells exposed to ionizing radiation, and explains why radiation decreases the electrical performance of solar cells. Three basic elements required to perform solar array degradation calculations: degradation data for GaAs solar cells after irradiation with 1 MeV electrons at normal incidence; relative damage coefficients for omnidirectional electron and proton exposure; and the definition of the space radiation environment for the orbit of interest, are developed and used to perform a solar array degradation calculation.

  18. Stratospheric Aerosols for Solar Radiation Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Ben

    SRM in the context of this entry involves placing a large amount of aerosols in the stratosphere to reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface, thereby cooling the surface and counteracting some of the warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gases. The way this is accomplished depends on the specific aerosol used, but the basic mechanism involves backscattering and absorbing certain amounts of solar radiation aloft. Since warming from greenhouse gases is due to longwave (thermal) emission, compensating for this warming by reduction of shortwave (solar) energy is inherently imperfect, meaning SRM will have climate effects that are different from the effects of climate change. This will likely manifest in the form of regional inequalities, in that, similarly to climate change, some regions will benefit from SRM, while some will be adversely affected, viewed both in the context of present climate and a climate with high CO2 concentrations. These effects are highly dependent upon the means of SRM, including the type of aerosol to be used, the particle size and other microphysical concerns, and the methods by which the aerosol is placed in the stratosphere. SRM has never been performed, nor has deployment been tested, so the research up to this point has serious gaps. The amount of aerosols required is large enough that SRM would require a major engineering endeavor, although SRM is potentially cheap enough that it could be conducted unilaterally. Methods of governance must be in place before deployment is attempted, should deployment even be desired. Research in public policy, ethics, and economics, as well as many other disciplines, will be essential to the decision-making process. SRM is only a palliative treatment for climate change, and it is best viewed as part of a portfolio of responses, including mitigation, adaptation, and possibly CDR. At most, SRM is insurance against dangerous consequences that are directly due to increased surface air

  19. Design and proof of concept of an innovative very high temperature ceramic solar absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, Cédric; Ferriere, Alain; Toutant, Adrien; Olalde, Gabriel; Peroy, Jean-Yves; Chéreau, Patrick; Ferrato, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Hybrid solar gas-turbine (HSGT) is an attractive technology to foster market penetration of CSP. HSGT offers some major advantages like for example high solar-to-electric conversion efficiency, reduced water requirement and low capital cost. A very high temperature solar receiver is needed when elevated solar share is claimed. A few research works, as reported by Karni et al. [8] and by Buck et al. [1], have been dedicated to solar receiver technologies able to deliver pressurized air at temperature above 750°C. The present work focuses on research aiming at developing an efficient and reliable solar absorber able to provide pressurized air at temperature up to 1000°C and more. A surface absorber technology is selected and a modular design of receiver is proposed in which each absorber module is made of BOOSTEC® SiC ceramic (silicon carbide) as bulk material with straight air channels inside. Early stage experimental works done at CNRS/PROMES on lab-scale absorbers showed that the thermo-mechanical behavior of this material is a critical issue, resulting in elevated probability of failure under severe conditions like large temperature gradient or steep variation of solar flux density in situations of cloud covering. This paper reports on recent progress made at CNRS/PROMES to address this critical issue. The design of the absorber has been revised and optimized according to thermo-mechanical numerical simulations, and an experimental proof of concept has been done on a pilot-scale absorber module at Themis solar tower facility.

  20. Solar radiation for Mars power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed information about the solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. A procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally and daily variation of the global, direct (or beam), and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated, are presented. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the Sun with a special diode on the Viking Lander cameras; and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation.

  1. Flight attendant radiation dose from solar particle events.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeri L; Mertens, Christopher J; Grajewski, Barbara; Luo, Lian; Tseng, Chih-Yu; Cassinelli, Rick T

    2014-08-01

    Research has suggested that work as a flight attendant may be related to increased risk for reproductive health effects. Air cabin exposures that may influence reproductive health include radiation dose from galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle events. This paper describes the assessment of radiation dose accrued during solar particle events as part of a reproductive health study of flight attendants. Solar storm data were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Space Weather Prediction Center list of solar proton events affecting the Earth environment to ascertain storms relevant to the two study periods (1992-1996 and 1999-2001). Radiation dose from exposure to solar energetic particles was estimated using the NAIRAS model in conjunction with galactic cosmic radiation dose calculated using the CARI-6P computer program. Seven solar particle events were determined to have potential for significant radiation exposure, two in the first study period and five in the second study period, and over-lapped with 24,807 flight segments. Absorbed (and effective) flight segment doses averaged 6.5 μGy (18 μSv) and 3.1 μGy (8.3 μSv) for the first and second study periods, respectively. Maximum doses were as high as 440 μGy (1.2 mSv) and 20 flight segments had doses greater than 190 μGy (0.5 mSv). During solar particle events, a pregnant flight attendant could potentially exceed the equivalent dose limit to the conceptus of 0.5 mSv in a month recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  2. Solar radiation and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juzeniene, Asta; Brekke, Pål; Dahlback, Arne; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Reichrath, Jörg; Moan, Kristin; Holick, Michael F.; Grant, William B.; Moan, Johan

    2011-06-01

    The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

  3. Improved Single-Source Precursors for Solar-Cell Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Improved single-source precursor compounds have been invented for use in spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) of chalcopyrite semiconductor absorber layers of thin-film cells. A "single-source precursor compound" is a single molecular compound that contains all the required elements, which when used under the spray CVD conditions, thermally decomposes to form CuIn(x)Ga(1-x)S(y)Se(2-y).

  4. Solar Radiation and Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Pacific Warm Pool Estimated Using TOGA COARE Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chou, Shu-Hsien; Zhao, Wenzhong

    1999-01-01

    The energy budget of the tropical western Pacific (TWP) is particularly important because this is one of the most energetic convection regions on the Earth. Nearly half of the solar radiation incident at the top of atmosphere is absorbed at the surface and only about 22% absorbed in the atmosphere. A large portion of the excess heat absorbed at the surface is transferred to the atmosphere through evaporation, which provides energy and water for convection and precipitation. The western equatorial Pacific is characterized by the highest sea surface temperature (SST) and heaviest rainfall in the world ocean. A small variation of SST associated with the eastward shift of the warm pool during El-Nino/Souther Oscillation changes the atmospheric circulation pattern and affects the global climate. In a study of the TWP surface heat and momentum fluxes during the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) Intensive observing period (IOP) from November 1992 to February have found that the solar radiation is the most important component of the surface energy budget, which undergoes significant temporal and spatial variation. The variations are influenced by the two 40-50 days Madden Julian Oscillations (MJOs) which propagated eastward from the Indian Ocean to the Central Pacific during the IOP. The TWP surface solar radiation during the COARE IOP was investigated by a number of studies. In addition, the effects of clouds on the solar heating of the atmosphere in the TWP was studied using energy budget analysis. In this study, we present some results of the TWP surface solar shortwave or SW radiation budget and the effect of clouds on the atmospheric solar heating using the surface radiation measurements and Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 4 radiance measurements during COARE IOP.

  5. Coordinated weather balloon solar radiation measurements during a solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R G; Marlton, G J; Williams, P D; Nicoll, K A

    2016-09-28

    Solar eclipses provide a rapidly changing solar radiation environment. These changes can be studied using simple photodiode sensors, if the radiation reaching the sensors is unaffected by cloud. Transporting the sensors aloft using standard meteorological instrument packages modified to carry extra sensors, provides one promising but hitherto unexploited possibility for making solar eclipse radiation measurements. For the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44°N, 0.94°W), Lerwick (60.15°N, 1.13°W) and Reykjavik (64.13°N, 21.90°W), straddling the path of the eclipse. The balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. In the swing-averaged technique, the mean value across a set of swings was used to approximate the radiation falling on a horizontal surface; in the swing-maximum technique, the direct beam was estimated by assuming that the maximum solar radiation during a swing occurs when the photodiode sensing surface becomes normal to the direction of the solar beam. Both approaches, essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. © 2016 The Authors.

  6. Coordinated weather balloon solar radiation measurements during a solar eclipse

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solar eclipses provide a rapidly changing solar radiation environment. These changes can be studied using simple photodiode sensors, if the radiation reaching the sensors is unaffected by cloud. Transporting the sensors aloft using standard meteorological instrument packages modified to carry extra sensors, provides one promising but hitherto unexploited possibility for making solar eclipse radiation measurements. For the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44°N, 0.94°W), Lerwick (60.15°N, 1.13°W) and Reykjavik (64.13°N, 21.90°W), straddling the path of the eclipse. The balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. In the swing-averaged technique, the mean value across a set of swings was used to approximate the radiation falling on a horizontal surface; in the swing-maximum technique, the direct beam was estimated by assuming that the maximum solar radiation during a swing occurs when the photodiode sensing surface becomes normal to the direction of the solar beam. Both approaches, essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse’. PMID:27550757

  7. Radiation Testing of PICA at the Solar Power Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory's Solar Power Tower was used to irradiate specimens of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), in order to evaluate whether this thermal protection system material responded differently to potential shock layer radiative heating than to convective heating. Tests were run at 50, 100 and 150 Watts per square centimeter levels of concentrated solar radiation. Experimental results are presented both from spectral measurements on 1- 10 mm thick specimens of PICA, as well as from in-depth temperature measurements on instrumented thicker test specimens. Both spectral measurements and measured in-depth temperature profiles showed that, although it is a porous, low-density material, PICA does not exhibit problematic transparency to the tested high levels of NIR radiation, for all pragmatic cm-to-inch scale thicknesses. PICA acted as a surface absorber to efficiently absorb the incident visible and near infrared incident radiation in the top 2 millimeter layer in the Solar Power Tower tests up to 150 Watts per square centimeter.

  8. Development of selective solar absorbers on the basis of aluminum roll-bond heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, M.

    1981-11-01

    A deposition technique comparable to two-stage anodizing and especially suited for solar absorber panels, using roll-bond Al 99.5 and AlMnZr alloys as a substrate, was developed. The coating is of the nickel structure filter type and provides average solar absorptivity values of 94% and thermal emission values of 14%. The setup of a production plant capable of coating surfaces up to 2 sq m is described as well as the development of corrosion resistent hermetically sealed collectors. By means of an appropriate surface treatment the same corrosion resistance was achieved for absorbers mounted in ventilated collectors.

  9. Solar radiation on Mars: Stationary photovoltaic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Sherman, I.; Landis, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Solar energy is likely to be an important power source for surface-based operation on Mars. Photovoltaic cells offer many advantages. In this article we have presented analytical expressions and solar radiation data for stationary flat surfaces (horizontal and inclined) as a function of latitude, season and atmospheric dust load (optical depth). The diffuse component of the solar radiation on Mars can be significant, thus greatly affecting the optimal inclination angle of the photovoltaic surface.

  10. Solar radiation on Mars: Update 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. The authors present a procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally and daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the Sun with a special diode on the Viking Lander cameras and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation. This work is an update to NASA-TM-102299 and includes a refinement of the solar radiation model.

  11. Experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in a low-profile, concentrated solar thermal collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiyuan; Zheng, Cheng; Mesgari, Sara; Hewakuruppu, Yasitha L.; Hjerrild, Natasha; Crisostomo, Felipe; Morrison, Karl; Woffenden, Albert; Rosengarten, Gary; Scott, Jason A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies [1-3] have demonstrated that nanotechnology, in the form of nanoparticles suspended in water and organic liquids, can be employed to enhance solar collection via direct volumetric absorbers. However, current nanofluid solar collector experimental studies are either relevant to low-temperature flat plate solar collectors (<100 °C) [4] or higher temperature (>100 °C) indoor laboratory-scale concentrating solar collectors [1, 5]. Moreover, many of these studies involve in thermal properties of nanofluid (such as thermal conductivity) enhancement in solar collectors by using conventional selective coated steel/copper tube receivers [6], and no full-scale concentrating collector has been tested at outdoor condition by employing nanofluid absorber [2, 6]. Thus, there is a need of experimental researches to evaluate the exact performance of full-scale concentrating solar collector by employing nanofluids absorber at outdoor condition. As reported previously [7-9], a low profile (<10 cm height) solar thermal concentrating collector was designed and analysed which can potentially supply thermal energy in the 100-250 °C range (an application currently met by gas and electricity). The present study focuses on the design and experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in this newly designed collector. The nanofluid absorber consists of glass tubes used to contain chemically functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed in DI water. MWCNTs (average diameter of 6-13 nm and average length of 2.5-20 μm) were functionalized by potassium persulfate as an oxidant. The nanofluids were prepared with a MCWNT concentration of 50 +/- 0.1 mg/L to form a balance between solar absorption depth and viscosity (e.g. pumping power). Moreover, experimentally comparison of the thermal efficiency between two receivers (a black chrome-coated copper tube versus a MWCNT nanofluid contained within a glass tubetube) is investigated. Thermal

  12. Leaf color is fine-tuned on the solar spectra to avoid strand direct solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Kume, Atsushi; Akitsu, Tomoko; Nasahara, Kenlo Nishida

    2016-07-01

    The spectral distributions of light absorption rates by intact leaves are notably different from the incident solar radiation spectra, for reasons that remain elusive. Incident global radiation comprises two main components; direct radiation from the direction of the sun, and diffuse radiation, which is sunlight scattered by molecules, aerosols and clouds. Both irradiance and photon flux density spectra differ between direct and diffuse radiation in their magnitude and profile. However, most research has assumed that the spectra of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) can be averaged, without considering the radiation classes. We used paired spectroradiometers to sample direct and diffuse solar radiation, and obtained relationships between the PAR spectra and the absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments and organs. As monomers in solvent, the spectral absorbance of Chl a decreased with the increased spectral irradiance (W m(-2) nm(-1)) of global PAR at noon (R(2) = 0.76), and was suitable to avoid strong spectral irradiance (λmax = 480 nm) rather than absorb photon flux density (μmol m(-2) s(-1) nm(-1)) efficiently. The spectral absorption of photosystems and the intact thallus and leaves decreased linearly with the increased spectral irradiance of direct PAR at noon (I dir-max), where the wavelength was within the 450-650 nm range (R(2) = 0.81). The higher-order structure of photosystems systematically avoided the strong spectral irradiance of I dir-max. However, when whole leaves were considered, leaf anatomical structure and light scattering in leaf tissues made the leaves grey bodies for PAR and enabled high PAR use efficiency. Terrestrial green plants are fine-tuned to spectral dynamics of incident solar radiation and PAR absorption is increased in various structural hierarchies.

  13. Impacts of solar-absorbing aerosol layers on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann M.; ...

    2017-10-26

    Here, the effects of an initially overlying layer of solar-absorbing aerosol on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds are examined using large-eddy simulations. For lightly drizzling cloud the transition is generally hastened, resulting mainly from increased cloud droplet number concentration ( N c) induced by entrained aerosol. The increased N c slows sedimentation of cloud droplets and shortens their relaxation time for diffusional growth, both of which accelerate entrainment of overlying air and thereby stratocumulus breakup. However, the decrease in albedo from cloud breakup is more than offset by redistributing cloud water over a greater number of droplets,more » such that the diurnal-average shortwave forcing at the top of the atmosphere is negative. The negative radiative forcing is enhanced by sizable longwave contributions, which result from the greater cloud breakup and a reduced boundary layer height associated with aerosol heating. A perturbation of moisture instead of aerosol aloft leads to a greater liquid water path and a more gradual transition. Adding absorbing aerosol to that atmosphere results in substantial reductions in liquid water path (LWP) and cloud cover that lead to positive shortwave and negative longwave forcings on average canceling each other. Only for heavily drizzling clouds is the breakup delayed, as inhibition of precipitation overcomes cloud water loss from enhanced entrainment. Considering these simulations as an imperfect proxy for biomass burning plumes influencing Namibian stratocumulus, we expect regional indirect plus semi-direct forcings to be substantially negative to negligible at the top of the atmosphere, with its magnitude sensitive to background and perturbation properties.« less

  14. Impacts of solar-absorbing aerosol layers on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann M.

    Here, the effects of an initially overlying layer of solar-absorbing aerosol on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds are examined using large-eddy simulations. For lightly drizzling cloud the transition is generally hastened, resulting mainly from increased cloud droplet number concentration ( N c) induced by entrained aerosol. The increased N c slows sedimentation of cloud droplets and shortens their relaxation time for diffusional growth, both of which accelerate entrainment of overlying air and thereby stratocumulus breakup. However, the decrease in albedo from cloud breakup is more than offset by redistributing cloud water over a greater number of droplets,more » such that the diurnal-average shortwave forcing at the top of the atmosphere is negative. The negative radiative forcing is enhanced by sizable longwave contributions, which result from the greater cloud breakup and a reduced boundary layer height associated with aerosol heating. A perturbation of moisture instead of aerosol aloft leads to a greater liquid water path and a more gradual transition. Adding absorbing aerosol to that atmosphere results in substantial reductions in liquid water path (LWP) and cloud cover that lead to positive shortwave and negative longwave forcings on average canceling each other. Only for heavily drizzling clouds is the breakup delayed, as inhibition of precipitation overcomes cloud water loss from enhanced entrainment. Considering these simulations as an imperfect proxy for biomass burning plumes influencing Namibian stratocumulus, we expect regional indirect plus semi-direct forcings to be substantially negative to negligible at the top of the atmosphere, with its magnitude sensitive to background and perturbation properties.« less

  15. Impacts of solar-absorbing aerosol layers on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Wood, Robert; Kollias, Pavlos

    2017-10-01

    The effects of an initially overlying layer of solar-absorbing aerosol on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds are examined using large-eddy simulations. For lightly drizzling cloud the transition is generally hastened, resulting mainly from increased cloud droplet number concentration (Nc) induced by entrained aerosol. The increased Nc slows sedimentation of cloud droplets and shortens their relaxation time for diffusional growth, both of which accelerate entrainment of overlying air and thereby stratocumulus breakup. However, the decrease in albedo from cloud breakup is more than offset by redistributing cloud water over a greater number of droplets, such that the diurnal-average shortwave forcing at the top of the atmosphere is negative. The negative radiative forcing is enhanced by sizable longwave contributions, which result from the greater cloud breakup and a reduced boundary layer height associated with aerosol heating. A perturbation of moisture instead of aerosol aloft leads to a greater liquid water path and a more gradual transition. Adding absorbing aerosol to that atmosphere results in substantial reductions in liquid water path (LWP) and cloud cover that lead to positive shortwave and negative longwave forcings on average canceling each other. Only for heavily drizzling clouds is the breakup delayed, as inhibition of precipitation overcomes cloud water loss from enhanced entrainment. Considering these simulations as an imperfect proxy for biomass burning plumes influencing Namibian stratocumulus, we expect regional indirect plus semi-direct forcings to be substantially negative to negligible at the top of the atmosphere, with its magnitude sensitive to background and perturbation properties.

  16. Impacts of Solar-Absorbing Aerosol Layers on the Transition of Stratocumulus to Trade Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Wood, Robert; Kollias, Pavlos

    2017-01-01

    The effects of an initially overlying layer of solar-absorbing aerosol on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds are examined using large-eddy simulations. For lightly drizzling cloud the transition is generally hastened, resulting mainly from increased cloud droplet number concentration (Nc) induced by entrained aerosol. The increased Nc slows sedimentation of cloud droplets and shortens their relaxation time for diffusional growth, both of which accelerate entrainment of overlying air and thereby stratocumulus breakup. However, the decrease in albedo from cloud breakup is more than offset by redistributing cloud water over a greater number of droplets, such that the diurnal-average shortwave forcing at the top of the atmosphere is negative. The negative radiative forcing is enhanced by sizable longwave contributions, which result from the greater cloud breakup and a reduced boundary layer height associated with aerosol heating. A perturbation of moisture instead of aerosol aloft leads to a greater liquid water path and a more gradual transition. Adding absorbing aerosol to that atmosphere results in substantial reductions in liquid water path (LWP) and cloud cover that lead to positive short-wave and negative longwave forcings on average canceling each other. Only for heavily drizzling clouds is the breakup delayed, as inhibition of precipitation overcomes cloud water loss from enhanced entrainment. Considering these simulations as an imperfect proxy for biomass burning plumes influencing Namibian stratocumulus, we expect regional indirect plus semi-direct forcings to be substantially negative to negligible at the top of the atmosphere, with its magnitude sensitive to background and perturbation properties.

  17. Measuring Solar Radiation Incident on Earth: Solar Constant-3 (SOLCON-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crommelynck, Dominique; Joukoff, Alexandre; Dewitte, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Life on Earth is possible because the climate conditions on Earth are relatively mild. One element of the climate on Earth, the temperature, is determined by the heat exchanges between the Earth and its surroundings, outer space. The heat exchanges take place in the form of electromagnetic radiation. The Earth gains energy because it absorbs solar radiation, and it loses energy because it emits thermal infrared radiation to cold space. The heat exchanges are in balance: the heat gained by the Earth through solar radiation equals the heat lost through thermal radiation. When the balance is perturbed, a temperature change and hence a climate change of the Earth will occur. One possible perturbation of the balance is the CO2 greenhouse effect: when the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere increases, this will reduce the loss of thermal infrared radiation to cold space. Earth will gain more heat and hence the temperature will rise. Another perturbation of the balance can occur through variation of the amount of energy emitted by the sun. When the sun emits more energy, this will directly cause a rise of temperature on Earth. For a long time scientists believed that the energy emitted by the sun was constant. The 'solar constant' is defined as the amount of solar energy received per unit surface at a distance of one astronomical unit (the average distance of Earth's orbit) from the sun. Accurate measurements of the variations of the solar constant have been made since 1978. From these we know that the solar constant varies approximately with the 11-year solar cycle observed in other solar phenomena, such as the occurrence of sunspots, dark spots that are sometimes visible on the solar surface. When a sunspot occurs on the sun, since the spot is dark, the radiation (light) emitted by the sun drops instantaneously. Oddly, periods of high solar activity, when a lot of sunspot numbers increase, correspond to periods when the average solar constant is high. This indicates that

  18. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  19. Spectral distribution of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecherikunnel, A. T.; Richmond, J.

    1980-01-01

    Available quantitative data on solar total and spectral irradiance are examined in the context of utilization of solar irradiance for terrestrial applications of solar energy. The extraterrestrial solar total and spectral irradiance values are also reviewed. Computed values of solar spectral irradiance at ground level for different air mass values and various levels of atmospheric pollution or turbidity are presented. Wavelengths are given for computation of solar, absorptance, transmittance and reflectance by the 100 selected-ordinate method and by the 50 selected-ordinate method for air mass 1.5 and 2 solar spectral irradiance for the four levels of atmospheric pollution.

  20. Microstructure of a black chrome solar selective absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.

    1978-08-01

    The structure of Harshaw Chemicals' CHROM-ONYX type of black chrome/metal selective absorber was studied to gain a better understanding of its influence upon the mechanism of wavelength selectivity. Spectral reflectance measurements were performed on seven samples. In this study, the best selectivity was found by these measurements to be 1.0 micron of black chrome on copper and 0.7 micron of black chrome on nickel. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study microstructure and chemical composition. As a result of the combined studies, some effects of black chrome thickness and the metallic substrate were determined. It was foundmore » that black chrome consisted of a very fine metallic distribution of particles of chromium, possibly suspended within a matrix of an oxide of chromium. This combination was, in turn, agglomerated into larger particles within the 0.05--0.3 micron size range. These larger particles formed a network which constituted the surface coating.« less

  1. Solar radiation on Mars: Update 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. A procedure and solar radiation related data are presented from which the daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. Given the optical depth of the Mars atmosphere, the global radiation is calculated from the normalized net flux function based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation. The direct beam was derived from the optical depth using Beer's law, and the diffuse component was obtained from the difference of the global and the direct beam radiation. The optical depths of the Mars atmosphere were derived from images taken of the Sun with a special diode on the cameras used on the two Viking Landers.

  2. Radiative entropy generation in a gray absorbing, emitting, and scattering planar medium at radiative equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Pegah; Safavinejad, Ali

    2017-11-01

    Radiative entropy generation through a gray absorbing, emitting, and scattering planar medium at radiative equilibrium with diffuse-gray walls is investigated. The radiative transfer equation and radiative entropy generation equations are solved using discrete ordinates method. Components of the radiative entropy generation are considered for two different boundary conditions: two walls are at a prescribed temperature and mixed boundary conditions, which one wall is at a prescribed temperature and the other is at a prescribed heat flux. The effect of wall emissivities, optical thickness, single scattering albedo, and anisotropic-scattering factor on the entropy generation is attentively investigated. The results reveal that entropy generation in the system mainly arises from irreversible radiative transfer at wall with lower temperature. Total entropy generation rate for the system with prescribed temperature at walls remarkably increases as wall emissivity increases; conversely, for system with mixed boundary conditions, total entropy generation rate slightly decreases. Furthermore, as the optical thickness increases, total entropy generation rate remarkably decreases for the system with prescribed temperature at walls; nevertheless, for the system with mixed boundary conditions, total entropy generation rate increases. The variation of single scattering albedo does not considerably affect total entropy generation rate. This parametric analysis demonstrates that the optical thickness and wall emissivities have a significant effect on the entropy generation in the system at radiative equilibrium. Considering the parameters affecting radiative entropy generation significantly, provides an opportunity to optimally design or increase overall performance and efficiency by applying entropy minimization techniques for the systems at radiative equilibrium.

  3. Dielectric compound parabolic concentrating solar collector with a frustrated total internal reflection absorber.

    PubMed

    Hull, J R

    1989-01-01

    Coupling a dielectric compound parabolic concentrator (DCPC) to an absorber across a vacuum gap by means of frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) can theoretically approach the maximum concentration permitted by physical laws, thus allowing higher radiative fluxes in thermal applications. The calculated optical performance of 2-D DCPCs with FTIR absorbers indicates that the ratio of gap thickness to optical wavelength must be <0.22 before the optical performance of the DCPC is superior to that of the nondielectric CPC.

  4. Operando Analyses of Solar Fuels Light Absorbers and Catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Lewerenz, Hans -Joachim; Lichterman, Michael F.; Richter, Matthias H.; ...

    2016-06-06

    Operando synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy in the tender X-ray energy range has been used to obtain information on the energy-band relations of semiconductor and metal-covered semiconductor surfaces while in direct contact with aqueous electrolytes under potentiostatic control. The system that was investigated consists of highly doped Si substrates that were conformally coated with ~70 nm titania films produced by atomic-layer deposition. TiO 2/electrolyte and Si/TiO 2 /Ni/electrolyte interfaces were then analyzed by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. The PES data allows for determination of the flat-band position and identification of potential regions in which Fermi level pinning, depletion, or accumulation occurred. Operandomore » X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques were additionally used to investigate the properties of heterogeneous electrocatalysts for the oxygen-evolution reaction. Operando XAS including the pre-edge, edge and EXAFS regions allowed the development of a detailed picture of the catalysts under operating conditions, and elucidated the changes in the physical and electronic structure of the catalyst that accompanied increases in the applied potential. Specifically, XAS data, combined with DFT studies, indicated that the activity of the electrocatalyst correlated with the formation of Fe dopant sites in γ-NiOOH.« less

  5. Unassisted HI photoelectrolysis using n-WSe 2 solar absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, James R.; Potash, Rebecca A.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    Molybdenum and tungsten diselenide are among the most robust and efficient semiconductor materials for photoelectrochemistry, but they have seen limited use for integrated solar energy storage systems. Herein, we report that n-type WSe 2 photoelectrodes can facilitate unassisted aqueous HI electrolysis to H 2(g) and HI 3(aq) when placed in contact with a platinum counter electrode and illuminated by simulated sunlight. Even in strongly acidic electrolyte, the photoelectrodes are robust and operate very near their maximum power point. We have rationalized this behavior by characterizing the n-WSe 2|HI/HI 3 half cell, the Pt|HI/H 2||HI 3/HI|Pt full cell, and the n-WSemore » 2 band-edge positions. Importantly, specific interactions between the n-WSe 2 surface and aqueous iodide significantly shift the semiconductor’s flatband potential and allow for unassisted HI electrolysis. These findings exemplify the important role of interfacial chemical reactivity in influencing the energetics of semiconductor-liquid junctions and the resulting device performance.« less

  6. Unassisted HI photoelectrolysis using n-WSe2 solar absorbers.

    PubMed

    McKone, James R; Potash, Rebecca A; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-06-07

    Molybdenum and tungsten diselenide are among the most robust and efficient semiconductor materials for photoelectrochemistry, but they have seen limited use for integrated solar energy storage systems. Herein, we report that n-type WSe2 photoelectrodes can facilitate unassisted aqueous HI electrolysis to H2(g) and HI3(aq) when placed in contact with a platinum counter electrode and illuminated by simulated sunlight. Even in strongly acidic electrolyte, the photoelectrodes are robust and operate very near their maximum power point. We have rationalized this behavior by characterizing the n-WSe2|HI/HI3 half cell, the Pt|HI/H2||HI3/HI|Pt full cell, and the n-WSe2 band-edge positions. Importantly, specific interactions between the n-WSe2 surface and aqueous iodide significantly shift the semiconductor's flatband potential and allow for unassisted HI electrolysis. These findings exemplify the important role of interfacial chemical reactivity in influencing the energetics of semiconductor-liquid junctions and the resulting device performance.

  7. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  8. The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB)

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Manajit; Habte, Aron; Lopez, Anthony

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB), including sensing, measurement and forecasting, and discusses observations that are needed for research and product development.

  9. Effects of solar radiation on glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Kinser, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation of selected glasses are reported. Optical property degradation is studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Strength changes are measured using a concentric ring bend test. Direct fracture toughness measurements using an indentation test are planned.

  10. Solar radiation alert system : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-03-01

    The Solar Radiation Alert (SRA) system continuously evaluates measurements of high-energy protons made by instruments on GOES satellites. If the measurements indicate a substantial elevation of effective dose rates at aircraft flight altitudes, the C...

  11. Solar-Radiation Measuring Equipment and Glossary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. A.; Patel, A. M.; Greenbaum, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    1976 listing of commercially available solar-radiation measuring equipment is presented in 50-page report. Sensor type, response time, cost data, and comments concerning specifications and intended usage are listed for 145 instruments from 38 manufactures.

  12. Investigation of theoretical efficiency limit of hot carriers solar cells with a bulk indium nitride absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliberti, P.; Feng, Y.; Takeda, Y.; Shrestha, S. K.; Green, M. A.; Conibeer, G.

    2010-11-01

    Theoretical efficiencies of a hot carrier solar cell considering indium nitride as the absorber material have been calculated in this work. In a hot carrier solar cell highly energetic carriers are extracted from the device before thermalisation, allowing higher efficiencies in comparison to conventional solar cells. Previous reports on efficiency calculations approached the problem using two different theoretical frameworks, the particle conservation (PC) model or the impact ionization model, which are only valid in particular extreme conditions. In addition an ideal absorber material with the approximation of parabolic bands has always been considered in the past. Such assumptions give an overestimation of the efficiency limits and results can only be considered indicative. In this report the real properties of wurtzite bulk InN absorber have been taken into account for the calculation, including the actual dispersion relation and absorbance. A new hybrid model that considers particle balance and energy balance at the same time has been implemented. Effects of actual impact ionization (II) and Auger recombination (AR) lifetimes have been included in the calculations for the first time, considering the real InN band structure and thermalisation rates. It has been observed that II-AR mechanisms are useful for cell operation in particular conditions, allowing energy redistribution of hot carriers. A maximum efficiency of 43.6% has been found for 1000 suns, assuming thermalisation constants of 100 ps and ideal blackbody absorption. This value of efficiency is considerably lower than values previously calculated adopting PC or II-AR models.

  13. Progress In The Commercialization Of A Carbonaceous Solar Selective Absorber On A Glass Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, John D.; Haiad, J. Carlos; Averett, Anthony J.

    1987-11-01

    A carbonaceous solar selective absorber is formed on a glass substrate by coating the glass with a silver infrared reflecting layer, electroplating a thin nickel catalyst coating on the silver using very special plating conditions, and then exposing the nickel coated, silvered glass substrate to acetylene at a temperature of about 400 - 500°C for about five minutes. A fairly large plater and conveyor oven have been constructed and operated for the formation of these solar selective absorbers in order to study the formation of this absorber by a process which might be used commercially. Samples of this selective absorber on a glass substrate have been formed using the plater and conveyor oven. The samples, which have the best optical properties, have an absorptance of about 0.9 and an emittance of about 0.03. Excessive decomposition of the acetylene by the walls of the oven at higher temperatures with certain wall materials and oven geometries can prevent the formation of good selective absorbers. Procedures for preventing excessive decomposition of the acetylene and the knowledge gained so far by these studies is discussed.

  14. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-09-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed.

  15. A multilayer physically based snowpack model simulating direct and indirect radiative impacts of light-absorbing impurities in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzet, Francois; Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Picard, Ghislain; Arnaud, Laurent; Voisin, Didier; Lejeune, Yves; Charrois, Luc; Nabat, Pierre; Morin, Samuel

    2017-11-01

    Light-absorbing impurities (LAIs) decrease snow albedo, increasing the amount of solar energy absorbed by the snowpack. Its most intuitive and direct impact is to accelerate snowmelt. Enhanced energy absorption in snow also modifies snow metamorphism, which can indirectly drive further variations of snow albedo in the near-infrared part of the solar spectrum because of the evolution of the near-surface snow microstructure. New capabilities have been implemented in the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus (referred to as Crocus) to account for impurities' deposition and evolution within the snowpack and their direct and indirect impacts. Once deposited, the model computes impurities' mass evolution until snow melts out, accounting for scavenging by meltwater. Taking advantage of the recent inclusion of the spectral radiative transfer model TARTES (Two-stream Analytical Radiative TransfEr in Snow model) in Crocus, the model explicitly represents the radiative impacts of light-absorbing impurities in snow. The model was evaluated at the Col de Porte experimental site (French Alps) during the 2013-2014 snow season against in situ standard snow measurements and spectral albedo measurements. In situ meteorological measurements were used to drive the snowpack model, except for aerosol deposition fluxes. Black carbon (BC) and dust deposition fluxes used to drive the model were extracted from simulations of the atmospheric model ALADIN-Climate. The model simulates snowpack evolution reasonably, providing similar performances to our reference Crocus version in terms of snow depth, snow water equivalent (SWE), near-surface specific surface area (SSA) and shortwave albedo. Since the reference empirical albedo scheme was calibrated at the Col de Porte, improvements were not expected to be significant in this study. We show that the deposition fluxes from the ALADIN-Climate model provide a reasonable estimate of the amount of light-absorbing impurities deposited on the

  16. The CVD ZrB2 as a selective solar absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randich, E.; Allred, D. D.

    Coatings of ZrB2 and TiB2 for photothermal solar absorber applications were prepared using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Oxidation tests suggest a maximum temperature limit for air exposure of 600 K for TiB2 and 800 K for Z4B2. Both materials exhibit innate spectral selectivity with emittance at 375 K ranging from 0.06 to 0.09 and solar absorptance for ZrB2 ranging from 0.67 to 0.77 and solar absorptance for TiB2 ranging from 0.46 to 0.58. ZrB2 has better solar selectivity and more desirable oxidation behavior than TiB2. A 0.071 micrometer antireflection coating of Si3N4 deposited on the ZrB2 coating leads to an increase in absorptance from 0.77 to 0.93, while the emittance remains unchanged.

  17. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V., E-mail: niko200707@mail.ru; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of anmore » obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.« less

  18. Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This is a close-up of the NASA-sponsored Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Satellite. The SORCE mission, launched aboard a Pegasus rocket January 25, 2003, will provide state of the art measurements of incoming x-ray, ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, and total solar radiation. Critical to studies of the Sun and its effect on our Earth system and mankind, SORCE will provide measurements that specifically address long-term climate change, natural variability and enhanced climate prediction, and atmospheric ozone and UV-B radiation. Orbiting around the Earth accumulating solar data, SORCE measures the Sun's output with the use of state-of-the-art radiometers, spectrometers, photodiodes, detectors, and bolo meters engineered into instruments mounted on a satellite observatory. SORCE is carrying 4 instruments: The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM); the Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE); the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM); and the XUV Photometer System (XPS).

  19. Solar radiation at Parsons, West Virginia

    Treesearch

    James H. Patric; Stanley Caruso

    1978-01-01

    Twelve years of solar radiation data, measured with a Kipp-Zonen pyranometer, were recorded near Parsons, West Virginia. The data agree well with calculated values of potential and average radiation for the vicinity and are applicable to the central Appalachian region.

  20. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  1. Compositionally Graded Absorber for Efficient and Stable Near-Infrared-Transparent Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fan; Pisoni, Stefano; Weiss, Thomas P; Feurer, Thomas; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Fuchs, Peter; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Zortea, Lukas; Tiwari, Ayodhya N; Buecheler, Stephan

    2018-03-01

    Compositional grading has been widely exploited in highly efficient Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 , CdTe, GaAs, quantum dot solar cells, and this strategy has the potential to improve the performance of emerging perovskite solar cells. However, realizing and maintaining compositionally graded perovskite absorber from solution processing is challenging. Moreover, the operational stability of graded perovskite solar cells under long-term heat/light soaking has not been demonstrated. In this study, a facile partial ion-exchange approach is reported to achieve compositionally graded perovskite absorber layers. Incorporating compositional grading improves charge collection and suppresses interface recombination, enabling to fabricate near-infrared-transparent perovskite solar cells with power conversion efficiency of 16.8% in substrate configuration, and demonstrate 22.7% tandem efficiency with 3.3% absolute gain when mechanically stacked on a Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 bottom cell. Non-encapsulated graded perovskite device retains over 93% of its initial efficiency after 1000 h operation at maximum power point at 60 °C under equivalent 1 sun illumination. The results open an avenue in exploring partial ion-exchange to design graded perovskite solar cells with improved efficiency and stability.

  2. Compositionally Graded Absorber for Efficient and Stable Near‐Infrared‐Transparent Perovskite Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pisoni, Stefano; Weiss, Thomas P.; Feurer, Thomas; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Fuchs, Peter; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Zortea, Lukas; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Compositional grading has been widely exploited in highly efficient Cu(In,Ga)Se2, CdTe, GaAs, quantum dot solar cells, and this strategy has the potential to improve the performance of emerging perovskite solar cells. However, realizing and maintaining compositionally graded perovskite absorber from solution processing is challenging. Moreover, the operational stability of graded perovskite solar cells under long‐term heat/light soaking has not been demonstrated. In this study, a facile partial ion‐exchange approach is reported to achieve compositionally graded perovskite absorber layers. Incorporating compositional grading improves charge collection and suppresses interface recombination, enabling to fabricate near‐infrared‐transparent perovskite solar cells with power conversion efficiency of 16.8% in substrate configuration, and demonstrate 22.7% tandem efficiency with 3.3% absolute gain when mechanically stacked on a Cu(In,Ga)Se2 bottom cell. Non‐encapsulated graded perovskite device retains over 93% of its initial efficiency after 1000 h operation at maximum power point at 60 °C under equivalent 1 sun illumination. The results open an avenue in exploring partial ion‐exchange to design graded perovskite solar cells with improved efficiency and stability. PMID:29593970

  3. Dynamic tuning of optical absorbers for accelerated solar-thermal energy storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongyong; Tong, Zhen; Ye, Qinxian; Hu, Hang; Nie, Xiao; Yan, Chen; Shang, Wen; Song, Chengyi; Wu, Jianbo; Wang, Jun; Bao, Hua; Tao, Peng; Deng, Tao

    2017-11-14

    Currently, solar-thermal energy storage within phase-change materials relies on adding high thermal-conductivity fillers to improve the thermal-diffusion-based charging rate, which often leads to limited enhancement of charging speed and sacrificed energy storage capacity. Here we report the exploration of a magnetically enhanced photon-transport-based charging approach, which enables the dynamic tuning of the distribution of optical absorbers dispersed within phase-change materials, to simultaneously achieve fast charging rates, large phase-change enthalpy, and high solar-thermal energy conversion efficiency. Compared with conventional thermal charging, the optical charging strategy improves the charging rate by more than 270% and triples the amount of overall stored thermal energy. This superior performance results from the distinct step-by-step photon-transport charging mechanism and the increased latent heat storage through magnetic manipulation of the dynamic distribution of optical absorbers.

  4. Production and characterization of large-area sputtered selective solar absorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Wolfgang; Koehl, Michael; Wittwer, Volker

    1992-11-01

    Most of the commercially available selective solar absorber coatings are produced by electroplating. Often the reproducibility or the durability of their optical properties is not very satisfying. Good reproducibility can be achieved by sputtering, the technique for the production of low-(epsilon) coatings for windows. The suitability of this kind of deposition technique for flat-plate solar absorber coatings based on the principle of ceramic/metal composites was investigated for different material combinations, and prototype collectors were manufactured. The optical characterization of the coatings is based on spectral measurements of the near-normal/hemispherical and the angle-dependent reflectance in the wavelength-range 0.38 micrometers - 17 micrometers . The durability assessment was carried out by temperature tests in ovens and climatic chambers.

  5. Orbiter radiator panel solar focusing test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, H. R.; Rankin, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Test data are presented which define the area around the Orbiter radiator panels for which the solar reflections are concentrated to one-sun or more. The concave shape of the panels and their specular silver/Teflon coating causes focusing of the reflected solar energy which could have adverse heating effects on equipment or astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) in the vicinity of the radiator panels. A room ambient test method was utilized with a one-tenth scale model of the radiator panels.

  6. Nowcast and Short-Term Forecast of Solar Radiation for Photovoltaic power and Solar thermal using 3rd generation geostationary satellite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, H.; Teruyuki, N.; Nakajima, T. Y.; Higurashi, A.; Hashimoto, M.; Suzuki, K.; Uchida, J.; Nagao, T. M.; Shi, C.; Inoue, T.

    2017-12-01

    It is important to estimate the earth's radiation budget accurately for understanding of climate. Clouds can cool the Earth by reflecting solar radiation but also maintain warmth by absorbing and emitting terrestrial radiation. similarly aerosols also have an effect on radiation budget by absorption and scattering of Solar radiation. In this study, we developed the high speed and accurate algorithm for shortwave (SW) radiation budget and it's applied to geostationary satellite for rapid analysis. It enabled highly accurate monitoring of solar radiation and photo voltaic (PV) power generation. Next step, we try to update the algorithm for retrieval of Aerosols and Clouds. It indicates the accurate atmospheric parameters for estimation of solar radiation. (This research was supported in part by CREST/EMS).

  7. Design and cost analysis for an ammonia-based solar thermochemical cavity absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, O. M.

    1980-01-01

    A design and cost analysis is introduced for a solar thermochemical cavity absorber operated at the focus of a tracking paraboloidal concentrator and based on the ammonia dissociation reaction. The absorber design consists of a catalyst-filled nickel alloy tube wound into a spiral forming the inner cavity wall and shaped to match the incident power density profile to the reactor heat requirements. The reactor tube is welded to a coaxial counterflow heat exchanger. The relationships among the power density profile, the reaction thermodynamics and kinetics, and the heat transfer characteristics are examined in detail and it is shown that an installed cost goal of typically 10 U.S. dollars per square meter of solar collector area can be achieved through use of high activity ammonia dissociation catalyst. The optimum absorber size for a given paraboloidal dish area is calculated for a system pressure of 20 MPa and it is shown that a cost effective absorber suitable for 100,000-hr operation would operate at 90% efficiency at 750 C wall temperature.

  8. Temperature Response of Emissivity in Intrinsic Silicon: A Selective Absorber for Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia, Cristian Alonso

    The National Academy of Engineers named affordable solar energy as one of the grand challenges for the twenty-first century. Even in sunniest U.S. locations, without subsidies, home generation is still cost prohibitive. To address the cost of solar energy, we investigated intrinsic silicon as a low emissivity selective absorber. We wanted to determine the emissivity of intrinsic silicon at elevated temperatures. At elevated temperatures, a selective absorber coupled to a heat engine could efficiently generate electrical power. Photothermal efficiency depends on the absorber's emissivity. I analyzed total hemispherical emissivity for graphite and intrinsic silicon using a thermal decay method inside a thermal isolation chamber. The results show low emissivity values for intrinsic silicon. Consequently, for temperatures less than 300 °C, intrinsic silicon has a small emissivity (0.16). This small value is in agreement with doped silicon experiments. However, unlike doped silicon, at elevated temperatures of 600 °C, intrinsic silicon emissivity values remain low (0.33). Our analysis suggests intrinsic silicon could convert more solar power into heat than an ideal blackbody. Specifically, the harvested heat could drive a heat engine for efficient power generation. Thus, a cost-effective electrical generating system can operate with a small land footprint using earth abundant silicon.

  9. Radiation From Solar Activity | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-08-07

    Solar flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and geomagnetic storms from the sun can send extreme bursts of ionizing radiation and magnetic energy toward Earth. Some of this energy is in the form ionizing radiation and some of the energy is magnetic energy.

  10. Scalable, "Dip-and-Dry" Fabrication of a Wide-Angle Plasmonic Selective Absorber for High-Efficiency Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Jyotirmoy; Wang, Derek; Overvig, Adam C; Shi, Norman N; Paley, Daniel; Zangiabadi, Amirali; Cheng, Qian; Barmak, Katayun; Yu, Nanfang; Yang, Yuan

    2017-11-01

    A galvanic-displacement-reaction-based, room-temperature "dip-and-dry" technique is demonstrated for fabricating selectively solar-absorbing plasmonic-nanoparticle-coated foils (PNFs). The technique, which allows for facile tuning of the PNFs' spectral reflectance to suit different radiative and thermal environments, yields PNFs which exhibit excellent, wide-angle solar absorptance (0.96 at 15°, to 0.97 at 35°, to 0.79 at 80°), and low hemispherical thermal emittance (0.10) without the aid of antireflection coatings. The thermal emittance is on par with those of notable selective solar absorbers (SSAs) in the literature, while the wide-angle solar absorptance surpasses those of previously reported SSAs with comparable optical selectivities. In addition, the PNFs show promising mechanical and thermal stabilities at temperatures of up to 200 °C. Along with the performance of the PNFs, the simplicity, inexpensiveness, and environmental friendliness of the "dip-and-dry" technique makes it an appealing alternative to current methods for fabricating selective solar absorbers. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Experimental indication for band gap widening of chalcopyrite solar cell absorbers after potassium fluoride treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistor, P.; Greiner, D.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Brunken, S.; Gorgoi, M.; Steigert, A.; Calvet, W.; Lauermann, I.; Klenk, R.; Unold, T.; Lux-Steiner, M.-C.

    2014-08-01

    The implementation of potassium fluoride treatments as a doping and surface modification procedure in chalcopyrite absorber preparation has recently gained much interest since it led to new record efficiencies for this kind of solar cells. In the present work, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorbers have been evaporated on alkali containing Mo/soda-lime glass substrates. We report on compositional and electronic changes of the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorber surface as a result of a post deposition treatment with KF (KF PDT). In particular, by comparing standard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron-based hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), we are able to confirm a strong Cu depletion in the absorbers after the KF PDT which is limited to the very near surface region. As a result of the Cu depletion, we find a change of the valence band structure and a shift of the valence band onset by approximately 0.4 eV to lower binding energies which is tentatively explained by a band gap widening as expected for Cu deficient compounds. The KF PDT increased the open circuit voltage by 60-70 mV compared to the untreated absorbers, while the fill factor deteriorated.

  12. Experimental indication for band gap widening of chalcopyrite solar cell absorbers after potassium fluoride treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pistor, P., E-mail: paul.pistor@physik.uni-halle.de; Greiner, D.; Kaufmann, C. A.

    2014-08-11

    The implementation of potassium fluoride treatments as a doping and surface modification procedure in chalcopyrite absorber preparation has recently gained much interest since it led to new record efficiencies for this kind of solar cells. In the present work, Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorbers have been evaporated on alkali containing Mo/soda-lime glass substrates. We report on compositional and electronic changes of the Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber surface as a result of a post deposition treatment with KF (KF PDT). In particular, by comparing standard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron-based hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), we are able to confirm a strong Cu depletionmore » in the absorbers after the KF PDT which is limited to the very near surface region. As a result of the Cu depletion, we find a change of the valence band structure and a shift of the valence band onset by approximately 0.4 eV to lower binding energies which is tentatively explained by a band gap widening as expected for Cu deficient compounds. The KF PDT increased the open circuit voltage by 60–70 mV compared to the untreated absorbers, while the fill factor deteriorated.« less

  13. Obliquity Modulation of the Incoming Solar Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on a basic principle of orbital resonance, we have identified a huge deficit of solar radiation induced by the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity as possibly the causal mechanism for ice age glaciation. Including this modulation effect on solar radiation, we have performed model simulations of climate change for the past 2 million years. Simulation results show that: (1) For the past 1 million years, temperature fluctuation cycles were dominated by a 100-Kyr period due to amplitude-frequency resonance effect of the obliquity; (2) From 2 to 1 million years ago, the amplitude-frequency interactions. of the obliquity were so weak that they were not able to stimulate a resonance effect on solar radiation; (3) Amplitude and frequency modulation analysis on solar radiation provides a series of resonance in the incoming solar radiation which may shift the glaciation cycles from 41-Kyr to 100-Kyr about 0.9 million years ago. These results are in good agreement with the marine and continental paleoclimate records. Thus, the proposed climate response to the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity may be the key to understanding the glaciation puzzles in paleoclimatology.

  14. Resistance of Marine Bacterioneuston to Solar Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Agogué, Hélène; Joux, Fabien; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Lebaron, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    A total of 90 bacterial strains were isolated from the sea surface microlayer (i.e., bacterioneuston) and underlying waters (i.e., bacterioplankton) from two sites of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The strains were identified by sequence analysis, and growth recovery was investigated after exposure to simulated solar radiation. Bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton isolates were subjected to six different exposure times, ranging from 0.5 to 7 h of simulated noontime solar radiation. Following exposure, the growth of each isolate was monitored, and different classes of resistance were determined according to the growth pattern. Large interspecific differences among the 90 marine isolates were observed. Medium and highly resistant strains accounted for 41% and 22% of the isolates, respectively, and only 16% were sensitive strains. Resistance to solar radiation was equally distributed within the bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton. Relative contributions to the highly resistant class were 43% for γ-proteobacteria and 14% and 8% for α-proteobacteria and the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides (CFB) group, respectively. Within the γ-proteobacteria, the Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas genera appeared to be highly resistant to solar radiation. The majority of the CFB group (76%) had medium resistance. Our study further provides evidence that pigmented bacteria are not more resistant to solar radiation than nonpigmented bacteria. PMID:16151115

  15. On the absorption of solar radiation in a layer of oil beneath a layer of snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Barkstrom, B. R.

    1976-01-01

    Solar energy deposition in oil layers covered by snow is calculated for three model snow types using radiative transfer theory. It is suggested that excess absorbed energy is unlikely to escape, so that some melting is likely to occur for snow depths less than about 4 cm.

  16. A Solar Volumetric Receiver: Influence of Absorbing Cells Configuration on Device Thermal Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Shuja, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal performance of a solar volumetric receiver incorporating the different cell geometric configurations is investigated. Triangular, hexagonal, and rectangular absorbing cells are incorporated in the analysis. The fluid volume fraction, which is the ratio of the volume of the working fluid over the total volume of solar volumetric receiver, is introduced to assess the effect of cell size on the heat transfer rates in the receiver. In this case, reducing the fluid volume fraction corresponds to increasing cell size in the receiver. SiC is considered as the cell material, and air is used as the working fluid in the receiver. The Lambert's Beer law is incorporated to account for the solar absorption in the receiver. A finite element method is used to solve the governing equation of flow and heat transfer. It is found that the fluid volume fraction has significant effect on the flow field in the solar volumetric receiver, which also modifies thermal field in the working fluid. The triangular absorbing cell gives rise to improved effectiveness of the receiver and then follows the hexagonal and rectangular cells. The second law efficiency of the receiver remains high when hexagonal cells are used. This occurs for the fluid volume fraction ratio of 0.5.

  17. Trade-Offs in Thin Film Solar Cells with Layered Chalcostibite Photovoltaic Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Peng, Haowei

    Discovery of novel semiconducting materials is needed for solar energy conversion and other optoelectronic applications. However, emerging low-dimensional solar absorbers often have unconventional crystal structures and unusual combinations of optical absorption and electrical transport properties, which considerably slows down the research and development progress. Here, the effect of stronger absorption and weaker carrier collection of 2D-like absorber materials are studied using a high-throughput combinatorial experimental approach, complemented by advanced characterization and computations. It is found that the photoexcited charge carrier collection in CuSbSe 2 solar cells is enhanced by drift in an electric field, addressing a different absorption/collection balance. Themore » resulting drift solar cells efficiency is <5% due to inherent J SC/ V OC trade-off, suggesting that improved carrier diffusion and better contacts are needed to further increase the CuSbSe 2 performance. Furthermore, this study also illustrates the advantages of high-throughput experimental methods for fast optimization of the optoelectronic devices based on emerging low-dimensional semiconductor materials.« less

  18. Trade-Offs in Thin Film Solar Cells with Layered Chalcostibite Photovoltaic Absorbers

    DOE PAGES

    Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Peng, Haowei; ...

    2017-01-25

    Discovery of novel semiconducting materials is needed for solar energy conversion and other optoelectronic applications. However, emerging low-dimensional solar absorbers often have unconventional crystal structures and unusual combinations of optical absorption and electrical transport properties, which considerably slows down the research and development progress. Here, the effect of stronger absorption and weaker carrier collection of 2D-like absorber materials are studied using a high-throughput combinatorial experimental approach, complemented by advanced characterization and computations. It is found that the photoexcited charge carrier collection in CuSbSe 2 solar cells is enhanced by drift in an electric field, addressing a different absorption/collection balance. Themore » resulting drift solar cells efficiency is <5% due to inherent J SC/ V OC trade-off, suggesting that improved carrier diffusion and better contacts are needed to further increase the CuSbSe 2 performance. Furthermore, this study also illustrates the advantages of high-throughput experimental methods for fast optimization of the optoelectronic devices based on emerging low-dimensional semiconductor materials.« less

  19. Orbiter radiator panel solar focusing test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    A test was conducted to determine the solar reflections from the Orbiter radiator panels. A one-tenth scale model of the forward and mid-forward radiator panels in the deployed position was utilized in the test. Test data was obtained to define the reflected one-sun envelope for the embossed silver/Teflon radiator coating. The effects of the double contour on the forward radiator panels were included in the test. Solar concentrations of 2 suns were measured and the one-sun envelope was found to extend approximately 86 inches above the radiator panel. A limited amount of test data was also obtained for the radiator panels with the smooth silver/Teflon coating to support the planned EVA on the Orbiter STS-5 flight. Reflected solar flux concentrations as high as 8 suns were observed with the smooth coating and the one-sun envelope was determined to extend 195 inches above the panel. It is recommended that additional testing be conducted to define the reflected solar environment beyond the one-sun boundary.

  20. Radiative Forcing of the Lower Stratosphere over the Arctic by Light Absorbing Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP), such as soot and dust, change the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere and contribute to regional and global climate change. The lower stratosphere (LS) is particularly sensitive to the presence of LAP since the lifetime of particles in the LS may extend from months to years, in contrast to tropospheric lifetimes of at most a few days. The source of particles in the LS may be aircraft, meteorites or emissions from tropospheric sources. There has been a lack, however, of accurate, quantitative measurements made with sufficiently sensitive instruments. This limits our understanding of the origin and lifetime of aerosols in this region of the atmosphere. Here we present recent measurements in the Arctic UT/LS with a new, highly sensitive instrument that has detected black carbon (BC) mass concentrations of 20-1000 ng m(exp -3) that are 10-1000 times larger than those reported in previous studies and are at least 30 times larger than predicted masses based on fuel consumption by commercial aircraft that fly in these regions. Scattering and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation by the particles in a layer from 8- 12 Km leads to a negative net forcing of -0.5 W sq m at the top of the atmosphere and 9C of heating in this layer during the average aerosol lifetime at these altitudes. The new measurements suggest that the influence of aircraft emissions have been underestimated or that aircraft may not be the only significant source of light absorbing particles in the UT/LS. The presence of these aerosols can cause local changes in the thermal structure of the lower stratosphere and a subsequent modification of stratosphere/tropopause exchange of gases and particles.

  1. Working group written presentation: Solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wayne S.

    1989-01-01

    The members of the Solar Radiation Working Group arrived at two major solar radiation technology needs: (1) generation of a long term flight data base; and (2) development of a standardized UV testing methodology. The flight data base should include 1 to 5 year exposure of optical filters, windows, thermal control coatings, hardened coatings, polymeric films, and structural composites. The UV flux and wavelength distribution, as well as particulate radiation flux and energy, should be measured during this flight exposure. A standard testing methodology is needed to establish techniques for highly accelerated UV exposure which will correlate well with flight test data. Currently, UV can only be accelerated to about 3 solar constants and can correlate well with flight exposure data. With space missions to 30 years, acceleration rates of 30 to 100X are needed for efficient laboratory testing.

  2. Solar Radiation on Mars: Tracking Photovoltaic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.; Crutchik, Marcos

    1994-01-01

    A photovoltaic power source for surface-based operation on Mars can offer many advantages. Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars and the insolation on various types of collector surfaces are necessary for effective design of future planned photovoltaic systems. In this article we have presented analytical expressions for solar radiation calculation and solar radiation data for single axis (of various types) and two axis tracking surfaces and compared the insulation to horizontal and inclined surfaces. For clear skies (low atmospheric dust load) tracking surfaces resulted in higher insolation than stationary surfaces, whereas for highly dusty atmospheres, the difference is small. The insolation on the different types of stationary and tracking surfaces depend on latitude, season and optical depth of the atmosphere, and the duration of system operation. These insolations have to be compared for each mission.

  3. A solar radiation database for Chile.

    PubMed

    Molina, Alejandra; Falvey, Mark; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    Chile hosts some of the sunniest places on earth, which has led to a growing solar energy industry in recent years. However, the lack of high resolution measurements of solar irradiance becomes a critical obstacle for both financing and design of solar installations. Besides the Atacama Desert, Chile displays a large array of "solar climates" due to large latitude and altitude variations, and so provides a useful testbed for the development of solar irradiance maps. Here a new public database for surface solar irradiance over Chile is presented. This database includes hourly irradiance from 2004 to 2016 at 90 m horizontal resolution over continental Chile. Our results are based on global reanalysis data to force a radiative transfer model for clear sky solar irradiance and an empirical model based on geostationary satellite data for cloudy conditions. The results have been validated using 140 surface solar irradiance stations throughout the country. Model mean percentage error in hourly time series of global horizontal irradiance is only 0.73%, considering both clear and cloudy days. The simplicity and accuracy of the model over a wide range of solar conditions provides confidence that the model can be easily generalized to other regions of the world.

  4. Measurement of solar radiation at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of solar energy arriving at the surface of the Earth are defined and the history of solar measurements in the United States presented. Radiation and meteorological measurements being made at solar energy meteorological research and training sites and calibration procedures used there are outlined. Data illustrating the annual variation in daily solar radiation at Ann Arbor, Michigan and the diurnal variation in radiation at Albuquerque, New Mexico are presented. Direct normal solar radiation received at Albuquerque is contrasted with that received at Maynard, Massachusetts. Average measured global radiation for a period of one year for four locations under clear skies, 50% cloud cover, and 100% cloud cover is given and compared with the solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. The May distribution of mean daily direct solar radiation and mean daily global solar radiation over the United States is presented. The effects of turbidity on the direct and circumsolar radiation are shown.

  5. Impact of natural photosensitizer extraction solvent upon light absorbance in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhaimi, Suriati; Mohamed Siddick, Siti Zubaidah; Ahmad Hambali, Nor Azura Malini; Retnasamy, Vithyacharan; Abdul Wahid, Mohamad Halim; Mohamad Shahimin, Mukhzeer

    2017-02-01

    Natural pigmentations of Ardisia, Bawang Sabrang, Harum Manis mango, Oxalis Triangularis and Rosella were used to study the general trend in performance of dyes as a photosensitizer in the application of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on optical light absorbance and photoelectrochemical characteristics. From the Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometer with the recorded absorption measurements in the range between 400 nm to 800 nm, the dyes extracted from Rosella and Oxalis Triangularis in water solvent exhibited the conversion efficiency up to 0.68% and 0.67%, respectively. The light absorbance peak for dye extracted from Ardisia, Bawang Sabrang, Oxalis Triangularis and Rosella in water and ethanol solvent resulted in the range between 500 nm to 650 nm, while the Harum Manis mango resulted in the broader spectra in both water and ethanol solvent. The light absorbance spectra of each the dyes shows shifted wavelength spectrum when the extracted dye is adsorbed onto TiO2 film surface that might influenced the absorption of light by TiO2 particle in the visible region. The capabilities of the dyes to absorb light when bonded onto the TiO2 photoanode was found to be significant with the current-voltage conversion of the cell. The results demonstrates just the tip of the vastness of natural dyes' (native to tropical region) feasibility and applicability as a photosensitizer.

  6. Absorption of solar radiation by alkali vapors. [for efficient high temperature energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattick, A. T.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical study of the direct absorption of solar radiation by the working fluid of high temperature, high efficiency energy converters has been carried out. Alkali vapors and potassium vapor in particular were found to be very effective solar absorbers and suitable thermodynamically for practical high temperature cycles. Energy loss via reradiation from a solar boiler was shown to reduce the overall efficiency of radiation-heated energy converters, although a simple model of radiation transfer in a potassium vapor solar boiler revealed that self-trapping of the reradiation may reduce this loss considerably. A study was also made of the requirements for a radiation boiler window. It was found that for sapphire, one of the best solar transmitting materials, the severe environment in conjunction with high radiation densities will require some form of window protection. An aerodynamic shield is particularly advantageous in this capacity, separating the window from the absorbing vapor to prevent condensation and window corrosion and to reduce the radiation density at the window.

  7. Research Update: Emerging chalcostibite absorbers for thin-film solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    de Souza Lucas, Francisco Willian; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2018-06-04

    Copper antimony chalcogenides CuSbCh 2 (Ch=S, Se) are an emerging family of absorbers studied for thin-film solar cells. These non-toxic and Earth-abundant materials show a layered low-dimensional chalcostibite crystal structure, leading to interesting optoelectronic properties for applications in photovoltaic (PV) devices. This research update describes the CuSbCh 2 crystallographic structures, synthesis methods, competing phases, band structures, optoelectronic properties, point defects, carrier dynamics, and interface band offsets, based on experimental and theoretical data. Correlations between these absorber properties and PV device performance are discussed, and opportunities for further increase in the efficiency of the chalcostibite PV devices are highlighted.

  8. 10.4% Efficient triple organic solar cells containing near infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerheim, Rico; Körner, Christian; Oesen, Benjamin; Leo, Karl

    2016-03-01

    The efficiency of organic solar cells can be increased by serially stacked subcells with spectrally different absorber materials. For the triple junction devices presented here, we use the small molecule donor materials DCV5T-Me for the green region and Tol2-benz-bodipy or Ph2-benz-bodipy as near infrared absorbers. The broader spectral response allows an efficiency increase from a pure DCV5T-Me triple cell to a triple junction containing a Ph2-benz-bodipy subcell, reaching 10.4%. As often observed for organic photovoltaics, the efficiency is further increased at low light intensities to 11%, which allows improved energy harvesting under real outdoor conditions and better performance indoor.

  9. Research Update: Emerging chalcostibite absorbers for thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza Lucas, Francisco Willian; Zakutayev, Andriy

    Copper antimony chalcogenides CuSbCh 2 (Ch=S, Se) are an emerging family of absorbers studied for thin-film solar cells. These non-toxic and Earth-abundant materials show a layered low-dimensional chalcostibite crystal structure, leading to interesting optoelectronic properties for applications in photovoltaic (PV) devices. This research update describes the CuSbCh 2 crystallographic structures, synthesis methods, competing phases, band structures, optoelectronic properties, point defects, carrier dynamics, and interface band offsets, based on experimental and theoretical data. Correlations between these absorber properties and PV device performance are discussed, and opportunities for further increase in the efficiency of the chalcostibite PV devices are highlighted.

  10. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the index of refraction on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux in semitransparent materials, such as some ceramics, is investigated analytically. In the case considered here, a plane layer of a ceramic material is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces; the material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. It is shown that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained in a simple manner from the results for an index of refraction of unity.

  11. SOLAR UV RADIATION AND AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade significant interest has developed in the influence of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in surface waters of lakes and the sea. A major portion of this research has focused on photoreactions of the colored component of dissolved organic matter, ...

  12. MODELING ACUTE EXPOSURE TO SOLAR RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major technical challenges in calculating solar flux on the human form has been the complexity of the surface geometry (i.e., the surface normal vis a vis the incident radiation). The American Cancer Society reports that over 80% of skin cancers occur on the face, he...

  13. Photoacoustic Determination of Non-radiative Relaxation Time of Absorbing Centers in Maize Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Cruz-Orea, A.

    2017-07-01

    Using non-destructive photothermal techniques, it is possible to characterize non-homogenous materials to obtain its optical and thermal properties through photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). In photoacoustic (PA) phenomena, there are transient states of thermal excitation, when samples absorb the incident light; these states manifest an excitation process that generates the PA signal, being in direct relation with the non-radiative relaxation times with the sample absorbent centers. The objective of this study was to determine the non-radiative relaxation times associated with different absorbent centers of corn seeds ( Zea mays L.), by using PAS. A frequency scan was done at different wavelengths (350 nm, 470 nm and 650 nm) in order to obtain the non-radiative relaxation times with different types of maize seeds.

  14. An advanced plasmonic cermet solar absorber for high temperature solar energy conversion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilokur, M.; Gentle, A.; Arnold, M.; Cortie, M.; Smith, G.

    2017-08-01

    Cermet coatings based on nanoparticles of Au or Ag in a stable dielectric matrix provide a combination of spectral-selectivity and microstructural stability at elevated temperatures. The nanoparticles provide an absorption peak due to their localized surface plasmon resonance and the dielectric matrix provides red-shifting and intrinsic absorption from defects. The matrix and two separated cermet layers combined add mechanical support, greater thermal stability and extra absorptance. The coatings may be prepared by magnetron sputtering. They have solar absorptance ranging between 91% and 97% with low thermal emittance making them suitable for application in solar thermal conversion installations.

  15. Radiation balances and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crommelynck, D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiometric concepts are defined in order to consider various types of radiation balances and relate them to the diabetic form of the energy balance. Variability in space and time of the components of the radiation field are presented. A specific concept for sweeping which is tailored to the requirements is proposed. Finally, after establishing the truncated character of the present knowledge of the radiation balance. The results of the last observations of the solar constant are given. Ground and satellite measurement techniques are discussed.

  16. Solar Transparent Radiators by Optical Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Gustav; Tordera, Daniel; Pakizeh, Tavakol; Jaysankar, Manoj; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Tong, Lianming; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2017-11-08

    Architectural windows are a major cause of thermal discomfort as the inner glazing during cold days can be several degrees colder than the indoor air. Mitigating this, the indoor temperature has to be increased, leading to unavoidable thermal losses. Here we present solar thermal surfaces based on complex nanoplasmonic antennas that can raise the temperature of window glazing by up to 8 K upon solar irradiation while transmitting light with a color rendering index of 98.76. The nanoantennas are directional, can be tuned to absorb in different spectral ranges, and possess a structural integrity that is not substrate-dependent, and thus they open up for application on a broad range of surfaces.

  17. Turning collectors for solar radiation

    DOEpatents

    Barak, Amitzur Z.

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for turning a solar collector about the polar axis so that the collector is directed toward the sun as the sun tracks the sky each day. It includes two heat-expansive elements and a shadow plate. In the morning a first expansive element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the second expansive element is shaded by the plate. In the afternoon the second element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the first is shaded by the plate.

  18. Solar Storm's Radiation at Martian Orbit and Surface

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-29

    Energetic particles from a large solar storm in September 2017 were seen both in Mars orbit and on the surface of Mars by NASA missions to the Red Planet. The horizontal axis for both parts of this graphic is the time from Sept. 10 to Sept. 15, 2017. The upper portion of this graphic shows the increase in protons in two ranges of energy levels (15- to-100 million electron volts and 80-to-220 million electron volts), as recorded by the Solar Energetic Particle instrument on NASA's on NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution orbiter, or MAVEN. The lower portion shows the radiation dose on the Martian surface, in micrograys per day, as measured by the Radiation Assessment Monitor instrument on NASA' Curiosity Mars rover. Micrograys are unit of measurement for absorbed radiation dose. Note that only protons in the higher bracket of energy levels penetrate the atmosphere enough to be detected on the surface. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21856

  19. Societal Impacts of Solar Electromagnetic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lean, J. L.

    2000-05-01

    Changes in solar electromagnetic radiation, which occur continuously and at all wavelengths of the spectrum, can have significant societal impacts on a wide range of time scales. Detection of climate change and ozone depletion requires reliable specification of solar-induced processes that mask or exacerbate anthropogenic effects. Living with, and mitigating, climate change and ozone depletion has significant economic, habitat and political impacts of international extent. As an example, taxes to restrict carbon emission may cause undue economic stress if the role of greenhouse gases in global warming is incorrectly diagnosed. Ignoring solar-induced ozone changes in the next century may lead to incorrect assessment of the success of the Montreal Protocol in protecting the ozone layer by limiting the use of ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons. Societal infrastructure depends in many ways on space-based technological assets. Communications and navigation for commerce, industry, science and defense rely on satellite signals transmitted through, and reflected by, electrons in the ionosphere. Electron densities change in response to solar flares, and by orders of magnitude in response to EUV and X-ray flux variations during the Sun's 11-year activity cycle. Spacecraft and space debris experience enhanced drag on their orbits when changing EUV radiation causes upper atmosphere densities to increase. Especially affected are spacecraft and debris in lower altitude orbits, such as Iridium-type communication satellites, and the International Space Station (ISS). Proper specification of solar-induced fluctuations in the neutral upper atmosphere can, for example, aid in tracking the ISS and surrounding space debris, reducing the chance of ISS damage from collisions, and maximizing its operations. Aspects of solar electromagnetic radiation variability will be briefly illustrated on a range of time scales, with specific identification of the societal impacts of different

  20. Methylammonium Bismuth Iodide as a Lead-Free, Stable Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Robert L Z; Brandt, Riley E; Osherov, Anna; Stevanović, Vladan; Stranks, Samuel D; Wilson, Mark W B; Kim, Hyunho; Akey, Austin J; Perkins, John D; Kurchin, Rachel C; Poindexter, Jeremy R; Wang, Evelyn N; Bawendi, Moungi G; Bulović, Vladimir; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-02-18

    Methylammonium lead halide (MAPbX3 ) perovskites exhibit exceptional carrier transport properties. But their commercial deployment as solar absorbers is currently limited by their intrinsic instability in the presence of humidity and their lead content. Guided by our theoretical predictions, we explored the potential of methylammonium bismuth iodide (MBI) as a solar absorber through detailed materials characterization. We synthesized phase-pure MBI by solution and vapor processing. In contrast to MAPbX3, MBI is air stable, forming a surface layer that does not increase the recombination rate. We found that MBI luminesces at room temperature, with the vapor-processed films exhibiting superior photoluminescence (PL) decay times that are promising for photovoltaic applications. The thermodynamic, electronic, and structural features of MBI that are amenable to these properties are also present in other hybrid ternary bismuth halide compounds. Through MBI, we demonstrate a lead-free and stable alternative to MAPbX3 that has a similar electronic structure and nanosecond lifetimes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) metric to characterize solar absorber coatings for the CSP industry

    DOE PAGES

    Boubault, Antoine; Ho, Clifford K.; Hall, Aaron; ...

    2015-07-08

    The contribution of each component of a power generation plant to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) can be estimated and used to increase the power output while reducing system operation and maintenance costs. The LCOE is used in order to quantify solar receiver coating influence on the LCOE of solar power towers. Two new parameters are introduced: the absolute levelized cost of coating (LCOC) and the LCOC efficiency. Depending on the material properties, aging, costs, and temperature, the absolute LCOC enables quantifying the cost-effectiveness of absorber coatings, as well as finding optimal operating conditions. The absolute LCOC is investigatedmore » for different hypothetic coatings and is demonstrated on Pyromark 2500 paint. Results show that absorber coatings yield lower LCOE values in most cases, even at significant costs. Optimal reapplication intervals range from one to five years. At receiver temperatures greater than 700 °C, non-selective coatings are not always worthwhile while durable selective coatings consistently reduce the LCOE—up to 12% of the value obtained for an uncoated receiver. Moreover the absolute LCOC is a powerful tool to characterize and compare different coatings, not only considering their initial efficiencies but also including their durability.« less

  2. Refractive Index Effects on Radiation in an Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Laminated Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    A simple set of equations is derived for predicting temperature radiative energy flow in a two-region semitransparent laminated layer in the limit of zero heat conduction. The composite is heated on its two sides by unequal amounts of incident radiation. The two layers of the composite have different refractive indices, and each material absorbs, emits, and isotropically scatters radiation. The interfaces are diffuse, and all interface reflections are included. To illustrate the thermal behavior that is readily calculated from the equations, typical results an given for various optical thicknesses and refractive indices of the layers. Internal reflections have a substantial effect on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flow.

  3. Radiation Damage Workshop report. [solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahilly, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    The starting material, cell design/geometry, and cell processing/fabrication for silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells are addressed with reference to radiation damage. In general, it is concluded that diagnostic sensitivities and material purities are basic to making significant gains in end-of-life performance and thermal annealability. Further, GaAs material characterization is so sketchy that a well defined program to evaluate such material for solar cell application is needed to maximize GaAs cell technology benefits.

  4. Temporal variability patterns in solar radiation estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindel, José M.; Navarro, Ana A.; Valenzuela, Rita X.; Zarzalejo, Luis F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, solar radiation estimations obtained from a satellite and a numerical weather prediction model in mainland Spain have been compared. Similar comparisons have been formerly carried out, but in this case, the methodology used is different: the temporal variability of both sources of estimation has been compared with the annual evolution of the radiation associated to the different study climate zones. The methodology is based on obtaining behavior patterns, using a Principal Component Analysis, following the annual evolution of solar radiation estimations. Indeed, the adjustment degree to these patterns in each point (assessed from maps of correlation) may be associated with the annual radiation variation (assessed from the interquartile range), which is associated, in turn, to different climate zones. In addition, the goodness of each estimation source has been assessed comparing it with data obtained from the radiation measurements in ground by pyranometers. For the study, radiation data from Satellite Application Facilities and data corresponding to the reanalysis carried out by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts have been used.

  5. Solar ultraviolet radiation from cancer induction to cancer prevention: solar ultraviolet radiation and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Tuorkey, Muobarak J

    2015-09-01

    Although decades have elapsed, researchers still debate the benefits and hazards of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. On the one hand, humans derive most of their serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D3], which has potent anticancer activity, from solar UVB radiation. On the other hand, people are more aware of the risk of cancer incidence associated with harmful levels of solar UVR from daily sunlight exposure. Epidemiological data strongly implicate UV radiation exposure as a major cause of melanoma and other cancers, as UVR promotes mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. This review highlights the impact of the different mutagenic effects of solar UVR, along with the cellular and carcinogenic challenges with respect to sun exposure.

  6. Generating a heated fluid using an electromagnetic radiation-absorbing complex

    SciTech Connect

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    A vessel including a concentrator configured to concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source and a complex configured to absorb EM radiation to generate heat. The vessel is configured to receive a cool fluid from the cool fluid source, concentrate the EM radiation using the concentrator, apply the EM radiation to the complex, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the cool fluid to the heated fluid. The complex is at least one of consisting of copper nanoparticles, copper oxide nanoparticles, nanoshells, nanorods, carbon moieties, encapsulated nanoshells, encapsulated nanoparticles, and branched nanostructures. Further, the EMmore » radiation is at least one of EM radiation in an ultraviolet region of an electromagnetic spectrum, in a visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and in an infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum.« less

  7. Ultrarelativistic electrons and solar flare gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semukhin, P. E.; Kovaltsov, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Ten solar flares with gamma radiation in excess of 10 MeV were observed. Almost all took place within a heliolatitude greater than 60 deg, close to the solar limb, an indication of the essential anisotropy of high-energy gamma radiation. This high-energy solar flare gamma radiation can be explained by the specific features of the bremsstrahlung of ultrarelativistic electrons trapped within the magnetic arc of the solar atmosphere, even if the acceleration of the electrons is anisotropic.

  8. Absorbed radiation doses to staff after implementation of a radiopharmacy clean room.

    PubMed

    Ponto, James A

    2014-12-01

    In response to U.S. Pharmacopeia general chapter <797> standards, a clean room was constructed for our in-house radiopharmacy. Previously, most patient doses were prepared as needed just before injection. Currently, to minimize repeated entries into the clean room, most patient doses are prepared in batches; that is, early morning and noontime preparation of doses to be injected at various times throughout the morning and the afternoon, respectively. Because these patient doses may be prepared well before injection time, radioactive decay necessitates higher amounts of radioactivity to be handled for patient dose preparation. Hence, absorbed radiation doses to staff, all of whom rotate into the radiopharmacy clean room in addition to their regular patient-related activities, were retrospectively evaluated. Monthly dosimetry reports for body (chest badge) and extremities (finger ring) were retrospectively reviewed for each staff member for 12 mo before and 12 mo after implementation of the radiopharmacy clean room. Monthly data were evaluated for average and SD, and 12-mo groups were evaluated using a paired t test. Data for the second 12-mo period were also normalized to the same number of patient doses to account for an increase in procedure volume and were reevaluated. Before the radiopharmacy clean room had been implemented, average monthly absorbed radiation doses to body and extremities were 23 ± 15 mrem (0.23 ± 0.15 mSv) and 93 ± 59 mrem (0.93 ± 0.59 mSv), respectively. After the clean room had been implemented, average monthly absorbed radiation doses increased to 32 ± 16 mrem (0.32 ± 0.16 mSv) (P < 0.001) and 121 ± 89 mrem (1.21 ± 0.89 mSv) (P = 0.0015), respectively. When normalized for procedure volume, average monthly absorbed radiation doses after implementation of the clean room were still higher, at 29 ± 15 mrem (0.29 ± 0.15 mSv) (P = 0.001) and 110 ± 80 mrem (1.10 ± 0.80 mSv) (P = 0.039), respectively. After implementation of a

  9. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  10. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, S. D.; Kuehne, M.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.

    1992-01-01

    The experiment Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) is designed for the investigations of plasma flow characteristics, turbulence and wave motions, plasma densities and temperatures, structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity in the chromosphere, the transition zone and the corona. Specifically, SUMER will measure profiles and intensities of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lines emitted in the solar atmosphere ranging from the upper chromosphere to the lower corona; determine line broadenings, spectral positions and Doppler shifts with high accuracy, provide stigmatic images of selected areas of the Sun in the EUV with high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution and obtain full images of the Sun and the inner corona in selectable EUV lines, corresponding to a temperature from 10,000 to more than 1,800,000 K.

  11. Radiative heat transfer enhancement using geometric and spectral control for achieving high-efficiency solar-thermophotovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohiyama, Asaka; Shimizu, Makoto; Yugami, Hiroo

    2018-04-01

    We numerically investigate radiative heat transfer enhancement using spectral and geometric control of the absorber/emitter. A high extraction of the radiative heat transfer from the emitter as well as minimization of the optical losses from the absorber leads to high extraction and solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system efficiency. The important points for high-efficiency STPV design are discussed for the low and high area ratio of the absorber/emitter. The obtained general guideline will support the design of various types of STPV systems.

  12. Electron Radiation Belts of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Barry; Fox, Nicola

    To address the question of what factors dictate similarities and differences between radiation belts, we present comparisons between the electron radiation belt spectra of all five strongly magnetized planets within the solar system: Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. We choose the highest intensity observed electron spectrum within each system (highest specifically near 1 MeV) and compare them against expectations based on the so-called Kennel-Petschek limit (KP; 1966) for each system. For evaluating the KP limit, we begin with the new relativis-tically correct formulation of Summers et al. (2009) but then add several refinements of our own. Specifically, we: 1) utilized a much more flexible analytic spectral shape that allows us to accurately fit observed radiation belt spectra; 2) adopt the point of view that the anisotropy parameter is not a free parameter but must take on a minimal value, as originally proposed by Kennel and Petschek (1966); and 3) examine the differential characteristics of the KP limit along the lines of what Schulz and Davidson (1988) performed for the non-relativistic formula-tion. We find that three factors limit the highest electron radiation belt intensities within solar system planetary magnetospheres: a) whistler mode interactions that limit spectral intensities to a differential Kennel-Petschek limit (3 planets); b) the absence of robust acceleration pro-cesses associated with injection dynamics (1 planet); and c) material interactions between the radiation particles and clouds of gas and dust (1 planet).

  13. Organic solar cells with graded absorber layers processed from nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Stefan; Reich, Stefan; Bruns, Michael; Czolk, Jens; Colsmann, Alexander

    2016-03-28

    The fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures from solution is often limited by the choice of solvents since most organic semiconductors dissolve in the same aromatic agents. In this work, we investigate multi-pass deposition of organic semiconductors from eco-friendly ethanol dispersion. Once applied, the nanoparticles are insoluble in the deposition agent, allowing for the application of further nanoparticulate layers and hence for building poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):indene-C60 bisadduct absorber layers with vertically graded polymer and conversely graded fullerene concentration. Upon thermal annealing, we observe some degrees of polymer/fullerene interdiffusion by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Replacing the common bulk-heterojunction by such a graded photo-active layer yields an enhanced fill factor of the solar cell due to an improved charge carrier extraction, and consequently an overall power conversion efficiency beyond 4%. Wet processing of such advanced device architectures paves the way for a versatile, eco-friendly and industrially feasible future fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures.

  14. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  15. Spatial interpolation of solar global radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussana, C.; Uboldi, F.; Antoniazzi, C.

    2010-09-01

    Solar global radiation is defined as the radiant flux incident onto an area element of the terrestrial surface. Its direct knowledge plays a crucial role in many applications, from agrometeorology to environmental meteorology. The ARPA Lombardia's meteorological network includes about one hundred of pyranometers, mostly distributed in the southern part of the Alps and in the centre of the Po Plain. A statistical interpolation method based on an implementation of the Optimal Interpolation is applied to the hourly average of the solar global radiation observations measured by the ARPA Lombardia's network. The background field is obtained using SMARTS (The Simple Model of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer of Sunshine, Gueymard, 2001). The model is initialised by assuming clear sky conditions and it takes into account the solar position and orography related effects (shade and reflection). The interpolation of pyranometric observations introduces in the analysis fields information about cloud presence and influence. A particular effort is devoted to prevent observations affected by large errors of different kinds (representativity errors, systematic errors, gross errors) from entering the analysis procedure. The inclusion of direct cloud information from satellite observations is also planned.

  16. Radiation force on absorbing targets and power measurements of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Zuwen; Zhu, Zhemin; Ye, Shigong; Jiang, Wenhua; Zhu, Houqing; Yu, Jinshen

    2010-10-01

    Based on the analytic expressions for the radiated field of a circular concave piston given by Hasegawa et al., an integral for calculation of the radiation force on a plane absorbing target in a spherically focused field is derived. A general relation between acoustic power P and normal radiation force F n is obtained under the condition of kr ≫ 1. Numerical computation is carried out by using the symbolic computation program for practically focused sources and absorbing circular targets. The results show that, for a given source, there is a range of target positions where the radiation force is independent of the target’s position under the assumption that the contribution of the acoustic field behind the target to the radiation force can be neglected. The experiments are carried out and confirm that there is a range of target positions where the measured radiation force is basically independent of the target’s position even at high acoustic power (up to 700 W). It is believed that when the radiation force method is used to measure the acoustic power radiated from a focused source, the size of the target must be selected in such a way that no observable sound can be found in the region behind the target.

  17. From sunlight to phytomass: on the potential efficiency of converting solar radiation to phyto-energy.

    PubMed

    Amthor, Jeffrey S

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between solar radiation capture and potential plant growth is of theoretical and practical importance. The key processes constraining the transduction of solar radiation into phyto-energy (i.e. free energy in phytomass) were reviewed to estimate potential solar-energy-use efficiency. Specifically, the out-put:input stoichiometries of photosynthesis and photorespiration in C(3) and C(4) systems, mobilization and translocation of photosynthate, and biosynthesis of major plant biochemical constituents were evaluated. The maintenance requirement, an area of important uncertainty, was also considered. For a hypothetical C(3) grain crop with a full canopy at 30°C and 350 ppm atmospheric [CO(2) ], theoretically potential efficiencies (based on extant plant metabolic reactions and pathways) were estimated at c. 0.041 J J(-1) incident total solar radiation, and c. 0.092 J J(-1) absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). At 20°C, the calculated potential efficiencies increased to 0.053 and 0.118 J J(-1) (incident total radiation and absorbed PAR, respectively). Estimates for a hypothetical C(4) cereal were c. 0.051 and c. 0.114 J J(-1), respectively. These values, which cannot be considered as precise, are less than some previous estimates, and the reasons for the differences are considered. Field-based data indicate that exceptional crops may attain a significant fraction of potential efficiency. © The Author (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  18. Solar radiation data sources, applications, and network design

    SciTech Connect

    None

    A prerequisite to considering solar energy projects is to determine the requirements for information about solar radiation to apply to possible projects. This report offers techniques to help the reader specify requirements in terms of solar radiation data and information currently available, describes the past and present programs to record and present information to be used for most requirements, presents courses of action to help the user meet his needs for information, lists sources of solar radiation data and presents the problems, costs, benefits and responsibilities of programs to acquire additional solar radiation data. Extensive background information is provided aboutmore » solar radiation data and its use. Specialized information about recording, collecting, processing, storing and disseminating solar radiation data is given. Several Appendices are included which provide reference material for special situations.« less

  19. Calibration of solar radiation measuring instruments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bahm, R J; Nakos, J C

    A review of solar radiation measurement of instruments and some types of errors is given; and procedures for calibrating solar radiation measuring instruments are detailed. An appendix contains a description of various agencies who perform calibration of solar instruments and a description of the methods they used at the time this report was prepared. (WHK)

  20. Interfacial Engineering and Charge Carrier Dynamics in Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edley, Michael

    Photovoltaic energy is a clean and renewable source of electricity; however, it faces resistance to widespread use due to cost. Nanostructuring decouples constraints related to light absorption and charge separation, potentially reducing cost by allowing a wider variety of processing techniques and materials to be used. However, the large interfacial areas also cause an increased dark current which negatively affects cell efficiency. This work focuses on extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells that used a ZnO nanowire array as a scaffold for an extremely thin CdSe absorber layer. Photoexcited electrons generated in the CdSe absorber are transferred to the ZnO layer, while photogenerated holes are transferred to the liquid electrolyte. The transfer of photoexcited carriers to their transport layer competes with bulk recombination in the absorber layer. After charge separation, transport of charge carriers to their respective contacts must occur faster than interfacial recombination for efficient collection. Charge separation and collection depend sensitively on the dimensions of the materials as well as their interfaces. We demonstrated that an optimal absorber thickness can balance light absorption and charge separation. By treating the ZnO/CdSe interface with a CdS buffer layer, we were able to improve the Voc and fill factor, increasing the ETA cell's efficiency from 0.53% to 1.34%, which is higher than that achievable using planar films of the same material. We have gained additional insight into designing ETA cells through the use of dynamic measurements. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that characteristic times for electron injection from CdSe to ZnO are less than 1 ps. Electron injection is rapid compared to the 2 ns bulk lifetime in CdSe. Optoelectronic measurements such as transient photocurrent/photovoltage and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were applied to study the processes of charge transport and interfacial recombination

  1. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on aquatic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.

    Solar UV degrades dissolved organic carbon photolytically so that they can readily be taken up by bacterioplankton. On the other hand solar UV radiation inhibits bacterioplankton activity. Bacterioplankton productivity is far greater than previously thought and is comparable to phytoplankton primary productivity. According to the "microbial loop hypothesis," bacterioplankton is seen in the center of a food web, having a similar function to phytoplankton and protists. The penetration of UV and PAR into the water column can be measured. Marine waters show large temporal and regional differences in their concentrations of dissolved and particulate absorbing substances. A network of dosimeters (ELDONET) has been installed in Europe ranging from Abisko in Northern Sweden to Gran Canaria. Cyanobacteria are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen which is then made available to higher plants. The agricultural potential of cyanobacteria has been recognized as a biological fertilizer for wet soils such as in rice paddies. UV-B is known to impair processes such as growth, survival, pigmentation, motility, as well as the enzymes of nitrogen metabolism and CO 2 fixation. The marine phytoplankton represents the single most important ecosystem on our planet and produces about the same biomass as all terrestrial ecosystems taken together. It is the base of the aquatic food chain and any changes in the size and composition of phytoplankton communities will directly affect food production for humans from marine sources. Another important role of marine phytoplankton is to serve as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. Recent investigations have shown a large sensitivity of most phytoplankton organisms toward solar short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UV-B); even at ambient levels of UV-B radiation many organisms seem to be under UV stress. Because of their requirement for solar energy, the phytoplankton dwell in the top layers of the water column. In this near-surface position

  2. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hader, D P

    2000-01-01

    Solar UV degrades dissolved organic carbon photolytically so that they can readily be taken up by bacterioplankton. On the other hand solar UV radiation inhibits bacterioplankton activity. Bacterioplankton productivity is far greater than previously thought and is comparable to phytoplankton primary productivity. According to the "microbial loop hypothesis," bacterioplankton is seen in the center of a food web, having a similar function to phytoplankton and protists. The penetration of UV and PAR into the water column can be measured. Marine waters show large temporal and regional differences in their concentrations of dissolved and particulate absorbing substances. A network of dosimeters (ELDONET) has been installed in Europe ranging from Abisko in Northern Sweden to Gran Canaria. Cyanobacteria are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen which is then made available to higher plants. The agricultural potential of cyanobacteria has been recognized as a biological fertilizer for wet soils such as in rice paddies. UV-B is known to impair processes such as growth, survival, pigmentation, motility, as well as the enzymes of nitrogen metabolism and CO2 fixation. The marine phytoplankton represents the single most important ecosystem on our planet and produces about the same biomass as all terrestrial ecosystems taken together. It is the base of the aquatic food chain and any changes in the size and composition of phytoplankton communities will directly affect food production for humans from marine sources. Another important role of marine phytoplankton is to serve as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. Recent investigations have shown a large sensitivity of most phytoplankton organisms toward solar short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UV-B); even at ambient levels of UV-B radiation many organisms seem to be under UV stress. Because of their requirement for solar energy, the phytoplankton dwell in the top layers of the water column. In this near-surface position

  3. ESTIMATING SOLAR RADIATION EXPOSURE IN WETLANDS USING RADIATION MODELS, FIELD DATA, AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This seminar will describe development of methods for the estimation of solar radiation doses in wetlands. The methodology presents a novel approach to incorporating aspects of solar radiation dosimetry that have historically received limited attention. These include effects of a...

  4. Study of thermal effects and optical properties of an innovative absorber in integrated collector storage solar water heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Yaser; Alimardani, Kazem; Ziapour, Behrooz M.

    2015-10-01

    Solar passive water heaters are potential candidates for enhanced heat transfer. Solar water heaters with an integrated water tank and with the low temperature energy resource are used as the simplest and cheapest recipient devices of the solar energy for heating and supplying hot water in the buildings. The solar thermal performances of one primitive absorber were determined by using both the experimental and the simulation model of it. All materials applied for absorber such as the cover glass, the black colored sands and the V shaped galvanized plate were submerged into the water. The water storage tank was manufactured from galvanized sheet of 0.0015 m in thickness and the effective area of the collector was 0.67 m2. The absorber was installed on a compact solar water heater. The constructed flat-plate collectors were tested outdoors. However the simulation results showed that the absorbers operated near to the gray materials and all experimental results showed that the thermal efficiencies of the collector are over than 70 %.

  5. Temperature effect of natural organic extraction upon light absorbance in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhaimi, Suriati; Mohamed Siddick, Siti Zubaidah; Retnasamy, Vithyacharan; Abdul Wahid, Mohamad Halim; Ahmad Hambali, Nor Azura Malini; Mohamad Shahimin, Mukhzeer

    2017-02-01

    Natural organic dyes contain pigments which when safely extracted from plants have the potential to be used as a sensitizer while promising a low-cost fabrication, environmental friendly dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Ardisia, Bawang Sabrang, Harum Manis mango, Oxalis Triangularis and Rosella showed different absorption peaks when the extraction process were carried out at different temperatures. Hence, these were used as the basis to determine the conversion efficiency against the dyes extracting temperature. In this study, all dyes extracted in water have shown the best performance at a temperature of 100°C except for Harum Manis mango, while in ethanol, the optimum temperature was obtained between the room temperature, 25°C and 50°C. The absorption spectrum in water showed a broader absorption wavelength vis-à-vis ethanol solvent that resulted in the absorption peak for Ardisia, Harum Manis mango and Rosella between 450 nm and 550 nm. The highest conversion efficiency is observed to be achieved by Oxalis Triangularis extracted in water solution at 100°C, which was approximately 0.96% which corresponds to the broader absorbance trends in the literature. Thus, the optimum condition for extracting temperature for dyes in water and ethanol is room temperature and boiling points of water. Hence, Ardisia, Bawang Sabrang, Harum Manis mango, Oxalis Triangularis and Rosella can be an as alternative source for photosensitizer, and the impacts of temperature upon the light absorbance can be further investigated to produce the ultimate natural dye based solar cells.

  6. MSG-7: Atmospheric Penetration of Solar Radiation in the Range of Schumann-runge Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    There have been major efforts in measuring extraterrestrial solar irradiance for use in atmospheric studies. The quantity of immediate relevance to theoretical studies is the number of photons which reach a given altitude in the middle atmosphere. Current models compute the attenuated radiation field but the cross sections available for the major absorbers, O2 and O3, often come from experiments that are now quite old. Balloon measurements show some significant differences between the predicted and observed ultraviolet radiation field between 30 and 40 km. The wavelength region to be studied includes Lyman alpha plus the range 175 nm to the visible. Specific topics to be addressed are as follows: (1) the cross sections of the major absorbers, O2 and O3 including the Schumann-Runge bands as a subset; (2) comparison of the in situ measurements of the attenuated radiation field with calculations; and (3) the relevance of the scattered and reflected radiation fields for middle atmospheric processes.

  7. High performance and thermally stable tandem solar selective absorber coating for concentrated solar thermal power (CSP) application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, M. Shiva; Kumar, K. K. Phani; Atchuta, S. R.; Sobha, B.; Sakthivel, S.

    2018-05-01

    A novel tandem absorber system (Mn-Cu-Co-Ox-ZrO2/SiO2) developed on an austenitic stainless steel (SS-304) substrate to show an excellent optical performance (αsol: 0.96; ɛ: 0.23@500 °C). In order to achieve this durable tandem, we experimented with two antireflective layers such as ZrO2-SiO2 and nano SiO2 layer on top of Mn-Cu-Co-Ox-ZrO2 layer. We optimized the thickness of antireflective layers to get good tandem system in terms of solar absorptance and emittance. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), UV-Vis-NIR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize the developed coatings. Finally, the Mn-Cu-Co-Ox-ZrO2/SiO2 exhibits high temperature resistance up to 800 °C, thus allow an increase in the operating temperature of CSP which may lead to high efficiency. We successfully developed a high temperature resistant tandem layer with easy manufacturability at low cost which is an attractive candidate for concentrated solar power generation (CSP).

  8. Radiation Belts Throughout the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.

    2008-12-01

    The several preceding decades of deep space missions have demonstrated that the generation of planetary radiation belts is a universal phenomenon. All strongly magnetized planets show well developed radiation regions, specifically Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The similarities occur despite the tremendous differences between the planets in size, levels of magnetization, external environments, and most importantly, in the fundamental processes that power them. Some planets like Jupiter are powered overwhelmingly by planetary rotation, much like astrophysical pulsars, whereas others, like Earth and probably Uranus, are powered externally by the interplanetary environment. Uranus is a particularly interesting case in that despite the peculiarities engendered by its ecliptic equatorial spin axis orientation, its magnetosphere shows dynamical behavior similar to that of Earth as well as radiation belt populations and associated wave emissions that are perhaps more intense than expected based on Earth-derived theories. Here I review the similarities and differences between the radiation regions of radiation belts throughout the solar system. I discuss the value of the comparative approach to radiation belt physics as one that allows critical factors to be evaluated in environments that are divorced from the special complex conditions that prevail in any one environment, such as those at Earth.

  9. Toward a High-Efficient Utilization of Solar Radiation by Quad-Band Solar Spectral Splitting.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Huang, Yi; Tang, Lu; Sun, Tianyi; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Chen, Gang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2016-12-01

    The promising quad-band solar spectral splitter incorporates the properties of the optical filter and the spectrally selective solar thermal absorber can direct PV band to PV modules and absorb thermal band energy for thermal process with low thermal losses. It provides a new strategy for spectral splitting and offers potential ways for hybrid PVT system design. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The Effects of Water Vapor and Clouds on the Spectral Distribution of Solar Radiation at the...

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Mariani, P.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    During the Subsonic Contrail and Cloud Effect Special Study (SUCCESS) a Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer was deployed at the surface in a zenith observing position. The instrument measured the solar spectral downwelling irradiance between 350 and 2500 nm with 10 nm resolution. From April 12 through April 29 approximately 18000 spectra were acquired, under a variety of meteorological conditions including cloud free, cirrus, Stearns, and cumulonimbus clouds. This study focuses on the effect of cirrus and cirrus contrails on the spectral distribution of solar irradiance at the surface and on inferring cirrus properties from their spectral transmittance. The observations have also proven to be useful for comparing the solar spectral irradiance measurements with model predictions, and in particular, for inferring the amount of solar radiation absorbed in the clear and cloudy atmosphere.

  11. The Effect of Ionic Correlations on Radiative Properties in the Solar Interior and Terrestrial Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krief, Menahem; Kurzweil, Yair; Feigel, Alexander; Gazit, Doron

    2018-04-01

    With the aim of solving the decade-old problem of solar opacity, we report substantial photoabsorption uncertainty due to the effect of ion–ion correlations. By performing detailed opacity calculations of the solar mixture, we find that taking into account the ionic structure changes the Rosseland opacity near the convection zone by ∼10%. We also report a ∼15% difference in the Rosseland opacity for iron, which was recently measured at the Sandia Z facility, where the temperature reached that prevailing in the convection zone boundary while the density was 2.5 times lower. Finally, we propose a method to measure opacities at solar temperatures and densities that have never been reached in the past via laboratory radiation flow experiments, by using plastic foams doped with permilles of dominant photon absorbers in the Sun. The method is advantageous for an experimental study of solar opacities that may lead to a resolution of the solar abundance problem.

  12. The Energy Under Our Feet: A Study of Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, I.

    2016-12-01

    In this experiment I tested if asphalt pavement can produce enough solar heat to produce energy through a system that uses water, solar energy and heat. A setup that can conserve the water and prevent it from evaporating, as well as measuring the energy production is required to run this experiment. I have done a lot of research on this experiment and found that there are several variables that impact the results of this experiment. 1. The surface temperature compared to the air temperature 2. The Geographical location of the pavement 3. The time of the year 4. Cloud coverage for the day Overall there will be many variables I will have to keep out of the experiment such as temperature ranges, season changes and geographical location. My constant will be my location at 33.7086o North and 117.9564o West. Asphalt pavements do not reflect the sunlight and hence heat up faster than a light surface that would reflect the sunlight. This means the Asphalt absorbs the solar radiation, which increases the temperature of the air around the asphalt contributing to what is known as the urban heat island effect. This heating in turn contributes to the formation of smog and ozone products. With the population still growing this would also mean an increase in this temperature and hence an increase in smog and ozone, creating a significant health concern. Cities need to start looking at ways to cool their pavement and find ways to harvest the energy created by their streets. Installing pipes with water can provide that solution and not only reduce the heat reflected from the pavement but also harvest energy from this setup, and decrease the smog production and maintain a balance in ozone levels. As well as the asphalt needed to run the testing, a Stirling engine is required. A Stirling Engine is a highly efficient engine that can run on a variety of heat sources. Because it is highly compatible with alternative energy and renewable energy sources it could become increasingly

  13. Solar Energy Technician/Installer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Solar power (also known as solar energy) is solar radiation emitted from the sun. Large panels that absorb the sun's energy as the sun beats down on them gather solar power. The energy in the rays can be used for heat (solar thermal energy) or converted to electricity (photovoltaic energy). Each solar energy project, from conception to…

  14. Electrodeposited Ni nanowires-track etched P.E.T. composites as selective solar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukhwa, R.; Sone, B.; Kotsedi, L.; Madjoe, R.; Maaza, M.

    2018-05-01

    This contribution reports on the structural, optical and morphological properties of nanostructured flexible solar-thermal selective absorber composites for low temperature applications. The candidate material in the system is consisting of electrodeposited nickel nano-cylinders embedded in track-etched polyethylene terephthalate (PET) host membrane of pore sizes ranging between 0.3-0.8µm supported by conductive nickel thin film of about 0.5µm. PET were irradiated with 11MeV/u high charged xenon (Xe) ions at normal incidence. The tubular and metallic structure of the nickel nano-cylinders within the insulator polymeric host forms a typical ceramic-metal nano-composite "Cermet". The produced material was characterized by the following techniques: X-ray diffraction (XRD) for structural characterization to determine preferred crystallographic structure, and grain size of the materials; Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine surface morphology, particle size, and visual imaging of distribution of structures on the surface of the substrate; Atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize surface roughness, surface morphology, and film thickness, and UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer to measure the reflectance, then to determine solar absorption

  15. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the costmore » of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.« less

  16. Solar Photothermal Disinfection using Broadband-Light Absorbing Gold Nanoparticles and Carbon Black.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Stephanie; Li, Chuanhao; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2018-01-02

    A simple heat treatment, perhaps the most globally recognized point-of-use water sterilization method, is seemingly effective against all major pathogens of concern, but bulk water boiling is not energy efficient or sustainable. Herein, we present the first application of solar-to-thermal converting nanomaterials for the direct inactivation of bacteria and viruses in drinking water through the application of Au nanorods, carbon black, and Au nanorod-carbon black composite materials as light absorbers. With broad absorption bands spanning the visible and near-infrared wavelengths, at sufficient concentrations, these nanoparticles induce multiple scattering events, increasing photon absorption probability and concentrating the light within a small spatial domain, leading to localized, intense heating that inactivates microorganisms in close proximity. Moving toward practical device design, we have developed a facile silane immobilization approach to fabricate films with densely packed layers of photothermal nanomaterials. Our results suggest that upon irraditaion with simulated solar light, these films can thermally inactivate bacteria and viruses, as demonstrated through the inactivation of surrogate organisms Escherichia coli K-12, and bacteriophages MS2 and PR772.

  17. Design principles for morphologies of antireflection patterns for solar absorbing applications.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yoon-Jong; Na, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional surface texturing is a widespread technology for imparting broadband antireflection, yet its design rules are not completely understood. The dependence of the reflectance spectrum of a periodically patterned glass film on various structural parameters (e.g., pitch, height, shape, and fill factor) has been investigated by means of full-vectorial numerical simulations. An average weighted reflectivity accounting for the AM1.5G solar spectrum (λ=300-1000  nm) was sinusoidally modulated by a rod pattern's height, and was minimized for pitches of 400-600 nm. When a rationally optimized cone pattern was used, the average weighted reflectivity was less than 0.5%, for incident angles of up to 40° off normal. The broadband antireflection of a cone pattern was reproduced well by a graded refractive index film model corresponding to its geometry, with the addition of a diffraction effect resulting from its periodicity. The broadband antireflection ability of optimized cone patterns is not limited to the glass material, but rather is generically applicable to other semiconductor materials, including Si and GaAs. The design rules developed herein represent a key step in the development of light-absorbing devices, such as solar cells.

  18. Radiative forcing by light-absorbing aerosols of pyrogenetic iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akinori; Lin, Guangxing; Penner, Joyce E

    2018-05-09

    Iron (Fe) oxides in aerosols are known to absorb sun light and heat the atmosphere. However, the radiative forcing (RF) of light-absorbing aerosols of pyrogenetic Fe oxides is ignored in climate models. For the first time, we use a global chemical transport model and a radiative transfer model to estimate the RF by light-absorbing aerosols of pyrogenetic Fe oxides. The model results suggest that strongly absorbing Fe oxides (magnetite) contribute a RF that is about 10% of the RF due to black carbon (BC) over East Asia. The seasonal average of the RF due to dark Fe-rich mineral particles over East Asia (0.4-1.0 W m -2 ) is comparable to that over major biomass burning regions. This additional warming effect is amplified over polluted regions where the iron and steel industries have been recently developed. These findings may have important implications for the projection of the climate change, due to the rapid growth in energy consumption of the heavy industry in newly developing countries.

  19. Cavity radiation model for solar central receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Lipps, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    The Energy Laboratory of the University of Houston has developed a computer simulation program called CREAM (i.e., Cavity Radiations Exchange Analysis Model) for application to the solar central receiver system. The zone generating capability of CREAM has been used in several solar re-powering studies. CREAM contains a geometric configuration factor generator based on Nusselt's method. A formulation of Nusselt's method provides support for the FORTRAN subroutine NUSSELT. Numerical results from NUSSELT are compared to analytic values and values from Sparrow's method. Sparrow's method is based on a double contour integral and its reduction to a single integral which is approximatedmore » by Guassian methods. Nusselt's method is adequate for the intended engineering applications, but Sparrow's method is found to be an order of magnitude more efficient in many situations.« less

  20. The distribution of solar global radiation over Romania

    SciTech Connect

    Badescu, V.

    1990-01-01

    This article shows the monthly distributions of solar global radiation over Romania. The results have been tested by the author under the climatic features of Romania. Meteorological data from 29 localities have been used in computations. The results show Romania has a solar potential higher than that of the world maps of solar radiation. It was pointed out that local radiation peculiarities, expressed as strong deviations from the law of latitudinal variation, are mainly determined by the atmospheric circulation features.

  1. The National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB)

    DOE PAGES

    Sengupta, Manajit; Xie, Yu; Lopez, Anthony; ...

    2018-03-19

    The National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB), consisting of solar radiation and meteorological data over the United States and regions of the surrounding countries, is a publicly open dataset that has been created and disseminated during the last 23 years. This paper briefly reviews the complete package of surface observations, models, and satellite data used for the latest version of the NSRDB as well as improvements in the measurement and modeling technologies deployed in the NSRDB over the years. The current NSRDB provides solar irradiance at a 4-km horizontal resolution for each 30-min interval from 1998 to 2016 computed bymore » the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Physical Solar Model (PSM) and products from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), the National Ice Center's (NIC's) Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, version 2 (MERRA-2). The NSRDB irradiance data have been validated and shown to agree with surface observations with mean percentage biases within 5% and 10% for global horizontal irradiance (GHI) and direct normal irradiance (DNI), respectively. The data can be freely accessed via https://nsrdb.nrel.gov or through an application programming interface (API). During the last 23 years, the NSRDB has been widely used by an ever-growing group of researchers and industry both directly and through tools such as NREL's System Advisor Model.« less

  2. The National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB)

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Manajit; Xie, Yu; Lopez, Anthony

    The National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB), consisting of solar radiation and meteorological data over the United States and regions of the surrounding countries, is a publicly open dataset that has been created and disseminated during the last 23 years. This paper briefly reviews the complete package of surface observations, models, and satellite data used for the latest version of the NSRDB as well as improvements in the measurement and modeling technologies deployed in the NSRDB over the years. The current NSRDB provides solar irradiance at a 4-km horizontal resolution for each 30-min interval from 1998 to 2016 computed bymore » the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Physical Solar Model (PSM) and products from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), the National Ice Center's (NIC's) Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, version 2 (MERRA-2). The NSRDB irradiance data have been validated and shown to agree with surface observations with mean percentage biases within 5% and 10% for global horizontal irradiance (GHI) and direct normal irradiance (DNI), respectively. The data can be freely accessed via https://nsrdb.nrel.gov or through an application programming interface (API). During the last 23 years, the NSRDB has been widely used by an ever-growing group of researchers and industry both directly and through tools such as NREL's System Advisor Model.« less

  3. Evaluation of Solar Air Heater Performance with Artificial Rib Roughness over the Absorber Plate using Finite Element Modelling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K. Ravi; Nikhil Varma, P.; Jagadeesh, N.; Sandeep, J. V.; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Venkateswarlu, D.; Srinivas, B.

    2018-03-01

    Among the different renewable energy resources, solar energy is widely used due to its quantitative intensity factor. Solar air heater is cheap, simple in design and has got wide range of applications. A modest solar air heater has a lower in heat transfer and thermal performance as it has heat transfer coefficient lower in between coated absorber plate and the carrier fluid. This low thermal performance can be reduced to a greater extent by introducing the artificially created roughness over the absorber plate of the solar heater. In the present study, the combination of various geometries and roughness’s on the absorber plate are reported. Methods have been developed and implemented in order to improve the rate of the heat transfer. A comparison is drawn among different geometries to select the most effective absorber plate roughness. For flow analysis k-ω SST model was used and the constant heat flux was taken as 1100 W/m2. The Reynolds number is varied in a range from 3000 to 20000. The variation of different parameters temperature, Nusselt number, turbulence kinetic energy and heat transfer coefficient with Reynolds number were examined and discussed.

  4. Surface modification technologies using concentrated solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, J. Roland; Stanley, J. T.; Tracy, Ed; Fields, C. L.

    Research conducted at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) during the past three years addressed a number of the critical areas and has explored the possibility of using highly concentrated solar radiation to induce beneficial surface transformation. The principal goal is to develop new coatings and processes that improve the performance and lifetime of materials at reduced processing costs. Highly concentrated radiant energy provides a controllable means of delivering large flux densities to solid surfaces, where the resulting thermal energy can cause phase changes, atomic migrations, and chemical reactions on a surface without greatly perturbing the bulk properties; alternatively, the photons may directly interact with species on the surface. These changes may result in improved properties of the materials by making the surface harder, more resistant to corrosion or wear, thermally resistant, or with lower coefficients of friction. In a solar furnace, this flux can be delivered in large quantities over large areas, or it can be tailored to match the demands of a particular process. Furthermore, this occurs without the environmental liability associated with providing power to more conventional light sources. Recent work at SERI has used fluxes in the range from 100 to 250 w/sq cm for inducing such beneficial surface transformations. Significant results have been obtained in the area of phase transformation hardening of steels and melting powders and preapplied coatings to form fully dense, well-bonded coatings on the surface. New directions in coating technology using highly concentrated solar beams to induce chemical vapor deposition processes are described. Application areas that have not been researched in detail but would appear to be good matches to the solar technology are also reviewed.

  5. Cooling systems and hybrid A/C systems using an electromagnetic radiation-absorbing complex

    DOEpatents

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-05-19

    A method for powering a cooling unit. The method including applying electromagnetic (EM) radiation to a complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, transforming, using the heat generated by the complex, a fluid to vapor, and sending the vapor from the vessel to a turbine coupled to a generator by a shaft, where the vapor causes the turbine to rotate, which turns the shaft and causes the generator to generate the electric power, wherein the electric powers supplements the power needed to power the cooling unit

  6. Novel radiator for carbon dioxide absorbents in low-flow anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Go; Mitsui, Takanori; Kakinuma, Takayasu; Ogihara, Yukihiko; Matsumoto, Shohei; Isshiki, Atsushi; Yasuo, Watanabe

    2003-01-01

    During long-term low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia, dew formation and the generation of compound A are increased in the anesthesia circuit because of elevated soda lime temperature. The object of this study was to develop a novel radiator for carbon dioxide absorbents used for long durations of low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia. Eleven female swine were divided into two groups comprising a "radiator" group (n = 5) that used a novel radiator for carbon dioxide absorbents and a "control" group (n = 6) that used a conventional canister. Anesthesia was maintained with N2O, O2, and sevoflurane, and low-flow anesthesia was performed with fresh gas flow at 0.6 L/min for 12 hr. In the "control" group, the soda lime temperature reached more than 40 degrees C and soda lime dried up with severe dew formation in the inspiratory valve. In the "radiator" group, the temperature of soda lime stayed at 30 degrees C, and the water content of soda lime was retained with no dew formation in the inspiratory valve. In addition, compound A concentration was reduced. In conclusion, radiation of soda lime reduced the amounts of condensation formed and the concentration of compound A in the anesthetic circuit, and allowed long term low-flow anesthesia without equipment malfunction.

  7. Plant response to solar ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Plant reactions and mechanisms of reaction to solar UV radiation are reviewed, along with characteristics of plants which enhance UV tolerance. Wavelength regions to which proteins are particularly sensitive are examined and the possibility of synergistic effects from photoreactions to multiple wavelengths is considered, along with available evidence of nonadditive plant spectral responses to UV radiation. Decreases in atmospheric ozone content are explored in terms of UV wavelengths which would increase with the ozone decreases, particularly for UV-B, which depresses photosynthesis and would increase 1% with a 16% reduction of stratospheric ozone. Higher elevations are projected to display effects of increased UV incident flux first, and global distributions of UV increases due to atmospheric inhomogeneity and water surface clarity are examined. Finally, the response of plant nucleic acids, DNA, chlorophyll to enhanced UV are described, along with repair, avoidance, and optical mechanisms which aid plant survival

  8. The influence of surface type on the absorbed radiation by a human under hot, dry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, A. W.; Vanos, J. K.

    2018-01-01

    Given the predominant use of heat-retaining materials in urban areas, numerous studies have addressed the urban heat island mitigation potential of various "cool" options, such as vegetation and high-albedo surfaces. The influence of altered radiational properties of such surfaces affects not only the air temperature within a microclimate, but more importantly the interactions of long- and short-wave radiation fluxes with the human body. Minimal studies have assessed how cool surfaces affect thermal comfort via changes in absorbed radiation by a human ( R abs) using real-world, rather than modeled, urban field data. The purpose of the current study is to assess the changes in the absorbed radiation by a human—a critical component of human energy budget models—based on surface type on hot summer days (air temperatures > 38.5∘C). Field tests were conducted using a high-end microclimate station under predominantly clear sky conditions over ten surfaces with higher sky view factors in Lubbock, Texas. Three methods were used to measure and estimate R abs: a cylindrical radiation thermometer (CRT), a net radiometer, and a theoretical estimation model. Results over dry surfaces suggest that the use of high-albedo surfaces to reduce overall urban heat gain may not improve acute human thermal comfort in clear conditions due to increased reflected radiation. Further, the use of low-cost instrumentation, such as the CRT, shows potential in quantifying radiative heat loads within urban areas at temporal scales of 5-10 min or greater, yet further research is needed. Fine-scale radiative information in urban areas can aid in the decision-making process for urban heat mitigation using non-vegetated urban surfaces, with surface type choice is dependent on the need for short-term thermal comfort, or reducing cumulative heat gain to the urban fabric.

  9. High-Temperature Tolerance in Multi-Scale Cermet Solar-Selective Absorbing Coatings Prepared by Laser Cladding.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xuming; Wei, Qian; Zhou, Jianxin; Ma, Huiyang

    2018-06-19

    In order to achieve cermet-based solar absorber coatings with long-term thermal stability at high temperatures, a novel single-layer, multi-scale TiC-Ni/Mo cermet coating was first prepared using laser cladding technology in atmosphere. The results show that the optical properties of the cermet coatings using laser cladding were much better than the preplaced coating. In addition, the thermal stability of the optical properties for the laser cladding coating were excellent after annealing at 650 °C for 200 h. The solar absorptance and thermal emittance of multi-scale cermet coating were 85% and 4.7% at 650 °C. The results show that multi-scale cermet materials are more suitable for solar-selective absorbing coating. In addition, laser cladding is a new technology that can be used for the preparation of spectrally-selective coatings.

  10. 2D Homologous Perovskites as Light-Absorbing Materials for Solar Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Duyen H; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2015-06-24

    We report on the fabrication and properties of the semiconducting 2D (CH3(CH2)3NH3)2(CH3NH3)(n-1)Pb(n)I(3n+1) (n = 1, 2, 3, and 4) perovskite thin films. The band gaps of the series decrease with increasing n values, from 2.24 eV (CH3(CH2)3NH3)2PbI4 (n = 1) to 1.52 eV CH3NH3PbI3 (n = ∞). The compounds exhibit strong light absorption in the visible region, accompanied by strong photoluminescence at room temperature, rendering them promising light absorbers for photovoltaic applications. Moreover, we find that thin films of the semi-2D perovskites display an ultrahigh surface coverage as a result of the unusual film self-assembly that orients the [Pb(n)I(3n+1)](-) layers perpendicular to the substrates. We have successfully implemented this 2D perovskite family in solid-state solar cells, and obtained an initial power conversion efficiency of 4.02%, featuring an open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 929 mV and a short-circuit current density (J(sc)) of 9.42 mA/cm(2) from the n = 3 compound. This result is even more encouraging considering that the device retains its performance after long exposure to a high-humidity environment. Overall, the homologous 2D halide perovskites define a promising class of stable and efficient light-absorbing materials for solid-state photovoltaics and other applications.

  11. Influence of Diffused Solar Radiation on the Solar Concentrating System of a Plant Shoot Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shin'ya

    Investigation of a plant shoot configuration is used to obtain valuable information concerning the received light system. Additionally, analysis results concerning a plant shoot configuration interaction with direct solar radiation were taken from a past study. However, in order to consider a plant shoot as a received sunlight system, it is necessary to understand the received light characteristics of both direct solar radiation and diffused solar radiation. Under a clear sky, the ratio of direct solar radiation to diffused solar radiation is large. However, under a clouded sky, the amount of diffused solar radiation becomes larger. Therefore, in this paper, we investigate the received light characteristics of a plant shoot configuration under the influence of diffused solar radiation. As a result, we clarify the relationship between the amount of diffused solar radiation and the amount of received light as a function of the characteristics of the plant shoot configuration. In order to obtain diffused solar radiation, it is necessary to correspond to the radiation of the multi-directions. In the analysis, the characteristic of the difference in arrangement of the top leaf and the other leaf was obtained. Therefore, in analysis, leaves other than the top were distributed in the wide range.

  12. Ground truth data for test sites (SL-3). [solar radiation and thermal radiation brightness temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Field measurements performed simultaneously with Skylab overpasses in order to provide comparative calibration and performance evaluation measurements for the EREP sensors are presented. The solar radiation region from 400 to 1300 nanometers and the thermal radiation region from 8 to 14 micrometer region were investigated. The measurements of direct solar radiation were analyzed for atmospheric optical depth; the total and reflected solar radiation were analyzed for target reflectivity. These analyses were used in conjunction with a radiative transfer computer program in order to calculate the amount and spectral distribution of solar radiation at the apertures of the EREP sensors. The instrumentation and techniques employed, calibrations and analyses performed, and results obtained are discussed.

  13. Biological Sensors for Solar Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yagura, Teiti; Makita, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Menck, Carlos F.M.; Schuch, André P.

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is widely known as a genotoxic environmental agent that affects Earth ecosystems and the human population. As a primary consequence of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion observed over the last decades, the increasing UV incidence levels have heightened the concern regarding deleterious consequences affecting both the biosphere and humans, thereby leading to an increase in scientific efforts to understand the role of sunlight in the induction of DNA damage, mutagenesis, and cell death. In fact, the various UV-wavelengths evoke characteristic biological impacts that greatly depend on light absorption of biomolecules, especially DNA, in living organisms, thereby justifying the increasing importance of developing biological sensors for monitoring the harmful impact of solar UV radiation under various environmental conditions. In this review, several types of biosensors proposed for laboratory and field application, that measure the biological effects of the UV component of sunlight, are described. Basically, the applicability of sensors based on DNA, bacteria or even mammalian cells are presented and compared. Data are also presented showing that on using DNA-based sensors, the various types of damage produced differ when this molecule is exposed in either an aqueous buffer or a dry solution. Apart from the data thus generated, the development of novel biosensors could help in evaluating the biological effects of sunlight on the environment. They also emerge as alternative tools for using live animals in the search for protective sunscreen products. PMID:22163847

  14. The impact of solar UV radiation on the early biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.

    2007-08-01

    Stratospheric ozone, photochemically produced from atmospheric oxygen, is a protective filter of the Earth's atmosphere by absorbing most of the biologically harmful UV radiation of our sun in the UV-C (190-280 nm) and short wavelength-region of the UV-B (280-315 nm). Numerous lines of isotopic and geologic evidence suggest that the Archean atmosphere was essentially anoxic. As a result the column abundance of ozone would have been insufficient to affect the surface UV radiation environment. Thus, as well as UV-B radiation, UV-C radiation would have penetrated to the Earth's surface with its associated biological consequences. The history of this ultraviolet stress for the early Earth has been determined from theoretical data and data obtained in Earth orbit on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores under a simulated ozone layer of different thicknesses. Although the UV-C and UV-B regions contribute only 2 % of the entire solar extraterrestrial irradiance, photobiological experiments in space have demonstrated a high mutagenicity and lethality of this UV range to living organisms. The reason for these severe effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation - compared to conditions on present-day Earth - lies in the absorption characteristics of the DNA, which is the decisive target for inactivation and mutation induction at this UV range. Being a strong mutagen, UV-radiation is considered as a powerful promoter of biological evolution on the one hand, one the other hand, it may have deleterious consequences to individual cells and organisms, e.g. by causing inactivation, mutations or cancer induction. In response to potential harmful effects of environmental UV radiation, life on Earth has developed several strategies of survival, either avoiding exposure to UV radiation or restoring UV damage. Mechanisms of avoidance of exposure to UV radiation include (i) moving away from the UV radiation into shadowed areas, which requires the development of UV radiation

  15. A rapid radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiang, X.; Smith, E. A.; Justus, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over alternative two-stream solutions is that in addition to yielding the irradiance components, which turn out to be mathematically equivalent to the delta-Eddington approximation, the radiance field can also be expanded in a mathematically consistent fashion. Tests with the model against a more precise multistream discrete ordinate model over a wide range of input parameters demonstrate that the new approximate method typically produces average radiance differences of less than 5%, with worst average differences of approximately 10%-15%. By the same token, the computational speed of the new model is some tens to thousands times faster than that of the more precise model when its stream resolution is set to generate precise calculations.

  16. Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) for Thermal Storage on Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Future manned exploration spacecraft will need to operate in challenging thermal environments. State-of the- art technology for active thermal control relies on sublimating water ice and venting the vapor overboard in very hot environments. This approach can lead to large loss of water and a significant mass penalty for the spacecraft. This paper describes an innovative thermal control system that uses a Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to control spacecraft temperatures in highly variable environments without venting water. SEAR uses heat pumping and energy storage by LiCl/water absorption to enable effective cooling during hot periods and regeneration during cool periods. The LiCl absorber technology has the potential to absorb over 800 kJ per kg of system mass, compared to phase change heat sink systems that typically achieve approx. 50 kJ/kg. The optimal system is based on a trade-off between the mass of water saved and extra power needed to regenerate the LiCl absorber. This paper describes analysis models and the predicted performance and optimize the size of the SEAR system, estimated size and mass of key components, and power requirements for regeneration. We also present a concept design for an ISS test package to demonstrate operation of a subscale system in zero gravity.

  17. Radiation absorbed by a vertical cylinder in complex outdoor environments under clear sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krys, S. A.; Brown, R. D.

    1990-06-01

    Research was conducted into the estimation of radiation absorbed by a vertical cylinder in complex outdoor environments under clear sky conditions. Two methods of estimation were employed: a cylindrical radiation thermometer (CRT) and model developed by Brown and Gillespie (1986), and the weather station model. The CRT produced an integrated temperature reading from which the radiant environment could be estimated successfully given simultaneous measurements of air temperature and wind speed. The CRT estimates compared to the measured radiation gave a correlation coefficient of 0.9499, SE=19.8 W/m2, α=99.9%. The physically-based equations (weather station model)require the inputs of data from a near by weather station and site characteristics to estimate radiation absorbed by a vertical cylinder. The correlation coefficient for the weather station model is 0.9529, SE=16.8 W/m2, α=99.9%. This model estimates short wave and long wave radiation separately; hence, this allowed further comparison to measured values. The short wave radiation was very successfully estimated: R=0.9865, SE=10.0 W/m2, α=99.9%. The long wave radiation estimates were also successful: R=0.8654, SE=15.7 W/m2, and α=99.9%. Though the correlation coefficient and standard error may suggest inaccuracy to the micrometeorologist, these estimation techniques would be extremely useful as predictors of human thermal comfort which is not a precise measure buut defined by a range. The reported methods require little specialized knowledge of micrometeorology and are vehicles for the designers of outdoor spaces to measure accurately the inherent radiant environment of outdoor spaces and provide a measurement technique to simulate or model the effect of various landscape elements on planned environments.

  18. A Solar Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies. Volume 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation parameterization (CLIRAD-SW) developed at the Goddard Climate and Radiation Branch for application to atmospheric models are described. It includes the absorption by water vapor, O3, O2, CO2, clouds, and aerosols and the scattering by clouds, aerosols, and gases. Depending upon the nature of absorption, different approaches are applied to different absorbers. In the ultraviolet and visible regions, the spectrum is divided into 8 bands, and single O3 absorption coefficient and Rayleigh scattering coefficient are used for each band. In the infrared, the spectrum is divided into 3 bands, and the k-distribution method is applied for water vapor absorption. The flux reduction due to O2 is derived from a simple function, while the flux reduction due to CO2 is derived from precomputed tables. Cloud single-scattering properties are parameterized, separately for liquid drops and ice, as functions of water amount and effective particle size. A maximum-random approximation is adopted for the overlapping of clouds at different heights. Fluxes are computed using the Delta-Eddington approximation.

  19. Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This talk provides an overview of the subject of absorption of solar radiation by clouds in the earth's atmosphere. The paper summarizes the available evidence which points to disagreements between theoretical and observed values of cloud absorption (and reflections). The importance of these discrepancies, particularly to remote sensing of clouds as well as to studies of cloud physics and earth radiation budgets, is emphasized. Existing cloud absorption and reflection measurements are reviewed and the persistent differences that exist between calculated and measured near-infrared cloud albedos are highlighted. Various explanations for these reflection and absorption discrepancies are discussed under two separate paths: a theoretician's approach and an experimentalist's approach. Examples for the former approach include model accuracy tests, large-droplet hypothesis, excess absorbing aerosol, enhanced water vapor continuum absorption, and effects of cloud inhomogeneity. The latter approach focuses on discussions of instrumental device, calibration, operational strategy, and signal/noise separation. A recommendation for future activities on this subject will be given.

  20. Two new methods used to simulate the circumferential solar flux density concentrated on the absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Minghuan; Wang, Zhifeng; Sun, Feihu

    2016-05-01

    The optical efficiencies of a solar trough concentrator are important to the whole thermal performance of the solar collector, and the outer surface of the tube absorber is a key interface of energy flux. So it is necessary to simulate and analyze the concentrated solar flux density distributions on the tube absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector for various sun beam incident angles, with main optical errors considered. Since the solar trough concentrators are linear focusing, it is much of interest to investigate the solar flux density distribution on the cross-section profile of the tube absorber, rather than the flux density distribution along the focal line direction. Although a few integral approaches based on the "solar cone" concept were developed to compute the concentrated flux density for some simple trough concentrator geometries, all those integral approaches needed special integration routines, meanwhile, the optical parameters and geometrical properties of collectors also couldn't be changed conveniently. Flexible Monte Carlo ray trace (MCRT) methods are widely used to simulate the more accurate concentrated flux density distribution for compound parabolic solar trough concentrators, while generally they are quite time consuming. In this paper, we first mainly introduce a new backward ray tracing (BRT) method combined with the lumped effective solar cone, to simulate the cross-section flux density on the region of interest of the tube absorber. For BRT, bundles of rays are launched at absorber-surface points of interest, directly go through the glass cover of the absorber, strike on the uniformly sampled mirror segment centers in the close-related surface region of the parabolic reflector, and then direct to the effective solar cone around the incident sun beam direction after the virtual backward reflection. All the optical errors are convoluted into the effective solar cone. The brightness distribution of the effective solar cone is supposed

  1. Review of reconstruction of radiation incident air kerma by measurement of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with EPR.

    PubMed

    Wieser, A

    2012-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel has been proved to be a reliable method to determine retrospectively exposures from photon fields with minimal detectable doses of 100 mGy or lower, which is lower than achievable with cytogenetic dose reconstruction methods. For risk assessment or validating dosimetry systems for specific radiation incidents, the relevant dose from the incident has to be calculated from the total absorbed dose in enamel by subtracting additional dose contributions from the radionuclide content in teeth, natural external background radiation and medical exposures. For calculating organ doses or evaluating dosimetry systems the absorbed dose in enamel from a radiation incident has to be converted to air kerma using dose conversion factors depending on the photon energy spectrum and geometry of the exposure scenario. This paper outlines the approach to assess individual dose contributions to absorbed dose in enamel and calculate individual air kerma of a radiation incident from the absorbed dose in tooth enamel.

  2. Frequency dependence of the acoustic radiation force acting on absorbing cylindrical shells.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Farid G

    2005-02-01

    The frequency dependence of the radiation force function Y(p) for absorbing cylindrical shells suspended in an inviscid fluid in a plane incident sound field is analysed, in relation to the thickness and the content of their interior hollow region. The theory is modified to include the effect of hysteresis type absorption of compressional and shear waves in the material. The results of numerical calculations are presented for two viscoelastic (lucite and phenolic polymer) materials, with the hollow region filled with water or air indicating how damping and change of the interior fluid inside the shell's hollow region affect the acoustic radiation force. The acoustic radiation force acting on cylindrical lucite shells immersed in a high density fluid (in this case mercury) and filled with water in their hollow region, is also studied.

  3. Radiation absorbed dose to bladder walls from positron emitters in the bladder content.

    PubMed

    Powell, G F; Chen, C T

    1987-01-01

    A method to calculate absorbed doses at depths in the walls of a static spherical bladder from a positron emitter in the bladder content has been developed. The beta ray dose component is calculated for a spherical model by employing the solutions to the integration of Loevinger and Bochkarev point source functions over line segments and a line segment source array technique. The gamma ray dose is determined using the specific gamma ray constant. As an example, absorbed radiation doses to the bladder walls from F-18 in the bladder content are presented for static spherical bladder models having radii of 2.0 and 3.5 cm, respectively. Experiments with ultra-thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) were performed to verify the results of the calculations. Good agreement between TLD measurements and calculations was obtained.

  4. The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB): A Brief Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, Aron M; Sengupta, Manajit; Lopez, Anthony

    This poster presents a high-level overview of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). The NSRDB uses the physics-based model (PSM), which was developed using: adapted PATMOS-X model for cloud identification and properties, REST-2 model for clear-sky conditions, and NREL's Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar Applications (FARMS) for cloudy-sky Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) solar irradiance calculations.

  5. Impact of climate change on occupational exposure to solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Carlo; Borra, Massimo; Militello, Andrea; Polichetti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to solar radiation may induce both acute and long-term effects on skin and eyes. Personal exposure is very difficult to assess accurately, as it depends on environmental, organisational and individual factors. The ongoing climate change interacting with stratospheric ozone dynamics may affect occupational exposure to solar radiation. In addition, tropospheric levels of environmental pollutants interacting with solar radiation may be altered by climate dynamics, so introducing another variable affecting the overall exposure to solar radiation. Given the uncertainties regarding the direction of changes in exposure to solar radiation due to climate change, compliance of outdoor workers with protective measures and a proper health surveillance are crucial. At the same time, education and training, along with the promotion of healthier lifestyles, are of paramount importance.

  6. Correlation of total, diffuse, and direct solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyco, E. H.; Namkoong, D.

    1977-01-01

    Present requirements for realistic solar energy system evaluations necessitate a comprehensive body of solar-radition data. The data should include both diffuse and direct solar radiation as well as their total on an hourly (or shorter) basis. In general, however, only the total solar radiation values were recorded. This report presents a correlation that relates the diffuse component of an hourly total solar radiation value to the total radiation ratio of the maximum value attainable. The data used were taken at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, Massachusetts, for the period 1952. The relation - in the form of the data plots - can be used in situations in which only the hourly total radiation data are available but the diffuse component is desired.

  7. Spectrally-engineered solar thermal photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lenert, Andrej; Bierman, David; Chan, Walker

    A solar thermal photovoltaic device, and method of forming same, includes a solar absorber and a spectrally selective emitter formed on either side of a thermally conductive substrate. The solar absorber is configured to absorb incident solar radiation. The solar absorber and the spectrally selective emitter are configured with an optimized emitter-to-absorber area ratio. The solar thermal photovoltaic device also includes a photovoltaic cell in thermal communication with the spectrally selective emitter. The spectrally selective emitter is configured to permit high emittance for energies above a bandgap of the photovoltaic cell and configured to permit low emittance for energies belowmore » the bandgap.« less

  8. Evidence for Solar Cycle Influence on the Infrared Energy Budget and Radiative Cooling of the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Marshall, B. Thomas; Thompson, R. Earl; Williams, Joshua; Turpin, TImothy; Kratz, D. P.; Russell, James M.; Woods, Tom; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for solar cycle influence on the infrared energy budget and radiative cooling of the thermosphere. By analyzing nearly five years of data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument, we show that the annual mean infrared power radiated by the nitric oxide (NO) molecule at 5.3 m has decreased by a factor of 2.9. This decrease is correlated (r = 0.96) with the decrease in the annual mean F10.7 solar index. Despite the sharp decrease in radiated power (which is equivalent to a decrease in the vertical integrated radiative cooling rate), the variability of the power as given in the standard deviation of the annual means remains approximately constant. A simple relationship is shown to exist between the infrared power radiated by NO and the F10.7 index, thus providing a fundamental relationship between solar activity and the thermospheric cooling rate for use in thermospheric models. The change in NO radiated power is also consistent with changes in absorbed ultraviolet radiation over the same time period.

  9. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The index of refraction can considerably influence the temperature distribution and radiative heat flow in semitransparent materials such as some ceramics. For external radiant heating, the refractive index influences the amount of energy transmitted into the interior of the material. Emission within a material depends on the square of its refractive index, and hence this emission can be many times that for a biackbody radiating into a vacuum. Since radiation exiting through an interface into a vacuum cannot exceed that of a blackbody, there is extensive reflection at the internal surface of an interface, mostly by total internal reflection. This redistributes energy within the layer and tends to make its temperature distribution more uniform. The purpose of the present analysis is to show that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained very simply from the results for an index of refraction of unity. For the situation studied here, the layer is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces. The material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. For simplicity the index of refraction is unity in the medium surrounding the layer. The surfaces of the layer are assumed diffuse. This is probably a reasonable approximation for a ceramic layer that has not been polished. When transmitted radiation or radiation emitted from the interior reaches the inner surface of an interface, the radiation is diffused and some of it thereby placed into angular directions for which there is total internal reflection. This provides a trapping effect for retaining energy within the layer and tends to equalize its temperature distribution. An analysis of temperature distributions in absorbing-emitting layers, including index of refraction effects, was developed by Gardon (1958) to predict cooling and heat treating of glass plates

  10. The effects of solar radiation on thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Simon G; Parsons, Ken

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between simulated solar radiation and thermal comfort. Three studies investigated the effects of (1) the intensity of direct simulated solar radiation, (2) spectral content of simulated solar radiation and (3) glazing type on human thermal sensation responses. Eight male subjects were exposed in each of the three studies. In Study 1, subjects were exposed to four levels of simulated solar radiation: 0, 200, 400 and 600 Wm(-2). In Study 2, subjects were exposed to simulated solar radiation with four different spectral contents, each with a total intensity of 400 Wm(-2) on the subject. In Study 3, subjects were exposed through glass to radiation caused by 1,000 Wm(-2) of simulated solar radiation on the exterior surface of four different glazing types. The environment was otherwise thermally neutral where there was no direct radiation, predicted mean vote (PMV)=0+/-0.5, [International Standards Organisation (ISO) standard 7730]. Ratings of thermal sensation, comfort, stickiness and preference and measures of mean skin temperature (t(sk)) were taken. Increase in the total intensity of simulated solar radiation rather than the specific wavelength of the radiation is the critical factor affecting thermal comfort. Thermal sensation votes showed that there was a sensation scale increase of 1 scale unit for each increase of direct radiation of around 200 Wm(-2). The specific spectral content of the radiation has no direct effect on thermal sensation. The results contribute to models for determining the effects of solar radiation on thermal comfort in vehicles, buildings and outdoors.

  11. Least-squares collocation meshless approach for radiative heat transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. H.; Tan, J. Y.

    2007-02-01

    A least-squares collocation meshless method is employed for solving the radiative heat transfer in absorbing, emitting and scattering media. The least-squares collocation meshless method for radiative transfer is based on the discrete ordinates equation. A moving least-squares approximation is applied to construct the trial functions. Except for the collocation points which are used to construct the trial functions, a number of auxiliary points are also adopted to form the total residuals of the problem. The least-squares technique is used to obtain the solution of the problem by minimizing the summation of residuals of all collocation and auxiliary points. Three numerical examples are studied to illustrate the performance of this new solution method. The numerical results are compared with the other benchmark approximate solutions. By comparison, the results show that the least-squares collocation meshless method is efficient, accurate and stable, and can be used for solving the radiative heat transfer in absorbing, emitting and scattering media.

  12. Solar Radiation Estimated Through Mesoscale Atmospheric Modeling over Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Menezes Neto, Otacilio Leandro; Costa, Alexandre Araújo; Ramalho, Fernando Pinto; de Maria, Paulo Henrique Santiago

    2009-03-01

    The use of renewable energy sources, like solar, wind and biomass is rapidly increasing in recent years, with solar radiation as a particularly abundant energy source over Northeast Brazil. A proper quantitative knowledge of the incoming solar radiation is of great importance for energy planning in Brazil, serving as basis for developing future projects of photovoltaic power plants and solar energy exploitation. This work presents a methodology for mapping the incoming solar radiation at ground level for Northeast Brazil, using a mesoscale atmospheric model (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System—RAMS), calibrated and validated using data from the network of automatic surface stations from the State Foundation for Meteorology and Water Resources from Ceará (Fundação Cearense de Meteorologia e Recursos Hídricos- FUNCEME). The results showed that the model exhibits systematic errors, overestimating surface radiation, but that, after the proper statistical corrections, using a relationship between the model-predicted cloud fraction, the ground-level observed solar radiation and the incoming solar radiation estimated at the top of the atmosphere, a correlation of 0.92 with a confidence interval of 13.5 W/m2 is found for monthly data. Using this methodology, we found an estimate for annual average incoming solar radiation over Ceará of 215 W/m2 (maximum in October: 260 W/m2).

  13. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  14. Gallium arsenide solar cell radiation damage study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Herbert, G. A.; Kinnison, J. D.; Meulenberg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A thorough analysis has been made of electron- and proton- damaged GaAs solar cells suitable for use in space. It is found that, although some electrical parametric data and spectral response data are quite similar, the type of damage due to the two types of radiation is different. An I-V analysis model shows that electrons damage the bulk of the cell and its currents relatively more, while protons damage the junction of the cell and its voltages more. It is suggested that multiple defects due to protons in a strong field region such as a p/n junction cause the greater degradation in cell voltage, whereas the individual point defects in the quasi-neutral minority-carrier-diffusion regions due to electrons cause the greater degradation in cell current and spectral response.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF THE ABSORBED RADIATION DOSE ON THE THIRD SOVIET SATELLITE SPACESHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Savenko, I.A.; Pisarenko, N.F.; Shavrin, P.I.

    1963-05-01

    The data obtained from two scintillation counters and one gas-discharge counter aboard the third Soviet satellite were reported. The main result is the conclusion that there is practically no danger in space flight at heights less than 350 km over a considerable period of time, in the absence of solar flares. A comparison of the data obtained on the second and third satellite permit practical inferences on radiation danger at greater heights as well. (C.E.S.)

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Turbulent Flows through a Solar Air Heater Having Square-Sectioned Transverse Rib Roughness on the Absorber Plate

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anil Singh; Bhagoria, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Solar air heater is a type of heat exchanger which transforms solar radiation into heat energy. The thermal performance of conventional solar air heater has been found to be poor because of the low convective heat transfer coefficient from the absorber plate to the air. Use of artificial roughness on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the rate of heat transfer. A CFD-based investigation of turbulent flow through a solar air heater roughened with square-sectioned transverse rib roughness has been performed. Three different values of rib-pitch (P) and rib-height (e) have been taken such that the relative roughness pitch (P/e = 14.29) remains constant. The relative roughness height, e/D, varies from 0.021 to 0.06, and the Reynolds number, Re, varies from 3800 to 18,000. The results predicted by CFD show that the average heat transfer, average flow friction, and thermohydraulic performance parameter are strongly dependent on the relative roughness height. A maximum value of thermohydraulic performance parameter has been found to be 1.8 for the range of parameters investigated. Comparisons with previously published work have been performed and found to be in excellent agreement. PMID:24222752

  17. Modeling and simulation of turbulent flows through a solar air heater having square-sectioned transverse rib roughness on the absorber plate.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anil Singh; Bhagoria, J L

    2013-01-01

    Solar air heater is a type of heat exchanger which transforms solar radiation into heat energy. The thermal performance of conventional solar air heater has been found to be poor because of the low convective heat transfer coefficient from the absorber plate to the air. Use of artificial roughness on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the rate of heat transfer. A CFD-based investigation of turbulent flow through a solar air heater roughened with square-sectioned transverse rib roughness has been performed. Three different values of rib-pitch (P) and rib-height (e) have been taken such that the relative roughness pitch (P/e = 14.29) remains constant. The relative roughness height, e/D, varies from 0.021 to 0.06, and the Reynolds number, Re, varies from 3800 to 18,000. The results predicted by CFD show that the average heat transfer, average flow friction, and thermohydraulic performance parameter are strongly dependent on the relative roughness height. A maximum value of thermohydraulic performance parameter has been found to be 1.8 for the range of parameters investigated. Comparisons with previously published work have been performed and found to be in excellent agreement.

  18. Molecular engineering of fluorescein dyes as complementary absorbers in dye co-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pepe, Giulio; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Waddell, Paul G.

    Fluorescein dye derivatives exhibit extended optical absorption up to 500 nm, rendering these compounds suitable as co-absorbers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). A molecular engineering approach is presented, which embraces this intrinsic optical attribute of fluoresceins, while modifying the dye chemistry to enhance their light harvesting efficiency, in order to effectively tailor them for DSC applications. This approach first realizes relationships between the molecular structure and the optoelectronic properties for a series of five a priori known (parent) fluorescein dyes: 5-carboxyfluorescein (1), a mixture of m-carboxyfluorescein where m = 5 or 6 (2), 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (3), 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (4), amore » mixture of n-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate where n = 5 or 6 (5). The first step in this approach combines, where available, experimental and computational methods so that electronic structure calculations can also be validated for representative fluorescein dyes. Such calculations can then be used reliably to predict the structure and properties of fluorescein dyes for cases where experimental data are lacking. Structure-function relationships established from this initial step inform the selection of parent dye 1 that is taken forward to the second step in molecular engineering: in silico chemical derivation to re-functionalize 1 for DSC applications. For this purpose, computational calculations are used to extend the charge conjugation in 1 between its donor and acceptor moieties. These structural modifications result in a bathochromic shift of the lowest excitation by ~1.3-1.9 eV (100-170 nm), making the dye optically absorb in the visible region. Further calculations on dye molecules adsorbed onto the surface of a TiO 2 cluster are used to investigate the dye sensitization behavior via dye adsorption energies and anchoring modes. The results of this theoretical investigation lead to two molecularly engineered

  19. Molecular engineering of fluorescein dyes as complementary absorbers in dye co-sensitized solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Pepe, Giulio; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Waddell, Paul G.; ...

    2016-09-22

    Fluorescein dye derivatives exhibit extended optical absorption up to 500 nm, rendering these compounds suitable as co-absorbers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). A molecular engineering approach is presented, which embraces this intrinsic optical attribute of fluoresceins, while modifying the dye chemistry to enhance their light harvesting efficiency, in order to effectively tailor them for DSC applications. This approach first realizes relationships between the molecular structure and the optoelectronic properties for a series of five a priori known (parent) fluorescein dyes: 5-carboxyfluorescein (1), a mixture of m-carboxyfluorescein where m = 5 or 6 (2), 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (3), 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (4), amore » mixture of n-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate where n = 5 or 6 (5). The first step in this approach combines, where available, experimental and computational methods so that electronic structure calculations can also be validated for representative fluorescein dyes. Such calculations can then be used reliably to predict the structure and properties of fluorescein dyes for cases where experimental data are lacking. Structure-function relationships established from this initial step inform the selection of parent dye 1 that is taken forward to the second step in molecular engineering: in silico chemical derivation to re-functionalize 1 for DSC applications. For this purpose, computational calculations are used to extend the charge conjugation in 1 between its donor and acceptor moieties. These structural modifications result in a bathochromic shift of the lowest excitation by ~1.3-1.9 eV (100-170 nm), making the dye optically absorb in the visible region. Further calculations on dye molecules adsorbed onto the surface of a TiO 2 cluster are used to investigate the dye sensitization behavior via dye adsorption energies and anchoring modes. The results of this theoretical investigation lead to two molecularly engineered

  20. The effects of simulated solar UVB radiation on early developmental stages of the Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile) from three lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, Robin D.; Little, Edward E.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) has received much attention as a factor that could play a role in amphibian population declines. UV can be hazardous to some amphibians, but the resultant effects depend on a variety of environmental and behavioral factors. In this study, the potential effects of UV on the Northwestern Salamander, Ambystoma gracile, from three lakes were assessed in the laboratory using a solar simulator. We measured the survival of embryos and the survival and growth of larvae exposed to four UV treatments in controlled laboratory studies, the UV absorbance of egg jelly, oviposition depths in the lakes, and UV absorbance in water samples from the three lakes. Hatching success of embryos decreased in the higher UV treatments as compared to the control treatments, and growth of surviving larvae was significantly reduced in the higher UVB irradiance treatments. The egg jelly exhibited a small peak of absorbance within the UVB range (290–320 nm). The magnitude of UV absorbance differed among egg jellies from the three lakes. Oviposition depths at the three sites averaged 1.10 m below the water surface. Approximately 66% of surface UVB radiation was attenuated at 10-cm depth in all three lakes. Results of this study indicate that larvae may be sensitive to UVB exposure under laboratory conditions; however, in field conditions the depths of egg deposition in the lakes, absorbance of UV radiation by the water column, and the potential for behavioral adjustments may mitigate severe effects of UV radiation.

  1. Solar wind radiation damage effects in lunar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, B.; Cohen, A. J.; Cassidy, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    The research on solar wind radiation damage and other effects in lunar samples which was conducted to understand the optical properties of lunar materials is reported. Papers presented include: solar radiation effects in lunar samples, albedo of the moon, radiation effects in lunar crystalline rocks, valence states of 3rd transition elements in Apollo 11 and 12 rocks, and trace ferric iron in lunar and meteoritic titanaugites.

  2. Candidate chemical systems for air cooled solar powered, absorption air conditioner design. Part I. Organic absorbent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    All the available experimental evidence suggests that the optimum ''organic'' absorbent/refrigerant combination would be a methane derivative with a single hydrogen atom with chlorine and fluorine atoms in the other sites, as refrigerant. This would be hydrogen bonded to an absorbent molecule containing the group =NC/sup -/O, with the substituent groups being such that no steric hindrance took place. Cycle analyses showed that the ratio of internal heat transfer to cooling would be large, probably impractically so in view of the high coefficient of performance needed for solar driven cooling and the additional handicap of heat rejection to the atmosphere.more » A more promising approach would be to reduce the internal heat transfer per unit of space cooling by selecting a refrigerant with a high latent heat of vaporization and selecting an absorbent with suitable properties.« less

  3. Convective instability of sludge storage under evaporation and solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiberkin, Kirill; Tatyana, Lyubimova

    2014-05-01

    The sludge storages are an important part of production cycle at salt manufacturing, water supply, etc. A quality of water in the storage depends on mixing of pure water and settled sediment. One of the leading factors is thermal convection. There are two main mechanisms of the layer instability exist. First, it is instability of water due to evaporation from the free surface [1]. It cools the water from upside, increases the particles concentration and leads to the instability in the near-surface layer. Second, the sediment absorbs a solar radiation and heats the liquid from below making it unstable in the near-bottom area. We assume the initial state is the mechanical equilibrium. The water and sediment particles are motionless, the sediment forms a uniform sludge layer of thickness z0, there are no evaporation and heating by solar energy, and the temperature has a linear profile is determined by fixed upper and bottom temperatures of the layer. Taking into account the evaporation and solar radiation absorption, we obtain a non-stationary solution for the temperature using Fourier series method. The local temperature gradients increases rapidly with time, and local Rayleigh number can be estimated by thermal conduction length Lt: Raloc(z,t) = gβ(δT(z,t)/δz)L4t-/νΞ , Lt ~ √Ξt, (1) where g is gravity acceleration, β, ν and Ξ are thermal volume expansion coefficient, kinematic viscosity and thermal conductivity of the liquid, respectively. Raloc* reaches the critical value at finite time t* and water motion begins. The maximal power of solar radiation in visible band equals 230 Wt/m2 at the latitude of "Uralkalii" salt manufacturer (Berezniki, Perm Region, Russian Federation). We neglect IR and UV radiation because of its huge absorption by water [2]. The evaporation speed is found using results for shallow water reservoir [3] and meteorological data for Berezniki [4]. We get the t*~ 6 · 102 s (10 min) for the layer of 1 m depth and t*~ 2 · 103 s (40

  4. Near-infrared absorbing squarylium dyes with linearly extended π-conjugated structure for dye-sensitized solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takeshi; Hamamura, Yuuto; Miyanaga, Kyohei; Shima, Naoki; Yagi, Shigeyuki; Nakazumi, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-18

    A novel class of near-infrared absorbing squarylium sensitizers with linearly extended π-conjugated structures, which were obtained by Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions with stannylcyclobutenediones, has been developed for dye-sensitized solar cells. The cells based on these dyes exhibited a significant spectral response in the near-infrared region over 750 nm in addition to the visible region.

  5. Variation of solar cell sensitivity and solar radiation on tilted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    The validity is studied that one of various insolation models used to compute solar radiation incident on tilted surfaces from global data measured on horizontal surfaces. The variation of solar cell sensitivity to solar radiation is determined over a wide range of atmospheric condition. A new model was formulated that reduced the deviations between measured and predicted insolation to less than 3 percent. Evaluation of solar cell sensitivity data indicates small change (2-3 percent) in sensitivity from winter to summer for tilted cells. The feasibility of using such global data as a means for calibrating terrestrial solar cells is discussed.

  6. Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) for Thermal Storage on Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Future manned exploration spacecraft will need to operate in challenging thermal environments. State-of-the-art technology for active thermal control relies on sublimating water ice and venting the vapor overboard in very hot environments, and or heavy phase change material heat exchangers for thermal storage. These approaches can lead to large loss of water and a significant mass penalties for the spacecraft. This paper describes an innovative thermal control system that uses a Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to control spacecraft temperatures in highly variable environments without venting water. SEAR uses heat pumping and energy storage by LiCl/water absorption to enable effective cooling during hot periods and regeneration during cool periods. The LiCl absorber technology has the potential to absorb over 800 kJ per kg of system mass, compared to phase change heat sink systems that typically achieve approx. 50 kJ/kg. This paper describes analysis models to predict performance and optimize the size of the SEAR system, estimated size and mass of key components, and an assessment of potential mass savings compared with alternative thermal management approaches. We also describe a concept design for an ISS test package to demonstrate operation of a subscale system in zero gravity.

  7. [Variations of solar activity and radiation situation on board MIR station during the period 1986-1994].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V A; Mitrikas, V G; Tsetlin , V V

    1995-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the analysis of the radiation situation onboard Mir station over a period of 1986-1994, there examined the main cosmophysics parameters and indices of the solar activity as well as the variations of the parameters of the earth's magnetic field and their association with the changes in the power of absorbed dose onboard the station. There noted the high levels of radiation exposure to the cosmonauts under terrestrial conditions when carrying out the roentgeno-radiologic examinations and procedures comparable or exceeding the absorbed doses during the flights. For revealing the regular associations of the radiation situation onboard the station with the parameters of solar activity there has been analyzed the time changes of average monthly values of dose power since the beginning of station functioning in 1986 until returning the fifteenth expedition to Earth. From the analyses of the results it might be assumed that the best statistical associations of average monthly power of the absorbed dose are found with the streams of protons of GCR. Wolff numbers and background stream of the radio emission of the Sun which reflects the existence of the radiation situation upon the phase of solar activity cycle. From this paper it transpires that calculating the dose loads during the period of the extreme phases of solar activity, it is possible to make between them the interpolations of time dependence by analogy with the dynamics in time of the background streams of GCR or Wolff numbers.

  8. Solar radiation is inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Francisca; Riutort, Maria C; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Camargo, Carlos A; Borzutzky, Arturo

    To explore the associations between latitude and solar radiation with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile, the country with the largest variation in solar radiation in the world. This is an ecological study, which included data on all hospital-admitted population for inflammatory bowel disease between 2001 and 2012, according to different latitudes and solar radiation exposures in Chile. The data were acquired from the national hospital discharge database from the Department of Health Statistics and Information of the Chilean Ministry of Health. Between 2001 and 2012 there were 12,869 admissions due to inflammatory bowel disease (69% ulcerative colitis, 31% Crohn's disease). Median age was 36 years (IQR: 25-51); 57% were female. The national inflammatory bowel disease admission rate was 6.52 (95% CI: 6.40-6.63) per 100,000 inhabitants with increasing rates over the 12-year period. In terms of latitude, the highest admission rates for pediatric ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, as well as adult ulcerative colitis, were observed in the southernmost region with lowest annual solar radiation. Linear regression analysis showed that regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions in Chile (β: -.44, p = .03). Regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile; inflammatory bowel disease admissions were highest in the southernmost region with lowest solar radiation. Our results support the potential role of vitamin D deficiency on inflammatory bowel disease flares.

  9. Relationships between surface solar radiation and wheat yield in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Barrera, Sara; Rodriguez-Puebla, Concepción

    2017-04-01

    Here we examine the role of solar radiation to describe wheat-yield variability in Spain. We used Partial Least Square regression to capture the modes of surface solar radiation that drive wheat-yield variability. We will show that surface solar radiation introduces the effects of teleconnection patterns on wheat yield and also it is associated with drought and diurnal temperature range. We highlight the importance of surface solar radiation to obtain models for wheat-yield projections because it could reduce uncertainty with respect to the projections based on temperatures and precipitation variables. In addition, the significance of the model based on surface solar radiation is greater than the previous one based on drought and diurnal temperature range (Hernandez-Barrera et al., 2016). According to our results, the increase of solar radiation over Spain for 21st century could force a wheat-yield decrease (Hernandez-Barrera et al., 2017). Hernandez-Barrera S., Rodríguez-Puebla C. and Challinor A.J. 2016 Effects of diurnal temperature range and drought on wheat yield in Spain. Theoretical and Applied Climatology. DOI: 10.1007/s00704-016-1779-9 Hernandez-Barrera S., Rodríguez-Puebla C. 2017 Wheat yield in Spain and associated solar radiation patterns. International Journal of Climatology. DOI: 10.1002/joc.4975

  10. Materials That Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiadong; Wang, Haorong

    2012-01-01

    A thin layer (approximately 10 microns) of a novel "transparent" fluorescent material is applied to existing solar cells or modules to effectively block and convert UV light, or other lower solar response waveband of solar radiation, to visible or IR light that can be more efficiently used by solar cells for additional photocurrent. Meanwhile, the layer of fluorescent coating material remains fully "transparent" to the visible and IR waveband of solar radiation, resulting in a net gain of solar cell efficiency. This innovation alters the effective solar spectral power distribution to which an existing cell gets exposed, and matches the maximum photovoltaic (PV) response of existing cells. By shifting a low PV response waveband (e.g., UV) of solar radiation to a high PV response waveband (e.g. Vis-Near IR) with novel fluorescent materials that are transparent to other solar-cell sensitive wavebands, electrical output from solar cells will be enhanced. This approach enhances the efficiency of solar cells by converting UV and high-energy particles in space that would otherwise be wasted to visible/IR light. This innovation is a generic technique that can be readily implemented to significantly increase efficiencies of both space and terrestrial solar cells, without incurring much cost, thus bringing a broad base of economical, social, and environmental benefits. The key to this approach is that the "fluorescent" material must be very efficient, and cannot block or attenuate the "desirable" and unconverted" waveband of solar radiation (e.g. Vis-NIR) from reaching the cells. Some nano-phosphors and novel organometallic complex materials have been identified that enhance the energy efficiency on some state-of-the-art commercial silicon and thin-film-based solar cells by over 6%.

  11. Preparation and characterization of CuInS2 absorber layers by sol-gel method for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerioun, M. H.; Ghazi, M. E.; Izadifard, M.; Bahramian, B.

    2016-04-01

    CuInSe2 , CuInS2 ( CIS2 and CuInGaS2 alloys and their compounds with band gaps between 1.05 and 1.7eV are absorbance materials based on chalcopyrite, in which, because of their suitable direct band gap, high absorbance coefficient and short carrier diffusion are used as absorbance layers in solar cells. In this work, the effects of decrease in p H and thickness variation on characteristics of the CIS2 absorber layers, grown by spin coating on glass substrates, are investigated. Furthermore by using thiourea as a sulphur source in solvent, the sulfurization of layers was done easier than other sulfurization methods. Due to the difficulty in dissolving thiourea in the considered solvent that leads to a fast deposition during the dissolving process, precise conditions are employed in order to prepare the solution. In fact, this procedure can facilitate the sulfurization process of CuIn layers. The results obtained from this investigation indicate reductions in absorbance and band gap in the visible region of the spectrum as a result of decrease in p H. Finally, conductivity of layers is studied by the current vs. voltage curve that represents reduction of electrical resistance with decrease and increase in p H and thickness, respectively.

  12. Determination of solar proton fluxes and energies at high solar latitudes by UV radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The latitudinal variation of the solar proton flux and energy causes a density increase at high solar latitudes of the neutral gas penetrating the heliosphere. Measurements of the neutral density by UV resonance radiation observations from interplanetary spacecraft thus permit deductions on the dependence of the solar proton flux on heliographic latitude. Using both the results of Mariner 10 measurements and of other off-ecliptic solar wind observations, the values of the solar proton fluxes and energies at polar heliographic latitudes are determined for several cases of interest. The Mariner 10 analysis, together with IPS results, indicate a significant decrease of the solar proton flux at polar latitudes.

  13. Super-hydrophilic copper sulfide films as light absorbers for efficient solar steam generation under one sun illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhenzhen; Ming, Xin; Wang, Gang; Hou, Baofei; Liu, Xinghang; Mei, Tao; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Jianying; Wang, Xianbao

    2018-02-01

    Solar steam technology is one of the simplest, most direct and effective ways to harness solar energy through water evaporation. Here, we report the development using super-hydrophilic copper sulfide (CuS) films with double-layer structures as light absorbers for solar steam generation. In the double-layer structure system, a porous mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membrane is used as a supporting layer, which enables water to get into the CuS light absorbers through a capillary action to provide continuous water during solar steam generation. The super-hydrophilic property of the double-layer system (CuS/MCE) leads to a thinner water film close to the air-water interface where the surface temperature is sufficiently high, leading to more efficient evaporation (˜80 ± 2.5%) under one sun illumination. Furthermore, the evaporation efficiencies still keep a steady value after 15 cycles of testing. The super-hydrophilic CuS film is promising for practical application in water purification and evaporation as a light absorption material.

  14. A simple solar radiation index for wildlife habitat studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keating, Kim A.; Gogan, Peter J.; Vore, John N.; Irby, Lynn R.

    2007-01-01

    Solar radiation is a potentially important covariate in many wildlife habitat studies, but it is typically addressed only indirectly, using problematic surrogates like aspect or hillshade. We devised a simple solar radiation index (SRI) that combines readily available information about aspect, slope, and latitude. Our SRI is proportional to the amount of extraterrestrial solar radiation theoretically striking an arbitrarily oriented surface during the hour surrounding solar noon on the equinox. Because it derives from first geometric principles and is linearly distributed, SRI offers clear advantages over aspect-based surrogates. The SRI also is superior to hillshade, which we found to be sometimes imprecise and ill-behaved. To illustrate application of our SRI, we assessed niche separation among 3 ungulate species along a single environmental axis, solar radiation, on the northern Yellowstone winter range. We detected no difference between the niches occupied by bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) and elk (Cervus elaphus; P = 0.104), but found that mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) tended to use areas receiving more solar radiation than either of the other species (P < 0.001). Overall, our SRI provides a useful metric that can reduce noise, improve interpretability, and increase parsimony in wildlife habitat models containing a solar radiation component.

  15. Nanoimprinted backside reflectors for a-Si:H thin-film solar cells: critical role of absorber front textures.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Yao-Chung; Fisker, Christian; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2014-05-05

    The development of optimal backside reflectors (BSRs) is crucial for future low cost and high efficiency silicon (Si) thin-film solar cells. In this work, nanostructured polymer substrates with aluminum coatings intended as BSRs were produced by positive and negative nanoimprint lithography (NIL) techniques, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was deposited hereon as absorbing layers. The relationship between optical properties and geometry of front textures was studied by combining experimental reflectance spectra and theoretical simulations. It was found that a significant height variation on front textures plays a critical role for light-trapping enhancement in solar cell applications. As a part of sample preparation, a transfer NIL process was developed to overcome the problem of low heat deflection temperature of polymer substrates during solar cell fabrication.

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Solar Radiation on Amino Acid Uptake in Chesapeake Bay Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Carmela A.; Neihof, Rex A.; Tabor, Paul S.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on a natural bacterial population from the Chesapeake Bay was evaluated from measured changes in numbers of organisms engaged in amino acid uptake. From July through May, freshly collected water samples were exposed in quartz containers to 3.5 h of total sunlight both with and without UV-absorbing filters. Water samples were subsequently incubated with tritiated amino acids, and the uptake-active bacteria were assayed by microauto-radiography-epifluorescence microscopy. The survival index, defined as the fraction of the uptake-active population that remained active after the exposure to sunlight, ranged from 0.93 to 0.20. Decreased survival was correlated with increased solar intensity. The inhibition of amino acid uptake was attributed not only to the UV-B component of the solar spectrum (280 to 320 nm), but also to longer UV and visible wavelengths. PMID:16346351

  17. Inhibitory effect of solar radiation on amino Acid uptake in chesapeake bay bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C A; Neihof, R A; Tabor, P S

    1983-07-01

    The effect of solar radiation on a natural bacterial population from the Chesapeake Bay was evaluated from measured changes in numbers of organisms engaged in amino acid uptake. From July through May, freshly collected water samples were exposed in quartz containers to 3.5 h of total sunlight both with and without UV-absorbing filters. Water samples were subsequently incubated with tritiated amino acids, and the uptake-active bacteria were assayed by microauto-radiography-epifluorescence microscopy. The survival index, defined as the fraction of the uptake-active population that remained active after the exposure to sunlight, ranged from 0.93 to 0.20. Decreased survival was correlated with increased solar intensity. The inhibition of amino acid uptake was attributed not only to the UV-B component of the solar spectrum (280 to 320 nm), but also to longer UV and visible wavelengths.

  18. Variation of solar cell sensitivity and solar radiation on tilted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    An empirical study was performed (1) to evaluate the validity of various insolation models used to compute solar radiation incident on tilted surfaces from global data measured on horizontal surfaces and (2) to determine the variation of solar cell sensitivity to solar radiation over a wide range of atmospheric condition. Evaluation of the insolation data indicates that the isotropic sky model of Liu and Jordan underestimates the amount of solar radiation falling on tilted surfaces by as much as 10%. An anisotropic-clear-sky model proposed by Temps and Coulson was also evaluated and found to be deficient under cloudy conditions. A new model, formulated herein, reduced the deviations between measured and predicted insolation to less than 3%. Evaluation of solar cell sensitivity data indicates small change (2-3%) in sensitivity from winter to summer for tilted cells. The feasibility of using such global data as a means for calibrating terrestrial solar cells as done by Treble is discussed.

  19. Intrinsic radiation tolerance of ultra-thin GaAs solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L. C.; Yakes, M. K.; Warner, J. H.

    2016-07-18

    Radiation tolerance is a critical performance criterion of photovoltaic devices for space power applications. In this paper we demonstrate the intrinsic radiation tolerance of an ultra-thin solar cell geometry. Device characteristics of GaAs solar cells with absorber layer thicknesses 80 nm and 800 nm were compared before and after 3 MeV proton irradiation. Both cells showed a similar degradation in V{sub oc} with increasing fluence; however, the 80 nm cell showed no degradation in I{sub sc} for fluences up to 10{sup 14 }p{sup +} cm{sup −2}. For the same exposure, the I{sub sc} of the 800 nm cell had severely degraded leaving a remaining factor ofmore » 0.26.« less

  20. Absolute high spectral resolution measurements of surface solar radiation for detection of water vapour continuum absorption.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, T D; Coleman, M; Browning, H; Tallis, L; Ptashnik, I V; Shine, K P

    2012-06-13

    Solar-pointing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy offers the capability to measure both the fine scale and broadband spectral structure of atmospheric transmission simultaneously across wide spectral regions. It is therefore suited to the study of both water vapour monomer and continuum absorption behaviours. However, in order to properly address this issue, it is necessary to radiatively calibrate the FTIR instrument response. A solar-pointing high-resolution FTIR spectrometer was deployed as part of the 'Continuum Absorption by Visible and Infrared radiation and its Atmospheric Relevance' (CAVIAR) consortium project. This paper describes the radiative calibration process using an ultra-high-temperature blackbody and the consideration of the related influence factors. The result is a radiatively calibrated measurement of the solar irradiation at the ground across the IR region from 2000 to 10 000 cm(-1) with an uncertainty of between 3.3 and 5.9 per cent. This measurement is shown to be in good general agreement with a radiative-transfer model. The results from the CAVIAR field measurements are being used in ongoing studies of atmospheric absorbers, in particular the water vapour continuum.

  1. High spectral selectivity for solar absorbers using a monolayer transparent conductive oxide coated on a metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Makoto; Suzuki, Mari; Iguchi, Fumitada; Yugami, Hiroo

    2017-05-01

    A spectrally selective absorber composed of a monolayer transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coated on a metal substrate is investigated for use in solar systems operating at temperatures higher (>973 K) than the operation temperature of conventional systems ( ˜ 673 K). This method is different from the currently used solar-selective coating technologies, such as those using multilayered and cermet materials. The spectral selective absorption property can be attributed to the inherent optical property of TCO owing to the plasma frequency and interferences between the substrates. Since spectral selectivity can be achieved using monolayered materials, the effect of atomic diffusion occurring at each layer boundary in a multilayer or cermet coatings under high-temperature conditions can be reduced. In addition, since this property is attributed to the inherent property of TCO, the precise control of the layer thickness can be omitted if the layer is sufficiently thick (>0.5 μm). The optimum TCO properties, namely, carrier density and mobility, required for solar-selective absorbers are analyzed to determine the cutoff wavelength and emittance in the infrared range. A solar absorptance of 0.95 and hemispherical emittance of 0.10 at 973 K are needed for achieving the optimum TCO properties, i.e., a carrier density of 5.5 × 1020 cm-3 and mobility of 90 cm2 V-1 s-1 are required. Optical simulations indicate that the spectrally selective absorption weakly depends on the incident angle and film thickness. The thermal stability of the fabricated absorber treated at temperatures up to 973 K for 10 h is verified in vacuum by introducing a SiO2 interlayer, which plays an important role as a diffusion barrier.

  2. Forecasting of global solar radiation using anfis and armax techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Auwal; Gaya, M. S.; Aliyu, Rakiya; Aliyu Abdulkadir, Rabi'u.; Dauda Umar, Ibrahim; Aminu Yusuf, Lukuman; Umar Ali, Mudassir; Khairi, M. T. M.

    2018-01-01

    Procurement of measuring device, maintenance cost coupled with calibration of the instrument contributed to the difficulty in forecasting of global solar radiation in underdeveloped countries. Most of the available regressional and mathematical models do not capture well the behavior of the global solar radiation. This paper presents the comparison of Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Autoregressive Moving Average with eXogenous term (ARMAX) in forecasting global solar radiation. Full-Scale (experimental) data of Nigerian metrological agency, Sultan Abubakar III international airport Sokoto was used to validate the models. The simulation results demonstrated that the ANFIS model having achieved MAPE of 5.34% outperformed the ARMAX model. The ANFIS could be a valuable tool for forecasting the global solar radiation.

  3. National Solar Radiation Database 1991-2010 Update: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S. M.

    This user's manual provides information on the updated 1991-2010 National Solar Radiation Database. Included are data format descriptions, data sources, production processes, and information about data uncertainty.

  4. Estimation of Solar Radiation on Building Roofs in Mountainous Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agugiaro, G.; Remondino, F.; Stevanato, G.; De Filippi, R.; Furlanello, C.

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study is estimating solar radiation on building roofs in complex mountain landscape areas. A multi-scale solar radiation estimation methodology is proposed that combines 3D data ranging from regional scale to the architectural one. Both the terrain and the nearby building shadowing effects are considered. The approach is modular and several alternative roof models, obtained by surveying and modelling techniques at varying level of detail, can be embedded in a DTM, e.g. that of an Alpine valley surrounded by mountains. The solar radiation maps obtained from raster models at different resolutions are compared and evaluated in order to obtain information regarding the benefits and disadvantages tied to each roof modelling approach. The solar radiation estimation is performed within the open-source GRASS GIS environment using r.sun and its ancillary modules.

  5. National Solar Radiation Database 1991-2005 Update: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2007-04-01

    This manual describes how to obtain and interpret the data products from the updated 1991-2005 National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). This is an update of the original 1961-1990 NSRDB released in 1992.

  6. Ecological study of solar radiation and cancer mortality in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mizoue, Tetsuya

    2004-11-01

    Geographic observation of the increased mortality of some cancers at higher latitudes has led to a hypothesis that vitamin D produced after exposure to solar radiation has anti-carcinogenic effects. However, it is unclear whether such association would be observed in countries like Japan, where fish consumption, and therefore dietary vitamin D intake, is high. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between averaged annual solar radiation levels for the period from 1961 through 1990 and cancer mortality in the year 2000 in 47 prefectures in Japan, with adjustments for regional per capita income and dietary factors. A moderate, inverse correlation with solar radiation was observed for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, pancreas, and gallbladder and bile ducts in both sexes (correlation coefficient, ranging from -0.6 to -0.3). The results of this study support the hypothesis that increased exposure to solar radiation reduces the risk of cancers of the digestive organs.

  7. Public understanding of solar radiation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, A. M.; Keith, D. W.; Sharp, J. D.

    2011-10-01

    We report the results of the first large-scale international survey of public perception of geoengineering and solar radiation management (SRM). Our sample of 3105 individuals in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom was recruited by survey firms that administer internet surveys to nationally representative population samples. Measured familiarity was higher than expected, with 8% and 45% of the population correctly defining the terms geoengineering and climate engineering respectively. There was strong support for allowing the study of SRM. Support decreased and uncertainty rose as subjects were asked about their support for using SRM immediately, or to stop a climate emergency. Support for SRM is associated with optimism about scientific research, a valuing of SRM's benefits and a stronger belief that SRM is natural, while opposition is associated with an attitude that nature should not be manipulated in this way. The potential risks of SRM are important drivers of public perception with the most salient being damage to the ozone layer and unknown risks. SRM is a new technology and public opinions are just forming; thus all reported results are sensitive to changes in framing, future information on risks and benefits, and changes to context.

  8. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Tyrone

    1995-01-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

  9. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, T.

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containersmore » with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.« less

  10. Denoising solar radiation data using coiflet wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul, E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my; Janier, Josefina B., E-mail: josefinajanier@petronas.com.my; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram, E-mail: mohana.muthuvalu@petronas.com.my

    Signal denoising and smoothing plays an important role in processing the given signal either from experiment or data collection through observations. Data collection usually was mixed between true data and some error or noise. This noise might be coming from the apparatus to measure or collect the data or human error in handling the data. Normally before the data is use for further processing purposes, the unwanted noise need to be filtered out. One of the efficient methods that can be used to filter the data is wavelet transform. Due to the fact that the received solar radiation data fluctuatesmore » according to time, there exist few unwanted oscillation namely noise and it must be filtered out before the data is used for developing mathematical model. In order to apply denoising using wavelet transform (WT), the thresholding values need to be calculated. In this paper the new thresholding approach is proposed. The coiflet2 wavelet with variation diminishing 4 is utilized for our purpose. From numerical results it can be seen clearly that, the new thresholding approach give better results as compare with existing approach namely global thresholding value.« less

  11. An economic evaluation of solar radiation management.

    PubMed

    Aaheim, Asbjørn; Romstad, Bård; Wei, Taoyuan; Kristjánsson, Jón Egill; Muri, Helene; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke

    2015-11-01

    Economic evaluations of solar radiation management (SRM) usually assume that the temperature will be stabilized, with no economic impacts of climate change, but with possible side-effects. We know from experiments with climate models, however, that unlike emission control the spatial and temporal distributions of temperature, precipitation and wind conditions will change. Hence, SRM may have economic consequences under a stabilization of global mean temperature even if side-effects other than those related to the climatic responses are disregarded. This paper addresses the economic impacts of implementing two SRM technologies; stratospheric sulfur injection and marine cloud brightening. By the use of a computable general equilibrium model, we estimate the economic impacts of climatic responses based on the results from two earth system models, MPI-ESM and NorESM. We find that under a moderately increasing greenhouse-gas concentration path, RCP4.5, the economic benefits of implementing climate engineering are small, and may become negative. Global GDP increases in three of the four experiments and all experiments include regions where the benefits from climate engineering are negative. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimation of snow albedo reduction by light absorbing impurities using Monte Carlo radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, D.; Gao, L.; Wilcox, E. M.; Beres, N. D.; Moosmüller, H.; Khlystov, A.

    2017-12-01

    Radiative forcing and climate change greatly depends on earth's surface albedo and its temporal and spatial variation. The surface albedo varies greatly depending on the surface characteristics ranging from 5-10% for calm ocean waters to 80% for some snow-covered areas. Clean and fresh snow surfaces have the highest albedo and are most sensitive to contamination with light absorbing impurities that can greatly reduce surface albedo and change overall radiative forcing estimates. Accurate estimation of snow albedo as well as understanding of feedbacks on climate from changes in snow-covered areas is important for radiative forcing, snow energy balance, predicting seasonal snowmelt, and run off rates. Such information is essential to inform timely decision making of stakeholders and policy makers. Light absorbing particles deposited onto the snow surface can greatly alter snow albedo and have been identified as a major contributor to regional climate forcing if seasonal snow cover is involved. However, uncertainty associated with quantification of albedo reduction by these light absorbing particles is high. Here, we use Mie theory (under the assumption of spherical snow grains) to reconstruct the single scattering parameters of snow (i.e., single scattering albedo ῶ and asymmetry parameter g) from observation-based size distribution information and retrieved refractive index values. The single scattering parameters of impurities are extracted with the same approach from datasets obtained during laboratory combustion of biomass samples. Instead of using plane-parallel approximation methods to account for multiple scattering, we have used the simple "Monte Carlo ray/photon tracing approach" to calculate the snow albedo. This simple approach considers multiple scattering to be the "collection" of single scattering events. Using this approach, we vary the effective snow grain size and impurity concentrations to explore the evolution of snow albedo over a wide

  13. Interplanetary Radiation and Internal Charging Environment Models for Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; Neergaard, Linda F.

    2004-01-01

    A Solar Sail Radiation Environment (SSRE) model has been developed for characterizing the radiation dose and internal charging environments in the solar wind. The SSRE model defines the 0.01 keV to 1 MeV charged particle environment for use in testing the radiation dose vulnerability of candidate solar sail materials and for use in evaluating the internal charging effects in the interplanetary environment. Solar wind and energetic particle instruments aboard the Ulysses spacecraft provide the particle data used to derive the environments for the high inclination 0.5 AU Solar Polar Imager mission and the 1.0 AU L1 solar sail missions. Ulysses is the only spacecraft to sample high latitude solar wind environments far from the ecliptic plane and is therefore uniquely capable of providing the information necessary for defining radiation environments for the Solar Polar Imager spacecraft. Cold plasma moments are used to derive differential flux spectra based on Kappa distribution functions. Energetic particle flux measurements are used to constrain the high energy, non-thermal tails of the distribution functions providing a comprehensive electron, proton, and helium spectra from less than 0.01 keV to a few MeV.

  14. Improved Statistical Model Of 10.7-cm Solar Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedder, John D.; Tabor, Jill L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved mathematical model simulates short-term fluctuations of flux of 10.7-cm-wavelength solar radiation during 91-day averaging period. Called "F10.7 flux", important as measure of solar activity and because it is highly correlated with ultraviolet radiation causing fluctuations in heating and density of upper atmosphere. F10.7 flux easily measureable at surface of Earth.

  15. Reducing heat loss from the energy absorber of a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Chao, Bei Tse; Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing convective heat loss in a cylindrical radiant energy collector. It includes a curved reflective wall in the shape of the arc of a circle positioned on the opposite side of the exit aperture from the reflective side walls of the collector. Radiant energy exiting the exit aperture is directed by the curved wall onto an energy absorber such that the portion of the absorber upon which the energy is directed faces downward to reduce convective heat loss from the absorber.

  16. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) x ultraviolet radiation (UV) interact to initiate solar injury in apple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sunburn or solar injury (SI) in apple is associated with high temperature, high visible light and ultraviolet radiation (UV). Fruit surface temperature (FST) thresholds for SI related disorders have been developed but there are no thresholds established for solar radiation. The objectives of the s...

  17. Measurement-based estimates of direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2015-07-01

    The elevated layers of absorbing smoke aerosols from western African (e.g., Gabon and Congo) biomass burning activities have been frequently observed above low-level stratocumulus clouds off the African coast, which presents an excellent natural laboratory for studying the effects of aerosols above clouds (AAC) on regional energy balance in tropical and subtropical environments. Using spatially and temporally collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data sets, the top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol direct shortwave radiative effects (ARE) of absorbing aerosols above low-level water clouds in the southeast Atlantic Ocean was examined in this study. The regional averaged instantaneous ARE has been estimated to be 36.7 ± 20.5 Wm-2 (regional mean ± standard deviation) along with a mean positive OMI Aerosol Index at 1.3 in August 2006 based on multisensors measurements. The highest magnitude of instantaneous ARE can even reach 138.2 Wm-2. We assess that the 660 nm cloud optical depth (COD) values of 8-12 is the critical value above (below) which aerosol absorption (scattering) effect dominates and further produces positive (negative) ARE values. The results further show that ARE values are more sensitive to aerosols above lower COD values than cases for higher COD values. This is among the first studies to provide quantitative estimates of shortwave ARE due to AAC events from an observational perspective.

  18. Prostate cancer incidence in Australia correlates inversely with solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Loke, Tim W; Seyfi, Doruk; Sevfi, Doruk; Khadra, Mohamed

    2011-11-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Increased sun exposure and blood levels of vitamin D have been postulated to be protective against prostate cancer. This is controversial. We investigated the relationship between prostate cancer incidence and solar radiation in non-urban Australia, and found a lower incidence in regions receiving more sunlight. In landmark ecological studies, prostate cancer mortality rates have been shown to be inversely related to ultraviolet radiation exposure. Investigators have hypothesised that ultraviolet radiation acts by increasing production of vitamin D, which inhibits prostate cancer cells in vitro. However, analyses of serum levels of vitamin D in men with prostate cancer have failed to support this hypothesis. This study has found an inverse correlation between solar radiation and prostate cancer incidence in Australia. Our population (previously unstudied) represents the third group to exhibit this correlation. Significantly, the demographics and climate of Australia differ markedly from those of previous studies conducted on men in the United Kingdom and the United States. • To ascertain if prostate cancer incidence rates correlate with solar radiation among non-urban populations of men in Australia. • Local government areas from each state and territory were selected using explicit criteria. Urban areas were excluded from analysis. • For each local government area, prostate cancer incidence rates and averaged long-term solar radiation were obtained. • The strength of the association between prostate cancer incidence and solar radiation was determined. • Among 70 local government areas of Australia, age-standardized prostate cancer incidence rates for the period 1998-2007 correlated inversely with daily solar radiation averaged over the last two decades. •  There exists an association between less solar radiation and higher prostate cancer incidence in Australia. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU

  19. Editor's choice--Use of disposable radiation-absorbing surgical drapes results in significant dose reduction during EVAR procedures.

    PubMed

    Kloeze, C; Klompenhouwer, E G; Brands, P J M; van Sambeek, M R H M; Cuypers, P W M; Teijink, J A W

    2014-03-01

    Because of the increasing number of interventional endovascular procedures with fluoroscopy and the corresponding high annual dose for interventionalists, additional dose-protecting measures are desirable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of disposable radiation-absorbing surgical drapes in reducing scatter radiation exposure for interventionalists and supporting staff during an endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedure. This was a randomized control trial in which 36 EVAR procedures were randomized between execution with and without disposable radiation-absorbing surgical drapes (Radpad: Worldwide Innovations & Technologies, Inc., Kansas City, US, type 5511A). Dosimetric measurements were performed on the interventionalist (hand and chest) and theatre nurse (chest) with and without the use of the drapes to obtain the dose reduction and effect on the annual dose caused by the drapes. Use of disposable radiation-absorbing surgical drapes resulted in dose reductions of 49%, 55%, and 48%, respectively, measured on the hand and chest of the interventionalist and the chest of the theatre nurse. The use of disposable radiation-absorbing surgical drapes significantly reduces scatter radiation exposure for both the interventionalist and the supporting staff during EVAR procedures. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A multi-satellite analysis of the direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Christopher, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above liquid water clouds in the southeast Atlantic as a function of fire sources are investigated using A-Train data coupled with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP). Both the VIIRS Active Fire product and the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Thermal Anomalies product (MYD14) are used to identify the biomass burning fire origin in southern Africa. The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) are used to assess the aerosol type, aerosol altitude, and cloud altitude. We use back trajectory information, wind data, and the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) product to infer the transportation of aerosols from the fire source to the CALIOP swath in the southeast Atlantic during austral winter.

  1. Radiation forces on small particles in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Lamy, P. L.; Soter, S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar radiation forces on small particles in the solar system are examined, and the resulting orbital evolution of interplanetary and circumplanetary dust is considered. An expression is derived for the effects of radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag on small, spherical particles using the energy and momentum transformation laws of special relativity, and numerical examples are presented to illustrate that radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag are only important for particles within a narrow size range. The orbital consequences of these radiation forces are considered both for heliocentric and planetocentric orbiting particles, and the coupling between particle sizes and dynamics is discussed. A qualitative derivation is presented for the differential Doppler effect, which is due to the differential Doppler shifting of radiation from approaching and receding solar hemispheres, and the Yarkovsky effect, which is important for rotating meter-to kilometer-sized particles, is briefly described.

  2. Spectrally selective solar absorber with sharp and temperature dependent cut-off based on semiconductor nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Qinghui; Lu, Hong; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Yu, Zongfu; Zhu, Jia

    2017-05-01

    Spectrally selective absorbers (SSA) with high selectivity of absorption and sharp cut-off between high absorptivity and low emissivity are critical for efficient solar energy conversion. Here, we report the semiconductor nanowire enabled SSA with not only high absorption selectivity but also temperature dependent sharp absorption cut-off. By taking advantage of the temperature dependent bandgap of semiconductors, we systematically demonstrate that the absorption cut-off profile of the semiconductor-nanowire-based SSA can be flexibly tuned, which is quite different from most of the other SSA reported so far. As an example, silicon nanowire based selective absorbers are fabricated, with the measured absorption efficiency above (below) bandgap ˜97% (15%) combined with an extremely sharp absorption cut-off (transition region ˜200 nm), the sharpest SSA demonstrated so far. The demonstrated semiconductor-nanowire-based SSA can enable a high solar thermal efficiency of ≳86% under a wide range of operating conditions, which would be competitive candidates for the concentrated solar energy utilizations.

  3. Radiative effects of absorbing aerosols over northeastern India: Observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Bhuyan, Pradip Kumar; Pathak, Binita; Subba, Tamanna; Chutia, Lakhima; Kundu, Shyam Sundar; Bharali, Chandrakala; Borgohain, Arup; Guha, Anirban; De, Barin Kumar; Singh, Brajamani; Chin, Mian

    2017-01-01

    Multiyear measurements of spectral properties of aerosol absorption are examined over four geographically distinct locations of northeastern India. Results indicated significant spatiotemporal variation in aerosol absorption coefficients (σabs) with highest values in winter and lowest in monsoon. The western parts of the region, close to the outflow of Indo-Gangetic Plains, showed higher values of σabs and black carbon (BC) concentration—mostly associated with fossil fuel combustion. But, the eastern parts showed higher contributions from biomass-burning aerosols, as much as 20-25% to the total aerosol absorption, conspicuously during premonsoon season. This is attributed to a large number of burning activities over the Southeast Asian region, as depicted from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer fire count maps, whose spatial extent and magnitude peaks during March/April. The nearly consistent high values of aerosol index (AI) and layer height from Ozone Monitoring Instrument indicate the presence of absorbing aerosols in the upper atmosphere. The observed seasonality has been captured fairly well by Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) as well as Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations. The ratio of column-integrated optical depths due to particulate organic matter and BC from GOCART showed good coincidence with satellite-based observations, indicating the increased vertical dispersion of absorbing aerosols, probably by the additional local convection due to higher fire radiative power caused by the intense biomass-burning activities. In the WRF-Chem though underperformed by different magnitude in winter, the values are closer or overestimated near the burnt areas. Atmospheric forcing due to BC was highest ( 30 Wm-2) over the western part associated with the fossil fuel combustion.

  4. Pinning down high-performance Cu-chalcogenides as thin-film solar cell absorbers: A successive screening approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yubo; Zhang, Wenqing, E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: pzhang3@buffalo.edu; State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050

    2016-05-21

    Photovoltaic performances of Cu-chalcogenides solar cells are strongly correlated with the absorber fundamental properties such as optimal bandgap, desired band alignment with window material, and high photon absorption ability. According to these criteria, we carry out a successive screening for 90 Cu-chalcogenides using efficient theoretical approaches. Besides the well-recognized CuInSe{sub 2} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} materials, several novel candidates are identified to have optimal bandgaps of around 1.0–1.5 eV, spike-like band alignments with CdS window layer, sharp photon absorption edges, and high absorption coefficients. These new systems have great potential to be superior absorbers for photovolatic applications if their carrriermore » transport and defect properties are properly optimized.« less

  5. Ground truth data for test sites (SL-4). [thermal radiation brightness temperature and solar radiation measurments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Field measurements performed simultaneous with Skylab overpass in order to provide comparative calibration and performance evaluation measurements for the EREP sensors are presented. Wavelength region covered include: solar radiation (400 to 1300 nanometer), and thermal radiation (8 to 14 micrometer). Measurements consisted of general conditions and near surface meteorology, atmospheric temperature and humidity vs altitude, the thermal brightness temperature, total and diffuse solar radiation, direct solar radiation (subsequently analyzed for optical depth/transmittance), and target reflectivity/radiance. The particular instruments used are discussed along with analyses performed. Detailed instrument operation, calibrations, techniques, and errors are given.

  6. Cloud Induced Enhancement of Ground Level Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inman, R.; Chu, Y.; Coimbra, C.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol and cloud cover are typically associated with long and short-term variability of all three solar radiation components at the ground level. Although aerosol attenuation can be a substantial factor for Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) in some microclimates, the strongest factor for ground level irradiance attenuation is cloud cover which acts on time-scales associated with strong solar power generation fluctuations. Furthermore, the driving effects of clouds on radiative energy budgets include shortwave cooling, as a result of absorption of incoming solar radiation, and longwave heating, due to reduced emission of thermal radiation by relatively cool cloud tops. Under special circumstances, the presence of clouds in the circumsolar region may lead to the reverse; a local increase in the diffuse downwelling solar radiation due to directional scattering from clouds. This solar beam effect exceed the losses resulting from the backscattering of radiation into space. Such conditions result in radiation levels that temporarily exceed the localized clear sky values. These phenomena are referred to as Cloud Enhancement Events (CEEs). There are currently two fundamental CEE mechanisms discussed in the literature. The first involves well-defined, and optically thick cloud edges close to, but not obscuring, the solar disk. The effect here is of producing little or no change in the normal beam radiation. In this case, cloud edges in the vicinity of the sun create a non-isotropic increase in the local diffuse radiation field with respect to the isotropic scattering of a clear-sky atmosphere. The second type of CEE allows for partial or full obstruction of the solar disk by an optically thin diffuser such as fine clouds, haze or fog; which results in an enhanced but still nearly isotropic diffuse radiation field. In this study, an entire year of solar radiation data and total sky images taken at 30 second resolution at the University of California, Merced (UCM

  7. Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds: Observations Versus Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M. H.; Minnis, P.; Corsetti, L.; Dutton, E. G.; Forgan, B. W.; Garber, D. P.; Gates, W. L.; Hack, J. J.; Harrison, E. F.; hide

    1995-01-01

    There has been a long history of unexplained anomalous absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Collocated satellite and surface measurements of solar radiation at five geographically diverse locations showed significant solar absorption by clouds, resulting in about 25 watts per square meter more global-mean absorption by the cloudy atmosphere than predicted by theoretical models. It has often been suggested that tropospheric aerosols could increase cloud absorption. But these aerosols are temporally and spatially heterogeneous, whereas the observed cloud absorption is remarkably invariant with respect to season and location. Although its physical cause is unknown, enhanced cloud absorption substantially alters our understanding of the atmosphere's energy budget.

  8. Solar radiation pressure effects on the Helios spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgevic, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model of the solar radiation force and torques, developed for the Mariner 10 Venus/Mercury spacecraft mission, was used for a detailed analysis of the effects of solar light pressure on the Helios spacecraft. Due to the fact that the main body of the Helios spacecraft is a surface of enclosure, inside of which most of the reradiated thermal energy is lost, expressions for the portion of the solar radiation force, produced by the thermal reradiation, had to be given a different form. Hence the need for the derivation of a somewhat different theoretical model for the force acting on the main body of the spacecraft.

  9. Radiation tolerance of low resistivity, high voltage silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.; Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation tolerance of the following three low resistivity, high voltage silicon solar cells was investigated: (1) the COMSAT MSD (multi-step diffused) cell, (2) the MinMIS cell, and (3) the MIND cell. A description of these solar cells is given along with drawings of their configurations. The diffusion length damage coefficients for the cells were calculated and presented. Solar cell spectral response was also discussed. Cells of the MinMIS type were judged to be unsuitable for use in the space radiation environment.

  10. Origin of Non-Radiative Voltage Losses in Fullerene-Based Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benduhn, Johannes; Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Piersimoni, Fortunato; Ullbrich, Sascha; Neher, Dieter; Spoltore, Donato; Vandewal, Koen

    The open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells (OSCs) is low as compared to the optical gap of the absorber molecules, indicating high energy losses per absorbed photon. These voltage losses arise only partly due to necessity of an electron transfer event to dissociate the excitons. A large part of these voltage losses is due to recombination of photo-generated charge carriers, including inevitable radiative recombination. In this work, we study the non-radiative recombination losses and we find that they increase when the energy difference between charge transfer (CT) state and ground state decreases. This behavior is in agreement with the \\x9Denergy gap law for non-radiative transition\\x9D, which implies that internal conversion from CT state to ground state is facilitated by skeletal molecular vibrations. This intrinsic loss mechanism, which until now has not been thoroughly considered for OSCs, is different in its nature as compared to the commonly considered inorganic photovoltaic loss mechanisms of defect, surface, and Auger recombination. As a consequence, the theoretical upper limit for the power conversion efficiency of a single junction OSC reduces by 25% as compared to the Shockley-Queisser limit for an optimal optical gap of the main absorber between (1.45-1.65) eV.

  11. More Frequent Cloud Free Sky and Less Surface Solar Radiation in China from 1955-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Yun; Kaiser, Dale P.; Leung, L. Ruby; Xu, Ming

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we used newly available data frorn extended weather stations and time period to reveal that much of China has experienced significant decreases in cloud cover over the last half of the Twentieth century. This conclusion is supported by analysis of the more reliably observed frequency of cloud-free sky and overcast sky. We estimated that the total cloud cover and low cloud cover in China have decreased 0.88% and 0.33% per decade, respectively, and cloud-free days have increased 0.60% and overcast days decreased 0.78% per decade from 1954-2001. Meanwhile, both solar radiation and pan evaporation have decreased in China, with'solar radiation decreasing 3.1 w/square m and pan evaporation decreasing 39 mm per decade. Combining these results with findings of previous studies, we speculated that increased air pollution may have produced a fog-like haze that reflected/absorbed radiation from the sun and resulted in less solar radiation reaching the surface, despite concurrent increasing trends in cloud-free sky over China.

  12. Measurements of the radiation quality factor Q at aviation altitudes during solar minimum (2006-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Matthias M.; Hubiak, Melina

    2010-05-01

    In radiation protection, the Q-factor has been defined to describe the biological effectiveness of the energy deposition or absorbed dose to humans in the mixed radiation fields at aviation altitudes. This particular radiation field is generated by the interactions of primary cosmic particles with the atoms of the constituents of the Earth’s atmosphere. Thus the intensity, characterized by the ambient dose equivalent rate H∗(10), depends on the flight altitude and the energy spectra of the particles, mainly protons and alpha particles, impinging on the atmosphere. These charged cosmic projectiles are deflected both by the interplanetary and the Earth’s magnetic field such that the corresponding energy spectra are modulated by these fields. The solar minimum is a time period of particular interest since the interplanetary magnetic field is weakest within the 11-year solar cycle and the dose rates at aviation altitudes reach their maximum due to the reduced shielding of galactic cosmic radiation. For this reason, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) performed repeated dosimetric on-board measurements in cooperation with several German airlines during the past solar minimum from March 2006 to August 2008. The Q-factors measured with a TEPC range from 1.98 at the equator to 2.60 in the polar region.

  13. Exposure to galactic cosmic radiation and solar energetic particles.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, D

    2007-01-01

    Several investigations of the radiation field at aircraft altitudes have been undertaken during solar cycle 23 which occurred in the period 1993-2003. The radiation field is produced by the passage of galactic cosmic rays and their nuclear reaction products as well as solar energetic particles through the Earth's atmosphere. Galactic cosmic rays reach a maximum intensity when the sun is least active and are at minimum intensity during solar maximum period. During solar maximum an increased number of coronal mass ejections and solar flares produce high energy solar particles which can also penetrate down to aircraft altitudes. It is found that the very complicated field resulting from these processes varies with altitude, latitude and stage of solar cycle. By employing several active and passive detectors, the whole range of radiation types and energies were encompassed. In-flight data was obtained with the co-operation of many airlines and NASA. The EURADOS Aircraft Crew in-flight data base was used for comparison with the predictions of various computer codes. A brief outline of some recent studies of exposure to radiation in Earth orbit will conclude this contribution.

  14. Optimization by simulation of the nature of the buffer, the gap profile of the absorber and the thickness of the various layers in CZTSSe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadel, Meriem; Chadel, Asma; Moustafa Bouzaki, Mohammed; Aillerie, Michel; Benyoucef, Boumediene; Charles, Jean-Pierre

    2017-11-01

    Performances of ZnO/ZnS/CZTSSe polycrystalline thin film solar cells (Copper Zinc Tin Sulphur Selenium-solar cell) were simulated for different thicknesses of the absorber and ZnS buffer layers. Simulations were performed with SCAPS (Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator) software, starting with actual parameters available from industrial data for commercial cells processing. The influences of the thickness of the various layers in the structure of the solar cell and the gap profile of the CZTSSe absorber layer on the performance of the solar cell were studied in detail. Through considerations of recent works, we discuss possible routes to enhance the performance of CZTSSe solar cells towards a higher efficiency level. Thus, we found that for one specific thickness of the absorber layer, the efficiency of the CZTSSe solar cell can be increased when a ZnS layer replaces the usual CdS buffer layer. On the other hand, the efficiency of the solar cell can be also improved when the absorber layer presents a grad-gap. In this case, the maximum efficiency for the CZTSSe cell was found equal to 13.73%.

  15. Observed ozone response to variations in solar ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Smythe, C. M.; Heath, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    During the winter of 1979, the solar ultraviolet irradiance varied with a period of 13.5 days and an amplitude of 1 percent. The zonal mean ozone values in the tropics varied with the solar irradiance, with an amplitude of 0.25 to 0.60 percent. This observation agrees with earlier calculations, although the response may be overestimated. These results imply changes in ozone at an altitude of 48 kilometers of up to 12 percent over an 11-year solar cycle. Interpretation of ozone changes in the upper stratosphere will require measurements of solar ultraviolet radiation at wavelengths near 200 nanometers.

  16. Correlations between solar wind parameters and auroral kilometric radiation intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Dangelo, N.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between solar wind properties and the influx of energy into the nightside auroral region as indicated by the intensity of auroral kilometric radiation is investigated. Smoothed Hawkeye satellite observations of auroral radiation at 178, 100 and 56.2 kHz for days 160 through 365 of 1974 are compared with solar wind data from the composite Solar Wind Plasma Data Set, most of which was supplied by the IMP-8 spacecraft. Correlations are made between smoothed daily averages of solar wind ion density, bulk flow speed, total IMF strength, electric field, solar wind speed in the southward direction, solar wind speed multiplied by total IMF strength, the substorm parameter epsilon and the Kp index. The greatest correlation is found between solar wind bulk flow speed and auroral radiation intensity, with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.78 for the 203 daily averages examined. A possible mechanism for the relationship may be related to the propagation into the nightside magnetosphere of low-frequency long-wavelength electrostatic waves produced in the magnetosheath by the solar wind.

  17. The virtual enhancements - solar proton event radiation (VESPER) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminalragia-Giamini, Sigiava; Sandberg, Ingmar; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Jiggens, Piers

    2018-02-01

    A new probabilistic model introducing a novel paradigm for the modelling of the solar proton environment at 1 AU is presented. The virtual enhancements - solar proton event radiation model (VESPER) uses the European space agency's solar energetic particle environment modelling (SEPEM) Reference Dataset and produces virtual time-series of proton differential fluxes. In this regard it fundamentally diverges from the approach of existing SPE models that are based on probabilistic descriptions of SPE macroscopic characteristics such as peak flux and cumulative fluence. It is shown that VESPER reproduces well the dataset characteristics it uses, and further comparisons with existing models are made with respect to their results. The production of time-series as the main output of the model opens a straightforward way for the calculation of solar proton radiation effects in terms of time-series and the pairing with effects caused by trapped radiation and galactic cosmic rays.

  18. Deposition Time Dependent Properties of Copper Tin Telluride (Cu₂SnTe₃) Nanoparticles for Solar Absorber Applications.

    PubMed

    Rakspun, Jariya; Tubtimtae, Auttasit; Vailikhit, Veeramol; Teesetsopon, Pichanan; Choopun, Supab

    2018-06-01

    We report the growth of copper tin telluride nanoparticles as an absorber layer using a chemical bath deposition (CBD) process for solar selective applications. The XRD results showed the phase of Cu2SnTe3 with a cubical structure. The larger-sized nanoparticles resulted with increased absorption properties and the optical band gap ranging from 1.93, 1.90, 1.58 and 1.56 eV for deposition times of 20-120 min, respectively. Then, the electrical properties of Cu2SnTe3 nanoparticles were also provided a higher current (~6-8 mA) with bias potential of zero.

  19. TiAlN/TiAlON/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} tandem absorber for high temperature solar selective applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barshilia, Harish C.; Selvakumar, N.; Rajam, K. S.

    2006-11-06

    A tandem absorber of TiAlN/TiAlON/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} is prepared using a magnetron sputtering process. The graded composition of the individual component layers of the tandem absorber produces a film with a refractive index increasing from the surface to the substrate, which exhibits a high absorptance (0.95) and a low emittance (0.07). The tandem absorber is stable in air up to 600 deg. C for 2 h, indicating its importance for high temperature solar selective applications. The thermal stability of the tandem absorber is attributed to high oxidation resistance and microstructural stability of the component materials at higher temperatures.

  20. Increased radiation resistance in lithium-counterdoped silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Mehta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Lithium-counterdoped n(+)p silicon solar cells are found to exhibit significantly increased radiation resistance to 1-MeV electron irradiation when compared to boron-doped n(+)p silicon solar cells. In addition to improved radiation resistance, considerable damage recovery by annealing is observed in the counterdoped cells at T less than or equal to 100 C. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements are used to identify the defect whose removal results in the low-temperature aneal. It is suggested that the increased radiation resistance of the counterdoped cells is primarily due to interaction of the lithium with interstitial oxygen.

  1. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  2. Local effects of partly cloudy skies on solar and emitted radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, D. A.; Venable, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    Solar radiation measurements are made on a routine basis. Global solar, atmospheric emitted, downwelled diffuse solar, and direct solar radiation measurement systems are fully operational with the first two in continuous operation. Fractional cloud cover measurements are made from GOES imagery or from ground based whole sky photographs. Normalized global solar irradiance values for partly cloudy skies were correlated to fractional cloud cover.

  3. Interplanetary Radiation and Internal Charging Environment Models for Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; NeegaardParker, Linda

    2005-01-01

    A Solar Sail Radiation Environment (SSRE) model has been developed for defining charged particle environments over an energy range from 0.01 keV to 1 MeV for hydrogen ions, helium ions, and electrons. The SSRE model provides the free field charged particle environment required for characterizing energy deposition per unit mass, charge deposition, and dose rate dependent conductivity processes required to evaluate radiation dose and internal (bulk) charging processes in the solar sail membrane in interplanetary space. Solar wind and energetic particle measurements from instruments aboard the Ulysses spacecraft in a solar, near-polar orbit provide the particle data over a range of heliospheric latitudes used to derive the environment that can be used for radiation and charging environments for both high inclination 0.5 AU Solar Polar Imager mission and the 1.0 AU L1 solar missions. This paper describes the techniques used to model comprehensive electron, proton, and helium spectra over the range of particle energies of significance to energy and charge deposition in thin (less than 25 micrometers) solar sail materials.

  4. Estimating the Direct Radiative Effect of Absorbing Aerosols Overlying Marine Boundary Layer Clouds in the Southeast Atlantic Using MODIS and CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2013-01-01

    Absorbing aerosols such as smoke strongly absorb solar radiation, particularly at ultraviolet and visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) wavelengths, and their presence above clouds can have considerable implications. It has been previously shown that they have a positive (i.e., warming) direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) when overlying bright clouds. Additionally, they can cause biased passive instrument satellite retrievals in techniques that rely on VIS/NIR wavelengths for inferring the cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (re) of underlying clouds, which can in turn yield biased above-cloud DARE estimates. Here we investigate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical property retrieval biases due to overlying absorbing aerosols observed by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and examine the impact of these biases on above-cloud DARE estimates. The investigation focuses on a region in the southeast Atlantic Ocean during August and September (2006-2011), where smoke from biomass burning in southern Africa overlies persistent marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds. Adjusting for above-cloud aerosol attenuation yields increases in the regional mean liquid COT (averaged over all ocean-only liquid clouds) by roughly 6%; mean re increases by roughly 2.6%, almost exclusively due to the COT adjustment in the non-orthogonal retrieval space. It is found that these two biases lead to an underestimate of DARE. For liquid cloud Aqua MODIS pixels with CALIOP-observed above-cloud smoke, the regional mean above-cloud radiative forcing efficiency (DARE per unit aerosol optical depth (AOD)) at time of observation (near local noon for Aqua overpass) increases from 50.9Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup-1) to 65.1Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup -1) when using bias-adjusted instead of nonadjusted MODIS cloud retrievals.

  5. Intrinsic non-radiative voltage losses in fullerene-based organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benduhn, Johannes; Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Piersimoni, Fortunato; Ullbrich, Sascha; Fan, Yeli; Tropiano, Manuel; McGarry, Kathryn A.; Zeika, Olaf; Riede, Moritz K.; Douglas, Christopher J.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.; Neher, Dieter; Spoltore, Donato; Vandewal, Koen

    2017-06-01

    Organic solar cells demonstrate external quantum efficiencies and fill factors approaching those of conventional photovoltaic technologies. However, as compared with the optical gap of the absorber materials, their open-circuit voltage is much lower, largely due to the presence of significant non-radiative recombination. Here, we study a large data set of published and new material combinations and find that non-radiative voltage losses decrease with increasing charge-transfer-state energies. This observation is explained by considering non-radiative charge-transfer-state decay as electron transfer in the Marcus inverted regime, being facilitated by a common skeletal molecular vibrational mode. Our results suggest an intrinsic link between non-radiative voltage losses and electron-vibration coupling, indicating that these losses are unavoidable. Accordingly, the theoretical upper limit for the power conversion efficiency of single-junction organic solar cells would be reduced to about 25.5% and the optimal optical gap increases to 1.45-1.65 eV, that is, 0.2-0.3 eV higher than for technologies with minimized non-radiative voltage losses.

  6. A facile fabrication of chemically converted graphene oxide thin films and their uses as absorber materials for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelifard, Mehdi; Darudi, Hosein

    2016-07-01

    There is a great interest in the use of graphene sheets in thin film solar cells with low-cost and good-optoelectronic properties. Here, the production of absorbent conductive reduced graphene oxide (RGO) thin films was investigated. RGO thin films were prepared from spray-coated graphene oxide (GO) layers at various substrate temperature followed by a simple hydrazine-reducing method. The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical characterizations of graphene oxide (GO) and RGO thin films were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a phase shift from GO to RGO due to hydrazine treatment, in agreement with the FTIR spectra of the layers. FESEM images clearly exhibited continuous films resulting from the overlap of graphene nanosheets. The produced low-cost thin films had high absorption coefficient up to 1.0 × 105 cm-1, electrical resistance as low as 0.9 kΩ/sq, and effective optical band gap of about 1.50 eV, close to the optimum value for solar conversion. The conductive absorbent properties of the reduced graphene oxide thin films would be useful to develop photovoltaic cells.

  7. The effects of solar radiation and black body re-radiation on thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Simon; Parsons, Ken

    2008-04-01

    When the sun shines on people in enclosed spaces, such as in buildings or vehicles, it directly affects thermal comfort. There is also an indirect effect as surrounding surfaces are heated exposing a person to re-radiation. This laboratory study investigated the effects of long wave re-radiation on thermal comfort, individually and when combined with direct solar radiation. Nine male participants (26.0 +/- 4.7 years) took part in three experimental sessions where they were exposed to radiation from a hot black panel heated to 100 degrees C; direct simulated solar radiation of 600 Wm(-2) and the combined simulated solar radiation and black panel radiation. Exposures were for 30 min, during which subjective responses and mean skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that, at a surface temperature of 100 degrees C (close to maximum in practice), radiation from the flat black panel provided thermal discomfort but that this was relatively small when compared with the effects of direct solar radiation. It was concluded that re-radiation, from a dashboard in a vehicle, for example, will not have a major direct influence on thermal comfort and that existing models of thermal comfort do not require a specific modification. These results showed that, for the conditions investigated, the addition of re-radiation from internal components has an effect on thermal sensation when combined with direct solar radiation. However, it is not considered that it will be a major factor in a real world situation. This is because, in practice, dashboards are unlikely to maintain very high surface temperatures in vehicles without an unacceptably high air temperature. This study quantifies the contribution of short- and long-wave radiation to thermal comfort. The results will aid vehicle designers to have a better understanding of the complex radiation environment. These include direct radiation from the sun as well as re-radiation from the dashboard and other internal surfaces.

  8. Absorbing Aerosols Above Cloud: Detection, Quantitative Retrieval, and Radiative Forcing from Satellite-based Passive Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jethva, H.; Torres, O.; Remer, L. A.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    Light absorbing particles such as carbonaceous aerosols generated from biomass burning activities and windblown dust particles can exert a net warming effect on climate; the strength of which depends on the absorption capacity of the particles and brightness of the underlying reflecting background. When advected over low-level bright clouds, these aerosols absorb the cloud reflected radiation from ultra-violet (UV) to shortwave-IR (SWIR) and makes cloud scene darker-a phenomenon commonly known as "cloud darkening". The apparent "darkening" effect can be seen by eyes in satellite images as well as quantitatively in the spectral reflectance measurements made by space borne sensors over regions where light absorbing carbonaceous and dust aerosols overlay low-level cloud decks. Theoretical radiative transfer simulations support the observational evidence, and further reveal that the strength of the cloud darkening and its spectral signature (or color ratio) between measurements at two wavelengths are a bi-function of aerosol and cloud optical thickness (AOT and COT); both are measures of the total amount of light extinction caused by aerosols and cloud, respectively. Here, we developed a retrieval technique, named as the "color ratio method" that uses the satellite measurements at two channels, one at shorter wavelength in the visible and one at longer wavelength in the shortwave-IR for the simultaneous retrieval of AOT and COT. The present technique requires assumptions on the aerosol single-scattering albedo and aerosol-cloud separation which are supplemented by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and space borne CALIOP lidar measurements. The retrieval technique has been tested making use of the near-UV and visible reflectance observations made by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for distinct above-cloud smoke and dust aerosol events observed seasonally over the southeast and tropical Atlantic Ocean

  9. Solar Radiation Management and Olivine Dissolution Methods in Climate Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kone, S.

    2014-12-01

    An overview of solar radiation management and olivine dissolution methods allows to discuss, comparatively, the benefits and consequences of these two geoengineering techniques. The combination of those two techniques allows to concomitantly act on the two main agents intervening in global warming: solar radiation and carbon dioxide. The earth surface temperature increases due mainly to carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) that keeps the solar radiation and causes the global warming. Two complementary methods to mitigate climate change are overviewed: SRM method, which uses injected aerosols, aims to reduce the amount of the inbound solar radiation in atmosphere; and olivine dissolution in water, a key chemical reaction envisaged in climate engineering , aiming to reduce the amount of the carbon dioxide in extracting it from atmosphere. The SRM method works on scenarios of solar radiation decrease and the olivine dissolution method works as a carbon dioxide sequestration method. Olivine dissolution in water impacts negatively on the pH of rivers but positively in counteracting ocean acidification and in transporting the silica in ocean, which has benefits for diatom shell formation.

  10. Dielectric compound parabolic concentrating solar collector with frustrated total internal reflection absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. R.

    Since its introduction, the concept of nonimaging solar concentrators, as exemplified by the compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) design, has greatly enhanced the ability to collect solar energy efficiently in thermal and photovoltaic devices. When used as a primary concentrator, a CPC can provide significant concentration without the complication of a tracking mechanism and its associated maintenance problems. When used as a secondary, a CPC provides higher total concentration, or for a fixed concentration, tolerates greater tracking error in the primary.

  11. Photothermal evaluation of the influence of nicotine, antitumor drugs, and radiation on cellular absorbing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Galitovsky, Valentin; Chowdhury, Parimal; Chambers, Timothy

    2004-07-01

    This short review presents findings from a recent evaluation of the diagnostic capabilities of a new experimental design of the advanced photothermal (PT) imaging system; specifically, its performance in studying the impact of nicotine, a combination of antitumor drugs, and radiation on the absorbing structures of various cells. We used this imaging system to test our hypothesis that low doses of chemicals or drugs lead to changes in cell metabolism, that these changes are accompanied by the shrinking of cellular absorbing zones (e.g. organelles), and that these reactions cause increased local absorption. Conversely, high (toxic) doses may lead to swelling of organelles or release of chromophores into the intracellular space, causing decreased local absorption. In this study, we compared PT images and PT responses of the pancreatic exocrine tumor cell line AR42J resulting from exposure to various concentrations of nicotine versus those of control cells. We found that responses were almost proportional to the drug concentration in concentrations ranging from 1 nM-100 μM, reached saturation at a maximum of approximately 100 μM-1 mM, and then fell rapidly at concentrations ranging from 1-50 mM. We also examined the influence of antitumor drugs (vinblastine and paclitaxel) on KB3 carcinoma cells, with drug concentrations ranging from 10-10 nM to 10 nM. In this instance, exposure initially led to slight cell activation, which was then followed by decreased cellular PT response. Drug administration led to corresponding changes in the amplitude and spatial intracellular localization of PT responses, including bubble formation, as an indicator of local absorption level. Additionally, it was shown that, depending on cell type, x-ray radiation may produce effects similar to those resulting from exposure to drugs. Independent verification with a combined PT-fluorescence assay and conventional staining kits (trypan blue, Annexin V-propidium iodide [PI]) revealed that this

  12. Radiation absorption and optimization of solar photocatalytic reactors for environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Colina-Márquez, Jose; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2010-07-01

    This study provides a systematic and quantitative approach to the analysis and optimization of solar photocatalytic reactors utilized in environmental applications such as pollutant remediation and conversion of biomass (waste) to hydrogen. Ray tracing technique was coupled with the six-flux absorption scattering model (SFM) to analyze the complex radiation field in solar compound parabolic collectors (CPC) and tubular photoreactors. The absorption of solar radiation represented by the spatial distribution of the local volumetric rate of photon absorption (LVRPA) depends strongly on catalyst loading and geometry. The total radiation absorbed in the reactors, the volumetric rate of absorption (VRPA), was analyzed as a function of the optical properties (scattering albedo) of the photocatalyst. The VRPA reached maxima at specific catalyst concentrations in close agreement with literature experimental studies. The CPC has on average 70% higher photon absorption efficiency than a tubular reactor and requires 39% less catalyst to operate under optimum conditions. The "apparent optical thickness" is proposed as a new dimensionless parameter for optimization of CPC and tubular reactors. It removes the dependence of the optimum catalyst concentration on tube diameter and photocatalyst scattering albedo. For titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) Degussa P25, maximum photon absorption occurs at apparent optical thicknesses of 7.78 for CPC and 12.97 for tubular reactors.

  13. MSG-7: atmospheric penetration of solar radiation in the range of Schumann-Runge bands

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, J.E.

    1982-12-01

    There have been major efforts in measuring extraterrestrial solar irradiance for use in atmospheric studies. The quantity of immediate relevance to theoretical studies is the number of photons which reach a given altitude in the middle atmosphere. Current models compute the attenuated radiation field but the cross sections available for the major absorbers, O2 and O3, often come from experiments that are now quite old. Balloon measurements show some significant differences between the predicted and observed ultraviolet radiation field between 30 and 40 km. The wavelength region to be studied includes Lyman alpha plus the range 175 nm to themore » visible. Specific topics to be addressed are as follows: (1) the cross sections of the major absorbers, O2 and O3 including the Schumann-Runge bands as a subset (2) comparison of the in situ measurements of the attenuated radiation field with calculations and (3) the relevance of the scattered and reflected radiation fields for middle atmospheric processes.« less

  14. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  15. Curve fitting methods for solar radiation data modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul, E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my, E-mail: balbir@petronas.com.my; Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder, E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my, E-mail: balbir@petronas.com.my

    2014-10-24

    This paper studies the use of several type of curve fitting method to smooth the global solar radiation data. After the data have been fitted by using curve fitting method, the mathematical model of global solar radiation will be developed. The error measurement was calculated by using goodness-fit statistics such as root mean square error (RMSE) and the value of R{sup 2}. The best fitting methods will be used as a starting point for the construction of mathematical modeling of solar radiation received in Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP) Malaysia. Numerical results indicated that Gaussian fitting and sine fitting (both withmore » two terms) gives better results as compare with the other fitting methods.« less

  16. Distributed solar radiation fast dynamic measurement for PV cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xuefen; Yang, Yi; Cui, Jian; Du, Xingjing; Zheng, Tao; Sardar, Muhammad Sohail

    2017-10-01

    To study the operating characteristics about PV cells, attention must be given to the dynamic behavior of the solar radiation. The dynamic behaviors of annual, monthly, daily and hourly averages of solar radiation have been studied in detail. But faster dynamic behaviors of solar radiation need more researches. The solar radiation random fluctuations in minute-long or second-long range, which lead to alternating radiation and cool down/warm up PV cell frequently, decrease conversion efficiency. Fast dynamic processes of solar radiation are mainly relevant to stochastic moving of clouds. Even in clear sky condition, the solar irradiations show a certain degree of fast variation. To evaluate operating characteristics of PV cells under fast dynamic irradiation, a solar radiation measuring array (SRMA) based on large active area photodiode, LoRa spread spectrum communication and nanoWatt MCU is proposed. This cross photodiodes structure tracks fast stochastic moving of clouds. To compensate response time of pyranometer and reduce system cost, the terminal nodes with low-cost fast-responded large active area photodiode are placed besides positions of tested PV cells. A central node, consists with pyranometer, large active area photodiode, wind detector and host computer, is placed in the center of the central topologies coordinate to scale temporal envelope of solar irradiation and get calibration information between pyranometer and large active area photodiodes. In our SRMA system, the terminal nodes are designed based on Microchip's nanoWatt XLP PIC16F1947. FDS-100 is adopted for large active area photodiode in terminal nodes and host computer. The output current and voltage of each PV cell are monitored by I/V measurement. AS62-T27/SX1278 LoRa communication modules are used for communicating between terminal nodes and host computer. Because the LoRa LPWAN (Low Power Wide Area Network) specification provides seamless interoperability among Smart Things without the

  17. Curve fitting methods for solar radiation data modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul; Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder

    2014-10-01

    This paper studies the use of several type of curve fitting method to smooth the global solar radiation data. After the data have been fitted by using curve fitting method, the mathematical model of global solar radiation will be developed. The error measurement was calculated by using goodness-fit statistics such as root mean square error (RMSE) and the value of R2. The best fitting methods will be used as a starting point for the construction of mathematical modeling of solar radiation received in Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP) Malaysia. Numerical results indicated that Gaussian fitting and sine fitting (both with two terms) gives better results as compare with the other fitting methods.

  18. Radiative efficiency of lead iodide based perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Malinkiewicz, Olga; Baumann, Andreas; Deibel, Carsten; Snaith, Henry J.; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Bolink, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    The maximum efficiency of any solar cell can be evaluated in terms of its corresponding ability to emit light. We herein determine the important figure of merit of radiative efficiency for Methylammonium Lead Iodide perovskite solar cells and, to put in context, relate it to an organic photovoltaic (OPV) model device. We evaluate the reciprocity relation between electroluminescence and photovoltaic quantum efficiency and conclude that the emission from the perovskite devices is dominated by a sharp band-to-band transition that has a radiative efficiency much higher than that of an average OPV device. As a consequence, the perovskite have the benefit of retaining an open circuit voltage ~0.14 V closer to its radiative limit than the OPV cell. Additionally, and in contrast to OPVs, we show that the photoluminescence of the perovskite solar cell is substantially quenched under short circuit conditions in accordance with how an ideal photovoltaic cell should operate. PMID:25317958

  19. Spectral estimates of solar radiation intercepted by corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Daughtry, C. S. T.; Gallo, K. P.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat band radiometer throughout two growing seasons for corn (Zea mays L.) canopies differing in planting dates, populations, and soil types. Agronomic data collected included leaf area index (LAI), biomass, development stage, and final grain yields. The spectral variable, greenness, was associated with 78 percent of the variation in LAI over all treatments. Single observations of LAI or greenness have limited value in predicting corn yields. The proportions of solar radiation intercepted (SRI) by these canopies were estimated using either measured LAI or greenness. Both SRI estimates, when accumulated over the growing season, accounted for approximately 65 percent of the variation in yields. Models which simulated the daily effects of weather and intercepted solar radiation on growth had the highest correlations to grain yields. This concept of estimating intercepted solar radiation using spectral data represents a viable approach for merging spectral and meteorological data for crop yield models.

  20. Broadband plasmonic perfect light absorber in the visible spectrum for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudachathi, Renilkumar; Tanaka, Takuo

    2018-03-01

    The coupling of electromagnetic waves with subwavelength metal structures results in the perfect light absorption and has been extensively explored in the recent years for many possible applications like photovoltaics, sensing, photodetectors, emitters and camouflaging systems to name a few. Herein we present the design and fabrication of a broadband plasmonic light absorber using aluminum as functional material for operation in the visible frequency range. The metal structures can be tuned in size to manipulate the plasmonic resonance; thereby light absorption at any desired wavelengths could be realized. Thus the broadband light absorber in the visible spectrum is designed using metal structures of different sizes supporting non-overlapping individual resonances at regular intervals of wavelengths. The metal structures of different sizes are grouped in to a single unit cell and the absorber is fabricated by periodically arranging these unit cells in a square lattice. Light absorption of more than 90% for over a broad wavelength range of 200 nm from 425 nm to 650 nm in the visible spectrum is demonstrated.

  1. Exposure limits: the underestimation of absorbed cell phone radiation, especially in children.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Om P; Morgan, L Lloyd; de Salles, Alvaro Augusto; Han, Yueh-Ying; Herberman, Ronald B; Davis, Devra Lee

    2012-03-01

    The existing cell phone certification process uses a plastic model of the head called the Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin (SAM), representing the top 10% of U.S. military recruits in 1989 and greatly underestimating the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) for typical mobile phone users, especially children. A superior computer simulation certification process has been approved by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) but is not employed to certify cell phones. In the United States, the FCC determines maximum allowed exposures. Many countries, especially European Union members, use the "guidelines" of International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), a non governmental agency. Radiofrequency (RF) exposure to a head smaller than SAM will absorb a relatively higher SAR. Also, SAM uses a fluid having the average electrical properties of the head that cannot indicate differential absorption of specific brain tissue, nor absorption in children or smaller adults. The SAR for a 10-year old is up to 153% higher than the SAR for the SAM model. When electrical properties are considered, a child's head's absorption can be over two times greater, and absorption of the skull's bone marrow can be ten times greater than adults. Therefore, a new certification process is needed that incorporates different modes of use, head sizes, and tissue properties. Anatomically based models should be employed in revising safety standards for these ubiquitous modern devices and standards should be set by accountable, independent groups.

  2. Modified Back Contact Interface of CZTSe Thin Film Solar Cells: Elimination of Double Layer Distribution in Absorber Layer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaojing; Yao, Liyong; Bi, Jinlian; Gao, Shoushuai; Gao, Qing; Jeng, Ming‐Jer; Sun, Guozhong; Zhou, Zhiqiang; He, Qing; Sun, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Double layer distribution exists in Cu2SnZnSe4 (CZTSe) thin films prepared by selenizing the metallic precursors, which will degrade the back contact of Mo substrate to absorber layer and thus suppressing the performance of solar cell. In this work, the double‐layer distribution of CZTSe film is eliminated entirely and the formation of MoSe2 interfacial layer is inhibited successfully. CZTSe film is prepared by selenizing the precursor deposited by electrodeposition method under Se and SnSex mixed atmosphere. It is found that the insufficient reaction between ZnSe and Cu‐Sn‐Se phases in the bottom of the film is the reason why the double layer distribution of CZTSe film is formed. By increasing Sn content in the metallic precursor, thus making up the loss of Sn because of the decomposition of CZTSe and facilitate the diffusion of liquid Cu2Se, the double layer distribution is eliminated entirely. The crystallization of the formed thin film is dense and the grains go through the entire film without voids. And there is no obvious MoSe2 layer formed between CZTSe and Mo. As a consequence, the series resistance of the solar cell reduces significantly to 0.14 Ω cm2 and a CZTSe solar cell with efficiency of 7.2% is fabricated. PMID:29610727

  3. Modified Back Contact Interface of CZTSe Thin Film Solar Cells: Elimination of Double Layer Distribution in Absorber Layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaojing; Yao, Liyong; Zhang, Yi; Ao, Jianping; Bi, Jinlian; Gao, Shoushuai; Gao, Qing; Jeng, Ming-Jer; Sun, Guozhong; Zhou, Zhiqiang; He, Qing; Sun, Yun

    2018-02-01

    Double layer distribution exists in Cu 2 SnZnSe 4 (CZTSe) thin films prepared by selenizing the metallic precursors, which will degrade the back contact of Mo substrate to absorber layer and thus suppressing the performance of solar cell. In this work, the double-layer distribution of CZTSe film is eliminated entirely and the formation of MoSe 2 interfacial layer is inhibited successfully. CZTSe film is prepared by selenizing the precursor deposited by electrodeposition method under Se and SnSe x mixed atmosphere. It is found that the insufficient reaction between ZnSe and Cu-Sn-Se phases in the bottom of the film is the reason why the double layer distribution of CZTSe film is formed. By increasing Sn content in the metallic precursor, thus making up the loss of Sn because of the decomposition of CZTSe and facilitate the diffusion of liquid Cu 2 Se, the double layer distribution is eliminated entirely. The crystallization of the formed thin film is dense and the grains go through the entire film without voids. And there is no obvious MoSe 2 layer formed between CZTSe and Mo. As a consequence, the series resistance of the solar cell reduces significantly to 0.14 Ω cm 2 and a CZTSe solar cell with efficiency of 7.2% is fabricated.

  4. Effects of simulated solar UVB radiation on early developmental stages of the northwestern salamander (Ambystoma gracile) from three lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, R.D.; Little, E.E.; Pearl, C.A.; Hoffman, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) has received much attention as a factor that could play a role in amphibian population declines. UV can be hazardous to some amphibians, but the resultant effects depend on a variety of environmental and behavioral factors. In this study, the potential effects of UV on the Northwestern Salamander, Ambystoma gracile, from three lakes were assessed in the laboratory using a solar simulator. We measured the survival of embryos and the survival and growth of larvae exposed to four UV treatments in controlled laboratory studies, the UV absorbance of egg jelly, oviposition depths in the lakes, and UV absorbance in water samples from the three lakes. Hatching success of embryos decreased in the higher UV treatments as compared to the control treatments, and growth of surviving larvae was significantly reduced in the higher UVB irradiance treatments. The egg jelly exhibited a small peak of absorbance within the UVB range (290-320 nm). The magnitude of UV absorbance differed among egg jellies from the three lakes. Oviposition depths at the three sites averaged 1.10 m below the water surface. Approximately 66 of surface UVB radiation was attenuated at 10-cm depth in all three lakes. Results of this study indicate that larvae may be sensitive to UVB exposure under laboratory conditions; however, in field conditions the depths of egg deposition in the lakes, absorbance of UV radiation by the water column, and the potential for behavioral adjustments may mitigate severe effects of UV radiation. Copyright 2010 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  5. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  6. The direct effect of aerosols on solar radiation over the broader Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimas, C. D.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Kanakidou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Vardavas, I.

    2012-08-01

    For the first time, the direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols on solar radiation is computed over the entire Mediterranean basin, one of the most climatically sensitive world regions, using a deterministic spectral radiation transfer model (RTM). The DRE effects on the outgoing shortwave radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA), DRETOA, on the absorption of solar radiation in the atmospheric column, DREatm, and on the downward and absorbed surface solar radiation (SSR), DREsurf and DREnetsurf, respectively, are computed separately. The model uses input data for the period 2000-2007 for various surface and atmospheric parameters, taken from satellite (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, ISCCP-D2), Global Reanalysis projects (National Centers for Environmental Prediction - National Center for Atmospheric Research, NCEP/NCAR), and other global databases. The spectral aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth, AOD, asymmetry parameter, gaer and single scattering albedo, ωaer), are taken from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and they are supplemented by the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model SSR fluxes have been successfully validated against measurements from 80 surface stations of the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) covering the period 2000-2007. A planetary cooling is found above the Mediterranean on an annual basis (regional mean DRETOA = -2.4 W m-2). Although a planetary cooling is found over most of the region, of up to -7 W m-2, large positive DRETOA values (up to +25 W m-2) are found over North Africa, indicating a strong planetary warming, and a weaker warming over the Alps (+0.5 W m-2). Aerosols are found to increase the absorption of solar radiation in the atmospheric column over the region (DREatm = +11.1 W m-2) and to decrease SSR (DREsurf = -16.5 W m-2 and DREnetsurf-13.5 W m-2) inducing thus significant atmospheric warming and surface

  7. Dependence of lattice strain relaxation, absorbance, and sheet resistance on thickness in textured ZnO@B transparent conductive oxide for thin-film solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Kou, Kuang-Yang; Huang, Yu-En; Chen, Chien-Hsun; Feng, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of surface texture, strain relaxation, absorbance, grain size, and sheet resistance in textured, boron-doped ZnO (ZnO@B), transparent conductive oxide (TCO) materials of different thicknesses used for thin film, solar cell applications is investigated. The residual strain induced by the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal expansion coefficient for thicker ZnO@B is relaxed, leading to an increased surface texture, stronger absorbance, larger grain size, and lower sheet resistance. These experimental results reveal the optical and material characteristics of the TCO layer, which could be useful for enhancing the performance of solar cells through an optimized TCO layer.

  8. Chemical and optical changes in freshwater dissolved organic matter exposed to solar radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osburn, C.L.; Morris, D.P.; Thorn, K.A.; Moeller, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the chemical and optical changes in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two freshwater lakes and a Sphagnum bog after exposure to solar radiation. Stable carbon isotopes and solid-state 13C-NMR spectra of DOM were used together with optical and chemical data to interpret results from experimental exposures of DOM to sunlight and from seasonal observations of two lakes in northeastern Pennsylvania. Solar photochemical oxidation of humic-rich bog DOM to smaller LMW compounds and to DIC was inferred from losses of UV absorbance, optical indices of molecular weight and changes in DOM chemistry. Experimentally, we observed a 1.2??? enrichment in ??13C and a 47% loss in aromatic C functionality in bog DOM samples exposed to solar UVR. Similar results were observed in the surface waters of both lakes. In late summer hypolimnetic water in humic Lake Lacawac, we observed 3 to 4.5??? enrichments in ??13C and a 30% increase in aromatic C relative to early spring values during spring mixing. These changes coincided with increases in molecular weight and UV absorbance. Anaerobic conditions of the hypolimnion in Lake Lacawac suggest that microbial metabolism may be turning over allochthonous C introduced during spring mixing, as well as autochthonous C. This metabolic activity produces HMW DOM during the summer, which is photochemically labile and isotopically distinct from allochthonous DOM or autochthonous DOM. These results suggest both photooxidation of allochthonous DOM in the epilimnion and autotrophic production of DOM by bacteria in the hypolimnion cause seasonal trends in the UV absorbance of lakes.

  9. INTERACTIONS OF SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION AND DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN FRESHWATER AND MARINE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar radiation provides the primary driving force for the biogeochemical cycles upon which life and climate depend. Recent studies have demonstrated that the absorption of solar radiation, especially 'm the ultraviolet spectral region, results in photochemical reactions that can...

  10. Degradation of Methyl Orange and Congo Red dyes by using TiO2 nanoparticles activated by the solar and the solar-like radiation.

    PubMed

    Ljubas, Davor; Smoljanić, Goran; Juretić, Hrvoje

    2015-09-15

    In this study we used TiO2 nanoparticles as semiconductor photocatalysts for the degradation of Methyl Orange (MO) and Congo Red (CR) dyes in an aqueous solution. Since TiO2 particles become photocatalytically active by UV radiation, two sources of UV-A radiation were used - natural solar radiation which contains 3-5% UV-A and artificial, solar-like radiation, created by using a lamp. The optimal doses of TiO2 of 500 mg/L for the CR and 1500 mg/L for the MO degradation were determined in experiments with the lamp and were also used in degradation experiments with natural solar light. The efficiency of each process was determined by measuring the absorbance at two visible wavelengths, 466 nm for MO and 498 nm for CR, and the total organic carbon (TOC), i.e. decolorization and mineralization, respectively. In both cases, considerable potential for the degradation of CR and MO was observed - total decolorization of the solution was achieved within 30-60 min, while the TOC removal was in the range 60-90%. CR and MO solutions irradiated without TiO2 nanoparticles showed no observable changes in either decolorization or mineralization. Three different commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were used: pure-phase anatase, pure-phase rutile, and mixed-phase preparation named Degussa P25. In terms of degradation kinetics, P25 TiO2 exhibited a photocatalytic activity superior to that of pure-phase anatase or rutile. The electric energy consumption per gram of removed TOC was determined. For nearly the same degradation effect, the consumption in the natural solar radiation experiment was more than 60 times lower than in the artificial solar-like radiation experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting solar radiation based on available weather indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Frank Joseph

    Solar radiation prediction models are complex and require software that is not available for the household investor. The processing power within a normal desktop or laptop computer is sufficient to calculate similar models. This barrier to entry for the average consumer can be fixed by a model simple enough to be calculated by hand if necessary. Solar radiation modeling has been historically difficult to predict and accurate models have significant assumptions and restrictions on their use. Previous methods have been limited to linear relationships, location restrictions, or input data limits to one atmospheric condition. This research takes a novel approach by combining two techniques within the computational limits of a household computer; Clustering and Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). Clustering helps limit the large observation space which restricts the use of HMMs. Instead of using continuous data, and requiring significantly increased computations, the cluster can be used as a qualitative descriptor of each observation. HMMs incorporate a level of uncertainty and take into account the indirect relationship between meteorological indicators and solar radiation. This reduces the complexity of the model enough to be simply understood and accessible to the average household investor. The solar radiation is considered to be an unobservable state that each household will be unable to measure. The high temperature and the sky coverage are already available through the local or preferred source of weather information. By using the next day's prediction for high temperature and sky coverage, the model groups the data and then predicts the most likely range of radiation. This model uses simple techniques and calculations to give a broad estimate for the solar radiation when no other universal model exists for the average household.

  12. Space radiation effects in InP solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Messenger, S. R.; Summers, G. P.; Burke, E. A.; Keavney, C. J.

    1991-12-01

    InP solar cells and mesa diodes grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) were irradiated with electrons and protons at room temperature. The radiation-induced defects (RIDs) were characterized by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), and the degradation of the solar cell performance was determined through I-V measurements. The nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) of electrons and protons in InP was calculated as a function of energy from 1 to 200 MeV and compared to the measured defect introduction rates. A linear dependence was evident. InP solar cells showed significantly more radiation resistance than c-Si or GaAs/Ge cells under 1 MeV electron irradiation. Using the calculated InP damage rates and measured damage factors, the performance of InP solar cells as a function of orbital altitude and time in orbit was predicted and compared with the performance of c-Si solar cells in the same environment. In all cases, the InP cells showed highly superior radiation resistance.

  13. The solar dynamic radiator with a historical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Fleming, M. L.; Hoehn, F. W.; Howerton, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    A historical perspective on pumped-fluid loop space radiators provides a basis for the design of the Space Station Solar Dynamic (SD) power module radiator. SD power modules, capable of generating 25 kW (electrical) each, are planned for growth in Station power requirements. The Brayton cycle SD module configuration incorporates a pumped-fluid loop radiator that must reject up to 99 kW (thermal). The thermal/hydraulic design conditions in combination with required radiator orientation and packaging envelope form a unique set of constraints as compared to previous pumped-fluid loop radiator systems. Nevertheless, past program successes have demonstrated a technology base that can be applied to the SD radiator development program to ensure a low risk, low cost system.

  14. The Solar Dynamic radiator with a historical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Fleming, M. L.; Hoehn, F. W.; Howerton, R.

    1988-01-01

    A historical perspective on pumped loop space radiators provides a basis for the design of the Space Station Solar Dynamic (SD) power module radiator. SD power modules, capable of generating 25 kWe each, are planned for growth Station power requirements. The Brayton (cycle) SD module configuration incorporates a pumped loop radiator that must reject up to 99 kW. The thermal/hydraulic design conditions in combination with required radiator orientation and packaging envelope form a unique set of constraints as compared to previous pumped loop radiator systems. Nevertheless, past program successes have demonstrated a technology base which can be applied to the SD radiator development program to ensure a low risk, low cost system.

  15. Estimating shortwave solar radiation using net radiation and meteorological measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shortwave radiation has a wide variety of uses in land-atmosphere interactions research. Actual evapotranspiration estimation that involves stomatal conductance models like Jarvis and Ball-Berry require shortwave radiation to estimate photon flux density. However, in most weather stations, shortwave...

  16. Inexpensive Meter for Total Solar Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, E. G.

    1987-01-01

    Pyranometer containing solar cells measures combined intensity of direct light from Sun and diffuse light from sky. Instrument includes polyethylene dome that diffuses entering light so output of light detectors does not vary significantly with changing angle of Sun during day. Not to be calibrated for response of each detector to Sun angle, and sensor outputs not corrected separately before summed and integrated. Aids in deciding on proper time to harvest crops.

  17. Listing of solar radiation measuring equipment and glossary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. A.; Greenbaum, S. A.; Patel, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt is made to list and provide all available information about solar radiation measuring equipment which are being manufactured and are available on the market. The list is in tabular form and includes sensor type, response time, cost data and comments for each model. A cost code is included which shows ranges only.

  18. Glacial Influences on Solar Radiation in a Subarctic Sea.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding macroscale processes controlling solar radia­tion in marine systems will be important in interpreting the potential effects of global change from increasing ultraviolet radiation (UV) and glacial retreat. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of UV i...

  19. Improved Solar-Radiation-Pressure Models for GPS Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Kuang, Da

    2006-01-01

    A report describes a series of computational models conceived as an improvement over prior models for determining effects of solar-radiation pressure on orbits of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. These models are based on fitting coefficients of Fourier functions of Sun-spacecraft- Earth angles to observed spacecraft orbital motions.

  20. THE HAZARD OF CORPUSCULAR SOLAR RADIATION TO MANNED SPACEFLIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Waddington, C.J.

    BS>The presently available data on the storms'' of solar particles are used to compute the radiation dose that would be received by astronauts shielded by different thicknesses of material. It is shown that at least some of these storms represent a severe hazard to successful manned spaceflights. (auth)

  1. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR THE EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION ON AMPHIBIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated that exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can cause mortality and increase the occurrence of eye and limb malformation in some species of amphibians. Based on these reports and various field observations, it has been hypothesized that UV...

  2. Galactic and solar radiation exposure to aircrew during a solar cycle.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B J; Bennett, L G I; Green, A R; McCall, M J; Ellaschuk, B; Butler, A; Pierre, M

    2002-01-01

    An on-going investigation using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) has been carried out to measure the ambient dose equivalent rate of the cosmic radiation exposure of aircrew during a solar cycle. A semi-empirical model has been derived from these data to allow for the interpolation of the dose rate for any global position. The model has been extended to an altitude of up to 32 km with further measurements made on board aircraft and several balloon flights. The effects of changing solar modulation during the solar cycle are characterised by correlating the dose rate data to different solar potential models. Through integration of the dose-rate function over a great circle flight path or between given waypoints, a Predictive Code for Aircrew Radiation Exposure (PCAIRE) has been further developed for estimation of the route dose from galactic cosmic radiation exposure. This estimate is provided in units of ambient dose equivalent as well as effective dose, based on E/H x (10) scaling functions as determined from transport code calculations with LUIN and FLUKA. This experimentally based treatment has also been compared with the CARI-6 and EPCARD codes that are derived solely from theoretical transport calculations. Using TEPC measurements taken aboard the International Space Station, ground based neutron monitoring, GOES satellite data and transport code analysis, an empirical model has been further proposed for estimation of aircrew exposure during solar particle events. This model has been compared to results obtained during recent solar flare events.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Variabilities of Solar and Longwave Radiation Fluxes below a Coniferous Forest in the French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicart, J. E.; Ramseyer, V.; Lejeune, Y.; Essery, R.; Webster, C.; Rutter, N.

    2017-12-01

    At high altitudes and latitudes, snow has a large influence on hydrological processes. Large fractions of these regions are covered by forests, which have a strong influence on snow accumulation and melting processes. Trees absorb a large part of the incoming shortwave radiation and this heat load is mostly dissipated as longwave radiation. Trees shelter the snow surface from wind, so sub-canopy snowmelt depends mainly on the radiative fluxes: vegetation attenuates the transmission of shortwave radiation but enhances longwave irradiance to the surface. An array of 13 pyranometers and 11 pyrgeometers was deployed on the snow surface below a coniferous forest at the CEN-MeteoFrance Col de Porte station in the French Alps (1325 m asl) during the 2017 winter in order to investigate spatial and temporal variabilities of solar and infrared irradiances in different meteorological conditions. Sky view factors measured with hemispherical photographs at each radiometer location were in a narrow range from 0.2 to 0.3. The temperature of the vegetation was measured with IR thermocouples and an IR camera. In clear sky conditions, the attenuation of solar radiation by the canopy reached 96% and its spatial variability exceeded 100 W m-2. Longwave irradiance varied by 30 W m-2 from dense canopy to gap areas. In overcast conditions, the spatial variabilities of solar and infrared irradiances were reduced and remained closely related to the sky view factor. A simple radiative model taking into account the penetration through the canopy of the direct and diffuse solar radiation, and isotropic infrared emission of the vegetation as a blackbody emitter, accurately reproduced the dynamics of the radiation fluxes at the snow surface. Model results show that solar transmissivity of the canopy in overcast conditions is an excellent proxy of the sky view factor and the emitting temperature of the vegetation remained close to the air temperature in this typically dense Alpine forest.

  4. Scattered radiation doses absorbed by technicians at different distances from X-ray exposure: Experiments on prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsien-Wen; Liu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Tou-Rong; Chen, Chun-Lon; Chiang, Hsien-Jen; Chao, Shin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to investigate the spatial distribution of scattered radiation doses induced by exposure to the portable X-ray, the C-arm machine, and to simulate the radiologist without a shield of lead clothing, radiation doses absorbed by medical staff at 2 m from the central exposure point. With the adoption of the Rando Phantom, several frequently X-rayed body parts were exposed to X-ray radiation, and the scattered radiation doses were measured by ionization chamber dosimeters at various angles from the patient. Assuming that the central point of the X-ray was located at the belly button, five detection points were distributed in the operation room at 1 m above the ground and 1-2 m from the central point horizontally. The radiation dose measured at point B was the lowest, and the scattered radiation dose absorbed by the prosthesis from the X-ray's vertical projection was 0.07 ±0.03 μGy, which was less than the background radiation levels. The Fluke biomedical model 660-5DE (400 cc) and 660-3DE (4 cc) ion chambers were used to detect air dose at a distance of approximately two meters from the central point. The AP projection radiation doses at point B was the lowest (0.07±0.03 μGy) and the radiation doses at point D was the highest (0.26±0.08 μGy) .Only taking the vertical projection into account, the radiation doses at point B was the lowest (0.52 μGy), and the radiation doses at point E was the highest (4 μGy).The PA projection radiation at point B was the lowest (0.36 μGy) and the radiation doses at point E was the highest(2.77 μGy), occupying 10-32% of the maximum doses. The maximum dose in five directions was nine times to the minimum dose. When the PX and the C-arm machine were used, the radiation doses at a distance of 2 m were attenuated to the background radiation level. The radiologist without a lead shield should stand at point B of patient's feet. Accordingly, teaching materials on radiation safety for radiological interns and clinical

  5. The direct effect of aerosols on solar radiation over the broader Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimas, C. D.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Kanakidou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Vardavas, I.

    2011-11-01

    For the first time, the direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols on solar radiation is computed over the entire Mediterranean basin, one of the most climatically sensitive world regions, by using a deterministic spectral radiation transfer model (RTM). The DRE effects on the outgoing shortwave radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA), DRETOA, on the absorption of solar radiation in the atmospheric column, DREatm, and on the downward and absorbed surface solar radiation (SSR), DREsurf and DREnetsurf, respectively, are computed separately. The model uses input data for the period 2000-2007 for various surface and atmospheric parameters, taken from satellite (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, ISCCP-D2), Global Reanalysis projects (National Centers for Environmental Prediction - National Center for Atmospheric Research, NCEP/NCAR), and other global databases. The spectral aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth, AOD, asymmetry parameter, gaer and single scattering albedo, ωaer), are taken from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and they are Supplemented by the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model SSR fluxes have been successfully validated against measurements from 80 surface stations of the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) covering the period 2000-2007. A planetary cooling is found above the Mediterranean on an annual basis (regional mean DRETOA = -2.4 Wm-2). Though planetary cooling is found over most of the region, up to -7 Wm-2, large positive DRETOA values (up to +25 Wm-2) are found over North Africa, indicating a strong planetary warming, as well as over the Alps (+0.5 Wm-2). Aerosols are found to increase the absorption of solar radiation in the atmospheric column over the region (DREatm = +11.1 Wm-2) and to decrease SSR (DREsurf = -16.5 Wm-2 and DREnetsurf -13.5 Wm-2) inducing thus significant atmospheric warming and surface radiative cooling

  6. Study of radiatively sustained cesium plasmas for solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Dunning, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a study aimed at developing a high temperature solar electric converter are reported. The converter concept is based on the use of an alkali plasma to serve as both an efficient high temperature collector of solar radiation as well as the working fluid for a high temperature working cycle. The working cycle is a simple magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Rankine cycle employing a solid electrode Faraday MHD channel. Research milestones include the construction of a theoretical model for coupling sunlight in a cesium plasma and the experimental demonstration of cesium plasma heating with a solar simulator in excellent agreement with the theory. Analysis of a solar MHD working cycle in which excimer laser power rather than electric power is extracted is also presented. The analysis predicts a positive gain coefficient on the cesium-xenon excimer laser transition.

  7. A radiative transfer module for calculating photolysis rates and solar heating in climate models: Solar-J v7.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Juno; Prather, Michael J.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Veidenbaum, Alex; Nicolau, Alex

    2017-07-01

    Solar-J is a comprehensive radiative transfer model for the solar spectrum that addresses the needs of both solar heating and photochemistry in Earth system models. Solar-J is a spectral extension of Cloud-J, a standard in many chemical models that calculates photolysis rates in the 0.18-0.8 µm region. The Cloud-J core consists of an eight-stream scattering, plane-parallel radiative transfer solver with corrections for sphericity. Cloud-J uses cloud quadrature to accurately average over correlated cloud layers. It uses the scattering phase function of aerosols and clouds expanded to eighth order and thus avoids isotropic-equivalent approximations prevalent in most solar heating codes. The spectral extension from 0.8 to 12 µm enables calculation of both scattered and absorbed sunlight and thus aerosol direct radiative effects and heating rates throughout the Earth's atmosphere.The Solar-J extension adopts the correlated-k gas absorption bins, primarily water vapor, from the shortwave Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for general circulation model (GCM) applications (RRTMG-SW). Solar-J successfully matches RRTMG-SW's tropospheric heating profile in a clear-sky, aerosol-free, tropical atmosphere. We compare both codes in cloudy atmospheres with a liquid-water stratus cloud and an ice-crystal cirrus cloud. For the stratus cloud, both models use the same physical properties, and we find a systematic low bias of about 3 % in planetary albedo across all solar zenith angles caused by RRTMG-SW's two-stream scattering. Discrepancies with the cirrus cloud using any of RRTMG-SW's three different parameterizations are as large as about 20-40 % depending on the solar zenith angles and occur throughout the atmosphere.Effectively, Solar-J has combined the best components of RRTMG-SW and Cloud-J to build a high-fidelity module for the scattering and absorption of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, for which the three major components - wavelength integration, scattering, and

  8. A radiative transfer module for calculating photolysis rates and solar heating in climate models: Solar-J v7.5

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Juno; Prather, Michael J.; Cameron-Smith, Philip

    Solar-J is a comprehensive radiative transfer model for the solar spectrum that addresses the needs of both solar heating and photochemistry in Earth system models. Solar-J is a spectral extension of Cloud-J, a standard in many chemical models that calculates photolysis rates in the 0.18–0.8 µm region. The Cloud-J core consists of an eight-stream scattering, plane-parallel radiative transfer solver with corrections for sphericity. Cloud-J uses cloud quadrature to accurately average over correlated cloud layers. It uses the scattering phase function of aerosols and clouds expanded to eighth order and thus avoids isotropic-equivalent approximations prevalent in most solar heating codes. Themore » spectral extension from 0.8 to 12 µm enables calculation of both scattered and absorbed sunlight and thus aerosol direct radiative effects and heating rates throughout the Earth's atmosphere. Furthermore, the Solar-J extension adopts the correlated-k gas absorption bins, primarily water vapor, from the shortwave Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for general circulation model (GCM) applications (RRTMG-SW). Solar-J successfully matches RRTMG-SW's tropospheric heating profile in a clear-sky, aerosol-free, tropical atmosphere. Here, we compare both codes in cloudy atmospheres with a liquid-water stratus cloud and an ice-crystal cirrus cloud. For the stratus cloud, both models use the same physical properties, and we find a systematic low bias of about 3 % in planetary albedo across all solar zenith angles caused by RRTMG-SW's two-stream scattering. Discrepancies with the cirrus cloud using any of RRTMG-SW's three different parameterizations are as large as about 20–40 % depending on the solar zenith angles and occur throughout the atmosphere. Effectively, Solar-J has combined the best components of RRTMG-SW and Cloud-J to build a high-fidelity module for the scattering and absorption of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, for which the three major components – wavelength

  9. A radiative transfer module for calculating photolysis rates and solar heating in climate models: Solar-J v7.5

    DOE PAGES

    Hsu, Juno; Prather, Michael J.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; ...

    2017-01-01

    Solar-J is a comprehensive radiative transfer model for the solar spectrum that addresses the needs of both solar heating and photochemistry in Earth system models. Solar-J is a spectral extension of Cloud-J, a standard in many chemical models that calculates photolysis rates in the 0.18–0.8 µm region. The Cloud-J core consists of an eight-stream scattering, plane-parallel radiative transfer solver with corrections for sphericity. Cloud-J uses cloud quadrature to accurately average over correlated cloud layers. It uses the scattering phase function of aerosols and clouds expanded to eighth order and thus avoids isotropic-equivalent approximations prevalent in most solar heating codes. Themore » spectral extension from 0.8 to 12 µm enables calculation of both scattered and absorbed sunlight and thus aerosol direct radiative effects and heating rates throughout the Earth's atmosphere. Furthermore, the Solar-J extension adopts the correlated-k gas absorption bins, primarily water vapor, from the shortwave Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for general circulation model (GCM) applications (RRTMG-SW). Solar-J successfully matches RRTMG-SW's tropospheric heating profile in a clear-sky, aerosol-free, tropical atmosphere. Here, we compare both codes in cloudy atmospheres with a liquid-water stratus cloud and an ice-crystal cirrus cloud. For the stratus cloud, both models use the same physical properties, and we find a systematic low bias of about 3 % in planetary albedo across all solar zenith angles caused by RRTMG-SW's two-stream scattering. Discrepancies with the cirrus cloud using any of RRTMG-SW's three different parameterizations are as large as about 20–40 % depending on the solar zenith angles and occur throughout the atmosphere. Effectively, Solar-J has combined the best components of RRTMG-SW and Cloud-J to build a high-fidelity module for the scattering and absorption of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, for which the three major components – wavelength

  10. Placement and efficiency effects on radiative forcing of solar installations

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, Brian R.; Ruch, Patrick; Paredes, Stephan

    2015-09-28

    The promise for harnessing solar energy being hampered by cost, triggered efforts to reduce them. As a consequence low-efficiency, low-cost photovoltaics (PV) panels prevail. Conversely, in the traditional energy sector efficiency is extremely important due to the direct costs associated to fuels. This also affects solar energy due to the radiative forcing caused by the dark solar panels. In this paper we extend the concept of energy payback time by including the effect of albedo change, which gives a better assessment of the system sustainability. We present an analysis on the short and medium term climate forcing effects of differentmore » solar collectors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and demonstrate that efficiency is important to reduce the collector area and cost. This also influences the embodied energy and the global warming potential. We show that a placement of a high concentration photovoltaic thermal solar power station outside of the city using a district cooling system has a double beneficial effect since it improves the solar conversion efficiency and reduces the energy demand for cooling in the city. We also explain the mechanisms of the current economic development of solar technologies and anticipate changes.« less

  11. Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim; silverman, vered; harnik, nili; Erlich, caryn

    2016-04-01

    Superposed epoch analysis of meteorological reanalysis data is used to demonstrate a significant connection between intraseasonal solar variability and temperatures in the stratosphere. Decreasing solar flux leads to a cooling of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, while increasing solar flux leads to a warming of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, after a lag of approximately six to ten days. Late winter (February-March) Arctic stratospheric temperatures also change in response to changing incoming solar flux in a manner consistent with that seen on the 11 year timescale: ten to thirty days after the start of decreasing solar flux, the polar cap warms during the easterly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation. In contrast, cooling is present after decreasing solar flux during the westerly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation (though it is less robust than the warming during the easterly phase). The estimated composite mean changes in Northern Hemisphere upper stratospheric (~ 5hPa) polar temperatures exceed 8K, and are potentially a source of intraseasonal predictability for the surface. These changes in polar temperature are consistent with the changes in wave driving entering the stratosphere. Garfinkel, C.I., V. Silverman, N. Harnik, C. Erlich, Y. Riz (2015), Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 7648-7660. doi: 10.1002/2015JD023244.

  12. Radiative Effects of Atmospheric Aerosols and Impacts on Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Cory Christopher

    Atmospheric aerosols, by scattering and absorbing radiation, perturbs the Earth's energy balance and reduces the amount of insolation reaching the surface. This dissertation first studies the radiative effects of aerosols by analyzing the internal mixing of various aerosol species. It then examines the aerosol impact on solar PV efficiency and the resulting influence on power systems, including both atmospheric aerosols and deposition of particulate matter (PM) on PV surfaces,. Chapter 2 studies the radiative effects of black carbon (BC), sulfate and organic carbon (OC) internal mixing using a simple radiative transfer model. I find that internal mixing may not result in a positive radiative forcing compared to external mixing, but blocks additional shortwave radiation from the surface, enhancing the surface dimming effect. Chapter 3 estimates the impact of atmospheric aerosol attenuation on solar PV resources in China using a PV performance model with satellite-derived long-term surface irradiance data. I find that, in Eastern China, annual average reductions of solar resources due to aerosols are more than 20%, with comparable impacts to clouds in winter. Improving air quality in China would increase efficiency of solar PV generation. As a positive feedback, increased PV efficiency and deployment would further reduce air pollutant emissions too. Chapter 4 further quantifies the total aerosol impact on PV efficiency globally, including both atmospheric aerosols and the deposition of PM on PV surfaces. I find that, if panels are uncleaned and soiling is only removed by precipitation, deposition of PM accounts for more than two-thirds of the total aerosol impact in most regions. Cleaning the panels, even every few months, would largely increase PV efficiency in resource-abundant regions. Chapter 5 takes a further step to evaluate the impact of PV generation reduction due to aerosols on a projected 2030 power system in China with 400GW of PV. I find that aerosols

  13. High-temperature photochemical destruction of toxic organic wastes using concentrated solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dellinger, B.; Graham, J.L.; Berman, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    Application of concentrated solar energy has been proposed to be a viable waste disposal option. Specifically, this concept of solar induced high-temperature photochemistry is based on the synergistic contribution of concentrated infrared (IR) radiation, which acts as an intense heating source, and near ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) radiation, which can induce destructive photochemical processes. Some significant advances have been made in the theoretical framework of high-temperature photochemical processes (Section 2) and development of experimental techniques for their study (Section 3). Basic thermal/photolytic studies have addressed the effect of temperature on the photochemical destruction of pure compounds (Section 4). Detailed studiesmore » of the destruction of reaction by-products have been conducted on selected waste molecules (Section 5). Some very limited results are available on the destruction of mixtures (Section 6). Fundamental spectroscopic studies have been recently initiated (Section 7). The results to date have been used to conduct some relatively simple scale-up studies of the solar detoxification process. More recent work has focused on destruction of compounds that do not directly absorb solar radiation. Research efforts have focused on homogeneous as well as heterogeneous methods of initiating destructive reaction pathways (Section 9). Although many conclusions at this point must be considered tentative due to lack of basic research, a clearer picture of the overall process is emerging (Section 10). However, much research remains to be performed and most follow several veins, including photochemical, spectroscopic, combustion kinetic, and engineering scale-up (Section 11).« less

  14. Production of crystalline refractory metal oxides containing colloidal metal precipitates and useful as solar-effective absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, Jagdish; Chen, Yok

    1983-01-01

    This invention is a new process for producing refractory crystalline oxides having improved or unusual properties. The process comprises the steps of forming a doped-metal crystal of the oxide; exposing the doped crystal in a bomb to a reducing atmosphere at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature effecting precipitation of the dopant metal in the crystal lattice of the oxide but insufficient to effect net diffusion of the metal out of the lattice; and then cooling the crystal. Preferably, the cooling step is effected by quenching. The process forms colloidal precipitates of the metal in the oxide lattice. The process may be used, for example, to produce thermally stable black MgO crystalline bodies containing magnetic colloidal precipitates consisting of about 99% Ni. The Ni-containing bodies are solar-selective absorbers, having a room-temperature absorptivity of about 0.96 over virtually all of the solar-energy spectrum and exhibiting an absorption edge in the region of 2 .mu.m. The process parameters can be varied to control the average size of the precipitates. The process can produce a black MgO crystalline body containing colloidal Ni precipitates, some of which have the face-centered-cubic structure and others of which have the body-centered cubic structure. The products of the process are metal-precipitate-containing refractory crystalline oxides which have improved or unique optical, mechanical, magnetic, and/or electronic properties.

  15. Radiation tolerance of boron doped dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of dendritic web silicon for giving radiation hard solar cells is compared with the float zone silicon material. Solar cells with n(+)-p-P(+) structure and approximately 15% (AMl) efficiency were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation. Radiation tolerance of web cell efficiency was found to be at least as good as that of the float zone silicon cell. A study of the annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects via deep level transient spectroscopy revealed that E sub v + 0.31 eV defect, attributed to boron-oxygen-vacancy complex, is responsible for the reverse annealing of the irradiated cells in the temperature range of 150 to 350 C.

  16. Effects of solar radiation on hair and photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Dario, Michelli F; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the negative effects of solar radiation (ultraviolet, visible and infrared wavelengths) on hair properties like color, mechanical properties, luster, protein content, surface roughness, among others, will be discussed. Despite knowing that radiation damages hair, there are no consensus about the particular effect of each segment of solar radiation on the hair shaft. The hair photoprotection products are primarily targeted to dyed hair, specially auburn pigments, and gray shades. They are usually based on silicones, antioxidants and quaternary chemical UV filters that have more affinity for negatively charged hair surface and present higher efficacy. Unfortunately, there are no regulated parameters, like for skin photoprotection, for efficacy evaluation of hair care products, which makes impossible to compare the results published in the literature. Thus, it is important that researchers make an effort to apply experimental conditions similar to a real level of sun exposure, like dose, irradiance, time, temperature and relative humidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Diffuse solar radiation and associated meteorological parameters in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, A. B.; Kar, S. K.; Bhattacharya, R.

    1996-10-01

    Solar diffuse radiation data including global radiation, shortwave and longwave balances, net radiation and sunshine hours have been extensively analyzed to study the variation of diffuse radiation with turbidity and cloud discharges appearing in the form of atmospherics over the tropics. Results of surface radiation measurements at Calcutta, Poona, Delhi and Madras are presented together with some meteorological parameters. The monthly values of diffuse radiation and the monthly ratios of diffuse to global solar radiation have been examined, with a special emphasis in relation to the noise level of atmospherics at Calcutta in the very low frequency band. The results exhibit some definite seasonal changes which appear to be in close agreement with one another. Acknowledgements. We gratefully appreciate the on-line DMSP database facility at APL (Newell et al., 1991) from which this study has benefited greatly. We wish to thank E. Friis-Christensen for his encouragement and useful discussions. A. Y. would like to thank the Danish Meteorological Institute, where this work was done, for its hospitality during his stay there and the Nordic Baltic Scholarship Scheme for its financial support of this stay. Topical Editor K.-H. Glassmeier thanks M. J. Engebretson and H. Lühr for their help in evaluating this paper.--> Correspondence to: A. Yahnin-->

  18. Radiation Environments for Future Human Exploration Throughout the Solar System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N.; Gorby, M.; Linker, J.; Riley, P.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Spence, H. E.; Desai, M. I.; Mikic, Z.; Joyce, C. J.; Kozarev, K. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2016-12-01

    Acute space radiation hazards pose one of the most serious risks to future human and robotic exploration. The ability to predict when and where large events will occur is necessary in order to mitigate their hazards. The largest events are usually associated with complex sunspot groups (also known as active regions) that harbor strong, stressed magnetic fields. Highly energetic protons accelerated very low in the corona by the passage of coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven compressions or shocks and from flares travel near the speed of light, arriving at Earth minutes after the eruptive event. Whether these particles actually reach Earth, the Moon, Mars (or any other point) depends on their transport in the interplanetary magnetic field and their magnetic connection to the shock. Recent contemporaneous observations during the largest events in almost a decade show the unique longitudinal distributions of this ionizing radiation broadly distributed from sources near the Sun and yet highly isolated during the passage of CME shocks. Over the last decade, we have observed space weather events as the solar wind exhibits extremely low densities and magnetic field strengths, representing states that have never been observed during the space age. The highly abnormal solar activity during cycles 23 and 24 has caused the longest solar minimum in over 80 years and continues into the unusually small solar maximum of cycle 24. As a result of the remarkably weak solar activity, we have also observed the highest fluxes of galactic cosmic rays in the space age and relatively small particle radiation events. We have used observations from LRO/CRaTER to examine the implications of these highly unusual solar conditions for human space exploration throughout the inner solar system. While these conditions are not a show-stopper for long-duration missions (e.g., to the Moon, an asteroid, or Mars), galactic cosmic ray radiation remains a significant and worsening factor that limits

  19. Evaluation of CLM4 Solar Radiation Partitioning Scheme Using Remote Sensing and Site Level FPAR Datasets

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Kai; Mao, Jiafu; Dickinson, Robert; ...

    2013-06-05

    This paper examines a land surface solar radiation partitioning scheme, i.e., that of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with coupled carbon and nitrogen cycles. Taking advantage of a unique 30-year fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) dataset derived from the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data set, multiple other remote sensing datasets, and site level observations, we evaluated the CLM4 FPAR ’s seasonal cycle, diurnal cycle, long-term trends and spatial patterns. These findings show that the model generally agrees with observations in the seasonal cycle, long-term trends, and spatial patterns,more » but does not reproduce the diurnal cycle. Discrepancies also exist in seasonality magnitudes, peak value months, and spatial heterogeneity. Here, we identify the discrepancy in the diurnal cycle as, due to, the absence of dependence on sun angle in the model. Implementation of sun angle dependence in a one-dimensional (1-D) model is proposed. The need for better relating of vegetation to climate in the model, indicated by long-term trends, is also noted. Evaluation of the CLM4 land surface solar radiation partitioning scheme using remote sensing and site level FPAR datasets provides targets for future development in its representation of this naturally complicated process.« less

  20. Synthesis of active absorber layer by dip-coating method for perovskite solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rahul; Noor, I. M.; Singh, Pramod K.; Bhattacharya, B.; Arof, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we develop the hybrid perovskite-based n-i-p solar cell using a simple, fast and low-cost dip-coating method. Hot solution and the pre-annealed substrate are used for coating the perovskite thin film by this method this is further used for studying its structural and electrical properties. UV-vis spectroscopy is carried out for calculating the band gap of the hybrid perovskite layer which is ∼1.6 eV. X-ray spectroscopy confirms that the formation of hybrid perovskite layer. The profilometer is used to study the surface roughness and also for measuring the thickness of the perovskite layer with varying substrate temperature. The optimized sample was further used for cross-sectional SEM image to verify the thickness measured from the profiler. The electrical parameter of JV characteristic with varying temperature is tabulated in the table. Whereas, the perovskite sensitized solar cell exhibits highest short circuit current density, Jsc of 11 mA cm-2, open circuit voltage, Voc of 0.87 V, fill factor of 0.55 and efficiency, η of >5%.

  1. Solar ultraviolet radiation in a changing climate

    EPA Science Inventory

    The projected large increases in damaging ultraviolet radiation as a result of global emissions of ozone-depleting substances have been forestalled by the success of the Montreal Protocol. New challenges are now arising in relation to climate change. We highlight the complex inte...

  2. Assessing the role of hydrogen in Fermi-level pinning in chalcopyrite and kesterite solar absorbers from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, J. B.; Lordi, V.; Ogitsu, T.; Deangelis, A.; Horsley, K.; Gaillard, N.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the impact of impurities in solar absorbers is critical to engineering high-performance in devices, particularly over extended periods of time. Here, we use hybrid functional calculations to explore the role of hydrogen interstitial (Hi) defects in the electronic properties of a number of attractive solar absorbers within the chalcopyrite and kesterite families to identify how this common impurity may influence device performance. Our results identify that Hi can inhibit the highly p-type conditions desirable for several higher-band gap absorbers and that H incorporation could detrimentally affect the open-circuit voltage (Voc) and limit device efficiencies. Additionally, we find that Hi can drive the Fermi level away from the valence band edge enough to lead to n-type conductivity in a number of chalcopyrite and kesterite absorbers, particularly those containing Ag rather than Cu. We find that these effects can lead to interfacial Fermi-level pinning that can qualitatively explain the observed performance in high-Ga content CIGSe solar cells that exhibit saturation in the Voc with increasing band gap. Our results suggest that compositional grading rather than bulk alloying, such as by creating In-rich surfaces, may be a better strategy to favorably engineering improved thin-film photovoltaics with larger-band gap absorbers.

  3. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  4. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  5. Solar converter system with thermal overload protection

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, J.M.; Thornbury, T.R.

    1979-10-02

    A solar energy conversion system comprises: (a) a solar converter in which liquid absorbs solar radiation, the liquid being solar energy absorptive; (b) first means to circulate said liquid for flow through the converter; and (c) means to effect removal of liquid from the converter in response to an undesirable operation condition in said system. 12 claims.

  6. Hydrocarbon pyrolysis reactor experimentation and modeling for the production of solar absorbing carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederickson, Lee Thomas

    Much of combustion research focuses on reducing soot particulates in emissions. However, current research at San Diego State University (SDSU) Combustion and Solar Energy Laboratory (CSEL) is underway to develop a high temperature solar receiver which will utilize carbon nanoparticles as a solar absorption medium. To produce carbon nanoparticles for the small particle heat exchange receiver (SPHER), a lab-scale carbon particle generator (CPG) has been built and tested. The CPG is a heated ceramic tube reactor with a set point wall temperature of 1100-1300°C operating at 5-6 bar pressure. Natural gas and nitrogen are fed to the CPG where natural gas undergoes pyrolysis resulting in carbon particles. The gas-particle mixture is met downstream with dilution air and sent to the lab scale solar receiver. To predict soot yield and general trends in CPG performance, a model has been setup in Reaction Design CHEMKIN-PRO software. One of the primary goals of this research is to accurately measure particle properties. Mean particle diameter, size distribution, and index of refraction are calculated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and a Diesel Particulate Scatterometer (DPS). Filter samples taken during experimentation are analyzed to obtain a particle size distribution with SEM images processed in ImageJ software. These results are compared with the DPS, which calculates the particle size distribution and the index of refraction from light scattering using Mie theory. For testing with the lab scale receiver, a particle diameter range of 200-500 nm is desired. Test conditions are varied to understand effects of operating parameters on particle size and the ability to obtain the size range. Analysis of particle loading is the other important metric for this research. Particle loading is measured downstream of the CPG outlet and dilution air mixing point. The air-particle mixture flows through an extinction tube where opacity of the mixture is measured with a 532 nm

  7. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure during solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Anid, Hani Khaled

    In 1990, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recognized the occupational exposure of aircrew to cosmic radiation. In Canada, a Commercial and Business Aviation Advisory Circular was issued by Transport Canada suggesting that action should be taken to manage such exposure. In anticipation of possible regulations on exposure of Canadian-based aircrew in the near future, an extensive study was carried out at the Royal Military College of Canada to measure the radiation exposure during commercial flights. The radiation exposure to aircrew is a result of a complex mixed-radiation field resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). Supernova explosions and active galactic nuclei are responsible for GCRs which consist of 90% protons, 9% alpha particles, and 1% heavy nuclei. While they have a fairly constant fluence rate, their interaction with the magnetic field of the Earth varies throughout the solar cycles, which has a period of approximately 11 years. SEPs are highly sporadic events that are associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This type of exposure may be of concern to certain aircrew members, such as pregnant flight crew, for which the annual effective dose is limited to 1 mSv over the remainder of the pregnancy. The composition of SEPs is very similar to GCRs, in that they consist of mostly protons, some alpha particles and a few heavy nuclei, but with a softer energy spectrum. An additional factor when analysing SEPs is the effect of flare anisotropy. This refers to the way charged particles are transported through the Earth's magnetosphere in an anisotropic fashion. Solar flares that are fairly isotropic produce a uniform radiation exposure for areas that have similar geomagnetic shielding, while highly anisotropic events produce variable exposures at different locations on the Earth. Studies of neutron monitor count rates from detectors sharing similar geomagnetic shielding properties

  8. Solar radiation on a catenary collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutchik, M.; Appelbaum, J.

    1992-01-01

    A tent-shaped structure with a flexible photovoltaic blanket acting as a catenary collector is presented. The shadow cast by one side of the collector on the other side producing a self shading effect is analyzed. The direct beam, the diffuse and the albedo radiation on the collector are determined. An example is given for the insolation on the collector operating on the martian surface for the location of Viking Lander 1 (VL1).

  9. Solar radiation on a catenary collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutchik, M.; Appelbaum, J.

    1992-01-01

    A tent-shaped structure with a flexible photovoltaic blanket acting as a catenary collector is presented. The shadow cast by one side of the collector produces a shadow on the other side of the collector. This self-shading effect is analyzed. The direct beam, the diffuse, and the albedo radiation on the collector are determined. An example is given for the insolation on the collector operating on Viking Lander 1 (VL1).

  10. Habitat Design Considerations for Implementing Solar Particle Event Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Mathew A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Walker, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation protection is an important habitat design consideration for human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. Fortunately, radiation shelter concepts can effectively reduce astronaut exposure for the relatively low proton energies of solar particle events, enabling moderate duration missions of several months before astronaut exposure (galactic cosmic ray and solar particle event) approaches radiation exposure limits. In order to minimize habitat mass for increasingly challenging missions, design of radiation shelters must minimize dedicated, single-purpose shielding mass by leveraging the design and placement of habitat subsystems, accommodations, and consumables. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems RadWorks Storm Shelter Team has recently designed and performed radiation analysis on several low dedicated mass shelter concepts for a year-long mission. This paper describes habitat design considerations identified during the study's radiation analysis. These considerations include placement of the shelter within a habitat for improved protection, integration of human factors guidance for sizing shelters, identification of potential opportunities for habitat subsystems to compromise on individual subsystem performances for overall vehicle mass reductions, and pre-configuration of shelter components for reduced deployment times.

  11. Implementation of a physically-based scheme representing light-absorbing impurities deposition, evolution and radiative impacts in the SURFEX/Crocus model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzet, F.; Dumont, M.; Lafaysse, M.; Hagenmuller, P.; Arnaud, L.; Picard, G.; Morin, S.

    2017-12-01

    Light-absorbing impurities decrease snow albedo, increasing the amount of solar energy absorbed by the snowpack. Its most intuitive impact is to accelerate snow melt. However the presence of a layer highly concentrated in light-absorbing impurities in the snowpack also modify its temperature profile affecting snow metamorphism. New capabilities have been implemented in the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus (referred to as Crocus) to account for impurities deposition and evolution within the snowpack (Tuzet et al., 2017, TCD). Once deposited, the model computes impurities mass evolution until snow melts out. Taking benefits of the recent inclusion of the spectral radiative transfer model TARTES in Crocus, the model explicitly represents the radiative impacts of light-absorbing impurities in snow. In the Pyrenees mountain range, strong sporadic Saharan dust deposition (referred to as dust outbreaks) can occur during the snow season leading some snow layers in the snowpack to contain high concentrations of mineral dust. One of the major events of the past years occurred on February 2014, affecting the whole southern Europe. During the weeks following this dust outbreak a strong avalanche activity was reported in the Aran valley (Pyrenees, Spain). For now, the link between the dust outbreak and the avalanche activity is not demonstrated.We investigate the impact of this dust outbreak on the snowpack stability in the Aran valley using the Crocus model, trying to determine whether the snowpack instability observed after the dust outbreak can be related to the presence of dust. SAFRAN-reanalysis meteorological data are used to drive the model on several altitudes, slopes and aspects. For each slope configuration two different simulations are run; one without dust and one simulating the dust outbreak of February 2014.The two corresponding simulations are then compared to assess the role of impurities on snow metamorphism and stability.On this example, we

  12. Electron Radiation Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Hollerman, William A.; Hubbs, Whitney S.; Gray, Perry A.; Wertz, George E.; Hoppe, David T.; Nehls, Mary K.; Semmel, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Solar sails are not limited by reaction mass and provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Once thought to be difficult or impossible, solar sailing has come out of science fiction and into the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this propulsion method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. The availability of strong, ultra lightweight, and radiation resistant materials will determine the future of solar sailing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to space environmental effects. This paper will describe the irradiation of candidate solar sail materials to energetic electrons, in vacuum, to determine the hardness of several candidate sail materials.

  13. Distributed modeling of surface solar radiation based on aerosol optical depth and sunshine duration in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaofan; Zhao, Na; Ma, Yue

    2018-02-01

    Surface solar radiation, as a major component of energy balance, is an important driving condition for nutrient and energy cycle in the Earth system. The spatial distribution of total solar radiation at 10 km×10 km resolution in China was simulated with Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data from remote sensing and observing sunshine hours data from ground meteorological stations based on Geographic Information System (GIS). The results showed that the solar radiation was significantly different in the country, and affected by both sunshine hours and AOD. Sunshine hours are higher in the Northwest than that in the Northeast, but solar radiation is lower because of the higher AOD, especially in autumn and winter. It was suggested that the calculation accuracy of solar radiation was limited if just based on sunshine hours, and AOD can be considered as the influencing factor which would help to improve the simulation accuracy of the total solar radiation and realize the solar radiation distributed simulation.

  14. Productivity, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, and light use efficiency in crops: implications for remote sensing of crop primary production.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Arkebauer, Timothy J; Suyker, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation productivity metrics such as gross primary production (GPP) at the canopy scale are greatly affected by the efficiency of using absorbed radiation for photosynthesis, or light use efficiency (LUE). Thus, close investigation of the relationships between canopy GPP and photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation is the basis for quantification of LUE. We used multiyear observations over irrigated and rainfed contrasting C3 (soybean) and C4 (maize) crops having different physiology, leaf structure, and canopy architecture to establish the relationships between canopy GPP and radiation absorbed by vegetation and quantify LUE. Although multiple LUE definitions are reported in the literature, we used a definition of efficiency of light use by photosynthetically active "green" vegetation (LUE(green)) based on radiation absorbed by "green" photosynthetically active vegetation on a daily basis. We quantified, irreversible slowly changing seasonal (constitutive) and rapidly day-to-day changing (facultative) LUE(green), as well as sensitivity of LUE(green) to the magnitude of incident radiation and drought events. Large (2-3-fold) variation of daily LUE(green) over the course of a growing season that is governed by crop physiological and phenological status was observed. The day-to-day variations of LUE(green) oscillated with magnitude 10-15% around the seasonal LUE(green) trend and appeared to be closely related to day-to-day variations of magnitude and composition of incident radiation. Our results show the high variability of LUE(green) between C3 and C4 crop species (1.43 g C/MJ vs. 2.24 g C/MJ, respectively), as well as within single crop species (i.e., maize or soybean). This implies that assuming LUE(green) as a constant value in GPP models is not warranted for the crops studied, and brings unpredictable uncertainties of remote GPP estimation, which should be accounted for in LUE models. The uncertainty of GPP estimation due to facultative and

  15. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh; Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria; Sekkat, Zouheir; Abd-lefdil, Mohammed; El Khakani, My Ali

    2017-02-01

    We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (Ta), but their crystallinity is much improved for Ta ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with Ta (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at Ta = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for Ta = 300-400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV-vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at Ta = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS spectroscopies to determine their chemical bondings, the position of their valence band maximum (relative to Fermi level), and their work function values. This enabled us to sketch out, as accurately as possible, the band alignment of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials.

  16. Si3 AlP: A New Promising Material for Solar Cell Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jihui; Zhai, Yingteng; Liu, Hengrui; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xingao; Wei, Suhuai

    2014-03-01

    First-principles calculations are performed to study the structural and optoelectronic properties of the newly synthesized nonisovalent and lattice-matched (Si2)0.6(AlP)0.4 alloy [T. Watkins et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 16212.] The most stable structure of Si3AlP is a superlattice along the <111>direction with separated AlP and Si layers, which has a similar optical absorption spectrum to silicon. The ordered C1c1-Si3AlP is found to be the most stable one among all the structures with -AlPSi3- motifs, in agreement with the experimental suggestions. We predict that C1c1-Si3AlP has good optical properties, i.e., it has a larger fundamental band gap and a smaller direct band gap than Si, thus it has much higher absorption in the visible light region, making it a promising candidate for improving the performance of the existing Si-based solar cells.

  17. Reflection of solar radiation by a cylindrical cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    Potential applications of an analytic method for computing the solar radiation reflected by a cylindrical cloud are discussed, including studies of radiative transfer within finite clouds and evaluations of these effects on other clouds and on remote sensing problems involving finite clouds. The pattern of reflected sunlight from a cylindrical cloud as seen at a large distance has been considered and described by the bidirectional function method for finite cloud analysis, as previously studied theoretically for plane-parallel atmospheres by McKee and Cox (1974); Schmetz and Raschke (1981); and Stuhlmann et al. (1985). However, the lack of three-dimensional radiative transfer solutions for anisotropic scattering media have hampered theoretical investigations of bidirectional functions for finite clouds. The present approach permits expression of the directional variation of the radiation field as a spherical harmonic series to any desired degree and order.

  18. Characterisation of spectrophotometers used for spectral solar ultraviolet radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Gröbner, J

    2001-01-01

    Spectrophotometers used for spectral measurements of the solar ultraviolet radiation need to be well characterised to provide accurate and reliable data. Since the characterisation and calibration are usually performed in the laboratory under conditions very different from those encountered during solar measurements, it is essential to address all issues concerned with the representativity of the laboratory characterisation with respect to the solar measurements. These include among others the instrument stability, the instrument linearity, the instrument responsivity, the wavelength accuracy, the spectral resolution, stray light rejection and the instrument dependence on ambient temperature fluctuations. These instrument parameters need to be determined often enough so that the instrument changes only marginally in the period between successive characterisations and therefore provides reliable data for the intervening period.

  19. Solar radiation and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-11-01

    Although several studies have estimated the effects of temperature on mortality and morbidity, little is known regarding the burden of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) attributable to solar radiation. We obtained data for all cases of OHCA and meteorological data reported between 2011 and 2014 in 3 Japanese prefectures: Hokkaido, Ibaraki, and Fukuoka. We first examined the relationship between daily solar radiation and OHCA risk for each prefecture using time-varying distributed lag non-linear models and then pooled the results in a multivariate random-effects meta-analysis. The attributable fractions of OHCA were calculated for low and high solar radiation, defined as solar radiation below and above the minimum morbidity solar radiation, respectively. The minimum morbidity solar radiation was defined as the specific solar radiation associated with the lowest morbidity risk. A total of 49,892 cases of OHCA occurred during the study period. The minimum morbidity solar radiation for each prefecture was the 100th percentile (72.5 MJ/m 2 ) in Hokkaido, the 83rd percentile (59.7 MJ/m 2 ) in Ibaraki, and the 70th percentile (53.8 MJ/m 2 ) in Fukuoka. Overall, 20.00% (95% empirical confidence interval [eCI]: 10.97-27.04) of the OHCA cases were attributable to daily solar radiation. The attributable fraction for low solar radiation was 19.50% (95% eCI: 10.00-26.92), whereas that for high solar radiation was 0.50% (95% eCI: -0.07-1.01). Low solar radiation was associated with a substantial attributable risk for OHCA. Our findings suggest that public health efforts to reduce OHCA burden should consider the solar radiation level. Large prospective studies with longitudinal collection of individual data is required to more conclusively assess the impact of solar radiation on OHCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Instrumentation for remote sensing solar radiation from light aircraft.

    PubMed

    Howard, J A; Barton, I J

    1973-10-01

    The paper outlines the instrumentation needed to study, from a light aircraft, the solar radiation reflected by ground surfaces and the incoming solar radiation. A global shortwave radiometer was mounted on the roof of the aircraft and a specially designed mount was used to support a downward pointing 70-mm aerial camera, a downward pointing narrow-beam pyranometer, and, sometimes, a downward pointing global shortwave pyranometer. Calibration factors were determined for the three pyranometers by comparison with a standard Angstrom compensation pyrheliometer. Results have indicated trends in the albedos of major plant communities and have shown that the calculated albedo values vary according to whether the downward pointing instrument is narrow-beam or global. Comparisons were also made with albedos measured on the ground.

  1. Atmospheric transformation of solar radiation reflected from the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malkevich, M. S.; Istomina, L. G.; Hovis, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Airborne measurements of the brightness spectrum of the Atlantic Ocean in the wavelength region from 0.4 to 0.7 micron are analyzed. These measurements were made over a tropical region of the Atlantic from an aircraft at heights of 0.3 and 10.5 km during the TROPEX-72 experiment. The results are used to estimate the contribution of the atmosphere to the overall brightness of the ocean-atmosphere system. It is concluded that: (1) the atmosphere decreases the absolute brightness of the ocean by a factor of 5 to 10 and also strongly affects the spectral behavior of solar radiation reflected from the ocean surface; (2) the atmospheric contribution to overall brightness may vary considerably under real conditions; (3) finely dispersed particles and Rayleigh scattering affect the spectral distribution of solar radiation; and (4) the spectral composition of ocean-atmosphere brightness may be completely governed by the atmosphere.

  2. Numerical model of solar dynamic radiator for parametric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    1989-01-01

    Growth power requirements for Space Station Freedom will be met through addition of 25 kW solar dynamic (SD) power modules. Extensive thermal and power cycle modeling capabilities have been developed which are powerful tools in Station design and analysis, but which prove cumbersome and costly for simple component preliminary design studies. In order to aid in refining the SD radiator to the mature design stage, a simple and flexible numerical model was developed. The model simulates heat transfer and fluid flow performance of the radiator and calculates area mass and impact survivability for many combinations of flow tube and panel configurations, fluid and material properties, and environmental and cycle variations.

  3. Convenient models of the atmosphere: optics and solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Ginsburg; Victor, Frolkis; Irina, Melnikova; Sergey, Novikov; Dmitriy, Samulenkov; Maxim, Sapunov

    2017-11-01

    Simple optical models of clear and cloudy atmosphere are proposed. Four versions of atmospheric aerosols content are considered: a complete lack of aerosols in the atmosphere, low background concentration (500 cm-3), high concentrations (2000 cm-3) and very high content of particles (5000 cm-3). In a cloud scenario, the model of external mixture is assumed. The values of optical thickness and single scattering albedo for 13 wavelengths are calculated in the short wavelength range of 0.28-0.90 µm, with regard to the molecular absorption bands, that is simulated with triangle function. A comparison of the proposed optical parameters with results of various measurements and retrieval (lidar measurement, sampling, processing radiation measurements) is presented. For a cloudy atmosphere models of single-layer and two-layer atmosphere are proposed. It is found that cloud optical parameters with assuming the "external mixture" agrees with retrieved values from airborne observations. The results of calculating hemispherical fluxes of the reflected and transmitted solar radiation and the radiative divergence are obtained with the Delta-Eddington approach. The calculation is done for surface albedo values of 0, 0.5, 0.9 and for spectral values of the sandy surface. Four values of solar zenith angle: 0°, 30°, 40° and 60° are taken. The obtained values are compared with data of radiative airborne observations. Estimating the local instantaneous radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols and clouds for considered models is presented together with the heating rate.

  4. Ecohydrologic role of solar radiation on landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetemen, Omer; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Flores-Cervantes, J. Homero; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Bras, Rafael L.

    2015-02-01

    Solar radiation has a clear signature on the spatial organization of ecohydrologic fluxes, vegetation patterns and dynamics, and landscape morphology in semiarid ecosystems. Existing landscape evolution models (LEMs) do not explicitly consider spatially explicit solar radiation as model forcing. Here, we improve an existing LEM to represent coupled processes of energy, water, and sediment balance for semiarid fluvial catchments. To ground model predictions, a study site is selected in central New Mexico where hillslope aspect has a marked influence on vegetation patterns and landscape morphology. Model predictions are corroborated using limited field observations in central NM and other locations with similar conditions. We design a set of comparative LEM simulations to investigate the role of spatially explicit solar radiation on landscape ecohydro-geomorphic development under different uplift scenarios. Aspect-control and network-control are identified as the two main drivers of soil moisture and vegetation organization on the landscape. Landscape-scale and long-term implications of these short-term ecohdrologic patterns emerged in modeled landscapes. As north facing slopes (NFS) get steeper by continuing uplift they support erosion-resistant denser vegetation cover which leads to further slope steepening until erosion and uplift attains a dynamic equilibrium. Conversely, on south facing slopes (SFS), as slopes grow with uplift, increased solar radiation exposure with slope supports sparser biomass and shallower slopes. At the landscape scale, these differential erosion processes lead to asymmetric development of catchment forms, consistent with regional observations. Understanding of ecohydrogeomorphic evolution will improve to assess the impacts of past and future climates on landscape response and morphology.

  5. Genoprotective effect of Phyllanthus orbicularis extract against UVA, UVB and solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Vernhes Tamayo, Marioly; Schuch, André Passaglia; Yagura, Teiti; Baly Gil, Luis; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins; Sánchez-Lamar, Angel

    2018-05-16

    One approach to protect the human skin against harmful effects of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is to use natural products as photoprotectors. In this work, the extract from specie Phyllanthus orbicularis K was evaluated as a protective agent against the photodamage by UVB, UVA artificial lamps and environmental sunlight exposure. The plasmid DNA solutions were exposed to radiations using the DNA-dosimeter system in presence of plant extract. The DNA repair enzymes, E. coli Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and T4 bacteriophage endonuclease V (T4-endo V), were employed to discriminate oxidized DNA damage and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) respectively. The supercoiled and relaxed forms of DNA were separated through electrophoretic migration in agarose gels. These DNA forms were quantified to determine strands break, representing the types of lesion levels. The results showed that, in presence of P. orbicularis extract, the CPD and oxidative damage were reduced in irradiated DNA samples. The photoprotective effect of extract was more evident for UVB and sunlight radiation than for UVA. This work documents the UV absorbing properties of P. orbicularis aqueous extract and opens up new vistas in its characterization as protective agent against DNA damage induced by environmental sunlight radiation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  7. Solar radiation and water vapor pressure to forecast chickenpox epidemics.

    PubMed

    Hervás, D; Hervás-Masip, J; Nicolau, A; Reina, J; Hervás, J A

    2015-03-01

    The clear seasonality of varicella infections in temperate regions suggests the influence of meteorologic conditions. However, there are very few data on this association. The aim of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of varicella infections on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic conditions and schooling. Data on the number of cases of varicella were obtained from the Network of Epidemiologic Surveillance, which is composed of primary care physicians who notify varicella cases on a compulsory basis. From 1995 to 2012, varicella cases were correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, water vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and solar radiation using regression and time-series models. The influence of schooling was also analyzed. A total of 68,379 cases of varicella were notified during the study period. Cases occurred all year round, with a peak incidence in June. Varicella cases increased with the decrease in water vapor pressure and/or the increase of solar radiation, 3 and 4 weeks prior to reporting, respectively. An inverse association was also observed between varicella cases and school holidays. Using these variables, the best fitting autoregressive moving average with exogenous variables (ARMAX) model could predict 95 % of varicella cases. In conclusion, varicella in our region had a clear seasonality, which was mainly determined by solar radiation and water vapor pressure.

  8. Properties of solar generators with reflectors and radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, W. D.; Rex, D.; Bierfischer, U.

    1980-06-01

    Radiation cooled concentrator systems using silicon and GaAs cells were studied. The principle of radiation cooling by the reflector surfaces is discussed for cylindrical parabolic reflectors (SARA), truncated hexagonal pyramids, and a small trough configuration. Beam paths, collection properties for imperfect orientation, and thermal optimization parameters were analyzed. The three concentrating systems with radiation cooling offer advantages over the plane panel and over the large trough. With silicon solar cells they exhibit considerably lower solar cell consumption per Kw and also lower mass per kW. With GaAs cells the SARA system reduces the number of solar cells needed per kW to less than 10%. Also in all other cases SARA offers the best values for alpha and F sub sol, as long as narrow angular tolerances of the panel orientation can be met. Analysis of the energy collecting properties for imperfect orientation shows the superiority of the hexagonal concentrator. This device can produce power for even large angles between the sun and the panel normal.

  9. How well do we know the incoming solar infrared radiation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsey, Jonathan; Coleman, Marc; Gardiner, Tom; Shine, Keith

    2017-04-01

    The solar spectral irradiance (SSI) has been identified as a key climate variable by the Global Climate Observing System (Bojinski et al. 2014, Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.). It is of importance in the modelling of atmospheric radiative transfer, and the quantification of the global energy budget. However, in the near-infrared spectral region (between 2000-10000 cm-1) there exists a discrepancy of 7% between spectra measured from the space-based SOLSPEC instrument (Thuillier et al. 2015, Solar Physics) and those from a ground-based Langley technique (Bolseé et al. 2014, Solar Physics). This same difference is also present between different analyses of the SOLSPEC data. This work aims to reconcile some of these differences by presenting an estimate of the near-infrared SSI obtained from ground-based measurements taken using an absolutely calibrated Fourier transform spectrometer. Spectra are obtained both using the Langley technique and by direct comparison with a radiative transfer model, with appropriate handling of both aerosol scattering and molecular continuum absorption. Particular focus is dedicated to the quantification of uncertainty in these spectra, from both the inherent uncertainty in the measurement setup and that from the use of the radiative transfer code and its inputs.

  10. Effects of thermochemical treatment on CuSbS 2 photovoltaic absorber quality and solar cell reproducibility

    DOE PAGES

    de Souza Lucas, Francisco Willian; Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; ...

    2016-08-01

    CuSbS 2 is a promising nontoxic and earth-abundant photovoltaic absorber that is chemically simpler than the widely studied Cu 2ZnSnS 4. However, CuSbS 2 photovoltaic (PV) devices currently have relatively low efficiency and poor reproducibility, often due to suboptimal material quality and insufficient optoelectronic properties. To address these issues, here we develop a thermochemical treatment (TT) for CuSbS 2 thin films, which consists of annealing in Sb 2S 3 vapor followed by a selective KOH surface chemical etch. The annealed CuSbS 2 films show improved structural quality and optoelectronic properties, such as stronger band-edge photoluminescence and longer photoexcited carrier lifetime.more » These improvements also lead to more reproducible CuSbS 2 PV devices, with performance currently limited by a large cliff-type interface band offset with CdS contact. Altogether, these results point to the potential avenues to further increase the performance of CuSbS 2 thin film solar cell, and the findings can be transferred to other thin film photovoltaic technologies.« less

  11. Effects of Solar Ultraviolet Radiation on the Potential Efficiency of Photosystem II in Leaves of Tropical Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Krause, G. Heinrich; Schmude, Claudia; Garden, Hermann; Koroleva, Olga Y.; Winter, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    The effects of solar ultraviolet (UV)-B and UV-A radiation on the potential efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) in leaves of tropical plants were investigated in Panama (9°N). Shade-grown tree seedlings or detached sun leaves from the outer crown of mature trees were exposed for short periods (up to 75 min) to direct sunlight filtered through plastic or glass filters that absorbed either UV-B or UV-A+B radiation, or transmitted the complete solar spectrum. Persistent changes in potential PSII efficiency were monitored by means of the dark-adapted ratio of variable to maximum chlorophyll a fluorescence. In leaves of shade-grown tree seedlings, exposure to the complete solar spectrum resulted in a strong decrease in potential PSII efficiency, probably involving protein damage. A substantially smaller decline in the dark-adapted ratio of variable to maximum chlorophyll a fluorescence was observed when UV-B irradiation was excluded. The loss in PSII efficiency was further reduced by excluding both UV-B and UV-A light. The photoinactivation of PSII was reversible under shade conditions, but restoration of nearly full activity required at least 10 d. Repeated exposure to direct sunlight induced an increase in the pool size of xanthophyll cycle pigments and in the content of UV-absorbing vacuolar compounds. In sun leaves of mature trees, which contained high levels of UV-absorbing compounds, effects of UV-B on PSII efficiency were observed in several cases and varied with developmental age and acclimation state of the leaves. The results show that natural UV-B and UV-A radiation in the tropics may significantly contribute to photoinhibition of PSII during sun exposure in situ, particularly in shade leaves exposed to full sunlight. PMID:10594122

  12. Solar radiation as a forest management tool: a primer of principles and application

    Treesearch

    Howard G. Halverson; James L. Smith

    1979-01-01

    Forests are products of solar radiation use. The sun also drives the hydrologic cycle on forested watersheds. Some basic concepts of climatology and solar radiation are summarized in including earth-sun relations, polar tilt, solar energy, terrestrial energy, energy balance, and local energy. An example shows how these principles can be applied in resource management....

  13. Slowly varying component of extreme ultraviolet solar radiation and its relation to solar radio radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. D.; Neupert, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the correlations between solar EUV line fluxes and solar radio fluxes has been carried out. A calibration for the Goddard Space Flight Center EUV spectrum is suggested. The results are used to obtain an equation for the absolute EUV flux for several lines in the 150- to 400-A region and the total flux of 81 intense lines in the region, the 2800-MHz radio flux being used as independent variable.

  14. Efficiency enhancement of perovskite solar cells using structural and morphological improvement of CH3NH3PbI3 absorber layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidaei, Maryam; Izadifard, Morteza; Ghazi, Mohammad E.; Ahmadi, Vahid

    2018-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells have been heavily investigated due to their unique properties such as high power conversion efficiency (PCE), low-cost fabrication by solution processes, high diffusion length, large absorption coefficient, and direct and tunable band gap. PCE of perovskite devices is strongly dependent on the absorber layer properties such as morphology, crystallinity, and compactness, which are required to be optimized. In this work, the CH3NH3PbI3 (170-480 nm) absorber layers with various methylammonium iodine (MAI) concentrations (7, 10, 20 and 40 mg ml-1) and perovskite solar cells with the fluorine-doped tin oxide (400 nm)/C-TiO2 (30 nm)/Meso-TiO2 (400 nm)/CH3NH3PbI3 (170-480 nm)/P3HT (30 nm)/Au (100 nm) structure were fabricated. A two-step solution process was used for deposition of the CH3NH3PbI3 absorber layers. The morphology, crystal structure, and optical properties of the perovskite layer grown on glass and also the photovoltaic properties of the fabricated solar cells were studied. The results obtained showed that by controlling the deposition conditions, due to the reduction in charge recombination, PCE enhancement of the perovskite solar cell (up to 11.6%) was accessible.

  15. Effect of solar radiation on severity of soybean rust.

    PubMed

    Young, Heather M; George, Sheeja; Narváez, Dario F; Srivastava, Pratibha; Schuerger, Andrew C; Wright, David L; Marois, James J

    2012-08-01

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a damaging fungal disease of soybean (Glycine max). Although solar radiation can reduce SBR urediniospore survival, limited information is available on how solar radiation affects SBR progress within soybean canopies. Such information can aid in developing accurate SBR prediction models. To manipulate light penetration into soybean canopies, structures of shade cloth attenuating 30, 40, and 60% sunlight were constructed over soybean plots. In each plot, weekly evaluations of severity in lower, middle, and upper canopies, and daily temperature and relative humidity were recorded. Final plant height and leaf area index were also recorded for each plot. The correlation between amount of epicuticular wax and susceptibility of leaves in the lower, middle, and upper canopies was assessed with a detached leaf assay. Final disease severity was 46 to 150% greater in the lower canopy of all plots and in the middle canopy of 40 and 60% shaded plots. While daytime temperature within the canopy of nonshaded soybean was greater than shaded soybean by 2 to 3°C, temperatures recorded throughout typical evenings and mornings of the growing season in all treatments were within the range (10 to 28.5°C) for SBR development as was relative humidity. This indicates temperature and relative humidity were not limiting factors in this experiment. Epicuticular wax and disease severity in detached leaf assays from the upper canopy had significant negative correlation (P = 0.009, R = -0.84) regardless of shade treatment. In laboratory experiments, increasing simulated total solar radiation (UVA, UVB, and PAR) from 0.15 to 11.66 MJ m(-2) increased mortality of urediniospores from 2 to 91%. Variability in disease development across canopy heights in early planted soybean may be attributed to the effects of solar radiation not only on urediniospore viability, but also on plant height, leaf area index, and epicuticular wax, which influence

  16. Inferring total canopy APAR from PAR bidirectional reflectances and vegetation indices in tallgrass prairie. [Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    The fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by a vegetated canopy (APARc) or landscape (APARs) is a critical parameter in climate processes. A grassland study examined: 1) whether APARs can be estimated from PAR bidirectional exitance fractions; and 2) whether APARs is correlated with spectral vegetation indices (SVIs). Data were acquired with a high resolution continuous spectroradiometer at 4 sun angles on grassland sites. APARs was computed from the scattered surface PAR exitance fractions. The nadir APARs value was the most variable diurnally; it provided a good estimate of the average surface APARs at 95 percent. APARc was best represented by exitance factors between 30-60* forward.

  17. Solar Radiation Pressure Binning for the Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.; Ghrist, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Orbital maintenance parameters for individual satellites or groups of satellites have traditionally been set by examining orbital parameters alone, such as through apogee and perigee height binning; this approach ignored the other factors that governed an individual satellite's susceptibility to non-conservative forces. In the atmospheric drag regime, this problem has been addressed by the introduction of the "energy dissipation rate," a quantity that represents the amount of energy being removed from the orbit; such an approach is able to consider both atmospheric density and satellite frontal area characteristics and thus serve as a mechanism for binning satellites of similar behavior. The geo-synchronous orbit (of broader definition than the geostationary orbit -- here taken to be from 1300 to 1800 minutes in orbital period) is not affected by drag; rather, its principal non-conservative force is that of solar radiation pressure -- the momentum imparted to the satellite by solar radiometric energy. While this perturbation is solved for as part of the orbit determination update, no binning or division scheme, analogous to the drag regime, has been developed for the geo-synchronous orbit. The present analysis has begun such an effort by examining the behavior of geosynchronous rocket bodies and non-stabilized payloads as a function of solar radiation pressure susceptibility. A preliminary examination of binning techniques used in the drag regime gives initial guidance regarding the criteria for useful bin divisions. Applying these criteria to the object type, solar radiation pressure, and resultant state vector accuracy for the analyzed dataset, a single division of "large" satellites into two bins for the purposes of setting related sensor tasking and orbit determination (OD) controls is suggested. When an accompanying analysis of high area-to-mass objects is complete, a full set of binning recommendations for the geosynchronous orbit will be available.

  18. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Gaidos, Eric; Kasting, James; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have started a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the influence of solar ultraviolet radiation on the atmosphere of of the early Earth. We plan to model the chemistry of the Earth atmosphere during its evolution, using observed UV flux distributions of early solar analogs as boundary conditions in photochemical models of the Earth's atmosphere. The study has four distinct but interlinked parts: (1) Establishing the radiation of the early Sun; (2) Determining the photochemistry of the early Earth's atmosphere; (3) Estimating the rates of H2 loss from the atmosphere; and (4) Ascertaining how sensitive is the photochemistry to the metallicity of the Sun. We are currently using STIS and EUVE to obtain high-quality far-UV and extreme-UV observations of three early-solar analogs. We will perform a detailed non-LTE study of each stars, and construct theoretical model photosphere, and an empirical model chromospheres, which can be used to extrapolate the continuum to the Lyman continuum region. Given a realistic flux distribution of the early Sun, we will perform photochemical modeling of weakly reducing primitive atmospheres to determine the lifetime and photochemistry of CH4. In particular, we will make estimates of the amount of CH4 present in the prebiotic atmosphere, and estimate the atmospheric CH4 concentration during the Late Archean (2.5-3.0 b.y. ago) and determine whether it would have been sufficiently abundant to help offset reduced solar luminosity at that time. Having obtained a photochemical model, we will solve for the concentrations of greenhouse gasses and important pre-biotic molecules, and perform a detailed radiative transfer calculations to compute the UV flux reaching the surface.

  19. Modeling the Interaction of Mineral Dust with Solar Radiation: Spherical versus Non-spherical Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshyaripour, A.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral dust, emitted from arid and semi-arid regions, is the most dominant atmospheric aerosol by mass. Beside detrimental effect on air quality, airborne dust also influences the atmospheric radiation by absorbing and scattering solar and terrestrial radiation. As a result, while the long-term radiative impacts of dust are important for climate, the short-term effects are significant for the photovoltaic energy production. Therefore, it is a vital requirement to accurately forecast the effects of dust on energy budget of the atmosphere and surface. To this end, a major issue is the fact that dust particles are non-spherical. Thus, the optical properties of such particles cannot be calculated precisely using the conventional methods like Mie theory that are often used in climate and numerical weather forecast models. In this study, T-Matrix method is employed, which is able to treat the non-sphericity of particles. Dust particles are assumed to be prolate spheroids with aspect ratio of 1.5 distributed in three lognormal modes. The wavelength-dependent refractive indices of dust are used in T-Matrix algorithm to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter and backscattering ratio at different wavelengths. These parameters are then implemented in ICON-ART model (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic model with Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) to conduct a global simulation with 80 km horizontal resolution and 90 vertical levels. April 2014 is selected as the simulation period during which North African dust plumes reached central Europe and Germany. Results show that treatment of non-sphericity reduces the dust AOD in the range of 10 to 30%/. The impacts on diffuse and direct radiation at global, regional and local scales show strong dependency on the size distribution of the airborne dust. The implications for modeling and remote sensing the dust impacts on solar energy are also discussed.

  20. Solar energy collector

    DOEpatents

    Brin, Raymond L.; Pace, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a solar energy collector comprising solar energy absorbing material within chamber having a transparent wall, solar energy being transmitted through the transparent wall, and efficiently absorbed by the absorbing material, for transfer to a heat transfer fluid. The solar energy absorbing material, of generally foraminous nature, absorbs and transmits the solar energy with improved efficiency.

  1. The effects of solar radiation on plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agard, Joslyn

    1995-01-01

    This phase of this continuing project was completed in April, 1994, using Dahlgren #855 hybrid sunflower seeds and Park Seeds #0950 non-hybrid sunflower seeds in both the control groups and the tests groups. The control groups (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6) were grown under normal, un-radiated, conditions. The tests groups (1a, 2a, 3a, 4a, 5a, and 6a) were grown onboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on the STS-60 flight in February 1994. All data from this experiment (both control and test groups) will be taken and recorded in a data log and compared against each other to determine the radiation effects of solar radiation on plant germination and growth.

  2. Optically pumped carbon dioxide laser mixtures. [using solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yesil, O.; Christiansen, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    This work explores the concept of blackbody radiation pumping of CO2 gas as a step toward utilization of solar radiation as a pumping source for laser action. To demonstrate this concept, an experiment was performed in which laser gas mixtures were exposed to 1500 K thermal radiation for brief periods of time. A gain of 2.8 x 10 to the -3rd reciprocal centimeters has been measured at 10.6 microns in a CO2-He gas mixture of 1 Torr pressure. A simple analytical model is used to describe the rate of change of energy of the vibrational modes of CO2 and to predict the gain. Agreement between the prediction and experiment is good.

  3. Image dissector photocathode solar damage test program. [solar radiation shielding using a fast optical lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Image dissector sensors of the same type which will be used in the NASA shuttle star tracker were used in a series of tests directed towards obtaining solar radiation/time damage criteria. Data were evaluated to determine the predicted level of operability of the star tracker if tube damage became a reality. During the test series a technique for reducing the solar damage effect was conceived and verified. The damage concepts are outlined and the test methods and data obtained which were used for verification of the technique's feasibility are presented. The ability to operate an image dissector sensor with the solar image focussed on the photocathode by a fast optical lens under certain conditions is feasible and the elimination of a mechanical protection device is possible.

  4. Efficient Broadband Terahertz Radiation Detectors Based on Bolometers with a Thin Metal Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dem'yanenko, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    The matrix method has been used to calculate the coefficients of absorption of terahertz radiation in conventional (with radiation incident from vacuum adjacent to the bolometer) and inverted (with radiation incident from the substrate on which the bolometer was fabricated) bolometric structures. Near-unity absorption coefficients were obtained when an additional cavity in the form of a gap between the bolometer and the input or output window was introduced. Conventional bolometers then became narrowband, while inverted-type devices remained broadband.

  5. Absorbed radiation dose in adults from iodine-131 and iodine-123 orthoiodohippurate and technetium-99m DTPA renography

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsen, O.

    1988-03-01

    A mathematic model for evaluation of absorbed dose in radionuclide renography has been developed and programmed for automatic calculation in the computer. Input data to the model are readily available from the results of the renography and, hence, the method described is suitable for individual dose determinations in adults. Apart from the situation with very considerable outflow obstructions (/sup 131/I)OIH single probe renography involves a 15-20 times smaller dose to radiation sensitive organs than (/sup 123/I)OIH gamma camera renography. Further, the latter examination results in a 2-10 times smaller dose than (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA gamma camera renography under normal outflow conditions.more » Absorbed renal dose is large, approximately 70 mGy, in the three renographies in the borderline case with total outflow obstructions. For comparison, i.v. pyelography, which is the x-ray examination often used instead of radionuclide renography, involves an absorbed dose to ovaries 10-1000 times larger than in radionuclide renography« less

  6. The Investigation of Property of Radiation and Absorbed of Infrared Lights of the Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Bo; Xiao, He-Lan; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2010-04-01

    The properties of absorption of infrared light for collagen, hemoglobin, bivine serum albumen (BSA) protein molecules with α- helix structure and water in the living systems as well as the infrared transmission spectra for person’s skins and finger hands of human body in the region of 400-4000 cm-1 (i.e., wavelengths of 2-20 μm) have been collected and determined by using a Nicolet Nexus 670 FT-IR Spectrometer, a Perkin Elmer GX FT-IR spectrometer, an OMA (optical multichannel analysis) and an infrared probe systems, respectively. The experimental results obtained show that the protein molecules and water can all absorb the infrared lights in the ranges of 600-1900 cm-1 and 2900-3900 cm-l, but their properties of absorption are somewhat different due to distinctions of their structure and conformation and molecular weight. We know from the transmission spectra of person’s finger hands and skin that the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm can not only transmit over the person’s skin and finger hands, but also be absorbed by the above proteins and water in the living systems. Thus, we can conclude from this study that the human beings and animals can absorb the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm.

  7. Radiation Belt Transport Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mueller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The creation of the Earth's outer zone radiation belts is attributed to earthward transport and adiabatic acceleration of electrons by drift-resonant interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations in the magnetosphere. Three types of radial transport driven by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations that have been identified are: (1) radial diffusion [Falthammer, 1965], (2) significant changes in the phase space density radial profile due to a single or few ULF drift-resonant interactions [Ukhorskiy et al., 2006; Degeling et al., 2008], and (3) shock associated injections of radiation belt electrons occurring in less than a drift period [Li et al., 1993]. A progress report will be given on work to fully characterize different forms of radial transport and their effect on the Earth's radiation belts. The work is being carried out by computing test-particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields from a simple analytic ULF field model and from global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. Degeling, A. W., L. G. Ozeke, R. Rankin, I. R. Mann, and K. Kabin (2008), Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves, textit{J. Geophys. Res., 113}, A02208, doi:10.1029/2007JA012411. Fälthammar, C.-G. (1965), Effects of Time-Dependent Electric Fields on Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, J. Geophys. Res., 70(11), 2503-2516, doi:10.1029/JZ070i011p02503. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 20}(22), 2423-2426, doi:10.1029/93GL02701. Ukhorskiy, A. Y., B. J. Anderson, K. Takahashi, and N. A. Tsyganenko (2006), Impact of ULF oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the outer radiation belt electrons, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 33}(6), L06111, doi:10.1029/2005GL024380.

  8. Preface: Solar energetic particles, solar modulation and space radiation: New opportunities in the AMS-02 Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindi, Veronica

    2017-08-01

    Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) acceleration at high energies and their propagation through the heliosphere and into the magnetosphere are not well understood and are still a matter of debate. Our understanding of solar modulation and transport of different species of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) inside the heliosphere has been significantly improved; however, a lot of work still needs to be done. GCR and SEPs pose a significant radiation risk for people and technology in space, and thus it is becoming increasingly important to understand the space radiation environment. AMS-02 will provide brand new information with unprecedented statistics about GCR and SEPs. Both GCR and heliophysics experiments will contribute to the increased understanding of acceleration physics, and transport of particles in space with improved models. This will inevitably lead to better predictions of space weather and safer operations in space.

  9. [Comparison of three daily global solar radiation models].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ming; Fan, Wen-Yi; Zhao, Ying-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Three daily global solar radiation estimation models ( Å-P model, Thornton-Running model and model provided by Liu Ke-qun et al.) were analyzed and compared using data of 13 weather stations from 1982 to 2012 from three northeastern provinces and eastern Inner Mongolia. After cross-validation analysis, the result showed that mean absolute error (MAE) for each model was 1.71, 2.83 and 1.68 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1) respectively, showing that Å-P model and model provided by Liu Ke-qun et al. which used percentage of sunshine had an advantage over Thornton-Running model which didn't use percentage of sunshine. Model provided by Liu Ke-qun et al. played a good effect on the situation of non-sunshine, and its MAE and bias percentage were 18.5% and 33.8% smaller than those of Å-P model, respectively. High precision results could be obtained by using the simple linear model of Å-P. Å-P model, Thornton-Running model and model provided by Liu Ke-qun et al. overvalued daily global solar radiation by 12.2%, 19.2% and 9.9% respectively. MAE for each station varied little with the spatial change of location, and annual MAE decreased with the advance of years. The reason for this might be that the change of observation accuracy caused by the replacement of radiation instrument in 1993. MAEs for rainy days, non-sunshine days and warm seasons of the three models were greater than those for days without rain, sunshine days and cold seasons respectively, showing that different methods should be used for different weather conditions on estimating solar radiation with meteorological elements.

  10. Decadal Variability of Surface Incident Solar Radiation over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaicun

    2015-04-01

    Observations have reported a widespread dimming of surface incident solar radiation (Rs) from the 1950s to the 1980s and a brightening afterwards. However, none of the state-of-the-art earth system models, including those from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5), could successfully reproduce the dimming/brightening rates over China. This study provides metadata and reference data to investigate the observed variability of Rs in China. From 1958 to 1990, diffuse solar radiation (Rsdif) and direct solar radiation (Rsdir) was measured separately in China, from which Rs was calculated a sum. However, pyranometers used to measure Rsdif had a strong sensitivity drift problem, which introduced a spurious decreasing trend to Rsdif and Rs measurements. The observed Rsdir did not suffer from such sensitivity drift problem. From 1990 to 1993, the old instruments were replaced and measuring stations were relocated in China, which introduced an abrupt increase in the observed Rs. After 1993, Rs was measured by solid black thermopile pyranometers. Comprehensive comparisons between observation-based and model-based Rs performed in this research have shown that sunshine duration (SunDu)-derived Rs is of high quality and provide accurate estimate of decadal variability of Rs over China. SunDu-derived Rs averaged over 105 stations in China decreased at -2.9 W m-2 per decade from 1961 to 1990 and remained stable afterward. This decadal variability has been confirmed by the observed Rsdir, independent studies on aerosols and diurnal temperature range, and can be reproduced by certain high-quality earth system models. However, neither satellite retrievals (the Global Energy and Water Exchanges Project Surface Radiation Budget (GEWEX SRB)) nor reanalyses (ERA-Interim and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA)) can accurately reproduce such decadal variability of Rs over China for their exclusion of annual variability of tropospheric

  11. Advances in Radiation-Tolerant Solar Arrays for SEP Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark J.; Eskenazi, Michael I.; Ferguson, Dale C.

    2007-01-01

    As the power levels of commercial communications satellites reach the 20 kWe and higher, new options begin to emerge for transferring the satellite from LEO to GEO. In the past electric propulsion has been demonstrated successfully for this mission - albeit under unfortunate circumstances when the kick motor failed. The unexpected use of propellant for the electric propulsion (EP) system compromised the life of that vehicle, but did demonstrate the viability of such an approach. Replacing the kick motor on a satellite and replacing that mass by additional propellant for the EP system as well as mass for additional revenue-producing transponders should lead to major benefits for the provider. Of course this approach requires that the loss in solar array power during transit of the Van Allen radiation belts is not excessive and still enables the 15 to 20 year mission life. In addition, SEP missions to Jupiter, with its exceptional radiation belts, would mandate a radiation-resistant solar array to compete with a radioisotope alternative. Several critical issues emerge as potential barriers to this approach: reducing solar array radiation damage, operating the array at high voltage (>300 V) for extended times for Hall or ion thrusters, designing an array that will be resistant to micrometeoroid impacts and the differing environmental conditions as the vehicle travels from LEO to GEO (or at Jupiter), producing an array that is light weight to preserve payload mass fraction - and to do this at a cost that is lower than today's arrays. This paper will describe progress made to date on achieving an array that meets all these requirements and is also useful for deep space electric propulsion missions.

  12. Development of gridded solar radiation data over Belgium based on Meteosat and in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journée, Michel; Vanderveken, Gilles; Bertrand, Cédric

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge on solar resources is highly important for all forms of solar energy applications. With the recent development in solar-based technologies national meteorological services are faced with increasing demands for high-quality and reliable site-time specific solar resource information. Traditionally, solar radiation is observed by means of networks of meteorological stations. Costs for installation and maintenance of such networks are very high and national networks comprise only few stations. Consequently the availability of ground-based solar radiation measurements has proven to be spatially and temporally inadequate for many applications. To overcome such a limitation, a major effort has been undertaken at the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMI) to provide the solar energy industry, the electricity sector, governments, and renewable energy organizations and institutions with the most suitable and accurate information on the solar radiation resources at the Earth's surface over the Belgian territory. Only space-based observations can deliver a global coverage of the solar irradiation impinging on horizontal surface at the ground level. Because only geostationary data allow to capture the diurnal cycle of the solar irradiance at the Earth's surface, a method that combines information from Meteosat Second Generation satellites and ground-measurement has been implemented at RMI to generate high resolution solar products over Belgium on an operational basis. Besides these new products, the annual and seasonal variability of solar energy resource was evaluated, solar radiation climate zones were defined and the recent trend in solar radiation was characterized.

  13. Impact of buildings on surface solar radiation over urban Beijing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Gu, Yu

    The rugged surface of an urban area due to varying buildings can interact with solar beams and affect both the magnitude and spatiotemporal distribution of surface solar fluxes. Here we systematically examine the impact of buildings on downward surface solar fluxes over urban Beijing by using a 3-D radiation parameterization that accounts for 3-D building structures vs. the conventional plane-parallel scheme. We find that the resulting downward surface solar flux deviations between the 3-D and the plane-parallel schemes are generally ±1–10 W m -2 at 800 m grid resolution and within ±1 W m -2 at 4 km resolution. Pairsmore » of positive–negative flux deviations on different sides of buildings are resolved at 800 m resolution, while they offset each other at 4 km resolution. Flux deviations from the unobstructed horizontal surface at 4 km resolution are positive around noon but negative in the early morning and late afternoon. The corresponding deviations at 800 m resolution, in contrast, show diurnal variations that are strongly dependent on the location of the grids relative to the buildings. Both the magnitude and spatiotemporal variations of flux deviations are largely dominated by the direct flux. Furthermore, we find that flux deviations can potentially be an order of magnitude larger by using a finer grid resolution. Atmospheric aerosols can reduce the magnitude of downward surface solar flux deviations by 10–65 %, while the surface albedo generally has a rather moderate impact on flux deviations. The results imply that the effect of buildings on downward surface solar fluxes may not be critically significant in mesoscale atmospheric models with a grid resolution of 4 km or coarser. However, the effect can play a crucial role in meso-urban atmospheric models as well as microscale urban dispersion models with resolutions of 1 m to 1 km.« less

  14. Solar and Net Radiation for Estimating Potential Evaporation from Three Vegetation Canopies

    Treesearch

    D.M. Amatya; R.W. Skaggs; G.W. Cheschier; G.P. Fernandez

    2000-01-01

    Solar and net radiation data are frequent/y used in estimating potential evaporation (PE) from various vegetative surfaces needed for water balance and hydrologic modeling studies. Weather parameters such as air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, and net radiation have been continuously monitored using automated sensors to estimate PE for...

  15. Radiation transfer in plant canopies - Scattering of solar radiation and canopy reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verstraete, Michel M.

    1988-01-01

    The one-dimensional vertical model of radiation transfer in a plant canopy described by Verstraete (1987) is extended to account for the transfer of diffuse radiation. This improved model computes the absorption and scattering of both visible and near-infrared radiation in a multilayer canopy as a function of solar position and leaf orientation distribution. Multiple scattering is allowed, and the spectral reflectance of the vegetation stand is predicted. The results of the model are compared to those of other models and actual observations.

  16. Electron Radiation Damage of (alga) As-gaas Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R.; Kamath, G. S.; Knechtli, R.

    1979-01-01

    Solar cells (2 cm by 2 cm (AlGa) As-GaAs cells) were fabricated and then subjected to irradiation at normal incidence by electrons. The influence of junction depth and n-type buffer layer doping level on the cell's resistance to radiation damage was investigated. The study shows that (1) a 0.3 micrometer deep junction results in lower damage to the cells than does a 0.5 micrometer junction, and (2) lowering the n buffer layer doping density does not improve the radiation resistance of the cell. Rather, lowering the doping density decreases the solar cell's open circuit voltage. Some preliminary thermal annealing experiments in vacuum were performed on the (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells damaged by 1-MeV electron irradiation. The results show that cell performance can be expected to partially recover at 200 C with more rapid and complete recovery occurring at higher temperature. For a 0.5hr anneal at 400 C, 90% of the initial power is recovered. The characteristics of the (AlGa)As-GaAs cells both before and after irradiation are described.

  17. BOREAS HYD-3 Subcanopy Incoming Solar Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Janet P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Davis, Robert E.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-3 team collected several data sets related to the hydrology of forested areas. This data set contains solar radiation measurements from several pyranometers (solar radiometers) placed on the snow surface in jack pine (1994) and black spruce and aspen forests (1996) in the BOREAS southern study area (SSA). An array of radiometers was used to collect data for three to four consecutive days in each forest type to study the hypothesis that energy transfer and snow water equivalent would vary spatially as a function of canopy closure. The quality of the data is good, because the days were generally clear and the radiometers were checked daily to remove anything that landed on the radiometers. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The subcanopy incoming solar radiation measurement data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. Time evolution of photon-pulse propagation in scattering and absorbing media: The dynamic radiative transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakopoulos, A.; Politopoulos, K.; Georgiou, E.

    2018-03-01

    A new dynamic-system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on first-hand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix, which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material-volume of interest. The new system state is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix-vector multiplication for each subsequent time step. DRTS is capable of calculating accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. The flexibility of DRTS allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and refraction in a unified and consistent way. Various examples of DRTS simulation results are presented for ultra-fast light pulse 3-D propagation, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods.

  19. Multidecadal variations of solar radiation reaching the surface and the role of aerosol direct radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, M.; Diehl, T. L.; Bian, H.; Yu, H.; Kucsera, T. L.; Wild, M., Sr.; Hakuba, M. Z.; Qian, Y.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Pinker, R. T.; Zhang, Y.; Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Kinne, S.; Streets, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Incoming solar radiation drives the Earth's climate system. Long-term surface observations of the solar radiation reaching the surface (RSFC) have shown decreasing or increasing trends, often referred to as solar "dimming" or "brightening", in many regions of the world in the past several decades. Such long-term variation of RSFC mostly reflects the change of the solar-attenuation components within the atmosphere. Anthropogenic emissions of aerosols and precursor gases have changed significantly in the past decades with 50-80% reduction in North America and Europe but an increase of similar magnitude in East and South Asia since 1980, mirroring the change in RSFC over those regions. This has led to suggestions that aerosols play a critical role in determining RSFC trends. This work is to assess the role of direct radiative effects of aerosols on the solar "dimming" and "brightening" trends with modeling studies. First, we will show the trends of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol surface concentrations in different regions from 1980 to 2009 with remote sensing and in-situ data as well as model simulations, and attribute those changes to anthropogenic or natural sources. We will then show the trends of RSFC from the model and compare the results with observations from the surface networks and satellite-based products. Furthermore, we will use the GOCART model to attribute the "dimming/ brightening" trends to the changes of aerosols through the direct radiative effects. Finally, we will discuss the way forward to understand the aerosol effects on RSFC (as well as on other climate variables) through aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions.

  20. Relationship between open-circuit voltage in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cell and peak position of (220/204) preferred orientation near its absorber surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantana, J.; Watanabe, T.; Teraji, S.; Kawamura, K.; Minemoto, T.

    2013-11-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) absorbers with various Ga/III, Ga/(In+Ga), profiles are prepared by the so-called "multi-layer precursor method" using multi-layer co-evaporation of material sources. It is revealed that open-circuit voltage (VOC) of CIGS solar cell is primarily dependent on averaged Ga/III near the surface of its absorber. This averaged Ga/III is well predicted by peak position of (220/204) preferred orientation of CIGS film near its surface investigated by glancing-incidence X-ray diffraction with 0.1° incident angle. Finally, the peak position of (220/204) preferred orientation is proposed as a measure of VOC before solar cell fabrication.

  1. Studies of the Solar Radiations' Influence About Geomembranes Used in Ecological Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiluta, Petre; Cofaru, Ileana Ioana; Cofaru, Nicolae Florin; Popa, Dragos Laurentiu

    2017-12-01

    The study shown in this paper presents the behavior of geomembranes used at the ecological landfills. The influences of the solar radiations has a great importance regarding the correct mounting of the geomembranes. The mathematical model developed for the determination anytime and anywhere in the world for the next values and parameters: apparent solar time, solar declination, solar altitude, solar azimuth and incidence angle, zone angle, angle of sun elevation, solar declination, solar constant, solar flux density, diffuse solar radiation, global radiation, soil albedo, total radiant flux density and relational links of these values. The results of this model was used for creations an AutoCAD subroutines useful for choosing the correct time for correct mounting anywhere of the geomembranes

  2. Impacts of wind stilling on solar radiation variability in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Changgui; Yang, Kun; Huang, Jianping; Tang, Wenjun; Qin, Jun; Niu, Xiaolei; Chen, Yingying; Chen, Deliang; Lu, Ning; Fu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Solar dimming and wind stilling (slowdown) are two outstanding climate changes occurred in China over the last four decades. The wind stilling may have suppressed the dispersion of aerosols and amplified the impact of aerosol emission on solar dimming. However, there is a lack of long-term aerosol monitoring and associated study in China to confirm this hypothesis. Here, long-term meteorological data at weather stations combined with short-term aerosol data were used to assess this hypothesis. It was found that surface solar radiation (SSR) decreased considerably with wind stilling in heavily polluted regions at a daily scale, indicating that wind stilling can considerably amplify the aerosol extinction effect on SSR. A threshold value of 3.5 m/s for wind speed is required to effectively reduce aerosols concentration. From this SSR dependence on wind speed, we further derived proxies to quantify aerosol emission and wind stilling amplification effects on SSR variations at a decadal scale. The results show that aerosol emission accounted for approximately 20% of the typical solar dimming in China, which was amplified by approximately 20% by wind stilling. PMID:26463748

  3. Radiation transfer in plant canopies - Transmission of direct solar radiation and the role of leaf orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verstraete, Michel M.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the details of the interaction between the radiation field and plant structures is important climatically because of the influence of vegetation on the surface water and energy balance, but also biologically, since solar radiation provides the energy necessary for photosynthesis. The problem is complex because of the extreme variety of vegetation forms in space and time, as well as within and across plant species. This one-dimensional vertical multilayer model describes the transfer of direct solar radiation through a leaf canopy, accounting explicitly for the vertical inhomogeneities of a plant stand and leaf orientation, as well as heliotropic plant behavior. This model reproduces observational results on homogeneous canopies, but it is also well adapted to describe vertically inhomogeneous canopies. Some of the implications of leaf orientation and plant structure as far as light collection is concerned are briefly reviewed.

  4. The role of solar UV radiation in the ecology of alpine lakes.

    PubMed

    Sommaruga, R

    2001-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 290-400 nm) is a crucial environmental factor in alpine lakes because of the natural increase of the UVR flux with elevation and the high water transparency of these ecosystems. The ecological importance of UVR, however, has only recently been recognized. This review, examines the general features of alpine lakes regarding UVR, summarizes what is known about the role of solar UVR in the ecology of alpine lakes, and identifies future research directions. Unlike the pattern observed in most lowland lakes, variability of UV attenuation in alpine lakes is poorly explained by differences in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, and depends mainly on optical characteristics (absorption) of the chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Within the water column of lakes with low DOC concentrations (0.2-0.4 mg l(-1)), UV attenuation is influenced by phytoplankton whose development at depth (i.e. the deep chlorophyll maximum) causes important changes in UV attenuation. Alpine aquatic organisms have developed a number of strategies to minimize UV damage. The widespread synthesis or bioaccumulation of different compounds that directly or indirectly absorb UV energy is one such strategy. Although most benthic and planktonic primary producers and crustacean zooplankton are well adapted to high intensities of solar radiation, heterotrophic protists, bacteria, and viruses seem to be particularly sensitive to UVR. Understanding the overall impact of UVR on alpine lakes would need to consider synergistic and antagonistic processes resulting from the pronounced climatic warming, which have the potential to modify the UV underwater climate and consequently the stress on aquatic organisms.

  5. A Proposal for a Thesaurus for Web Services in Solar Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gschwind, Benoit; Menard, Lionel; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Metadata are necessary to discover, describe and exchange any type of information, resource and service at a large scale. A significant amount of effort has been made in the field of geography and environment to establish standards. Efforts still remain to address more specific domains such as renewable energies. This communication focuses on solar energy and more specifically on aspects in solar radiation that relate to geography and meteorology. A thesaurus in solar radiation is proposed for the keys elements in solar radiation namely time, space and radiation types. The importance of time-series in solar radiation is outlined and attributes of the key elements are discussed. An XML schema for encoding metadata is proposed. The exploitation of such a schema in web services is discussed. This proposal is a first attempt at establishing a thesaurus for describing data and applications in solar radiation.

  6. Radiative transfer of X-rays in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of resonance scattering of X-ray emission lines in the solar corona is investigated. For the resonance lines of some helium-like ions, significant optical depths are reached over distances small compared with the size of typical coronal features. A general integral equation for the transfer of resonance-line radiation under solar coronal conditions is derived. This expression is in a form useful for modeling the complex three-dimensional temperature and density structure of coronal active regions. The transfer equation is then cast in a form illustrating the terms which give rise to the attenuation or enhancement of the resonance-line intensity. The source function for helium-like oxygen (O VII) under coronal conditions is computed and discussed in terms of the relative importance of scattering.

  7. Solar Extreme UV radiation and quark nugget dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2017-10-01

    We advocate the idea that the surprising emission of extreme ultra violet (EUV) radiation and soft x-rays from the Sun are powered externally by incident dark matter (DM) particles. The energy and the spectral shape of this otherwise unexpected solar irradiation is estimated within the quark nugget dark matter model. This model was originally invented as a natural explanation of the observed ratio Ωdark ~ Ωvisible when the DM and visible matter densities assume the same order of magnitude values. This generic consequence of the model is a result of the common origin of both types of matter which are formed during the same QCD transition and both proportional to the same fundamental dimensional parameter ΛQCD. We also present arguments suggesting that the transient brightening-like "nanoflares" in the Sun may be related to the annihilation events which inevitably occur in the solar atmosphere within this dark matter scenario.

  8. The Homogeneity of the Potsdam Solar Radiation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, K.

    2009-04-01

    At Meteorological Station in Potsdam (Germany) the measurement of sunshine duration started already in 1983. Later on, in 1937 the registration of global, diffuse and direct solar radiation was begun with pyranometers and a pyrheliometer. Since 1983 sunshine duration has been measured with the same method, the Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder, at the same site, while the measurements of solar radiation changed as well as in equipment, measurement methods and location. Furthermore, it was firstly necessary to supplement some missing data within the time series and secondly, it was desirable to extend the series of global radiation by regression with the sunshine duration backward to 1893. Because solar radiation, especially global radiation, is one of the most important quantities for climate research, it is necessary to investigate the homogeneity of these time series. At first the history was studied and as much as possible information about all parameters, which could influence the data, were gathered. In a second step these metadata were reviewed critically followed by a discussion about the potential effects of local factors on the homogeneity of the data. In a first step of data rehabilitation the so-called engineering correction (data levelling to WRR and SI units) were made followed by the supplementation of gaps. Finally, for every month and the year the so generated time series of measured data (1937/2008) and the complete series, prolonged by regression and measurements (1893/2008), were tested on homogeneity with the following distribution-free tests: WILCOXON (U) test, MANN-KENDALL test and progressive analysis were used for the examination of the stability of the mean and the dispersion, while with the Wald-Wolfowitz test the first order autocorrelation was checked. These non-parametric test were used, because frequently radiation data do not fulfil the assumption of a GAUSSian or normal distribution. The investigations showed, that discontinuities

  9. Numerical model of solar dynamic radiator for parametric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    1989-01-01

    Growth power requirements for Space Station Freedom will be met through addition of 25 kW solar dynamic (SD) power modules. The SD module rejects waste heat from the power conversion cycle to space through a pumped-loop, multi-panel, deployable radiator. The baseline radiator configuration was defined during the Space Station conceptual design phase and is a function of the state point and heat rejection requirements of the power conversion unit. Requirements determined by the overall station design such as mass, system redundancy, micrometeoroid and space debris impact survivability, launch packaging, costs, and thermal and structural interaction with other station components have also been design drivers for the radiator configuration. Extensive thermal and power cycle modeling capabilities have been developed which are powerful tools in Station design and analysis, but which prove cumbersome and costly for simple component preliminary design studies. In order to aid in refining the SD radiator to the mature design stage, a simple and flexible numerical model was developed. The model simulates heat transfer and fluid flow performance of the radiator and calculates area mass and impact survivability for many combinations of flow tube and panel configurations, fluid and material properties, and environmental and cycle variations. A brief description and discussion of the numerical model, it's capabilities and limitations, and results of the parametric studies performed is presented.

  10. Near-Field Thermal Radiation for Solar Thermophotovoltaics and High Temperature Thermal Logic and Memory Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzouka, Mahmoud

    This dissertation investigates Near-Field Thermal Radiation (NFTR) applied to MEMS-based concentrated solar thermophotovoltaics (STPV) energy conversion and thermal memory and logics. NFTR is the exchange of thermal radiation energy at nano/microscale; when separation between the hot and cold objects is less than dominant radiation wavelength (˜1 mum). NFTR is particularly of interest to the above applications due to its high rate of energy transfer, exceeding the blackbody limit by orders of magnitude, and its strong dependence on separation gap size, surface nano/microstructure and material properties. Concentrated STPV system converts solar radiation to electricity using heat as an intermediary through a thermally coupled absorber/emitter, which causes STPV to have one of the highest solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency limits (85.4%). Modeling of a near-field concentrated STPV microsystem is carried out to investigate the use of STPV based solid-state energy conversion as high power density MEMS power generator. Numerical results for In 0.18Ga0.82Sb PV cell illuminated with tungsten emitter showed significant enhancement in energy transfer, resulting in output power densities as high as 60 W/cm2; 30 times higher than the equivalent far-field power density. On thermal computing, this dissertation demonstrates near-field heat transfer enabled high temperature NanoThermoMechanical memory and logics. Unlike electronics, NanoThermoMechanical memory and logic devices use heat instead of electricity to record and process data; hence they can operate in harsh environments where electronics typically fail. NanoThermoMechanical devices achieve memory and thermal rectification functions through the coupling of near-field thermal radiation and thermal expansion in microstructures, resulting in nonlinear heat transfer between two temperature terminals. Numerical modeling of a conceptual NanoThermoMechanical is carried out; results include the dynamic response under

  11. Solar Radiation Patterns and Glaciers in the Western Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobreva, I. D.; Bishop, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier dynamics in the Himalaya are poorly understood, in part due to variations in topography and climate. It is well known that solar radiation is the dominant surface-energy component governing ablation, although the spatio-temporal patterns of surface irradiance have not been thoroughly investigated given modeling limitations and topographic variations including altitude, relief, and topographic shielding. Glaciation and topographic conditions may greatly influence supraglacial characteristics and glacial dynamics. Consequently, our research objectives were to develop a GIS-based solar radiation model that accounts for Earth's orbital, spectral, atmospheric and topographic dependencies, in order to examine the spatio-temporal surface irradiance patterns on glaciers in the western Himalaya. We specifically compared irradiance patterns to supraglacial characteristics and ice-flow velocity fields. Shuttle Radar Mapping Mission (SRTM) 90 m data were used to compute geomorphometric parameters that were input into the solar radiation model. Simulations results for 2013 were produced for the summer ablation season. Direct irradiance, diffuse-skylight, and total irradiance variations were compared and related to glacier altitude profiles of ice velocity and land-surface topographic parameters. Velocity and surface information were derived from analyses of ASTER satellite data. Results indicate that the direct irradiance significantly varies across the surface of glaciers given local topography and meso-scale relief conditions. Furthermore, the magnitude of the diffuse-skylight irradiance varies with altitude and as a result, glaciers in different topographic settings receive different amounts of surface irradiance. Spatio-temporal irradiance patterns appear to be related to glacier surface conditions including supraglacial lakes, and are spatially coincident with ice-flow velocity conditions on some glaciers. Collectively, our results demonstrate that glacier

  12. Highly Physical Solar Radiation Pressure Modeling During Penumbra Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Robert V.

    Solar radiation pressure (SRP) is one of the major non-gravitational forces acting on spacecraft. Acceleration by radiation pressure depends on the radiation flux; on spacecraft shape, attitude, and mass; and on the optical properties of the spacecraft surfaces. Precise modeling of SRP is needed for dynamic satellite orbit determination, space mission design and control, and processing of data from space-based science instruments. During Earth penumbra transitions, sunlight is passing through Earth's lower atmosphere and, in the process, its path, intensity, spectral composition, and shape are significantly affected. This dissertation presents a new method for highly physical SRP modeling in Earth's penumbra called Solar radiation pressure with Oblateness and Lower Atmospheric Absorption, Refraction, and Scattering (SOLAARS). The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. This dissertation aims to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects due to solar radiation passing through the troposphere and stratosphere are modeled, and the results are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. SOLAARS includes new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. A new approach to modeling the influence of Earth's polar flattening draws on past work to provide a relatively simple but accurate method for this important effect. Previous penumbra SRP models tend to lie at two extremes of complexity and computational cost, and so the significant improvement in accuracy provided by the complex

  13. Light-absorbing carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbonaceous aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and can directly affect Earth’s climate by absorbing and scattering incoming solar radiation. Both field and laboratory measurements have confirmed that biomass burning (BB) is an important primary source of light absorbing o...

  14. Mathematical Modeling and Numerical Analysis of Thermal Distribution in Arch Dams considering Solar Radiation Effect

    PubMed Central

    Mirzabozorg, H.; Hariri-Ardebili, M. A.; Shirkhan, M.; Seyed-Kolbadi, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on thermal distribution in thin high arch dams is investigated. The differential equation governing thermal behavior of mass concrete in three-dimensional space is solved applying appropriate boundary conditions. Solar radiation is implemented considering the dam face direction relative to the sun, the slop relative to horizon, the region cloud cover, and the surrounding topography. It has been observed that solar radiation changes the surface temperature drastically and leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. Solar radiation effects should be considered in thermal transient analysis of thin arch dams. PMID:24695817

  15. Determination of incoming solar radiation in major tree species in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Osman Yalcin; Sevgi, Orhan; Koc, Ayhan

    2012-07-01

    Light requirements and spatial distribution of major forest tree species in Turkey hasn't been analyzed yet. Continuous surface solar radiation data, especially at mountainous-forested areas, are needed to put forward this relationship between forest tree species and solar radiation. To achieve this, GIS-based modeling of solar radiation is one of the methods used in rangelands to estimate continuous surface solar radiation. Therefore, mean monthly and annual total global solar radiation maps of whole Turkey were computed spatially using GRASS GIS software "r.sun" model under clear-sky (cloudless) conditions. 147498 pure forest stand point-based data were used in the study for calculating mean global solar radiation values of all the major forest tree species of Turkey. Beech had the lowest annual mean total global solar radiation value of 1654.87 kWh m(-2), whereas juniper had the highest value of 1928.89 kWh m(-2). The rank order of tree species according to the mean monthly and annual total global solar radiation values, using a confidence level of p < 0.05, was as follows: Beech < Spruce < Fir species < Oak species < Scotch pine < Red pine < Cedar < Juniper. The monthly and annual solar radiation values of sites and light requirements of forest trees ranked similarly.

  16. Mathematical modeling and numerical analysis of thermal distribution in arch dams considering solar radiation effect.

    PubMed

    Mirzabozorg, H; Hariri-Ardebili, M A; Shirkhan, M; Seyed-Kolbadi, S M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on thermal distribution in thin high arch dams is investigated. The differential equation governing thermal behavior of mass concrete in three-dimensional space is solved applying appropriate boundary conditions. Solar radiation is implemented considering the dam face direction relative to the sun, the slop relative to horizon, the region cloud cover, and the surrounding topography. It has been observed that solar radiation changes the surface temperature drastically and leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. Solar radiation effects should be considered in thermal transient analysis of thin arch dams.

  17. Radiative recombination and photon recycling in gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstrom, M. S.; Melloch, M. R.; Lush, G. B.; Patkar, M. P.; Young, M.; Durbin, S. M.; Gray, J. L.; MacMillan, H. F.; Keyes, B. M.; Levi, D. H.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.

    1992-12-01

    This talk reviews experimental work to develop a detailed understanding of radiative recombination in n-GaAs. Photoluminescence decay studies of minority carrier lifetimes versus doping in n-GaAs are presented. We show that when the substrate is removed by etching, photon recycling is enhanced, and lifetimes increase by nearly a factor of 10. The doping-dependent absorption coefficient is measured, and detailed balance arguments are used to relate absorption and recombination. Modeling surfaces, verified by comparison with experiments, are used to examine the effects of recycling in conventional solar cells and to explore new design options.

  18. Annealing of radiation damage in low resistivity silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.

    1980-01-01

    The reduction of the temperatures required to restore cell performance after irradiation was investigated with emphasis on the annealing characteristics of two groups of cells containing different amounts of oxygen and carbon. Examination of defect behavior in irradiated boron doped silicon leads to the tentative conclusion that further reduction in annealing temperature could be achieved by decreasing the carbon concentration and either neutralizing the divacancy and/or minimizing its formation as a result of irradiation. A significant reduction in the temperature required to remove radiation induced degradation in 0.1 ohm centimeter silicon solar cells was achieved.

  19. Solar Cycle Variation and Application to the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Shinn, Judy L.; Tai, Hsiang; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Badhwar, Gautam D.; Badavi, Francis F.; Atwell, William

    1999-01-01

    The interplanetary plasma and fields are affected by the degree of disturbance that is related to the number and types of sunspots in the solar surface. Sunspot observations were improved with the introduction of the telescope in the seventeenth century, allowing observations which cover many centuries. A single quantity (sunspot number) was defined by Wolf in 1848 that is now known to be well correlated with many space observable quantities and is used herein to represent variations caused in the space radiation environment. The resultant environmental models are intended for future aircraft and space-travel-related exposure estimates.

  20. A possible radiation-resistant solar cell geometry using superlattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, C.; Clark, R.; Brinker, D.

    1985-01-01

    A solar cell structure is proposed which uses a GaAs nipi doping superlattice. An important feature of this structure is that photogenerated minority carriers are very quickly collected in a time shorter than bulk lifetime in the fairly heavily doped n and p layers and these carriers are then transported parallel to the superlattice layers to selective ohmic contacts. Assuming that these already-separated carriers have very long recombination lifetimes, due to their across an indirect bandgap in real space, it is argued that the proposed structure may exhibit superior radiation tolerance along with reasonably high beginning-of-life efficiency.

  1. Evaluation of different models to estimate the global solar radiation on inclined surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demain, C.; Journée, M.; Bertrand, C.

    2012-04-01

    Global and diffuse solar radiation intensities are, in general, measured on horizontal surfaces, whereas stationary solar conversion systems (both flat plate solar collector and solar photovoltaic) are mounted on inclined surface to maximize the amount of solar radiation incident on the collector surface. Consequently, the solar radiation incident measured on a tilted surface has to be determined by converting solar radiation from horizontal surface to tilted surface of interest. This study evaluates the performance of 14 models transposing 10 minutes, hourly and daily diffuse solar irradiation from horizontal to inclined surface. Solar radiation data from 8 months (April to November 2011) which include diverse atmospheric conditions and solar altitudes, measured on the roof of the radiation tower of the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium in Uccle (Longitude 4.35°, Latitude 50.79°) were used for validation purposes. The individual model performance is assessed by an inter-comparison between the calculated and measured solar global radiation on the south-oriented surface tilted at 50.79° using statistical methods. The relative performance of the different models under different sky conditions has been studied. Comparison of the statistical errors between the different radiation models in function of the clearness index shows that some models perform better under one type of sky condition. Putting together different models acting under different sky conditions can lead to a diminution of the statistical error between global measured solar radiation and global estimated solar radiation. As models described in this paper have been developed for hourly data inputs, statistical error indexes are minimum for hourly data and increase for 10 minutes and one day frequency data.

  2. Radiation effects in silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells using isotropic and normally incident radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Several types of silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells were irradiated with protons with energies between 50 keV and 10 MeV at both normal and isotropic incidence. Damage coefficients for maximum power relative to 10 MeV were derived for these cells for both cases of omni-directional and normal incidence. The damage coefficients for the silicon cells were found to be somewhat lower than those quoted in the Solar Cell Radiation Handbook. These values were used to compute omni-directional damage coefficients suitable for solar cells protected by coverglasses of practical thickness, which in turn were used to compute solar cell degradation in two proton-dominated orbits. In spite of the difference in the low energy proton damage coefficients, the difference between the handbook prediction and the prediction using the newly derived values was negligible. Damage coefficients for GaAs solar cells for short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and maximum power were also computed relative to 10 MeV protons. They were used to predict cell degradation in the same two orbits and in a 5600 nmi orbit. Results show the performance of the GaAs solar cells in these orbits to be superior to that of the Si cells.

  3. Impact of Solar Radiation on Gene Expression in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms often regulate their gene expression at the level of transcription and/or translation in response to solar radiation. In this review, we present the use of both transcriptomics and proteomics to advance knowledge in the field of bacterial response to damaging radiation. Those studies pertain to diverse application areas such as fundamental microbiology, water treatment, microbial ecology and astrobiology. Even though it has been demonstrated that mRNA abundance is not always consistent with the protein regulation, we present here an exhaustive review on how bacteria regulate their gene expression at both transcription and translation levels to enable biomarkers identification and comparison of gene regulation from one bacterial species to another. PMID:28250399

  4. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life On Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lanz, T.; Hubeny, I.; Gaidos, E.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have embarked on a program aimed at understanding the atmosphere of the early Earth, because of its importance as a greenhouse, radiation shield and energy source for life. Here, we give a progress report on the first phase of this program to establish the UV radiation from the early Sun. We have obtained ultraviolet spectra (STIS, FUSE, EUVE) of carefully selected nearby, young solar-type stars, which act as surrogates for the early Sun We are making detailed non-LTE analyses of the spectra and constructing models of their photospheres + chromospheres. Once validated, these models will allow us to extrapolate our theoretical spectra to other metallicities and to unobserved spectral regions.

  5. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.; Gaidos, E.; Hubeny, I.; Lanz, T. M.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have embarked on a program aimed at understanding the atmosphere of the early Earth, because of its importance as a greenhouse, radiation shield, and energy source for life. Here, we give a progress report on the first phase of this program: to establish the UV radiation from the early Sun. We are presently obtaining ultraviolet spectra (STIS, FUSE, EUVE) of carefully selected nearby, young solar-type stars, which act as surrogates for the early Sun. We are currently making detailed non-LTE analyses of the spectra and constructing models of their photospheres + chromospheres. once validated, these models will allow us to extrapolate our theoretical spectra to unobserved spectral regions, and to proceed to the next step: to develop photochemical models of the pre-biotic and Archean atmosphere of the Earth.

  6. A Changing Arctic Sea Ice Cover and the Partitioning of Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovich, D. K.; Light, B.; Polashenski, C.; Nghiem, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    Certain recent changes in the Arctic sea ice cover are well established. There has been a reduction in sea ice extent, an overall thinning of the ice cover, reduced prevalence of perennial ice with accompanying increases in seasonal ice, and a lengthening of the summer melt season. Here we explore the effects of these changes on the partitioning of solar energy between reflection to the atmosphere, absorption within the ice, and transmission to the ocean. The physical changes in the ice cover result in less light reflected and more light absorbed in the ice and transmitted to the ocean. These changes directly affect the heat and mass balance of the ice as well as the amount of light available for photosynthesis within and beneath the ice cover. The central driver is that seasonal ice covers tend to have lower albedo than perennial ice throughout the melt season, permitting more light to penetrate into the ice and ocean. The enhanced light penetration increases the amount of internal melting of the ice and the heat content of the upper ocean. The physical changes in the ice cover mentioned above have affected both the amount and the timing of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) transmitted into the ice and ocean, increasing transmitted PAR, particularly in the spring. A comparison of the partitioning of solar irradiance and PAR for both historical and recent ice conditions will be presented.

  7. Correlation between the physical parameters of the i-nc-Si absorber layer grown by 27.12 MHz plasma with the nc-Si solar cell parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debajyoti; Mondal, Praloy

    2017-09-01

    Growth of highly conducting nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) thin films of optimum crystalline volume fraction, involving dominant <220> crystallographic preferred orientation with simultaneous low fraction of microstructures at a low substrate temperature and high growth rate, is a challenging task for its promising utilization in nc-Si solar cells. Utilizing enhanced electron density and superior ion flux densities of the high frequency (∼27.12 MHz) SiH4 plasma, improved nc-Si films have been produced by simple optimization of H2-dilution, controlling the ion damage and enhancing supply of atomic-hydrogen onto the growing surface. Single junction nc-Si p-i-n solar cells have been prepared with i-nc-Si absorber layer and optimized. The physical parameters of the absorber layer have been systematically correlated to variations of the solar cell parameters. The preferred <220> alignment of crystallites, its contribution to the low recombination losses for conduction of charge carriers along the vertical direction, its spectroscopic correlation with the dominant growth of ultra-nanocrystalline silicon (unc-Si) component and corresponding longer wavelength absorption, especially in the neighborhood of i/n-interface region recognize scientific and technological key issues that pave the ground for imminent advancement of multi-junction silicon solar cells.

  8. Observed Reduction In Surface Solar Radiation - Aerosol Forcing Versus Cloud Feedback?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepert, B.

    The solar radiation reaching the ground is a key parameter for the climate system. It drives the hydrological cycle and numerous biological processes. Surface solar radi- ation revealed an estimated 7W/m2 or 4% decline at sites worldwide from 1961 to 1990. The strongest decline occurred at the United States sites with 19W/m2 or 10%. Increasing air pollution and hence direct and indirect aerosol effect, as we know today can only explain part of the reduction in solar radiation. Increasing cloud optical thick- ness - possibly due to global warming - is a more likely explanation for the observed reduction in solar radiation in the United States. The analysis of surface solar radiation data will be shown and compared with GCM results of the direct and indirect aerosol effect. It will be argued that the residual declines in surface solar radiation is likely due to cloud feedback.

  9. Absorption of visible radiation in atmosphere containing mixtures of absorbing and nonabsorbing particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, T. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1981-01-01

    The presence of a strongly absorbing material, tentatively identified as graphitic carbon, or 'soot', is indicated by measurements of single-scattering albedo of tropospheric aerosols. Although theoretical calculations based on models of the ways in which soot may mix with other aerosol materials yield the single-scattering albedo values of 0.6, accounted for by a minimum 20% soot by volume, in urban regions and 0.8, yielded by 1-5% soot by volume, in rural settings, it is found that these same values can be produced by similar amounts of the iron oxide magnetite. Magnetite is shown to be indistinguishable from soot by optical measurements performed on bulk samples, and calculation of various mixtures of soot indicate the difficulty of determining aerosol composition by optical scattering techniques.

  10. Atmospheric Sensitivity to Spectral Top-of-Atmosphere Solar Irradiance Perturbations, Using MODTRAN-5 Radiative Transfer Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Berk, A.; Harder, G.; Fontenla, J.; Shettle, E.; Pilewski, P.; Kindel, B.; Chetwynd, J.; Gardner, J.; Hoke, M.; Jordan, A.; Lockwood, R.; Felde, G.; Archarya, P.

    2006-12-01

    expected to be very small in visible wavelengths, although absolute power is substantial. SORCE's Spectral Irradiance Monitor measurements are readily included in comparative MOD5 calculations. (2) The embedded solar irradiance within MOD5 must be compatible with the chosen band model resolution binning. By matching resolutions some issues related to the correlated-k band model parameterizations can be tested. Two high resolution solar irradiances, the MOD5 default irradiance (Kurucz) and a new compilation associated with Solar Radiation Physical Modeling project (Fontenla), are compared to address the potential impact of discrepancies between any sets of irradiances. The magnitude of solar variability, as measured and calculated, can lead to subtle changes in heating/cooling rates throughout the atmosphere, as a function of altitude and wavelength. By holding chemical & dynamical responses constant, only controlled distributions of absorbing gases, aerosols and clouds will contribute to observed 1st order radiative effects.

  11. Rapid modulation of ultraviolet shielding in plants is influenced by solar ultraviolet radiation and linked to alterations in flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul W; Tobler, Mark A; Keefover-Ring, Ken; Flint, Stephan D; Barkley, Anne E; Ryel, Ronald J; Lindroth, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and related phenylpropanoids) and the resultant decrease in epidermal UV transmittance (TUV ) are primary protective mechanisms employed by plants against potentially damaging solar UV radiation and are critical components of the overall acclimation response of plants to changing solar UV environments. Whether plants can adjust this UV sunscreen protection in response to rapid changes in UV, as occurs on a diurnal basis, is largely unexplored. Here, we use a combination of approaches to demonstrate that plants can modulate their UV-screening properties within minutes to hours, and these changes are driven, in part, by UV radiation. For the cultivated species Abelmoschus esculentus, large (30-50%) and reversible changes in TUV occurred on a diurnal basis, and these adjustments were associated with changes in the concentrations of whole-leaf UV-absorbing compounds and several quercetin glycosides. Similar results were found for two other species (Vicia faba and Solanum lycopersicum), but no such changes were detected in Zea mays. These findings reveal a much more dynamic UV-protection mechanism than previously recognized, raise important questions concerning the costs and benefits of UV-protection strategies in plants and have practical implications for employing UV to enhance crop vigor and quality in controlled environments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Prediction of the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays and radiation dose of aircrews up to the solar cycle 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, S.; Kataoka, R.; Sato, T.

    2016-12-01

    The solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), which is the variation of the terrestrial GCR flux caused by the heliospheric environmental change, is basically anti-correlated with the solar activity with so-called 11-year periodicity. In the current weak solar cycle 24, we expect that the flux of GCRs is getting higher than that in the previous solar cycles, leading to the increase in the radiation exposure in the space and atmosphere. In order to quantitatively evaluate the possible solar modulation of GCRs and resultant radiation exposure at flight altitude during the solar cycles 24, 25, and 26, we have developed the time-dependent and three-dimensional model of the solar modulation of GCRs. Our model can give the flux of GCRs anywhere in the heliosphere by assuming the variation of the solar wind velocity, the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field, and its tilt angle. We solve the curvature and gradient drift motion of GCRs in the heliospheric magnetic field, and therefore reproduce the 22-year variation of the solar modulation of GCRs. It is quantitatively confirmed that our model reproduces the energy spectra observed by BESS and PAMELA. We then calculate the variation of the GCR energy spectra during the solar cycles 24, 25, and 26, by extrapolating the solar wind parameters and tilt angle. We also calculate the neutron monitor counting rate and the radiation dose of aircrews at flight altitude, by the air-shower simulation performed by PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System). In this presentation, we report the quantitative forecast values of the solar modulation of GCRs, neutron monitor counting rate, and the radiation dose at flight altitude up to the cycle 26, including the discussion of the charge sign dependence on those results.

  13. Natural Antioxidants: Multiple Mechanisms to Protect Skin From Solar Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Dunaway, Spencer; Odin, Rachel; Zhou, Linli; Ji, Liyuan; Zhang, Yuhang; Kadekaro, Ana L.

    2018-01-01

    Human skin exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) results in a dramatic increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The sudden increase in ROS shifts the natural balance toward a pro-oxidative state, resulting in oxidative stress. The detrimental effects of oxidative stress occur through multiple mechanisms that involve alterations to proteins and lipids, induction of inflammation, immunosuppression, DNA damage, and activation of signaling pathways that affect gene transcription, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis. All of these alterations promote carcinogenesis and therefore, regulation of ROS levels is critical to the maintenance of normal skin homeostasis. Several botanical products have been found to exhibit potent antioxidant capacity and the ability to counteract UV-induced insults to the skin. These natural products exert their beneficial effects through multiple pathways, including some known to be negatively affected by solar UVR. Aging of the skin is also accelerated by UVR exposure, in particular UVA rays that penetrate deep into the epidermis and the dermis where it causes the degradation of collagen and elastin fibers via oxidative stress and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Because natural compounds are capable of attenuating some of the UV-induced aging effects in the skin, increased attention has been generated in the area of cosmetic sciences. The focus of this review is to cover the most prominent phytoproducts with potential to mitigate the deleterious effects of solar UVR and suitability for use in topical application. PMID:29740318

  14. Effects of solar radiation on the orbits of small particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A modification of the Robertson (1937) equations of particle motion in the presence of solar radiation is developed which allows for partial reflection of sunlight as a result of rapid and varying particle rotations caused by interaction with the solar wind. The coefficients and forces in earlier forms of the equations are compared with those in the present equations, and secular rates of change of particle orbital elements are determined. Orbital dimensions are calculated in terms of time, probable sizes and densities of meteoric and cometary particles are estimated, and times of infall to the sun are computed for a particle moving in an almost circular orbit and a particle moving in an elliptical orbit of high eccentricity. Changes in orbital elements are also determined for particles from a long-period sun-grazing comet. The results show that the time of infall to the sun from a highly eccentric orbit is substantially shorter than from a circular orbit with a radius equal to the mean distance in the eccentric orbit. The possibility is considered that the free orbital kinetic energy of particles drawn into the sun may be the energy source for the solar corona.

  15. Short-range solar radiation forecasts over Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landelius, Tomas; Lindskog, Magnus; Körnich, Heiner; Andersson, Sandra

    2018-04-01

    In this article the performance for short-range solar radiation forecasts by the global deterministic and ensemble models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is compared with an ensemble of the regional mesoscale model HARMONIE-AROME used by the national meteorological services in Sweden, Norway and Finland. Note however that only the control members and the ensemble means are included in the comparison. The models resolution differs considerably with 18 km for the ECMWF ensemble, 9 km for the ECMWF deterministic model, and 2.5 km for the HARMONIE-AROME ensemble. The models share the same radiation code. It turns out that they all underestimate systematically the Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) for clear-sky conditions. Except for this shortcoming, the HARMONIE-AROME ensemble model shows the best agreement with the distribution of observed Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and DNI values. During mid-day the HARMONIE-AROME ensemble mean performs best. The control member of the HARMONIE-AROME ensemble also scores better than the global deterministic ECMWF model. This is an interesting result since mesoscale models have so far not shown good results when compared to the ECMWF models. Three days with clear, mixed and cloudy skies are used to illustrate the possible added value of a probabilistic forecast. It is shown that in these cases the mesoscale ensemble could provide decision support to a grid operator in terms of forecasts of both the amount of solar power and its probabilities.

  16. A solar radiation model for use in climate studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1992-01-01

    A solar radiation routine is developed for use in climate studies that includes absorption and scattering due to ozone, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide, clouds, and aerosols. Rayleigh scattering is also included. Broadband parameterization is used to compute the absorption by water vapor in a clear atmosphere, and the k-distribution method is applied to compute fluxes in a scattering atmosphere. The reflectivity and transmissivity of a scattering layer are computed analytically using the delta-four-stream discrete-ordinate approximation. The two-stream adding method is then applied to compute fluxes for a composite of clear and scattering layers. Compared to the results of high spectral resolution and detailed multiple-scattering calculations, fluxes and heating rate are accurately computed to within a few percent. The high accuracy of the flux and heating-rate calculations is achieved with a reasonable amount of computing time. With the UV and visible region grouped into four bands, this solar radiation routine is useful not only for climate studies but also for studies on photolysis in the upper atmosphere and photosynthesis in the biosphere.

  17. Evidence for a Solar Influence on Gamma Radiation from Radon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Steinitz, G.; Fischbach, E.; Javorsek, D.; Jenkins, J.

    2012-12-01

    We have analyzed 29,000 measurements of gamma radiation associated with the decay of radon confined to an airtight vessel at the Geological Survey of Israel (GSI) Laboratory in Jerusalem between January 28 2007 and May 10 2010. These measurements exhibit strong variations in time of year and time of day, which may be due in part to environmental influences. However, time-series analysis reveals a number of strong periodicities, including two at approximately 11.2 year-1 and 12.5 year-1. We consider it significant that these same oscillations have previously been detected in nuclear-decay data acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Physiklisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. We have suggested that these oscillations are due to some form of solar radiation (possibly neutrinos) that has its origin in the deep solar interior. A curious property of the GSI data is that the annual oscillation is much stronger in daytime data than in nighttime data, but the opposite is true for all other oscillations. Time-frequency analysis also yields quite different results from daytime and nighttime data. These procedures have also been applied to data collected from subsurface geological sites in Israel, Tenerife, and Italy, which have a variety of geological and geophysical scenarios, different elevations, and depths below the surface ranging from several meters to 1000 meters. In view of these results, and in view of the fact that there is at present no clear understanding of the behavior of radon in its natural environment, there would appear to be a need for multi-disciplinary research. Investigations that clarify the nature and mechanisms of solar influences may help clarify the nature and mechanisms of geological influences.

  18. Validation of a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining the absorbed and effective radiation doses in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Manninen, A-L; Kotiaho, A; Nikkinen, J; Nieminen, M T

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to validate a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining absorbed and effective doses (EDs) in the dose and energy range used in diagnostic radiology. Energy dependence, dose linearity and repeatability of the dosemeter were examined. The absorbed doses (ADs) were compared at anterior-posterior projection and the EDs were determined at posterior-anterior, anterior-posterior and lateral projections of thoracic imaging using an anthropomorphic phantom. The radiation exposures were made using digital radiography systems. This study revealed that the MOSFET system with high sensitivity bias supply set-up is sufficiently accurate for AD and ED determination. The dosemeter is recommended to be calibrated for energies <60 and >80 kVp. The entrance skin dose level should be at least 5 mGy to minimise the deviation of the individual dosemeter dose. For ED determination, dosemeters should be implanted perpendicular to the surface of the phantom to prevent the angular dependence error. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Implementation of street trees within the solar radiative exchange parameterization of TEB in SURFEX v8.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redon, Emilie C.; Lemonsu, Aude; Masson, Valéry; Morille, Benjamin; Musy, Marjorie

    2017-01-01

    The Town Energy Balance (TEB) model has been refined and improved in order to explicitly represent street trees and their impacts on radiative transfer: a new vegetated stratum on the vertical plane, which can shade the road, the walls, and the low vegetation has been added. This modification led to more complex radiative calculations, but has been done with a concern to preserve a certain level of simplicity and to limit the number of new input parameters for TEB to the cover fraction of trees, the mean height of trunks and trees, their specific leaf area index, and albedo. Indeed, the model is designed to be run over whole cities, for which it can simulate the local climatic variability related to urban landscape heterogeneity at the neighborhood scale. This means that computing times must be acceptable, and that input urban data must be available or easy to define. This simplified characterization of high vegetation necessarily induces some uncertainties in terms of the solar radiative exchanges, as quantified by comparison of TEB with a high-spatial-resolution solar enlightenment model (SOLENE). On the basis of an idealized geometry of an urban canyon with various vegetation layouts, TEB is evaluated regarding the total shortwave radiation flux absorbed by the elements that compose the canyon. TEB simulations in summer gathered best scores for all configurations and surfaces considered, which is precisely the most relevant season to assess the cooling effect of deciduous trees under temperate climate. Mean absolute differences and biases of 6.03 and +3.50 W m-2 for road, respectively, and of 3.38 and +2.80 W m-2 for walls have been recorded in vegetationless canyons. In view of the important incident radiation flux, exceeding 1000 W m-2 at solar noon, the mean absolute percentage differences of 3 % for both surfaces remain moderate. Concerning the vegetated canyons, we noted a high variability of statistical scores depending on the vegetation layout. The

  20. The Effects of an Absorbing Smoke Layer on MODIS Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Optical Property Retrievals and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Clouds, aerosols, and their interactions are widely considered to be key uncertainty components in our current understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and radiation budget. The work presented here is focused on the quasi-permanent marine boundary layer . (MBL) clouds off the southern Atlantic coast of Africa and the effects on MODIS cloud optical property retrievals (MOD06) of an overlying absorbing smoke layer. During much of August and September, a persistent smoke layer resides over this region, produced from extensive biomass burning throughout the southern African savanna. The resulting absorption, which increases with decreasing wavelength, potentially introduces biases into the MODIS cloud optical property retrievals of the underlying MBL clouds. This effect is more pronounced in the cloud optical thickness retrievals, which over ocean are derived from the wavelength channel centered near 0.86 micron (effective particle size retrievals are derived from the longer-wavelength near-IR channels at 1.6, 2.1, and 3.7 microns). Here, the spatial distributions of the scalar statistics of both the cloud and aerosol layers are first determined from the CALIOP 5 km layer products. Next, the MOD06 look-up tables (LUTs) are adjusted by inserting an absorbing smoke layer of varying optical thickness over the cloud. Retrievals are subsequently performed for a subset of MODIS pixels collocated with the CALIOP ground track, using smoke optical thickness from the CALIOP 5km aerosol layer product to select the appropriate LUT. The resulting differences in cloud optical property retrievals due to the inclusion of the smoke layer in the LUTs will be examined. In addition, the direct radiative forcing of this smoke layer will be investigated from the perspective of the cloud optical property retrieval differences.

  1. Biophysical properties affecting vegetative canopy reflectance and absorbed photosynthetically active radiation at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, E. A.; Blad, B. L.; Hays, C. J.; Mesarch, M. A.; Deering, D. W.; Middleton, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    Leaves of the dominant grass species of the ISCLP FIFE site reflect and transmit radiation in a like manner to other healthy green leaves. Visible reflectance factors (RFs) and transmittance factors (TFs) were less for older leaves than younger leaves except during senescence, when RF and TF values were greater. NIR-RF values increased and TF values decreased with leaf age, with the reverse occurring as the leaf went through senescence.

  2. Solar Radiation Measurements Onboard the Research Aircraft HALO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, I.; Bohn, B.; Werner, F.; Ehrlich, A.; Wendisch, M.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne measurements of the separated upward and downward components of solar spectral actinic flux densities for the determination of photolysis frequencies and of upward nadir spectral radiance were performed with the HALO Solar Radiation (HALO-SR) instrument package onboard the High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO). The instrumentation of HALO-SR is characterized and first measurement data from the Next-generation Aircraft Remote-Sensing for Validation Studies (NARVAL) campaigns in 2013 and 2014 are presented. The measured data are analyzed in the context of the retrieved microphysical and optical properties of clouds which were observed underneath the aircraft. Detailed angular sensitivities of the two optical actinic flux receivers were determined in the laboratory. The effects of deviations from the ideal response are investigated using radiative transfer calculations of atmospheric radiance distributions under various atmospheric conditions and different ground albedos. Corresponding correction factors are derived. Example photolysis frequencies are presented, which were sampled in the free troposphere and lower stratosphere over the Atlantic Ocean during the 2013/14 HALO NARVAL campaigns. Dependencies of photolysis frequencies on cloud cover, flight altitude and wavelength range of the photolysis process are investigated. Calculated actinic flux densities in the presence of clouds benefit from the measured spectral radiances. Retrieved cloud optical thicknesses and effective droplet radii are used as model input for the radiative transfer calculations. By comparison with the concurrent measurements of actinic flux densities the retrieval approach is validated. Acknowledgements: Funding by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within the priority program HALO (BO 1580/4-1, WE 1900/21-1) is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to 137Cs) dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  4. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to (137)Cs dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  5. Synergistic effect of solar radiation and solar heating to disinfect drinking water sources.

    PubMed

    Rijal, G K; Fujioka, R S

    2001-01-01

    Waterborne diseases are still common in developing countries as drinking water sources are contaminated and feasible means to reliably treat and disinfect these waters are not available. Many of these developing countries are in the tropical regions of the world where sunlight is plentiful. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combining solar radiation and solar heating to disinfect contaminated water using a modified Family Sol*Saver System (FSP). The non-UV transmittable cover sheet of the former FSP system was replaced with an UV transmittable plastic cover sheet to enable more wavelengths of sunlight to treat the water. Disinfection efficiency of both systems was evaluated based on reduction of the natural populations of faecal coliform, E. coli, enterococci, C. perfringens, total heterotrophic bacteria, hydrogen sulphide producing bacteria and FRNA virus. The results showed that under sunny and partly sunny conditions, water was heated to critical temperature (60 degrees C) in both the FSP systems inactivating more than 3 log (99.9%) of the concentrations of faecal coliform and E. coli to undetectable levels of < 1 CFU/100 mL within 2-5 h exposure to sunlight. However, under cloudy conditions, the two FSP systems did not reduce the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria to levels of < 1 CFU/100 mL. Nonetheless, sufficient evidence was obtained to show that UV radiation of sunlight plus heat worked synergistically to enhance the inactivation of faecal indicator bacteria. The relative log removal of indicator microorganism in the FSP treated water was total heterotrophic bacteria < C. perfringens < F RNA virus < enterococci < E. coli < faecal coliform. In summary, time of exposure to heat and radiation effects of sunlight were important in disinfecting water by solar units. The data indicated that direct radiation of sunlight worked synergistically with solar heating of the water to disinfect the water. Thus, effective

  6. Effects of Solar UV Radiation and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions...

  7. Investigation of the effect of weather conditions on solar radiation in Brunei Darussalam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, M. G.; Salam, M. A.; Rahman, Q. M.

    2016-11-01

    The amount of solar radiation received on the earth's surface is known to be highly influenced by the weather conditions and the geography of a particular area. This paper presents some results of an investigation that was carried out to find the effects of weather patterns on the solar radiation in Brunei Darussalam, a small country that experiences equatorial climate due to its geographical location. Weather data were collected at a suitable location in the University Brunei Darussalam (UBD) and were compared with the available data provided by the Brunei Darussalam Meteorological Services (BDMS). It has been found that the solar radiation is directly proportional to the atmospheric temperature while it is inversely proportional to the relative humidity. It has also been found that wind speed has little influence on solar radiation. Functional relationships between the solar radiation and the atmospheric temperature, and between the solar radiation and the relative humidity have also been developed from the BDMS weather data. Finally, an artificial neural network (ANN) model has been developed for training and testing the solar radiation data with the inputs of temperature and relative humidity, and a coefficient of determination of around 99% was achieved. This set of data containing all the aforementioned results may serve as a guideline on the solar radiation pattern in the geographical areas around the equator.

  8. Transmission components of solar radiation in pine stands in relation to climatic and stand variables

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Muller

    1971-01-01

    In a new approach, transmission was studied by relating to stand biomass the ratio of incoming solar radiation beneath tree crowns to that within the atmosphere. Several assumptions were used to estimate analytically the various ways in which solar radiation penetrates through crowns of three pine species in northern California. Sunflecks accounted for much of the...