Science.gov

Sample records for absorption 2pa cross-section

  1. Near-Infrared Emitting Squaraine Dyes with High 2PA Cross Sections for Multiphoton Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo-Yang; Yao, Sheng; Wang, Xuhua; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Designed to achieve high two-photon absorptivity, new near infrared (NIR) emitting squaraine dyes, (E)-2-(1-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl)-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-4-(1-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl)-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-2H-pyrrolium-2-ylidene)-3-oxocyclobut-1-enolate (1) and (Z)-2-(4-(dibutylamino)-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-(4-(dibutyliminio)-2-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienylidene)-3-oxocyclobut-1-enolate (2) were synthesized and characterized. Their linear photophysical properties were investigated via UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy in various solvents, while their nonlinear photophysical properties were investigated using a combination of two-photon induced fluorescence and open aperture z-scan methods. Squaraine 1 exhibited a high two-photon absorption (2PA) cross section2PA), ~ 20,000 GM at 800 nm, and high photostability with the photochemical decomposition quantum yield one order of magnitude lower than Cy 5, a commercially available pentamethine cyanine NIR dye. The cytotoxicity of the squaraine dyes were evaluated in HCT 116 and COS 7 cell lines to assess the potential of these probes for biomedical imaging. The viability of both cell lines was maintained above 80% at dye concentrations up to 30 μM, indicating good biocompatibility of the probes. Finally, one-photon fluorescence microscopy (1PFM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) imaging was accomplished after incubation of micelle-encapsulated squaraine probes with HCT 116 and COS 7 cells, demonstrating their potential in 2PFM bioimaging. PMID:22591003

  2. Photoelectric absorption cross sections with variable abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balucinska-Church, Monika; Mccammon, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Polynomial fit coefficients have been obtained for the energy dependences of the photoelectric absorption cross sections of 17 astrophysically important elements. These results allow the calculation of X-ray absorption in the energy range 0.03-10 keV in material with noncosmic abundances.

  3. New Parameterization of Neutron Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1997-01-01

    Recent parameterization of absorption cross sections for any system of charged ion collisions, including proton-nucleus collisions, is extended for neutron-nucleus collisions valid from approx. 1 MeV to a few GeV, thus providing a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for any system of collision pairs (charged or uncharged). The parameters are associated with the physics of the problem. At lower energies, optical potential at the surface is important, and the Pauli operator plays an increasingly important role at intermediate energies. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is better than earlier published results.

  4. Universal Parameterization of Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Our prior nuclear absorption cross sections model is extended for light systems (A less than or equal to 4) where either both projectile and target are light particles or one is a light particle and the other is a medium or heavy nucleus. The agreement with experiment is excellent for these cases as well. Present work in combination with our original model provides a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for light, medium, and heavy systems, a very valuable input for radiation protection studies.

  5. Infrared absorption cross sections of alternative CFCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clerbaux, Cathy; Colin, Reginald; Simon, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption cross sections have obtained in the infrared atmospheric window, between 600 and 1500 cm(exp -1), for 10 alternative hydrohalocarbons: HCFC-22, HCFC-123, HCFC-124, HCFC-141b, HCFC-142b, HCFC-225ca, HCFC-225cb, HFC-125, HFC-134a, and HFC-152a. The measurements were made at three temperatures (287K, 270K and 253K) with a Fourier transform spectrometer operating at 0.03 cm(exp -1) apodized resolution. Integrated cross sections are also derived for use in radiative models to calculate the global warming potentials.

  6. Tables of nuclear cross sections for galactic cosmic rays: Absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A simple but comprehensive theory of nuclear reactions is presented. Extensive tables of nucleon, deuteron, and heavy-ion absorption cross sections over a broad range of energies are generated for use in cosmic ray shielding studies. Numerous comparisons of the calculated values with available experimental data show agreement to within 3 percent for energies above 80 MeV/nucleon and within approximately 10 percent for energies as low as 30 MeV/nucleon. These tables represent the culmination of the development of the absorption cross section formalism and supersede the preliminary absorption cross sections published previously in NASA TN D-8107, NASA TP-2138, and NASA TM-84636.

  7. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  8. Universal Parameterization of Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a simple universal parameterization of total reaction cross sections for any system of colliding nuclei that is valid for the entire energy range from a few AMeV to a few AGeV. The universal picture presented here treats proton-nucleus collision as a special case of nucleus-nucleus collision, where the projectile has charge and mass number of one. The parameters are associated with the physics of the collision system. In general terms, Coulomb interaction modifies cross sections at lower energies, and the effects of Pauli blocking are important at higher energies. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is better than all earlier published results.

  9. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  10. Infrared absorption cross sections of propane broadened by hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, A.; Hargreaves, R. J.; Billinghurst, B.; Bernath, P. F.

    2017-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared absorption cross-sections of pure propane (C3H8) and propane broadened with H2 have been calculated from transmittance spectra recorded at temperatures from 292 K to 205 K. Transmittance spectra were recorded at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) Far-Infrared beamline, utilizing both the synchrotron source and the internal glowbar source. The absorption cross-sections have been calibrated to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) reference cross-sections of propane and can be used to interpret astronomical observations of giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn as well as exoplanets.

  11. Absorption Cross-Sections of Sodium Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Zeng-Shevan

    1985-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of sodium dimers were studied using a heat pipe over operating in the non-heat-pipe mode. Three wavelength regions were observed. They are in the red, the green-blue, and the near ultraviolet regions. The absorption cross section depends on the wavelength of the incident light. Representative peak values for the v"=0 progression in the red and green-blue regions are 2.59 A sup 2 (average value) and 11.77 A sup 2 (T sub ave=624 K). The value for the C greater than X transitions is several tenths A sup 2. The cross sections were measured from absorption spectra taken as a function of temperature.

  12. Ultraviolet absorption cross-sections of hot carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.; Davidson, David F.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2004-12-01

    The temperature-dependent ultraviolet absorption cross-section for CO 2 has been measured in shock-heated gases between 1500 and 4500 K at 216.5, 244, 266, and 306 nm. Continuous-wave lasers provide the spectral brightness to enable precise time-resolved measurements with the microsecond time-response needed to monitor thermal decomposition of CO 2 at temperatures above 3000 K. The photophysics of the highly temperature dependent cross-section is discussed. The new data allows the extension of CO 2 absorption-based temperature sensing methods to higher temperatures, such as those found in behind detonation waves.

  13. Hydrogen and Nitrogen Broadened Ethane and Propane Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Robert J.; Appadoo, Dominique; Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution infrared absorption cross sections are presented for the ν9 band of ethane (C2H6) at 823 cm-1. These cross sections make use of spectra recorded at the Australian Synchrotron using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with maximum resolution of 0.00096 cm-1. The spectra have been recorded at 150, 120 and 90 K for hydrogen and nitrogen broadened C2H6. They cover appropriate temperatures, pressures and broadening gases associated with the atmospheres of the Outer Planets and Titan, and will improve atmospheric retrievals. The THz/Far-IR beamline at the Australian Synchrotron is unique in combining a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer with an 'enclosive flow cooling' (EFC) cell designed to study molecules at low temperatures. The EFC cell is advantageous at temperatures for which the vapor pressure is very low, such as C2H6 at 90 K. Hydrogen broadened absorption cross sections of propane between 700 and 1200 cm-1 will also be presented based on spectra obtained at the Canadian Light Source.

  14. Absorptive coding metasurface for further radar cross section reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Sai; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Pang, Yongqiang; Feng, Mingde; Xu, Zhuo; Qu, Shaobo

    2018-02-01

    Lossless coding metasurfaces and metamaterial absorbers have been widely used for radar cross section (RCS) reduction and stealth applications, which merely depend on redirecting electromagnetic wave energy into various oblique angles or absorbing electromagnetic energy, respectively. Here, an absorptive coding metasurface capable of both the flexible manipulation of backward scattering and further wideband bistatic RCS reduction is proposed. The original idea is carried out by utilizing absorptive elements, such as metamaterial absorbers, to establish a coding metasurface. We establish an analytical connection between an arbitrary absorptive coding metasurface arrangement of both the amplitude and phase and its far-field pattern. Then, as an example, an absorptive coding metasurface is demonstrated as a nonperiodic metamaterial absorber, which indicates an expected better performance of RCS reduction than the traditional lossless coding metasurface and periodic metamaterial-absorber. Both theoretical analysis and full-wave simulation results show good accordance with the experiment.

  15. Measurement of Scattering and Absorption Cross Sections of Dyed Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalas, Adolfas K; Choquette, Steven; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of absorbance and fluorescence emission were carried out on aqueous suspensions of polystyrene (PS) microspheres with a diameter of 2.5 µm using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere detector. The apparatus and the principles of measurements were described in our earlier publications. Microspheres with and without green BODIPY@ dye were measured. Placing the suspension inside an integrating sphere (IS) detector of the spectrophotometer yielded (after a correction for fluorescence emission) the absorbance (called A in the text) due to absorption by BODIPY@ dye inside the microsphere. An estimate of the absorbance due to scattering alone was obtained by subtracting the corrected BODIPY@ dye absorbance (A) from the measured absorbance of a suspension placed outside the IS detector (called A1 in the text). The absorption of the BODIPY@ dye inside the microsphere was analyzed using an imaginary index of refraction parameterized with three Gaussian-Lorentz functions. The Kramer-Kronig relation was used to estimate the contribution of the BODIPY@ dye to the real part of the microsphere index of refraction. The complex index of refraction, obtained from the analysis of A, was used to analyze the absorbance due to scattering ((A1- A) in the text). In practice, the analysis of the scattering absorbance, A1-A, and the absorbance, A, was carried out in an iterative manner. It was assumed that A depended primarily on the imaginary part of the microsphere index of refraction with the other parameters playing a secondary role. Therefore A was first analyzed using values of the other parameters obtained from a fit to the absorbance due to scattering, A1-A, with the imaginary part neglected. The imaginary part obtained from the analysis of A was then used to reanalyze A1-A, and obtain better estimates of the other parameters. After a few iterations, consistent estimates were obtained of the scattering and absorption cross sections in the wavelength region 300

  16. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; ...

    2014-11-19

    Isoprene (C 5H 8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O 3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm -1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N 2) spectra were recorded atmore » 278, 298, and 323 K in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm -1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.« less

  17. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Sharpe, S. W.; Sams, R. L.; Johnson, T. J.

    2014-11-01

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600-6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298, and 323 K in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.

  18. Scattered light and accuracy of the cross-section measurements of weak absorptions: Gas and liquid phase UV absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, A.; Braun, W.; Kurylo, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2(HCFC-141b) were determined in the gas phase (190-260 nm) and liquid phase (230-260 mm) at 298 K. The liquid phase absorption cross sections were then converted into accurate gas phase values using a previously described procedure. It has been demonstrated that scattered light from the shorter-wavelength region (as little as several parts per thousand) can seriously compromise the absorption cross-section measurement, particularly at longer wavelengths where cross sections are low, and can be a source of discrepancies in the cross sections of weakly absorbing halocarbons reported in the literature. A modeling procedure was developed to assess the effect of scattered light on the measured absorption cross section in our experiments, thereby permitting appropriate corrections to be made on the experimental values. Modeled and experimental results were found to be in good agreement. Experimental results from this study were compared with other available determinations and provide accurate input for calculating the atmospheric lifetime of HCFC-141b.

  19. Temperature dependence of the ozone absorption cross section at the 253.7-nm mercury line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1987-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ozone absorption cross section at 253.7 nm has been measured between 195 and 351 K. The experimental technique employed circumvents the necessity to determine the absolute ozone concentration for each temperature measurement. Below 273 K the cross section increases approximately 0.6 percent, while toward higher temperatures the cross section decreases rapidly. In a comparison, good agreement with other recently made measurements is shown.

  20. Interstellar photoelectric absorption cross sections, 0.03-10 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R.; Mccammon, D.

    1983-01-01

    An effective absorption cross section per hydrogen atom has been calculated as a function of energy in the 0.03-10 keV range using the most recent atomic cross section and cosmic abundance data. Coefficients of a piecewise polynomial fit to the numerical results are given to allow convenient application in automated calculations.

  1. Target correlation effects on neutron-nucleus total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Second order optical model solutions to the elastic scattering amplitude were used to evaluate total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections for neutron nucleus scattering. Improved agreement with experimental data for total and absorption cross sections is found when compared with first order (coherent approximation) solutions, especially below several hundred MeV. At higher energies, the first and second order solutions are similar. There are also large differences in abrasion cross section calculations; these differences indicate a crucial role for cluster knockout in the abrasion step.

  2. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.

    2014-11-19

    The OH- and O 3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm -1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N 2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm -1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of sevenmore » pressures at each temperature.« less

  3. On the correlation of absorption cross-section with plasmonic color generation.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Soroosh Daqiqeh; Ho, Jinfa; Ng, Ray Jia Hong; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Yang, Joel K W

    2017-10-30

    Through numerical simulations, we investigate the correlation between the absorption cross-section and the color saturation of plasmonic nanostructures of varying density. Understanding this correlation, enables the prediction of an optimal nanostructure separation, or combinations of different nanostructure sizes for plasmonic color printing applications. Here, we use metal-insulator-metal (MIM) aluminum nanostructures that support gap-plasmons. Large absorption cross-sections were observed that exceed twelve times the physical cross-section of the nanostructure disks. We derive a set of equations to determine the optimal separation for a periodic array using the absorption cross-section of an individual structure to realize saturated colors. Using the optimum pitch and enabled by the large absorption cross-sections of our structures, we employ color mixing strategies to realize a wider color gamut. The simulated color gamut exceeds the sRGB gamut for some colors, and includes dark tones. Color mixing using structures with large absorption cross-sections is a practical approach to generate a broad range of colors, in comparison to fabricating structures with continuously varying sizes.

  4. Experimental determination of single CdSe nanowire absorption cross sections through photothermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Giblin, Jay; Syed, Muhammad; Banning, Michael T; Kuno, Masaru; Hartland, Greg

    2010-01-26

    Absorption cross sections ((sigma)abs) of single branched CdSe nanowires (NWs) have been measured by photothermal heterodyne imaging (PHI). Specifically, PHI signals from isolated gold nanoparticles (NPs) with known cross sections were compared to those of individual CdSe NWs excited at 532 nm. This allowed us to determine average NW absorption cross sections at 532 nm of (sigma)abs = (3.17 +/- 0.44) x 10(-11) cm2/microm (standard error reported). This agrees well with a theoretical value obtained using a classical electromagnetic analysis ((sigma)abs = 5.00 x 10(-11) cm2/microm) and also with prior ensemble estimates. Furthermore, NWs exhibit significant absorption polarization sensitivities consistent with prior NW excitation polarization anisotropy measurements. This has enabled additional estimates of the absorption cross section parallel ((sigma)abs) and perpendicular ((sigma)abs(perpendicular) to the NW growth axis, as well as the corresponding NW absorption anisotropy ((rho)abs). Resulting values of (sigma)abs = (5.6 +/- 1.1) x 10(-11) cm2/microm, (sigma)abs(perpendicular) = (1.26 +/- 0.21) x 10(-11) cm2/microm, and (rho)abs = 0.63+/- 0.04 (standard errors reported) are again in good agreement with theoretical predictions. These measurements all indicate sizable NW absorption cross sections and ultimately suggest the possibility of future direct single NW absorption studies.

  5. O2 absorption cross sections /187-225 nm/ from stratospheric solar flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Mentall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of molecular oxygen are calculated in the wavelength range from 187 to 230 nm from solar flux measurements obtained within the stratosphere. Within the Herzberg continuum wavelength region the molecular oxygen cross sections are found to be about 30% smaller than the laboratory results of Shardanand and Rao (1977) from 200 to 210 nm and about 50% smaller than those of Hasson and Nicholls (1971). At wavelengths longer than 210 nm the cross sections agree with those of Shardanand and Rao. The effective absorption cross sections of O2 in the Schumann-Runge band region from 187 to 200 nm are calculated and compared to the empirical fit given by Allen and Frederick (1982). The calculated cross sections indicate that the transmissivity of the atmosphere may be underestimated by the use of the Allen and Frederic cross sections between 195 and 200 nm. The ozone column content between 30 and 40 km and the relative ozone cross sections are determined from the same solar flux data set.

  6. Broadband two-photon absorption cross sections of benzothiazole derivatives and benzobisthiazolium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noskovičova, Eva; Lorenc, Dušan; Magdolen, Peter; Sigmundová, Ivica; Zahradník, Pavol; Velič, Dušan

    2018-05-01

    Two-photon absorption (TPA) cross sections of conjugated donor-π-acceptor dipolar structures containing benzothiazole or benzobisthiazolium moieties are determined in a broad spectral range from 700 nm to 1000 nm using two-photon induced fluorescence technique. The TPA cross section values range from 150 GM to 4600 GM. The largest values are observed in near-infrared region. The dipolar derivative of benzothiazole has the largest TPA cross section of 4600 GM at wavelength of 890 nm. A combination of the large TPA in the near-infrared region and the high emission quantum yield makes these compounds excellent candidates for two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

  7. Accurate universal parameterization of absorption cross sections III--light systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Our prior nuclear absorption cross sections model [R.K. Tripathi, F.A. Cucinotta, J.W. Wilson, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 117 (1996) 347; R.K. Tripathi, J.W. Wilson, F.A. Cucinotta, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 129 (1997) 11] is extended for light systems (A < or = 4) where either both projectile and target are light particles or one is light particle and the other is medium or heavy nucleus. The agreement with experiment is excellent for these cases as well. Present work in combination with our original model provides a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for light, medium and heavy systems. As a result the extended model can reliably be used in all studies where there is a need for absorption cross sections.

  8. Absorption cross sections of some atmospheric molecules for resonantly scattered O I 1304-A radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Absorption cross sections for O2, N2, CO2, CH4, N2O, and CO have been measured at each of the lines of the atomic oxygen triplet at 1302, 1305, and 1306 A. Radiation resonantly scattered from oxygen atoms at a temperature of about 300 K was used for the line source. Absorber temperatures were also near 300 K. Direct application of the Lambert-Beer absorption equation yielded pressure-dependent cross sections for carbon monoxide at each line of the O I triplet. Reasons for this apparent dependence are presented and discussed.

  9. Equality between gravitational and electromagnetic absorption cross sections of extreme Reissner-Nordstroem black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Crispino, Luis C. B.; Higuchi, Atsushi

    2011-10-15

    The absorption cross section of Reissner-Nordstroem black holes for the gravitational field is computed numerically, taking into account the coupling of the electromagnetic and gravitational perturbations. Our results are in excellent agreement with low- and high-frequency approximations. We find equality between gravitational and electromagnetic absorption cross sections of extreme Reissner-Nordstroem black holes for all frequencies, which we explain analytically. This gives the first example of objects in general relativity in four dimensions that absorb the electromagnetic and gravitational waves in exactly the same way.

  10. Infrared Absorption Cross Sections of Cold Propane in the Low Frequency Region Between 600 - 1300 \\wn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Andy; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2017-06-01

    Propane is one of several hydrocarbons present in the atmospheres of the Giant Planets, Jupiter and Saturn. In order to characterize the atmospheres of the Giant Planets, it is necessary to provide absorption cross sections which can be used to determine abundances. Absorption cross sections have been obtained from high resolution transmission spectra recorded at the Canadian Light Source Far Infrared beamline. The experimental conditions used mimic those of the atmospheres belonging to the Giant Planets using He and H_{2} as foreign broadeners.

  11. Helium broadened propane absorption cross sections in the far-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, A.; Billinghurst, B.; Bernath, P. F.

    2017-09-01

    Infrared absorption spectra for pure and He broadened propane have been recorded in the far-IR region (650-1300 cm-1) at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) facility using either the synchrotron or internal glowbar source depending on the required resolution. The measurements were made for 4 temperatures in the range 202-292 K and for 3 pressures of He broadening gas up to 100 Torr. Infrared absorption cross sections are derived from the spectra and the integrated cross sections are within 10 % of the corresponding values from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for all temperatures and pressures.

  12. Temperature- and pressure-dependent absorption cross sections of gaseous hydrocarbons at 3.39 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingbeil, A. E.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2006-07-01

    The pressure- and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of several neat hydrocarbons and multi-component fuels are measured using a 3.39 µm helium-neon laser. Absorption cross section measurements are reported for methane, ethylene, propane, n-heptane, iso-octane, n-decane, n-dodecane, JP-10, gasoline and jet-A with an estimated uncertainty of less than 3.5%. The experimental conditions range from 298 to 673 K and from 500 to 2000 Torr with nitrogen as the bath gas. An apparatus is designed to facilitate these measurements, and specific care is taken to ensure the compositional accuracy of the hydrocarbon/N2 mixtures. The absorption cross sections of the smallest hydrocarbons, methane and ethylene, vary with temperature and pressure. The cross sections of larger hydrocarbons show negligible dependence on pressure and only a weak dependence on temperature. The reported data increase the range of conditions and the number of hydrocarbons for which cross section measurements are available at the HeNe laser wavelength.

  13. Energy-absorption capability and scalability of square cross section composite tube specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy square cross section tubes to study the influence of specimen geometry on the energy-absorption capability and scalability of composite materials. The tube inside width-to-wall thickness (W/t) ratio was determined to significantly affect the energy-absorption capability of composite materials. As W/t ratio decreases, the energy-absorption capability increases nonlinearly. The energy-absorption capability of Kevlar epoxy tubes was found to be geometrically scalable, but the energy-absorption capability of graphite/epoxy tubes was not geometrically scalable.

  14. Thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross section measurement (theory, experiment and results) for small environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Czubek, J.A.; Drozdowicz, K.; Gabanska, B.

    Czubek`s method of measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross section of small samples has been developed at the Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics in Krakow, Poland. Theoretical principles of the method have been elaborated in the one-velocity diffusion approach in which the thermal neutron parameters used have been averaged over a modified Maxwellian. In consecutive measurements the investigated sample is enveloped in shells of a known moderator of varying thickness and irradiated with a pulsed beam of fast neutrons. The neutrons are slowed-down in the system and a die-away rate of escaping thermal neutrons is measured. Themore » decay constant vs. thickness of the moderator creates the experimental curve. The absorption cross section of the unknown sample is found from the intersection of this curve with the theoretical one. The theoretical curve is calculated for the case when the dynamic material buckling of the inner sample is zero. The method does not use any reference absorption standard and is independent of the transport cross section of the measured sample. The volume of the sample is form of fluid or crushed material is about 170 cm{sup 3}. The standard deviation for the measured mass absorption cross section of rock samples is in the range of 4 divided by 20% of the measured value and for brines is of the order of 0.5%.« less

  15. Nucleon and heavy-ion total and absorption cross section for selected nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Costner, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Approximate solutions of the coupled-channel equations for high-energy composite particle scattering are obtained and are applied to the nuclear scattering problem. Relationships between several approximation procedures are established and discussed. The eikonal formalism is used with a small-angle approximation to calculate the coherent elastic scattered amplitude from which total and absorption cross sections are derived. Detailed comparisons with nucleon-nucleus experiments show agreement within 5 percent except at lower energies where the eikonal approximation is of questionable accuracy. Even at these lower energies, agreement is within 15 percent. Tables of cross sections required for cosmic heavy-ion transport and shielding studies are presented.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide vapor cross sections: A flow cell study using laser absorption in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, B. L.; Ronney, P. D.; DeSain, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    The absorption spectra of vapors of concentrated hydrogen peroxide/water mixtures (without a carrier gas) were characterized at wavelengths from 1390 to 1470 nm utilizing a near-infrared diode laser. Low pressures were employed to examine these spectral features near the Doppler-broadened limit. An advantageous portion of the spectra near 1420 nm containing several distinct H2O2 peaks and one well-known H2O peak (for calibration) was identified and the cross-sections of these peaks determined. These cross section values can be employed to measure vapor-phase concentrations of H2O2 in propulsion, atmospheric chemistry, and sterilization applications.

  17. Total absorption cross sections of several gases of aeronomic interest at 584 A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, W. L.; Loewenstein, M.

    1972-01-01

    Total photoabsorption cross sections have been measured at 584.3 A for N2, O2, Ar, CO2, CO, NO, N2O, NH3, CH4, H2, and H2S. A monochromator was used to isolate the He I 584 line produced in a helium resonance lamp, and thin aluminum filters were used as absorption cell windows, thereby eliminating possible errors associated with the use of undispersed radiation or windowless cells. Sources of error are examined, and limits of uncertainty are given. Previous relevant cross-sectional measurements and possible error sources are reviewed. Wall adsorption as a source of error in cross-sectional measurements has not previously been considered and is discussed briefly.

  18. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  19. Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Choi, Sangkook; Jin, Chenhao; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Kim, Jihoon; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Louie, Steven G.; Wang, Enge; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Optical absorption is the most fundamental optical property characterizing light–matter interactions in materials and can be most readily compared with theoretical predictions. However, determination of optical absorption cross-section of individual nanostructures is experimentally challenging due to the small extinction signal using conventional transmission measurements. Recently, dramatic increase of optical contrast from individual carbon nanotubes has been successfully achieved with a polarization-based homodyne microscope, where the scattered light wave from the nanostructure interferes with the optimized reference signal (the reflected/transmitted light). Here we demonstrate high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by combining the polarization-based homodyne technique with broadband supercontinuum excitation in transmission configuration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that high-throughput and quantitative determination of nanotube absorption cross-section over broad spectral range at the single-tube level was performed for more than 50 individual chirality-defined single-walled nanotubes. Our data reveal chirality-dependent behaviors of exciton resonances in carbon nanotubes, where the exciton oscillator strength exhibits a universal scaling law with the nanotube diameter and the transition order. The exciton linewidth (characterizing the exciton lifetime) varies strongly in different nanotubes, and on average it increases linearly with the transition energy. In addition, we establish an empirical formula by extrapolating our data to predict the absorption cross-section spectrum for any given nanotube. The quantitative information of absorption cross-section in a broad spectral range and all nanotube species not only provides new insight into the unique photophysics in one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, but also enables absolute determination of optical quantum efficiencies in important

  20. Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Choi, Sangkook; Jin, Chenhao; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Kim, Jihoon; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Louie, Steven G; Wang, Enge; Wang, Feng

    2014-05-27

    Optical absorption is the most fundamental optical property characterizing light-matter interactions in materials and can be most readily compared with theoretical predictions. However, determination of optical absorption cross-section of individual nanostructures is experimentally challenging due to the small extinction signal using conventional transmission measurements. Recently, dramatic increase of optical contrast from individual carbon nanotubes has been successfully achieved with a polarization-based homodyne microscope, where the scattered light wave from the nanostructure interferes with the optimized reference signal (the reflected/transmitted light). Here we demonstrate high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by combining the polarization-based homodyne technique with broadband supercontinuum excitation in transmission configuration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that high-throughput and quantitative determination of nanotube absorption cross-section over broad spectral range at the single-tube level was performed for more than 50 individual chirality-defined single-walled nanotubes. Our data reveal chirality-dependent behaviors of exciton resonances in carbon nanotubes, where the exciton oscillator strength exhibits a universal scaling law with the nanotube diameter and the transition order. The exciton linewidth (characterizing the exciton lifetime) varies strongly in different nanotubes, and on average it increases linearly with the transition energy. In addition, we establish an empirical formula by extrapolating our data to predict the absorption cross-section spectrum for any given nanotube. The quantitative information of absorption cross-section in a broad spectral range and all nanotube species not only provides new insight into the unique photophysics in one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, but also enables absolute determination of optical quantum efficiencies in important

  1. Cavity-enhanced measurements of hydrogen peroxide absorption cross sections from 353 to 410 nm.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Tara F; Washenfelder, Rebecca A; Vaida, Veronica; Brown, Steven S

    2012-06-21

    We report near-ultraviolet and visible absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) using incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS), a recently developed, high-sensitivity technique. The measurements reported here span the range of 353-410 nm and extend published electronic absorption cross sections by 60 nm to absorption cross sections below 1 × 10(-23) cm(2) molecule(-1). We have calculated photolysis rate constants for H(2)O(2) in the lower troposphere at a range of solar zenith angles by combining the new measurements with previously reported data at wavelengths shorter than 350 nm. We predict that photolysis at wavelengths longer than those included in the current JPL recommendation may account for up to 28% of the total hydroxyl radical (OH) production from H(2)O(2) photolysis under some conditions. Loss of H(2)O(2) via photolysis may be of the same order of magnitude as reaction with OH and dry deposition in the lower atmosphere; these processes have very different impacts on HO(x) loss and regeneration.

  2. Absorption and dissociative photoionization cross sections of NH3 from 80 to 1120 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, James A. R.; Haddad, G. N.; Kilcoyne, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    The total absorption, photoionization, and dissociative photoionization cross sections of ammonia have been measured from 80 to 1120 A. All possible fragment ions have been observed including doubly ionized ammonia. The absolute ionization efficiencies have also been measured in this spectral range. The appearance potentials of the fragment ions have been measured and are compared with the calculated appearance potentials derived from published heats of formation and ionization potentials of the fragments.

  3. Two-Photon Excitation, Fluorescence Microscopy, and Quantitative Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeArmond, Fredrick Michael

    As optical microscopy techniques continue to improve, most notably the development of super-resolution optical microscopy which garnered the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014, renewed emphasis has been placed on the development and use of fluorescence microscopy techniques. Of particular note is a renewed interest in multiphoton excitation due to a number of inherent properties of the technique including simplified optical filtering, increased sample penetration, and inherently confocal operation. With this renewed interest in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, comes an increased demand for robust non-linear fluorescent markers, and characterization of the associated tool set. These factors have led to an experimental setup to allow a systematized approach for identifying and characterizing properties of fluorescent probes in the hopes that the tool set will provide researchers with additional information to guide their efforts in developing novel fluorophores suitable for use in advanced optical microscopy techniques as well as identifying trends for their synthesis. Hardware was setup around a software control system previously developed. Three experimental tool sets were set up, characterized, and applied over the course of this work. These tools include scanning multiphoton fluorescence microscope with single molecule sensitivity, an interferometric autocorrelator for precise determination of the bandwidth and pulse width of the ultrafast Titanium Sapphire excitation source, and a simplified fluorescence microscope for the measurement of two-photon absorption cross sections. Resulting values for two-photon absorption cross sections and two-photon absorption action cross sections for two standardized fluorophores, four commercially available fluorophores, and ten novel fluorophores are presented as well as absorption and emission spectra.

  4. Absorption Cross-Sections of Ozone in the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectral Regions: Status report 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orphal, Johannes; Staehelin, Johannes; Tamminen, Johanna; Braathen, Geir; De Backer, Marie-Renee; Bais, Alkiviadis; Balis, Dimitris; Barbe, Alain; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Birk, Manfred; hide

    2016-01-01

    The activity Absorption Cross-Sections of Ozone (ACSO) started in 2008 as a joint initiative of the International Ozone Commission (IO3C), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the IGACO (Integrated Global Atmospheric Chemistry Observations) O3/UV subgroup to study, evaluate, and recommend the most suitable ozone absorption cross-section laboratory data to be used in atmospheric ozone measurements. The evaluation was basically restricted to ozone absorption cross-sections in the UV range with particular focus on the Huggins band. Up until now, the data of Bass and Paur published in 1985 (BP, 1985) are still officially recommended for such measurements. During the last decade it became obvious that BP (1985) cross-section data have deficits for use in advanced space-borne ozone measurements. At the same time, it was recognized that the origin of systematic differences in ground-based measurements of ozone required further investigation, in particular whether the BP (1985) cross-section data might contribute to these differences. In ACSO, different sets of laboratory ozone absorption cross-section data (including their dependence on temperature) of the group of Reims (France) (Brion et al., 1993, 1998, 1992, 1995, abbreviated as BDM, 1995) and those of Serdyuchenko et al. (2014), and Gorshelev et al. (2014), (abbreviated as SER, 2014) were examined for use in atmospheric ozone measurements in the Huggins band. In conclusion, ACSO recommends:(a) The spectroscopic data of BP (1985) should no longer be used for retrieval of atmospheric ozone measurements.(b) For retrieval of ground-based instruments of total ozone and ozone profile measurements by the Umkehr method performed by Brewer and Dobson instruments data of SER (2014) are recommended to be used. When SER (2014) is used, the difference between total ozone measurements of Brewer and Dobson instruments are very small and the difference between Dobson measurements at AD and CD wavelength pairs are

  5. Effective absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of anthropogenic and biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Ali, Nujhat N.; Saiduddin, Mariyah N.; Wu, Michael; Lee, Hyun Ji (Julie); Aiona, Paige K.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2016-04-01

    Mass absorption coefficient (MAC) values were measured for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples produced by flow tube ozonolysis and smog chamber photooxidation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically: α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, farnesene, guaiacol, imidazole, isoprene, linalool, ocimene, p-xylene, 1-methylpyrrole, and 2-methylpyrrole. Both low-NOx and high-NOx conditions were employed during the chamber photooxidation experiments. MAC values were converted into effective molecular absorption cross sections assuming an average molecular weight of 300 g/mol for SOA compounds. The upper limits for the effective photolysis rates of SOA compounds were calculated by assuming unity photolysis quantum yields and convoluting the absorption cross sections with a time-dependent solar spectral flux. A more realistic estimate for the photolysis rates relying on the quantum yield of acetone was also obtained. The results show that condensed-phase photolysis of SOA compounds can potentially occur with effective lifetimes ranging from minutes to days, suggesting that photolysis is an efficient and largely overlooked mechanism of SOA aging.

  6. The Influence of Trace Gases Absorption on Differential Ring Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dong; Zhao, Keyi

    2017-04-01

    The Ring effect refers to the filling in of Fraunhofer lines, which is known as solar absorption lines, caused almost entirely by rotational Raman scattering. The rotational Raman scattering by N2 and O2 in the atmosphere is the main factor that leads to Ring effect. The Ring effect is one significant limitation to the accuracy of the retrieval of trace gas constituents in atmosphere, while using satellite data with Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy technique. In this study, firstly the solar spectrum is convolved with rotational Raman cross sections of atmosphere, which is calculated with rotational Raman cross sections of N2 and O2, divided by the original solar spectrum, with a cubic polynomial subtracted off, to create differential Ring spectrum Ring1. Secondly, the Ring effect for pure Raman scattering of the Fraunhofer spectrum plus the contribution from interference by terrestrial absorption which always comes from a kind of trace gas (e.g., O3) are derived. To allow for more generality, the optically thin term as well as the next term in the expansion for the Beer-Lambert law are calculated.Ring1, Ring2, and Ring3are the Fraunhofer only, 1st terrestrial correction, and 2nd terrestrial correction for DOAS fitting.

  7. Method and apparatus for determination of temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power

    DOEpatents

    Vagelatos, Nicholas; Steinman, Donald K.; John, Joseph; Young, Jack C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear method and apparatus determines the temperature of a medium by injecting fast neutrons into the medium and detecting returning slow neutrons in three first energy ranges by producing three respective detection signals. The detection signals are combined to produce three derived indicia each systematically related to the population of slow neutrons returning from the medium in a respective one of three second energy ranges, specifically exclusively epithermal neutrons, exclusively substantially all thermal neutrons and exclusively a portion of the thermal neutron spectrum. The derived indicia are compared with calibration indicia similarly systematically related to the population of slow neutrons in the same three second energy ranges returning from similarly irradiated calibration media for which the relationships temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power to such calibration indicia are known. The comparison indicates the temperature at which the calibration indicia correspond to the derived indicia and consequently the temperature of the medium. The neutron absorption cross section and moderating power of the medium can be identified at the same time.

  8. Two-photon absorption cross sections within equation-of-motion coupled-cluster formalism using resolution-of-the-identity and Cholesky decomposition representations: Theory, implementation, and benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Kaushik D.; Krylov, Anna I.

    The equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) methods provide a robust description of electronically excited states and their properties. Here, we present a formalism for two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections for the equation-of-motion for excitation energies CC with single and double substitutions (EOM-CC for electronically excited states with single and double substitutions) wave functions. Rather than the response theory formulation, we employ the expectation-value approach which is commonly used within EOM-CC, configuration interaction, and algebraic diagrammatic construction frameworks. In addition to canonical implementation, we also exploit resolution-of-the-identity (RI) and Cholesky decomposition (CD) for the electron-repulsion integrals to reduce memory requirements and to increasemore » parallel efficiency. The new methods are benchmarked against the CCSD and CC3 response theories for several small molecules. We found that the expectation-value 2PA cross sections are within 5% from the quadratic response CCSD values. The RI and CD approximations lead to small errors relative to the canonical implementation (less than 4%) while affording computational savings. RI/CD successfully address the well-known issue of large basis set requirements for 2PA cross sections calculations. The capabilities of the new code are illustrated by calculations of the 2PA cross sections for model chromophores of the photoactive yellow and green fluorescent proteins.« less

  9. Absolute ozone absorption cross section in the Huggins Chappuis minimum (350-470 nm) at 296 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axson, J. L.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Kahan, T. F.; Young, C. J.; Vaida, V.; Brown, S. S.

    2011-08-01

    We report the ozone absolute absorption cross section between 350-470 nm, the minimum between the Huggins and Chappuis bands, where the ozone cross section is less than 10-22 cm2. Ozone spectra were acquired using an incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer, with three channels centered at 365, 405, and 455 nm. The accuracy of the measured cross section is 2 %. Previous measurements vary by more than an order of magnitude in this spectral region. The measurements reported here provide much greater spectral coverage than the most recent measurements. We report a minimum absorption cross section of 3.4×10-24 cm2 at 381.8 nm, which is 22 % lower than the previously reported value. The effect of O3 concentration and water vapor partial pressure were investigated, however there were no observable changes in the absorption spectrum most likely due to the low optical density of the complex.

  10. New and improved infrared absorption cross sections for chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.

    2016-06-01

    The most widely used hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) commercially since the 1930s has been chloro-difluoromethane, or HCFC-22, which has the undesirable effect of depleting stratospheric ozone. As this molecule is currently being phased out under the Montreal Protocol, monitoring its concentration profiles using infrared sounders crucially requires accurate laboratory spectroscopic data. This work describes new high-resolution infrared absorption cross sections of chlorodifluoromethane over the spectral range 730-1380 cm-1, determined from spectra recorded using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125HR) and a 26 cm pathlength cell. Spectra of chlorodifluoromethane/dry synthetic air mixtures were recorded at resolutions between 0.01 and 0.03 cm-1 (calculated as 0.9/MOPD; MOPD denotes the maximum optical path difference) over a range of temperatures and pressures (7.5-762 Torr and 191-295 K) appropriate for atmospheric conditions. This new cross-section dataset improves upon the one currently available in the HITRAN (HIgh-resolution TRANsmission) and GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques) databases; in particular it provides coverage over a wider range of pressures and temperatures, has more accurate wavenumber scales, more consistent integrated band intensities, improved signal-to-noise, is free of channel fringing, and additionally covers the ν2 and ν7 bands.

  11. SO_2 Absorption Cross Sections and N_2 VUV Oscillator Strengths for Planetary Atmosphere Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter L.; Stark, G.; Rufus, J.; Pickering, J. C.; Cox, G.; Huber, K. P.

    1998-09-01

    The determination of the chemical composition of the atmosphere of Io from Hubble Space Telescope observations in the 190-220 nm wavelength region requires knowledge of the photoabsorption cross sections of SO_2 at temperatures ranging from about 110 K to 300 K. We are engaged in a laboratory program to measure SO_2 absorption cross sections with very high resolving power (lambda /delta lambda =~ 450,000) and at a range of temperatures appropriate to the Io atmosphere. Previous photoabsorption measurements, with lambda /delta lambda =~ 100,000, have been unable to resolve the very congested SO_2 spectrum, and, thus, to elucidate the temperature dependence of the cross sections. Our measurements are being performed at Imperial College, London, using an ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. We will present our recently completed room temperature measurements of SO_2 cross sections in the 190-220 nm region and plans for extending these to ~ 195 K. Analyses of Voyager VUV occultation measurements of the N_2-rich atmospheres of Titan and Triton have been hampered by the lack of fundamental spectroscopic data for N_2, in particular, by the lack of reliable f-values and line widths for electronic bands of N_2 in the 80-100 nm wavelength region. We are continuing our program of measurements of band oscillator strengths for the many (approximately 100) N_2 bands between 80 and 100 nm. We report new f-values, derived from data obtained at the Photon Factory (Tsukuba, Japan) synchrotron radiation facility with lambda /delta lambda =~ 130,000, of 37 bands in the 80-86 nm region and 21 bands in the 90-95 nm region. We have also begun the compilation of a searchable archive of N_2 data on the World Wide Web; see http://cfa-www.harvard. edu/amp/data/n2/n2home.html. The archive, covering the spectroscopy of N_2 between 80 and 100 nm, will include published and unpublished (14) N_2, (14) N(15) N, and (15) N_2 line lists and spectroscopic identifications, excited state energy

  12. Absolute ozone absorption cross section in the Huggins Chappuis minimum (350-470 nm) at 296 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axson, J. L.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Kahan, T. F.; Young, C. J.; Vaida, V.; Brown, S. S.

    2011-11-01

    We report the ozone absolute absorption cross section between 350-470 nm, the minimum between the Huggins and Chappuis bands, where the ozone cross section is less than 10-22 cm2. Ozone spectra were acquired using an incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer, with three channels centered at 365, 405, and 455 nm. The accuracy of the measured cross section is 4-30%, with the greatest uncertainty near the minimum absorption at 375-390 nm. Previous measurements vary by more than an order of magnitude in this spectral region. The measurements reported here provide much greater spectral coverage than the most recent measurements. The effect of O3 concentration and water vapor partial pressure were investigated, however there were no observable changes in the absorption spectrum most likely due to the low optical density of the complex.

  13. Ionization yields, total absorption, and dissociative photoionization cross sections of CH4 from 110-950 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, James A. R.; Haddad, G. N.; Masuoka, T.; Pareek, P. N.; Kilcoyne, D. A. L.

    1989-01-01

    Absolute absorption and photoionization cross sections of methane have been measured with an accuracy of about 2 or 3 percent over most of the wavelength range from 950 to 110 A. Also, dissociative photoionization cross sections were measured for the production of CH4(+), CH3(+), CH2(+), CH(+), and C(+) from their respective thresholds to 159 A, and for H(+) and H2(+) measurements were made down to 240 A. Fragmentation was observed at all excited ionic states of CH4.

  14. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladhaf, Bibifatima M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2015-04-01

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  15. Large Femtosecond Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Sections of Fullerosome Vesicle Nanostructures Derived from Highly Photoresponsive Amphiphilic C60-Light-Harvesting Fluorene Dyad

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Nalla, Venkatram; Jeon, Seaho; Mamidala, Venkatesh; Ji, Wei; Tan, Loon-Seng; Cooper, Thomas; Chiang, Long Y.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated ultrafast femtosecond nonlinear optical (NLO) absorption characteristics of bilayered fullerosome vesicle nanostructures derived from molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic oligo(ethylene glycolated) C60-(light-harvesting diphenylaminofluorene antenna). Fullerene conjugates were designed to enhance photoresponse in a femtosecond time scale by applying an isomerizable periconjugation linker between the C60 cage and diphenylaminofluorene antenna subunit in an intramolecular contact distance of only < 3.0 Å. Morphology of C60(>DPAF-EG12C1)-based fullerosome nanovesicles in H2O was characterized to consist of a bilayered shell with a sphere diameter of 20–70 nm and a chromophore shell-width of 9.0–10 nm, fitting well with a head-to-head packing configuration of the molecular length. At the estimated effective nanovesicle concentration as low as 5.5 × 10−8 MV (molecular molar concentration of 5.0 × 10−4 M) in H2O, two-photon absorption (2PA) phenomena were found to be the dominating photophysical events showing a large molar concentration-insensitive 2PA cross-section value equivalent to 8500 GM in a form of nanovesicles, on average. The observed NLO characteristics led to a sharp trend of efficient light-transmittance intensity reduction at the input laser intensity above 100 GW/cm2. PMID:22022620

  16. VUV-absorption cross section of carbon dioxide from 150 to 800 K and applications to warm exoplanetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venot, O.; Bénilan, Y.; Fray, N.; Gazeau, M.-C.; Lefèvre, F.; Es-sebbar, Et.; Hébrard, E.; Schwell, M.; Bahrini, C.; Montmessin, F.; Lefèvre, M.; Waldmann, I. P.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Most exoplanets detected so far have atmospheric temperatures significantly higher than 300 K. Often close to their star, they receive an intense UV photons flux that triggers important photodissociation processes. The temperature dependency of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption cross sections are poorly known, leading to an undefined uncertainty in atmospheric models. Similarly, data measured at low temperatures similar to those of the high atmosphere of Mars, Venus, and Titan are often lacking. Aims: Our aim is to quantify the temperature dependency of the VUV absorption cross sections of important molecules in planetary atmospheres. We want to provide high-resolution data at temperatures prevailing in these media, and a simple parameterisation of the absorption in order to simplify its use in photochemical models. This study focuses on carbon dioxide (CO2). Methods: We performed experimental measurements of CO2 absorption cross sections with synchrotron radiation for the wavelength range (115-200 nm). For longer wavelengths (195-230 nm), we used a deuterium lamp and a 1.5 m Jobin-Yvon spectrometer. We used these data in our one-dimensional (1D) thermo-photochemical model in order to study their impact on the predicted atmospheric compositions. Results: The VUV absorption cross section of CO2 increases with the temperature. The absorption we measured at 150 K seems to be close to the absorption of CO2 in the fundamental ground state. The absorption cross section can be separated into two parts: a continuum and a fine structure superimposed on the continuum. The variation in the continuum of absorption can be represented by the sum of three Gaussian functions. Using data at high temperature in thermo-photochemical models significantly modifies the abundance and the photodissociation rates of many species in addition to CO2, such as methane and ammonia. These deviations have an impact on synthetic transmission spectra, leading to variations of up to 5 ppm

  17. MEASUREMENTS OF THE ABSORPTION AND SCATTERING CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE INTERACTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES WITH SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hui; Chou, Dean-Yi, E-mail: chou@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    The solar acoustic waves are modified by the interaction with sunspots. The interaction can be treated as a scattering problem: an incident wave propagating toward a sunspot is scattered by the sunspot into different modes. The absorption cross section and scattering cross section are two important parameters in the scattering problem. In this study, we use the wavefunction of the scattered wave, measured with a deconvolution method, to compute the absorption cross section σ {sub ab} and the scattering cross section σ {sub sc} for the radial order n = 0–5 for two sunspots, NOAA 11084 and NOAA 11092. Inmore » the computation of the cross sections, the random noise and dissipation in the measured acoustic power are corrected. For both σ {sub ab} and σ {sub sc}, the value of NOAA 11092 is greater than that of NOAA 11084, but their overall n dependence is similar: decreasing with n . The ratio of σ {sub ab} of NOAA 11092 to that of NOAA 11084 approximately equals the ratio of sunspot radii for all n , while the ratio of σ {sub sc} of the two sunspots is greater than the ratio of sunspot radii and increases with n . This suggests that σ {sub ab} is approximately proportional to the sunspot radius, while the dependence of σ {sub sc} on radius is faster than the linear increase.« less

  18. Improved absorption cross-sections of oxygen in the wavelength region 205-240 nm of the Herzberg continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Cheung, A. S.-C.; Esmond, J. R.; Parkinson, W. H.; Freeman, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    The laboratory values of the Herzberg continuum absorption cross-section of oxygen at room temperature from Cheung et al. (1986) and Jenouvrier et al. (1986) are compared and analyzed. It is found that there is no discrepancy between the absolute values of these two sets of independent measurements. The values are combined in a linear least-squares fit to obtain improved values of the Herzberg continuum cross-section of oxygen at room temperature throughout the wavelength region 205-240 nm. The results are compared with in situ and other laboratory measurements.

  19. Total absorption and photoionization cross sections of water vapor between 100 and 1000 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, G. N.; Samson, J. A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute photoabsorption and photoionization cross sections of water vapor are reported at a large number of discrete wavelengths between 100 and 1000 A with an estimate error of + or - 3 percent in regions free from any discrete structure. The double ionization chamber technique utilized is described. Recent calculations are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the present data.

  20. Temperature dependent O3 absorption cross sections for GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2: II. New laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyuchenko, Anna; Gorshelev, Victor; Chehade, Wissam; Weber, Mark; Burrows, John P.

    We report on the work devoted to the up-to-date measurements of the ozone absorption cross-sections. The main goal of the project is to produce a consolidated and consistent set of high resolution cross-sections for satellite spectrometers series that allows a derivation of the harmonized long term data set. The generation of long-term datasets of atmospheric trace gases is a major need and prerequisite for climate and air quality related studies. At present there are three atmospheric chemistry instruments (GOME1, SCIAMACHY and GOME2) in operation and two more spectrometers (GOME2) to be launched five years apart in the next decade resulting in a time series covering two or more decades of ozone observations. Information from different sensors has to be com-bined for a consistent long-term data record, since the lifetime of individual satellite missions is limited. The harmonization of cross-sections is carried out by combination of new experimental work with re-evaluation of the existing cross-sections data. New laboratory measurements of ozone cross-section are underway that will improve a) absolute scaling of cross-sections, b) temper-ature dependence of cross-sections (using very low temperatures starting at 190 K and higher sampling of temperatures up to room temperature) and c) improved wavelength calibration. We take advantage of a Fourier transform spectrometer (visible, near IR) and Echelle spectropho-tometer (UV, visible) to extend the dynamic range of the system (covering several orders of magnitude in cross-sections from UV up to the near IR). We plan to cover the spectral range 220 -1000 nm at a spectral resolution of 0.02 nm in UV/VIS with absolute intensity accuracy of at least 2%, and wavelength accuracy better than 0.001 nm in the temperature range 193-293 K in 10 K steps. A lot of attention is paid to the accuracy of determining the temperature of the ozone flow and new methods for absolute calibration of relative spectra. This work is in

  1. New High-Resolution Absorption Cross-Section Measurements of HCFC-142B in the Mid-Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, Karine; Strong, Kimberly; Melo, Stella

    2009-06-01

    HCFC-142b (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) is a temporary substitute for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). However, due to its high absorption cross-sections in the mid-IR, HCFC-142b is also a highly potent greenhouse gas, now detectable from space by satellite missions. So far, the accuracy of the retrieval has been limited by the lack of reference data in a range of temperatures compatible with atmospheric observations. We present new absorption cross section measurements of HCFC-142b at high-resolution (0.02 cm^{-1}) from 223 K to 283 K in the 600 cm^{-1}- 4000 cm^{-1} spectral window. The composite spectra are calculated for each temperature from a set of acquisitions at different pressures by Fourier transform spectroscopy.

  2. High resolution absorption cross sections for the A2Pi-X2Pi system of ClO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Philen, D. L.; Davis, D. D.; Watson, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution ultraviolet absorption cross-sections for the ClO molecule are obtained, with the aim of facilitating studies of ozone depletion resulting from the injection of chlorofluorocarbons into the atmosphere. The spectroscopic analysis, which involves a frequency-doubled tunable dye laser with a bandwidth of 0.015 A, is described. Studies of the rotational lines of the ClO A 2Pi 3/2-X2Pi 3/2 9-10 band were conducted. Peak cross-sections for the P and R lines of the 9-0 band are found to be 10.0, 9.6, 8.6, 10.6, 10.3, and 9.2 times ten to the negative seventeenth power cm squared, with estimated accuracy of plus or minus 25%. Problems in distinguishing between Cl-35 and Cl-37 absorption are also considered.

  3. Measurement of the multi-TeV neutrino interaction cross-section with IceCube using Earth absorption.

    PubMed

    2017-11-30

    Neutrinos interact only very weakly, so they are extremely penetrating. The theoretical neutrino-nucleon interaction cross-section, however, increases with increasing neutrino energy, and neutrinos with energies above 40 teraelectronvolts (TeV) are expected to be absorbed as they pass through the Earth. Experimentally, the cross-section has been determined only at the relatively low energies (below 0.4 TeV) that are available at neutrino beams from accelerators. Here we report a measurement of neutrino absorption by the Earth using a sample of 10,784 energetic upward-going neutrino-induced muons. The flux of high-energy neutrinos transiting long paths through the Earth is attenuated compared to a reference sample that follows shorter trajectories. Using a fit to the two-dimensional distribution of muon energy and zenith angle, we determine the neutrino-nucleon interaction cross-section for neutrino energies 6.3-980 TeV, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous measurements. The measured cross-section is about 1.3 times the prediction of the standard model, consistent with the expectations for charged- and neutral-current interactions. We do not observe a large increase in the cross-section with neutrino energy, in contrast with the predictions of some theoretical models, including those invoking more compact spatial dimensions or the production of leptoquarks. This cross-section measurement can be used to set limits on the existence of some hypothesized beyond-standard-model particles, including leptoquarks.

  4. Measurement of the multi-TeV neutrino interaction cross-section with IceCube using Earth absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Hill, G. C.; Kyriacou, A.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B. J.; Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Blot, S.; Bradascio, F.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Kintscher, T.; Kunwar, S.; Nahnhauer, R.; Satalecka, K.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stasik, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; van Santen, J.; Adams, J.; Bagherpour, H.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O'Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C.; Ahlers, M.; Koskinen, D. J.; Larson, M. J.; Medici, M.; Rameez, M.; Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J. P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Zoll, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Bron, S.; Carver, T.; Christov, A.; Montaruli, T.; Altmann, D.; Anton, G.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Katz, U.; Kittler, T.; Tselengidou, M.; Andeen, K.; Plum, M.; Anderson, T.; Delaunay, J. J.; Dunkman, M.; Eller, P.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Pankova, D. V.; Teši´, G.; Turley, C. F.; Weiss, M. J.; Argüelles, C.; Axani, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Moulai, M.; Auffenberg, J.; Brenzke, M.; Glauch, T.; Haack, C.; Kalaczynski, P.; Koschinsky, J. P.; Leuermann, M.; Rädel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Sälzer, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stettner, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Wallraff, M.; Waza, A.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Bai, X.; Barron, J. P.; Giang, W.; Grant, D.; Kopper, C.; Moore, R. W.; Nowicki, S. C.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sarkar, S.; Wandler, F. D.; Weaver, C.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Yanez, J. P.; Barwick, S. W.; Yodh, G.; Baum, V.; Böser, S.; di Lorenzo, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Köpke, L.; Krückl, G.; Momenté, G.; Peiffer, P.; Sandroos, J.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K.; Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P. B.; Woschnagg, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Schöneberg, S.; Tenholt, F.; Becker, K.-H.; Bindig, D.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Lauber, F.; Naumann, U.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Soldin, D.; Benzvi, S.; Cross, R.; Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Friedman, E.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K. D.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Klein, S. R.; Miarecki, S.; Palczewski, T.; Tatar, J.; Börner, M.; Fuchs, T.; Hünnefeld, M.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Pieloth, D.; Rhode, W.; Ruhe, T.; Sandrock, A.; Schlunder, P.; Soedingrekso, J.; Werthebach, J.; Bose, D.; Dujmovic, H.; in, S.; Jeong, M.; Kang, W.; Kim, J.; Rott, C.; Botner, O.; Burgman, A.; Hallgren, A.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Unger, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Braun, J.; Casey, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Fahey, S.; Ghorbani, K.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Liu, Q. R.; Luszczak, W.; Mancina, S.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Schneider, A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Ty, B.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Xu, D. L.; Yuan, T.; Brayeur, L.; Casier, M.; de Clercq, C.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; Kunnen, J.; Lünemann, J.; Maggi, G.; Toscano, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Kappes, A.; Coenders, S.; Huber, M.; Krings, K.; Rea, I. C.; Resconi, E.; Turcati, A.; Cowen, D. F.; de André, J. P. A. M.; Deyoung, T.; Hignight, J.; Lennarz, D.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Micallef, J.; Neer, G.; Rysewyk, D.; Dembinski, H.; Evenson, P. A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Koirala, R.; Pandya, H.; Seckel, D.; Stanev, T.; Tilav, S.; De Ridder, S.; Labare, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; van Driessche, W.; Vanheule, S.; Vraeghe, M.; de With, M.; Hebecker, D.; Kolanoski, H.; Fazely, A. R.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Xu, X. W.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Nygren, D. R.; Przybylski, G. T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Ishihara, A.; Kim, M.; Kuwabara, T.; Lu, L.; Mase, K.; Relich, M.; Stößl, A.; Yoshida, S.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jones, B. J. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Niederhausen, H.; Xu, Y.; Kohnen, G.; Kopper, S.; Nakarmi, P.; Pepper, J. A.; Toale, P. A.; Williams, D. R.; Kowalski, M.; Kurahashi, N.; Relethford, B.; Richman, M.; Wills, L.; Madsen, J.; Seunarine, S.; Spiczak, G. M.; Maruyama, R.; Rawlins, K.; Sarkar, S.; Sutherland, M.; Taboada, I.; Tung, C. F.; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Neutrinos interact only very weakly, so they are extremely penetrating. The theoretical neutrino-nucleon interaction cross-section, however, increases with increasing neutrino energy, and neutrinos with energies above 40 teraelectronvolts (TeV) are expected to be absorbed as they pass through the Earth. Experimentally, the cross-section has been determined only at the relatively low energies (below 0.4 TeV) that are available at neutrino beams from accelerators. Here we report a measurement of neutrino absorption by the Earth using a sample of 10,784 energetic upward-going neutrino-induced muons. The flux of high-energy neutrinos transiting long paths through the Earth is attenuated compared to a reference sample that follows shorter trajectories. Using a fit to the two-dimensional distribution of muon energy and zenith angle, we determine the neutrino-nucleon interaction cross-section for neutrino energies 6.3-980 TeV, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous measurements. The measured cross-section is about 1.3 times the prediction of the standard model, consistent with the expectations for charged- and neutral-current interactions. We do not observe a large increase in the cross-section with neutrino energy, in contrast with the predictions of some theoretical models, including those invoking more compact spatial dimensions or the production of leptoquarks. This cross-section measurement can be used to set limits on the existence of some hypothesized beyond-standard-model particles, including leptoquarks.

  5. Experimental technique for simultaneous measurement of absorption-, emission cross-sections, and background loss coefficient in doped optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, M.; Seraji, F. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report a new simple technique for the simultaneous measurements of absorption-, emission cross-sections, background loss coefficient, and dopant density of doped optical fibers with low dopant concentration. Using our proposed technique, the experimental characterization of a sample Ge-Er-doped optical fiber is presented, and the results are analyzed and compared with other reports. This technique is suitable for production line of doped optical fibers.

  6. Synthesis, prodigious two-photon absorption cross sections and electrochemical properties of a series of triphenylamine-based chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Li, Dandan; Fei, Wenwen; Tan, Jingyun; Li, Shengli; Zhou, Hongping; Zhang, Shengyi; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2014-06-01

    A series of triphenylamine-based chromophores (L1-3) with donor-π-donor (D-π-D) model have been designed and synthesized via solid phase Wittig reaction. Their one/two-photon fluorescence and electrochemical properties have been investigated. The results show that L2 and L3 exhibited strong and wide-dispersed two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) in different solvents. Chromophore L3 displays the strongest intensity two-photon absorption activity and large cross-sections (>3600 GM) in the range of 680-840 nm in THF, the largest δ up to 8899 GM in the near-IR range, and the measured maximum TPA cross-sections per molecular weight (δmax/MW) is 8.64 GM/g (L3) in THF. Significantly, it also exhibits good solubility in common organic solvents when the chromophore was modified by polyether units as peripheral groups.

  7. 2nd-order optical model of the isotopic dependence of heavy ion absorption cross sections for radiation transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Yan, Congchong; Saganti, Premkumar B.

    2018-01-01

    Heavy ion absorption cross sections play an important role in radiation transport codes used in risk assessment and for shielding studies of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures. Due to the GCR primary nuclei composition and nuclear fragmentation leading to secondary nuclei heavy ions of charge number, Z with 3 ≤ Z ≥ 28 and mass numbers, A with 6 ≤ A ≥ 60 representing about 190 isotopes occur in GCR transport calculations. In this report we describe methods for developing a data-base of isotopic dependent heavy ion absorption cross sections for interactions. Calculations of a 2nd-order optical model solution to coupled-channel solutions to the Eikonal form of the nucleus-nucleus scattering amplitude are compared to 1st-order optical model solutions. The 2nd-order model takes into account two-body correlations in the projectile and target ground-states, which are ignored in the 1st-order optical model. Parameter free predictions are described using one-body and two-body ground state form factors for the isotopes considered and the free nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude. Root mean square (RMS) matter radii for protons and neutrons are taken from electron and muon scattering data and nuclear structure models. We report on extensive comparisons to experimental data for energy-dependent absorption cross sections for over 100 isotopes of elements from Li to Fe interacting with carbon and aluminum targets. Agreement between model and experiments are generally within 10% for the 1st-order optical model and improved to less than 5% in the 2nd-order optical model in the majority of comparisons. Overall the 2nd-order optical model leads to a reduction in absorption compared to the 1st-order optical model for heavy ion interactions, which influences estimates of nuclear matter radii.

  8. High resolution absorption cross sections in the transmission window region of the Schumann-Runge bands and Herzberg continuum of O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Cheung, A. S.-C.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented on measurements, conducted in the wavelength region 180-195 nm, and at different pressures of oxygen (between 2.5-760 torr) in order to separate the pressure-dependent absorption from the main cross sections, of the absorption cross sections of the Schumann-Runge bands in the window region between the rotational lines of S-R bands of O2. The present cross sections supersede the earlier published cross sections (Yoshino et al., 1983). The combined cross sections are presented graphically; they are available at wavenumber intervals of about 0.1/cm from the National Space Science Data Center. The Herzberg continuum cross sections are derived after subtracting calculated contributions from the Schumann-Runge bands. These are significantly smaller than any previous measurements.

  9. Review of ultraviolet absorption cross sections of a series of alternative fluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar photolysis is likely to contribute to the stratospheric destruction of those alternative fluorocarbons (HFC's) which have two or more chlorine atoms bonded to the same carbon atom. Two of the eight HFC's considered here fall into this category, namely HFC-123 and HFC141b. For these two species there is good agreement among the various measurements of the ultraviolet cross sections in the wavelength region which is important for atmospheric photodissociation, that is, around 200 nm. There is also good agreement for HFC-124, HFC-22 and HFC-142b. These are the three species which contain one chlorine atom per molecule. The agreement in the measurements is poor for the other species, i.e., those that do not contain chlorine, except in so far as to corroborate that solar photolysis should be negligible relative to destruction by hydroxyl radicals.

  10. Evaluation of the use of five laboratory determined ozone absorption cross sections in brewer and dobson retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondas, A.; Evans, R.; Stuebi, R.; Köhler, U.; Weber, M.

    2013-09-01

    The primary ground-based instruments used to report total column ozone (TOC) are Brewer and Dobson Spectrophotometers, in separate networks. These instruments make measurements of the UV irradiances, and through a well-defined process a TOC value is produced. Inherent in the algorithm is the use of a laboratory determined cross-section data set. We used five ozone cross section data sets: three Bass and Paur, Daumont, Malicet and Brion (DMB) and a new Institute of Environmental Physics (IUP), University of Bremen, set. The three Bass and Paur (1985) sets are: quadratic temperature coefficients from IGACO web page (IGQ4), the Brewer network operational calibration set (BOp), and the set used by Bernhard et al. (2005), in the reanalysis of the Dobson absorption coefficient values (B05). The ozone absorption coefficients for Brewer and Dobson are then calculated using the normal Brewer operative method which is essentially the same as used on Dobson. Considering the standard TOC algorithm for the Brewer instruments and comparing to the Brewer standard operational calibration data set, using the slit functions for the individual instruments: we find the UIP data set changes the calculated TOC by -0.5%, the DBM data set changes the calculate TOC by -3.2%, and the IGQ4 data set at -45 °C changes the calculated TOC by +1.3%. Considering the standard algorithm for the Dobson instruments, and comparing to results using the official 1992 ozone absorption coefficients values and the single set of slit functions defined for all Dobson instruments, the calculated TOC changes by +1%, with little variation depending on which data set is used We applied the changes to the European Dobson and Brewer reference instruments during the Izaña 2012 Absolute Calibration Campaign. The application of a common Langley calibration and the IUP cross section the differences between Brewer and Dobson vanish whereas using Bass and Paur and DBM produce differences of 1.5% and 2% respectively. A

  11. Off-Resonant Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Section Enhancement of an Organic Chromophore on Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Sivapalan, Sean T.; Vella, Jarrett H.; Yang, Timothy K.; Dalton, Matthew J.; Haley, Joy E.; Cooper, Thomas M.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Tan, Loon-Seng; Murphy, Catherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Surface-plasmon-initiated interference effects of polyelectrolyte-coated gold nanorods on the two-photon absorption of an organic chromophore were investigated. With polyelectrolyte bearing gold nanorods of 2,4,6 and 8 layers, the role of the plasmonic fields as function of distance on such effects was examined. An unusual distance dependence was found: enhancements in the two-photon cross-section were at a minimum at an intermediate distance, then rose again at a further distance. The observed values of enhancement were compared to theoretical predictions using finite element analysis and showed good agreementdue to constructive and destructive interference effects. PMID:23687561

  12. UV absorption cross sections between 290 and 380 nm of a series of furanaldehydes: Estimation of their photolysis lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenar, Inmaculada; González, Sergio; Jiménez, Elena; Martín, Pilar; Salgado, Sagrario; Cabañas, Beatriz; Albaladejo, José

    2015-02-01

    Furanaldehydes, such as 2-furanaldehyde (also known as furfural), 3-furanaldehyde and 5-methyl-2-furanaldehyde, are aromatic aldehydes which can be present in the atmosphere as primary and secondary pollutants. The atmospheric removal initiated by sunlight for these species is not well-known in the solar actinic region (at λ > 290 nm), mainly due to the absence of data concerning the UV absorption cross sections (σλ) and photolysis frequencies (Ji(z,θ)). In this work σλ for the mentioned furanaldehydes have been determined between 290 and 380 nm at room temperature for the first time. Experiments were performed in an absorption jacketed Pyrex cell, employing a deuterium lamp as irradiation source and a CCD detector. The obtained absorption spectra exhibit absorption maxima around 320 nm with absolute absorption cross sections of 1.13, 0.75 and 1.14 × 10-19 cm2 molecule-1 for 2-furanaldehyde, 3-furanaldehyde and 5-methyl-2-furanaldehyde, respectively. The reported UV absorption cross sections were used to provide estimates of Ji(z,θ) and, therefore, estimates of the lifetime (τhν) due to this atmospheric removal process, under different solar radiation situations. Estimated τhν have been compared with the lifetimes due to the homogeneous reaction with the main diurnal tropospheric oxidants. The results obtained suggest that photolysis in the actinic region can be the main degradation pathway for these furanaldehydes when assuming a quantum yield (Φλ) of unity and the maximum solar actinic flux, while photolysis can compete with the reaction of OH radicals when assuming Φλ = 0.1. On the contrary, the removal of all three furanaldehydes by the reactions with OH radicals becomes more important than the UV photolysis under low solar actinic flux conditions independently of Φλ. If the emission source of these furanaldehydes also occurs during the nighttime NO3 radicals will dominate the elimination process of these species.

  13. Doppler Broadening and its Contribution to Compton Energy-Absorption Cross Sections: An Analysis of the Compton Component in Terms of Mass-Energy Absorption Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. V.; Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.; Akatsuka, T.; Cesareo, R.; Brunetti, A.; Gigante, G. E.

    2002-09-01

    Compton energy absorption cross sections are calculated using the formulas based on a relativistic impulse approximation to assess the contribution of Doppler broadening and to examine the Compton profile literature and explore what, if any, effect our knowledge of this line broadening has on the Compton component in terms of mass-energy absorption coefficient. Compton energy-absorption cross sections are evaluated for all elements, Z=1-100, and for photon energies 1 keV-100 MeV. Using these cross sections, the Compton component of the mass-energy absorption coefficient is derived in the energy region from 1 keV to 1 MeV for all the elements Z=1-100. The electron momentum prior to the scattering event should cause a Doppler broadening of the Compton line. The momentum resolution function is evaluated in terms of incident and scattered photon energy and scattering angle. The overall momentum resolution of each contribution is estimated for x-ray and γ-ray energies of experimental interest in the angular region 1°-180°. Also estimated is the Compton broadening using nonrelativistic formula in the angular region 1°-180°, for 17.44, 22.1, 58.83, and 60 keV photons for a few elements (H, C, N, O, P, S, K, and Ca) of biological importance.

  14. Absolute absorption cross sections of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Parkinson, W. H.; Freeman, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of progress of work on absorption cross section measurements of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm. In this wavelength region, the penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere is controlled by O2 and O3. The transmitted radiation is available to dissociate trace species such as halocarbons and nitrous oxide. We have recently measured absolute absorption cross sections of O3 in the wavelength region 240-350 nm (Freeman et al., 1985; Yoshino et al., 1988). We apply these proven techniques to the determination of the absorption cross section of O3 at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K throughout the wavelength region 185-240 nm. A paper titled 'Absolute Absorption Cross Section Measurements of Ozone in the Wavelength Region 185-254 nm and the Temperature Dependence' has been submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  15. Radiation and chemistry in the stratosphere - Sensitivity to O2 absorption cross sections in the Herzberg continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Yung, Y. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that the discrepancies between observed and modeled vertical profiles of such halocarbons as CFCl3, as well as the problem of simultaneously fitting N2O, CH4, CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 profiles with a single eddy diffusion model, are due to an overestimation of the molecular oxygen absorption cross sections in the 200-220 nm spectral region. The replacement of current O2 cross sections in this range with values that are in better agreement with results for the compounds cited leads to N2O, CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 concentration reductions of factors 0.70, 0.62 and 0.19, respectively. Profiles of CH4, H2 and CO remain unchanged, and the predicted concentration of HNO3 above 30 km is reduced by about 50% for yet another improved fit with observations. It is noted that the correction proposed produces a 30% ozone increase near the 20-25 km peak.

  16. The relative absorption cross-sections of photosystem I and photosystem II in chloroplasts from three types of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Melis, A; Thielen, A P

    1980-02-08

    In the present study we used three types of Nicotiana tabacum, cv John William's Broad Leaf (the wild type and two mutants, the yellow-green Su/su and the yellow Su/su var. Aurea) in order to correlat functional properties of Photosystem II and Photosystem I with the structural organization of their chloroplasts. The effective absorption cross-section of Photosystem II and Photosystem I centers was measured by means of the rate constant of their photoconversion under light-limiting conditions. In agreement with earlier results (Okabe, K., Schmid, G.H. and Straub, J. (1977) Plant Physiol. 60, 150--156) the photosynthetic unit size for both System II and System I in the two mutants was considerably smaller as compared to the wild type. We observed biphasic kinetics in the photoconversion of System II in all three types of N. tabacum. However, the photoconversion of System I occurred with monophasic and exponential kinetics. Under our experimental conditions, the effective cross-section of Photosystem I was comparable to that of the fast System II component (alpha centers). The relative amplitude of the slow System II component (beta centers) varied between 30% in the wild type to 70% in the Su/su var. Aurea mutant. The increased fraction of beta centers is correlated with the decreased fraction of appressed photosynthetic membranes in the chloroplasts of the two mutants. As a working hypothesis, it is suggested that beta centers are located on photosynthetic membranes directly exposed to the stroma medium.

  17. New and improved infra-red absorption cross sections and ACE-FTS retrievals of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.; Boone, Christopher D.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is one of the species regulated by the Montreal Protocol on account of its ability to deplete stratospheric ozone. As such, the inconsistency between observations of its abundance and estimated sources and sinks is an important problem requiring urgent attention (Carpenter et al., 2014) [5]. Satellite remote-sensing has a role to play, particularly limb sounders which can provide vertical profiles into the stratosphere and therefore validate stratospheric loss rates in atmospheric models. This work is in two parts. The first describes new and improved high-resolution infra-red absorption cross sections of carbon tetrachloride/dry synthetic air over the spectral range 700-860 cm-1 for a range of temperatures and pressures (7.5-760 Torr and 208-296 K) appropriate for atmospheric conditions. This new cross-section dataset improves upon the one currently available in the HITRAN and GEISA databases. The second describes a new, preliminary ACE-FTS carbon tetrachloride retrieval that improves upon the v3.0/v3.5 data products, which are biased high by up to 20-30% relative to ground measurements. Making use of the new spectroscopic data, this retrieval also improves the microwindow selection, contains additional interfering species, and utilises a new instrumental lineshape; it will form the basis for the upcoming v4.0 CCl4 data product.

  18. The application of reduced absorption cross section on the identification of the compounds with similar function-groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei; Zuo, Jian; Mu, Kai-jun; Zhang, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Liang-liang; Zhang, Lei-wei; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2013-08-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy is a powerful tool for materials investigation. The low frequency vibrations were usually investigated by means of absorption coefficient regardless of the refractive index. It leads to the disregard of some inherent low-frequency vibrational information of the chemical compounds. Moreover, due to the scattering inside the sample, there are some distortions of the absorption features, so that the absorption dependent material identification is not valid enough. Here, a statistical parameter named reduced absorption cross section (RACS) is introduced. This can not only help us investigate the molecular dynamics but also distinguish one chemical compound with another which has similar function-groups. Experiments are carried out on L-Tyrosine and L-Phenylalanine and the different mass ratios of their mixtures as an example of the application of RACS. The results come out that the RACS spectrum of L-Tyrosine and L-Phenylalanine reserve the spectral fingerprint information of absorption spectrum. The log plot of RACSs of the two amino acids show power-law behavior σR(~ν) ~ (ν~α), and there is a linear relation between the wavenumber and the RACS in the double logarithmic plot. The exponents α, at the same time, are the slopes of the RACS curves in the double logarithmic plot. The big differences of the exponents α between the two amino acids and their mixtures can be seen visually from the slopes of the RACS curves. So we can use RACS analytical method to distinguish some complex compounds with similar function-groups and mixtures from another which has similar absorption peaks in THz region.

  19. Quantitative infrared absorption cross-sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; ...

    2014-04-25

    Isoprene (C 5H 8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Produced by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, the OH- and O 3-initiated oxidations of isoprene are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, however, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via stand-off infrared or in situ detection. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm −1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N 2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298more » and 323 K in a 19.94 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm −1 resolution, using a Bruker 66v FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures at each temperature and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atmosphere.« less

  20. Entangled Two Photon Absorption Cross Section on the 808 nm Region for the Common Dyes Zinc Tetraphenylporphyrin and Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Villabona-Monsalve, Juan P; Calderón-Losada, Omar; Nuñez Portela, M; Valencia, Alejandra

    2017-10-19

    We report the measurement of the entangled two-photon absorption (ETPA) cross section, σ E , at 808 nm on organic chromophores in solution in a low photon flux regime. We performed measurements on zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) in toluene and rhodamine B (RhB) in methanol. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first time that σ E is measured for RhB. Additionally, we report a study of the dependence of σ E on the molecular concentration for both molecular systems. In contrast to previous experiments, our measurements are based on detecting the pairs of photons that are transmitted by the molecular system. By using a coincidence count circuit it was possible to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. This type of work is important for the development of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques using entangled photons.

  1. Evaluation of the use of five laboratory-determined ozone absorption cross sections in Brewer and Dobson retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondas, A.; Evans, R.; Stuebi, R.; Köhler, U.; Weber, M.

    2014-02-01

    The primary ground-based instruments used to report total column ozone (TOC) are Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers in separate networks. These instruments make measurements of the UV irradiances, and through a well-defined process, a TOC value is produced. Inherent to the algorithm is the use of a laboratory-determined cross-section data set. We used five ozone cross-section data sets: three data sets that are based on measurements of Bass and Paur; one derived from Daumont, Brion and Malicet (DBM); and a new set determined by Institute of Experimental Physics (IUP), University of Bremen. The three Bass and Paur (1985) sets are as follows: quadratic temperature coefficients from the IGACO (a glossary is provided in Appendix A) web page (IGQ4), the Brewer network operational calibration set (BOp), and the set used by Bernhard et al. (2005) in the reanalysis of the Dobson absorption coefficient values (B05). The ozone absorption coefficients for Brewer and Dobson instruments are then calculated using the normal Brewer operative method, which is essentially the same as that used for Dobson instruments. Considering the standard TOC algorithm for the Brewer instruments and comparing to the Brewer standard operational calibration data set, using the slit functions for the individual instruments, we find the IUP data set changes the calculated TOC by -0.5%, the DBM data set changes the calculated TOC by -3.2%, and the IGQ4 data set at -45 °C changes the calculated TOC by +1.3%. Considering the standard algorithm for the Dobson instruments, and comparing to results using the official 1992 ozone absorption coefficients values and the single set of slit functions defined for all Dobson instruments, the calculated TOC changes by +1%, with little variation depending on which data set is used. We applied the changes to the European Dobson and Brewer reference instruments during the Izaña 2012 Absolute Calibration Campaign. With the application of a common Langley

  2. Numerical approximations of the mean absorption cross-section of a variety of randomly oriented microalgal shapes.

    PubMed

    Baird, Mark E

    2003-10-01

    The size, shape, and absorption coefficient of a microalgal cell determines, to a first order approximation, the rate at which light is absorbed by the cell. The rate of absorption determines the maximum amount of energy available for photosynthesis, and can be used to calculate the attenuation of light through the water column, including the effect of packaging pigments within discrete particles. In this paper, numerical approximations are made of the mean absorption cross-section of randomly oriented cells, aA. The shapes investigated are spheroids, rectangular prisms with a square base, cylinders, cones and double cones with aspect ratios of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4. The results of the numerical simulations are fitted to a modified sigmoid curve, and take advantage of three analytical solutions. The results are presented in a non-dimensionalised format and are independent of size. A simple approximation using a rectangular hyperbolic curve is also given, and an approach for obtaining the upper and lower bounds of aA for more complex shapes is outlined.

  3. High Resolution UV SO2 Absorption Cross Sections and VUV N2 Oscillator Strengths for Planetary Atmospheres Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. L.; Stark, G.; Rufus, J.

    2000-10-01

    The determination of the chemical composition of the atmosphere of Io in the 190-220 nm wavelength region requires a knowledge of the photoabsorption cross section of SO2 at temperatures ranging from 110 to 300 K. We are continuing our laboratory program to measure SO2 absorption cross sections with very high resolving power (450,000) at a range of temperatures appropriate to the Io atmosphere. Previous photoabsorption measurements have been unable to resolve the very congested SO2 spectrum. Out measurements are being undertaken at Imperial College, London, using an ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. We recently completed room temperature measurements of SO2 cross sections in the 190-220 nm region (Stark et al., JGR Planets 104, 16,585 (1999)). Current laboratory work is focusing on a complementary set of measurements at 160 K. Preliminary results will be presented. Analyses of Voyager VUV occultation measurements of the N2-rich atmospheres of Titan and Triton are hampered by the lack of fundamental spectroscopic data for N2, in particular, by the lack of reliable f-values and line widths for electronic bands of N2 in the 80-100 nm wavelength region. We are continuing our program to measure band oscillator strengths for about 100 N2 bands between 80-100 nm. We have begun an on-line molecular spectroscopic atlas [http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/amdata/ampdata/N2ARCHIVE/n2home.html]. The archive includes published and unpublished 14N2, 14N15N, and 15N2 line lists and spectroscopic identifications, excited state energy levels, band and line f-values, a summary of published band f-value and line width measurements, and a cross-referenced summary of the relevant N2 literature. The listings are searchable by wavelength interval or band identification and are suitable for down-loading in a convenient format. This work was supported in part by NASA Grant NAG5-6222 and the Smithsonian Institution Atherton Seidel Grant Program.

  4. Photonuclear absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron multiplicity in photonuclear reactions; invariance of classical electromagnetism; momentum transfer models in ion collisions; cosmic ray electromagnetic interactions; quadrupole excitations in nucleus-nucleus collisons and Y-89 interactions with relativistic nuclei; and the Weizsacker-Williams theory for nucleon emission via electromagnetic excitations in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed.

  5. Employing X-ray absorption technique for better detector resolution and measurement of low cross-section events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Puri, Nitin K.; Kumar, Pravin; Nandi, T.

    2018-03-01

    The versatility of X-ray absorption technique is experimentally employed for enhancing the detector resolution and to rejuvenate the low probable transitions obscured in the pile-up region, during a beam-foil spectroscopy experiment. The multiple aluminum absorber layers (10 μm each) are used to suppress the pile-up contribution drastically and to restore a weak transition which is about 1.38 × 104 times weaker than a one-electron-one-photon transitions viz. Kα and Khα. The weak line is possibly originating from a two-electron-one-photon transition in He-like Ti. Further, the transitions, which were obscured in the spectra due to high intensity ratio, are revived by dissimilar line intensity attenuation using this technique. The measured lifetimes of Kα line with and without intensity attenuation match well within error bar. The present technique finds potential implications in understanding the structure of multiple-core-vacant ions and other low cross section processes in ion-solid collisions.

  6. Infrared absorption cross-sections, radiative efficiency and global warming potential of HFC-43-10mee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, Karine; DeZeeuw, Jasmine; Godin, Paul J.; Strong, Kimberly

    2018-06-01

    HFC-43-10mee (C5H2F10) is a substitute for CFC-113, HCFC-141b and methyl chloroform, as well as an alternative to perfluorocarbons with high radiative efficiencies. Recent observations have shown that the global mean tropospheric abundance of HFC-43-10mee has increased steadily from the 1990s to reach 0.211 ppt in 2012. To date, the emission of this compound is not regulated. The radiative efficiency (RE) of HFC-43-10mee has recently been re-evaluated at 0.42 W m-2 ppb-1, giving a 100-year time horizon global warming potential (GWP100) of 1650. However, the initial RE, from which the new values were derived, originated from an unpublished source. We calculated a new RE of 0.36 W m-2 ppb-1 and a GWP100 of 1410 from laboratory absorption cross-section spectra of a pure vapour of HFC-43-10mee. Acquisitions were performed in the 550-3500 cm-1 spectral range using Fourier transform spectroscopy. The results were compared with the broadened spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) database and with theoretical calculations using density functional theory.

  7. A new photometric ozone reference in the Huggins bands: the absolute ozone absorption cross section at the 325 nm HeCd laser wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Christof; Elandaloussi, Hadj; Gröbner, Julian

    2018-03-01

    The room temperature (294.09 K) absorption cross section of ozone at the 325 nm HeCd wavelength has been determined under careful consideration of possible biases. At the vacuum wavelength of 325.126 nm, thus in a region used by a variety of ozone remote sensing techniques, an absorption cross-section value of σ = 16.470×10-21 cm2 was measured. The measurement provides the currently most accurate direct photometric absorption value of ozone in the UV with an expanded (coverage factor k = 2) standard uncertainty u(σ) = 31×10-24 cm2, corresponding to a relative level of 2 ‰. The measurements are most compatible with a relative temperature coefficient cT = σ-1 ∂ Tσ = 0.0031 K-1 at 294 K. The cross section and its uncertainty value were obtained using generalised linear regression with correlated uncertainties. It will serve as a reference for ozone absorption spectra required for the long-term remote sensing of atmospheric ozone in the Huggins bands. The comparison with commonly used absorption cross-section data sets for remote sensing reveals a possible bias of about 2 %. This could partly explain a 4 % discrepancy between UV and IR remote sensing data and indicates that further studies will be required to reach the accuracy goal of 1 % in atmospheric reference spectra.

  8. Classical Calculations of Scattering Signatures from a Gravitational Singularity or the Scattering and Absorption Cross-Sections of a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difilippo, Felix C.

    2012-09-01

    Within the context of general relativity theory we calculate, analytically, scattering signatures around a gravitational singularity: angular and time distributions of scattered massive objects and photons and the time and space modulation of Doppler effects. Additionally, the scattering and absorption cross sections for the gravitational interactions are calculated. The results of numerical simulations of the trajectories are compared with the analytical results.

  9. National Bureau Of Standards Data Base Of Photon Absorption Cross Sections From 10 eV To 100 deV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, E. B.; Hubbell, J. H.; Berger, M. J.

    1988-07-01

    The National Bureau of Standards (NBS) has maintained a data base of experimental and theoretical photon absorption cross sections (attenuation coefficients) since 1950. Currently the measured data include more than 20,000 data points abstracted from more than 500 independen.t literature sources including both published and unpublished reports and private communications. We have recently completed a systematic comparison over the energy range 0.1-100 keV of the measured cross sections in the NBS data base with cross sections obtained using the photoionization cross sections calculated by Scofield and the semi-empirical set of recommended photoionization cross section values of Henke et al. Cross sections for coherent and incoherent scattering were added to that of photoionization to obtain a value which could be compared to the experimental results. At energies above 1 keV, agreement between theory and experiment is rather good except for some special situations which prevent the accurate description of the measured samples as free atoms. These include molecular effects near absorption edges and solid state and crystal effects (such as for silicon). Below 1 keV the comparison indicates the range of atomic numbers and energies where the theory becomes inapplicable. The results obtained using Henke et al. agree well with the measured data when such data exist, but there are many elements for which data are not available over a wide range of energies. Comparisons with other theoretical data are in progress. This study also enabled us to show that a suggested renormalization procedure to the Scofield calculation (from dartree-Slater to Hartree-Fock) worsened the agreement between the theory and experiment. We have recently developed a PC-based computer program to generate theoretical cross section values based on Scofield's calculation. We have also completed a related program to enable a user to extract selected data from the measured data base.

  10. Pressure transfer function and absorption cross section from the diffuse field to the human infant ear canal.

    PubMed

    Keefe, D H; Bulen, J C; Campbell, S L; Burns, E M

    1994-01-01

    The diffuse-field pressure transfer function from a reverberant field to the ear canal of human infants, ages 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, has been measured from 125-10700 Hz. The source was a loudspeaker using pink noise, and the diffuse-field pressure and the ear-canal pressure were simultaneously measured using a spatial averaging technique in a reverberant room. The results in most subjects show a two-peak structure in the 2-6-kHz range, corresponding to the ear-canal and concha resonances. The ear-canal resonance frequency decreases from 4.4 kHz at age 1 month to 2.9 kHz at age 24 months. The concha resonance frequency decreases from 5.5 kHz at age 1 month to 4.5 kHz at age 24 months. Below 2 kHz, the diffuse-field transfer function shows effects due to the torsos of the infant and parent, and varies with how the infant is held. Comparisons are reported of the diffuse-field absorption cross section for infants relative to adults. This quantity is a measure of power absorbed by the middle ear from a diffuse sound field, and large differences are observed in infants relative to adults. The radiation efficiencies of the infant and the adult ear are small at low frequencies, near unity at midfrequencies, and decrease at higher frequencies. The process of ear-canal development is not yet complete at age 24 months. The results have implications for experiments on hearing in infants.

  11. Temperature dependent absorption cross-sections of O2-O2 collision pairs between 340 and 630 nm and at atmospherically relevant pressure.

    PubMed

    Thalman, Ryan; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-10-07

    The collisions between two oxygen molecules give rise to O4 absorption in the Earth atmosphere. O4 absorption is relevant to atmospheric transmission and Earth's radiation budget. O4 is further used as a reference gas in Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) applications to infer properties of clouds and aerosols. The O4 absorption cross section spectrum of bands centered at 343, 360, 380, 446, 477, 532, 577 and 630 nm is investigated in dry air and oxygen as a function of temperature (203-295 K), and at 820 mbar pressure. We characterize the temperature dependent O4 line shape and provide high precision O4 absorption cross section reference spectra that are suitable for atmospheric O4 measurements. The peak absorption cross-section is found to increase at lower temperatures due to a corresponding narrowing of the spectral band width, while the integrated cross-section remains constant (within <3%, the uncertainty of our measurements). The enthalpy of formation is determined to be ΔH(250) = -0.12 ± 0.12 kJ mol(-1), which is essentially zero, and supports previous assignments of O4 as collision induced absorption (CIA). At 203 K, van der Waals complexes (O(2-dimer)) contribute less than 0.14% to the O4 absorption in air. We conclude that O(2-dimer) is not observable in the Earth atmosphere, and as a consequence the atmospheric O4 distribution is for all practical means and purposes independent of temperature, and can be predicted with an accuracy of better than 10(-3) from knowledge of the oxygen concentration profile.

  12. ARTICLES: Variation of the absorption cross section of high-power infrared laser radiation in homologous series of CnH2n+1OH molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N.; Brodskaya, E. A.; Vereshchagina, Lyudmila N.; Kuz'min, M. V.; Osmanov, R. R.; Putilin, F. N.; Stuchebryukhov, A. A.

    1984-11-01

    An experimental investigation was made of variation of the characteristics of infrared multiphoton absorption in a homologous series of CnH2n+1OH alcohols (n = 1-5) excited with CO2 laser pulses. The dependences of the energy absorbed by the molecules on the frequency and energy density of laser radiation were determined by the optoacoustic method. It was found that the multiphoton absorption cross section decreases on increase in the radiation energy density at a rate which becomes slower on increase in the molecular size. A model is proposed for multiphoton excitation of molecules in a homologous series. This model is based on an analysis of a resonant mode interacting with the infrared radiation field and coupled to a reservoir of modes that do not interact with the field. The model predicts correctly the change in the multiphoton absorption cross section on increase in the number of the degrees of freedom of a molecule.

  13. UV Absorption Cross Sections of Nitrous Oxide (N2O) and Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Between 210 and 350 K and the Atmospheric Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlon, Nabilah Rontu; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Newman, Paul A.; Burkholder, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Absorption cross sections of nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) are reported at five atomic UV lines (184.95, 202.548, 206.200, 213.857, and 228.8 nm) at 27 temperatures in the range 210-350 K. In addition, UV absorption spectra of CCl4 are reported between 200-235 nm as a function of temperature (225-350 K). The results from this work are critically compared with results from earlier studies. For N2O, the present results are in good agreement with the current JPL recommendation enabling a reduction in the estimated uncertainty in the N2O atmospheric photolysis rate. For CCl4, the present cross section results are systematically greater than the current recommendation at the reduced temperatures most relevant to stratospheric photolysis. The new cross sections result in a 5-7% increase in the modeled CCl4 photolysis loss, and a slight decrease in the stratospheric lifetime, from 51 to 50 years, for present day conditions. The corresponding changes in modeled inorganic chlorine and ozone in the stratosphere are quite small. A CCl4 cross section parameterization for use in 37 atmospheric model calculations is presented.

  14. Theoretical X-ray production cross sections at incident photon energies across Li (i=1-3) absorption edges of Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Sanjiv

    2015-08-01

    The X-ray production (XRP) cross sections, σLk (k = l, η, α, β6, β1, β3, β4, β9,10, γ1,5, γ2,3) have been evaluated at incident photon energies across the Li(i=1-3) absorption edge energies of 35Br using theoretical data sets of different physical parameters, namely, the Li(i=1-3) sub-shell the X-ray emission rates based on the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, the fluorescence and Coster Kronig yields based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater (DHS) model, and two sets of the photoionisation cross sections based on the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (RHFS) model and the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, in order to highlight the importance of electron exchange effects at photon energies in vicinity of absorption edge energies.

  15. Absorption spectrum and absorption cross sections of the 2ν1 band of HO2 between 20 and 760 Torr air in the range 6636 and 6639 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Liu, Lu; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2018-05-01

    The absorption spectrum of HO2 radicals has been measured in the range 6636-6639 cm-1 at several pressures between 20 and 760 Torr of air. Absolute absorption cross sections of the strongest line at around 6638.2 cm-1 have been determined from kinetic measurements, taking advantage of the well known rate constant of the self-reaction. Peak absorption cross sections of 22.6, 19.5, 14.4, 7.88, 5.12 and 3.23 × 10-20 cm2 were obtained at 20, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 760 Torr, respectively. By fitting these data, an empirical expression has been obtained for the absorption cross section of HO2 in the range 20-760 Torr air: σ6638.2cm-1 = 1.18 × 10-20 + (2.64 × 10-19 × (1-exp (-63.1/p (Torr))) cm2.

  16. High-resolution absorption cross sections of carbon monoxide bands at 295 K between 91.7 and 100.4 nanometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, G.; Yoshino, K.; Smith, Peter L.; Ito, K.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical descriptions of the abundance and excitation of carbon monoxide in interstellar clouds require accurate data on the vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the molecule. The 6.65 m spectrometer at the Photon Factory synchrotron light source was used to measure photoabsorption cross sections of CO features between 91.2 and 100.4 nm. These data were recorded at a resolving power of 170,000, more than 20 times greater than that used in previous work.

  17. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  18. Experimental determination of the absorption cross-section and molar extinction coefficient of CdSe and CdTe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Protasenko, Vladimir; Bacinello, Daniel; Kuno, Masaru

    2006-12-21

    Absorption cross-sections and corresponding molar extinction coefficients of solution-based CdSe and CdTe nanowires (NWs) are determined. Chemically grown semiconductor NWs are made via a recently developed solution-liquid-solid (SLS) synthesis, employing low melting Au/Bi bimetallic nanoparticle "catalysts" to induce one-dimensional (1D) growth. Resulting wires are highly crystalline and have diameters between 5 and 12 nm as well as lengths exceeding 10 microm. Narrow diameters, below twice the corresponding bulk exciton Bohr radius of each material, place CdSe and CdTe NWs within their respective intermediate to weak confinement regimes. Supporting this are solution linear absorption spectra of NW ensembles showing blue shifts relative to the bulk band gap as well as structure at higher energies. In the case of CdSe, the wires exhibit band edge emission as well as strong absorption/emission polarization anisotropies at the ensemble and single-wire levels. Analogous photocurrent polarization anisotropies have been measured in recently developed CdSe NW photodetectors. To further support fundamental NW optical/electrical studies as well as to promote their use in device applications, experimental absorption cross-sections are determined using correlated transmission electron microscopy, UV/visible extinction spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Measured CdSe NW cross-sections for 1 microm long wires (diameters, 6-42 nm) range from 6.93 x 10(-13) to 3.91 x 10(-11) cm2 at the band edge (692-715 nm, 1.73-1.79 eV) and between 3.38 x 10(-12) and 5.50 x 10(-11) cm2 at 488 nm (2.54 eV). Similar values are obtained for 1 microm long CdTe NWs (diameters, 7.5-11.5 nm) ranging from 4.32 x 10(-13) to 5.10 x 10(-12) cm2 at the band edge (689-752 nm, 1.65-1.80 eV) and between 1.80 x 10(-12) and 1.99 x 10(-11) cm2 at 2.54 eV. These numbers compare well with previous theoretical estimates of CdSe/CdTe NW cross-sections far to the blue of the

  19. Thermo-luminescence and neutron absorption cross section evaluations of compounds of Lithium based oxide ceramic breeders in Li-Zr-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sumanta; Naik, Yeshwant

    2018-04-01

    Lithium-zirconium based oxides were prepared by combustion route. Thermal analysis (TG and DTA) was used to study the combustion process. The nucleation and growth stages were identified and their activation energies were predicted. The suitability of these oxide breeders was evaluated based on their radiation stability, variation in thermal behavior upon γ irradiation, neutron absorption and tritium breeding characteristics. Nuclear properties of these oxide ceramics were evaluated with a view to use them as efficient neutron absorbers and simultaneously breed tritium. Total neutron absorption cross sections were evaluated as a function of neutron energy in the range of 0 to 20 MeV. Resonant absorption is predicted for the neutron of energy 2.3 keV manly due to contribution from neutron induced nuclear reactions of 7Li in this energy range.

  20. Measurement of the absorption cross sections of SiCl4, SiCl3, SiCl2 and Cl at H Lyman-α wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mével, R.; Catoire, L.; Fikri, M.; Roth, P.

    2013-03-01

    Atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy coupled with a shock tube is a powerful technique for studying high temperature dynamics of reactive systems. Presently, high temperature pyrolysis of SiCl4-Ar mixtures has been studied behind reflected shock waves. Using time-resolved absorption profiles at 121.6 nm and a detailed reaction model, the absorption cross sections of SiCl, SiCl, SiCl and Cl have been measured. Results agree well with available data for SiCl and constitute, to our knowledge, the first measurements for SiCl, SiCl and Cl at the Lyman-α wavelength. These data are relevant to silica particle production from SiCl-oxidant mixtures combustion synthesis.

  1. High temperature infrared absorption cross sections of methane near 3.4 µm in Ar and CO 2 mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Koroglu, Batikan; Neupane, Sneha; Pryor, Owen

    In this study, the absorption cross-sections of CH 4 at two wavelengths in the mid-IR region: λ peak = 3403.4 nm and λ valley = 3403.7 nm were measured. Data were taken using three different compositions of non-reactive gas mixtures comprising CH 4/Ar/CO 2 between 700 < T < 2000 K and 0.1 < P < 1.5 atm in a shock tube utilizing a continuous-wave distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser. Also, broadband room temperature methane cross section measurements were performed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and the cascade laser to gain a better insight into the changes of the linemore » shapes in various bath gasses (Ar, CO 2, and N 2). An application of the high-temperature cross-section data was demonstrated to determine the concentration of methane during oxy-methane combustion in a mixture of CO 2, O 2, and Ar. Lastly, current measurements will be valuable addition to the spectroscopy database for methane- an important fuel used for power generation and heating around the world.« less

  2. High temperature infrared absorption cross sections of methane near 3.4 µm in Ar and CO 2 mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Koroglu, Batikan; Neupane, Sneha; Pryor, Owen; ...

    2017-11-04

    In this study, the absorption cross-sections of CH 4 at two wavelengths in the mid-IR region: λ peak = 3403.4 nm and λ valley = 3403.7 nm were measured. Data were taken using three different compositions of non-reactive gas mixtures comprising CH 4/Ar/CO 2 between 700 < T < 2000 K and 0.1 < P < 1.5 atm in a shock tube utilizing a continuous-wave distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser. Also, broadband room temperature methane cross section measurements were performed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and the cascade laser to gain a better insight into the changes of the linemore » shapes in various bath gasses (Ar, CO 2, and N 2). An application of the high-temperature cross-section data was demonstrated to determine the concentration of methane during oxy-methane combustion in a mixture of CO 2, O 2, and Ar. Lastly, current measurements will be valuable addition to the spectroscopy database for methane- an important fuel used for power generation and heating around the world.« less

  3. Measurement of the 238U(n ,γ ) cross section up to 80 keV with the Total Absorption Calorimeter at the CERN n_TOF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T.; Guerrero, C.; Billowes, J.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dietz, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Durán, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Furman, V.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Heftrich, T.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Katabuchi, T.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Žugec, P.; n TOF Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The radiative capture cross section of a highly pure (99.999%), 6.125(2) grams and 9.56(5)×10-4 atoms/barn areal density 238U sample has been measured with the Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) in the 185 m flight path at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF. This measurement is in response to the NEA High Priority Request list, which demands an accuracy in this cross section of less than 3% below 25 keV. These data have undergone careful background subtraction, with special care being given to the background originating from neutrons scattered by the 238U sample. Pileup and dead-time effects have been corrected for. The measured cross section covers an energy range between 0.2 eV and 80 keV, with an accuracy that varies with neutron energy, being better than 4% below 25 keV and reaching at most 6% at higher energies.

  4. High temperature infrared absorption cross sections of methane near 3.4 μm in Ar and CO2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Neupane, Sneha; Pryor, Owen; Peale, Robert E.; Vasu, Subith S.

    2018-02-01

    The absorption cross-sections of CH4 at two wavelengths in the mid-IR region: λpeak = 3403.4 nm and λvalley = 3403.7 nm were measured. Data were taken using three different compositions of non-reactive gas mixtures comprising CH4/Ar/CO2 between 700 < T < 2000 K and 0.1 < P < 1.5 atm in a shock tube utilizing a continuous-wave distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser. Also, broadband room temperature methane cross section measurements were performed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and the cascade laser to gain a better insight into the changes of the line shapes in various bath gasses (Ar, CO2, and N2). An application of the high-temperature cross-section data was demonstrated to determine the concentration of methane during oxy-methane combustion in a mixture of CO2, O2, and Ar. Current measurements will be valuable addition to the spectroscopy database for methane- an important fuel used for power generation and heating around the world.

  5. Theoretical X-ray production cross sections at incident photon energies across L{sub i} (i=1-3) absorption edges of Br

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Sanjiv

    The X-ray production (XRP) cross sections, σ{sub Lk} (k = l, η, α, β{sub 6}, β{sub 1}, β{sub 3}, β{sub 4}, β{sub 9,10}, γ{sub 1,5}, γ{sub 2,3}) have been evaluated at incident photon energies across the L{sub i}(i=1-3) absorption edge energies of {sub 35}Br using theoretical data sets of different physical parameters, namely, the L{sub i}(i=1-3) sub-shell the X-ray emission rates based on the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, the fluorescence and Coster Kronig yields based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater (DHS) model, and two sets of the photoionisation cross sections based on the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (RHFS) model and the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, inmore » order to highlight the importance of electron exchange effects at photon energies in vicinity of absorption edge energies.« less

  6. High resolution absolute absorption cross sections of the B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' transition of the CH2OO biradical.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Jou, YiTien; Kalinowski, Jarosław; Feng, David; Gerber, R Benny; Murray, Craig

    2015-12-28

    Carbonyl oxides, or Criegee intermediates, are formed from the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes and play a pivotal role in night-time and urban area atmospheric chemistry. Significant discrepancies exist among measurements of the strong B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' electronic transition of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO in the visible/near-UV. We report room temperature spectra of the B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' electronic absorption band of CH2OO acquired at higher resolution using both single-pass broadband absorption and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The new absorption spectra confirm the vibrational structure on the red edge of the band that is absent from ionization depletion measurements. The absolute absorption cross sections over the 362-470 nm range are in good agreement with those reported by Ting et al. Broadband absorption spectra recorded over the temperature range of 276-357 K were identical within their mutual uncertainties, confirming that the vibrational structure is not due to hot bands.

  7. Evolution of wavelength-dependent mass absorption cross sections of carbonaceous aerosols during the 2010 DOE CARES campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.; Subramanian, R.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Kelley, P.; Luke, W. T.; Jobson, B. T.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of aerosol radiative forcing require process level optical property models that are built on precise and accurate field observations. Evolution of aerosol optical properties for urban influenced carbonaceous aerosol undergoing transport and mixing with rural air masses was a focal point of the DOE Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects (CARES) campaign near Sacramento, CA in summer 2010. Urban aerosol was transported from Sacramento, CA (T0) to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to a rural site located near Cool, CA (T1). Aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients were measured at the T0 and T1 sites using integrated photoacoustic acoustic/nephelometer instruments (PASS-3 and PASS-UV) at 781, 532, 405, and 375 nm. Single particle soot photometry (SP2) instrumentation was used to monitor black carbon (BC) mass at both sites. Combining data from these sensors allows estimate of the wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficient (MAC(λ)) and partitioning of MAC(λ) into contributions from the BC core and from enhancements from coating of BC cores. MAC(λ) measured in this way is free of artifacts associated with filter-based aerosol absorption measurements and takes advantage of the single particle sensitivity of the SP2 instrument, allowing observation of MAC(λ) on 10 minute and faster time scales. Coating was observed to enhance MAC(λ) by 20 - 30 % and different wavelength dependence for MAC(λ) was observed for urban and biomass burning aerosol. Further, T0 - T1 evolution of MAC(λ) was correlated with separately measured NO/NOy ratios and CO/CO2 ratios to understand the effects of aging & transport on MAC(λ) and the implications of aerosol processing that links air quality to radiative forcing on a regional scale. Aircraft observations made from the Gulfstream-1 during CARES are also analyzed to enhance process level understanding of the optical properties of fresh and aged carbonaceous aerosol in the urban-rural interface.

  8. Broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 1- and 2-photon excitations: Relaxation paths and cross sections of a triphenylamine dye in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Hecht, S., E-mail: sh@chemie.hu-berlin.de, E-mail: skovale@chemie.hu-berlin.de

    2015-07-14

    1-photon (382 nm) and 2-photon (752 nm) excitations to the S{sub 1} state are applied to record and compare transient absorption spectra of a push-pull triphenylamine (TrP) dye in solution. After 1-photon excitation, ultrafast vibrational and structural molecular relaxations are detected on a 0.1 ps time scale in nonpolar hexane, while in polar acetonitrile, the spectral evolution is dominated by dipolar solvation. Upon 2-photon excitation, transient spectra in hexane reveal an unexpected growth of stimulated emission (SE) and excited-state absorption (ESA) bands. The behavior is explained by strong population transfer S{sub 1} → S{sub n} due to resonant absorption ofmore » a third pump photon. Subsequent S{sub n} → S{sub 1} internal conversion (with τ{sub 1} = 1 ps) prepares a very hot S{sub 1} state which cools down with τ{sub 2} = 13 ps. The pump pulse energy dependence proves the 2-photon origin of the bleach signal. At the same time, SE and ESA are strongly affected by higher-order pump absorptions that should be taken into account in nonlinear fluorescence applications. The 2-photon excitation cross sections σ{sup (2)} = 32 ⋅ 10{sup −50} cm{sup 4} s at 752 nm are evaluated from the bleach signal.« less

  9. Two-photon absorption in diazobenzene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, A. A.; Yamaki, S. B.; Misoguti, L.; Zilio, S. C.; Atvars, Teresa D. Z.; Oliveira, O. N.; Mendonça, C. R.

    2004-12-01

    An investigation is made into molecular design strategies to enhance the two-photon absorption (2PA) of organic materials by measuring the 2PA cross-section of diazoaromatic compounds with the femtosecond pulses Z-scan technique at 775 nm. These diazo dyes exhibit a moderate 2PA cross-section, of the order of 300 GM, comparable to those of regular azoaromatic compounds. The increase in the π-electron bridge in the diazoaromatic compounds does not bring, therefore, substantial increase to the measured 2PA intensities, while the main factor to enhance the 2PA cross-section is the presence of charge donor and acceptor groups. It is concluded that current molecular design strategies are unlikely to produce azoaromatic compounds that are useful for applications requiring very high 2PA coefficients.

  10. The Scaled SLW model of gas radiation in non-uniform media based on Planck-weighted moments of gas absorption cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovjov, Vladimir P.; Andre, Frederic; Lemonnier, Denis; Webb, Brent W.

    2018-02-01

    The Scaled SLW model for prediction of radiation transfer in non-uniform gaseous media is presented. The paper considers a new approach for construction of a Scaled SLW model. In order to maintain the SLW method as a simple and computationally efficient engineering method special attention is paid to explicit non-iterative methods of calculation of the scaling coefficient. The moments of gas absorption cross-section weighted by the Planck blackbody emissive power (in particular, the first moment - Planck mean, and first inverse moment - Rosseland mean) are used as the total characteristics of the absorption spectrum to be preserved by scaling. Generalized SLW modelling using these moments including both discrete gray gases and the continuous formulation is presented. Application of line-by-line look-up table for corresponding ALBDF and inverse ALBDF distribution functions (such that no solution of implicit equations is needed) ensures that the method is flexible and efficient. Predictions for radiative transfer using the Scaled SLW model are compared to line-by-line benchmark solutions, and predictions using the Rank Correlated SLW model and SLW Reference Approach. Conclusions and recommendations regarding application of the Scaled SLW model are made.

  11. Accurate Cross Sections for Microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Rez, Peter

    2002-01-01

    To calculate the intensity of x-ray emission in electron beam microanalysis requires a knowledge of the energy distribution of the electrons in the solid, the energy variation of the ionization cross section of the relevant subshell, the fraction of ionizations events producing x rays of interest and the absorption coefficient of the x rays on the path to the detector. The theoretical predictions and experimental data available for ionization cross sections are limited mainly to K shells of a few elements. Results of systematic plane wave Born approximation calculations with exchange for K, L, and M shell ionization cross sections over the range of electron energies used in microanalysis are presented. Comparisons are made with experimental measurement for selected K shells and it is shown that the plane wave theory is not appropriate for overvoltages less than 2.5 V.

  12. Filter-based measurements of UV-vis mass absorption cross sections of organic carbon aerosol from residential biomass combustion: Preliminary findings and sources of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Apoorva; Pervez, Shamsh; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.

    2016-10-01

    Combustion of solid biomass fuels is a major source of household energy in developing nations. Black (BC) and organic carbon (OC) aerosols are the major PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 μm) pollutants co-emitted during burning of these fuels. While the optical nature of BC is well characterized, very little is known about the properties of light-absorbing OC (LAOC). Here, we report our preliminary findings on the mass-based optical properties of LAOC emitted from the combustion of four commonly used solid biomass fuels - fuel-wood, agricultural residue, dung-cake, and mixed - in traditional Indian cookstoves. As part of a pilot field study conducted in central India, PM2.5 samples were collected on Teflon filters and analyzed for their absorbance spectra in the 300-900 nm wavelengths at 1 nm resolution using a UV-Visible spectrophotometer equipped with an integrating sphere. The mean mass absorption cross-sections (MAC) of the emitted PM2.5 and OC, at 550 nm, were 0.8 and 0.2 m2 g-1, respectively, each with a factor of ~2.3 uncertainty. The mean absorption Ångström exponent (AǺE) values for PM2.5 were 3±1 between 350 and 550 nm, and 1.2±0.1 between 550 and 880 nm. In the 350-550 nm range, OC had an AǺE of 6.3±1.8. The emitted OC mass, which was on average 25 times of the BC mass, contributed over 50% of the aerosol absorbance at wavelengths smaller than 450 nm. The overall OC contribution to visible solar light (300-900 nm) absorption by the emitted particles was 26-45%. Our results highlight the need to comprehensively and accurately address: (i) the climatic impacts of light absorption by OC from cookstove emissions, and (ii) the uncertainties and biases associated with variability in biomass fuel types and combustion conditions, and filter-based measurement artifacts during determination of MAC values.

  13. Estimation of the mass absorption cross-section of the black and brown carbon aerosols during GoPoEx 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, C.; Kim, S. W.; Lee, M.; Gustafsson, O.; Fang, W.

    2017-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a major contributor to the atmospheric heating by absorbing the solar radiation. According to recent studies, the solar absorption of brown carbon (BrC) is not negligible and even comparable to that of BC at visible to UV wavelengths, but most optical instruments that quantify light absorption are unable to distinguish each other. Thus, light absorption properties of BC or BrC usually have been studied through modeling researches by using mass absorption cross-section (MAC). Although MAC has a large spatial and temporal variability, most modeling studies have used a specific value of BC MAC and even the absorption by BrC is seldom considered in most chemical and climate models. The generalization of modeling research can lead to serious errors of radiative forcing by BC and BrC. In this study, MAC of BC and BrC are separately determined and the contribution of BC and BrC on aerosol light absorption are estimated from co-located simultaneous in-situ measurements, COSMOS, CLAP and Sunset EC/OC analyzer, at Gosan climate observatory, Korea during Gosan Pollution Experiment in January 2014 (GoPoEx 2014). At 565 nm, MAC of BC is found to be about 6.4±1.5 m2 g-1 from COSMOS and Sunset EC/OC analyzer measurements. This value is similar to those from previous studies in China (Cui et al., STE, 2016), but lower than those observed to be ranged 10-18 m2 g-1 in America or Europe (Lack et al., PNAS, 2012). Aerosol absorption coefficient (AAC) and BC mass concentration from COSMOS, meanwhile, are approximately 15-20% lower than those of CLAP. This difference can be attributable to the contribution of BrC. The MAC of BrC was calculated using the absorption coefficient of BrC and by the following three methods: (1) the difference of mass concentration from Aethalometer and COSMOS applied new BC MAC of this study, (2) The mass concentration of water-soluble organic carbon, (3) a method using the mass concentration of organic carbon suggested by Chung et al

  14. Light scattering and extinction measurements combined with laser-induced incandescence for the real-time determination of soot mass absorption cross section.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yiyi; Ma, Lulu; Cao, Tingting; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Jun; Buseck, Peter R; Thompson, J E

    2013-10-01

    An aerosol albedometer was combined with laser-induced incandescence (LII) to achieve simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering, extinction coefficient, and soot mass concentration. Frequency doubling of a Nd:YAG laser line resulted in a colinear beam of both λ = 532 and 1064 nm. The green beam was used to perform cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), with simultaneous measurements of scattering coefficient made through use of a reciprocal sphere nephelometer. The 1064 nm beam was selected and directed into a second integrating sphere and used for LII of light-absorbing kerosene lamp soot. Thermal denuder experiments showed the LII signals were not affected by the particle mixing state when laser peak power was 1.5-2.5 MW. The combined measurements of optical properties and soot mass concentration allowed determination of mass absorption cross section (M.A.C., m(2)/g) with 1 min time resolution when soot concentrations were in the low microgram per cubic meter range. Fresh kerosene nanosphere soot (ns-soot) exhibited a mean M.A.C and standard deviation of 9.3 ± 2.7 m(2)/g while limited measurements on dry ambient aerosol yielded an average of 8.2 ± 5.9 m(2)/g when soot was >0.25 μg/m(3). The method also detected increases in M.A.C. values associated with enhanced light absorption when polydisperse, laboratory-generated ns-soot particles were embedded within or coated with ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, and glycerol. Glycerol coatings produced the largest fractional increase in M.A.C. (1.41-fold increase), while solid coatings of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate produced increases of 1.10 and 1.06, respectively. Fresh, ns-soot did not exhibit increased M.A.C. at high relative humidity (RH); however, lab-generated soot coated with ammonium nitrate and held at 85% RH exhibited M.A.C. values nearly double the low-humidity case. The hybrid instrument for simultaneously tracking soot mass concentration and aerosol optical properties in real time is a

  15. Average absorption cross-section of the human body measured at 1-12 GHz in a reverberant chamber: results of a human volunteer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flintoft, I. D.; Robinson, M. P.; Melia, G. C. R.; Marvin, A. C.; Dawson, J. F.

    2014-07-01

    The electromagnetic absorption cross-section (ACS) averaged over polarization and angle-of-incidence of 60 ungrounded adult subjects was measured at microwave frequencies of 1-12 GHz in a reverberation chamber. Average ACS is important in non-ionizing dosimetry and exposure studies, and is closely related to the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBSAR). The average ACS was measured with a statistical uncertainty of less than 3% and high frequency resolution for individuals with a range of body shapes and sizes allowing the statistical distribution of WBSAR over a real population with individual internal and external morphologies to be determined. The average ACS of all subjects was found to vary from 0.15 to 0.4 m2 for an individual subject it falls with frequency over 1-6 GHz, and then rises slowly over the 6-12 GHz range in which few other studies have been conducted. Average ACS and WBSAR are then used as a surrogate for worst-case ACS/WBSAR, in order to study their variability across a real population compared to literature results from simulations using numerical phantoms with a limited range of anatomies. Correlations with body morphological parameters such as height, mass and waist circumference have been investigated: the strongest correlation is with body surface area (BSA) at all frequencies above 1 GHz, however direct proportionality to BSA is not established until above 5 GHz. When the average ACS is normalized to the BSA, the resulting absorption efficiency shows a negative correlation with the estimated thickness of subcutaneous body fat. Surrogate models and statistical analysis of the measurement data are presented and compared to similar models from the literature. The overall dispersion of measured average WBSAR of the sample of the UK population studied is consistent with the dispersion of simulated worst-case WBSAR across multiple numerical phantom families. The statistical results obtained allow the calibration of human exposure

  16. Average absorption cross-section of the human body measured at 1-12 GHz in a reverberant chamber: results of a human volunteer study.

    PubMed

    Flintoft, I D; Robinson, M P; Melia, G C R; Marvin, A C; Dawson, J F

    2014-07-07

    The electromagnetic absorption cross-section (ACS) averaged over polarization and angle-of-incidence of 60 ungrounded adult subjects was measured at microwave frequencies of 1-12 GHz in a reverberation chamber. Average ACS is important in non-ionizing dosimetry and exposure studies, and is closely related to the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBSAR). The average ACS was measured with a statistical uncertainty of less than 3% and high frequency resolution for individuals with a range of body shapes and sizes allowing the statistical distribution of WBSAR over a real population with individual internal and external morphologies to be determined. The average ACS of all subjects was found to vary from 0.15 to 0.4 m(2); for an individual subject it falls with frequency over 1-6 GHz, and then rises slowly over the 6-12 GHz range in which few other studies have been conducted. Average ACS and WBSAR are then used as a surrogate for worst-case ACS/WBSAR, in order to study their variability across a real population compared to literature results from simulations using numerical phantoms with a limited range of anatomies. Correlations with body morphological parameters such as height, mass and waist circumference have been investigated: the strongest correlation is with body surface area (BSA) at all frequencies above 1 GHz, however direct proportionality to BSA is not established until above 5 GHz. When the average ACS is normalized to the BSA, the resulting absorption efficiency shows a negative correlation with the estimated thickness of subcutaneous body fat. Surrogate models and statistical analysis of the measurement data are presented and compared to similar models from the literature. The overall dispersion of measured average WBSAR of the sample of the UK population studied is consistent with the dispersion of simulated worst-case WBSAR across multiple numerical phantom families. The statistical results obtained allow the calibration of human

  17. Mass energy-absorption coefficients and average atomic energy-absorption cross-sections for amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    More, Chaitali V., E-mail: chaitalimore89@gmail.com; Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; Pawar, Pravina P., E-mail: pravinapawar4@gmail.com

    Mass attenuation coefficients of amino acids such as n-acetyl-l-tryptophan, n-acetyl-l-tyrosine and d-tryptophan were measured in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV. NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system was used to detect gamma rays with a resolution of 8.2% at 0.662 MeV. The measured attenuation coefficient values were then used to determine the mass energy-absorption coefficients (σ{sub a,en}) and average atomic energy-absorption cross sections (μ{sub en}/ρ) of the amino acids. Theoretical values were calculated based on XCOM data. Theoretical and experimental values are found to be in good agreement.

  18. Porosity estimates on basaltic basement samples using the neutron absorption cross section (Σ): Implications for fluid flow and alteration of the oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichow, M. K.; Brewer, T. S.; Marvin, L. G.; Lee, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    Little information presently exists on the heterogeneity of hydrothermal alteration in the oceanic crust or the variability of the associated thermal, fluid, and chemical fluxes. Formation porosities are important controls on these fluxes and porosity measurements are routinely collected during wireline logging operations. These estimates on the formation porosity are measures of the moderating power of the formation in response to bombardment by neutrons. The neutron absorption macroscopic cross-section (Σ = σρ) is a representation of the ability of the rock to slow down neutrons, and as such can be used to invert the porosity of a sample. Boron, lithium and other trace elements are important controls on σ-values, and the distribution of these is influenced by secondary low-temperature alteration processes. Consequently, computed σ-values may be used to discriminate between various basalt types and to identify areas of secondary alteration. Critical in this analysis is the degree of alteration, since elements such as B and Li can dramatically affect the sigma value and leading to erroneous porosity values. We analysed over 150 'pool-samples' for S, Li, Be and B element concentrations to estimate their contribution to the measured neutron porosity. These chemical analyses allow the calculation of the model sigma values for individual samples. Using a range of variably altered samples recovered during IODP Expeditions 309 and 312 we provide bulk estimates of alteration within the drilled section using the measured neutron porosity. B concentration in Hole 1256D increases with depth, with sharp rises at 959 and 1139 mbsf. Elevated wireline neutron porosities cannot always be directly linked with high B content. However, our preliminary results imply that increased neutron porosity (~15) at depths below 1100 mbsf may reflect hydrothermal alteration rather than formation porosity. This interpretation is supported when compared with generally lower computed

  19. Bibliography of photoabsorption cross-section data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, R. D.; Kieffer, L. J.

    1970-01-01

    This bibliography contains only references which report a measured or calculated photoabsorption cross section (relative or normalized) in regions of continuous absorption. The bibliography is current as of January 1, 1970.

  20. High-resolution absorption cross section measurements of supersonic jet-cooled carbon monoxide between 92.5 and 97.4 nanometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Stark, G.; Esmond, J. R.; Smith, P. L.; Ito, K.; Matsui, T.

    1995-01-01

    High-resolution photoabsorption cross sections for eight CO bands, at wavelengths between 92.5 nm and 97.4 nm, have been measured in a supersonic jet-cooled source (approximately equals 20 K) at the Photon Factory synchrotron radiation facility. New integrated cross sections are reported for four bands between 92.5 nm and 94.2 nm. A low-temperature spectrum of the W(1)-X(0) band (95.6 nm), which was used to determine the absorbing CO column densities, is also presented. Additional jet-cooled cross section measurements were made on the L(0)-X(0), K(0)-X(0), and W(0)-X(0) bands (96.7-97.4 nm) which verify previously published results. A self-consistent set of band oscillator strengths is presented for the eight bands studied.

  1. High-resolution absorption cross section measurements of carbon monoxide at 20 K between 96.7 and 98.8 nanometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, G.; Yoshino, K.; Smith, P. L.; Esmond, J. R.; Ito, K.; Stevens, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Photoabsorption cross sections for five CO bands, at wavelengths between 96.7 and 98.8 nm, have been measured at high-resolution in a supersonic jet-cooled source at the Photon Factory synchrotron facility. New integrated cross sections are reported for the K-X, L(prime)-X, and L-X bands. Low-temperature spectra of the J-X and W-X bands, which were used in the determination of the absorbing CO column densities, are also presented. The rotational structures of the K-X, L(prime)-X, and L-X bands do not overlap in the low-temperature spectra, allowing for the first unambiguous determination of these band oscillator strengths. We also report revised room temperature measurements of integrated cross sections for the K-X, L(prime)-X, and L-X bands, in which distortions in the measured spectra due to insufficient instrumental resolution have been minimized; the revised room temperature integrated cross sections are consistent with the low-temperature results.

  2. Neutrino Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments aims to answer many interesting questions such as whether there is CP violation in the neutrino sector and whether sterile neutrinos exist. These esperiments will require high precision cross section measurements of various neutrino and antineutrino channels. Results and prosepects for such measurements from the MINERvA, MiniBooNE, T2K and ArgoNeuT collaborations will be reviewed.

  3. Radar cross section lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhs, A. E.

    A comprehensive account is given of the principles that can be applied in military aircraft configuration studies to minimize the radar cross section (RCS) that will be presented by the resulting design to advanced radars under various mission circumstances. It is noted that, while certain ECM techniques can be nullified by improved enemy electronics in a very short time, RCS reductions may require as much as a decade of radar development before prior levels of detectability can be reestablished by enemy defenses. Attention is given to RCS magnitude determinants, inverse scattering, the polarization and scattering matrix, the RCSs of flat plates and conducting cylinders, and antenna geometry and beam patterns.

  4. FLOWS WITH CROSS SECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Verjovsky, Alberto

    1970-01-01

    Let M be a compact connected C∞-manifold, of dimension n, without boundary. Let ft: M → M be a Cr-flow with cross section. Let Dr(M) be the topological group of diffeomorphisms of M with Cr-topology (1 ≤ r ≤ ∞) and let Dor(M) be its connected component of the identity. Let [unk](M) be the group of I-cobordism classes in Dr(M) generated by orientation-preserving diffeomorphisms. For fεDr(M) denote by [f] its I-cobordism class. Theorem 1 deals with the dependence of M(f) on [f]. Theorem 2: S6 × S1 has at least 28 distinct differentiable structures. Let xoεS1 and let [unk]r be the set of Cr-flows (r ≥ 1) in M × S1 with cross section M × {xo} and inducing in it the identity. Theorem 3: Intuitively to a loop in Dor based at the identity there corresponds a flow in [unk]r, and to homotopic loops correspond isotopic flows. COROLLARY. complete analysis of [unk]r/ [unk] for dim M = 2. Theorems 4 and 5 refer to Anosov flows for dim M > 3. PMID:16591849

  5. Optical Model and Cross Section Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.W.; Pigni, M.T.; Dietrich, F.S.

    2009-10-05

    Distinct minima and maxima in the neutron total cross section uncertainties were observed in model calculations using spherical optical potential. We found this oscillating structure to be a general feature of quantum mechanical wave scattering. Specifically, we analyzed neutron interaction with 56Fe from 1 keV up to 65 MeV, and investigated physical origin of the minima.We discuss their potential importance for practical applications as well as the implications for the uncertainties in total and absorption cross sections.

  6. Earth Versus Neutrinos: Measuring the Total Muon-Neutrino-to-Nucleon Cross Section at Ultra-High Energies through Differential Earth Absorption of Muon Neutrinos from Cosmic Rays Using the IceCube Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miarecki, Sandra Christine

    The IceCube Neutrino Detector at the South Pole was constructed to measure the flux of high-energy neutrinos and to try to identify their cosmic sources. In addition to these astrophysical neutrinos, IceCube also detects the neutrinos that result from cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. These atmospheric neutrinos can be used to measure the total muon neutrino-to-nucleon cross section by measuring neutrino absorption in the Earth. The measurement involves isolating a sample of 10,784 Earth-transiting muons detected by IceCube in its 79-string configuration. The cross-section is determined using a two-dimensional fit in measured muon energy and zenith angle and is presented as a multiple of the Standard Model expectation as calculated by Cooper-Sarkar, Mertsch, and Sarkar in 2011. A multiple of 1.0 would indicate agreement with the Standard Model. The results of this analysis find the multiple to be 1.30 (+0.21 -0.19 statistical) (+0.40 -0.44 systematic) for the neutrino energy range of 6.3 to 980 TeV, which is in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  7. Atmospheric Chemistry of E- and Z-CF3CH═CHF (HFO-1234ze): OH Reaction Kinetics as a Function of Temperature and UV and IR Absorption Cross Sections.

    PubMed

    Antiñolo, María; Bravo, Iván; Jiménez, Elena; Ballesteros, Bernabé; Albaladejo, José

    2017-11-02

    We report here the rate coefficients for the OH reactions (k OH ) with E-CF 3 CH═CHF and Z-CF 3 CH═CHF, potential substitutes of HFC-134a, as a function of temperature (263-358 K) and pressure (45-300 Torr) by pulsed laser photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence techniques. For the E-isomer, the existing discrepancy among previous results on the T dependence of k OH needs to be elucidated. For the Z-isomer, this work constitutes the first absolute determination of k OH . No pressure dependence of k OH was observed, while k OH exhibits a non-Arrhenius behavior: k OH (E) = [Formula: see text] and k OH (Z) = [Formula: see text] cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , where uncertainties are 2σ. UV absorption cross sections, σ λ , are reported for the first time. From σ λ and considering a photolysis quantum yield of 1, an upper limit for the photolysis rate coefficients and lifetimes due to this process in the troposphere are estimated: 3 × 10 -8 s -1 and >1 year for the E-isomer and 2 × 10 -7 s -1 and >2 months for Z-CF 3 CH═CHF, respectively. Under these conditions, the overall estimated tropospheric lifetimes are 15 days (for the E-isomer) and 8 days (for the Z-isomer), the major degradation pathway being the OH reaction, with a contribution of the photolytic pathway of less than 3% (for E) and 13% (for Z). IR absorption cross sections were determined both experimentally (500-4000 cm -1 ) and theoretically (0-2000 cm -1 ). From the theoretical IR measurements, it is concluded that the contribution of the 0-500 cm -1 region to the total integrated cross sections is appreciable for the E-isomer (9%) but almost negligible for the Z-isomer (0.5%). Nevertheless, the impact on their radiative efficiency and global warming potential is negligible.

  8. Cross section of resonant Raman scattering of light by polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdyugin, V. V.; Burshteyn, K. Ya.; Shorygin, P. P.

    1987-03-01

    An experimental study is presented of the resonant Raman spectra of beta carotene. Absolute differential cross sections are obtained for the most intensive Raman spectral lines with excitation at the absorption maximum. A theoretical analysis is presented of the variation in absolute differential cross section as a function of a number of conjunct double bonds in the polyenes.

  9. Ultrafast responses of two V-shaped compounds with a reverse conjugated structural configuration: an investigation of the reason for the enhanced two-photon absorption cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaochuan; Jiang, Yihua; Liu, Dajun; Wang, Yizhuo; Wang, Guiqiu; Hua, Jianli

    2018-06-01

    To study the effect of the conjugated structural configuration on the two-photon absorption (TPA) properties of V-shaped compounds, two 1,3,5-triazine-based compounds with the same electron donor (D) and acceptor (A) connected in a reverse-conjugated structural configuration ( T02: D-π-A-π-D; R02: A-π-D-π-A) were systematically investigated using steady-state and transient absorption spectroscopy, open-aperture Z-scan measurements, and two-photon fluorescence measurements. The TPA cross-section of compound R02 connected in a A-π-D-π-A-conjugated structural configuration with triphenylamine as the central core was 203 GM, which showed a 2.3-fold enhancement compared with compound T02 connected in a reverse D-π-A-π-D-conjugated structural configuration (90 GM, with 1,3,5-triazine as the central core). This result indicates that the conjugated structural configuration plays an important role in the TPA properties. A two-color pump-probe experiment was used to investigate the effect of the conjugated structural configuration on the excited state and intra-molecular charge transfer (ICT) properties of these V-shaped compounds. The formation and relaxation lifetimes of the ICT state were determined. The results indicate that the electron-donating/accepting strength of the central group, which serves as a communal group for two D-π-A subunits, was confirmed to be a key role to the overall effect of the ICT for V-shaped compounds. These ultrafast dynamic results are in agreement with the TPA properties.

  10. Total cross sections for ultracold neutrons scattered from gases

    DOE PAGES

    Seestrom, Susan Joyce; Adamek, Evan R.; Barlow, Dave; ...

    2017-01-30

    Here, we have followed up on our previous measurements of upscattering of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) from a series of gases by making measurements of total cross sections on the following gases hydrogen, ethane, methane, isobutene, n-butane, ethylene, water vapor, propane, neopentane, isopropyl alcohol, and 3He. The values of these cross sections are important for estimating the loss rate of trapped neutrons due to residual gas and are relevant to neutron lifetime measurements using UCNs. The effects of the UCN velocity and path-length distributions were accounted for in the analysis using a Monte Carlo transport code. Results are compared to ourmore » previous measurements and with the known absorption cross section for 3He scaled to our UCN energy. We find that the total cross sections for the hydrocarbon gases are reasonably described by a function linear in the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule.« less

  11. Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 107 Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database (Web, free access)   This is a database primarily of total ionization cross sections of molecules by electron impact. The database also includes cross sections for a small number of atoms and energy distributions of ejected electrons for H, He, and H2. The cross sections were calculated using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, which combines the Mott cross section with the high-incident energy behavior of the Bethe cross section. Selected experimental data are included.

  12. Terahertz radar cross section measurements.

    PubMed

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-12-06

    We perform angle- and frequency-resolved radar cross section (RCS) measurements on objects at terahertz frequencies. Our RCS measurements are performed on a scale model aircraft of size 5-10 cm in polar and azimuthal configurations, and correspond closely to RCS measurements with conventional radar on full-size objects. The measurements are performed in a terahertz time-domain system with freely propagating terahertz pulses generated by tilted pulse front excitation of lithium niobate crystals and measured with sub-picosecond time resolution. The application of a time domain system provides ranging information and also allows for identification of scattering points such as weaponry attached to the aircraft. The shapes of the models and positions of reflecting parts are retrieved by the filtered back projection algorithm.

  13. Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry: Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, Robert S.

    The neutron activation of components in a nuclear device can provide useful signatures of weapon design or sophistication. This lecture will cover some of the basics of neutron reaction cross sections. Nuclear reactor cross sections will also be presented to illustrate the complexity of convolving neutron energy spectra with nuclear excitation functions to calculate useful effective reactor cross sections. Deficiencies in the nuclear database will be discussed along with tools available at Los Alamos to provide new neutron cross section data.

  14. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  15. Annular-Cross-Section CFE Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed continuous-flow-electrophoresis (CFE) chamber of annular cross section offers advantages over conventional CFE chamber, and wedge-cross-section chamber described in "Increasing Sensitivity in Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis" (MFS-26176). In comparison with wedge-shaped chamber, chamber of annular cross section virtually eliminates such wall effects as electro-osmosis and transverse gradients of velocity. Sensitivity enhanced by incorporating gradient maker and radial (collateral) flow.

  16. Nucleon-Nucleon Total Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The total proton-proton and neutron-proton cross sections currently used in the transport code HZETRN show significant disagreement with experiment in the GeV and EeV energy ranges. The GeV range is near the region of maximum cosmic ray intensity. It is therefore important to correct these cross sections, so that predictions of space radiation environments will be accurate. Parameterizations of nucleon-nucleon total cross sections are developed which are accurate over the entire energy range of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  17. SU-E-I-43: Photoelectric Cross Section Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, A; Nakagawa, K; Kotoku, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The importance of the precision in photoelectric cross-section value increases for recent developed technology such as dual energy computed tomography, in which some reconstruction algorithms require the energy dependence of the photo-absorption in each material composition of human being. In this study, we revisited the photoelectric cross-section calculation by self-consistent relativistic Hartree-Fock (HF) atomic model and compared with that widely distributed as “XCOM database” in National Institute of Standards and Technology, which was evaluated with localdensity approximation for electron-exchange (Fock)z potential. Methods: The photoelectric cross section can be calculated with the electron wave functions in initial atomic state (boundmore » electron) and final continuum state (photoelectron). These electron states were constructed based on the selfconsistent HF calculation, where the repulsive Coulomb potential from the electron charge distribution (Hartree term) and the electron exchange potential with full electromagnetic interaction (Fock term) were included for the electron-electron interaction. The photoelectric cross sections were evaluated for He (Z=2), Be (Z=4), C (Z=6), O (Z=8), and Ne (Z=10) in energy range of 10keV to 1MeV. The Result was compared with XCOM database. Results: The difference of the photoelectric cross section between the present calculation and XCOM database was 8% at a maximum (in 10keV for Be). The agreement tends to be better as the atomic number increases. The contribution from each atomic shell has a considerable discrepancy with XCOM database except for K-shell. However, because the photoelectric cross section arising from K-shell is dominant, the net photoelectric cross section was almost insensitive to the different handling in Fock potential. Conclusion: The photoelectric cross-section program has been developed based on the fully self-consistent relativistic HF atomic model. Due to small effect on the

  18. The radar cross section of dielectric disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A solution is presented for the backscatter (nonstatic) radar cross section of dielectric disks of arbitrary shape, thickness and dielectric constant. The result is obtained by employing a Kirchhoff type approximation to obtain the fields inside the disk. The internal fields induce polarization and conduction currents from which the scattered fields and the radar cross section can be computed. The solution for the radar cross section obtained in this manner is shown to agree with known results in the special cases of normal incidence, thin disks and perfect conductivity. The solution can also be written as a product of the reflection coefficient of an identically oriented slab times the physical optics solution for the backscatter cross section of a perfectly conducting disk of the same shape. This result follows directly from the Kirchhoff type approximation without additional assumptions.

  19. Capture cross sections on unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Escher, J. E.; Scielzo, N.; Bedrossian, P.; Ilieva, R. S.; Humby, P.; Cooper, N.; Goddard, P. M.; Werner, V.; Tornow, W.; Rusev, G.; Kelley, J. H.; Pietralla, N.; Scheck, M.; Savran, D.; Löher, B.; Yates, S. W.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Tsoneva, N.; Goriely, S.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate neutron-capture cross sections on unstable nuclei near the line of beta stability are crucial for understanding the s-process nucleosynthesis. However, neutron-capture cross sections for short-lived radionuclides are difficult to measure due to the fact that the measurements require both highly radioactive samples and intense neutron sources. Essential ingredients for describing the γ decays following neutron capture are the γ-ray strength function and level densities. We will compare different indirect approaches for obtaining the most relevant observables that can constrain Hauser-Feshbach statistical-model calculations of capture cross sections. Specifically, we will consider photon scattering using monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photon beams. Challenges that exist on the path to obtaining neutron-capture cross sections for reactions on isotopes near and far from stability will be discussed.

  20. Capture cross sections on unstable nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tonchev, A. P.; Escher, J. E.; Scielzo, N.

    2017-09-13

    Accurate neutron-capture cross sections on unstable nuclei near the line of beta stability are crucial for understanding the s-process nucleosynthesis. However, neutron-capture cross sections for short-lived radionuclides are difficult to measure due to the fact that the measurements require both highly radioactive samples and intense neutron sources. Essential ingredients for describing the γ decays following neutron capture are the γ-ray strength function and level densities. We will compare different indirect approaches for obtaining the most relevant observables that can constrain Hauser-Feshbach statistical-model calculations of capture cross sections. Specifically, we will consider photon scattering using monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photonmore » beams. Here, challenges that exist on the path to obtaining neutron-capture cross sections for reactions on isotopes near and far from stability will be discussed.« less

  1. Shuttle orbiter radar cross-sectional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; James, R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and model simulation studies on signal to noise levels and shuttle radar cross section are described. Pre-mission system calibrations, system configuration, and postmission system calibration of the tracking radars are described. Conversion of target range, azimuth, and elevation into radar centered east north vertical position coordinates are evaluated. The location of the impinging rf energy with respect to the target vehicles body axis triad is calculated. Cross section correlation between the two radars is presented.

  2. Two-Photon Absorption and Two-Photon-Induced Gain in Perovskite Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Gabriel; Rocha, Jaqueline O; Bonato, Luiz G; Nogueira, Ana F; Zaharieva, Zhanet; Watt, Andrew A R; de Brito Cruz, Carlos H; Padilha, Lazaro A

    2018-06-21

    Perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) emerged as a promising class of material for applications in lighting devices, including light emitting diodes and lasers. In this work, we explore nonlinear absorption properties of PQDs showing the spectral signatures and the size dependence of their two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-section, which can reach values higher than 10 6 GM. The large 2PA cross section allows for low threshold two-photon induced amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which can be as low as 1.6 mJ/cm 2 . We also show that the ASE properties are strongly dependent on the nanomaterial size, and that the ASE threshold, in terms of the average number of excitons, decreases for smaller PQDs. Investigating the PQDs biexciton binding energy, we observe strong correlation between the increasing on the biexciton binding energy and the decreasing on the ASE threshold, suggesting that ASE in PQDs is a biexciton-assisted process.

  3. Cross sections for electron collision with difluoroacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Choi, Heechol; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Antony, Bobby; Song, Mi-Young

    2017-04-01

    We report a detailed calculation of total elastic, differential elastic, momentum transfer and electronic excitation for electron impact on difluoroacetylene (C2F2) molecules using the R-matrix method at low energies. After testing many target models, the final results are reported for the target model that gave the best target properties and predicted the lowest value of the shape resonance. The shape resonance is detected at 5.86 eV and 6.49 eV with the close-coupling and static exchange models due to 2Πg (2B2g, 2B3g) states. We observed that the effect of polarization becomes prominent at low energies below 4 eV, decreasing the magnitude of the elastic cross section systematically as it increases for C2F2. We have also computed elastic cross sections for C2H2, C2F4 and C2H4 with a similar model and compared with the experimental data for these molecules along with C2F2. General agreement is found in terms of the shape and nature of the cross section. Such a comparison shows the reliability of the present method for obtaining the cross section for C2F2. The calculation of elastic scattering cross section is extended to higher energies up to 5 keV using the spherical complex optical potential method. The two methods are found to be consistent, merging at around 12 eV for the elastic scattering cross section. Finally we report the total ionization cross section using the binary encounter Bethe method for C2F2. The perfluorination effect in the shape and magnitude of the elastic, momentum transfer and ionization cross sections when compared with C2H2 showed a similar trend to that in the C2H4-C2F4 and C6H6-C6F6 systems. The cross-section data reported in this article could be an important input for the development of a C2F2 plasma model for selective etching of Si/SiO2 in the semiconductor industry.

  4. Dijet cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Garcia, Y. Zamora; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jelén, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajaç, J.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Große-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mańczak, O.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stilliaris, E.; Surrow, B.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zhou, J. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Leich, A.; Mattingly, M.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Bagbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; De Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Freidhof, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, J. I.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Mainusch, J.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. Y. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Blair, G. A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Daniels, D.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Luffman, P. E.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; De Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Porocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; Van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchuła, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Ali, I.; Badgett, W. F.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; ZEUS Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Dijet production by almost real photons has been studied at HERA with the ZEUS detector. Jets have been identified using the cone algorithm. A cut on xγOBS, the fraction of the photon energy participating in the production of the two jets of highest transverse energy, is used to define cross sections sensitive to the parton distributions in the proton and in the photon. The dependence of the dijet cross sections on pseudorapidity has been measured for xγOBS ⩾ 0.75 and xγOBS < 0.75. The former is sensitive to the gluon momentum density in the proton. The latter is sensitive to the ginon in the photon. The cross sections are corrected for detector acceptance and compared to leading order QCD calculations.

  5. Survival Mediated Heavy Element Capture Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveland, Walter; Yao, Larry

    2017-11-01

    Formally, the cross section for producing a heavy evaporation residue, σEVR, in a fusion reaction can be written as where E is the center of mass energy, and T is the probability of the colliding nuclei to overcome the potential barrier in the entrance channel and reach the contact point. PCN is the probability that the projectile-target system will evolve from the contact point to the compound nucleus. Wsur is the probability that the compound nucleus will decay to produce an evaporation residue rather than fissioning. However, one must remember that the Wsur term effectively sets the allowed values of the spin, which in turn, restricts the values of the capture and fusion cross sections. We point out the implications of this fact for capture cross sections for heavy element formation reactions.

  6. Prospects for Precision Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.

    2016-01-28

    The need for precision cross section measurements is more urgent now than ever before, given the central role neutrino oscillation measurements play in the field of particle physics. The definition of precision is something worth considering, however. In order to build the best model for an oscillation experiment, cross section measurements should span a broad range of energies, neutrino interaction channels, and target nuclei. Precision might better be defined not in the final uncertainty associated with any one measurement but rather with the breadth of measurements that are available to constrain models. Current experience shows that models are better constrainedmore » by 10 measurements across different processes and energies with 10% uncertainties than by one measurement of one process on one nucleus with a 1% uncertainty. This article describes the current status of and future prospects for the field of precision cross section measurements considering the metric of how many processes, energies, and nuclei have been studied.« less

  7. Multigroup cross section library for GFR2400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čerba, Štefan; Vrban, Branislav; Lüley, Jakub; Haščík, Ján; Nečas, Vladimír

    2017-09-01

    In this paper the development and optimization of the SBJ_E71 multigroup cross section library for GFR2400 applications is discussed. A cross section processing scheme, merging Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, was developed. Several fine and coarse group structures and two weighting flux options were analysed through 18 benchmark experiments selected from the handbook of ICSBEP and based on performed similarity assessments. The performance of the collapsed version of the SBJ_E71 library was compared with MCNP5 CE ENDF/B VII.1 and the Korean KAFAX-E70 library. The comparison was made based on integral parameters of calculations performed on full core homogenous models.

  8. Cotton fibre cross-section properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    From a structural perspective the cotton fibre is a singularly discrete, elongated plant cell with no junctions or inter-cellular boundaries. Its form in nature is essentially unadulterated from the field to the spinning mill where its cross-section properties, as for any textile fibre, are central ...

  9. Windows in direct dissociative recombination cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1986-01-01

    Model potential curves are used to show that large windows are present in direct dissociative-recombination cross sections from excited molecular-ion vibrational levels. The windows are due to the overlap of vibrational wave functions of the repulsive neutral states with the nodes of the ion vibrational wave function.

  10. Cross Sections From Scalar Field Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank; Norman, Ryan B.; Nasto, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    A one pion exchange scalar model is used to calculate differential and total cross sections for pion production through nucleon- nucleon collisions. The collisions involve intermediate delta particle production and decay to nucleons and a pion. The model provides the basic theoretical framework for scalar field theory and can be applied to particle production processes where the effects of spin can be neglected.

  11. Cross-sectional structural parameters from densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Whalen, Robert T.

    2002-01-01

    Bone densitometry has previously been used to obtain cross-sectional properties of bone from a single X-ray projection across the bone width. Using three unique projections, we have extended the method to obtain the principal area moments of inertia and orientations of the principal axes at each scan cross-section along the length of the scan. Various aluminum phantoms were used to examine scanner characteristics to develop the highest accuracy possible for in vitro non-invasive analysis of cross-sectional properties. Factors considered included X-ray photon energy, initial scan orientation, the angle spanned by the three scans (included angle), and I(min)/I(max) ratios. Principal moments of inertia were accurate to within +/-3.1% and principal angles were within +/-1 degrees of the expected value for phantoms scanned with included angles of 60 degrees and 90 degrees at the higher X-ray photon energy (140 kVp). Low standard deviations in the error (0.68-1.84%) also indicate high precision of calculated measurements with these included angles. Accuracy and precision decreased slightly when the included angle was reduced to 30 degrees. The method was then successfully applied to a pair of excised cadaveric tibiae. The accuracy and insensitivity of the algorithms to cross-sectional shape and changing isotropy (I(min)/I(max)) values when various included angles are used make this technique viable for future in vivo studies.

  12. Two-photon absorption spectra of carotenoids compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, Marcelo Gonçalves; Silva, Daniel Luiz; Boni, Leonardo de; Zalesny, Robert; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2011-05-01

    Carotenoids are biosynthetic organic pigments that constitute an important class of one-dimensional π-conjugated organic molecules with enormous potential for application in biophotonic devices. In this context, we studied the degenerate two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-section spectra of two carotenoid compounds (β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal) employing the conventional and white-light-continuum Z-scan techniques and quantum chemistry calculations. Because carotenoids coexist at room temperature as a mixture of isomers, the 2PA spectra reported here are due to samples containing a distribution of isomers, presenting distinct conjugation length and conformation. We show that these compounds present a defined structure on the 2PA spectra, that peaks at 650 nm with an absorption cross-section of approximately 5000 GM, for both compounds. In addition, we observed a 2PA band at 990 nm for β-apo-8'-carotenal, which was attributed to a overlapping of 11Bu+-like and 21Ag--like states, which are strongly one- and two-photon allowed, respectively. Spectroscopic parameters of the electronic transitions to singlet-excited states, which are directly related to photophysical properties of these compounds, were obtained by fitting the 2PA spectra using the sum-over-states approach. The analysis and interpretations of the 2PA spectra of the investigated carotenoids were supported by theoretical predictions of one- and two-photon transitions carried out using the response functions formalism within the density functional theory framework, using the long-range corrected CAM-B3LYP functional.

  13. High-accuracy reference standards for two-photon absorption in the 680–1050 nm wavelength range

    PubMed Central

    de Reguardati, Sophie; Pahapill, Juri; Mikhailov, Alexander; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Degenerate two-photon absorption (2PA) of a series of organic fluorophores is measured using femtosecond fluorescence excitation method in the wavelength range, λ2PA = 680–1050 nm, and ~100 MHz pulse repetition rate. The function of relative 2PA spectral shape is obtained with estimated accuracy 5%, and the absolute 2PA cross section is measured at selected wavelengths with the accuracy 8%. Significant improvement of the accuracy is achieved by means of rigorous evaluation of the quadratic dependence of the fluorescence signal on the incident photon flux in the whole wavelength range, by comparing results obtained from two independent experiments, as well as due to meticulous evaluation of critical experimental parameters, including the excitation spatial- and temporal pulse shape, laser power and sample geometry. Application of the reference standards in nonlinear transmittance measurements is discussed. PMID:27137334

  14. Two-photon excitation cross-section in light and intermediate atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1980-01-01

    The method of explicit summation over the intermediate states is used along with LS coupling to derive an expression for two-photon absorption cross section in light and intermediate atoms in terms of integrals over radial wave functions. Two selection rules, one exact and one approximate, are also derived. In evaluating the radial integrals, for low-lying levels, the Hartree-Fock wave functions, and for high-lying levels, hydrogenic wave functions obtained by the quantum defect method are used. A relationship between the cross section and the oscillator strengths is derived. Cross sections due to selected transitions in nitrogen, oxygen, and chlorine are given. The expression for the cross section is useful in calculating the two-photon absorption in light and intermediate atoms.

  15. The mid-IR Absorption Cross Sections of α- and β-NAT (HNO3 · 3H2O) in the range 170 to 185 K and of metastable NAD (HNO3 · 2H2O) in the range 172 to 182 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannarelli, R.; Rossi, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    Growth and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption in transmission of the title nitric acid hydrates have been performed in a stirred flow reactor (SFR) under tight control of the H2O and HNO3 deposition conditions affording a closed mass balance of the binary mixture. The gas and condensed phases have been simultaneously monitored using residual gas mass spectrometry and FTIR absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Barrierless nucleation of the metastable phases of both α-NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) and NAD (nitric acid dihydrate) has been observed when HNO3 was admitted to the SFR in the presence of a macroscopic thin film of pure H2O ice of typically 1 µm thickness. The stable β-NAT phase was spontaneously formed from the precursor α-NAT phase through irreversible thermal rearrangement beginning at 185 K. This facile growth scheme of nitric acid hydrates requires the presence of H2O ice at thicknesses in excess of approximately hundred nanometers. Absolute absorption cross sections in the mid-IR spectral range (700-4000 cm-1) of all three title compounds have been obtained after spectral subtraction of excess pure ice at temperatures characteristic of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. Prominent IR absorption frequencies correspond to the antisymmetric nitrate stretch vibration (ν3(NO3-)) in the range 1300 to 1420 cm-1 and the bands of hydrated protons in the range 1670 to 1850 cm-1 in addition to the antisymmetric O-H stretch vibration of bound H2O in the range 3380 to 3430 cm-1 for NAT.

  16. Study of elastic and inelastic cross sections by positron impact on inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Suvam; Naghma, Rahla; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2018-04-01

    In this article, a modified computational method recently introduced is used for the calculation of total, positronium (Ps) formation and ionization cross sections including direct and total ionization cross sections for positron scattering from noble gases. The incident positron is assumed to have energies over a wide range from 5 eV to 5 keV. The positron-atom interaction potential is developed under an optical potential framework and the computations of cross sections for each process are performed by introducing appropriate absorption thresholds. The calculated results obtained by employing this modified approach are found to be in reasonably good agreement with most of the existing data.

  17. Double differential cross sections of ethane molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev

    2018-05-01

    Partial and total double differential cross sections corresponding to various cations C2H6+, C2H4+, C2H5+, C2H3+, C2H2+, CH3+, H+, CH2+, C2H+, H2+, CH+, H3+, C2+ and C+ produced during the direct and dissociative electron ionization of Ethane (C2H6) molecule have been calculated at fixed impinging electron energies 200 and 500eV by using modified Jain-Khare semi empirical approach. The calculation for double differential cross sections is made as a function of energy loss suffered by primary electron and angle of incident. To the best of my knowledge no other data is available for the comparison.

  18. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, F. A.; Whitley, T. A.; Keller, P. R.; Taylor, J. W.

    1991-07-01

    Absolute partial photoionization cross sections for ionization out of the first four valence orbitals to the X 2B 3u, A 2B 3g, B 2A g and C 2B 2u states of the C 2H 4+ ion are presented as a function of photon energy over the energy range from 12 to 26 eV. The experimental results have been compared to previously published relative partial cross sections for the first two bands at 18, 21 and 24 eV. Comparison of the experimental data with continuum multiple scattering Xα calculations provides evidence for extensive autoionization to the X 2B 3u state and confirms the predicted shape resonances in ionization to the A 2B 3g and B 2A g states. Identification of possible transitions for the autoionizing resonances have been made using multiple scattering transition state calculations on Rydberg excited states.

  19. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  20. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  1. Fusion cross sections measurements with MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Ugalde, C.; Paul, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.

    2014-09-01

    The interaction between exotic nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion processes as well as for the energy production in stars. With the advent of radioactive beams new frontiers for fusion reaction studies have become accessible. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems 10 , 14 , 15C + 12C using a newly developed active target-detector system (MUSIC). Comparison of the obtained cross sections with theoretical predictions show a good agreement in the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams. This type of comparison allows us to calibrate the calculations for cases that cannot be studied in the laboratory with the current experimental capabilities. The high efficiency of this active detector system will allow future measurements with even more neutron-rich isotopes. The interaction between exotic nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion processes as well as for the energy production in stars. With the advent of radioactive beams new frontiers for fusion reaction studies have become accessible. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems 10 , 14 , 15C + 12C using a newly developed active target-detector system (MUSIC). Comparison of the obtained cross sections with theoretical predictions show a good agreement in the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams. This type of comparison allows us to calibrate the calculations for cases that cannot be studied in the laboratory with the current experimental capabilities. The high efficiency of this active detector system will allow future measurements with even more neutron-rich isotopes. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and the Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Argentina, Grant SJ10/39.

  2. Neutron capture cross section of ^243Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.

    2009-10-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was used for neutron capture cross section measurement on ^243Am. The high granularity of DANCE (160 BaF2 detectors in a 4π geometry) enables the efficient detection of prompt gamma-rays following neutron capture. DANCE is located on the 20.26 m neutron flight path 14 (FP14) at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The methods and techniques established in [1] were used for the determination of the ^243Am neutron capture cross section. The cross sections were obtained in the range of neutron energies from 0.02 eV to 400 keV. The resonance region was analyzed using SAMMY7 and resonance parameters were extracted. The results will be compared to existing evaluations and calculations. Work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy at Los Alamos National Laboratory by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. [4pt] [1] M. Jandel et al., Phys. Rev. C78, 034609 (2008)

  3. NNLO jet cross sections by subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, G.; Bolzoni, P.; Trócsányi, Z.

    2010-08-01

    We report on the computation of a class of integrals that appear when integrating the so-called iterated singly-unresolved approximate cross section of the NNLO subtraction scheme of Refs. [G. Somogyi, Z. Trócsányi, and V. Del Duca, JHEP 06, 024 (2005), arXiv:hep-ph/0502226; G. Somogyi and Z. Trócsányi, (2006), arXiv:hep-ph/0609041; G. Somogyi, Z. Trócsányi, and V. Del Duca, JHEP 01, 070 (2007), arXiv:hep-ph/0609042; G. Somogyi and Z. Trócsányi, JHEP 01, 052 (2007), arXiv:hep-ph/0609043] over the factorised phase space of unresolved partons. The integrated approximate cross section itself can be written as the product of an insertion operator (in colour space) times the Born cross section. We give selected results for the insertion operator for processes with two and three hard partons in the final state.

  4. Neutron capture cross sections of Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebiger, Stefan; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Couture, Aaron; Krtička, Milan; Mosby, Shea; Reifarth, René; O'Donnell, John; Rusev, Gencho; Ullmann, John; Weigand, Mario; Wolf, Clemens

    2018-01-01

    Neutron capture and β- -decay are competing branches of the s-process nucleosynthesis path at 85Kr [1], which makes it an important branching point. The knowledge of its neutron capture cross section is therefore essential to constrain stellar models of nucleosynthesis. Despite its importance for different fields, no direct measurement of the cross section of 85Kr in the keV-regime has been performed. The currently reported uncertainties are still in the order of 50% [2, 3]. Neutron capture cross section measurements on a 4% enriched 85Kr gas enclosed in a stainless steel cylinder were performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). 85Kr is radioactive isotope with a half life of 10.8 years. As this was a low-enrichment sample, the main contaminants, the stable krypton isotopes 83Kr and 86Kr, were also investigated. The material was highly enriched and contained in pressurized stainless steel spheres.

  5. Averaging cross section data so we can fit it

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.

    2014-10-23

    The 56Fe cross section we are interested in have a lot of fluctuations. We would like to fit the average of the cross section with cross sections calculated within EMPIRE. EMPIRE is a Hauser-Feshbach theory based nuclear reaction code, requires cross sections to be smoothed using a Lorentzian profile. The plan is to fit EMPIRE to these cross sections in the fast region (say above 500 keV).

  6. New cross sections for H on H2 collisional transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Qianxia

    2011-12-01

    The cross section for H on H2 collisions is important for astrophysics as well as our understanding of the simple chemical systems. This is the simplest atom-molecule cross section. With a new H3 potential surface by Mielke et al., we have modified the ABC code by Skouteris, Castillo and Manolopoulos to calculate new cross sections. These cross sections are compared to previous cross section calculations.

  7. Neutron cross sections. Volume I. Resonance parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Garber, D.I.

    1973-06-01

    In contrast to earlier editions, which presented in compact form a summary of the complete store of the neutron data files, this edition aims to provide those portions of neutron data considered to be of prime importance and best suited for inclusion in ready reference form. This volume contains thermal cross sections, resonance properties, resonance parameters, and bibliography for nuclides from H to /sup 257/Fm. Notation and nomenclature, considerations involved in the recommendations, and a table of energyordered resonances are also included. (RWR)

  8. Windowed multipole for cross section Doppler broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josey, C.; Ducru, P.; Forget, B.; Smith, K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an in-depth analysis on the accuracy and performance of the windowed multipole Doppler broadening method. The basic theory behind cross section data is described, along with the basic multipole formalism followed by the approximations leading to windowed multipole method and the algorithm used to efficiently evaluate Doppler broadened cross sections. The method is tested by simulating the BEAVRS benchmark with a windowed multipole library composed of 70 nuclides. Accuracy of the method is demonstrated on a single assembly case where total neutron production rates and 238U capture rates compare within 0.1% to ACE format files at the same temperature. With regards to performance, clock cycle counts and cache misses were measured for single temperature ACE table lookup and for windowed multipole. The windowed multipole method was found to require 39.6% more clock cycles to evaluate, translating to a 7.9% performance loss overall. However, the algorithm has significantly better last-level cache performance, with 3 fewer misses per evaluation, or a 65% reduction in last-level misses. This is due to the small memory footprint of the windowed multipole method and better memory access pattern of the algorithm.

  9. Photoionization research on atomic beams. 2: The photoionization cross section of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comes, F. J.; Speier, F.; Elzer, A.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment to determine the absolute value of the photo-ionization cross section of atomic oxygen is described. The atoms are produced in an electrical discharge in oxygen gas with 1% hydrogen added. In order to prevent recombination a crossed beam technique is employed. The ions formed are detected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The concentration of oxygen atoms in the beam is 57%. The measured photoionization cross section of atomic oxygen is compared with theoretical data. The results show the participation of autoionization processes in ionization. The cross section at the autoionizing levels detected is considerably higher than the absorption due to the unperturbed continuum. Except for wavelengths where autoionization occurs, the measured ionization cross section is in fair agreement with theory. This holds up to 550 A whereas for shorter wavelengths the theoretical values are much higher.

  10. Lunar Radar Cross Section at Low Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P.; Kennedy, E. J.; Kossey, P.; McCarrick, M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Tokarev, Y. V.

    2002-01-01

    Recent bistatic measurements of the lunar radar cross-section have extended the spectrum to long radio wavelength. We have utilized the HF Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) radar facility near Gakona, Alaska to transmit high power pulses at 8.075 MHz to the Moon; the echo pulses were received onboard the NASA/WIND spacecraft by the WAVES HF receiver. This lunar radar experiment follows our previous use of earth-based HF radar with satellites to conduct space experiments. The spacecraft was approaching the Moon for a scheduled orbit perturbation when our experiment of 13 September 2001 was conducted. During the two-hour experiment, the radial distance of the satellite from the Moon varied from 28 to 24 Rm, where Rm is in lunar radii.

  11. Preliminary cross section of Englebright Lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Noah P.; Hampton, Margaret A.

    2003-01-01

    Overview -- The Upper Yuba River Studies Program is a CALFED-funded, multidisciplinary investigation of the feasibility of introducing anadromous fish species to the Yuba River system upstream of Englebright Dam. Englebright Lake (Figure 1 on poster) is a narrow, 14-km-long reservoir located in the northern Sierra Nevada, northeast of Marysville, CA. The dam was completed in 1941 for the primary purpose of trapping sediment derived from mining operations in the Yuba River watershed. Possible management scenarios include lowering or removing Englebright Dam, which could cause the release of stored sediments and associated contaminants, such as mercury used extensively in 19th-century hydraulic gold mining. Transport of released sediment to downstream areas could increase existing problems including flooding and mercury bioaccumulation in sport fish. To characterize the extent, grain size, and chemistry of this sediment, a coring campaign was done in Englebright Lake in May and June 2002. More than twenty holes were drilled at 7 different locations along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir (Figure 4 on poster), recovering 6 complete sequences of post-reservoir deposition and progradation. Here, a longitudinal cross section of Englebright Lake is presented (Figure 5 on poster), including pre-dam and present-day topographic profiles, and sedimentologic sections for each coring site. This figure shows the deltaic form of the reservoir deposit, with a thick upper section consisting of sand and gravel overlying silt, a steep front, and a thinner lower section dominated by silt. The methodologies used to create the reservoir cross section are discussed in the lower part of this poster.

  12. A 23-GROUP NEUTRON THERMALIZATION CROSS SECTION LIBRARY

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R.D.; Boling, M.A.

    1963-07-15

    A set of 23-group neutron cross sections for use in the calculation of neutron thermalization and thermal neutron spectral effects in SNAP reactors is compiled. The sources and methods used to obtain the cross sections are described. (auth)

  13. Experiments on Antiprotons: Antiproton-Nucleon Cross Sections

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chamberlain, Owen; Keller, Donald V.; Mermond, Ronald; Segre, Emilio; Steiner, Herbert M.; Ypsilantis, Tom

    1957-07-22

    In this paper experiments are reported on annihilation and scattering of antiprotons in H{sub 2}O , D{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2}. From the data measured it is possible to obtain an antiproton-proton and an antiproton-deuteron cross section at 457 Mev (lab). Further analysis gives the p-p and p-n cross sections as 104 mb for the p-p reaction cross section and 113 mb for the p-n reaction cross section. The respective annihilation cross sections are 89 and 74 mb. The Glauber correction necessary in order to pass from the p-d to the p-n cross section by subtraction of the p-p cross section is unfortunately large and somewhat uncertain. The data are compared with the p-p and p-n cross sections and with other results on p-p collisions.

  14. Electron capture cross sections by O+ from atomic He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Dwayne C.; Saha, Bidhan C.

    2009-11-01

    The adiabatic representation is used in both the quantal and semi classical molecular orbital close coupling methods (MOCC) to evaluate charge exchange cross sections. Our results show good agreement with experimental cross sections

  15. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  16. Employee engagement within the NHS: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Jeve, Yadava Bapurao; Oppenheimer, Christina; Konje, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Employee engagement is the emotional commitment of the employee towards the organisation. We aimed to analyse baseline work engagement using Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) at a teaching hospital. We have conducted a cross-sectional study within the National Health Service (NHS) Teaching Hospital in the UK. All participants were working age population from both genders directly employed by the hospital. UWES has three constituting dimensions of work engagement as vigor, dedication, and absorption. We conducted the study using UWES-9 tool. Outcome measures were mean score for each dimension of work engagement (vigor, dedication, absorption) and total score compared with control score from test manual. We found that the score for vigor and dedication is significantly lower than comparison group (P< 0.0001 for both). The score for absorption was significantly higher than comparison group (P< 0.0001). However, total score is not significantly different. The study shows that work engagement level is below average within the NHS employees. Vigor and dedication are significantly lower, these are characterised by energy, mental resilience, the willingness to invest one's effort, and persistence as well as a sense of significance, enthusiasm, inspiration, pride, and challenge. The NHS employees are immersed in work. Urgent need to explore strategies to improve work engagement as it is vital for improving productivity, safety and patient experience.

  17. Employee engagement within the NHS: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jeve, Yadava Bapurao; Oppenheimer, Christina; Konje, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Employee engagement is the emotional commitment of the employee towards the organisation. We aimed to analyse baseline work engagement using Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) at a teaching hospital. Methods: We have conducted a cross-sectional study within the National Health Service (NHS) Teaching Hospital in the UK. All participants were working age population from both genders directly employed by the hospital. UWES has three constituting dimensions of work engagement as vigor, dedication, and absorption. We conducted the study using UWES-9 tool. Outcome measures were mean score for each dimension of work engagement (vigor, dedication, absorption) and total score compared with control score from test manual. Results: We found that the score for vigor and dedication is significantly lower than comparison group (P< 0.0001 for both). The score for absorption was significantly higher than comparison group (P< 0.0001). However, total score is not significantly different. Conclusion: The study shows that work engagement level is below average within the NHS employees. Vigor and dedication are significantly lower, these are characterised by energy, mental resilience, the willingness to invest one’s effort, and persistence as well as a sense of significance, enthusiasm, inspiration, pride, and challenge. The NHS employees are immersed in work. Urgent need to explore strategies to improve work engagement as it is vital for improving productivity, safety and patient experience PMID:25674571

  18. Viscous Flow through Pipes of Various Cross-Sections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2007-01-01

    An interesting variety of pipe cross-sectional shapes can be generated, for which the Navier-Stokes equations can be solved exactly. The simplest cases include the known solutions for elliptical and equilateral triangle cross-sections. Students can find pipe cross-sections from solutions of Laplace's equation in two dimensions, and then plot the…

  19. Mental Visualization of Objects from Cross-Sectional Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Stetten, George D.

    2012-01-01

    We extended the classic anorthoscopic viewing procedure to test a model of visualization of 3D structures from 2D cross-sections. Four experiments were conducted to examine key processes described in the model, localizing cross-sections within a common frame of reference and spatiotemporal integration of cross sections into a hierarchical object…

  20. Rayleigh scattering cross-section measurements of nitrogen, argon, oxygen and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, Ryan; Zarzana, Kyle J.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    Knowledge about Rayleigh scattering cross sections is relevant to predictions about radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and needed to calibrate the reflectivity of mirrors that are used in high-finesse optical cavities to measure atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. In this work we have measured the absolute Rayleigh scattering cross-section of nitrogen at 405.8 and 532.2 nm using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Further, multi-spectral measurements of the scattering cross-sections of argon, oxygen and air are presented relative to that of nitrogen from 350 to 660 nm using Broadband Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy (BBCES). The reported measurements agree with refractive index based theory within 0.2±0.4%, and have an absolute accuracy of better than 1.3%. Our measurements expand the spectral range over which Rayleigh scattering cross section measurements of argon, oxygen and air are available at near-ultraviolet wavelengths. The expressions used to represent the Rayleigh scattering cross-section in the literature are evaluated to assess how uncertainties affect quantities measured by cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopic (CEAS) techniques. We conclude that Rayleigh scattering cross sections calculated from theory provide accurate data within very low error bounds, and are suited well to calibrate CEAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols.

  1. An analysis of MCNP cross-sections and tally methods for low-energy photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Demarco, John J; Wallace, Robert E; Boedeker, Kirsten

    2002-04-21

    Monte Carlo calculations are frequently used to analyse a variety of radiological science applications using low-energy (10-1000 keV) photon sources. This study seeks to create a low-energy benchmark for the MCNP Monte Carlo code by simulating the absolute dose rate in water and the air-kerma rate for monoenergetic point sources with energies between 10 keV and 1 MeV. The analysis compares four cross-section datasets as well as the tally method for collision kerma versus absorbed dose. The total photon attenuation coefficient cross-section for low atomic number elements has changed significantly as cross-section data have changed between 1967 and 1989. Differences of up to 10% are observed in the photoelectric cross-section for water at 30 keV between the standard MCNP cross-section dataset (DLC-200) and the most recent XCOM/NIST tabulation. At 30 keV, the absolute dose rate in water at 1.0 cm from the source increases by 7.8% after replacing the DLC-200 photoelectric cross-sections for water with those from the XCOM/NIST tabulation. The differences in the absolute dose rate are analysed when calculated with either the MCNP absorbed dose tally or the collision kerma tally. Significant differences between the collision kerma tally and the absorbed dose tally can occur when using the DLC-200 attenuation coefficients in conjunction with a modern tabulation of mass energy-absorption coefficients.

  2. Multidimensional analysis of fast-spectrum material replacement measurements for systematic estimation of cross section uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.; Lantz, E.; Mayo, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    A series of central core and core-reflector interface sample replacement experiments for 16 materials performed in the NASA heavy-metal-reflected, fast spectrum critical assembly (NCA) were analyzed in four and 13 groups using the GAM 2 cross-section set. The individual worths obtained by TDSN and DOT multidimensional transport theory calculations showed significant differences from the experimental results. These were attributed to cross-section uncertainties in the GAM 2 cross sections. Simultaneous analysis of the measured and calculated sample worths permitted separation of the worths into capture and scattering components which systematically provided fast spectrum averaged correction factors to the magnitudes of the GAM 2 absorption and scattering cross sections. Several Los Alamos clean critical assemblies containing Oy, Ta, and Mo as well as one of the NCA compositions were reanalyzed using the corrected cross sections. In all cases the eigenvalues were significantly improved and were recomputed to within 1 percent of the experimental eigenvalue. A comparable procedure may be used for ENDF cross sections when these are available.

  3. Validation of Cross Sections for Monte Carlo Simulation of the Photoelectric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Han Sung; Pia, Maria Grazia; Basaglia, Tullio; Batič, Matej; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Saracco, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Several total and partial photoionization cross section calculations, based on both theoretical and empirical approaches, are quantitatively evaluated with statistical analyses using a large collection of experimental data retrieved from the literature to identify the state of the art for modeling the photoelectric effect in Monte Carlo particle transport. Some of the examined cross section models are available in general purpose Monte Carlo systems, while others have been implemented and subjected to validation tests for the first time to estimate whether they could improve the accuracy of particle transport codes. The validation process identifies Scofield's 1973 non-relativistic calculations, tabulated in the Evaluated Photon Data Library (EPDL), as the one best reproducing experimental measurements of total cross sections. Specialized total cross section models, some of which derive from more recent calculations, do not provide significant improvements. Scofield's non-relativistic calculations are not surpassed regarding the compatibility with experiment of K and L shell photoionization cross sections either, although in a few test cases Ebel's parameterization produces more accurate results close to absorption edges. Modifications to Biggs and Lighthill's parameterization implemented in Geant4 significantly reduce the accuracy of total cross sections at low energies with respect to its original formulation. The scarcity of suitable experimental data hinders a similar extensive analysis for the simulation of the photoelectron angular distribution, which is limited to a qualitative appraisal.

  4. Measurement of K Shell Photoelectric Cross Sections at a K Edge--A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayak, S. V.; Badiger, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe in this paper a new method for measuring the K shell photoelectric cross sections of high-Z elemental targets at a K absorption edge. In this method the external bremsstrahlung (EB) photons produced in the Ni target foil by beta particles from a weak[superscript 90]Sr-[superscript 90]Y beta source are passed through an elemental target…

  5. Measurement of Scattering Cross Section with a Spectrophotometer with an Integrating Sphere Detector

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalas, A. K.; Wang, Lili; Karpiak, V.; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Choquette, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A commercial spectrometer with an integrating sphere (IS) detector was used to measure the scattering cross section of microspheres. Analysis of the measurement process showed that two measurements of the absorbance, one with the cuvette placed in the normal spectrometer position, and the second with the cuvette placed inside the IS, provided enough information to separate the contributions from scattering and molecular absorption. Measurements were carried out with microspheres with different diameters. The data was fitted with a model consisting of the difference of two terms. The first term was the Lorenz-Mie (L-M) cross section which modeled the total absorbance due to scattering. The second term was the integral of the L-M differential cross section over the detector acceptance angle. The second term estimated the amount of forward scattered light that entered the detector. A wavelength dependent index of refraction was used in the model. The agreement between the model and the data was good between 300 nm and 800 nm. The fits provided values for the microsphere diameter, the concentration, and the wavelength dependent index of refraction. For wavelengths less than 300 nm, the scattering cross section had significant spectral structure which was inversely related to the molecular absorption. This work addresses the measurement and interpretation of the scattering cross section for wavelengths between 300 nm and 800 nm. PMID:26900524

  6. Measurement of Scattering Cross Section with a Spectrophotometer with an Integrating Sphere Detector.

    PubMed

    Gaigalas, A K; Wang, Lili; Karpiak, V; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Choquette, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A commercial spectrometer with an integrating sphere (IS) detector was used to measure the scattering cross section of microspheres. Analysis of the measurement process showed that two measurements of the absorbance, one with the cuvette placed in the normal spectrometer position, and the second with the cuvette placed inside the IS, provided enough information to separate the contributions from scattering and molecular absorption. Measurements were carried out with microspheres with different diameters. The data was fitted with a model consisting of the difference of two terms. The first term was the Lorenz-Mie (L-M) cross section which modeled the total absorbance due to scattering. The second term was the integral of the L-M differential cross section over the detector acceptance angle. The second term estimated the amount of forward scattered light that entered the detector. A wavelength dependent index of refraction was used in the model. The agreement between the model and the data was good between 300 nm and 800 nm. The fits provided values for the microsphere diameter, the concentration, and the wavelength dependent index of refraction. For wavelengths less than 300 nm, the scattering cross section had significant spectral structure which was inversely related to the molecular absorption. This work addresses the measurement and interpretation of the scattering cross section for wavelengths between 300 nm and 800 nm.

  7. Low energy cross sections and underground laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvisiero, P.; LUNA Collaboration

    2005-04-01

    It is known that the chemical elements and their isotopes were created by nuclear fusion reactions in the hot interiors of remote and long-vanished stars over many billions of years [C. Rolfs, W.S. Rodney, Cauldrons in the cosmos, University of Ghicago Press, Chicago (1988)]. The present picture is that all elements from carbon to uranium have been produced entirely within stars during their fiery lifetimes and explosive deaths. The detailed understanding of the origin of the chemical elements and their isotopes combines astrophysics and nuclear physics, and forms what is called nuclear astrophysics. In turn, nuclear reactions are at the heart of nuclear astrophysics: they influence sensitively the nucleosynthesis of the elements in the earliest stages of the universe and in all the objects formed thereafter, and control the associated energy generation, neutrino luminosity, and evolution of stars. A good knowledge of the rates of these fusion reactions is essential to understanding this broad picture. Some of the most important experimental techniques to measure the corresponding cross sections, based both on direct and indirect methods, will be described in this paper.

  8. Female medical leadership: cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kvaerner, K J; Aasland, O G; Botten, G S

    1999-01-09

    To assess the relation between male and female medical leadership. Cross sectional study on predictive factors for female medical leadership with data on sex, age, specialty, and occupational status of Norwegian physicians. Oslo, Norway. 13 844 non-retired Norwegian physicians. Medical leaders, defined as physicians holding a leading position in hospital medicine, public health, academic medicine, or private health care. 14.6% (95% confidence interval 14.0% to 15.4%) of the men were leaders compared with 5.1% (4.4% to 5.9%) of the women. Adjusted for age men had a higher estimated probability of leadership in all categories of age and job, the highest being in academic medicine with 0.57 (0.42 to 0.72) for men aged over 54 years compared with 0.39 (0.21 to 0.63) for women in the same category. Among female hospital physicians there was a positive relation between the proportion of women in their specialty and the probability of leadership. Women do not reach senior positions as easily as men. Medical specialties with high proportions of women have more female leaders.

  9. APPARATUS FOR MEASURING TOTAL NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Cranberg, L.

    1959-10-13

    An apparatus is described for measuring high-resolution total neutron cross sections at high counting rate in the range above 50-kev neutron energy. The pulsed-beam time-of-flight technique is used to identify the neutrons of interest which are produced in the target of an electrostatic accelerator. Energy modulation of the accelerator . makes it possible to make observations at 100 energy points simultaneously. 761O An apparatus is described for monitoring the proton resonance of a liquid which is particulariy useful in the continuous purity analysis of heavy water. A hollow shell with parallel sides defines a meander chamber positioned within a uniform magnetic fieid. The liquid passes through an inlet at the outer edge of the chamber and through a spiral channel to the central region of the chamber where an outlet tube extends into the chamber perpendicular to the magnetic field. The radiofrequency energy for the monitor is coupled to a coil positioned coaxially with the outlet tube at its entrance point within the chamber. The improvement lies in the compact mechanical arrangement of the monitor unit whereby the liquid under analysis is subjected to the same magnetic field in the storage and sensing areas, and the entire unit is shielded from external electrostatic influences.

  10. Extrinsic extinction cross-section in the multiple acoustic scattering by fluid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-04-01

    Cross-sections (and their related energy efficiency factors) are physical parameters used in the quantitative analysis of different phenomena arising from the interaction of waves with a particle (or multiple particles). Earlier works with the acoustic scattering theory considered such quadratic (i.e., nonlinear) quantities for a single scatterer, although a few extended the formalism for a pair of scatterers but were limited to the scattering cross-section only. Therefore, the standard formalism applied to viscous particles is not suitable for the complete description of the cross-sections and energy balance of the multiple-particle system because both absorption and extinction phenomena arise during the multiple scattering process. Based upon the law of the conservation of energy, this work provides a complete comprehensive analysis for the extrinsic scattering, absorption, and extinction cross-sections (i.e., in the far-field) of a pair of viscous scatterers of arbitrary shape, immersed in a nonviscous isotropic fluid. A law of acoustic extinction taking into consideration interparticle effects in wave propagation is established, which constitutes a generalized form of the optical theorem in multiple scattering. Analytical expressions for the scattering, absorption, and extinction cross-sections are derived for plane progressive waves with arbitrary incidence. The mathematical expressions are formulated in partial-wave series expansions in cylindrical coordinates involving the angle of incidence, the addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions, and the expansion coefficients of the scatterers. The analysis shows that the multiple scattering cross-section depends upon the expansion coefficients of both scatterers in addition to an interference factor that depends on the interparticle distance. However, the extinction cross-section depends on the expansion coefficients of the scatterer located in a particular system of coordinates, in addition to the

  11. 54Fe neutron elastic and inelastic scattering differential cross sections from 2-6 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Liu, S. H.; Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B. M.; Crider, B. P.; French, A. J.; Garza, E. A.; Harrison, T.; Henderson, S. L.; Howard, T. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Nigam, S.; Pecha, R. L.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ramirez, A. P. D.; Rice, B. G.; Ross, T. J.; Santonil, Z. C.; Sidwell, L. C.; Steves, J. L.; Thompson, B. K.; Yates, S. W.

    2018-04-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections from 54Fe were performed for nine incident neutron energies between 2 and 6 MeV. Measured differential scattering cross sections are compared to those from previous measurements and the ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF data evaluations. TALYS calculations were performed and modifications of the default parameters are found to better describe the experimental cross sections. A spherical optical model treatment is generally adequate to describe the cross sections in this energy region; however, in 54Fe the direct coupling is found to increase suddenly above 4 MeV and requires an increase in the DWBA deformation parameter by approximately 25%. This has little effect on the elastic scattering differential cross sections but makes a significant improvement in both the strength and shape of the inelastic scattering angular distribution, which are found to be very sensitive to the size and extent of the surface absorption region.

  12. Crushing characteristics of composite tubes with 'near-elliptical' cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine whether the energy-absorption capability of near-elliptical cross-section composite tubular specimens is a function of included angle. Each half of the near-elliptical cross-section tube is a segment of a circle. The included angle is the angle created by radial lines extending from the center of the circular segment to the ends of the circular segment. Graphite- and Kevlar-reinforced epoxy material was used to fabricate specimens. Tube internal diameters were 2.54, 3.81, and 7.62 cm, and included angles were 180, 160, 135, and 90 degrees. Based upon the test results from these tubes, energy-absorption capability increased between 10 and 30 percent as included angle decreased between 180 and 90 degrees for the materials evaluated. Energy-absorption capability was a decreasing nonlinear function of the ratio of tube internal diameter to wall thickness.

  13. Partial Photoneutron Cross Sections for 207,208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Goriely, S.; Iwamoto, C.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Lui, Y.-W.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    Using linearly-polarized laser-Compton scattering γ-rays, partial E1 and M1 photoneutron cross sections along with total cross sections were determined for 207,208Pb at four energies near neutron threshold by measuring anisotropies in photoneutron emission. Separately, total photoneutron cross sections were measured for 207,208Pb with a high-efficiency 4π neutron detector. The partial cross section measurement provides direct evidence for the presence of pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in 207,208Pb in the vicinity of neutron threshold. The strength of PDR amounts to 0.32%-0.42% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. Several μN2 units of B(M1)↑ strength were observed in 207,208Pb just above neutron threshold, which correspond to M1 cross sections less than 10% of the total photoneutron cross sections.

  14. Total and partial photoneutron cross sections for Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Goriely, S.; Daoutidis, I.; Iwamoto, C.; Akimune, H.; Okamoto, A.; Yamagata, T.; Kamata, M.; Itoh, O.; Toyokawa, H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A. J.

    2012-07-01

    Using quasimonochromatic laser-Compton scattering γ rays, total photoneutron cross sections were measured for 206,207,208Pb near neutron threshold with a high-efficiency 4π neutron detector. Partial E1 and M1 photoneutron cross sections along with total cross sections were determined for 207,208Pb at four energies near threshold by measuring anisotropies in photoneutron emission with linearly polarized γ rays. The E1 strength dominates over the M1 strength in the neutron channel where E1 photoneutron cross sections show extra strength of the pygmy dipole resonance in 207,208Pb near the neutron threshold corresponding to 0.32%-0.42% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. Several μN2 units of B(M1)↑ strength were observed in 207,208Pb just above neutron threshold, which correspond to an M1 cross section less than 10% of the total photoneutron cross section.

  15. Measured microwave scattering cross sections of three meteorite specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    Three meteorite specimens were used in a microwave scattering experiment to determine the scattering cross sections of stony meteorites and iron meteorites in the frequency range from 10 to 14 GHz. The results indicate that the stony meteorites have a microwave scattering cross section that is 30 to 50 percent of their projected optical cross section. Measurements of the iron meteorite scattering were inconclusive because of specimen surface irregularities.

  16. Cross sections for the dissociative attachment of electrons to NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, E.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    Cross sections for the production of O(-) by electron attachment to NO are reported. It is found that the maximum value of the cross section is about 52 percent higher than the measurement of Rapp and Briglia (1965). Cross sections for the process of polar dissociation, e + NO yields N(+) + O(_), have also been measured, and the threshold energy for this process has been obtained.

  17. Projectile and Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Electromagnetic Dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Adamczyk, Anne; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Differential cross sections for electromagnetic dissociation in nuclear collisions are calculated for the first time. In order to be useful for three - dimensional transport codes, these cross sections have been calculated in both the projectile and lab frames. The formulas for these cross sections are such that they can be immediately used in space radiation transport codes. Only a limited amount of data exists, but the comparison between theory and experiment is good.

  18. DBCC Software as Database for Collisional Cross-Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Daniel; Moroz, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Interactions of species, such as atoms, radicals, molecules, electrons, and photons, in plasmas used for materials processing could be very complex, and many of them could be described in terms of collisional cross-sections. Researchers involved in plasma simulations must select reasonable cross-sections for collisional processes for implementing them into their simulation codes to be able to correctly simulate plasmas. However, collisional cross-section data are difficult to obtain, and, for some collisional processes, the cross-sections are still not known. Data on collisional cross-sections can be obtained from numerous sources including numerical calculations, experiments, journal articles, conference proceedings, scientific reports, various universities' websites, national labs and centers specifically devoted to collecting data on cross-sections. The cross-sections data received from different sources could be partial, corresponding to limited energy ranges, or could even not be in agreement. The DBCC software package was designed to help researchers in collecting, comparing, and selecting cross-sections, some of which could be constructed from others or chosen as defaults. This is important as different researchers may place trust in different cross-sections or in different sources. We will discuss the details of DBCC and demonstrate how it works and why it is beneficial to researchers working on plasma simulations.

  19. Three-photon absorption process in organic dyes enhanced by surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohanoschi, Ion

    2006-07-01

    Multi-photon absorption processes have received significant attention from the scientific community during the last decade, mainly because of their potential applications in optical limiting, data storage and biomedical fields. Perhaps, one of the most investigated processes studied so far has been two-photon absorption (2PA). These investigations have resulted in successful applications in all the fields mentioned above. However, 2PA present some limitations in the biomedical field when pumping at typical 2PA wavelengths. In order to overcome these limitations, three-photon absorption (3PA) process has been proposed. However, 3PA in organic molecules has a disadvantage, typical values of sigma3' are small (10-81 cm6s 2/photon2), therefore, 3PA excitation requires high irradiances to induce the promotion of electrons from the ground state to the final excited state. To overcome this obstacle, specific molecules that exhibit large 3PA cross-section must be designed. Thus far, there is a lack of systematic studies that correlate 3PA processes with the molecular structure of organic compounds. In order to fill the existent gap in 3PA molecular engineering, in this dissertation we have investigated the structure/property relationship for a new family of fluorene derivatives with very high three-photon absorption cross-sections. We demonstrated that the symmetric intramolecular charge transfer as well as the pi-electron conjugation length enhances the 3PA cross-section of fluorene derivatives. In addition, we showed that the withdrawing electron character of the attractor groups in a pull-pull geometry proved greater 3PA cross-section. After looking for alternative ways to enhance the effective sigma 3' of organic molecules, we investigated the enhancement of two- and three-photon absorption processes by means of Surface Plasmon. We demonstrated an enhancement of the effective two- and three-photon absorption cross-section of an organic compound of 480 and 30 folds

  20. UV-Vis Ratiometric Resonance Synchronous Spectroscopy for Determination of Nanoparticle and Molecular Optical Cross Sections.

    PubMed

    Nettles, Charles B; Zhou, Yadong; Zou, Shengli; Zhang, Dongmao

    2016-03-01

    Demonstrated herein is a UV-vis Ratiometric Resonance Synchronous Spectroscopic (R2S2, pronounced as "R-two-S-two" for simplicity) technique where the R2S2 spectrum is obtained by dividing the resonance synchronous spectrum of a NP-containing solution by the solvent resonance synchronous spectrum. Combined with conventional UV-vis measurements, this R2S2 method enables experimental quantification of the absolute optical cross sections for a wide range of molecular and nanoparticle (NP) materials that range optically from pure photon absorbers or scatterers to simultaneous photon absorbers and scatterers, simultaneous photon absorbers and emitters, and all the way to simultaneous photon absorbers, scatterers, and emitters in the UV-vis wavelength region. Example applications of this R2S2 method were demonstrated for quantifying the Rayleigh scattering cross sections of solvents including water and toluene, absorption and resonance light scattering cross sections for plasmonic gold nanoparticles, and absorption, scattering, and on-resonance fluorescence cross sections for semiconductor quantum dots (Qdots). On-resonance fluorescence quantum yields were quantified for the model molecular fluorophore Eosin Y and fluorescent Qdots CdSe and CdSe/ZnS. The insights and methodology presented in this work should be of broad significance in physical and biological science research that involves photon/matter interactions.

  1. Total cross sections for positrons scattered elastically from helium based on new measurements of total ionization cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diana, L. M.; Chaplin, R. L.; Brooks, D. L.; Adams, J. T.; Reyna, L. K.

    1990-01-01

    An improved technique is presented for employing the 2.3m spectrometer to measure total ionization cross sections, Q sub ion, for positrons incident on He. The new ionization cross section agree with the values reported earlier. Estimates are also presented of total elastic scattering cross section, Q sub el, obtained by subtracting from total scattering cross sections, Q sub tot, reported in the literature, the Q sub ion and Q sub Ps (total positronium formation cross sections) and total excitation cross sections, Q sub ex, published by another researcher. The Q sub ion and Q sub el measured with the 3m high resolution time-of-flight spectrometer for 54.9eV positrons are in accord with the results from the 2.3m spectrometer. The ionization cross sections are in fair agreement with theory tending for the most part to be higher, especially at 76.3 and 88.5eV. The elastic cross section agree quite well with theory to the vicinity of 50eV, but at 60eV and above the experimental elastic cross sections climb to and remain at about 0.30 pi a sub o sq while the theoretical values steadily decrease.

  2. First measurement of the charged current cross section at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kazarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, M.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milone, V.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, G.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Nawrath, G.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schulz, M.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Seehausen, U.; Sefkow, F.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Staroba, P.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.; H1 Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    The cross section of the charged current process e-p → ve + hadrons is measured at HERA for transverse momenta of the hadron system larger than 25 GeV. The size of the cross section exhibits the W propagator.

  3. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Itikawa, Yukikazu, E-mail: yukitikawa@nifty.com

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

  4. Electron induced inelastic and ionization cross section for plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Pankaj; Mahato, Dibyendu; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2016-09-01

    The present paper reports electron impact total inelastic and ionization cross section for silicon, germanium, and tin tetrahalides at energies varying from ionization threshold of the target to 5000 eV. These cross section data over a wide energy domain are very essential to understand the physico-chemical processes involved in various environments such as plasma modeling, semiconductor etching, atmospheric sciences, biological sciences, and radiation physics. However, the cross section data on the above mentioned molecules are scarce. In the present article, we report the computation of total inelastic cross section using spherical complex optical potential formalism and the estimation of ionization cross section through a semi-empirical method. The present ionization cross section result obtained for SiCl4 shows excellent agreement with previous measurements, while other molecules have not yet been investigated experimentally. Present results show more consistent behaviour than previous theoretical estimates. Besides cross sections, we have also studied the correlation of maximum ionization cross section with the square root of the ratio of polarizability to ionization potential for the molecules with known polarizabilities. A linear relation is observed between these quantities. This correlation is used to obtain approximate polarizability volumes for SiBr4, SiI4, GeCl4, GeBr4, and GeI4 molecules.

  5. Photoabsorption cross sections of methane from 1400 to 1850 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Warden, E. S.; Moos, H. W.

    1977-01-01

    Photoabsorption cross sections of methane in the 1400-1850-A spectral region have been measured. Cross sections at wavelengths greater than 1475 A are approximately 200 times smaller than those currently accepted. This has a significant effect on the interpretation of spectral measurements of the Jovian planets in this wavelength region.

  6. Learning of Cross-Sectional Anatomy Using Clay Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    We incorporated clay modeling into gross anatomy and neuro-anatomy courses to help students understand cross-sectional anatomy. By making clay models, cutting them and comparing cut surfaces to CT and MR images, students learned how cross-sectional two-dimensional images were created from three-dimensional structure of human organs. Most students…

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility: A Cross Sectional Examination of Incentivization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    which address organizational behavior: Corporate Social Responsibility ( CSR ), Expense Preference Approach (EPA), Resource Dependency Theory (RDT...i V *>V CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY : A CROSS SECTIONAL EXAMINATION OF INCENTIVIZATION THESIS Jennifer A. Block, B.S. First Lieutenant, USAF...Distribution/ Availability Codes Dist m Avail and/or Special \\&\\W 0\\1 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY : A CROSS SECTIONAL EXAMINATION OF

  8. Electron impact ionisation cross section for organoplatinum compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahato, Dibyendu; Naghma, Rahla; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Ahmad, Shabbir; Antony, Bobby

    2016-11-01

    This article reports electron impact ionisation cross sections for platinum-based drugs viz., cisplatin (H6N2Cl2Pt), carboplatin (C6H12N2O4Pt), oxaliplatin (C8H14N2O4Pt), nedaplatin (C2H8N2O3Pt) and satraplatin (C10H22ClN2O4Pt) complexes used in the cancer chemotherapy. The multi-scattering centre spherical complex optical potential formalism is used to obtain the inelastic cross section for these large molecules upon electron impact. The ionisation cross section is derived from the inelastic cross section employing complex scattering potential-ionisation contribution method. Comparison is made with previous results, where ever available and overall a reasonable agreement is observed. This is the first attempt to report total ionisation cross sections for nedaplatin and satraplatin complexes.

  9. Lighting the Way to See Inside Two-Photon Absorption Materials: Structure–Property Relationship and Biological Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong; Tian, Xiaohe; Zhou, Hongping; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2017-01-01

    The application of two-photon absorption (2PA) materials is a classical research field and has recently attracted increasing interest. It has generated a demand for new dyes with high 2PA cross-sections. In this short review, we briefly cover the structure-2PA property relationships of organic fluorophores, organic-inorganic nanohybrids and metal complexes explored by our group. (1) The two-photon absorption cross-section (δ) of organic fluorophores increases with the extent of charge transfer, which is important to optimize the core, donor-acceptor pair, and conjugation-bridge to obtain a large δ value. Among the various cores, triphenylamine appears to be an efficient core. Lengthening of the conjugation with styryl groups in the D-π-D quadrupoles and D-π-A dipoles increased δ over a long wavelength range than when vinylene groups were used. Large values of δ were observed for extended conjugation length and moderate donor-acceptors in the near-IR wavelengths. The δ value of the three-arm octupole is larger than that of the individual arm, if the core has electron accepting groups that allow significant electronic coupling between the arms; (2) Optical functional organic/inorganic hybrid materials usually show high thermal stability and excellent optical activity; therefore the design of functional organic molecules to build functional organic-inorganic hybrids and optimize the 2PA properties are significant. Advances have been made in the design of organic-inorganic nanohybrid materials of different sizes and shapes for 2PA property, which provide useful examples to illustrate the new features of the 2PA response in comparison to the more thoroughly investigated donor-acceptor based organic compounds and inorganic components; (3) Metal complexes are of particular interest for the design of new materials with large 2PA ability. They offer a wide range of metals with different ligands, which can give rise to tunable electronic and 2PA properties. The metal

  10. Cross sections for electron scattering by carbon disulfide in the low- and intermediate-energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Brescansin, L. M.; Iga, I.; Lee, M.-T.

    2010-01-15

    In this work, we report a theoretical study on e{sup -}-CS{sub 2} collisions in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Elastic differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections, as well as grand total (elastic + inelastic) and absorption cross sections, are reported in the 1-1000 eV range. A recently proposed complex optical potential composed of static, exchange, and correlation-polarization plus absorption contributions is used to describe the electron-molecule interaction. The Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is applied to calculate the scattering amplitudes. The comparison between our calculated results and the existing experimental and/or theoretical results is encouraging.

  11. 3He(γ,pp)n cross sections with tagged photons below the Δ resonance energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, N. R.; Feldman, G.; O'rielly, G. V.; Pywell, R. E.; Skopik, D. M.; Hackett, E. D.; Quraan, M. A.; Rodning, N. L.

    1996-11-01

    Cross sections have been measured for the 3He(γ,pp)n reaction with tagged photons in the range Eγ =161-208 MeV using the Saskatchewan-Alberta Large Acceptance Detector (SALAD). The protons were detected over a range of polar angles of 40°-140° and azimuthal angles of 0°-360° with an energy threshold of 40 MeV. Comparisons are made with a microscopic calculation which includes one-, two-, and three-nucleon absorption mechanisms. One- and two-nucleon processes, including final-state interactions, are unable to account for the measured cross sections. The addition of three-nucleon absorption diagrams gives roughly the right strength, but the distribution in phase space is in disagreement with the data.

  12. Neutron Fission of 235,237,239U and 241,243Pu: Cross Sections, Integral Cross Sections and Cross Sections on Excited States

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Britt, H C

    In a recent paper submitted to Phys. Rev. C they have presented estimates for (n,f) cross sections on a series of Thorium, Uranium and Plutonium isotopes over the range E{sub n} = 0.1-2.5 MeV. The (n,f) cross sections for many of these isotopes are difficult or impossible to measure in the laboratory. The cross sections were obtained from previous (t,pf) reaction data invoking a model which takes into account the differences between (t,pf) and (n,f) reaction processes, and which includes improved estimates for the neutron compound formation process. The purpose of this note is: (1) to compare the estimated crossmore » sections to current data files in both ENDF and ENDL databases; (2) to estimate ratios of cross sections relatively to {sup 235}U integrated over the ''tamped flattop'' critical assembly spectrum that was used in the earlier {sup 237}U report; and (3) to show the effect on the integral cross sections when the neutron capturing state is an excited rotational state or an isomer. The isomer and excited state results are shown for {sup 235}U and {sup 237}U.« less

  13. Cross Section Sensitivity and Propagated Errors in HZE Exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Wilson, John W.; Blatnig, Steve R.; Qualls, Garry D.; Badavi, Francis F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2005-01-01

    It has long been recognized that galactic cosmic rays are of such high energy that they tend to pass through available shielding materials resulting in exposure of astronauts and equipment within space vehicles and habitats. Any protection provided by shielding materials result not so much from stopping such particles but by changing their physical character in interaction with shielding material nuclei forming, hopefully, less dangerous species. Clearly, the fidelity of the nuclear cross-sections is essential to correct specification of shield design and sensitivity to cross-section error is important in guiding experimental validation of cross-section models and database. We examine the Boltzmann transport equation which is used to calculate dose equivalent during solar minimum, with units (cSv/yr), associated with various depths of shielding materials. The dose equivalent is a weighted sum of contributions from neutrons, protons, light ions, medium ions and heavy ions. We investigate the sensitivity of dose equivalent calculations due to errors in nuclear fragmentation cross-sections. We do this error analysis for all possible projectile-fragment combinations (14,365 such combinations) to estimate the sensitivity of the shielding calculations to errors in the nuclear fragmentation cross-sections. Numerical differentiation with respect to the cross-sections will be evaluated in a broad class of materials including polyethylene, aluminum and copper. We will identify the most important cross-sections for further experimental study and evaluate their impact on propagated errors in shielding estimates.

  14. Positron induced scattering cross sections for hydrocarbons relevant to plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Suvam; Antony, Bobby

    2018-05-01

    This article explores positron scattering cross sections by simple hydrocarbons such as ethane, ethene, ethyne, propane, and propyne. Chemical erosion processes occurring on the surface due to plasma-wall interactions are an abundant source of hydrocarbon molecules which contaminate the hydrogenic plasma. These hydrocarbons play an important role in the edge plasma region of Tokamak and ITER. In addition to this, they are also one of the major components in the planetary atmospheres and astrophysical mediums. The present work focuses on calculation of different positron impact interactions with simple hydrocarbons in terms of the total cross section (Qtot), elastic cross section (Qel), direct ionization cross section (Qion), positronium formation cross section (Qps), and total ionization cross section (Qtion). Knowing that the positron-plasma study is one of the trending fields, the calculated data have diverse plasma and astrophysical modeling applications. A comprehensive study of Qtot has been provided where the inelastic cross sections have been reported for the first time. Comparisons are made with those available from the literature, and a good agreement is obtained with the measurements.

  15. Electron impact ionization cross sections of beryllium-tungsten clusters*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukuba, Ivan; Kaiser, Alexander; Huber, Stefan E.; Urban, Jan; Probst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report calculated electron impact ionization cross sections (EICSs) of beryllium-tungsten clusters, BenW with n = 1,...,12, from the ionization threshold to 10 keV using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The positions of the maxima of DM and BEB cross sections are mostly close to each other. The DM cross sections are more sensitive with respect to the cluster size. For the clusters smaller than Be4W they yield smaller cross sections than BEB and vice versa larger cross sections than BEB for clusters larger than Be6W. The maximum cross section values for the singlet-spin groundstate clusters range from 7.0 × 10-16 cm2 at 28 eV (BeW) to 54.2 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the DM cross sections and from 13.5 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (BeW) to 38.9 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the BEB cross sections. Differences of the EICSs in different isomers and between singlet and triplet states are also explored. Both the DM and BEB cross sections could be fitted perfectly to a simple expression used in modeling and simulation codes in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2015-60583-7

  16. Poster - 18: New features in EGSnrc for photon cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Elsayed; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Rogers, Davi

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To implement two new features in the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. The first is an option to account for photonuclear attenuation, which can contribute a few percent to the total cross section at the higher end of the energy range of interest to medical physics. The second is an option to use exact NIST XCOM photon cross sections. Methods: For the first feature, the photonuclear total cross sections are generated from the IAEA evaluated data. In the current, first-order implementation, after a photonuclear event, there is no energy deposition or secondary particle generation. The implementation is validated against deterministicmore » calculations and experimental measurements of transmission signals. For the second feature, before this work, if the user explicitly requested XCOM photon cross sections, EGSnrc still used its own internal incoherent scattering cross sections. These differ by up to 2% from XCOM data between 30 keV and 40 MeV. After this work, exact XCOM incoherent scattering cross sections are an available option. Minor interpolation artifacts in pair and triplet XCOM cross sections are also addressed. The default for photon cross section in EGSnrc is XCOM except for the new incoherent scattering cross sections, which have to be explicitly requested. The photonuclear, incoherent, pair and triplet data from this work are available for elements and compounds for photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV. Results: Both features are implemented and validated in EGSnrc.Conclusions: The two features are part of the standard EGSnrc distribution as of version 4.2.3.2.« less

  17. Calculation of the Coulomb Fission Cross Sections for Pb-Pb and Bi-Pb Interactions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poyser, William J.; Ahern, Sean C.; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The Weizsacker-Williams (WW) method of virtual quanta is used to make approximate cross section calculations for peripheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We calculated the Coulomb fission cross sections for projectile ions of Pb-208 and Bi-209 with energies of 158 A GeV interacting with a Pb-208 target. We also calculated the electromagnetic absorption cross section for Pb-208 ion interacting as described. For comparison we use both the full WW method and a standard approximate WW method. The approximate WW method in larger cross sections compared to the more accurate full WW method.

  18. Design of the Cross Section Shape of AN Aluminum Crash Box for Crashworthiness Enhancement of a CAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. B.; Huh, H.; Lee, G. H.; Yoo, J. S.; Lee, M. Y.

    This paper deals with the crashworthiness of an aluminum crash box for an auto-body with the various shapes of cross section such as a rectangle, a hexagon and an octagon. First, crash boxes with various cross sections were tested with numerical simulation to obtain the energy absorption capacity and the mean load. In case of the simple axial crush, the octagon shape shows higher mean load and energy absorption than the other two shapes. Secondly, the crash boxes were assembled to a simplified auto-body model for the overall crashworthiness. The model consists of a bumper, crash boxes, front side members and a sub-frame representing the behavior of a full car at the low speed impact. The analysis result shows that the rectangular cross section shows the best performance as a crash box which deforms prior to the front side member. The hexagonal and octagonal cross sections undergo torsion and local buckling as the width of cross section decreases while the rectangular cross section does not. The simulation result of the rectangular crash box was verified with the experimental result. The simulation result shows close tendency in the deformed shape and the load-displacement curve to the experimental result.

  19. Low energy e-Ar momentum transfer cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, M.J.

    1992-12-01

    Recent work has shown that solutions of the Boltzmann equation which use the so called {open_quotes}two-term{close_quotes} approximation provide an inadequate description of the transverse diffusion of electrons in argon gas at low values of E/N, contrary to earlier evidence. Previous determinations of the momentum transfer cross section for argon from the analysis of transport data have used two-term codes in good faith. Progress towards the determination of a new cross section in the energy range O - 4 eV, including an analysis of the energy dependence of the uncertainty in the derived cross section is reported.

  20. Evaluation of fusion-evaporation cross-section calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, B.; Canchel, G.; Seis, F.; Delahaye, P.

    2018-02-01

    Calculated fusion-evaporation cross sections from five different codes are compared to experimental data. The present comparison extents over a large range of nuclei and isotopic chains to investigate the evolution of experimental and calculated cross sections. All models more or less overestimate the experimental cross sections. We found reasonable agreement by using the geometrical average of the five model calculations and dividing the average by a factor of 11.2. More refined analyses are made for example for the 100Sn region.

  1. Nucleon and deuteron scattering cross sections from 25 MV/Nucleon to 22.5 GeV/Nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Bidasaria, H. B.

    1983-01-01

    Within the context of a double-folding optical potential approximation to the exact nucleus-nucleus multiple-scattering series, eikonal scattering theory is used to generate tables of nucleon and deuteron total and absorption cross sections at kinetic energies between 25 MeV/nucleon and 22.5 GeV/nucleon for use in cosmic-ray transport and shielding studies. Comparisons of predictions for nucleon-nucleus and deuteron-nucleus absorption and total cross sections with experimental data are also made.

  2. 28. CROSS SECTION OF A RECTANGULAR COKE OVEN SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. CROSS SECTION OF A RECTANGULAR COKE OVEN SHOWING THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF THE OVEN. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  3. Scaling Cross Sections for Ion-atom Impact Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-06-06

    The values of ion-atom ionization cross sections are frequently needed for many applications that utilize the propagation of fast ions through matter. When experimental data and theoretical calculations are not available, approximate formulas are frequently used. This paper briefly summarizes the most important theoretical results and approaches to cross section calculations in order to place the discussion in historical perspective and offer a concise introduction to the topic. Based on experimental data and theoretical predictions, a new fit for ionization cross sections is proposed. The range of validity and accuracy of several frequently used approximations (classical trajectory, the Born approximation,more » and so forth) are discussed using, as examples, the ionization cross sections of hydrogen and helium atoms by various fully stripped ions.« less

  4. Local Deplanation Of Double Reinforced Beam Cross Section Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltov, Anguel; Yanakieva, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Bending of beams, double reinforced by means of thin composite layers, is considered in the study. Approximate numerical solution is proposed, considering transitional boundary areas, where smooth quadratic transition of the elasticity modulus and deformations take place. Deplanation of the cross section is also accounted for in the areas. Their thickness is found equalizing the total stiffness of the cross section and the layer stiffness. Deplanation of the cross section of the transitional area is determined via the longitudinal deformation in the reinforcing layer, accounting for the equilibrium between the internal and the external moment, generated by the longitudinal stresses in the cross section. A numerical example is given as an illustration demonstrating model's plausibility. The model allows the design and the calculation of recycled concrete beams double reinforced by means of thin layers. The approach is in agreement with modern design of nearly zero energy buildings (NZEB).

  5. Electron-Impact Total Ionization Cross Sections of Fluorine Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-K.; Ali, M. A.; Rudd, M. E.

    1997-10-01

    A theoretical method called the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model(M. A. Ali, Y.-K. Kim, H. Hwang, N. M. Weinberger, and M. E. Rudd, J. Chem. Phys. 106), 9602 (1997), and references therein. that combines the Mott cross section at low incident energies T and the Bethe cross section at high T was applied to fluorine compounds of interest to plasma processing of semiconductors (CF_4, CHF_3, C_2F_6, C_4F_8, etc.). The theory provides total ioniztion cross sections in an analytic form from the threshold to a few keV in T, making it convenient to use the theory for modeling. The theory is particularly effective for closed-shell molecules. The theoretical cross sections are compared to available experimental data.

  6. Photocopy of longitudinal, cross sections and roof plan of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of longitudinal, cross sections and roof plan of the C.B. & Q. R.R. roundhouse and locomotive shops. June 1980. - Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, Roundhouse & Shops, Broadway & Spring Streets, Aurora, Kane County, IL

  7. 12. CLOSEUP VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF SPILLWAY FIFTY FEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF SPILLWAY FIFTY FEET FROM LAKESHORE, SHOWING REMAINS OF SPILLWAY TIMBERS, LOOKING WEST - Three Bears Lake & Dams, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  8. 15. Power plant elevations and cross sections, sheet 64 of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Power plant elevations and cross sections, sheet 64 of 130 - Naval Air Station Fallon, Power Plant, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  9. Cross section for the subthreshold fission of 236U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, A. A.; Bergman, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Koptelov, E. A.; Samylin, B. F.; Trufanov, A. M.; Fursov, B. I.; Shorin, V. S.

    2008-08-01

    The cross section for 236U fission in the neutron-energy range E n = 0.001 20 keV was measured by using the INR RAS (Institute of Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) LSDS-100 neutron spectrometer of the lead slowing-down spectrometer type. The resonance fission areas of the resonances at 5.45 eV and 1.28 keV were found, and the fission widths of these resonances were evaluated. The cross section for the 238U( n, f) fission process was measured, and the threshold sensitivity of the LSDS-100 to small values of fission cross sections was estimated. The well-known intermediate structure in the cross section for the neutron-induced subbarrier fission of 236U was confirmed.

  10. Radiative neutron capture cross sections on 176Lu at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, O.; Jandel, M.; Méot, V.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    The cross section of the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n ,γ ) has been measured for a wide incident neutron energy range with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be (1912 ±132 ) b for one of the Lu natural isotopes, 176Lu. The resonance part was measured and compared to the Mughabghab's atlas using the R -matrix code, sammy. At higher neutron energies the measured cross sections are compared to ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, and BRC evaluated nuclear data. The Maxwellian averaged cross sections in a stellar plasma for thermal energies between 5 keV and 100 keV were extracted using these data.

  11. Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2015-09-25

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab, has undergone intense studies in the last 20 years. Currently, CDF and D0 converge on their measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections using the full Tevatron data sample. In these proceedings, the latest results on inclusive and differential measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections at the Tevatron are reported.

  12. Thermoelastic damping in microrings with circular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pu; Fang, Yuming; Zhang, Jianrun

    2016-01-01

    Predicting thermoelastic damping (TED) is crucial in the design of high Q micro-resonators. Microrings are often critical components in many micro-resonators. Some analytical models for TED in microrings have already been developed in the past. However, the previous works are limited to the microrings with rectangular cross-section. The temperature field in the rectangular cross-section is one-dimensional. This paper deals with TED in the microrings with circular cross-section. The temperature field in the circular cross-section is two-dimensional. This paper first presents a 2-D analytical model for TED in the microrings with circular cross-section. Only the two-dimensional heat conduction in the circular cross-section is considered. The heat conduction along the circumferential direction of the microring is neglected in the 2-D model. Then the 2-D model has been extended to cover the circumferential heat conduction, and a 3-D analytical model for TED has been developed. The analytical results from the present 2-D and 3-D models show good agreement with the numerical results of FEM model. The limitations of the present 2-D analytical model are assessed.

  13. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Longitudinal Mediation Processes.

    PubMed

    O'Laughlin, Kristine D; Martin, Monica J; Ferrer, Emilio

    2018-01-01

    Statistical mediation analysis can help to identify and explain the mechanisms behind psychological processes. Examining a set of variables for mediation effects is a ubiquitous process in the social sciences literature; however, despite evidence suggesting that cross-sectional data can misrepresent the mediation of longitudinal processes, cross-sectional analyses continue to be used in this manner. Alternative longitudinal mediation models, including those rooted in a structural equation modeling framework (cross-lagged panel, latent growth curve, and latent difference score models) are currently available and may provide a better representation of mediation processes for longitudinal data. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, we provide a comparison of cross-sectional and longitudinal mediation models; second, we advocate using models to evaluate mediation effects that capture the temporal sequence of the process under study. Two separate empirical examples are presented to illustrate differences in the conclusions drawn from cross-sectional and longitudinal mediation analyses. Findings from these examples yielded substantial differences in interpretations between the cross-sectional and longitudinal mediation models considered here. Based on these observations, researchers should use caution when attempting to use cross-sectional data in place of longitudinal data for mediation analyses.

  14. Methodology Series Module 3: Cross-sectional Studies.

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional study design is a type of observational study design. In a cross-sectional study, the investigator measures the outcome and the exposures in the study participants at the same time. Unlike in case-control studies (participants selected based on the outcome status) or cohort studies (participants selected based on the exposure status), the participants in a cross-sectional study are just selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria set for the study. Once the participants have been selected for the study, the investigator follows the study to assess the exposure and the outcomes. Cross-sectional designs are used for population-based surveys and to assess the prevalence of diseases in clinic-based samples. These studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive. They may be conducted either before planning a cohort study or a baseline in a cohort study. These types of designs will give us information about the prevalence of outcomes or exposures; this information will be useful for designing the cohort study. However, since this is a 1-time measurement of exposure and outcome, it is difficult to derive causal relationships from cross-sectional analysis. We can estimate the prevalence of disease in cross-sectional studies. Furthermore, we will also be able to estimate the odds ratios to study the association between exposure and the outcomes in this design.

  15. Methodology Series Module 3: Cross-sectional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional study design is a type of observational study design. In a cross-sectional study, the investigator measures the outcome and the exposures in the study participants at the same time. Unlike in case–control studies (participants selected based on the outcome status) or cohort studies (participants selected based on the exposure status), the participants in a cross-sectional study are just selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria set for the study. Once the participants have been selected for the study, the investigator follows the study to assess the exposure and the outcomes. Cross-sectional designs are used for population-based surveys and to assess the prevalence of diseases in clinic-based samples. These studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive. They may be conducted either before planning a cohort study or a baseline in a cohort study. These types of designs will give us information about the prevalence of outcomes or exposures; this information will be useful for designing the cohort study. However, since this is a 1-time measurement of exposure and outcome, it is difficult to derive causal relationships from cross-sectional analysis. We can estimate the prevalence of disease in cross-sectional studies. Furthermore, we will also be able to estimate the odds ratios to study the association between exposure and the outcomes in this design. PMID:27293245

  16. Mental visualization of objects from cross-sectional images

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Stetten, George D.

    2011-01-01

    We extended the classic anorthoscopic viewing procedure to test a model of visualization of 3D structures from 2D cross-sections. Four experiments were conducted to examine key processes described in the model, localizing cross-sections within a common frame of reference and spatiotemporal integration of cross sections into a hierarchical object representation. Participants used a hand-held device to reveal a hidden object as a sequence of cross-sectional images. The process of localization was manipulated by contrasting two displays, in-situ vs. ex-situ, which differed in whether cross sections were presented at their source locations or displaced to a remote screen. The process of integration was manipulated by varying the structural complexity of target objects and their components. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated visualization of 2D and 3D line-segment objects and verified predictions about display and complexity effects. In Experiments 3 and 4, the visualized forms were familiar letters and numbers. Errors and orientation effects showed that displacing cross-sectional images to a remote display (ex-situ viewing) impeded the ability to determine spatial relationships among pattern components, a failure of integration at the object level. PMID:22217386

  17. Activation cross section and isomeric cross section ratios for the (n ,2 n ) reaction on 153Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junhua; Jiang, Li; Li, Suyuan

    2017-10-01

    The 153Eu(n ,2 n ) m1,m2,g152Eu cross section was measured by means of the activation technique at three neutron energies in the range 13-15 MeV. The quasimonoenergetic neutron beam was formed via the 3H(d ,n ) 4He reaction, in the Pd-300 Neutron Generator at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). The activities induced in the reaction products were measured using high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. The cross section of the population of the second high-spin (8-) isomeric state was measured along with the reaction cross section populating both the ground (3-) and the first isomeric state (0-). Cross sections were also evaluated theoretically using the numerical code TALYS-1.8, with different level density options at neutron energies varying from the reaction threshold to 20 MeV. Results are discussed and compared with the corresponding literature.

  18. Two-photon excitation cross section in light and intermediate atoms in frozen-core LS-coupling approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1980-01-01

    Using the method of explicit summation over the intermediate states two-photon absorption cross sections in light and intermediate atoms based on the simplistic frozen-core approximation and LS coupling have been formulated. Formulas for the cross section in terms of integrals over radial wave functions are given. Two selection rules, one exact and one approximate, valid within the stated approximations are derived. The formulas are applied to two-photon absorptions in nitrogen, oxygen, and chlorine. In evaluating the radial integrals, for low-lying levels, the Hartree-Fock wave functions, and for high-lying levels, hydrogenic wave functions obtained by the quantum-defect method have been used. A relationship between the cross section and the oscillator strengths is derived.

  19. Measurement of the 242Pu neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Dance Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Precision (n,f) and (n, γ) cross sections are important for the network calculations of the radiochemical diagnostic chain for the U.S. DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is relevant to the network calculations of Pu and Am. Additionally, new reactor concepts have catalyzed considerable interest in the measurement of improved cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on key actinides. To date, little or no experimental data has been reported on 242Pu(n, γ) for incident neutron energy below 50 keV. A new measurement of the 242Pu(n, γ) reaction was performed with the DANCE together with an improved PPAC for fission-fragment detection at LANSCE during FY14. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section spans four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ~ 30 keV. The absolute scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is set according to the measured 239Pu(n,f) resonance at 7.8 eV; the target was spiked with 239Pu for this measurement. The absolute 242Pu(n, γ) neutron capture cross section is ~ 30% higher than the cross section reported in ENDF for the 2.7 eV resonance. Latest results to be reported. Funded by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC52-06NA25396 (LANL). U.S. DOE/NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development. Isotopes (ORNL).

  20. Inclined Bodies of Various Cross Sections at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Leland H.

    1958-01-01

    To aid in assessing effects of cross-sectional shape on body aerodynamics, the forces and moments have been measured for bodies with circular, elliptic, square, and triangular cross sections at Mach numbers 1.98 and 3.88. Results for bodies with noncircular cross sections have been compared with results for bodies of revolution having the same axial distribution of cross-sectional area (and, thus, the same equivalent fineness ratio). Comparisons have been made for bodies of fineness ratios 6 and 10 at angles of attack from 0 deg to about 20 deg and for Reynolds numbers, based on body length, of 4.0 x 10(exp 6) and 6.7 x 10(exp 6). The results of this investigation show that distinct aerodynamic advantages can be obtained by using bodies with noncircular cross sections. At certain angles of bank, bodies with elliptic, square, and triangular cross sections develop considerably greater lift and lift-drag ratios than equivalent bodies of revolution. For bodies with elliptic cross sections, lift and pitching-moment coefficients can be correlated with corresponding coefficients for equivalent circular bodies. It has been found that the ratios of lift and pitching-moment coefficients for an elliptic body to those for an equivalent circular body are practically constant with change in both angle of attack and Mach number. These lift and moment ratios are given very accurately by slender-body theory. As a result of this agreement, the method of NACA Rep. 1048 for computing forces and moments for bodies of revolution has been simply extended to bodies with elliptic cross sections. For the cases considered (elliptic bodies of fineness ratios 6 and 10 having cross-sectional axis ratios of 1.5 and 2), agreement of theory with experiment is very good. As a supplement to the force and moment results, visual studies of the flow over bodies have been made by use of the vapor-screen, sublimation, and white-lead techniques. Photographs from these studies are included in the report.

  1. Determining the partial photoionization cross-sections of ethyl radicals.

    PubMed

    FitzPatrick, B L; Maienschein-Cline, M; Butler, L J; Lee, S-H; Lin, J J

    2007-12-13

    Using a crossed laser-molecular beam scattering apparatus, these experiments photodissociate ethyl chloride at 193 nm and detect the Cl and ethyl products, resolved by their center-of-mass recoil velocities, with vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. The data determine the relative partial cross-sections for the photoionization of ethyl radicals to form C2H5+, C2H4+, and C2H3+ at 12.1 and 13.8 eV. The data also determine the internal energy distribution of the ethyl radical prior to photoionization, so we can assess the internal energy dependence of the photoionization cross-sections. The results show that the C2H4++H and C2H3++H2 dissociative photoionization cross-sections strongly depend on the photoionization energy. Calibrating the ethyl radical partial photoionization cross-sections relative to the bandwidth-averaged photoionization cross-section of Cl atoms near 13.8 eV allows us to use these data in conjunction with literature estimates of the Cl atom photoionization cross-sections to put the present bandwidth-averaged cross-sections on an absolute scale. The resulting bandwidth-averaged cross-section for the photoionization of ethyl radicals to C2H5+ near 13.8 eV is 8+/-2 Mb. Comparison of our 12.1 eV data with high-resolution ethyl radical photoionization spectra allows us to roughly put the high-resolution spectrum on the same absolute scale. Thus, one obtains the photoionization cross-section of ethyl radicals to C2H5+ from threshold to 12.1 eV. The data show that the onset of the C2H4++H dissociative photoionization channel is above 12.1 eV; this result offers a simple way to determine whether the signal observed in photoionization experiments on complex mixtures is due to ethyl radicals. We discuss an application of the results for resolving the product branching in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction.

  2. 242Pu absolute neutron-capture cross section measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2017-09-01

    The absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. During target fabrication, a small amount of 239Pu was added to the active target so that the absolute scale of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section could be set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section covers four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. The cross section reported in ENDF/B-VII.1 for the 242Pu(n,γ) En,R = 2.68 eV resonance was found to be 2.4% lower than the new absolute 242Pu(n,γ) cross section.

  3. Statistical Features of the Thermal Neutron Capture Cross Sections

    DOE PAGES

    Hussein, M. S.; Carlson, B. V.; Kerman, A. K.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the existence of huge thermal neutron capture cross sections in several nuclei. The values of the cross sections are several orders of magnitude bigger than expected at these very low energies. We lend support to the idea that this phenomenon is random in nature and is similar to what we have learned from the study of parity violation in the actinide region. The idea of statistical doorways is advanced as a unified concept in the delineation of large numbers in the nuclear world. The average number of maxima per unit mass, < n A >more » in the capture cross section is calculated and related to the underlying cross section correlation function and found to be < n A > = 3/(π√2γ A), where γ A is a characteristic mass correlation width which designates the degree of remnant coherence in the system. Finally, we trace this coherence to nucleosynthesis which produced the nuclei whose neutron capture cross sections are considered here.« less

  4. EDDIX--a database of ionisation double differential cross sections.

    PubMed

    MacGibbon, J H; Emerson, S; Liamsuwan, T; Nikjoo, H

    2011-02-01

    The use of Monte Carlo track structure is a choice method in biophysical modelling and calculations. To precisely model 3D and 4D tracks, the cross section for the ionisation by an incoming ion, double differential in the outgoing electron energy and angle, is required. However, the double differential cross section cannot be theoretically modelled over the full range of parameters. To address this issue, a database of all available experimental data has been constructed. Currently, the database of Experimental Double Differential Ionisation Cross sections (EDDIX) contains over 1200 digitalised experimentally measured datasets from the 1960s to present date, covering all available ion species (hydrogen to uranium) and all available target species. Double differential cross sections are also presented with the aid of an eight parameter functions fitted to the cross sections. The parameters include projectile species and charge, target nuclear charge and atomic mass, projectile atomic mass and energy, electron energy and deflection angle. It is planned to freely distribute EDDIX and make it available to the radiation research community for use in the analytical and numerical modelling of track structure.

  5. Cross Sections and Transport Properties of BR- Ions in AR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Jasmina; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Raspopovic, Zoran; Petrovic, Zoran

    2014-10-01

    We have used a combination of a simple semi-analytic theory - Momentum Transfer Theory (MTT) and exact Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to develop Br- in Ar momentum transfer cross section based on the available data for reduced mobility at the temperature T = 300 K over the range 10 Td <= E / N <= 300 Td. At very low energies, we have extrapolated obtained cross sections towards Langevin's cross section. Also, we have extrapolated data to somewhat higher energies based on behavior of similar ions in similar gases and by the addition of the total detachment cross section that was used from the threshold around 7.7 eV. Relatively complete set was derived which can be used in modeling of plasmas by both hybrid, particle in cell (PIC) and fluid codes. A good agreement between calculated and measured ion mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients is an independent proof of the validity of the cross sections that were derived for the negative ion mobility data. In addition to transport coefficients we have also calculated the net rate coefficients of elastic scattering and detachment. Author acknowledge Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Proj. Nos. 171037 and 410011.

  6. Electromagnetic Dissociation Cross Sections using Weisskopf-Ewing Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, Anne M.; Norbury, John W.

    2011-01-01

    It is important that accurate estimates of crew exposure to radiation are obtained for future long-term space missions. Presently, several space radiation transport codes exist to predict the radiation environment, all of which take as input particle interaction cross sections that describe the nuclear interactions between the particles and the shielding material. The space radiation transport code HZETRN uses the nuclear fragmentation model NUCFRG2 to calculate Electromagnetic Dissociation (EMD) cross sections. Currently, NUCFRG2 employs energy independent branching ratios to calculate these cross sections. Using Weisskopf-Ewing (WE) theory to calculate branching ratios, however, is more advantageous than the method currently employed in NUCFRG2. The WE theory can calculate not only neutron and proton emission, as in the energy independent branching ratio formalism used in NUCFRG2, but also deuteron, triton, helion, and alpha particle emission. These particles can contribute significantly to total exposure estimates. In this work, photonuclear cross sections are calculated using WE theory and the energy independent branching ratios used in NUCFRG2 and then compared to experimental data. It is found that the WE theory gives comparable, but mainly better agreement with data than the energy independent branching ratio. Furthermore, EMD cross sections for single neutron, proton, and alpha particle removal are calculated using WE theory and an energy independent branching ratio used in NUCFRG2 and compared to experimental data.

  7. Cross-section fluctuations in chaotic scattering systems.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Torleif E O; Dietz, Barbara; Richter, Achim

    2016-10-01

    Exact analytical expressions for the cross-section correlation functions of chaotic scattering systems have hitherto been derived only under special conditions. The objective of the present article is to provide expressions that are applicable beyond these restrictions. The derivation is based on a statistical model of Breit-Wigner type for chaotic scattering amplitudes which has been shown to describe the exact analytical results for the scattering (S)-matrix correlation functions accurately. Our results are given in the energy and in the time representations and apply in the whole range from isolated to overlapping resonances. The S-matrix contributions to the cross-section correlations are obtained in terms of explicit irreducible and reducible correlation functions. Consequently, the model can be used for a detailed exploration of the key features of the cross-section correlations and the underlying physical mechanisms. In the region of isolated resonances, the cross-section correlations contain a dominant contribution from the self-correlation term. For narrow states the self-correlations originate predominantly from widely spaced states with exceptionally large partial width. In the asymptotic region of well-overlapping resonances, the cross-section autocorrelation functions are given in terms of the S-matrix autocorrelation functions. For inelastic correlations, in particular, the Ericson fluctuations rapidly dominate in that region. Agreement with known analytical and experimental results is excellent.

  8. Statistical Features of the Thermal Neutron Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, M. S.; Carlson, B. V.; Kerman, A. K.

    In this paper, we discuss the existence of huge thermal neutron capture cross sections in several nuclei. The values of the cross sections are several orders of magnitude bigger than expected at these very low energies. We lend support to the idea that this phenomenon is random in nature and is similar to what we have learned from the study of parity violation in the actinide region. The idea of statistical doorways is advanced as a unified concept in the delineation of large numbers in the nuclear world. The average number of maxima per unit mass, < n A >more » in the capture cross section is calculated and related to the underlying cross section correlation function and found to be < n A > = 3/(π√2γ A), where γ A is a characteristic mass correlation width which designates the degree of remnant coherence in the system. Finally, we trace this coherence to nucleosynthesis which produced the nuclei whose neutron capture cross sections are considered here.« less

  9. Electron Impact Ionization Cross Sections in Rb and Cs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddish, T. J.; Lukomski, M.; Sutton, S.; Kedzierski, W.; McConkey, J. W.; Bartschat, K.; Bartlett, P. L.; Stelbovics, A. T.; Bray, I.

    2006-05-01

    We present a new atom trapping technique for determining absolute, total ionisation cross sections (TICS) out of an excited atom. The novel feature of this method is in utilizing Doppler cooling of neutral atoms to determine ionisation cross sections. This fluorescence-monitoring experiment, which is a variant of the `trap loss' technique, has enabled us to obtain the experimental electron impact ionisation cross sections out of the Cs 6^2P3/2 excited state between 7 - 400 eV. New CCC, R-Matrix with Pseudo-States (RMPS), and Born approximation single ionisation cross sections (SICS) are also presented for both the ground and excited states of Cs and Rb, and compared with the available experimental data. The comparison of the results reveals the importance of the autoionisation and multiple ionisation contributions to the TICS. The autoionisation contribution appears to be substantial for ionisation out of the Cs 6^2P and Rb 5^2P excited states; ˜ 3-4 larger than the direct ionisation contribution predicted by CCC at ˜ 30-50 eV. This surprising result shows the importance of multi-electron processes in determining the ionisation cross sections of heavy alkali atoms.

  10. Simulation of multistatic and backscattering cross sections for airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Albert W.

    1986-07-01

    In order to determine susceptibilities of airborne radar to electronic countermeasures and electronic counter-countermeasures simulations of multistatic and backscattering cross sections were developed as digital modules in the form of algorithms. Cross section algorithms are described for prolate (cigar shape) and oblate (disk shape) spheroids. Backscattering cross section algorithms are also described for different categories of terrain. Backscattering cross section computer programs were written for terrain categorized as vegetation, sea ice, glacial ice, geological (rocks, sand, hills, etc.), oceans, man-made structures, and water bodies. PROGRAM SIGTERRA is a file for backscattering cross section modules of terrain (TERRA) such as vegetation (AGCROP), oceans (OCEAN), Arctic sea ice (SEAICE), glacial snow (GLASNO), geological structures (GEOL), man-made structures (MAMMAD), or water bodies (WATER). AGCROP describes agricultural crops, trees or forests, prairies or grassland, and shrubs or bush cover. OCEAN has the SLAR or SAR looking downwind, upwind, and crosswind at the ocean surface. SEAICE looks at winter ice and old or polar ice. GLASNO is divided into a glacial ice and snow or snowfields. MANMAD includes buildings, houses, roads, railroad tracks, airfields and hangars, telephone and power lines, barges, trucks, trains, and automobiles. WATER has lakes, rivers, canals, and swamps. PROGRAM SIGAIR is a similar file for airborne targets such as prolate and oblate spheroids.

  11. Electromagnetic Nucleus - Nucleus Cross Sections Using Energy Dependent Branching Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Anne; Norbury, John

    2009-11-01

    Energy dependent branching ratios, derived from Weisskopf-Ewing theory, are presented and compared to an energy independent formalism, developed by Norbury, Townsend, and Westfall. The energy dependent branching ratio formalism is more versatile since it allows for not only neutron and proton emission, but also alpha particle, deuteron, helion, and triton emission. A new theoretical method for calculating electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) nucleus - nucleus cross sections, with energy dependent branching ratios, is introduced. Comparisons of photonuclear and nucleus - nucleus cross sections, using energy dependent and independent branching ratios, to experiment are presented. Experimental efforts, by various groups, have focused on measuring cross sections for proton and neutron emission, because proton and neutron emission is generally more probable than heavier particle emission. Consequently, comparisons of energy dependent and independent branching ratios to experiment are made for photoneutron and photoproton cross sections. EMD cross sections for single neutron, proton, and alpha particle removal are calculated and compared to experimental data for a variety of projectile, target, and energy combinations. Results indicate that using energy dependent branching ratios yields better estimates.

  12. Intrinsic acoustical cross sections in the multiple scattering by a pair of rigid cylindrical particles in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-08-01

    The multiple scattering effects occurring between two scatterers are described based upon the multipole expansion formalism as well as the addition theorem of cylindrical wave functions. An original approach is presented in which an effective incident acoustic field on a particular object, which includes both the primary and re-scattered waves from the other particle is determined first, and then used with the scattered field to derive closed-form analytical expressions for the inherent (i.e. intrinsic) cross-sections based on the far-field scattering. This method does not introduce any approximation in the calculation of the intrinsic cross-sections since the procedure is reduced to the one-body problem. The mathematical expressions for the intrinsic cross-sections are formulated in partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) in cylindrical coordinates involving the angle of incidence, the addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions, and the expansion coefficients of the scatterers. Numerical examples illustrate the analysis for two rigid circular cylindrical cross-sections with different radii immersed in a non-viscous fluid. Computations for the dimensionless extrinsic and intrinsic extinction cross-section factors are evaluated with particular emphasis on varying the angle of incidence, the interparticle distance, as well as the sizes of the particles. A symmetric behavior is observed for the dimensionless extrinsic extinction cross-section, while asymmetry arises for the intrinsic extinction cross-section of each particle with respect to the angle of incidence. The present analysis provides a complete analytical and computational method for the prediction of the intrinsic (local) scattering, absorption and extinction cross-sections in the multiple acoustic scatterings of plane progressive waves of arbitrary incidence by a pair of scatterers. The results and computational analyses can be used as a priori information for future applications to guide the

  13. Experimental and evaluated photoneutron cross sections for 197Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, V.; Ishkhanov, B.; Orlin, V.

    2017-10-01

    There is a serious well-known problem of noticeable disagreements between the partial photoneutron cross sections obtained in various experiments. Such data were mainly determined using quasimonoenergetic annihilation photon beams and the method of neutron multiplicity sorting at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA) and Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires of Saclay (France). The analysis of experimental cross sections employing new objective physical data reliability criteria has shown that many of those are not reliable. The IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on photonuclear data evaluation was approved. The experimental and previously evaluated cross sections of the partial photoneutron reactions (γ ,1 n ) and (γ ,2 n ) on 197Au were analyzed using the new data reliability criteria. The data evaluated using the new experimental-theoretical method noticeably differ from both experimental data and data previously evaluated using nuclear modeling codes gnash, gunf, alice-f, and others. These discrepancies needed to be resolved.

  14. Pion Total Cross Section in Nucleon - Nucleon Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Total cross section parameterizations for neutral and charged pion production in nucleon - nucleon collisions are compared to experimental data over the projectile momentum range from threshold to 300 GeV. Both proton - proton and proton - neutron reactions are considered. Overall excellent agreement between parameterizations and experiment is found, except for notable disagreements near threshold. In addition, the hypothesis that the neutral pion production cross section can be obtained from the average charged pion cross section is checked. The theoretical formulas presented in the paper obey this hypothesis for projectile momenta below 500 GeV. The results presented provide a test of engineering tools used to calculate the pion component of space radiation.

  15. Absolute cross-section measurements of inner-shell ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Hans; Tobehn, Ingo; Ebel, Frank; Hippler, Rainer

    1994-12-01

    Cross section ratios for K- and L-shell ionization of thin silver and gold targets by positron and electron impact have been determined at projectile energies of 30 70 keV. The experimental results are confirmed by calculations in plane wave Born approximation (PWBA) which include an electron exchange term and account for the deceleration or acceleration of the incident projectile in the nuclear field of the target atom. We report first absolute cross sections for K- and L-shell ionization of silver and gold targets by lepton impact in the threshold region. We have measured the corresponding cross sections for electron (e-) impact with an electron gun and the same experimental set-up.

  16. Neutron scattering cross section measurements for Fe 56

    DOE PAGES

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; ...

    2017-06-09

    Elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for neutron scattering from 56Fe have been measured for several incident energies from 1.30 to 7.96 MeV at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Scattered neutrons were detected using a C 6D 6 liquid scintillation detector using pulse-shape discrimination and time-of-flight techniques. The deduced cross sections have been compared with previously reported data, predictions from evaluation databases ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF, and theoretical calculations performed using different optical model potentials using the TALYS and EMPIRE nuclear reaction codes. The coupled-channel calculations based on the vibrational and soft-rotor models are found to describe the experimentalmore » (n,n 0) and (n,n 1) cross sections well.« less

  17. Neutron scattering cross section measurements for 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Harrison, T. D.; Howard, T. J.; Jackson, D. T.; Lenzen, P. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Pecha, R. L.; Rice, B. G.; Thompson, B. K.; Yates, S. W.

    2017-06-01

    Elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for neutron scattering from 56Fe have been measured for several incident energies from 1.30 to 7.96 MeV at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Scattered neutrons were detected using a C6D6 liquid scintillation detector using pulse-shape discrimination and time-of-flight techniques. The deduced cross sections have been compared with previously reported data, predictions from evaluation databases ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF, and theoretical calculations performed using different optical model potentials using the talys and empire nuclear reaction codes. The coupled-channel calculations based on the vibrational and soft-rotor models are found to describe the experimental (n ,n0 ) and (n ,n1 ) cross sections well.

  18. Radiative neutron capture cross section from 236U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Roman, A. R.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C. L.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Kawano, T.

    2017-08-01

    The 236U(n ,γ ) reaction cross section has been measured for the incident neutron energy range from 10 eV to 800 keV by using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) γ -ray calorimeter at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The cross section was determined with the ratio method, which is a technique that uses the 235U(n ,f ) reaction as a reference. The results of the experiment are reported in the resolved and unresolved resonance energy regions. Individual neutron resonance parameters were obtained below 1 keV incident energy by using the R -matrix code sammy. The cross section in the unresolved resonance region is determined with improved experimental uncertainty. It agrees with both ENDF/B-VII.1 and JEFF-3.2 nuclear data libraries. The results above 10 keV agree better with the JEFF-3.2 library.

  19. Estimating Single-Event Logic Cross Sections in Advanced Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, R. C.; Kauppila, J. S.; Warren, K. M.; Chen, Y. P.; Maharrey, J. A.; Haeffner, T. D.; Loveless, T. D.; Bhuva, B. L.; Bounasser, M.; Lilja, K.; Massengill, L. W.

    2017-08-01

    Reliable estimation of logic single-event upset (SEU) cross section is becoming increasingly important for predicting the overall soft error rate. As technology scales and single-event transient (SET) pulse widths shrink to widths on the order of the setup-and-hold time of flip-flops, the probability of latching an SET as an SEU must be reevaluated. In this paper, previous assumptions about the relationship of SET pulsewidth to the probability of latching an SET are reconsidered and a model for transient latching probability has been developed for advanced technologies. A method using the improved transient latching probability and SET data is used to predict logic SEU cross section. The presented model has been used to estimate combinational logic SEU cross sections in 32-nm partially depleted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology given experimental heavy-ion SET data. Experimental SEU data show good agreement with the model presented in this paper.

  20. Cross-Sectional Transport Imaging in a Multijunction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Haegel, Nancy M.; Ke, Chi-Wen; Taha, Hesham

    2015-06-14

    Combining highly localized electron-beam excitation at a point with the spatial resolution capability of optical near-field imaging, we have imaged carrier transport in a cross-sectioned multijunction (GaInP/GaInAs/Ge) solar cell. We image energy transport associated with carrier diffusion throughout the full width of the middle (GaInAs) cell and luminescent coupling from point excitation in the top cell GaInP to the middle cell. Supporting cathodoluminescence and near-field photoluminescence measurements demonstrate excitation-dependent Fermi level splitting effects that influence cross-sectioned spectroscopy results as well as transport limitations on the spatial resolution of cross-sectional measurements.

  1. Thresholds and the rising pion inclusive cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.T.

    In the context of the hypothesis of the Pomeron-f identity, it is shown that the rising pion inclusive cross section can be explained over a wide range of energies as a series of threshold effects. Low-mass thresholds are seen to be important. In order to understand the contributions of high-mass thresholds (flavoring), a simple two-channel multiperipheral model is examined. The analysis sheds light on the relation between thresholds and Mueller-Regge couplings. In particular, it is seen that inclusive-, and total-cross-section threshold mechanisms may differ. A quantitative model based on this idea and utilizing previous total-cross-section fits is seen to agreemore » well with experiment.« less

  2. Lanl Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. B.; Tovesson, F.; Hill, T. S.

    2014-09-01

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R&D). Combining measurements at two LANSCE facilities, the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), cover neutron energies over 10 orders of magnitude: from sub-thermal up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate fission ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The 235U(n,f) standard was used as the reference. Fission cross sections have been measured for multiple actinides. The new data presented here completes the suite of long-lived Uranium isotopes that were investigated with this experimental approach. The cross section data are presented in comparison with existing evaluations and previous measurements.

  3. Photoabsorption cross section of acetylene in the EUV region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Judge, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute photoabsorption cross sections of C2H2 in the 175-740 A region by means of a double ionization chamber is reported. The continuum background source is the synchrotron radiation emitted by the Wisconsin 240 MeV electron storage ring. It is found that the cross sections range from 2 to a maximum of 36 Mb. Two new Rydberg series are identified and the cross section data are applied in the analysis of various sum rules. From the rules, it is shown that the data of C2H2 in the 580-1088 A range may be too low, while the measured ionization transition moment may be too high.

  4. Calculations of Total Classical Cross Sections for a Central Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, D. L.

    2018-07-01

    In order to find the total collision cross-section a direct method of the effective potential (EPM) in the framework of classical mechanics was proposed. EPM allows to over come both the direct scattering problem (calculation of the total collision cross-section) and the inverse scattering problem (reconstruction of the scattering potential) quickly and effectively. A general analytical expression was proposed for the generalized Lennard-Jones potentials: (6-3), (9-3), (12-3), (6-4), (8-4), (12-4), (8-6), (12-6), (18-6). The values for the scattering potential of the total cross section for pairs such as electron-N2, N-N, and O-O2 were obtained in a good approximation.

  5. 63Ni (n ,γ ) cross sections measured with DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Göbel, K.; Heftrich, T.; Jandel, M.; Käppeler, F.; Lederer, C.; Kivel, N.; Korschinek, G.; Krtička, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ostermöller, J.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Schumann, D.; Ullmann, J. L.; Wallner, A.

    2015-10-01

    The neutron capture cross section of the s -process branch nucleus 63Ni affects the abundances of other nuclei in its region, especially 63Cu and 64Zn. In order to determine the energy-dependent neutron capture cross section in the astrophysical energy region, an experiment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed using the calorimetric 4 π BaF2 array DANCE. The (n ,γ ) cross section of 63Ni has been determined relative to the well-known 197Au standard with uncertainties below 15%. Various 63Ni resonances have been identified based on the Q value. Furthermore, the s -process sensitivity of the new values was analyzed with the new network calculation tool NETZ.

  6. Development of Cross Section Library and Application Programming Interface (API)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C. H.; Marin-Lafleche, A.; Smith, M. A.

    2014-04-09

    The goal of NEAMS neutronics is to develop a high-fidelity deterministic neutron transport code termed PROTEUS for use on all reactor types of interest, but focused primarily on sodium-cooled fast reactors. While PROTEUS-SN has demonstrated good accuracy for homogeneous fast reactor problems and partially heterogeneous fast reactor problems, the simulation results were not satisfactory when applied on fully heterogeneous thermal problems like the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This is mainly attributed to the quality of cross section data for heterogeneous geometries since the conventional cross section generation approach does not work accurately for such irregular and complex geometries. Therefore, onemore » of the NEAMS neutronics tasks since FY12 has been the development of a procedure to generate appropriate cross sections for a heterogeneous geometry core.« less

  7. Cross-Sectional HIV Incidence Estimation in HIV Prevention Research

    PubMed Central

    Brookmeyer, Ron; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate methods for estimating HIV incidence from cross-sectional samples would have great utility in prevention research. This report describes recent improvements in cross-sectional methods that significantly improve their accuracy. These improvements are based on the use of multiple biomarkers to identify recent HIV infections. These multi-assay algorithms (MAAs) use assays in a hierarchical approach for testing that minimizes the effort and cost of incidence estimation. These MAAs do not require mathematical adjustments for accurate estimation of the incidence rates in study populations in the year prior to sample collection. MAAs provide a practical, accurate, and cost-effective approach for cross-sectional HIV incidence estimation that can be used for HIV prevention research and global epidemic monitoring. PMID:23764641

  8. Neutrino-nucleus cross sections for oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, Teppei; Martini, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations physics is entering an era of high precision. In this context, accelerator-based neutrino experiments need a reduction in systematic errors to the level of a few percent. Today, one of the most important sources of systematic errors are neutrino-nucleus cross sections which, in the energy region of hundreds of MeV to a few GeV, are known to a precision not exceeding 20%. In this article we review the present experimental and theoretical knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interaction physics. After introducing neutrino-oscillation physics and accelerator-based neutrino experiments, we give an overview of general aspects of neutrino-nucleus cross sections, from both the theoretical and experimental point of view. Then, we focus on these cross sections in different reaction channels. We start with the quasi-elastic and quasi-elastic-like cross section, placing a special emphasis on the multinucleon emission channel, which has attracted a lot of attention in the last few years. We review the main aspects of the different microscopic models for this channel by discussing analogies and the differences among them. The discussion is always driven by a comparison with the experimental data. We then consider the one-pion production channel where agreement between data and theory remains highly unsatisfactory. We describe how to interpret pion data, and then analyze, in particular, the puzzle related to the difficulty of theoretical models and Monte Carlo to simultaneously describe MiniBooNE and MINERvA experimental results. Inclusive cross sections are also discussed, as well as the comparison between the {ν }μ and {ν }e cross sections, relevant for the charge-conjugation-parity violation experiments. The impact of nuclear effects on the reconstruction of neutrino energy and on the determination of the neutrino-oscillation parameters is also reviewed. Finally, we look to the future by discussing projects and efforts in relation to future detectors, beams

  9. Inclusive charged particle cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Aid, S.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bärwolff, H.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Binder, E.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Bosetti, P. C.; Boudry, V.; Bourdarios, C.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braun, U.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Chyla, J.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; Devel, M.; De Roeck, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dingus, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Drescher, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebbinghaus, R.; Eberle, M.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N. N.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Fensome, I. F.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Gennis, M.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Godfrey, L.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Greif, H.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Harjes, J.; Haydar, R.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Huot, N.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kazarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langkau, R.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leuschner, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Lewin, D.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfiedl, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Monnier, E.; Moreau, F.; Moreels, J.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Murray, S. A.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Orenstein, S.; Ould-Saada, F.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Peters, S.; Phillips, H. T.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pilgram, W.; Pitzl, D.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Rauschnabel, K.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rudowicz, M.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitz, W.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schulz, M.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Scobel, W.; Seehausen, U.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Urban, L.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Vick, R.; Villet, G.; Vogel, E.; Wacker, K.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Womersley, L. A.; Wright, A. E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Cross sections are presented for the inclusive production of charged particles measured in electron-proton collisions at low Q2 with the H1 detector at HERA. The transverse momentum distribution extends up to 8 GeV/ c. Its shape is found to be harder than that observed in overlinepp collisions at comparable centre-of-mass energies √S γp ≈ √S overlinepp ≈ 200 GeV, and also harder than in γp collisions at lower energies √ Sγp ≈ 18 GeV. Results from quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations agree with the measured transverse momentum and pseudorapidity cross sections.

  10. Total photoproduction cross section measurement at HERA energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bärwolff, H.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Berthon, U.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Binder, E.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Bosetti, P. C.; Boudry, V.; Bourdarios, C.; Brasse, F.; Braun, U.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; del Buono, L.; Devel, M.; de Roeck, A.; Dingus, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Drescher, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Eberle, M.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N. N.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Feng, Y.; Fensome, I. F.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flower, P. S.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gellrich, A.; Gennis, M.; Gensch, U.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Gillespie, D.; Godfrey, L.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Goldberg, M.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Greif, H.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Handschuh, D.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Harjes, J.; Hartz, P.; Haydar, R.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Hedgecock, R.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Huot, N.; Ibbotson, M.; Jabiol, M. A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kasarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurça, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Langkau, R.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leuschner, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levin, D.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milone, V.; Monnier, E.; Moreau, F.; Moreels, J.; Morris, J. V.; Morton, J. M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Murray, S. A.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newton, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, H.; Olsson, J. E.; Orenstein, S.; Ould-Saada, F.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Peters, S.; Phillips, H. T.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pilgram, W.; Pitzl, D.; Prosi, R.; Raupach, F.; Rauschnabel, K.; Reimer, P.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rudowicz, M.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Ryseck, E.; Sacton, J.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitz, W.; Schröder, V.; Schulz, M.; Schwind, A.; Scobel, W.; Seehausen, U.; Sell, R.; Seman, M.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Smolik, L.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Staroba, P.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Steiner, H.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Taylor, R. E.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, R. J.; Tichomirov, I.; Trenkel, C.; Truöl, P.; Tchernyshov, V.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Urban, L.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; van Esch, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Vick, R.; Villet, G.; Vogel, E.; Wacker, K.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Womersley, L. A.; Wright, A. E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Áçek, J.; Závada, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.

    1993-01-01

    We present first results on the total photoproduction cross section measurement with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were extracted from low Q2 collisions of 26.7 GeV electrons with 820 GeV protons. The γp total cross section has been measured by two independent methods in the γp center of mass energy range from 90 to 290 GeV. For an average center of mass energy of 195 GeV a value of σtot (γp) = 159 +/- 7 (stat.) +/- 20 (syst.) μb was obtained. Supported by the Swedish Natural Science Research Council.

  11. Geodesic acoustic modes in noncircular cross section tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokina, E. A., E-mail: sorokina.ekaterina@gmail.com; Lakhin, V. P.; Konovaltseva, L. V.

    2017-03-15

    The influence of the shape of the plasma cross section on the continuous spectrum of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in a tokamak is analyzed in the framework of the MHD model. An expression for the frequency of a local GAM for a model noncircular cross section plasma equilibrium is derived. Amendments to the oscillation frequency due to the plasma elongation and triangularity and finite tokamak aspect ratio are calculated. It is shown that the main factor affecting the GAM spectrum is the plasma elongation, resulting in a significant decrease in the mode frequency.

  12. Light ray tracing through a leaf cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.; Silva, L. F.

    1973-01-01

    A light ray, incident at about 5 deg to the normal, is geometrically plotted through the drawing of the cross section of a soybean leaf using Fresnel's equations and Snell's law. The optical mediums of the leaf considered for ray tracing are: air, cell sap, chloroplast, and cell wall. The ray is also drawn through the same leaf cross section with cell wall and air as the only optical mediums. The values of the reflection and transmission found from the ray tracing tests agree closely with the experimental results obtained using a Beckman Dk-2A Spectroreflector.

  13. Uncertainty quantification in fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    DOE PAGES

    Tovesson, F.

    2015-01-09

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections have been measured for several isotopes of uranium and plutonium at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The total uncertainties in these measurements are in the range 3–5% above 100 keV of incident neutron energy, which results from uncertainties in the target, neutron source, and detector system. The individual sources of uncertainties are assumed to be uncorrelated, however correlation in the cross section across neutron energy bins are considered. The quantification of the uncertainty contributions will be described here.

  14. Iterative cross section sequence graph for handwritten character segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Amer

    2007-08-01

    The iterative cross section sequence graph (ICSSG) is an algorithm for handwritten character segmentation. It expands the cross section sequence graph concept by applying it iteratively at equally spaced thresholds. The iterative thresholding reduces the effect of information loss associated with image binarization. ICSSG preserves the characters' skeletal structure by preventing the interference of pixels that causes flooding of adjacent characters' segments. Improving the structural quality of the characters' skeleton facilitates better feature extraction and classification, which improves the overall performance of optical character recognition (OCR). Experimental results showed significant improvements in OCR recognition rates compared to other well-established segmentation algorithms.

  15. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  16. A benchmarking procedure for PIGE related differential cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Fazinić, S.; Harissopulos, S.; Kokkoris, M.; Preketes-Sigalas, K.; Provatas, G.

    2018-05-01

    The application of standard-less PIGE requires the a priori knowledge of the differential cross section of the reaction used for the quantification of each detected light element. Towards this end, a lot of datasets have been published the last few years from several laboratories around the world. The discrepancies often found between different measured cross sections can be resolved by applying a rigorous benchmarking procedure through the measurement of thick target yields. Such a procedure is proposed in the present paper and is applied in the case of the 19F(p,p‧ γ)19F reaction.

  17. Intubation simulation with a cross-sectional visual guidance.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chi-Hyoung; Kang, Chul Won; Lee, Chang Ha

    2013-01-01

    We present an intubation simulation with deformable objects and a cross-sectional visual guidance using a general haptic device. Our method deforms the tube model when it collides with the human model. Mass-Spring model with the Euler integration is used for the tube deformation. For the trainee's more effective understanding of the intubation process, we provide a cross-sectional view of the oral cavity and the tube. Our system also applies a stereoscopic rendering to improve the depth perception and the reality of the simulation.

  18. Sub-barrier fusion cross section measurements with STELLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, M.; Courtin, S.; Fruet, G.; Jenkins, D. G.; Montanari, D.; Adsley, P.; Beck, C.; Della Negra, S.; Dené, P.; Haas, F.; Hammache, F.; Heitz, G.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Krauth, M.; Lesrel, J.; Meyer, A.; Morris, L.; Regan, P. H.; Richer, M.; Rudigier, M.; de Séréville, N.; Stodel, C.

    2018-01-01

    The experimental setup STELLA (STELlar LAboratory) is designed for the measurement of deep sub-barrier light heavy ion fusion cross sections. For background suppression the γ-particle coincidence technique is used. In this project, LaBr3 detectors from the UK FATIMA (FAst TIMing Array) collaboration are combined with annular silicon strip detectors customized at IPHC-CNRS, Strasbourg, and the setup is located at Andromède, IPN, Orsay. The commissioning of the experimental approach as well as a sub-barrier 12C +12C → 24Mg∗ cross section measurement campaign are carried out.

  19. Commentary: Mediation Analysis, Causal Process, and Cross-Sectional Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrout, Patrick E.

    2011-01-01

    Maxwell, Cole, and Mitchell (2011) extended the work of Maxwell and Cole (2007), which raised important questions about whether mediation analyses based on cross-sectional data can shed light on longitudinal mediation process. The latest article considers longitudinal processes that can only be partially explained by an intervening variable, and…

  20. Measurement of inclusive jet cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H1 Collaboration; Abt, I.; Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bärwolff, H.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Binder, E.; Bischoff, A.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Bosetti, P. C.; Boudry, V.; Bourdarios, C.; Brasse, F.; Braun, U.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; del Buono, L.; Devel, M.; de Roeck, A.; Dingus, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Drescher, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebbinghaus, R.; Eberle, M.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N. N.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Fensome, I. F.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gellrich, A.; Gennis, M.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Godfrey, L.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Goldberg, M.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Greif, H.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Handschuh, D.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Harjes, J.; Haydar, R.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Huot, N.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kasarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langkau, R.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leuschner, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Lewin, D.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milone, V.; Monnier, E.; Moreau, F.; Moreels, J.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Murray, S. A.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Orenstein, S.; Ould-Saada, F.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Peters, S.; Phillips, H. T.; Phillips, J. C.; Pichler, Ch.; Pilgram, W.; Pitzl, D.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Rauschnabel, K.; Reimer, P.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rudowicz, M.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitz, W.; Schröder, V.; Schulz, M.; Schwind, A.; Scobel, W.; Seehausen, U.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Smolik, L.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Staroba, P.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Urban, L.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; van Esch, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Vick, R.; Villet, G.; Vogel, E.; Wacker, K.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Womersley, L. A.; Wright, A. E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Závada, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.

    1993-09-01

    The inclusive jet cross section in photoproduction has been measured as a function of transverse energy and pseudorapidity using the H 1 detector at the HERA electron-proton collider. The results are compared with leading order QCD calculations. Supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  1. Measuring cross sections using a sag tape: a generalized procedure

    Treesearch

    Gary A. Ray; Walter F. Megahan

    1979-01-01

    A procedure was developed for surveying cross sections using a sag tape with unequal end elevations. The procedure is as accurate as traditional engineer's level surveys, is faster and easier, and can be programed for a digital computer by following the flow diagram which is provided.

  2. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  3. 30 CFR 783.25 - Cross sections, maps, and plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Elevations and locations of monitoring stations used to gather data on water quality and quantity, fish and... aquifers on cross-sections and contour maps; (7) Location of surface water bodies such as streams, lakes... permit area; (9) Location and dimensions of existing areas of spoil, waste, coal development waste, and...

  4. 30 CFR 783.25 - Cross sections, maps, and plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Elevations and locations of monitoring stations used to gather data on water quality and quantity, fish and... aquifers on cross-sections and contour maps; (7) Location of surface water bodies such as streams, lakes... permit area; (9) Location and dimensions of existing areas of spoil, waste, coal development waste, and...

  5. 30 CFR 783.25 - Cross sections, maps, and plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Elevations and locations of monitoring stations used to gather data on water quality and quantity, fish and... aquifers on cross-sections and contour maps; (7) Location of surface water bodies such as streams, lakes... permit area; (9) Location and dimensions of existing areas of spoil, waste, coal development waste, and...

  6. 30 CFR 783.25 - Cross sections, maps, and plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Elevations and locations of monitoring stations used to gather data on water quality and quantity, fish and... aquifers on cross-sections and contour maps; (7) Location of surface water bodies such as streams, lakes... permit area; (9) Location and dimensions of existing areas of spoil, waste, coal development waste, and...

  7. 30 CFR 783.25 - Cross sections, maps, and plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Elevations and locations of monitoring stations used to gather data on water quality and quantity, fish and... aquifers on cross-sections and contour maps; (7) Location of surface water bodies such as streams, lakes... permit area; (9) Location and dimensions of existing areas of spoil, waste, coal development waste, and...

  8. Diffractive dijet cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitweg, J.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Yoshida, R.; Zhang, H.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Anselmo, F.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Romeo, G. Cara; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Garcia, Y. Zamora; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Eckert, M.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Heinz, L.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Paul, E.; Pfeiffer, M.; Stamm, J.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; McFall, J. D.; Piccioni, D.; Roff, D. G.; Tapper, R. J.; Ayad, R.; Capua, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Jing, Z.; Liu, W.; Mellado, B.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sampson, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Bukowy, M.; Czermak, A. M.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajc, J.; Duliński, Z.; Kotański, A.; Abbiendi, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fricke, U.; Gialas, I.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hebbel, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Milewski, J.; Milite, M.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Notz, D.; Park, I. H.; Pellegrino, A.; Pelucchi, F.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Ryan, J. J.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Schwarzer, O.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Surrow, B.; Tassi, E.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Burow, B. D.; Coldewey, C.; Grabosch, H. J.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Trefzger, T.; Wölfle, S.; Bromley, J. T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; MacDonald, N.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Strickland, E.; Waugh, R.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Garfagnini, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Horstmann, D.; Kçira, D.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Cole, J. E.; Howell, G.; Lamberti, L.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Pavel, N.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Sideris, D.; Walker, R.; Mallik, U.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Fleck, J. I.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Hong, S. J.; Lee, S. B.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Barreiro, F.; Fernández, J. P.; García, G.; Glasman, C.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Martínez, M.; Peso, J. Del; Puga, J.; Terrón, J.; Trocóniz, J. F. De; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Murray, W. N.; Ochs, A.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzinin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Engelen, J.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Verkerke, W.; Vossebeld, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wolf, E. De; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Nylander, P.; Romanowski, T. A.; Blaikley, H. E.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Edmonds, J. K.; Große-Knetter, J.; Harnew, N.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Ruske, O.; Tickner, J. R.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Corso, F. Dal; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiński, J. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Raso, M.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Wichmann, R.; Williams, D. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Nagano, K.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Matsushita, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Petrucci, M. C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Simmons, D.; Teuscher, R. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Hayes, M. E.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Sutton, M. R.; Wing, M.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Deppe, O.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Dasu, S.; Foudas, C.; Loveless, R. J.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Bhadra, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1998-08-01

    Differential dijet cross sections have been measured with the ZEUS detector for photoproduction events in which the hadronic final state containing the jets is separated with respect to the outgoing proton direction by a large rapidity gap. The cross section has been measured as a function of the fraction of the photon (ϰγ OBS) and pomeron (β OBS) momentum participating in the production of the dijet system. The observed ϰγ OBS dependence shows evidence for the presence of a resolved- as well as a direct-photon component. The measured cross section da/dβ OBS increases as β OBS increases indicating that there is a sizeable contribution to dijet production from those events in which a large fraction of the pomeron momentum participates in the hard scattering. These cross sections and the ZEUS measurements of the diffractive structure function can be described by calculations based on parton densities in the pomeron which evolve according to the QCD evolution equations and include a substantial hard momentum component of gluons in the pomeron.

  9. 55. CROSS SECTION OF POWER HOUSE, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. CROSS SECTION OF POWER HOUSE, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523199 (sheet no. 9, for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. Neutron elastic and inelastic cross section measurements for 28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derdeyn, E. C.; Lyons, E. M.; Morin, T.; Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Peters, E. E.; Ramirez, A. P. D.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Yates, S. W.

    2017-09-01

    Neutron elastic and inelastic cross sections are critical for design and implementation of nuclear reactors and reactor equipment. Silicon, an element used abundantly in fuel pellets as well as building materials, has little to no experimental cross sections in the fast neutron region to support current theoretical evaluations, and thus would benefit from any contribution. Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic differential scattering cross sections for 28Si were performed at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory for incident neutron energies of 6.1 MeV and 7.0 MeV. Neutrons were produced by accelerated deuterons incident on a deuterium gas cell. These nearly mono-energetic neutrons then scattered off a natural Si sample and were detected using liquid deuterated benzene scintillation detectors. Scattered neutron energy was deduced using time-of-flight techniques in tandem with kinematic calculations for an angular distribution. The relative detector efficiency was experimentally determined over a neutron energy range from approximately 0.5 to 7.75 MeV prior to the experiment. Yields were corrected for multiple scattering and neutron attenuation in the sample using the forced-collision Monte Carlo correction code MULCAT. Resulting cross sections will be presented along with comparisons to various data evaluations. Research is supported by USDOE-NNSA-SSAP: NA0002931, NSF: PHY-1606890, and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  11. Electron Impact Multiple Ionization Cross Sections for Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.; Mueller, A.

    2017-12-01

    We have compiled a set of electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI) cross sections for astrophysically relevant ions. EIMI can have a significant effect on the ionization balance of non-equilibrium plasmas. For example, it can be important if there is a rapid change in the electron temperature, as in solar flares or in nanoflare coronal heating. EIMI is also likely to be significant when the electron energy distribution is non-thermal, such as if the electrons follow a kappa distribution. Cross sections for EIMI are needed in order to account for these processes in plasma modeling and for spectroscopic interpretation. Here, we describe our comparison of proposed semiempirical formulae to the available experimental EIMI cross section data. Based on this comparison, we have interpolated and extrapolated fitting parameters to systems that have not yet been measured. A tabulation of the fit parameters is provided for thousands of EIMI cross sections. We also highlight some outstanding issues that remain to be resolved.

  12. Increasing total cross sections and flavoring of Pomeron in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Chung-I.

    A unified treatment of both the elastic and inelastic hadronic production is presented from the viewpoint of a topological expansion of nonperturbative QCD. The phenomenon of increasing total cross sections is examined and its relation to the flavoring of Pomeron is clarified. 12 refs.

  13. On Estimating Achievement Dynamic Models from Repeated Cross Sections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contini, Dalit; Grand, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing spread of standardized assessments of student learning, longitudinal data on achievement data are still lacking in many countries. This article raises the following question: Can we exploit cross-sectional assessments held at different schooling stages to evaluate how achievement inequalities related to individual-ascribed…

  14. Partial wave analysis for folded differential cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; McEachran, R. P.

    2018-03-01

    The value of modified effective range theory (MERT) and the connection between differential cross sections and phase shifts in low-energy electron scattering has long been recognized. Recent experimental techniques involving magnetically confined beams have introduced the concept of folded differential cross sections (FDCS) where the forward (θ ≤ π/2) and backward scattered (θ ≥ π/2) projectiles are unresolved, that is the value measured at the angle θ is the sum of the signal for particles scattered into the angles θ and π - θ. We have developed an alternative approach to MERT in order to analyse low-energy folded differential cross sections for positrons and electrons. This results in a simplified expression for the FDCS when it is expressed in terms of partial waves and thereby enables one to extract the first few phase shifts from a fit to an experimental FDCS at low energies. Thus, this method predicts forward and backward angle scattering (0 to π) using only experimental FDCS data and can be used to determine the total elastic cross section solely from experimental results at low-energy, which are limited in angular range.

  15. Service building. Cross section thru dry dock nos. 4 & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Service building. Cross section thru dry dock nos. 4 & 5 showing service bldg & 20-75-150 ton cranes (dry dock associates, May 23, 1941). In files of Cushman & Wakefield, building no. 501, Philadelphia Naval Business Center. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Service Building, Dry Docks No. 4 & 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. A New Measurement of Neutron Induced Fission Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Joshua; Niffte Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron induced fission cross sections of actinides are of great interest in nuclear energy and stockpile stewardship. Traditionally, measurements of these cross sections have been made with fission chambers, which provide limited information on the actual fragments, and ultimately result in uncertainties on the order of several percent. The Neutron Induced Fission ragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration designed and built a fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC), which provides additional information on these processes, through 3-dimensional tracking, improved particle identification, and in-situ profiles of target and beam non-uniformities. Ultimately, this should provide sub-percent measurements of (n,f) cross-sections. During the 2016 run cycle, measurements of the 238U(n,f)/235U(n,f) cross section shape was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. An overview of the fission TPC will be given, as well as these recently reported results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. 23. Cross section of newly completed concrete channel and trestle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Cross section of newly completed concrete channel and trestle supported steel flume, 1919. Courtesy of the Mandeville Department of Special Collections, Central Library, University of California, San Diego. - Lake Hodges Flume, Along San Dieguito River between Lake Hodges & San Dieguito Reservoir, Rancho Santa Fe, San Diego County, CA

  18. Radar cross sections of standard and complex shape targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohel, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The theoretical, analytical, and experimental results are described for radar cross sections (RCS) of different-shaped targets. Various techniques for predicting RCS are given, and RCS of finite standard targets are presented. Techniques used to predict the RCS of complex targets are made, and the RCS complex shapes are provided.

  19. 11. Photograph of a line drawing. 'CROSS SECTION OF GAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photograph of a line drawing. 'CROSS SECTION OF GAS PRODUCER.' From George R. Cooper (Wilputte Corporation). 'Operating Overview of a Producer Gas Plant (12 Machines) at Kingsport, Tennessee.' Presented at the Fifth Annual International Conference on Coal Gasification, Liquefaction and Conversion to Electricity. University of Pittsburgh, August 2, 1978. - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  20. Precision measurement of the 238 Pu ( n , γ ) cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A.; Wu, C. Y.; Kwan, E.

    2013-10-14

    Here, the neutron-capture cross section for 238Pu was measured by using the detector for advanced neutron-capture experiments (DANCE) array, which is a highly segmented and highly efficient 4π γ-ray calorimeter. The neutron-capture events were recognized by the total γ-ray energy deposited in DANCE, which is equal to the reaction Q value plus the incident neutron energy. The absolute neutron-capture cross section was derived as a function of incident neutron energy from thermal to about 30 keV. The measured cross section for incident neutron energy below 18 eV was performed for the first time by using the direct method and doesmore » not support the most recently adopted changes in endf/b-vii.1 where the neutron-capture cross section was lowered by as much as a factor of ~3 in the neighborhood of 0.3 eV from those evaluated in ENDF/B-VII.0.« less

  1. Reference Cross Sections for Charged-particle Monitor Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Capote, R.; Carlson, B. V.; Engle, J. W.; Kellett, M. A.; Kibédi, T.; Kim, G.; Kondev, F. G.; Hussain, M.; Lebeda, O.; Luca, A.; Nagai, Y.; Naik, H.; Nichols, A. L.; Nortier, F. M.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F. T.; Verpelli, M.

    2018-02-01

    Evaluated cross sections of beam-monitor reactions are expected to become the de-facto standard for cross-section measurements that are performed over a very broad energy range in accelerators in order to produce particular radionuclides for industrial and medical applications. The requirements for such data need to be addressed in a timely manner, and therefore an IAEA coordinated research project was launched in December 2012 to establish or improve the nuclear data required to characterise charged-particle monitor reactions. An international team was assembled to recommend more accurate cross-section data over a wide range of targets and projectiles, undertaken in conjunction with a limited number of measurements and more extensive evaluations of the decay data of specific radionuclides. Least-square evaluations of monitor-reaction cross sections including uncertainty quantification have been undertaken for charged-particle beams of protons, deuterons, 3He- and 4He-particles. Recommended beam monitor reaction data with their uncertainties are available at the IAEA-NDS medical portal http://www-nds.iaea.org/medical/monitor_reactions.html.

  2. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  3. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; ...

    2015-06-02

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  4. Positron total scattering cross-sections for alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Nidhi; Singh, Suvam; Antony, Bobby

    2018-01-01

    Positron-impact total scattering cross-sections for Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Fr atoms are calculated in the energy range from 5-5000 eV employing modified spherical complex optical potential formalism. The main aim of this work is to apply this formalism to the less studied positron-target collision systems. The results are compared with previous theoretical and experimental data, wherever available. In general, the present data show overall agreement and consistency with other results. Furthermore, we have done a comparative study of the results to investigate the effect of atomic size on the cross-sections as we descend through the group in the periodic table. We have also plotted a correlation graph of the present total cross-sections with polarizability and number of target electrons. The two correlation plots confirm the credibility and consistency of the present results. Besides, this is the first theoretical attempt to report positron-impact total cross-sections of alkali atoms over such a wide energy range.

  5. Electron impact ionisation cross sections of iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Stefan E.; Mauracher, Andreas; Sukuba, Ivan; Urban, Jan; Maihom, Thana; Probst, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We report electron impact ionisation cross sections (EICSs) of iron oxide molecules, FexOx and FexOx+1 with x = 1, 2, 3, from the ionisation threshold to 10 keV, obtained with the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) methods. The maxima of the EICSs range from 3.10 to 9 . 96 × 10-16 cm2 located at 59-72 eV and 5.06 to 14.32 × 10-16 cm2 located at 85-108 eV for the DM and BEB approaches, respectively. The orbital and kinetic energies required for the BEB method are obtained by employing effective core potentials for the inner core electrons in the quantum chemical calculations. The BEB cross sections are 1.4-1.7 times larger than the DM cross sections which can be related to the decreasing population of the Fe 4s orbitals upon addition of oxygen atoms, together with the different methodological foundations of the two methods. Both the DM and BEB cross sections can be fitted excellently to a simple analytical expression used in modelling and simulation codes employed in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80308-2.

  6. Measurement of Activation Cross Sections Producing Short-Lived Nuclei with Pulsed Neutron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Toshiaki; Arakita, Kazumasa; Miyazaki, Itaru; Shibata, Michihiro; Kawade, Kiyoshi; Hori, Jun-ichi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-05-01

    Activation cross sections for the (n, n') reaction were measured by means of the activation method at the neutron energies of 3.1 and 2.54 MeV by using a pulsed neutron beam. Target nuclei were 79Br, 90Zr, 197Au, and 207Pb, whose half-lives were between 0.8 and 8 s. The cross section for the 90Zr (n, n') 90mZr reaction was obtained for the first time in this energy range. The d-D neutrons were generated by bombarding a deuterated titanium target with a 350-keV d+ beam at the 80-degree beam line of the Fusion Neutronics Source at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In order to obtain reliable activation cross sections, careful attention was paid to correct the efficiency for a volume source, and the self-absorption of gamma rays in an irradiated sample. The systematics of the (n, n') reaction at the neutron energy of 3.1 MeV, which could be predicted within an accuracy of 50%, was proposed on the basis of our data.

  7. Absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical.

    PubMed

    Taatjes, Craig A; Osborn, David L; Selby, Talitha M; Meloni, Giovanni; Fan, Haiyan; Pratt, Stephen T

    2008-10-02

    The absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical has been measured using two completely independent methods. The CH3 photoionization cross-section was determined relative to that of acetone and methyl vinyl ketone at photon energies of 10.2 and 11.0 eV by using a pulsed laser-photolysis/time-resolved synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry method. The time-resolved depletion of the acetone or methyl vinyl ketone precursor and the production of methyl radicals following 193 nm photolysis are monitored simultaneously by using time-resolved synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Comparison of the initial methyl signal with the decrease in precursor signal, in combination with previously measured absolute photoionization cross-sections of the precursors, yields the absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical; sigma(CH3)(10.2 eV) = (5.7 +/- 0.9) x 10(-18) cm(2) and sigma(CH3)(11.0 eV) = (6.0 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2). The photoionization cross-section for vinyl radical determined by photolysis of methyl vinyl ketone is in good agreement with previous measurements. The methyl radical photoionization cross-section was also independently measured relative to that of the iodine atom by comparison of ionization signals from CH3 and I fragments following 266 nm photolysis of methyl iodide in a molecular-beam ion-imaging apparatus. These measurements gave a cross-section of (5.4 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 10.460 eV, (5.5 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 10.466 eV, and (4.9 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 10.471 eV. The measurements allow relative photoionization efficiency spectra of methyl radical to be placed on an absolute scale and will facilitate quantitative measurements of methyl concentrations by photoionization mass spectrometry.

  8. Absolute vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption cross section studies of atomic and molecular species: Techniques and observational data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, D. L.; Wu, C. Y. R.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of a high energy photon (greater than 6 eV) by an isolated molecule results in the formation of highly excited quasi-discrete or continuum states which evolve through a wide range of direct and indirect photochemical processes. These are: photoionization and autoionization, photodissociation and predissociation, and fluorescence. The ultimate goal is to understand the dynamics of the excitation and decay processes and to quantitatively measure the absolute partial cross sections for all processes which occur in photoabsorption. Typical experimental techniques and the status of observational results of particular interest to solar system observations are presented.

  9. A new multigroup method for cross-sections that vary rapidly in energy

    DOE PAGES

    Haut, Terry Scot; Ahrens, Cory D.; Jonko, Alexandra; ...

    2016-11-04

    Here, we present a numerical method for solving the time-independent thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equation or the neutron transport (NT) equation when the opacity (cross-section) varies rapidly in frequency (energy) on the microscale ε; ε corresponds to the characteristic spacing between absorption lines or resonances, and is much smaller than the macroscopic frequency (energy) variation of interest. The approach is based on a rigorous homogenization of the TRT/NT equation in the frequency (energy) variable. Discretization of the homogenized TRT/NT equation results in a multigroup-type system, and can therefore be solved by standard methods.

  10. Ion dipole capture cross sections at low ion and rotational energies - Comparison of integrated capture cross sections with reaction cross sections for NH3 and H2O parent-ion collisions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Canright, R. B., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The numerical capture cross section is calculated from the capture ratio, defined as the fraction of trajectories reaching a prescribed minimum separation of 3 A. The calculated capture cross sections for a rotational temperature of 77 K suggest large reaction cross sections in 80 K experiments for the large dipole-moment target, methyl cyanide.

  11. Calculation of photoionization cross section near auto-ionizing lines and magnesium photoionization cross section near threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. N.; Altick, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    The research performed is briefly reviewed. A simple method was developed for the calculation of continuum states of atoms when autoionization is present. The method was employed to give the first theoretical cross section for beryllium and magnesium; the results indicate that the values used previously at threshold were sometimes seriously in error. These threshold values have potential applications in astrophysical abundance estimates.

  12. Quantifying and predicting interpretational uncertainty in cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randle, Charles; Bond, Clare; Monaghan, Alison; Lark, Murray

    2015-04-01

    Cross-sections are often constructed from data to create a visual impression of the geologist's interpretation of the sub-surface geology. However as with all interpretations, this vision of the sub-surface geology is uncertain. We have designed and carried out an experiment with the aim of quantifying the uncertainty in geological cross-sections created by experts interpreting borehole data. By analysing different attributes of the data and interpretations we reflect on the main controls on uncertainty. A group of ten expert modellers at the British Geological Survey were asked to interpret an 11.4 km long cross-section from south-east Glasgow, UK. The data provided consisted of map and borehole data of the superficial deposits and shallow bedrock. Each modeller had a unique set of 11 boreholes removed from their dataset, to which their interpretations of the top of the bedrock were compared. This methodology allowed quantification of how far from the 'correct answer' each interpretation is at 11 points along each interpreted cross-section line; through comparison of the interpreted and actual bedrock elevations in the boreholes. This resulted in the collection of 110 measurements of the error to use in further analysis. To determine the potential control on uncertainty various attributes relating to the modeller, the interpretation and the data were recorded. Modellers were asked to fill out a questionnaire asking for information; such as how much 3D modelling experience they had, and how long it took them to complete the interpretation. They were also asked to record their confidence in their interpretations graphically, in the form of a confidence level drawn onto the cross-section. Initial analysis showed the majority of the experts' interpreted bedrock elevations within 5 metres of those recorded in the withheld boreholes. Their distribution is peaked and symmetrical about a mean of zero, indicating that there was no tendency for the experts to either under

  13. Microscopic description of production cross sections including deexcitation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Background: At the forefront of the nuclear science, production of new neutron-rich isotopes is continuously pursued at accelerator laboratories all over the world. To explore the currently unknown territories in the nuclear chart far away from the stability, reliable theoretical predictions are inevitable. Purpose: To provide a reliable prediction of production cross sections taking into account secondary deexcitation processes, both particle evaporation and fission, a new method called TDHF+GEMINI is proposed, which combines the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory with a sophisticated statistical compound-nucleus deexcitation model, GEMINI++. Methods: Low-energy heavy ion reactions are described based on three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations. Using the particle-number projection method, production probabilities, total angular momenta, and excitation energies of primary reaction products are extracted from the TDHF wave function after collision. Production cross sections for secondary reaction products are evaluated employing GEMINI++. Results are compared with available experimental data and widely used grazing calculations. Results: The method is applied to describe cross sections for multinucleon transfer processes in 40Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃128.54 MeV ), 48Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃125.44 MeV ), 40Ca+208Pb (Ec .m .≃208.84 MeV ), 58Ni+208Pb (Ec .m .≃256.79 MeV ), 64Ni+238U (Ec .m .≃307.35 MeV ), and 136Xe+198Pt (Ec .m .≃644.98 MeV ) reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. It is shown that the inclusion of secondary deexcitation processes, which are dominated by neutron evaporation in the present systems, substantially improves agreement with the experimental data. The magnitude of the evaporation effects is very similar to the one observed in grazing calculations. TDHF+GEMINI provides better description of the absolute value of the cross sections for channels involving transfer of more than one proton, compared to the grazing

  14. Developing Scientific Reasoning Through Drawing Cross-Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannula, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Cross-sections and 3D models of subsurface geology are typically based on incomplete information (whether surface geologic mapping, well logs, or geophysical data). Creating and evaluating those models requires spatial and quantitative thinking skills (including penetrative thinking, understanding of horizontality, mental rotation and animation, and scaling). However, evaluating the reasonableness of a cross-section or 3D structural model also requires consideration of multiple possible geometries and geologic histories. Teaching students to create good models requires application of the scientific methods of the geosciences (such as evaluation of multiple hypotheses and combining evidence from multiple techniques). Teaching these critical thinking skills, especially combined with teaching spatial thinking skills, is challenging. My Structural Geology and Advanced Structural Geology courses have taken two different approaches to developing both the abilities to visualize and to test multiple models. In the final project in Structural Geology (a 3rd year course with a pre-requisite sophomore mapping course), students create a viable cross-section across part of the Wyoming thrust belt by hand, based on a published 1:62,500 geologic map. The cross-section must meet a number of geometric criteria (such as the template constraint), but is not required to balance. Each student tries many potential geometries while trying to find a viable solution. In most cases, the students don't visualize the implications of the geometries that they try, but have to draw them and then erase their work if it does not meet the criteria for validity. The Advanced Structural Geology course used Midland Valley's Move suite to test the cross-sections that they made in Structural Geology, mostly using the flexural slip unfolding algorithm and testing whether the resulting line lengths balanced. In both exercises, students seemed more confident in the quality of their cross-sections when the

  15. Measurements of Radiative Capture Cross Sections at Big Bang Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Tanaka, Yutaro; Du, Hang; Ohnishi, Kousuke; Yagi, Shoichi; Sugihara, Takanobu; Hori, Taichi; Nakamura, Shoken; Yanagihara, Rikuto; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu; Nishimura, Daiki; Iwakiri, Shuichi; Kambayashi, Shohei; Kunimatsu, Shota; Sakakibara, Hikaru; Yamaoka, Shintaro

    We measured d(p, γ )3He cross sections at ECM = 0.12, 0.19, 0.44, and 0.57 MeV. In this energy region, available experimental values are systematically smaller than the recent calculation, so that additional experiments are desired for understanding the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The experiment was performed by bombarding proton beams to the D2 gas target with the 5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. The experimental d(p, γ )3He cross sections of the present study are systematically larger than previous data. On the other hand, recent theoretical results by Marcucci et al. are in good agreement with present experimental results.

  16. Measurements of Reaction Cross Sections for 9-11C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, Kenji; Takechi, Maya; Ohtsubo, Takashi; Nishimura, Daiki; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Aoki, Kazuya; Abe, Keijiro; Ikeda, Ayaka; Izumikawa, Takuji; Oikawa, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Kosuke; Ohno, Junichi; Ohmika, Shunichiro; Kato, Ikuma; Kanke, Yuki; Kanbe, Shunsuke; Kanda, Naoto; Kikuchi, Haruka; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Sato, Shinji; Sayama, Umito; Shimaya, Jiro; Sugihara, Takanobu; Suzuki, Shinji; Suzuki, Takeshi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Taguchi, Yoshisada; Takei, Yuki; Takeuchi, Yuki; Takenouchi, Arashi; Takemoto, Takanori; Tadano, Natsuki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Tanaka, Yutaro; Chikaato, Kazuya; Du, Hang; Nagai, Takumi; Nagumo, Junya; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Hori, Kensyu; Honma, Akira; Machida, Masahiro; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mihara, Mototsugu; Miyata, Eri; Murooka, Daiki; Yagi, Shoichi; Yamaoka, Shintaro; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Kouhei

    In order to probe the differences of matter and charge radii of atomic nucleus in the proton-rich C isotopes, measurements of reaction cross sections (σR) for 9-11C on proton targets in the energy range from 50 to 120A MeV were performed at HIMAC facility, NIRS. Owing to the large differences between proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering cross sections at this intermediate energy region, σR data for atomic nuclei on proton targets are expected to have the sensitivity to the differences between proton and neutron distributions in the nucleus. Present preliminary data are compared with the Glauber calculation, which suggest the larger enhancements of proton distributions in 9C and 10C compared to 11C.

  17. Probing neutron-skin thickness with total reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, W.; Suzuki, Y.; Inakura, T.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze total reaction cross sections, σR, to explore their sensitivity to the neutron-skin thickness of nuclei. We cover 91 nuclei of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Ni isotopes. The cross sections are calculated in the Glauber theory using the density distributions obtained with the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method in three-dimensional coordinate space. Defining a reaction radius, aR=√σR/π , to characterize the nuclear size and target (proton or 12C) dependence, we find an empirical formula for expressing aR with the point matter radius and the skin thickness, and assess two practical ways of determining the skin thickness from proton-nucleus σR values measured at different energies or from σR values measured for different targets.

  18. Shrink-wrapped isosurface from cross sectional images

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. K.; Hahn, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This paper addresses a new surface reconstruction scheme for approximating the isosurface from a set of tomographic cross sectional images. Differently from the novel Marching Cubes (MC) algorithm, our method does not extract the iso-density surface (isosurface) directly from the voxel data but calculates the iso-density point (isopoint) first. After building a coarse initial mesh approximating the ideal isosurface by the cell-boundary representation, it metamorphoses the mesh into the final isosurface by a relaxation scheme, called shrink-wrapping process. Compared with the MC algorithm, our method is robust and does not make any cracks on surface. Furthermore, since it is possible to utilize lots of additional isopoints during the surface reconstruction process by extending the adjacency definition, theoretically the resulting surface can be better in quality than the MC algorithm. According to experiments, it is proved to be very robust and efficient for isosurface reconstruction from cross sectional images. PMID:20703361

  19. Behavior of very high energy hadronic cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stodolsky, L.

    2017-10-01

    Analysis of the data for proton and antiproton scattering leads to a simple picture for very high energy hadronic cross-sections. There is, asymptotically, a simple “black disc” with a smooth “edge”. The radius of the “disc” is expanding logarithmically with energy, while the “edge” is constant. These conclusions follow from extensive fits to accelerator and cosmic ray data, combined with the observation that a certain combination of elastic and total cross-sections allows extraction of the “edge”. An interesting feature of the results is that the “edge” is rather large compared to the “disc”. This explains the slow approach to “asymptopia” where the “disc” finally dominates.

  20. Vortex breakdown in closed containers with polygonal cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, I. V., E-mail: naumov@itp.nsc.ru; Dvoynishnikov, S. V.; Kabardin, I. K.

    2015-12-15

    The vortex breakdown bubble in the confined flow generated by a rotating lid in closed containers with polygonal cross sections was analysed both experimentally and numerically for the height/radius aspect ratio equal to 2. The stagnation point locations of the breakdown bubble emergence and the corresponding Reynolds number were determined experimentally and in addition computed numerically by STAR-CCM+ CFD software for square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal cross section configurations. The flow pattern and the velocity were observed and measured by combining the seeding particle visualization and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The vortex breakdown size and position onmore » the container axis were determined for Reynolds numbers, ranging from 1450 to 2400. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed container of cubical and cylindrical configurations. It is shown that the measured evolution of steady vortex breakdown is in close agreement with the numerical results.« less

  1. Cross Section High Resolution Imaging of Polymer-Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaportas, D.; Aden, P.; Muckle, C.; Yeates, S.; Treutlein, R.; Haq, S.; Alexandrou, I.

    This paper describes a methodology for preparing cross sections of organic layers suitable for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at high resolution. Our principal aim is to prepare samples that are tough enough to allow the slicing into sub-150 nm sections. We also need strong contrast at the organic layer area to make it identifiable during TEM. Our approach is to deposit organic layers on flexible substrates and prepare thin cross sections using ultra-microtomy. We sandwich the organic layer between two metal thin films in order to isolate it and improve contrast. Our methodology is used to study the microstructure of polymer/nanotube composites, allowing us to accurately measure the organic layer thickness, determine nanotube dispersion and assess the effect of nanotube clustering on film structural stability.

  2. α-induced reaction cross section measurements on 197Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szücs, Tamás; Gyürky, György; Halász, Zoltán; Kiss, Gábor Gy.; Fülöp, Zsolt

    2018-01-01

    The γ-process is responsible for creating the majority of the isotopes of heavier elements on the proton rich side of the valley of stability. The γ-process simulations fail to reproduce the measured solar system abundance of these isotopes. The problem can lie in the not well known astrophysical scenarios where the process takes place, or in the not sufficiently known nuclear physics input. To improve the latter part, α-induced reaction cross section measurements on 197Au were carried out at Atomki. With this dataset new experimental information will become available, which can be later used as validation of the theoretical cross section calculations used in the γ-process simulations.

  3. Stopping cross sections of He + ions in bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuldeep; Jain, Animesh K.

    1985-06-01

    The stopping cross sections, ɛ( E), of He + ions in bismuth have been measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) at incident energies ranging from E = 1.6-3.4 MeV. The energy loss of He + ions and thicknesses of the bismuth films deposited on aluminium substrates were determined from the RBS spectra at each energy for scattering angles of 130° and 165°. The film thicknesses of some of the samples were also measured by weighing and the results compared with those from RBS. Parameters for energy dependence of stopping cross section in the Varelas-Biersack interpolation formula have been obtained for bismuth from a fit to all the available experimental data. Accuracy of our method based on RBS is demonstrated by measurements on copper, for which ɛ( E) is already well studied. It is also shown that reliable ɛ( E) values may be obtained even on samples with non-uniform film thickness.

  4. Extinction cross-section suppression and active acoustic invisibility cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-10-01

    Invisibility in its canonical form requires rendering a zero extinction cross-section (or energy efficiency) from an active or a passive object. This work demonstrates the successful theoretical realization of this physical effect for an active cylindrically radiating acoustic body, undergoing periodic axisymmetric harmonic vibrations near a flat rigid boundary. Radiating, amplification and extinction cross-sections of the active source are defined. Assuming monopole and dipole modal oscillations of the circular source, conditions are found where the extinction energy efficiency factor of the active source vanishes, achieving total invisibility with minimal influence of the source size. It also takes positive or negative values, depending on its size and distance from the boundary. Moreover, the amplification energy efficiency factor is negative for the acoustically-active source. These effects also occur for higher-order modal oscillations of the active source. The results find potential applications in the development of acoustic cloaking devices and invisibility.

  5. PIA and REWIND: Two New Methodologies for Cross Section Adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents two new cross section adjustment methodologies intended for coping with the problem of compensations. The first one PIA, Progressive Incremental Adjustment, gives priority to the utilization of experiments of elemental type (those sensitive to a specific cross section), following a definite hierarchy on which type of experiment to use. Once the adjustment is performed, both the new adjusted data and the new covariance matrix are kept. The second methodology is called REWIND (Ranking Experiments by Weighting for Improved Nuclear Data). This new proposed approach tries to establish a methodology for ranking experiments by looking at the potentialmore » gain they can produce in an adjustment. Practical applications for different adjustments illustrate the results of the two methodologies against the current one and show the potential improvement for reducing uncertainties in target reactors.« less

  6. Doppler Temperature Coefficient Calculations Using Adjoint-Weighted Tallies and Continuous Energy Cross Sections in MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Matthew Alejandro

    version of MCNP6. Temperature feedback results from the cross sections themselves, changes in the probability density functions, as well as changes in the density of the materials. The focus of this work is specific to the Doppler temperature feedback which result from Doppler broadening of cross sections as well as changes in the probability density function within the scattering kernel. This method is compared against published results using Mosteller's numerical benchmark to show accurate evaluations of the Doppler temperature coefficient, fuel assembly calculations, and a benchmark solution based on the heavy gas model for free-gas elastic scattering. An infinite medium benchmark for neutron free gas elastic scattering for large scattering ratios and constant absorption cross section has been developed using the heavy gas model. An exact closed form solution for the neutron energy spectrum is obtained in terms of the confluent hypergeometric function and compared against spectra for the free gas scattering model in MCNP6. Results show a quick increase in convergence of the analytic energy spectrum to the MCNP6 code with increasing target size, showing absolute relative differences of less than 5% for neutrons scattering with carbon. The analytic solution has been generalized to accommodate piecewise constant in energy absorption cross section to produce temperature feedback. Results reinforce the constraints in which heavy gas theory may be applied resulting in a significant target size to accommodate increasing cross section structure. The energy dependent piecewise constant cross section heavy gas model was used to produce a benchmark calculation of the Doppler temperature coefficient to show accurate calculations when using the adjoint-weighted method. Results show the Doppler temperature coefficient using adjoint weighting and cross section derivatives accurately obtains the correct solution within statistics as well as reduce computer runtimes by a factor of 50.

  7. Inclusive parton cross sections in photoproduction and photon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Bán, J.; Ban, Y.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bispham, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Burton, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Charlet, M.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Clerbaux, B.; Colombo, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormack, C.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Droutskoi, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herynek, I.; Hess, M. F.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Horisberger, R.; Hudgson, V. L.; Huet, Ph.; Hütte, M.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kazarian, S.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Köhne, J. H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J.-F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Link, J.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; List, B.; Lobo, G.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lomas, J.; Lopez, G. C.; Lubimov, V.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, T.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Migliori, A.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Mroczko, E.; Müller, G.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Nicholls, T. C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Niedzballa, Ch.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oakden, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panaro, E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pieuchot, A.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Rick, H.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, H. E.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Rylko, R.; Sahlmann, N.; Salesch, S. G.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schacht, P.; Schiek, S.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, M.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Spiekermann, J.; Spielman, S.; Spitzer, H.; Starosta, R.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Stolze, K.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Uelkes, P.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Wagener, M.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wittek, C.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zarbock, D.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.; H1 Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Photoproduction of 2-jet events is studied with the H1 detector at HERA. Parton cross sections are extracted from the data by an unfolding method using leading order parton-jet correlations of a QCD generator. The gluon distribution in the photon is derived in the fractional momentum range 0.04 ⩽ xγ ⩽ 1 at the average factorization scale 75 GeV 2.

  8. Cross-sectional echocardiographic diagnosis of systemic venous return.

    PubMed Central

    Huhta, J C; Smallhorn, J F; Macartney, F J; Anderson, R H; de Leval, M

    1982-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of cross-sectional echocardiography in diagnosing anomalous systemic venous return we used the technique in 800 consecutive children with congenital heart disease and whom the diagnosis was ultimately confirmed by angiography. Cross-sectional echocardiography was performed without prior knowledge of the diagnosis in all but 11 patients, who were recalled because of a known abnormality of atrial situs. The sensitivity of cross-sectional echocardiographic detection of various structures was as follows: right superior vena cava 792/792 (100%); left superior vena cava 46/48 (96%); bilateral superior vena cava 38/40 (95%); bridging innominate vein with bilateral superior vena cava 13/18 (72%); connection of superior caval segment to heart (coronary sinus or either atrium) (100%); absence of suprarenal inferior vena cava 23/23 (100%); azygos continuation of the inferior vena cava 31/33 (91%); downstream connection of azygos continuation, once seen, 21/21 (100%); partial anomalous hepatic venous connection (one hepatic vein not connected to the inferior vena cava) 1/1 (100%); total anomalous hepatic venous connection (invariably associated with left isomerism) 23/23 (100%). The specificity of each above diagnoses was 100% except in one infant with exomphalos in whom absence of the suprarenal inferior vena cava was incorrectly diagnosed. Thus cross-sectional echocardiography is an extremely specific and highly sensitive method of recognizing anomalous systemic venous return. It is therefore of great value of planning both cardiac catheterisation and cannulation for open heart surgery. Images PMID:6751361

  9. 13. Photocopy of drawing dated January 20, 1958, CROSS SECTION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of drawing dated January 20, 1958, CROSS SECTION, REHABILITATION OF PIERSHED AT FOOT OF 29TH ST. city of New York Department of Marine and Aviation, Contract 3049, Drawing 3. (On file, City of New York Department of Ports and Trade). - South Brooklyn Freight Terminal, 29th Street Pier, Opposite end of Twenty-ninth Street on upper New York Bay, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  10. Differential collision cross-sections for atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    Differential collision cross-sections of O on N2 and other gases were measured to understand vehicle-environmental contamination effects in orbit. The following subject areas are also covered: groundbased scientific observations of rocket releases during NICARE-1; data compression study for the UVI; science priorities for UV imaging in the mid-1990's; and assessment of optimizations possible in UV imaging systems.

  11. Differential cross sections in a thick brane world scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza, Omar; Arceo, R.; López, L. A.; Cerón, V. E.

    2018-04-01

    The elastic differential cross section is calculated at low energies for the elements He and Ne using an effective 4D electromagnetic potential coming from the contribution of the massive Kaluza-Klein modes of the 5D vector field in a thick brane scenario. The length scale is adjusted in the potential to compare with known experimental data and to set bounds for the parameter of the model.

  12. Radar Cross Section (RCS) Simulation for Wind Turbines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    SECTION (RCS) SIMULATION FOR WIND TURBINES by Cuong Ton June 2013 Thesis Advisor: David C. Jenn Second Reader: Ric Romero THIS PAGE...TITLE AND SUBTITLE RADAR CROSS SECTION (RCS) SIMULATION FOR WIND TURBINES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Cuong Ton 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Wind - turbine power provides energy-independence and greenhouse-gas reduction benefits, but if wind turbines are built

  13. 42. Photograph of a line drawing. 'CROSS SECTION AND PLAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Photograph of a line drawing. 'CROSS SECTION AND PLAN LAYOUT OF PART I, SECTION 8, BUILDINGS NO. H-1 TO H-10 INCL., GRINDING, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLANT B AS OF 4-24-44.' From the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (NashVille, TN: Office of the District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  14. Effect of core polarizability on photoionization cross-section calculations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration of the importance of core polarizability in a case where cancellation is only moderate, with suggestion of an improvement to the scaled Thomas-Fermi (STF) wave functions of Stewart and Rotenberg (1965). The inclusion of dipole polarizability of the core for argon is shown to substantially improve the agreement between the theoretical and experimental photoionization cross sections for the ground-state configuration.

  15. Workshop on a Cross Section of Archean Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D. (Editor); Card, K. D. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Various topics relevant to crustal genesis, especially the relationship between Archean low - and high-grade terrains, were discussed. The central Superior Province of the Canadian Shield was studied. Here a 120 km-wide transition from subgreenschist facies rocks of the Michipicoten greenstone belt to granulite facies rocks of the Kapuskasing structural zone represents an oblique cross section through some 20 km of crust, uplifted along a northwest-dipping thrust fault.

  16. 30. Photograph of a line drawing. 'CROSS SECTION OF PART ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photograph of a line drawing. 'CROSS SECTION OF PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS D-1 TO D-10 INCL., NITRATION, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLANT 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of the District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  17. 29. Photograph of a line drawing. 'CROSS SECTION AND PLAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photograph of a line drawing. 'CROSS SECTION AND PLAN LAYOUT OF PART I, SECTION 8, BUILDINGS NO. D-1 TO D-10 INCL., NITRATION, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLANT B AS OF 4-24-44.' From the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of the District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  18. Vibrational cross sections for positron scattering by nitrogen molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mazon, K. T.; Tenfen, W.; Michelin, S. E.

    2010-09-15

    We present a systematic study of low-energy positron collision with nitrogen molecules. Vibrational elastic and excitation cross sections are calculated using the multichannel version of the continued fractions method in the close-coupling scheme for the positron incident energy up to 20 eV. The interaction potential is treated within the static-correlation-polarization approximation. The comparison of our calculated data with existing theoretical and experimental results is encouraging.

  19. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; ...

    2016-06-23

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, F A(q 2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of F A from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of F A. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to r A 2 = 0.46(22)fm 2, withmore » a much larger uncertainty than determined in the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(ν μn → μ -p)| Ev=1 GeV = 10.1(0.9)×10 -39cm 2. The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. Furthermore, these techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.« less

  20. Fission cross section uncertainties with the NIFFTE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiorgio, Samuele; Niffte Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear data such as neutron-induced fission cross sections play a fundamental role in nuclear energy and defense applications. In recent years, understanding of these systems has become increasingly dependent upon advanced simulation and modeling, where uncertainties in nuclear data propagate in the expected performances of existing and future systems. It is important therefore that uncertainties in nuclear data are minimized and fully understood. For this reason, the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) uses a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure energy-differential (n,f) cross sections with unprecedented precision. The presentation will discuss how the capabilities of the NIFFTE TPC allow to directly measures systematic uncertainties in fission cross sections, in particular for what concerns fission-fragment identification, and target and beam uniformity. Preliminary results from recent analysis of 238U/235U and 239Pu/235U data collected with the TPC will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Why coronal flux tubes have axially invariant cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2001-10-01

    We present here a model that not only explains the long-standing mystery^1 of why solar coronal flux tubes tend towards having axially invariant cross-sections but also explains several other enigmatic features, namely: rotating jets emanating from the ends (surges), counter-streaming beams, ingestion of photospheric material, and elevated pressure/temperature compared to adjacent plasma. The model shows that when a steady current flows along a flux tube with a bulging middle (i.e., a flux tube that is initially produced by a potential magnetic field), non-conservative forces develop which accelerate fluid axially from both ends towards the middle. Remarkably, this axial pumping of fluid into the flux tube causes the flux tube cross-section and volume to decrease in a manner such that the flux tube develops an axial uniform cross-section as observed in coronal loops. The pumping process produces counter-rotating, counter-streaming Alfvenic bulk motion consistent with observations. Collision of the counter-streaming beams causes non-localized bulk heating. This picture also has relevance to astrophysical jets and coaxial spheromak guns and explains why these systems tend to form an axial jet along the geometric axis. Supported by USDOE. l ^1 J. A. Klimchuk, Solar Phys. 193, 53 (2000)

  2. Why coronal flux tubes have axially invariant cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, P. M.

    2001-12-01

    We present here a model that not only explains the long-standing mystery of why solar coronal flux tubes tend towards having axially in-variant cross-sections but also explains several other enigmatic features, namely: rotating jets emanating from the ends (surges), counter-streaming beams, ingestion of photospheric material, and elevated pressure/temperature compared to adjacent plasma. The model shows that when a steady current flows along a flux tube with a bulging middle (i.e., a flux tube that is initially produced by a potential magnetic field), non-conservative forces develop which accelerate fluid axially from both ends towards the middle. Remarkably, this axial pumping of fluid into the flux tube causes the flux tube cross-section and volume to decrease in a manner such that the flux tube develops an axial uniform cross-section as observed in coronal loops. The pumping process produces counter-rotating, counter-streaming Alfvenic bulk motion consistent with observations. Collision of the counter-streaming beams causes non-localized bulk heating. This picture also has relevance to astrophysical jets and coaxial spheromak guns and explains why these systems tend to form an axial jet along the geometric axis. Supported by USDOE. [1]J. A. Klimchuk, Solar Phys. 193, 53 (2000)

  3. Three Dimensional Cross-Sectional Properties From Bone Densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Bone densitometry has previously been used to obtain cross-sectional properties of bone in a single scan plane. Using three non-coplanar scans, we have extended the method to obtain the principal area Moments of inertia and orientations of the principal axes at each cross-section along the length of the scan. Various 5 aluminum phantoms were used to examine scanner characteristics to develop the highest accuracy possible for in vitro non-invasive analysis of mass distribution. Factors considered included X-ray photon energy, initial scan orientation, the included angle of the 3 scans, and Imin/Imax ratios. Principal moments of inertia were accurate to within 3.1% and principal angles were within 1 deg. of the expected value for phantoms scanned with included angles of 60 deg. and 90 deg. at the higher X-ray photon energy. Low standard deviations in error also 10 indicate high precision of calculated measurements with these included angles. Accuracy and precision decreased slightly when the included angle was reduced to 30 deg. The method was then successfully applied to a pair of excised cadaveric tibiae. The accuracy and insensitivity of the algorithms to cross-sectional shape and changing isotropy (Imin/Imax) values when various included angles are used make this technique viable for future in vivo studies.

  4. Novel Method for Vessel Cross-Sectional Shear Wave Imaging.

    PubMed

    He, Qiong; Li, Guo-Yang; Lee, Fu-Feng; Zhang, Qihao; Cao, Yanping; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-07-01

    Many studies have investigated the applications of shear wave imaging (SWI) to vascular elastography, mainly on the longitudinal section of vessels. It is important to investigate SWI in the arterial cross section when evaluating anisotropy of the vessel wall or complete plaque composition. Here, we proposed a novel method based on the coordinate transformation and directional filter in the polar coordinate system to achieve vessel cross-sectional shear wave imaging. In particular, ultrasound radiofrequency data were transformed from the Cartesian to the polar coordinate system; the radial displacements were then estimated directly. Directional filtering was performed along the circumferential direction to filter out the reflected waves. The feasibility of the proposed vessel cross-sectional shear wave imaging method was investigated through phantom experiments and ex vivo and in vivo studies. Our results indicated that the dispersion relation of the shear wave (i.e., the guided circumferential wave) within the vessel can be measured via the present method, and the elastic modulus of the vessel can be determined. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cross-sectional transport imaging in a multijunction solar cell

    DOE PAGES

    Haegel, Nancy M.; Ke, Chi -Wen; Taha, Hesham; ...

    2016-12-01

    Here, we combine a highly localized electron-beam point source excitation to generate excess free carriers with the spatial resolution of optical near-field imaging to map recombination in a cross-sectioned multijunction (Ga 0.5In 0.5P/GaIn 0.01As/Ge) solar cell. By mapping the spatial variations in emission of light for fixed generation (as opposed to traditional cathodoluminescence (CL), which maps integrated emission as a function of position of generation), it is possible to directly monitor the motion of carriers and photons. We observe carrier diffusion throughout the full width of the middle (GaInAs) cell, as well as luminescent coupling from point source excitation inmore » the top cell GaInP to the middle cell. Supporting CL and near-field photoluminescence (PL) measurements demonstrate the excitation-dependent Fermi level splitting effects that influence cross-sectioned spectroscopy results, as well as transport limitations on the spatial resolution of conventional cross-sectional far-field measurements.« less

  6. Catalyst shape engineering for anisotropic cross-sectioned nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Kelrich, Alexander; Cohen, Shimon; Ritter, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The ability to engineer material properties at the nanoscale is a crucial prerequisite for nanotechnology. Hereunder, we suggest and demonstrate a novel approach to realize non-hemispherically shaped nanowire catalysts, subsequently used to grow InP nanowires with a cross section anisotropy ratio of up to 1:1.8. Gold was deposited inside high aspect ratio nanotrenches in a 5 nm thick SiNx selective area mask; inside the growth chamber, upon heating to 455 °C, the thin gold stripes agglomerated, resulting in an ellipsoidal dome (hemiellipsoid). The initial shape of the catalyst was preserved during growth to realize asymmetrically cross-sectioned nanowires. Moreover, the crystalline nature of the nanowire side facets was found to depend on the nano-trench orientation atop the substrate, resulting in hexagonal or octagonal cross-sections when the nano-trenches are aligned or misaligned with the [1¯10] orientation atop a [111]B substrate. These results establish the role of catalyst shape as a unique tool to engineer nanowire growth, potentially allowing further control over its physical properties.

  7. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization cross section of the hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Leah G; Savee, John D; Gozem, Samer; Shen, Linhan; Krylov, Anna I; Taatjes, Craig A; Osborn, David L; Okumura, Mitchio

    2018-05-14

    The absolute photoionization spectrum of the hydroxyl (OH) radical from 12.513 to 14.213 eV was measured by multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with time-resolved radical kinetics. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation was generated at the Advanced Light Source. OH radicals were generated from the reaction of O( 1 D) + H 2 O in a flow reactor in He at 8 Torr. The initial O( 1 D) concentration, where the atom was formed by pulsed laser photolysis of ozone, was determined from the measured depletion of a known concentration of ozone. Concentrations of OH and O( 3 P) were obtained by fitting observed time traces with a kinetics model constructed with literature rate coefficients. The absolute cross section of OH was determined to be σ(13.436 eV) = 3.2 ± 1.0 Mb and σ(14.193 eV) = 4.7 ± 1.6 Mb relative to the known cross section for O( 3 P) at 14.193 eV. The absolute photoionization spectrum was obtained by recording a spectrum at a resolution of 8 meV (50 meV steps) and scaling to the single-energy cross sections. We computed the absolute VUV photoionization spectrum of OH and O( 3 P) using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster Dyson orbitals and a Coulomb photoelectron wave function and found good agreement with the observed absolute photoionization spectra.

  8. Origami tubes with reconfigurable polygonal cross-sections.

    PubMed

    Filipov, E T; Paulino, G H; Tachi, T

    2016-01-01

    Thin sheets can be assembled into origami tubes to create a variety of deployable, reconfigurable and mechanistically unique three-dimensional structures. We introduce and explore origami tubes with polygonal, translational symmetric cross-sections that can reconfigure into numerous geometries. The tubular structures satisfy the mathematical definitions for flat and rigid foldability, meaning that they can fully unfold from a flattened state with deformations occurring only at the fold lines. The tubes do not need to be straight and can be constructed to follow a non-linear curved line when deployed. The cross-section and kinematics of the tubular structures can be reprogrammed by changing the direction of folding at some folds. We discuss the variety of tubular structures that can be conceived and we show limitations that govern the geometric design. We quantify the global stiffness of the origami tubes through eigenvalue and structural analyses and highlight the mechanical characteristics of these systems. The two-scale nature of this work indicates that, from a local viewpoint, the cross-sections of the polygonal tubes are reconfigurable while, from a global viewpoint, deployable tubes of desired shapes are achieved. This class of tubes has potential applications ranging from pipes and micro-robotics to deployable architecture in buildings.

  9. Origami tubes with reconfigurable polygonal cross-sections

    PubMed Central

    Filipov, E. T.; Paulino, G. H.; Tachi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Thin sheets can be assembled into origami tubes to create a variety of deployable, reconfigurable and mechanistically unique three-dimensional structures. We introduce and explore origami tubes with polygonal, translational symmetric cross-sections that can reconfigure into numerous geometries. The tubular structures satisfy the mathematical definitions for flat and rigid foldability, meaning that they can fully unfold from a flattened state with deformations occurring only at the fold lines. The tubes do not need to be straight and can be constructed to follow a non-linear curved line when deployed. The cross-section and kinematics of the tubular structures can be reprogrammed by changing the direction of folding at some folds. We discuss the variety of tubular structures that can be conceived and we show limitations that govern the geometric design. We quantify the global stiffness of the origami tubes through eigenvalue and structural analyses and highlight the mechanical characteristics of these systems. The two-scale nature of this work indicates that, from a local viewpoint, the cross-sections of the polygonal tubes are reconfigurable while, from a global viewpoint, deployable tubes of desired shapes are achieved. This class of tubes has potential applications ranging from pipes and micro-robotics to deployable architecture in buildings. PMID:26997894

  10. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization cross section of the hydroxyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, Leah G.; Savee, John D.; Gozem, Samer; Shen, Linhan; Krylov, Anna I.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Okumura, Mitchio

    2018-05-01

    The absolute photoionization spectrum of the hydroxyl (OH) radical from 12.513 to 14.213 eV was measured by multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with time-resolved radical kinetics. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation was generated at the Advanced Light Source. OH radicals were generated from the reaction of O(1D) + H2O in a flow reactor in He at 8 Torr. The initial O(1D) concentration, where the atom was formed by pulsed laser photolysis of ozone, was determined from the measured depletion of a known concentration of ozone. Concentrations of OH and O(3P) were obtained by fitting observed time traces with a kinetics model constructed with literature rate coefficients. The absolute cross section of OH was determined to be σ(13.436 eV) = 3.2 ± 1.0 Mb and σ(14.193 eV) = 4.7 ± 1.6 Mb relative to the known cross section for O(3P) at 14.193 eV. The absolute photoionization spectrum was obtained by recording a spectrum at a resolution of 8 meV (50 meV steps) and scaling to the single-energy cross sections. We computed the absolute VUV photoionization spectrum of OH and O(3P) using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster Dyson orbitals and a Coulomb photoelectron wave function and found good agreement with the observed absolute photoionization spectra.

  11. Hydraulic geometry of river cross sections; theory of minimum variance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Garnett P.

    1978-01-01

    This study deals with the rates at which mean velocity, mean depth, and water-surface width increase with water discharge at a cross section on an alluvial stream. Such relations often follow power laws, the exponents in which are called hydraulic exponents. The Langbein (1964) minimum-variance theory is examined in regard to its validity and its ability to predict observed hydraulic exponents. The variables used with the theory were velocity, depth, width, bed shear stress, friction factor, slope (energy gradient), and stream power. Slope is often constant, in which case only velocity, depth, width, shear and friction factor need be considered. The theory was tested against a wide range of field data from various geographic areas of the United States. The original theory was intended to produce only the average hydraulic exponents for a group of cross sections in a similar type of geologic or hydraulic environment. The theory does predict these average exponents with a reasonable degree of accuracy. An attempt to forecast the exponents at any selected cross section was moderately successful. Empirical equations are more accurate than the minimum variance, Gauckler-Manning, or Chezy methods. Predictions of the exponent of width are most reliable, the exponent of depth fair, and the exponent of mean velocity poor. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. A study of radar cross section measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Malcolm W.

    1986-01-01

    Past, present, and proposed future technologies for the measurement of radar cross section were studied. The purpose was to determine which method(s) could most advantageously be implemented in the large microwave anechoic chamber facility which is operated at the antenna test range site. The progression toward performing radar cross section measurements of space vehicles with which the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle will be called upon to rendezvous and dock is a natural outgrowth of previous work conducted in recent years of developing a high accuracy range and velocity sensing radar system. The radar system was designed to support the rendezvous and docking of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle with various other space vehicles. The measurement of radar cross sections of space vehicles will be necessary in order to plan properly for Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle rendezvous and docking assignments. The methods which were studied include: standard far-field measurements; reflector-type compact range measurements; lens-type compact range measurement; near field/far field transformations; and computer predictive modeling. The feasibility of each approach is examined.

  13. Extension of the Bgl Broad Group Cross Section Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, Desislava; Belousov, Sergey; Ilieva, Krassimira

    2009-08-01

    The broad group cross-section libraries BUGLE and BGL are applied for reactor shielding calculation using the DOORS package based on discrete ordinates method and multigroup approximation of the neutron cross-sections. BUGLE and BGL libraries are problem oriented for PWR or VVER type of reactors respectively. They had been generated by collapsing the problem independent fine group library VITAMIN-B6 applying PWR and VVER one-dimensional radial model of the reactor middle plane using the SCALE software package. The surveillance assemblies (SA) of VVER-1000/320 are located on the baffle above the reactor core upper edge in a region where geometry and materials differ from those of the middle plane and the neutron field gradient is very high which would result in a different neutron spectrum. That is why the application of the fore-mentioned libraries for the neutron fluence calculation in the region of SA could lead to an additional inaccuracy. This was the main reason to study the necessity for an extension of the BGL library with cross-sections appropriate for the SA region. Comparative analysis of the neutron spectra of the SA region calculated by the VITAMIN-B6 and BGL libraries using the two-dimensional code DORT have been done with purpose to evaluate the BGL applicability for SA calculation.

  14. Photochemistry on ultrathin metal films: Strongly enhanced cross sections for NO2 on Ag /Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesenberg, Claudia; Autzen, Olaf; Hasselbrink, Eckart

    2006-12-01

    The surface photochemistry of NO2 on ultrathin Ag(111) films (5-60nm ) on Si(100) substrates has been studied. NO2, forming N2O4 on the surface, dissociates to release NO and NO2 into the gas phase with translational energies exceeding the equivalent of the sample temperature. An increase of the photodesorption cross section is observed for 266nm light when the film thickness is decreased below 30nm despite the fact that the optical absorptivity decreases. For 4.4nm film thickness this increase is about threefold. The data are consistent with a similar effect for 355nm light. The reduced film thickness has no significant influence on the average translation energy of the desorbing molecules or the branching into the different channels. The increased photodesorption cross section is interpreted to result from photon absorption in the Si substrate producing electrons with no or little momenta parallel to the surface at energies where this is not allowed in Ag. It is suggested that these electrons penetrate through the Ag film despite the gap in the surface projected band structure.

  15. Photoeffect cross sections of some rare-earth elements at 145.4 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umesh, T. K.; Ranganathaiah, C.; Sanjeevaiah, B.

    1985-08-01

    Total attenuation cross sections in the elements La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, and Er were derived from the measured total cross sections of their simple oxide compounds, by employing the mixture rule at 145.4-keV photon energy. The compound cross sections have been measured by performing transmission experiments in a good geometry setup. From the derived total cross sections of elements, photoeffect cross sections have been obtained by subtracting the theoretical scattering cross sections. A good agreement is observed between the present data of photoeffect cross sections and Scofield's theoretical data.

  16. Comparison of x-ray cross sections for diagnostic and therapeutic medical physics.

    PubMed

    Boone, J M; Chavez, A E

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to make available an up-to-date source of attenuation coefficient data to the medical physics community, and to compare these data with other more familiar sources. Data files from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (in Livermore, CA) were truncated to match the needs of the medical physics community, and an interpolation routine was written to calculate a continuous set of cross sections spanning energies from 1 keV to 50 MeV. Coefficient data are available for elements Z = 1 through Z = 100. Values for mass attenuation coefficients, mass-energy-transfer coefficients, and mass-energy absorption coefficients are produced by a single computer subroutine. In addition to total interaction cross sections, the cross sections for photoelectric, Rayleigh, Compton, pair, and some triplet interactions are also produced by this single program. The coefficients were compared to the 1970 data of Storm and Israel over the energy interval from 1 to 1000 keV; for elements 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80, the average positive difference between the Storm and Israel coefficients and the coefficients reported here are 1.4%, 2.7%, and 2.6%, for the mass attenuation, mass energy-transfer, and mass-energy absorption coefficients, respectively. The 1969 data compilation of mass attenuation coefficients from McMaster et al. were also compared with the newer LLNL data. Over the energy region from 10 keV to 1000 keV, and from elements Z = 1 to Z = 82 (inclusive), the overall average difference was 1.53% (sigma = 0.85%). While the overall average difference was small, there was larger variation (> 5%) between cross sections for some elements. In addition to coefficient data, other useful data such as the density, atomic weight, K, L1, L2, L3, M, and N edges, and numerous characteristic emission energies are output by the program, depending on a single input variable. The computer source code, written in C, can be accessed and downloaded from

  17. Reducing cross-sectional data using a genetic algorithm method and effects on cross-section geometry and steady-flow profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of reduced cross-sectional data points on steady-flow profiles were also determined. Thirty-five cross sections of the original steady-flow model of the Kootenai River were used. These two methods were tested for all cross sections with each cross section resolution reduced to 10, 20 and 30 data points, that is, six tests were completed for each of the thirty-five cross sections. Generally, differences from the original water-surface elevation were smaller as the number of data points in reduced cross sections increased, but this was not always the case, especially in the braided reach. Differences were smaller for reduced cross sections developed by the genetic algorithm method than the standard algorithm method.

  18. Formulation and Analysis of the Quantum Radar Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsema, Matthew J.

    In radar, the amount of returns that an object sends back to the receiver after being struck by an electromagnetic wave is characterized by what is known as the radar cross section, denoted by sigma typically. There are many mechanisms that affect how much radiation is reflected back in the receiver direction, such as reflectivity, physical contours and dimensions, attenuation properties of the materials, projected cross sectional area and so on. All of these characteristics are lumped together in a single value of sigma, which has units of m2. Stealth aircrafts for example are designed to minimize its radar cross section and return the smallest amount of radiation possible in the receiver direction. A new concept has been introduced called quantum radar, that uses correlated quantum states of photons as well as the unique properties of quantum mechanics to ascertain information on a target at a distance. At the time of writing this dissertation, quantum radar is very much in its infancy. There still exist fundamental questions about the feasibility of its implementation, especially in the microwave spectrum. However, what has been theoretically determined, is that quantum radar has a fundamental advantage over classical radar in terms of resolution and returns in certain regimes. Analogous to the classical radar cross section (CRCS), the concept of the quantum radar cross section (QRCS) has been introduced. This quantity measures how an object looks to a quantum radar be describing how a single photon, or small cluster of photons scatter off of a macroscopic target. Preliminary simulations of the basic quantum radar cross section equation have yielded promising results showing an advantage in sidelobe response in comparison to the classical RCS. This document expands upon this idea by providing insight as to where this advantage originates, as well as developing more rigorous simulation analysis, and greatly expanding upon the theory. The expanded theory presented

  19. Noncircular Cross Sections Could Enhance Mixing in Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Abdel-Hameed, Hesham

    2003-01-01

    A computational study has shown that by injecting drops in jets of gas having square, elliptical, triangular, or other noncircular injection cross sections, it should be possible to increase (relative to comparable situations having circular cross section) the entrainment and dispersion of liquid drops. This finding has practical significance for a variety of applications in which it is desirable to increase dispersion of drops. For example, in chemical-process sprays, increased dispersion leads to increases in chemical- reaction rates; in diesel engines, increasing the dispersion of drops of sprayed fuel reduces the production of soot; and in household and paint sprays, increasing the dispersion of drops makes it possible to cover larger surfaces. It has been known for some years that single-phase fluid jets that enter flow fields through noncircular inlets entrain more fluid than do comparable jets entering through circular inlets. The computational study reported here was directed in part toward determining whether and how this superior mixing characteristic of noncircular single phase jets translates to a similar benefit in cases of two-phase jets (that is, sprays). The study involved direct numerical simulations of single- and two-phase free jets with circular, elliptical, rectangular, square, and triangular inlet cross sections. The two-phase jets consisted of gas laden with liquid drops randomly injected at the inlets. To address the more interesting case of evaporating drops, the carrier gas in the jets was specified to be initially unvitiated by the vapor of the liquid chemical species and the initial temperature of the drops was chosen to be smaller than that of the gas. The mathematical model used in the study was constructed from the conservation equations for the two-phase flow and included complete couplings of mass, momentum, and energy based on thermodynamically self-consistent specification of the enthalpy, internal energy, and latent heat of

  20. Covariances for the 56Fe radiation damage cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Stanislav P.; Koning, Arjan; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu.

    2017-09-01

    The energy-energy and reaction-reaction covariance matrices were calculated for the n + 56Fe damage cross-sections by Total Monte Carlo method using the TENDL-2013 random files. They were represented in the ENDF-6 format and added to the unperturbed evaluation file. The uncertainties for the spectrum averaged radiation quantities in the representative fission, fusion and spallation facilities were first time assessed as 5-25%. Additional 5 to 20% have to be added to the atom displacement rate uncertainties to account for accuracy of the primary defects simulation in materials. The reaction-reaction correlation were shown to be 1% or less.

  1. He3 Spin-Dependent Cross Sections and Sum Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slifer, K.; Amarian, M.; Auerbach, L.; Averett, T.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.; Bertozzi, B.; Black, T.; Brash, E.; Brown, D.; Burtin, E.; Calarco, J.; Cates, G.; Chai, Z.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E.; Ciofi Degli Atti, C.; Cisbani, E.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Disalvo, R.; Dieterich, S.; Djawotho, P.; Finn, M.; Fissum, K.; Fonvieille, H.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Gao, J.; Garibaldi, F.; Gasparian, A.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.; Glashausser, C.; Glöckle, W.; Golak, J.; Goldberg, E.; Gomez, J.; Gorbenko, V.; Hansen, J.-O.; Hersman, B.; Holmes, R.; Huber, G. M.; Hughes, E.; Humensky, B.; Incerti, S.; Iodice, M.; Jensen, S.; Jiang, X.; Jones, C.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jutier, C.; Kamada, H.; Ketikyan, A.; Kominis, I.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, K.; Kumar, K.; Kumbartzki, G.; Kuss, M.; Lakuriqi, E.; Laveissiere, G.; Lerose, J. J.; Liang, M.; Liyanage, N.; Lolos, G.; Malov, S.; Marroncle, J.; McCormick, K.; McKeown, R. D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mitchell, J.; Nogga, A.; Pace, E.; Papandreou, Z.; Pavlin, T.; Petratos, G. G.; Pripstein, D.; Prout, D.; Ransome, R.; Roblin, Y.; Rowntree, D.; Rvachev, M.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Salmè, G.; Scopetta, S.; Skibiński, R.; Souder, P.; Saito, T.; Strauch, S.; Suleiman, R.; Takahashi, K.; Teijiro, S.; Todor, L.; Tsubota, H.; Ueno, H.; Urciuoli, G.; van der Meer, R.; Vernin, P.; Voskanian, H.; Witała, H.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Xiong, F.; Xu, W.; Yang, J.-C.; Zhang, B.; Zolnierczuk, P.

    2008-07-01

    We present a measurement of the spin-dependent cross sections for the He→3(e→,e')X reaction in the quasielastic and resonance regions at a four-momentum transfer 0.1≤Q2≤0.9GeV2. The spin-structure functions have been extracted and used to evaluate the nuclear Burkhardt-Cottingham and extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rules for the first time. The data are also compared to an impulse approximation calculation and an exact three-body Faddeev calculation in the quasielastic region.

  2. Ab initio method for calculating total cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Schneider, B. I.; Temkin, A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for calculating total cross sections without formally including nonelastic channels is presented. The idea is to use a one channel T-matrix variational principle with a complex correlation function. The derived T matrix is therefore not unitary. Elastic scattering is calculated from T-parallel-squared, but total scattering is derived from the imaginary part of T using the optical theorem. The method is applied to the spherically symmetric model of electron-hydrogen scattering. No spurious structure arises; results for sigma(el) and sigma(total) are in excellent agreement with calculations of Callaway and Oza (1984). The method has wide potential applicability.

  3. Top: Latest results from the Tevatron - Cross section and mass

    SciTech Connect

    M. Coca

    2003-09-02

    The Tevatron is presently the world's only source of top quark production. This presentation summarizes the latest Run II results on top physics obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations, using data taken until mid-January 2003. The first cross section measurements at 1.96 TeV in dilepton and lepton+jets channels agree with the NLO (Next-to-Leading-Order) theoretical predictions. Two top mass measurements, one by CDF using Run II data and another by D0 using an improved technique anticipate the improvements to come in the near future.

  4. Determination of Optimum Cross-section for Oran Highway Revetment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velioglu, Deniz; Sogut, Erdinc; Guler, Isikhan

    2017-04-01

    Revetments are shore parallel, sloping coastal structures which are built to provide protection from the negative effects of the sea. The revetment mentioned in this study is located in the City of Oran, Algeria and is currently under construction. This study investigates the determination of the optimum revetment cross section for Oran highway, considering both the hydraulic stability of the revetment and economy. The existence of cliffs in the region and the settlement of the City of Oran created a necessity to re-align Oran highway; therefore, it was shifted towards the Gulf of Oran. Approximately 1 km of the highway is to be constructed on the Mediterranean Sea due to the new alignment. In order to protect the sea side of the road from the adverse effects of the sea, a revetment was designed. The proposed cross section had an armour layer composed of 23 tons of antifer units and regular placement of armour units was recommended. In order to check the hydraulic stability of the proposed section, physical model tests were performed in the laboratory of LEM (Laboratoire d'Etudes Maritimes) in Algeria, using the pre-determined design wave conditions. The physical model tests revealed that the trunk of the revetment was totaly damaged. Accordingly, the proposed section was found insufficient and certain modifications were required. The first modification was made in the arrangement of armour units, changing them from regular to irregular. After testing the new cross section, it was observed that the revetment was vulnerable to breaking wave attack due to the toe geometry and thus the toe of the revetment had to be re-shaped. Therefore, the second option was to reduce the toe elevation. It was observed that even though the revetment trunk was safe, the damage in the toe was not in acceptable limits. The new cross section was found insufficient and as the final option, the weight of the antifer units used in the armour layer was increased, the toe length of the

  5. Determination of Optimum Cross-section for Oran Highway Revetment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogut, E.; Velioglu, D.; Guler, I.

    2016-12-01

    Revetments are shore parallel, sloping coastal structures which are built to provide protection from the negative effects of the sea. The revetment mentioned in this study is located in the City of Oran, Algeria and is currently under construction. This study investigates the determination of the optimum revetment cross section for Oran highway, considering both the hydraulic stability of the revetment and economy. The existence of cliffs in the region and the settlement of the City of Oran created a necessity to re-align Oran highway; therefore, it was shifted towards the Gulf of Oran. Approximately 1 km of the highway is to be constructed on the Mediterranean Sea due to the new alignment. In order to protect the sea side of the road from the adverse effects of the sea, a revetment was designed. The proposed cross section had an armour layer composed of 23 tons of antifer units and regular placement of armour units was recommended. In order to check the hydraulic stability of the proposed section, physical model tests were performed in the laboratory of LEM (Laboratoire d'Etudes Maritimes) in Algeria, using the pre-determined design wave conditions. The physical model tests revealed that the trunk of the revetment was totaly damaged. Accordingly, the proposed section was found insufficient and certain modifications were required. The first modification was made in the arrangement of armour units, changing them from regular to irregular. After testing the new cross section, it was observed that the revetment was vulnerable to breaking wave attack due to the toe geometry and thus the toe of the revetment had to be re-shaped. Therefore, the second option was to reduce the toe elevation. It was observed that even though the revetment trunk was safe, the damage in the toe was not in acceptable limits. The new cross section was found insufficient and as the final option, the weight of the antifer units used in the armour layer was increased, the toe length of the

  6. Higgs-differential cross section at NNLO in dimensional regularisation

    DOE PAGES

    Dulat, Falko; Lionetti, Simone; Mistlberger, Bernhard; ...

    2017-07-05

    We present an analytic computation of the Higgs production cross section in the gluon fusion channel, which is differential in the components of the Higgs momentum and inclusive in the associated partonic radiation through NNLO in perturbative QCD. Our computation includes the necessary higher order terms in the dimensional regulator beyond the finite part that are required for renormalisation and collinear factorisation at N 3LO. We outline in detail the computational methods which we employ. We present numerical predictions for realistic final state observables, specifically distributions for the decay products of the Higgs boson in the γγ decay channel.

  7. Neutron halo in 14B studied via reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, M.; Nishimura, D.; Suzuki, S.; Tanaka, M.; Takechi, M.; Iwamoto, K.; Wakabayashi, S.; Yaguchi, M.; Ohno, J.; Morita, Y.; Kamisho, Y.; Mihara, M.; Matsuta, K.; Nagashima, M.; Ohtsubo, T.; Izumikawa, T.; Ogura, T.; Abe, K.; Kikukawa, N.; Sakai, T.; Sera, D.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Sato, K.; Furuki, H.; Miyazawa, S.; Ichihashi, N.; Kohno, J.; Yamaki, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Sato, S.; Fukuda, S.

    2014-03-01

    Reaction cross sections (σR) for the neutron-rich nucleus 14B on Be, C, and Al targets have been measured at several energies in the intermediate energy range of 45-120 MeV/nucleon. The present experimental σR show a significant enhancement relative to the systematics of stable nuclei. The nucleon density distribution was deduced through the fitting procedure with the modified Glauber calculation. The necessity of a long tail in the density distribution was found, which is consistent with the valence neutron in 2s1/2 orbital with the small empirical one-neutron separation energy in 14B.

  8. Inband radar cross section of phased arrays with parallel feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flokas, Vassilios

    1994-06-01

    Approximate formulas for the inband radar cross section of arrays with parallel feeds are presented. To obtain the formulas, multiple reflections are neglected, and devices of the same type are assumed to have identical electrical performance. The approximate results were compared to the results obtained using a scattering matrix formulation. Both methods were in agreement in predicting RCS lobe positions, levels, and behavior with scanning. The advantages of the approximate method are its computational efficiency and its flexibility in handling an arbitrary number of coupler levels.

  9. Cross-sectional Imaging Review of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anant; Kaza, Ravi K; Vummidi, Dharshan R

    2016-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem, genetic disorder characterized by development of hamartomas in the brain, abdomen, and thorax. It results from a mutation in one of 2 tumor suppressor genes that activates the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. This article discusses the origins of the disorder, the recently updated criteria for the diagnosis of TSC, and the cross-sectional imaging findings and recommendations for surveillance. Familiarity with the diverse radiological features facilitates diagnosis and helps in treatment planning and monitoring response to treatment of this multisystem disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of the beryllium-7 plus proton fusion cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Ryan P.

    2005-11-01

    The fusion of protons with radioactive nuclei plays an important role in a wide variety of astrophysical scenarios ranging from high-temperature environments like novae and X-ray bursts to the production of neutrinos in the sun. For example, the 8 B neutrino flux measured in neutrino detectors on earth is directly proportional to the cross section for the fusion of protons with radioactive 7 Be. An experimental program has been established to study proton-fusion experiments in inverse kinematics at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using a windowless gas target and the Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS). The performance of the target and separator have been well characterized using a variety of experiments with stable beams including 12 C, 19 F, and 24 Mg. For instance, the areal density of hydrogen in the target was determined to 3% accuracy. This well-characterized system was used to measure accurate stopping powers for many elements in hydrogen gas for the first time. The first measurement of a proton-fusion cross section with a radioactive ion beam at ORNL, the fusion of protons with 7 Be, was performed using the hydrogen gas target and the DRS. The 7 Be was produced at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) and chemically isolated at ORNL. An average 7 Be beam current of 2.5 ppA bombarded the windowless gas target for a period of 3 days. Recoiling B-8 nuclei were efficiently collected using the DRS and were clearly identified in a gas-filled ion detector. The cross section at a center-of-mass energy of 1.502 MeV was determined to be 1.12 mb with 24% uncertainty. The zero-energy S-factor was determined to be 26.8 eV-b with 25% uncertainty. The technique has been clearly demonstrated, and a precise measurement of the fusion cross section will be possible with the development of a somewhat more intense 7 Be radioactive ion beam.

  11. Doubly differential cross sections for galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Norbury, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1987-01-01

    An abrasion-ablation T-matrix formulation is applied to the calculation of double differential-cross sections in projectile fragmentation of 2.1 GeV/nucleon O-16 on Be-9 and 86 MeV/nucleon C-12 on C-12 and Ag-108. An exponential parameterization of the ablation T-matrix is used and the total width of the intermediate states is taken as a parameter. Fitted values of the total width to experimental results are used to predict the lifetime of the ablation stage and indicate a decay time on the order of 10 to the -19th power sec.

  12. Measurement of Automobile UWB Radar Cross Sections at Ka Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takehiko; Takahashi, Naoto; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Tsunoda, Kikuo; Tenno, Nobuyuki

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) radar cross sections (RCS) of an automobile were measured in the frequency range from 22 to 29 GHz, with a view to obtaining information on the design of vehicular cruise control short-range radars. The measurements were made in a radio anechoic chamber using three transmitting and receiving polarization combinations (V-V, H-H, and +45° to -45°). A vector network analyzer was used in making the wideband measurements. The UWB RCSs were derived by integrating the receiving power from 22 to 29 GHz. It was found that the UWB RCS of the automobile varied as follows:

  13. Gingival recession: a cross-sectional clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Goutoudi, P; Koidis, P T; Konstantinidis, A

    1997-06-01

    In this cross-sectional study, risk and potentially causative factors of gingival recession were examined and their relationship to apical migration of the gingival margin evaluated. Thirty eight patients (18-60 years), displaying one or more sites with gingival recession but without any significant periodontal disease participated. A total of 28 parameters were evaluated in both 'test' teeth (50 teeth with gingival recession) and 'control' teeth (50 contralateral teeth). The results revealed that gingival margin recession was associated with both high inflammatory and plaque scores, with decreased widths of keratinized and attached gingiva and with the subjects' toothbrush bristle hardness.

  14. SHIELD and HZETRN comparisons of pion production cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbury, John W.; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Werneth, Charles M.

    2018-03-01

    A program of comparing American (NASA) and Russian (ROSCOSMOS) space radiation transport codes has recently begun, and the first paper directly comparing the NASA and ROSCOSMOS space radiation transport codes, HZETRN and SHIELD respectively has recently appeared. The present work represents the second time that NASA and ROSCOSMOS calculations have been directly compared, and the focus here is on models of pion production cross sections used in the two transport codes mentioned above. It was found that these models are in overall moderate agreement with each other and with experimental data. Disagreements that were found are discussed.

  15. Radar cross section of human cardiopulmonary activity for recumbent subject.

    PubMed

    Kiriazi, John E; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lubecke, Victor M

    2009-01-01

    The radar cross section (RCS) corresponding to human cardio-respiratory motion is measured for a subject in two different recumbent positions. Lying face-up (supine), the subject showed an RCS of 0.326 m(2). But when lying face-down (prone), the RCS increased to 2.9 m(2). This is the first reported RCS measurement corresponding to human cardio-respiratory motion. The results obtained in this experiment suggest modeling the upper part of the human body as a half-cylinder where the front body corresponds to the cylindrical surface and the back corresponds to the rectangular one.

  16. Space, energy and anisotropy effects on effective cross sections and diffusion coefficients in the resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Meftah, B.

    1982-01-01

    Present methods used in reactor analysis do not include adequately the effect of anisotropic scattering in the calculation of resonance effective cross sections. Also the assumption that the streaming term ..cap omega...del Phi is conserved when the total, absorption and transfer cross sections are conserved, is bad because the leakage from a heterogeneous cell will not be conserved and is strongly anisotropic. A third major consideration is the coupling between different regions in a multiregion reactor; currently this effect is being completely ignored. To assess the magnitude of these effects, a code based on integral transport formalism with linear anisotropicmore » scattering was developed. Also, a more adequate formulation of the diffusion coefficient in a heterogeneous cell was derived. Two reactors, one fast, ZPR-6/5, and one thermal, TRX-3, were selected for the study. The study showed that, in general, the inclusion of linear scattering anisotropy increases the cell effective capture cross section of U-238. The increase was up to 2% in TRX-3 and 0.5% in ZPR-6/5. The effect on the multiplication factor was -0.003% ..delta..k/k for ZPR-6/5 and -0.05% ..delta..k/k for TRX-3. For the case of the diffusion coefficient, the combined effect of heterogeneity and linear anisotropy gave an increase of up to 29% in the parallel diffusion coefficient of TRX-3 and 5% in the parallel diffusion coefficient of ZPR-6/5. In contrast, the change in the perpendicular diffusion coefficient did not exceed 2% in both systems.« less

  17. Numerical calculation of charge exchange cross sections for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Luis

    2016-09-01

    The diagnostics of impurity density and temperature in the plasma core in tokamak plasmas is carried out by applying the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) technique, where a fast beam of H atoms collides with the plasma particles leading to electron capture reactions with the impurity ions. The diagnostics is based on the emission of the excited ions formed in the electron capture. The application of the CXRS requires the knowledge of accurate state-selective cross sections, which in general are not accessible experimentally, and the calculation of cross sections for the high n capture levels, required for the diagnostics in the intermediate energy domain of the probe beam, is particularly difficult. In this work, we present a lattice numerical method to solve the time dependent Schrödinger equation. The method is based on the GridTDSE package, it is applicable in the wide energy range 1 - 500 keV/u and can be used to assess the accuracy of previous calculations. The application of the method will be illustrated with calculations for collisions of multiply charged ions with H. Work partially supported by project ENE2014-52432-R (Secretaria de Estado de I+D+i, Spain).

  18. CCKT Calculation of e-H Total Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Aaron K.; Schneider, B. I.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We are in the process of carrying out calculations of e-H total cross sections using the 'complex-correlation Kohn-T' (CCKT) method. In a later paper, we described the methodology more completely, but confined calculations to the elastic scattering region, with definitive, precision results for S-wave phase shifts. Here we extend the calculations to the (low) continuum (1 much less than k(exp 2) much less than 3) using a Green's function formulation. This avoids having to solve integro-differential equations; rather we evaluate indefinite integrals involving appropriate Green's functions and the (complex) optical potential to find the scattering function u(r). From the asymptotic form of u(r) we extract a T(sub L) which is a complex number. From T(sub L), elastic sigma(sub L)(elastic) = 4pi(2L+1)((absolute value of T(sub L))(exp 2)), and total sigma (sub L)(total) = 4pi/k(2L+1)Im(T(sub L)) cross sections follow.

  19. Inclusive jet differential cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Thron, J.; Arzarello, F.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Ciralli, F.; Contin, A.; D'Auria, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckart, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schattevoy, R.; Schneider, J.-L.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Eskreys, K.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajaç, J.; Kȩdzierski, T.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Böttcher, S.; Coldewey, C.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutjahr, B.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kröger, W.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Ladage, B.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mańczak, O.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Grabosch, H. J.; Leich, A.; Meyer, A.; Rethfeldt, C.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; De Paspuale, S.; Qian, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Freidhof, A.; Poser, T.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Theisen, G.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, I.; Jamieson, V. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Kammerlocher, H.; Krebs, B.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burrow, B. D.; Fürtjes, A.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Mainusch, J.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Terron, J.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Beuselinck, R.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Ikraiam, F.; Mayer, J. K.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Bentvelsen, S.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Jong, P.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; O'Dell, V.; Tenner, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Blair, G. A.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Daniels, D.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Luffman, P. E.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J.; Nath, C.; Quadt, A.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; De Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Iori, M.; Marini, G.; Mattioli, M.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; Van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nagira, T.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nagayama, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchuła, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Glasman, C.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Shapira, A.; Ali, I.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; ZEUS Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Inclusive jet differential cross sections for the reaction ep → jet + X at Q2 below 4 GeV 2 have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 0.55 pb -1. These cross sections are given in the kinematic region 0.2 < y < 0.85, for jet pseudorapidities in the ep-laboratory range -1 < ηjet < 2 and refer to jets at the hadron level with a cone radius of one unit in the η - θ plane. These results correspond to quasi-real photoproduction at centre-of-mass energies in the range 130-270 GeV and, approximately, for jet pseudorapidities in the interval -3 < ηjet( λp CMS) < 0. These measurements cover a new kinematic regime of the partonic structure of the photon, at typical scales up to ˜300 GeV 2 and photon fractional momenta down to xγ ˜ 10 -2. Leading logarithm parton shower Monte Carlo calculations, which include both resolved and direct processes and use the predictions of currently available parametrisations of the photon parton distributions, describe in general the shape and magnitude of the measured ηjet and Etjet distributions.

  20. Rosenbluth Separation of the π 0 Electroproduction Cross Section

    DOE PAGES

    Defurne, M.; Mazouz, M.; Ahmed, Z.; ...

    2016-12-23

    In this paper, we present deeply virtualmore » $$\\pi^0$$ electroproduction cross-section measurements at $$x_B$$=0.36 and three different $Q^2$ values ranging from 1.5 to 2 GeV$^2$, obtained from Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E07-007. The Rosenbluth technique is used to separate the longitudinal and transverse responses. Results demonstrate that the cross section is dominated by its transverse component and, thus, is far from the asymptotic limit predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics. Nonetheless, an indication of a nonzero longitudinal contribution is provided by the measured interference term $$\\sigma_{LT}$$. Results are compared with several models based on the leading-twist approach of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). In particular, a fair agreement is obtained with models in which the scattering amplitude includes convolution terms of chiral-odd (transversity) GPDs of the nucleon with the twist-3 pion distribution amplitude. Finally, this experiment, together with previous extensive unseparated measurements, provides strong support to the exciting idea that transversity GPDs can be accessed via neutral pion electroproduction in the high-Q 2 regime.« less

  1. Complex Correlation Calculation of e-H Total Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Calculation of e-H total and elastic partial wave cross sections is being carried out using the complex correlation variational T-matrix method. In this preliminary study, elastic partial wave phase shifts are calculated with the correlation functions which are confined to be real. In that case the method reduces to the conventional optical potential approach with projection operators. The number of terms in the Hylleraas-type wave function for the S phase shifts is 95 while for the S it is 56, except for k=0.8 where it is 84. Our results, which are rigorous lower bounds, are given. They are seen to be in general agreement with those of Schwartz, but they are of 0 greater accuracy and outside of his error limits for k=0.3 and 0.4 for S. The main aim of this approach' is the application to higher energy scattering. By virtue of the complex correlation functions, the T matrix is not unitary so that elastic and total scattering cross sections are independent of each other. Our results will be compared specifically with those of Bray and Stelbovics.

  2. Complex Correlation Calculation of e(-) - H Total Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Calculation of e(-) - H total and elastic partial wave cross sections is being carried out using the complex correlation variational T-matrix method. In this preliminary study, elastic partial wave phase shifts are calculated with the correlation functions which are confined to be real. In that case the method reduces to the conventional optical potential approach with 2 projection operators. The number of terms in the Hylleraas-type wave function for the S-1 phase shifts is 95 while for the S-3 it is 56, except for k = 0.8 where it is 84. Our results, which are rigorous lower bounds, are seen to be in general agreement with those of Schwartz, but they are of greater accuracy and outside of his error limits for k = 0.3 and 0.4 for S-1. The main aim of this approach is the application to higher energy scattering. By virtue of the complex correlation functions, the T-matrix is not unitary so that elastic and total scattering cross sections are independent of each other. Our results will be compared specifically with those of Bray and Stelbovics.

  3. Measuring and modeling the backscattering cross section of a leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, T. B. A.; Sarabandi, K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Leaves are a significant feature of any vegetation canopy, and for remote sensing purposes it is important to develop an effective model for predicting the scattering from a leaf. From measurements of the X band backscattering cross section of a coleus leaf in varying stages of dryness, it is shown that a uniform resistive sheet constitutes such a model for a planar leaf. The scattering is determined by the (complex) resistivity which is, in turn, entirely specified by the gravimetric moisture content of the leaf. Using an available asymptotic expression for the scattering from a rectangular resistive plate which includes, as a special case, a metallic plate whose resistivity is zero, the computed backscattering cross sections for both principal polarizations are found to be in excellent agreement with data measured for rectangular sections of leaves with different moisture contents. If the resistivity is sufficiently large, the asymptotic expressions do not differ significantly from the physical optics ones, and for naturally shaped leaves as well as rectangular sections, the physical optics approximation in conjunction with the resistive sheet model faithfully reproduces the dominant feataures of the scattering patterns under all moisture conditions.

  4. Full scattering profile of tissues with elliptical cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duadi, H.; Feder, I.; Fixler, D.

    2018-02-01

    Light reflectance and transmission from soft tissue has been utilized in noninvasive clinical measurement devices such as the photoplethysmograph (PPG) and reflectance pulse oximeter. Most methods of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy focus on the volume reflectance from a semi-infinite sample, while very few measure transmission. However, since PPG and pulse oximetry are usually measured on tissue such as earlobe, fingertip, lip and pinched tissue, we propose examining the full scattering profile (FSP), which is the angular distribution of exiting photons. The FSP provides more comprehensive information when measuring from a cylindrical tissue. In our work we discovered a unique point, that we named the iso-pathlength (IPL) point, which is not dependent on changes in the reduced scattering coefficient (µs'). This IPL point was observed both in Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and in experimental tissue mimicking phantoms. The angle corresponding to this IPL point depends only on the tissue geometry. In the case of cylindrical tissues this point linearly depends on the tissue diameter. Since the target tissues for clinically physiological measuring are not a perfect cylinder, in this work we will examine how the change in the tissue cross section geometry influences the FSP and the IPL point. We used a MC simulation to compare a circular to an elliptic tissue cross section. The IPL point can serve as a self-calibration point for optical tissue measurements such as NIR spectroscopy, PPG and pulse oximetery.

  5. Rosenbluth Separation of the π^{0} Electroproduction Cross Section.

    PubMed

    Defurne, M; Mazouz, M; Ahmed, Z; Albataineh, H; Allada, K; Aniol, K A; Bellini, V; Benali, M; Boeglin, W; Bertin, P; Brossard, M; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Chandavar, S; Chen, C; Chen, J-P; de Jager, C W; de Leo, R; Desnault, C; Deur, A; El Fassi, L; Ent, R; Flay, D; Friend, M; Fuchey, E; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Giusa, A; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Gomez, J; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D; Holmstrom, T; Horn, T; Huang, J; Huang, M; Huber, G M; Hyde, C E; Iqbal, S; Itard, F; Kang, Ho; Kang, Hy; Kelleher, A; Keppel, C; Koirala, S; Korover, I; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Long, E; Magne, M; Mammei, J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Martí Jiménez-Argüello, A; Meddi, F; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Mihovilovic, M; Muangma, N; Muñoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nuruzzaman, N; Paremuzyan, R; Puckett, A; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Rashad, M N H; Riordan, S; Roche, J; Russo, G; Sabatié, F; Saenboonruang, K; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Selvy, L; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Solvignon, P; Sperduto, M L; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Sutera, C; Tobias, W A; Urciuoli, G M; Wang, D; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yao, H; Ye, Z; Zana, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z; Zheng, X; Zhu, P

    2016-12-23

    We present deeply virtual π^{0} electroproduction cross-section measurements at x_{B}=0.36 and three different Q^{2} values ranging from 1.5 to 2  GeV^{2}, obtained from Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E07-007. The Rosenbluth technique is used to separate the longitudinal and transverse responses. Results demonstrate that the cross section is dominated by its transverse component and, thus, is far from the asymptotic limit predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics. Nonetheless, an indication of a nonzero longitudinal contribution is provided by the measured interference term σ_{LT}. Results are compared with several models based on the leading-twist approach of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). In particular, a fair agreement is obtained with models in which the scattering amplitude includes convolution terms of chiral-odd (transversity) GPDs of the nucleon with the twist-3 pion distribution amplitude. This experiment, together with previous extensive unseparated measurements, provides strong support to the exciting idea that transversity GPDs can be accessed via neutral pion electroproduction in the high-Q^{2} regime.

  6. Rosenbluth Separation of the π0 Electroproduction Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defurne, M.; Mazouz, M.; Ahmed, Z.; Albataineh, H.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Bellini, V.; Benali, M.; Boeglin, W.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Chandavar, S.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; de Jager, C. W.; de Leo, R.; Desnault, C.; Deur, A.; El Fassi, L.; Ent, R.; Flay, D.; Friend, M.; Fuchey, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D.; Holmstrom, T.; Horn, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Huber, G. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Iqbal, S.; Itard, F.; Kang, Ho.; Kang, Hy.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Koirala, S.; Korover, I.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Long, E.; Magne, M.; Mammei, J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Martí Jiménez-Argüello, A.; Meddi, F.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Muangma, N.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nuruzzaman, N.; Paremuzyan, R.; Puckett, A.; Punjabi, V.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Rashad, M. N. H.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Russo, G.; Sabatié, F.; Saenboonruang, K.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Selvy, L.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Solvignon, P.; Sperduto, M. L.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Sutera, C.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, D.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yao, H.; Ye, Z.; Zana, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, P.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We present deeply virtual π0 electroproduction cross-section measurements at xB=0.36 and three different Q2 values ranging from 1.5 to 2 GeV 2 , obtained from Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E07-007. The Rosenbluth technique is used to separate the longitudinal and transverse responses. Results demonstrate that the cross section is dominated by its transverse component and, thus, is far from the asymptotic limit predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics. Nonetheless, an indication of a nonzero longitudinal contribution is provided by the measured interference term σL T. Results are compared with several models based on the leading-twist approach of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). In particular, a fair agreement is obtained with models in which the scattering amplitude includes convolution terms of chiral-odd (transversity) GPDs of the nucleon with the twist-3 pion distribution amplitude. This experiment, together with previous extensive unseparated measurements, provides strong support to the exciting idea that transversity GPDs can be accessed via neutral pion electroproduction in the high-Q2 regime.

  7. Neutron cross section standards and instrumentation. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, O.A.

    The objective of this interagency program is to provide accurate neutron interaction measurements for the US Department of Energy nuclear programs which include waste disposal, fusion, safeguards, defense, fission, and personnel protection. These measurements are also useful to other energy programs which indirectly use the unique properties of the neutron for diagnostic and analytical purposes. The work includes the measurement of reference cross sections and related neutron data employing unique facilities and capabilities at NIST and other laboratories as required; leadership and participation in international intercomparisons and collaborations; the preservation of standard reference deposits and the development of improved neutronmore » detectors and measurement methods. A related and essential element of the program is critical evaluation of neutron interaction data including international coordinations. Data testing of critical data for important applications is included. The program is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This report from the National Institute of Standards and Technology contains a summary of the accomplishments of the Neutron Cross Section Standards and Instrumentation Project during the third year of this three-year interagency agreement. The proposed program and required budget for the following three years are also presented. The program continues the shifts in priority instituted in order to broaden the program base.« less

  8. Flow in curved ducts of varying cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Patel, V. C.

    1992-07-01

    Two numerical methods for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared with each other by applying them to calculate laminar and turbulent flows through curved ducts of regular cross-section. Detailed comparisons, between the computed solutions and experimental data, are carried out in order to validate the two methods and to identify their relative merits and disadvantages. Based on the conclusions of this comparative study a numerical method is developed for simulating viscous flows through curved ducts of varying cross-sections. The proposed method is capable of simulating the near-wall turbulence using fine computational meshes across the sublayer in conjunction with a two-layer k-epsilon model. Numerical solutions are obtained for: (1) a straight transition duct geometry, and (2) a hydroturbine draft-tube configuration at model scale Reynolds number for various inlet swirl intensities. The report also provides a detailed literature survey that summarizes all the experimental and computational work in the area of duct flows.

  9. Study of the total reaction cross section via QMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin-Meng; Guo, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Fan; Ni, Sheng

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a new empirical formula to calculate the average nucleon-nucleon (N-N) collision number for the total reaction cross sections (σR). Based on the initial average N-N collision number calculated by quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), quantum correction and Coulomb correction are taken into account within it. The average N-N collision number is calculated by this empirical formula. The total reaction cross sections are obtained within the framework of the Glauber theory. σR of 23Al+12C, 24Al+12C, 25 Al+12C, 26Al+12C and 27Al+12C are calculated in the range of low energy. We also calculate the σR of 27Al+12C with different incident energies. The calculated σR are compared with the experimental data and the results of Glauber theory including the σR of both spherical nuclear and deformed nuclear. It is seen that the calculated σR are larger than σR of spherical nuclear and smaller than σR of deformed nuclear, whereas the results agree well with the experimental data in low-energy range.

  10. Gravitational lensing frequencies - Galaxy cross-sections and selection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukugita, Masataka; Turner, Edwin L.

    1991-01-01

    Four issues - (1) the best currently available data on the galaxy velocity-dispersion distribution, (2) the effects of finite core radii potential ellipticity on lensing cross sections, (3) the predicted distribution of lens image separations compared to observational angular resolutions, and (4) the preferential inclusion of lens systems in flux limited samples - are considered in order to facilitate more realistic predictions of multiple image galaxy-quasar lensing frequencies. It is found that (1) the SIS lensing parameter F equals 0.047 +/-0.019 with almost 90 percent contributed by E and S0 galaxies, (2) observed E and S0 core radii are remarkably small, yielding a factor of less than about 2 reduction in total lensing cross sections, (3) 50 percent of galaxy-quasar lenses have image separations greater than about 1.3 arcsec, and (4) amplification bias factors are large and must be carefully taken into account. It is concluded that flat universe models excessively dominated by the cosmological constant are not favored by the small observed galaxy-quasar lensing rate.

  11. Absolute electron-impact total ionization cross sections of chlorofluoromethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Roberto; Sierra, Borja; Redondo, Carolina; Rayo, María N. Sánchez; Castaño, Fernando

    2004-12-01

    An experimental study is reported on the electron-impact total ionization cross sections (TICSs) of CCl4, CCl3F, CCl2F2, and CClF3 molecules. The kinetic energy of the colliding electrons was in the 10-85 eV range. TICSs were obtained as the sum of the partial ionization cross sections of all fragment ions, measured and identified in a linear double focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The resulting TICS profiles—as a function of the electron-impact energy—have been compared both with those computed by ab initio and (semi)empirical methods and with the available experimental data. The computational methods used include the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) modified to include atoms with principal quantum numbers n⩾3, the Deutsch and Märk (DM) formalism, and the modified additivity rule (MAR). It is concluded that both modified BEB and DM methods fit the experimental TICS for (CF4), CClF3, CCl2F2, CCl3F, and CCl4 to a high accuracy, in contrast with the poor accord of the MAR method. A discussion on the factors influencing the discrepancies of the fittings is presented.

  12. Neutron Scattering Differential Cross Sections for 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Stephen T.; Hicks, S. F.; Nickel, M. T.; Block, S. G.; Peters, E. E.; Ramirez, A. P. D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Because of the prevalence of its use in the nuclear energy industry and for our overall understanding of the interactions of neutrons with matter, accurately determining the effects of fast neutrons scattering from 12C is important. Previously measured 12C inelastic neutron scattering differential cross sections found in the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) show significant discrepancies (>30%). Seeking to resolve these discrepancies, neutron inelastic and elastic scattering differential cross sections for 12C were measured at the University of Kentucky Acceleratory Laboratory for incident neutron energies of 5.58, 5.83, and 6.04 MeV. Quasi mono-energetic neutrons were scattered off an enriched 12C target (>99.99%) and detected by a C6D6 liquid scintillation detector. Time-of-flight (TOF) techniques were used to determine scattered neutron energies and allowed for elastic/inelastic scattering distinction. Relative detector efficiencies were determined through direct measurements of neutrons produced by the 2H(d,n) and 3H(p,n) source reactions, and absolute normalization factors were found by comparing 1H scattering measurements to accepted NNDC values. This experimental procedure has been successfully used for prior neutron scattering measurements and seems well-suited to our current objective. Significant challenges were encountered, however, with measuring the neutron detector efficiency over the broad incident neutron energy range required for these measurements. Funding for this research was provided by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  13. Damage accumulation in closed cross-section, laminated, composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucinell, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    . Space structures typically have closed cross-sections, absent of free edges. As a result, composite material characterization data generated using finite width flat specimens does not accurately reflect the performance of the composite materials used in a closed cross-section structural configuration. Several investigators have recognized the need to develop characterization techniques for composite materials in closed cross-sectioned structures. In these investigations test methods were developed and cylindrical specimens were evaluated. The behavior of the cylindrical specimens were observed to depart from behavior typical of flat coupons. However, no attempts were made to identify and monitor the progression of damage in these cylindrical specimens during loading. The identification and monitoring of damage is fundamental to the characterization of composite materials in closed cross-section configurations. In the study reported here, a closed cross-sectioned test method was developed to monitor damage progression in 2 in. diameter cylindrical specimens and 1.5 in. finite width flat coupons subjected to quasi-static, tensile loading conditions. Damage in these specimen configurations was monitored using pulse echo ultrasonic, acoustic emission, and X-ray techniques.

  14. Measurement of the 241Am neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Altstadt, S.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Balibrea, J.; Bécares, V.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthier, B.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Durán, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Fernández-Ordóñez, M.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Furman, V.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Katabuchi, T.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Licata, M.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    New neutron cross section measurements of minor actinides have been performed recently in order to reduce the uncertainties in the evaluated data, which is important for the design of advanced nuclear reactors and, in particular, for determining their performance in the transmutation of nuclear waste. We have measured the 241Am(n,γ) cross section at the n_TOF facility between 0.2 eV and 10 keV with a BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter, and the analysis of the measurement has been recently concluded. Our results are in reasonable agreement below 20 eV with the ones published by C. Lampoudis et al. in 2013, who reported a 22% larger capture cross section up to 110 eV compared to experimental and evaluated data published before. Our results also indicate that the 241Am(n,γ) cross section is underestimated in the present evaluated libraries between 20 eV and 2 keV by 25%, on average, and up to 35% for certain evaluations and energy ranges.

  15. Measurement and analysis of the 241Am neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Altstadt, S.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Balibrea, J.; Bécares, V.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthier, B.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Durán, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Furman, V.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Katabuchi, T.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Licata, M.; López, D.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.; n TOF Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    The 241Am(n ,γ ) cross section has been measured at the n_TOF facility at CERN with the n_TOF BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter in the energy range between 0.2 eV and 10 keV. Our results are analyzed as resolved resonances up to 700 eV, allowing a more detailed description of the cross section than in the current evaluations, which contain resolved resonances only up to 150-160 eV. The cross section in the unresolved resonance region is perfectly consistent with the predictions based on the average resonance parameters deduced from the resolved resonances, thus obtaining a consistent description of the cross section in the full neutron energy range under study. Below 20 eV, our results are in reasonable agreement with JEFF-3.2 as well as with the most recent direct measurements of the resonance integral, and differ up to 20-30% with other experimental data. Between 20 eV and 1 keV, the disagreement with other experimental data and evaluations gradually decreases, in general, with the neutron energy. Above 1 keV, we find compatible results with previously existing values.

  16. Photoabsorption cross-section measurements of 32S, 33S, 34S, and 36S sulfur dioxide from 190 to 220 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Yoshiaki; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Ueno, Yuichiro; Hattori, Shohei; Johnson, Matthew S.; Yoshida, Naohiro; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2015-03-01

    The ultraviolet absorption cross sections of the SO2 isotopologues are essential to understanding the photochemical fractionation of sulfur isotopes in planetary atmospheres. We present measurements of the absorption cross sections of 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2, and 36SO2, recorded from 190 to 220 nm at room temperature with a resolution of 0.1 nm (~25 cm-1) made using a dual-beam photospectrometer. The measured absorption cross sections show an apparent pressure dependence and a newly developed analytical model shows that this is caused by underresolved fine structure. The model made possible the calculation of absorption cross sections at the zero-pressure limit that can be used to calculate photolysis rates for atmospheric scenarios. The 32SO2, 33SO2, and 34SO2 cross sections improve upon previously published spectra including fine structure and peak widths. This is the first report of absolute absorption cross sections of the 36SO2 isotopologue for the C1B2-X1A2 band where the amplitude of the vibrational structure is smaller than the other isotopologues throughout the spectrum. Based on the new results, solar UV photodissociation of SO2 produces 34ɛ, 33Ε, and 36Ε isotopic fractionations of +4.6 ± 11.6‰, +8.8 ± 9.0‰, and -8.8 ± 19.6‰, respectively. From these spectra isotopic effects during photolysis in the Archean atmosphere can be calculated and compared to the Archean sedimentary record. Our results suggest that broadband solar UV photolysis is capable of producing the mass-independent fractionation observed in the Archean sedimentary record without involving shielding by specific gaseous compounds in the atmosphere including SO2 itself. The estimated magnitude of 33Ε, for example, is close to the maximum Δ33S observed in the geological record.

  17. Benchmark of neutron production cross sections with Monte Carlo codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Pi-En; Lai, Bo-Lun; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2018-02-01

    Aiming to provide critical information in the fields of heavy ion therapy, radiation shielding in space, and facility design for heavy-ion research accelerators, the physics models in three Monte Carlo simulation codes - PHITS, FLUKA, and MCNP6, were systematically benchmarked with comparisons to fifteen sets of experimental data for neutron production cross sections, which include various combinations of 12C, 20Ne, 40Ar, 84Kr and 132Xe projectiles and natLi, natC, natAl, natCu, and natPb target nuclides at incident energies between 135 MeV/nucleon and 600 MeV/nucleon. For neutron energies above 60% of the specific projectile energy per nucleon, the LAQGMS03.03 in MCNP6, the JQMD/JQMD-2.0 in PHITS, and the RQMD-2.4 in FLUKA all show a better agreement with data in heavy-projectile systems than with light-projectile systems, suggesting that the collective properties of projectile nuclei and nucleon interactions in the nucleus should be considered for light projectiles. For intermediate-energy neutrons whose energies are below the 60% projectile energy per nucleon and above 20 MeV, FLUKA is likely to overestimate the secondary neutron production, while MCNP6 tends towards underestimation. PHITS with JQMD shows a mild tendency for underestimation, but the JQMD-2.0 model with a modified physics description for central collisions generally improves the agreement between data and calculations. For low-energy neutrons (below 20 MeV), which are dominated by the evaporation mechanism, PHITS (which uses GEM linked with JQMD and JQMD-2.0) and FLUKA both tend to overestimate the production cross section, whereas MCNP6 tends to underestimate more systems than to overestimate. For total neutron production cross sections, the trends of the benchmark results over the entire energy range are similar to the trends seen in the dominate energy region. Also, the comparison of GEM coupled with either JQMD or JQMD-2.0 in the PHITS code indicates that the model used to describe the first

  18. NLO cross sections in 4 dimensions without DREG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pinto, R. J.; Driencourt-Mangin, F.; Rodrigo, G.; Sborlini, G. F. R.

    2016-10-01

    In this review, we present a new method for computing physical cross sections at NLO accuracy in QCD without using the standard Dimensional Regularisation. The algorithm is based on the Loop-Tree Duality theorem, which allow us to obtain loop integrals as a sum of phase-space integrals; in this way, transforming loop integrals into phase-space integrals, we propose a method to merge virtual and real contributions in order to find observables at NLO in d = 4 space-time dimensions. In addition, the strategy described is used for computing the γ* → qq̅(g) process. A more detailed discussion related on this topic can be found in Ref [1].

  19. Production cross sections of neutron-rich No-263261 isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingjing; Li, Cheng; Zhang, Gen; Zhu, Long; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2017-05-01

    The fusion excitation functions of No-263249 are studied by using various reaction systems based on the dinuclear system model. The neutron-rich radioactive beam 22O is used to produce neutron-rich nobelium isotopes, and the new neutron-rich isotopes No-263261 are synthesized by 242Pu(22O,3 n )261No , 244Pu(22O,4 n )262No , and 244Pu(22O,3 n )263No reactions, respectively. The corresponding maximum evaporation residue cross sections are 0.628, 4.649, and 1.638 μ b , respectively. The effects of the three processes (capture, fusion, and survival) in the complete fusion reaction are also analyzed. From investigation, a neutron-rich radioactive beam as the projectile and neutron-rich actinide as the target could be a new selection of the projectile-target combination to produce a neutron-rich heavy nuclide.

  20. Application of backpack Lidar to geological cross-section measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jingyu; Wang, Ran; Xiao, Zhouxuan; Li, Lu; Yao, Weihua; Han, Wei; Zhao, Baolin

    2017-11-01

    As the traditional geological cross section measurement, the artificial traverse method was recently substituted by using point coordinates data. However, it is still the crux of the matter that how to acquire the high-precision point coordinates data quickly and economically. Thereby, the backpack Lidar is presented on the premise of the principle of using point coordinates in this issue. Undoubtedly, Lidar technique, one of booming and international active remote sensing techniques, is a powerful tool in obtaining precise topographic information, high-precision 3-D coordinates and building a real 3-D model. With field practice and date processing indoors, it is essentially accomplished that geological sections maps could be generated simply, accurately and automatically in the support of relevant software such as ArcGIS and LiDAR360.

  1. Model microswimmers in channels with varying cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Stark, Holger

    2017-05-01

    We study different types of microswimmers moving in channels with varying cross section and thereby interacting hydrodynamically with the channel walls. Starting from the Smoluchowski equation for a dilute suspension, for which interactions among swimmers can be neglected, we derive analytic expressions for the lateral probability distribution between plane channel walls. For weakly corrugated channels, we extend the Fick-Jacobs approach to microswimmers and thereby derive an effective equation for the probability distribution along the channel axis. Two regimes arise dominated either by entropic forces due to the geometrical confinement or by the active motion. In particular, our results show that the accumulation of microswimmers at channel walls is sensitive to both the underlying swimming mechanism and the geometry of the channels. Finally, for asymmetric channel corrugation, our model predicts a rectification of microswimmers along the channel, the strength and direction of which strongly depends on the swimmer type.

  2. Radar cross section models for limited aspect angle windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Mark C.

    1992-12-01

    This thesis presents a method for building Radar Cross Section (RCS) models of aircraft based on static data taken from limited aspect angle windows. These models statistically characterize static RCS. This is done to show that a limited number of samples can be used to effectively characterize static aircraft RCS. The optimum models are determined by performing both a Kolmogorov and a Chi-Square goodness-of-fit test comparing the static RCS data with a variety of probability density functions (pdf) that are known to be effective at approximating the static RCS of aircraft. The optimum parameter estimator is also determined by the goodness of-fit tests if there is a difference in pdf parameters obtained by the Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) and the Method of Moments (MoM) estimators.

  3. Radar cross section fundamentals for the aircraft designer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadmore, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of radar cross-section (RCS) techniques are summarized, with emphasis placed on fundamental electromagnetic phenomena, such as plane and spherical wave formulations, and the definition of RCS is given in the far-field sense. The basic relationship between electronic countermeasures and a signature level is discussed in terms of the detectability range of a target vehicle. Fundamental radar-signature analysis techniques, such as the physical-optics and geometrical-optics approximations, are presented along with examples in terms of aircraft components. Methods of analysis based on the geometrical theory of diffraction are considered and various wave-propagation phenomena are related to local vehicle geometry. Typical vehicle components are also discussed, together with their contribution to total vehicle RCS and their individual signature sensitivities.

  4. Scientific visualization of volumetric radar cross section data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojszynski, Thomas G.

    1992-12-01

    For aircraft design and mission planning, designers, threat analysts, mission planners, and pilots require a Radar Cross Section (RCS) central tendency with its associated distribution about a specified aspect and its relation to a known threat, Historically, RCS data sets have been statically analyzed to evaluate a d profile. However, Scientific Visualization, the application of computer graphics techniques to produce pictures of complex physical phenomena appears to be a more promising tool to interpret this data. This work describes data reduction techniques and a surface rendering algorithm to construct and display a complex polyhedron from adjacent contours of RCS data. Data reduction is accomplished by sectorizing the data and characterizing the statistical properties of the data. Color, lighting, and orientation cues are added to complete the visualization system. The tool may be useful for synthesis, design, and analysis of complex, low observable air vehicles.

  5. Triple differential cross sections of magnesium in doubly symmetric geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Y. Sun; X, Y. Miao; Xiang-Fu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    A dynamically screened three-Coulomb-wave (DS3C) method is applied to study the single ionization of magnesium by electron impact. Triple differential cross sections (TDCS) are calculated in doubly symmetric geometry at incident energies of 13.65, 17.65, 22.65, 27.65, 37.65, 47.65, 57.65, and 67.65 eV. Comparisons are made with experimental data and theoretical predictions from a three-Coulomb-wave function (3C) approach and distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA). The overall agreement between the predictions of the DS3C model and the DWBA approach with the experimental data is satisfactory. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274215).

  6. Multivariate survivorship analysis using two cross-sectional samples.

    PubMed

    Hill, M E

    1999-11-01

    As an alternative to survival analysis with longitudinal data, I introduce a method that can be applied when one observes the same cohort in two cross-sectional samples collected at different points in time. The method allows for the estimation of log-probability survivorship models that estimate the influence of multiple time-invariant factors on survival over a time interval separating two samples. This approach can be used whenever the survival process can be adequately conceptualized as an irreversible single-decrement process (e.g., mortality, the transition to first marriage among a cohort of never-married individuals). Using data from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (Ruggles and Sobek 1997), I illustrate the multivariate method through an investigation of the effects of race, parity, and educational attainment on the survival of older women in the United States.

  7. 102Pd(n, {gamma}) Cross Section Measurement Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Alpizar-Vicente, A. M.; Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545

    2006-03-13

    The neutron capture cross section of the proton rich nucleus 102Pd was measured with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The target was a 2 mg Pd foil with 78% enriched 102Pd. It was held by a 0.9 {mu}m thick Mylar bag which was selected after comparing different thicknesses of Kapton and Mylar for their scattering background. To identify the contribution of the other Pd isotopes the data of a natural Pd sample was compared to the data of the 102Pd enriched sample. A 12C sample was used to determine themore » scattering background. The 102Pd(n, {gamma}) rate is of importance for the p-process nucleosynthesis.« less

  8. Requirements engineering for cross-sectional information chain models

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, U; Cruel, E; Gök, M; Garthaus, M; Zimansky, M; Remmers, H; Rienhoff, O

    2012-01-01

    Despite the wealth of literature on requirements engineering, little is known about engineering very generic, innovative and emerging requirements, such as those for cross-sectional information chains. The IKM health project aims at building information chain reference models for the care of patients with chronic wounds, cancer-related pain and back pain. Our question therefore was how to appropriately capture information and process requirements that are both generally applicable and practically useful. To this end, we started with recommendations from clinical guidelines and put them up for discussion in Delphi surveys and expert interviews. Despite the heterogeneity we encountered in all three methods, it was possible to obtain requirements suitable for building reference models. We evaluated three modelling languages and then chose to write the models in UML (class and activity diagrams). On the basis of the current project results, the pros and cons of our approach are discussed. PMID:24199080

  9. Repeated Cross-Sectional Assessment of Commercial Truck Driver Health.

    PubMed

    Thiese, Matthew S; Moffitt, Gary; Hanowski, Richard J; Kales, Stefanos N; Porter, Richard J; Hegmann, Kurt T

    2015-09-01

    To assess relationships and trends over time in individual conditions and multiple conditions among a large sample of independent, nonoverlapping truck drivers using a repeated cross-sectional study design. Commercial driver medical examinations were conducted on 95,567 commercial drivers between January 1, 2005, and October 31, 2012. Specific medical conditions that have been identified by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's Medical Review Board as possibly increasing crash risk were examined. Prevalence and trends over time were analyzed. A total of 8 of the 13 conditions significantly increased from 2005 to 2012. Prevalence of multiple concomitant conditions also increased, with prevalence odds ratios as high as 7.39 (95% confidence interval, 3.92 to 13.98) for four or more conditions in 2012 as compared with 2005. Individual and multiple conditions thought to be associated with increased crash risk significantly increased between 2005 and 2012.

  10. MicroBooNE and its Cross Section Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yun-Tse

    2017-05-22

    MicroBooNE (the Micro Booster Neutrino Experiment) is a short-baseline neutrino experiment based on the technology of a liquid-argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC), and has recently completed its first year of data-taking in the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. It aims to address the anomalous excess of events with an electromagnetic final state in MiniBooNE, to measure neutrino-argon interaction cross sections, and to provide relevant R\\&D for the future LArTPC experiments, such as DUNE. In these proceedings, we present the first reconstructed energy spectrum of Michel electrons from cosmic muon decays, the first kinematic distributions of the candidate muon tracks frommore » $$\

  11. Cross section calculations for subthreshold pion production in peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Deutchman, P. A.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Total cross sections angular distributions, and spectral distributions for the exclusive production of charged and neutral subthreshold pions produced in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions are calculated by using a particle-hole formalism. The pions result from the formation and decay of an isobar giant resonance state formed in a C-12 nucleus. From considerations of angular momentum conservation and for the sake of providing a unique experimental signature, the other nucleus, chosen for this work to be C-12 also, is assumed to be excited to one of its isovector (1+) giant resonance states. The effects of nucleon recoil by the pion emission are included, and Pauli blocking and pion absorption effects are studied by varying the isobar width. Detailed comparisons with experimental subthreshold pion data for incident energies between 35 and 86 MeV/nucleon are made.

  12. A study of Radar Cross Section (RCS) characteristics and their application in future weapon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluggage, W. A.

    The sum of components technique was used to calculate the radar cross section (RCS) of a Canberra B2 aircraft. The theoretical result obtained by using simple shapes to model the aircraft were compared with practical results. It is found that this technique can be used to give a quick order of magnitude estimation of a target's RCS. However, the major drawback of this technique is that it cannot predict the rapid changes in RCS which result from a small change in aspect angle. Trends in radar guided weapons, the effects of aircraft shape on the overall RCS of a weapons platform, and reduction of aircraft RCS by appropriate shaping are discussed. Methods, including radar absorption, radar absorbing materials, impedance loading, and active cancellation, which can be used to reduce an aircraft's radar signature and the associated penalties are reviewed.

  13. Femtosecond pump-probe microscopy generates virtual cross-sections in historic artwork

    PubMed Central

    Villafana, Tana Elizabeth; Brown, William P.; Delaney, John K.; Palmer, Michael; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    The layering structure of a painting contains a wealth of information about the artist's choice of materials and working methods, but currently, no 3D noninvasive method exists to replace the taking of small paint samples in the study of the stratigraphy. Here, we adapt femtosecond pump-probe imaging, previously shown in tissue, to the case of the color palette in paintings, where chromophores have much greater variety. We show that combining the contrasts of multispectral and multidelay pump-probe spectroscopy permits nondestructive 3D imaging of paintings with molecular and structural contrast, even for pigments with linear absorption spectra that are broad and relatively featureless. We show virtual cross-sectioning capabilities in mockup paintings, with pigment separation and nondestructive imaging on an intact 14th century painting (The Crucifixion by Puccio Capanna). Our approach makes it possible to extract microscopic information for a broad range of applications to cultural heritage. PMID:24449855

  14. New production cross sections for the theranostic radionuclide 67Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupillo, Gaia; Sounalet, Thomas; Michel, Nathalie; Mou, Liliana; Esposito, Juan; Haddad, Férid

    2018-01-01

    The cross sections of the 68Zn(p,2p)67Cu, 68Zn(p,2n)67Ga and 68Zn(p,3n)66Ga reactions were measured at the ARRONAX facility by using the 70 MeV cyclotron, with particular attention to the production of the theranostic radionuclide 67Cu. Enriched 68Zn material was electroplated on silver backing and exposed to a low-intensity proton beam by using the stacked-foils target method. Since 67Cu and 67Ga radionuclides have similar half-lives and same γ-lines (they both decay to 67Zn), a radiochemical process aimed at Cu/Ga separation was mandatory to avoid interferences in γ-spectrometry measurements. A simple chemical procedure having a high separation efficiency (>99%) was developed and monitored during each foil processing, thanks to the tracer isotopes 61Cu and 66Ga. Nuclear cross sections were measured in the energy range 35-70 MeV by using reference reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to monitor beam flux. In comparison with literature data a general good agreement on the trend of the nuclear reactions was noted, especially with latest measurements, but slightly lower values were obtained in case of 67Cu. Experimental results of the 68Zn(p,2p)67Cu, 68Zn(p,2n)67Ga and 68Zn(p,3n)66Ga reactions were also compared with the theoretical values estimated by using the software TALYS. The production yield of the theranostic radionuclide 67Cu was estimated considering the results obtained in this work.

  15. Cross-sectional survey on lobectomy approach (X-SOLA).

    PubMed

    Cao, Christopher; Tian, David H; Wolak, Kevin; Oparka, Jonathan; He, Jianxing; Dunning, Joel; Walker, William S; Yan, Tristan D

    2014-08-01

    Lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be performed either through open thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). To improve the understanding of current attitudes of the thoracic community toward VATS lobectomy, the Collaborative Research Group conducted the Cross-sectional Survey on Lobectomy Approach (X-SOLA) study. We surveyed a large cohort of lobectomy-performing thoracic surgeons to examine their adoption of VATS lobectomy and their opinions of this technique vs conventional open thoracotomy. Participants included thoracic surgeons identified through an international index search from the Web of Science and the cardiothoracic surgery network. A confidential questionnaire was e-mailed in June 2012. Nonresponders were given two reminder e-mails at monthly intervals. The questionnaire, completed by 838 thoracic surgeons within a 3-month period, identified 416 surgeons who only performed lobectomy through open thoracotomy and 422 surgeons who performed VATS or robotic VATS. Of those who performed VATS, 95% agreed with the definition of "true" VATS lobectomy according to the Cancer and Leukemia Group B trial. Ninety-two percent of surgeons who did not perform VATS lobectomy responded that they were willing to learn this technique, but were hindered by limited resources, exposure, and mentoring. Both groups agreed there was a need for VATS lobectomy training in thoracic residency programs and in standardized workshops. X-SOLA represents the largest cross-sectional report within the thoracic community to date, demonstrating the penetration of VATS lobectomy for NSCLC internationally. From our study, we were able to identify a number of obstacles to broaden the adoption of this minimally invasive technique.

  16. Retrodeformable cross sections and Oak Ridge fault, Ventura basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Yeats, R.S.; Huftile, G.F.

    1988-03-01

    A retrodeformable (balanced) cross section is constructed such that stratified rocks are restored to their undeformed state without loss or gain of bed length or bed thickness. Ductile strata may be area-balanced if original thickness is known. Near Ventura, folds in Pliocene-Pleistocene turbidites and Miocene-early Pliocene shales (Rincon, Monterey, Sisquoc) overlie an unfolded competent Paleogene sequence. The basal decollement of the foldbelt is in the ductile Rincon Formation (lower Miocene). The overlying Sulphur Mountain, Ventura Avenue, San Miguelito, and Rincon anticlines are fault-propagation folds developing from south-dipping, largely late Quaternary frontal ramp thrusts (Sisar-Big Canyon-Lion fault set, Barnard fault set,more » padre Juan fault, and C-3 fault, respectively) that rise from the decollement. Cross-section balancing shows that the overlying fold-thrust belt has shortened 2.5-6 km more than subjacent Paleogene competent strata. This excess bed length is taken up in the Paleogene sequence on the Oak Ridge fault as a ramp from the brittle-plastic transition zone through the upper crust. This implies that the basal decollement is the frontal active thrust of the Oak Ridge fault. The decollement dies out southeast of a line between Timber Canyon oil field and the west end of Oak Ridge, possibly because of decreased ductility in the Miocene decollement sequence due to appearance of sandstone interbeds. Farther southeast, late Quaternary displacement concentrated on the Oak Ridge fault itself at rates greater than 10 mm/year.« less

  17. Eruption Chronology in Children: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Arpana; Tyagi, Parimala; Jain, Ankur; Tiwari, Utkarsh; Gupta, Ruchika

    2017-01-01

    Aims and objectives The purpose of this study is to determine the appropriate reference standard for eruption timing of primary teeth in infants and preschool children of Bhopal city and to determine the role of various factors affecting the eruption of primary dentition. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among the infants and preschool children (4-36 months) attending the local government or private hospitals, and vaccination centers. Prior to the study, Institutional Ethical Committee clearance and informed written consent from the parents were obtained. The data were collected from full-term infants and preschool children of 4 to 36 months from Bhopal city. Oral examination was done under adequate natural light by a single examiner using mouth mirror and probe. Teeth present in the oral cavity were noted by using Federation Dentaire Internationale system of nomenclature in the preformed pro-forma. The teeth were considered as erupted, when any part of its crown had penetrated the gingiva and was visible in the oral cavity. Height, weight, birth weight, and other close-ended questions in questionnaire were asked from parents. Results and conclusion The data collected were statistically analyzed and it was observed that significant relation exists between tooth eruption and birth weight, feeding habits, socioeconomic status, and body mass index (BMI). Based on the findings, it may be concluded that Indian children experienced delayed eruption of primary teeth when compared with children of different countries and standard norms. How to cite this article Verma N, Bansal A, Tyagi P, Jain A, Tiwari U, Gupta R. Eruption Chronology in Children: A Cross-sectional Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(3):278-282. PMID:29104389

  18. Total and Compound Formation Cross Sections for Americium Nuclei: Recommendations for Coupled-Channels Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J. E.

    Calculations for total cross sections and compound-nucleus (CN) formation cross sections for americium isotopes are described, for use in the 2017 NA-22 evaluation effort. The code ECIS 2006 was used in conjunction with Frank Dietrich's wrapper `runtemplate'.

  19. Graphene based tunable fractal Hilbert curve array broadband radar absorbing screen for radar cross section reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xianjun, E-mail: xianjun.huang@manchester.ac.uk; College of Electronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073; Hu, Zhirun

    2014-11-15

    This paper proposes a new type of graphene based tunable radar absorbing screen. The absorbing screen consists of Hilbert curve metal strip array and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene sheet. The graphene based screen is not only tunable when the chemical potential of the graphene changes, but also has broadband effective absorption. The absorption bandwidth is from 8.9GHz to 18.1GHz, ie., relative bandwidth of more than 68%, at chemical potential of 0eV, which is significantly wider than that if the graphene sheet had not been employed. As the chemical potential varies from 0 to 0.4eV, the central frequency of themore » screen can be tuned from 13.5GHz to 19.0GHz. In the proposed structure, Hilbert curve metal strip array was designed to provide multiple narrow band resonances, whereas the graphene sheet directly underneath the metal strip array provides tunability and averagely required surface resistance so to significantly extend the screen operation bandwidth by providing broadband impedance matching and absorption. In addition, the thickness of the screen has been optimized to achieve nearly the minimum thickness limitation for a nonmagnetic absorber. The working principle of this absorbing screen is studied in details, and performance under various incident angles is presented. This work extends applications of graphene into tunable microwave radar cross section (RCS) reduction applications.« less

  20. An investigation of MCNP6.1 beryllium oxide S(α, β) cross sections

    DOE PAGES

    Sartor, Raymond F.; Glazener, Natasha N.

    2016-03-08

    In MCNP6.1, materials are constructed by identifying the constituent isotopes (or elements in a few cases) individually. This list selects the corresponding microscopic cross sections calculated from the free-gas model to create the material macroscopic cross sections. Furthermore, the free-gas model and the corresponding material macroscopic cross sections assume that the interactions of atoms do not affect the nuclear cross sections.

  1. Electron impact excitation of SO2 - Differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Trajmar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the electronic states of SO2 was investigated. Differential, integral, and inelastic momentum transfer cross sections were obtained by normalizing the relative measurements to the elastic cross sections. The cross sections are given for seven spectral ranges of the energy-loss spectra extending from the lowest electronic state to near the first ionization limit. Most of the regions represent the overlap of several electronic transitions. No measurements for these cross sections have been reported previously.

  2. Factors affecting blood sample haemolysis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Ed B G; Potter, David L; Ayling, Ruth M; Higginson, Ian; Bailey, Andrew G; Smith, Jason E

    2016-04-01

    To determine the effect of blood sampling through an intravenous catheter compared with a needle in Emergency Department blood sampling. We undertook a prospective, cross-sectional study in a UK university teaching hospital Emergency Department. A convenience sample of 985 patients who required blood sampling via venepuncture was collected. A total of 844 complete sets of data were analysed. The median age was 63 years, and 57% of patients were male. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of haemolysis in blood samples obtained via a needle compared with samples obtained via an intravenous catheter. Secondary outcome measures defined the effect on sample haemolysis of the side of the patient the sample was obtained from, the anatomical location of sampling, the perceived difficulty in obtaining the sample, the order of sample tubes collected, estimated tourniquet time and bench time. Data were analysed with logistic regression, and expressed as odds ratios (95% confidence intervals; P-values). Blood samples obtained through an intravenous catheter were more likely to be haemolysed than those obtained via a needle, odds ratio 5.63 (95% confidence interval 2.49-12.73; P<0.001). Blood sampling via an intravenous catheter was significantly associated with an increase in the likelihood of sample haemolysis compared with sampling with a needle. Wherever practicable, blood samples should be obtained via a needle in preference to an intravenous catheter. Future research should include both an economic evaluation, and staff and patient satisfaction of separating blood sampling and intravenous catheter placement.

  3. Power Enhancement in High Dimensional Cross-Sectional Tests

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Yao, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel technique to boost the power of testing a high-dimensional vector H : θ = 0 against sparse alternatives where the null hypothesis is violated only by a couple of components. Existing tests based on quadratic forms such as the Wald statistic often suffer from low powers due to the accumulation of errors in estimating high-dimensional parameters. More powerful tests for sparse alternatives such as thresholding and extreme-value tests, on the other hand, require either stringent conditions or bootstrap to derive the null distribution and often suffer from size distortions due to the slow convergence. Based on a screening technique, we introduce a “power enhancement component”, which is zero under the null hypothesis with high probability, but diverges quickly under sparse alternatives. The proposed test statistic combines the power enhancement component with an asymptotically pivotal statistic, and strengthens the power under sparse alternatives. The null distribution does not require stringent regularity conditions, and is completely determined by that of the pivotal statistic. As specific applications, the proposed methods are applied to testing the factor pricing models and validating the cross-sectional independence in panel data models. PMID:26778846

  4. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A.; Hemmers, O.

    1997-04-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He{sup +}nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energymore » at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al.« less

  5. AFCI-2.0 Library of Neutron Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.

    2011-06-26

    Neutron cross section covariance library has been under development by BNL-LANL collaborative effort over the last three years. The primary purpose of the library is to provide covariances for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) data adjustment project, which is focusing on the needs of fast advanced burner reactors. The covariances refer to central values given in the 2006 release of the U.S. neutron evaluated library ENDF/B-VII. The preliminary version (AFCI-2.0beta) has been completed in October 2010 and made available to the users for comments. In the final 2.0 release, covariances for a few materials were updated, in particular newmore » LANL evaluations for {sup 238,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were adopted. BNL was responsible for covariances for structural materials and fission products, management of the library and coordination of the work, while LANL was in charge of covariances for light nuclei and for actinides.« less

  6. Exploring resilience in Chinese nurses: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu-Fang; Cross, Wendy; Plummer, Virginia; Lam, Louisa; Luo, Yuan-Hui; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2017-04-01

    To explore the state of resilience and its predictors among nurses in mainland China. Resilience is considered as an important ability to influence the prevention of job dissatisfaction and burnout. There are few studies on resilience in Chinese nurses, particularly investigating the predictors of resilience. A cross-sectional survey was employed and 1061 nurses from six three-level hospitals in Hunan responded to participate in the study. Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires. Nurses experienced moderate levels of resilience and self-efficacy and tended to use a positive coping style. Multiple linear regression showed that a high level of self-efficacy and education, having a positive coping style rather than a negative coping style, exercising regularly and not using cigarettes predicted a high level of resilience (P < 0.01). This study shows a moderate level of resilience among nurses and suggests that a high level of self-efficacy and education, as well as having a positive coping style and choosing a healthy lifestyle may increase nurses' resilience. Hospital administrators and nursing managers need to explore the resilience state among nurses and understand the predictors of resilience. Then, scientific and evidence-based interventions for improving resilience should be adopted. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. GP registrar well-being: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the major stressors affecting GP registrars, how those at risk can be best identified and the most useful methods of managing or reducing their stress. Design, setting and participants Cross-sectional postal questionnaire of all GP registrars in one large regional training provider's catchment area. Main outcome measures The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS), a specifically developed Registrar Stressor Scale consisting of five subscales of potential stressors, plus closed questions on how to identify and manage stress in GP registrars. Results Survey response rate of 51% (102/199). Rural difficulties followed by achieving a work/life balance were the principal stressors. Ten percent of registrars were mildly or moderately depressed or anxious (DASS) and 7% mild to moderately anxious (DASS). Registrars preferred informal means of identifying those under stress (a buddy system and talks with their supervisors); similarly, they preferred to manage stress by discussions with family and friends, debriefing with peers and colleagues, or undertaking sport and leisure activities. Conclusions This study supports research which confirms that poor psychological well-being is an important issue for a significant minority of GP trainees. Regional training providers should ensure that they facilitate formal and informal strategies to identify those at risk and assist them to cope with their stress. PMID:20181138

  8. Organizational home care models across Europe: A cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Van Eenoo, Liza; van der Roest, Henriëtte; Onder, Graziano; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Garms-Homolova, Vjenka; Jonsson, Palmi V; Draisma, Stasja; van Hout, Hein; Declercq, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Decision makers are searching for models to redesign home care and to organize health care in a more sustainable way. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize home care models within and across European countries by means of structural characteristics and care processes at the policy and the organization level. At the policy level, variables that reflected variation in health care policy were included based on a literature review on the home care policy for older persons in six European countries: Belgium, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Italy, and the Netherlands. At the organizational level, data on the structural characteristics and the care processes were collected from 36 home care organizations by means of a survey. Data were collected between 2013 and 2015 during the IBenC project. An observational, cross sectional, quantitative design was used. The analyses consisted of a principal component analysis followed by a hierarchical cluster analysis. Fifteen variables at the organizational level, spread across three components, explained 75.4% of the total variance. The three components made it possible to distribute home care organizations into six care models that differ on the level of patient-centered care delivery, the availability of specialized care professionals, and the level of monitoring care performance. Policy level variables did not contribute to distinguishing between home care models. Six home care models were identified and characterized. These models can be used to describe best practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cross sectional imaging of post partum headache and seizures.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Rudresh; Mundaganur, Praveen; Sonwalkar, Pradeep; N S, Vishal; G S, Narendra; P, Sanjay

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate spectrum of causes & their characteristic findings in peripartum head ache and seizures on computed tomography & magnetic resonance imaging. Forty patients with complaints of peripartum headache and seizures underwent cross sectional imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging during period of June 2011 to May 2012. Age group of subjects in this study was 18 to 38 y. Out of 40 patients 15 had history of eclampsia and remaining 25 patients were normotensive. Subjects with complaints of headache and seizures after six weeks of delivery were excluded from the study. Intravenous contrast was administered in cases with diagnostic dilemma. All results were reported and informed to the referring physicians on priority bases. Nine patients with peripartum headache and seizures revealed no brain parenchymal or cerebral vascular abnormalities on imaging. Eleven patients with a history of eclampsia showed features of eclamptic encephalopathy. Out 40 patients, 17 patients revealed cortical venous thrombosis with 14 patients showing parenchymal changes. One patient each showed features of meningoencephalitis, ischemic watershed territory infarct & region of gliosis. All results were analysed & tabulated. Eclamptic encephalopathy and cortical venous thrombosis are the major causes for post partum headache and seizures. Rational use of CT & MRI in the early course of the disease helps in characterizing the lesion and providing the appropriate treatment.

  10. Ultra wide band 3-D cross section (RCS) holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, H. D.; Hall, T. E.

    1992-07-01

    Ultra wide band impulse holography is an exciting new concept for predictive radar cross section (RCS) evaluation employing near-field measurements. Reconstruction of the near-field hologram data maps the target's scattering areas, and uniquely identifies the 'hot spot' locations on the target. In addition, the target and calibration sphere's plane wave angular spectrums are computed (via digital algorithm) and used to generate the target's far-field RCS values in three dimensions for each frequency component in the impulse. Thin and thick targets are defined in terms of their near-field amplitude variations in range. Range gating and computer holographic techniques are applied to correct these variations. Preliminary experimental results on various targets verify the concept of RCS holography. The unique 3-D presentation (i.e., typically containing 524,288 RCS values for a 1024 (times) 512 sampled aperture for every frequency component) illustrates the efficacy of target recognition in terms of its far-field plane wave angular spectrum image. RCS images can then be viewed at different angles for target recognition, etc.

  11. Cross-Section Measurements in the Fast Neutron Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plompen, Arjan

    2006-04-01

    Generation IV focuses research for advanced nuclear reactors on six concepts. Three of these concepts, the lead, gas and sodium fast reactors (LFR, GFR and SFR) have fast neutron spectra, whereas a fourth, the super-critical water reactor (SCWR), can be configured to have a fast spectrum. Such fast neutron spectra are essential to meet the sustainability objective of GenIV. Nuclear data requirements for GenIV concepts will therefore emphasize the energy region from about 1 keV to 10 MeV. Here, the potential is illustrated of the GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility and the Van de Graaff laboratory at IRMM to measure the relevant nuclear data in this energy range: the total, capture, fission and inelastic-scattering cross sections. In particular, measurement results will be shown for lead and bismuth inelastic scattering for which the need was recently expressed in a quantitative way by Aliberti et al. for Accelerator Driven Systems. Even without completion of the quantitative assessment of the data needs for GenIV concepts at ANL it is clear that this particular effort is of relevance to LFR system studies.

  12. Health literacy among Saudi population: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M M; Saad, Sherif Y

    2017-09-12

    Health literacy is a major problem worldwide and adversely affects an individual's health. The aim of the present study was to assess health literacy level among Saudi population. A cross-sectional study was conducted among a randomly selected population (n = 500) in Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire comprised of questions pertaining to demographic characteristics, health literacy and health information. Health literacy was measured by REALM-R test. Internal reliability was determined using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The majority of the respondents had intermediate (43.8%) and basic (34.4%) health literacy levels. A higher percentage among men had intermediate (59.8%) and basic (70.93%) health literacy levels compared with women. About 30% of respondents had difficulty in understanding health screening tests and disease treatment. More than half of participants (52.4%) had difficulty in finding health information. The REALM-R test revealed that about 42.6% of individuals with score of >6 had adequate health literacy compared with 57.4% with score of ≤6 had inadequate health literacy. The present study demonstrated that a majority of Saudi individuals had inadequate health literacy that associated with poor knowledge of health information. Our findings highlighted the importance of understanding the status of health literacy among Saudis and the need for educational programs to raise the health literacy awareness among Saudi population. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Ion Mobility Derived Collision Cross Sections to Support Metabolomics Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly evolving analytical approach in life and health sciences. The structural elucidation of the metabolites of interest remains a major analytical challenge in the metabolomics workflow. Here, we investigate the use of ion mobility as a tool to aid metabolite identification. Ion mobility allows for the measurement of the rotationally averaged collision cross-section (CCS), which gives information about the ionic shape of a molecule in the gas phase. We measured the CCSs of 125 common metabolites using traveling-wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (TW-IM-MS). CCS measurements were highly reproducible on instruments located in three independent laboratories (RSD < 5% for 99%). We also determined the reproducibility of CCS measurements in various biological matrixes including urine, plasma, platelets, and red blood cells using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with TW-IM-MS. The mean RSD was < 2% for 97% of the CCS values, compared to 80% of retention times. Finally, as proof of concept, we used UPLC–TW-IM-MS to compare the cellular metabolome of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, an in vitro model used to study cancer development. Experimentally determined and computationally derived CCS values were used as orthogonal analytical parameters in combination with retention time and accurate mass information to confirm the identity of key metabolites potentially involved in cancer. Thus, our results indicate that adding CCS data to searchable databases and to routine metabolomics workflows will increase the identification confidence compared to traditional analytical approaches. PMID:24640936

  14. GP registrar well-being: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Peter; Mazalin, Dennis; Pier, Ciaran; Wainer, Jo; Ling, Mee Yoke

    2010-02-09

    To investigate the major stressors affecting GP registrars, how those at risk can be best identified and the most useful methods of managing or reducing their stress. Cross-sectional postal questionnaire of all GP registrars in one large regional training provider's catchment area. The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS), a specifically developed Registrar Stressor Scale consisting of five subscales of potential stressors, plus closed questions on how to identify and manage stress in GP registrars. Survey response rate of 51% (102/199). Rural difficulties followed by achieving a work/life balance were the principal stressors. Ten percent of registrars were mildly or moderately depressed or anxious (DASS) and 7% mild to moderately anxious (DASS). Registrars preferred informal means of identifying those under stress (a buddy system and talks with their supervisors); similarly, they preferred to manage stress by discussions with family and friends, debriefing with peers and colleagues, or undertaking sport and leisure activities. This study supports research which confirms that poor psychological well-being is an important issue for a significant minority of GP trainees. Regional training providers should ensure that they facilitate formal and informal strategies to identify those at risk and assist them to cope with their stress.

  15. Microtubules soften due to cross-sectional flattening

    DOE PAGES

    Memet, Edvin; Hilitsk, Feodor; Morris, Margaret A.; ...

    2018-06-01

    We use optical trapping to continuously bend an isolated microtubule while simultaneously measuring the applied force and the resulting filament strain, thus allowing us to determine its elastic properties over a wide range of applied strains. We find that, while in the low-strain regime, microtubules may be quantitatively described in terms of the classical Euler-Bernoulli elastic filament, above a critical strain they deviate from this simple elastic model, showing a softening response with increasing deformations. A three-dimensional thin-shell model, in which the increased mechanical compliance is caused by flattening and eventual buckling of the filament cross-section, captures this softening effectmore » in the high strain regime and yields quantitative values of the effective mechanical properties of microtubules. Our results demonstrate that properties of microtubules are highly dependent on the magnitude of the applied strain and offer a new interpretation for the large variety in microtubule mechanical data measured by different methods.« less

  16. Microtubules soften due to cross-sectional flattening

    SciTech Connect

    Memet, Edvin; Hilitsk, Feodor; Morris, Margaret A.

    We use optical trapping to continuously bend an isolated microtubule while simultaneously measuring the applied force and the resulting filament strain, thus allowing us to determine its elastic properties over a wide range of applied strains. We find that, while in the low-strain regime, microtubules may be quantitatively described in terms of the classical Euler-Bernoulli elastic filament, above a critical strain they deviate from this simple elastic model, showing a softening response with increasing deformations. A three-dimensional thin-shell model, in which the increased mechanical compliance is caused by flattening and eventual buckling of the filament cross-section, captures this softening effectmore » in the high strain regime and yields quantitative values of the effective mechanical properties of microtubules. Our results demonstrate that properties of microtubules are highly dependent on the magnitude of the applied strain and offer a new interpretation for the large variety in microtubule mechanical data measured by different methods.« less

  17. Evaluation of hygiene habits: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Campos, Manuel António; Sousa, Ana Cristina; Varela, Paulo; Baptista, Armando

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that adequate hygiene is important for health. Even though this topic has drawn the attention of the media, little or no scientific investigation has been done. We performed a comparative questionnaire-based cross-sectional study in three groups: patients attending a dermatology outpatient clinic, patients attending an internal medicine consultation, and community members. We analyzed a total of 446 questionnaires (249 from dermatology patients, 98 from internal medicine patients, and 99 from the community group). The three groups did not differ statistically in sex and age (p=0.070). The patients from the dermatology department had a higher education level. The number of weekly baths did not differ among the three groups (p=0.417). Hair hygiene did not differ between the three groups. The dermatology and internal medicine groups washed their hands more frequently than the community group (p=0.028). Comparing our results to the limited data available, we find that the population surveyed has better hygiene habits than those previously reported. We believe that hygiene habits should be discussed during office visits.

  18. Excitons in Core-Shell Nanowires with Polygonal Cross Sections.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Anna; Urbaneja Torres, Miguel; Torfason, Kristinn; Gudmundsson, Vidar; Bertoni, Andrea; Manolescu, Andrei

    2018-04-11

    The distinctive prismatic geometry of semiconductor core-shell nanowires leads to complex localization patterns of carriers. Here, we describe the formation of optically active in-gap excitonic states induced by the interplay between localization of carriers in the corners and their mutual Coulomb interaction. To compute the energy spectra and configurations of excitons created in the conductive shell, we use a multielectron numerical approach based on the exact solution of the multiparticle Hamiltonian for electrons in the valence and conduction bands, which includes the Coulomb interaction in a nonperturbative manner. We expose the formation of well-separated quasidegenerate levels, and focus on the implications of the electron localization in the corners or on the sides of triangular, square, and hexagonal cross sections. We obtain excitonic in-gap states associated with symmetrically distributed electrons in the spin singlet configuration. They acquire large contributions due to Coulomb interaction, and thus are shifted to much higher energies than other states corresponding to the conduction electron and the vacancy localized in the same corner. We compare the results of the multielectron method with those of an electron-hole model, and we show that the latter does not reproduce the singlet excitonic states. We also obtain the exciton lifetime and explain selection rules which govern the recombination process.

  19. Determinants of burn first aid knowledge: Cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Hilary J; O'Neill, Tomas B; Wood, Fiona M; Edgar, Dale W; Rea, Suzanne M

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated demographic factors, experience of burn/care and first aid course attendance as factors influencing burn first aid knowledge. A cross-sectional study was undertaken using convenience sampling of members of sporting and recreation clubs. The main outcome measure was the proportion of correct responses to multiple-choice questions relating to four burn scenarios: (1) scald, (2) contact burn, (3) ignited clothing, and (4) chemical burn. A total of 2602 responses were obtained. Large gaps (30-50% incorrect answers) were identified in burn first aid knowledge across all scenarios. 15% more individuals gave correct answers if they had attended a first aid course compared to those who had not (p<0.0001); this proportion increased if the course was undertaken within the previous five years (p<0.0001) or contained a burns-specific component (p<0.0001). Males and younger (≤25 years) and older (≥65 years) age-groups had relatively lower levels of burn first aid knowledge. Gender and age were significant predictors of first aid course attendance, with males and younger (≤25 years) and older (≥65 years) age-groups less likely to have attended a first aid course. In this sample, first aid training undertaken within the last 5 years with a specific burns component was associated with enhanced burn first aid knowledge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Cross Sectional Imaging of Solitary Lesions of the Neurocranium.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Max-Ludwig; Koch, Arend; Streitparth, Florian; Wiener, Edzard

    2017-12-01

    Background  Although a wide range of processes along the neurocranium are of a benign nature, there are often difficulties in the differential diagnosis. Method  In the review CT/MRI scans of the head were evaluated retrospectively regarding solitary lesions along the neurocranium. The majority of the lesions were histologically proven. Results  The purpose of the review is to present typical pathologies of the neurocranium and provide a systematic overview based on 12 entities, their locations, prevalence and radiological characteristics. Conclusion  Processes, which primarily originate from the neurocranium have to be differentiated from secondary processes infiltrating the neurocranium. For this important diagnostic feature, MRI is typically essential, while the definitive diagnosis is often made on the basis of the medical history and the typical appearance on computer tomography. Key Points   · There are often difficulties in the precise differential diagnosis of solitary lesions along the neurocranium. Typical solitary pathologies of the neurocranium based on 12 entities were presented. Both magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are often essential for an exact differential diagnosis.. Citation Format · Schäfer M, Koch A, Streitparth F et al. Cross Sectional Diagnosis of Solitary Lesions of the Neurocranium. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 1135 - 1144. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays,more » fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.« less

  2. A new multigroup method for cross-sections that vary rapidly in energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haut, T. S.; Ahrens, C.; Jonko, A.; Lowrie, R.; Till, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a numerical method for solving the time-independent thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equation or the neutron transport (NT) equation when the opacity (cross-section) varies rapidly in frequency (energy) on the microscale ε; ε corresponds to the characteristic spacing between absorption lines or resonances, and is much smaller than the macroscopic frequency (energy) variation of interest. The approach is based on a rigorous homogenization of the TRT/NT equation in the frequency (energy) variable. Discretization of the homogenized TRT/NT equation results in a multigroup-type system, and can therefore be solved by standard methods. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the approach on three model problems. First we consider the Elsasser band model with constant temperature and a line spacing ε =10-4 . Second, we consider a neutron transport application for fast neutrons incident on iron, where the characteristic resonance spacing ε necessitates ≈ 16 , 000 energy discretization parameters if Planck-weighted cross sections are used. Third, we consider an atmospheric TRT problem for an opacity corresponding to water vapor over a frequency range 1000-2000 cm-1, where we take 12 homogeneous layers between 1-15 km, and temperature/pressure values in each layer from the standard US atmosphere. For all three problems, we demonstrate that we can achieve between 0.1 and 1 percent relative error in the solution, and with several orders of magnitude fewer parameters than a standard multigroup formulation using Planck-weighted (source-weighted) opacities for a comparable accuracy.

  3. Accurate treatment of total photoabsorption cross sections by an ab initio time-dependent method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, Mohammad Noh

    2014-09-01

    A detailed discussion of parallel and perpendicular transitions required for the photoabsorption of a molecule is presented within a time-dependent view. Total photoabsorption cross sections for the first two ultraviolet absorption bands of the N2O molecule corresponding to transitions from the X1 A' state to the 21 A' and 11 A'' states are calculated to test the reliability of the method. By fully considering the property of the electric field polarization vector of the incident light, the method treats the coupling of angular momentum and the parity differently for two kinds of transitions depending on the direction of the vector whether it is: (a) situated parallel in a molecular plane for an electronic transition between states with the same symmetry; (b) situated perpendicular to a molecular plane for an electronic transition between states with different symmetry. Through this, for those transitions, we are able to offer an insightful picture of the dynamics involved and to characterize some new aspects in the photoabsorption process of N2O. Our calculations predicted that the parallel transition to the 21 A' state is the major dissociation pathway which is in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. Most importantly, a significant improvement in the absolute value of the total cross section over previous theoretical results [R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064313 (2011), M.N. Daud, G.G. Balint-Kurti, A. Brown, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 054305 (2005), S. Nanbu, M.S. Johnson, J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 8905 (2004)] was obtained.

  4. Sex inequalities in cardiovascular health: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Janković, Janko; Marinković, Jelena; Stojisavljević, Dragana; Erić, Miloš; Vasiljević, Nadja; Janković, Slavenka

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine sex differences in the prevalence of cardiovascular health (CVH) metrics according to the CVH status. The cross-sectional, population-based study involved 2250 women and 1920 men aged ≥18 years that participated in the 2010 National Health Survey in the Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Prevalence of CVH behaviours (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diet), CVH factors (cholesterol, fasting blood glucose and blood pressure, plus smoking) and ideal CVH were estimated according to the American Heart Association criteria for ideal, intermediate and poor levels. Association between sex and ideal CVH categories was analyzed with multivariable logistic regression analysis across three age stratums. A higher prevalence of ideal CVH metrics was seen in women for smoking status, body mass index, healthy diet score and blood pressure, and in men for physical activity and total cholesterol. Women from all age groups had better CVH behaviours (odds ratio [OR] = 1.40 for the youngest; OR = 2.05 for middle-aged; and OR = 2.03 for older-aged women), while only women from the youngest age group had better CVH factors (OR = 5.09). In line with this, ideal overall CVH prevailed in younger and middle-aged women in comparison to men of the same ages (OR = 3.01 and OR = 2.25, respectively), while disappeared in older ones. Significant differences in the prevalence of CVH metrics between men and women in the Republic of Srpska should be considered in cardiovascular disease prevention. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  5. Phantom vibration syndrome among medical staff: a cross sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Michael B; Arora, Ashish; Hermann, Jodie; Kleppel, Reva; St Marie, Peter; Visintainer, Paul

    2010-12-15

    To describe the prevalence of and risk factors for experiencing "phantom vibrations," the sensory hallucination sometimes experienced by people carrying pagers or cell phones when the device is not vibrating. Cross sectional survey. Academic medical centre. 176 medical staff who responded to questionnaire (76% of the 232 people invited). Measurements Electronic survey consisting of 17 questions about demographics, device use, phantom vibrations experienced, and attempts to stop them. Of the 169 participants who answered the question, 115 (68%, 95% confidence interval 61% to 75%) reported having experienced phantom vibrations. Most (68/112) who experienced phantom vibrations did so after carrying the device between 1 month and 1 year, and 13% experienced them daily. Four factors were independently associated with phantom vibrations: occupation (resident v attending physician, prevalence ratio 1.47, 95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.97), device location (breast pocket v belt, prevalence ratio 1.66, 1.29 to 2.14), hours carried (per 6 hour increment, prevalence ratio 1.30, 1.07 to 1.58), and more frequent use in vibrate mode (per frequency category, prevalence ratio 1.18, 1.03 to 1.34). Of those who experienced phantom vibrations, 43 (39%, 30% to 48%) were able to stop them. Strategies for stopping phantom vibrations included taking the device off vibrate mode, changing the location of the device, and using a different device (success rates 75% v 63% v 50%, respectively, P=0.217). However, 39% (30% to 49%) of respondents did not attempt any strategies. Phantom vibration syndrome is common among those who use electronic devices.

  6. Workplace violence against nurses: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liuyi; Wang, Anni; Xie, Xia; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Jing; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Jingping

    2017-07-01

    Workplace violence is a serious problem for clinical nurses, as it leads to a series of adverse consequences. However, little information is available on the prevalence and influencing factors of workplace violence in China. To determine the prevalence of workplace violence against Chinese nurses, and its influencing factors. A multi-center, cross-sectional study. The seven geographical regions (i.e., northeast, north, central, east, south, northwest, and southwest) of China. Four thousand one hundred and twenty-five nurses. We randomly selected 28 hospitals, located in 14 cities over 13 provinces across the seven geographical regions. We distributed 4125 questionnaires between May 4 and September 23, 2014. The questionnaire included demographic information, the Workplace Violent Incident Questionnaire, the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Professionals, and the Practice Environment Scale of Nursing Work Index. Workplace violence was assessed in terms of physical violence, non-physical violence, sexual harassment, and organized healthcare disturbances. We then performed descriptive analyses and logistic regressions on the collected data. The response rate was 92.97% (n=3835). Additionally, we obtained valid questionnaires from 3004 individuals. Of these, 25.77% reported experiencing physical violence, 63.65% non-physical violence, 2.76% sexual harassment, and 11.72% organized healthcare disturbances. A logistic regression analysis revealed that nurses who have less experience, work a rotating roster, work in emergency rooms and pediatrics departments, have low empathy levels, and who work in poor nursing environments have greater odds of experiencing violence. Experiences of workplace violence are prevalent among Chinese nurses, and several complex factors are associated with a greater risk of such violence, including nurses' personal characteristics, work settings, and work environments. Our results might help nursing managers understand their employees' work

  7. Pet ownership and adolescent health: cross-sectional population study.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Megan; Canterford, Louise; Olds, Tim; Waters, Elizabeth; Wake, Melissa

    2010-12-01

    To determine whether adolescent health and well-being are associated with having a pet in the household (any pet, or specifically dogs, cats or horses/ponies) or average daily time spent caring for/playing with pet(s). Design, setting and participants--Cross-sectional data from the third wave of the Health of Young Victorians Study (HOYVS), a school-based population study in Victoria, Australia. Predictors--Adolescent-reported pet ownership and average daily time spent caring for/playing with pet(s). Outcomes--Self-reported quality of life (KIDSCREEN); average 4-day daily physical activity level from a computerised diary; parent-proxy and self-reported physical and psychosocial health status (PedsQL); measured BMI status (not overweight, overweight, obese) and blood pressure. Statistical Analysis--Regression methods, adjusted for socio-demographic factors, and non-parametric methods. Household pet data were available for 928 adolescents (466 boys; mean age of 15.9 (SD 1.2) years). Most adolescents (88.7%) reported having a pet in their household. Of these, 75.1% reported no activity involving pets over the surveyed days. It appeared that neither owning a pet nor time spent caring for/playing with a pet was related, positively or negatively, to adolescent health or well-being. Despite high rates of pet ownership, adolescents had little interaction with pets. It appears that owning a pet and time spent caring for/playing with a pet was not clearly associated with adolescents' health or well-being. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2010 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  8. Collagenous sprue cross-sectional imaging: a comparative blinded study.

    PubMed

    Al-Bawardy, Badr; Sheedy, Shannon P; Herberts, Michelle B; Murray, Joseph A; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Rajan, Elizabeth; Bruining, David H; Hansel, Stephanie L; Barlow, John M; Fletcher, Joel G; Fidler, Jeff L

    2017-02-01

    Collagenous sprue (CS) is a rare enteropathy characterized by villous atrophy and a thickened subepithelial collagen band. The aim of this study is to describe the cross-sectional imaging findings of CS. A case-control, retrospective study with cases of all CS patients from January 2000 to 2015 was performed. Inclusion criteria were (1) Histopathologic diagnosis and (2) Imaging with computed tomography abdomen/pelvis (CT A/P), CT enterography (CTE), or magnetic resonance enterography within 6 months of small bowel (SB) biopsy. Control subjects were irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients who underwent CTE. Imaging studies were examined by two GI radiologists, blinded to patient data. 108 patients (54 CS; 54 IBS) were included. Mean age was 56.7 ± 16.5 years, and 68% were female (72% in CS group vs. 63% in IBS group; p = 0.3). CS patients were significantly older (67 ± 12 vs. 47 ± 15 year; p < 0.001) and more likely to be on angiotensin receptor blockers (41% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) as compared to the IBS group. Compared to IBS, CS patients were more likely to have mesenteric lymph node (LN) prominence (56% vs. 15%; p < 0.001), jejunoileal fold pattern reversal (46% vs. 6%; p < 0.001), SB dilation (28% vs. 0%; p < 0.001), SB conformational change (28% vs. 6%; p = 0.002), SB wall thickening (13% vs. 2%; p = 0.03), and ulcerative jejunoileitis (4% vs. 0%; p = 0.01). Radiologists suspected malabsorption in 72% in the CS group and 2% in the IBS group (p < 0.001). Imaging findings suggestive of mucosal malabsorption are commonly demonstrated in CS.

  9. Ice Layer Cross-Section In False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image of shows a cross sectional view of the ice layers. Note the subtle peach banding on the left side of the image. The time variation that the bands represent is not yet understood.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 83.5, Longitude 118.2 East (241.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Sleep disorders and oral health: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Carra, Maria Clotilde; Schmitt, Audrey; Thomas, Frederique; Danchin, Nicolas; Pannier, Bruno; Bouchard, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    Sleep disorders (SDs), particularly sleep deprivation, may alter the immune system and induce systemic inflammation. Recent evidence supports an association between SDs and periodontal diseases. This cross-sectional epidemiological study aims to compare oral health variables, such as the amount of plaque/calculus, gingival inflammation, and masticatory function, in individuals with and without SDs. The study population consisted in a French cohort of individuals who underwent medical and oral examinations between 2012 and 2013. Multivariate logistic regression and general linear models were used for group comparisons. Over a total of 29,870 individuals, 11,185 (37.4 %) reported to suffer from SDs on a regular basis. Compared to individuals without SDs, SD individuals were older (mean age 44.2 vs. 45.3 years; p < 0.0001), prevalently female (38.6 vs. 52.1 %; p < 0.0001), and with higher BMI (25.3 vs. 25.7; p < 0.0001). Moreover, SD individuals displayed a significantly higher prevalence of comorbidities, higher level of gingival inflammation (adjusted odds ratio 1.22 [95 % confidence interval 1.13-1.32]), and lower masticatory function (1.45 [1.33-1.58]). Short sleepers (<6 h of sleep/night) were found to be at an increased risk of gingival inflammation (1.25 [1.1-1.4]). SD individuals with moderate-to-high gingival inflammation showed a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (1.39 [1.04-1.84]) compared to SD individuals with low or no gingival inflammation. Individuals with self-report SDs are at increased risk of gingival inflammation. The coexistence of SDs and gingival inflammation is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. These findings provide evidence for an association between SDs and gingival inflammation and support further clinical and experimental studies.

  11. Health promoting Behaviors Among Adolescents: A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Musavian, Azra Sadat; Pasha, Afsaneh; Rahebi, Seyyedeh-Marzeyeh; Atrkar Roushan, Zahra; Ghanbari, Atefeh

    2014-04-01

    Health maintenance and promotion are the fundamental prerequisites to community development. The best time for establishing healthy lifestyle habits is during adolescence. Due to importance of health promotion behaviors in adolescents, this study was conducted to investigate health-promoting behaviors and its associated factors among high school students in Rasht, Iran. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 424 students during the first semester of the year 2012. We employed the multistage sampling design to recruit from private and public high schools in Rasht, Iran. The data collection instrument was a self-report questionnaire consisting of two parts. The first part of instrument was consisted of demographic questionnaire and the second part was adolescent health promotion scale (AHPS) questionnaire. AHPS questionnaire was consisted of six dimensions (nutrition, social support, health responsibility, life appreciation, physical activity, and stress management) to measure health promoting lifestyles. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 16 software employing ANOVA (analysis of variance) test, t-test, Mann-Whitney, and the Kruskal-Wallis. The score of total Adolescent Health Promotion Scale were 3.58 ± 0.52 (possible range was 1-5). The highest score was in life appreciation dimension (3.99 ± 0.068) and the lowest score was in health responsibility dimension. Moreover, Significant associations were found between the adolescent health promotion Scale with age (P < 0.001), gender (P < 0.003), school grade (P < 0.011), father's educational level (P < 0.045), mother's educational level (P < 0.021), and mother's occupation (P < 0.008). Female and older students are at higher risk of developing unhealthy lifestyle. Consequently, healthcare providers, health instructors, schoolteachers, and families must pay more attention to these students. Moreover, as most of lifelong healthy and unhealthy lifestyle habits are established during adolescence

  12. Regulatory approval of new medical devices: cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Hani J; Payne, Christopher J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Marcus, Adam P; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Nandi, Dipankar

    2016-05-20

     To investigate the regulatory approval of new medical devices.  Cross sectional study of new medical devices reported in the biomedical literature.  PubMed was searched between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2004 to identify clinical studies of new medical devices. The search was carried out during this period to allow time for regulatory approval.  Articles were included if they reported a clinical study of a new medical device and there was no evidence of a previous clinical study in the literature. We defined a medical device according to the US Food and Drug Administration as an "instrument, apparatus, implement, machine, contrivance, implant, in vitro reagent, or other similar or related article."  Type of device, target specialty, and involvement of academia or of industry for each clinical study. The FDA medical databases were then searched for clearance or approval relevant to the device.  5574 titles and abstracts were screened, 493 full text articles assessed for eligibility, and 218 clinical studies of new medical devices included. In all, 99/218 (45%) of the devices described in clinical studies ultimately received regulatory clearance or approval. These included 510(k) clearance for devices determined to be "substantially equivalent" to another legally marketed device (78/99; 79%), premarket approval for high risk devices (17/99; 17%), and others (4/99; 4%). Of these, 43 devices (43/99; 43%) were actually cleared or approved before a clinical study was published.  We identified a multitude of new medical devices in clinical studies, almost half of which received regulatory clearance or approval. The 510(k) pathway was most commonly used, and clearance often preceded the first published clinical study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Decisional conflict in asthma patients: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Des Cormiers, Annick; Légaré, France; Simard, Serge; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the level of decisional conflict in asthmatic individuals facing recommendation-based decisions provided to improve asthma control. This was a cross-sectional study performed on a convenience sample of 50 adults aged between 18 and 65 years with a diagnosis of asthma. They completed a decisional conflict scale (possible range of 0-100%), asthma knowledge and control questionnaires (both 0% and 100%), and a general questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics. A decisional conflict was considered clinically significant with a score greater than 37.5%. Simple descriptive statistics were used to investigate associations with decisional conflict. Participants were mainly women (76%) and diagnosed with mild asthma (72%). The median age (1st and 3rd quartile) was 25 years (22 and 42). The median score (1st and 3rd quartile) of decisional conflict was 33% (24 and 44). A clinically significant score (>37.5%) was obtained in 36% of subjects. A statistically significant negative correlation between the knowledge score and the decisional conflict score (r(p) = -0.38; p = 0.006) was observed. The level of knowledge was the only statistically independent variable associated with the decisional conflict score (p = 0.0043). A considerable proportion of patients with asthma have a clinically significant level of decisional conflict when facing decisions aimed at improving asthma control. Patients with poor knowledge of asthma are more at risk of clinically significant level of decisional conflict. These findings support the relevance of providing asthmatic patients with relevant information in decision aids.

  14. Smoking habits in French farmers: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Roux, Pauline; Guillien, Alicia; Soumagne, Thibaud; Ritter, Ophélie; Laplante, Jean-Jacques; Travers, Cécile; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Peiffer, Gérard; Laurent, Lucie; Degano, Bruno

    2017-02-04

    Farmers are exposed to multiple air contaminants that may interact with tobacco smoking in the development of respiratory diseases. Farmers are currently considered to smoke less than non-farmers, but precise data in different categories of age and farming activities are lacking. Smoking habits were studied in a cross-sectional study involving 4105 farmers and 996 non-farming controls aged 40-74 years in 9 French departments between October 2012 and May 2013. Three age groups were defined (40-54, 55-64 and 65-74years). Farmers were divided into four activity groups, namely cattle breeders, livestock farmers working in confined spaces, crop farmers and others. Smoking prevalence was compared between farmers and controls, and odds ratios (ORs) for smoking adjusted for age were calculated. The adjusted OR for ever-smoking was lower among farmers than among non-farmers in all age categories, but the ORs for current smoking were similar in farmers and controls. Smoking prevalence varied according to the type of farming activity, and was lower than in non-farming controls only among cattle breeders and confined livestock farmers. In farmers, the proportion of smokers was higher in the youngest age categories compared with the older age classes. Our results confirm that the prevalence of ever-smokers is lower in farmers than in non-farmers. Nevertheless, our data show that active smoking prevalence is similar in farmers and in non-farmers. This suggests that farmers, just like non-farmers, should be targeted by primary prevention campaigns against smoking.

  15. Searching for unpublished data for Cochrane reviews: cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bero, Lisa; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the experiences of authors of Cochrane reviews in searching for, getting access to, and using unpublished data. Design Cross sectional study. Setting Cochrane reviews. Participants 2184 corresponding authors of Cochrane reviews as of May 2012. Main outcome measure Frequencies of responses to open ended and closed questions in an online survey. Results Of 5915 authors contacted by email, 2184 replied (36.9% response rate). Of those, 1656 (75.8%) had searched for unpublished data. In 913 cases (55.1% of 1656), new data were obtained and we received details about these data for 794 data sources. The most common data source was “trialists/investigators,” accounting for 73.9% (n=587) of the 794 data sources. Most of the data were used in the review (82.0%, 651/794) and in 53.4% (424/794) of cases data were provided in less than a month. Summary data were most common, provided by 50.8% (403/794) of the data sources, whereas 20.5% (163/794) provided individual patient data. In only 6.3% (50/794) of cases were data reported to have been obtained from the manufacturers, and this group waited longer and had to make more contacts to get the data. The data from manufacturers were less likely to be for individual patients and less likely to be used in the review. Data from regulatory agencies accounted for 3.0% (24/794) of the obtained data. Conclusions Most authors of Cochrane reviews who searched for unpublished data received useful information, primarily from trialists. Our response rate was low and the authors who did not respond were probably less likely to have searched for unpublished data. Manufacturers and regulatory agencies were uncommon sources of unpublished data. PMID:23613540

  16. Searching for unpublished data for Cochrane reviews: cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Schroll, Jeppe Bennekou; Bero, Lisa; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-04-23

    To describe the experiences of authors of Cochrane reviews in searching for, getting access to, and using unpublished data. Cross sectional study. Cochrane reviews. 2184 corresponding authors of Cochrane reviews as of May 2012. Frequencies of responses to open ended and closed questions in an online survey. Of 5915 authors contacted by email, 2184 replied (36.9% response rate). Of those, 1656 (75.8%) had searched for unpublished data. In 913 cases (55.1% of 1656), new data were obtained and we received details about these data for 794 data sources. The most common data source was "trialists/investigators," accounting for 73.9% (n=587) of the 794 data sources. Most of the data were used in the review (82.0%, 651/794) and in 53.4% (424/794) of cases data were provided in less than a month. Summary data were most common, provided by 50.8% (403/794) of the data sources, whereas 20.5% (163/794) provided individual patient data. In only 6.3% (50/794) of cases were data reported to have been obtained from the manufacturers, and this group waited longer and had to make more contacts to get the data. The data from manufacturers were less likely to be for individual patients and less likely to be used in the review. Data from regulatory agencies accounted for 3.0% (24/794) of the obtained data. Most authors of Cochrane reviews who searched for unpublished data received useful information, primarily from trialists. Our response rate was low and the authors who did not respond were probably less likely to have searched for unpublished data. Manufacturers and regulatory agencies were uncommon sources of unpublished data.

  17. Extinction cross section measurements for a single optically trapped particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotterell, Michael I.; Preston, Thomas C.; Mason, Bernard J.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2015-08-01

    Bessel beam (BB) optical traps have become widely used to confine single and multiple aerosol particles across a broad range of sizes, from a few microns to < 200 nm in radius. The radiation pressure force exerted by the core of a single, zeroth-order BB incident on a particle can be balanced by a counter-propagating gas flow, allowing a single particle to be trapped indefinitely. The pseudo non-diffracting nature of BBs enables particles to be confined over macroscopic distances along the BB core propagation length; the position of the particle along this length can be finely controlled by variation of the BB laser power. This latter property is exploited to optimize the particle position at the center of the TEM00 mode of a high finesse optical cavity, allowing cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) to be performed on single aerosol particles and their optical extinction cross section, σext, measured. Further, the variation in the light from the illuminating BB elastically scattered by the particle is recorded as a function of scattering angle. Such intensity distributions are fitted to Lorenz-Mie theory to determine the particle radius. The trends in σext with particle radius are modelled using cavity standing wave Mie simulations and a particle's varying refractive index with changing relative humidity is determined. We demonstrate σext measurements on individual sub-micrometer aerosol particles and determine the lowest limit in particle size that can be probed by this technique. The BB-CRDS method will play a key role in reducing the uncertainty associated with atmospheric aerosol radiative forcing, which remains among the largest uncertainties in climate modelling.

  18. Acromegaly and aging: a comparative cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Yuruyen, Mehmet; Keskin, Ela; Yavuzer, Hakan; Niyazoglu, Mutlu; Doventas, Alper; Erdincler, Deniz Suna; Beger, Tanju; Kadioglu, Pinar; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2015-02-01

    Cognitive and functional geriatric assessment may change in acromegaly. Herein we aimed to determine at which points geriatric assessment of the cases with acromegaly differs from that of general elderly population. In this comparative cross-sectional study, a total of 30 cases with acromegaly (controlled n = 14, uncontrolled n = 16) and 30 gender and body-mass index-matched cases without acromegaly (control group, CG) above 60 years old were included. Cognitive functions were evaluated on the basis of the mini-mental state exam (MMSE). Affective status was determined using the geriatric depression scale. Activities of daily living (ADL) were ranked according to the Barthel index while instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) were graded on the basis of the Lawton scale. Nutritional status was evaluated using the mini-nutritional assessment (MNA). Body composition was measured through bioimpedance analysis. Functional mobility was determined using the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and muscle strength with the handgrip strength test. Scores on the MMSE were significantly lower in the elderly cases with acromegaly than in the cases without acromegaly (p < 0.001). Dementia was more frequent in the acromegaly group than in the CG (p = 0.04). Total MNA scores were significantly lower in cases with acromegaly than in the CG (p = 0.006). More subjects in the acromegaly group (33%) were at greater risk of malnutrition than in the CG (3%) (p = 0.003). There was greater moderate functional impairment based on Barthel ADL in the acromegaly group than in the CG (p = 0.04). Acromegaly may impair cognitive functions, functional mobility and instrumental daily living activities in the geriatric population. With acromegaly, the risk of malnutrition may also increase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antihypertensive drugs for elderly patients: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ka Keat; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As the population ages, the prevalence of hypertension also increases. Although primary care is usually the patient’s first point of contact for healthcare, little is known about the management of hypertension among elderly patients at the primary care level. This study aimed to determine the antihypertensive prescription trend for elderly patients, the predictors of antihypertensive use and any inappropriate prescribing practices in both public and private primary care settings. METHODS Data on patient demographics, diagnosis, prescription pattern, payment mode and follow-up was extracted from a cross-sectional study involving 122 public primary care clinics and 652 private primary care clinics in Malaysia. Encounters with hypertensive patients aged ≥ 60 years were included. RESULTS A total of 1,017 antihypertensive medications were prescribed – calcium channel blockers (27.1%), beta blockers (25.5%), diuretics (23.3%), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (14.9%) and angiotensin receptor blockers (6.3%). Out of the 614 patient encounters, 53.1% of the patients were prescribed monotherapy, 31.6% were prescribed dual therapy, 12.2% triple therapy, 2.8% quadruple therapy and 0.3% quintuple therapy. Type of primary care clinic and payment mode were significant predictors for the prescription of combination therapy and fixed-dose combination therapy, respectively. Four types of inappropriate prescriptions were identified. CONCLUSION Calcium channel blockers were the most common antihypertensive drug prescribed and more than half of the elderly patients were on monotherapy. Antihypertensive drug prescription was found to be associated with the type of primary care clinic and the payment mode, suggesting that prescription is influenced by the cost of the drug. PMID:25597751

  20. Drug-related celebrity deaths: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Just, Johannes M; Bleckwenn, Markus; Schnakenberg, Rieke; Skatulla, Philipp; Weckbecker, Klaus

    2016-12-09

    Celebrities are at risk for premature mortality as well as drug-related death. Despite being a vulnerable patient group, celebrities influence people's health behaviours through biological, psychological and social processes. Therefore, celebrity endorsement of the topic could be one way to challenge the current "opioid endemic". Our aim was to better understand the factors surrounding drug-related celebrity deaths by investigating the incidence as well as substances used between 1970 and 2015 using a cross-sectional study design. We searched public databases for drug-related celebrity deaths between 1970 and 2015. They were categorized for sex, profession, age at death, year of death and substances involved. The main outcome measures are descriptive values including number of drug deaths per year and substances involved. Secondary outcome measures are analytical questions to examine whether and which factors influence age at death and year of death (e.g. type of substance use disorder). We identified 220 celebrities who died a drug-related death with a clear indication of involved substances between 1970 and 2015. The average age at death was 38.6 years; 75% were male. Most celebrities died between the age of 25 and 40. The number of drug-related deaths increased in the 21st century, with a significant increase in the use of prescription opioids. Deaths involving prescription opioids and heroin were associated with a significantly lower mean age at death compared to deaths where these substances were not involved. Compared to the 20th century, the total number of celebrities who died from a drug-related death in the 21st century increased, possibly due to an increased involvement of prescription opioids. Negative effects on individual health decisions of celebrity's followers could be the result.

  1. Awareness of surgical costs: a multicenter cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Bade, Kim; Hoogerbrug, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Resource scarcity continues to be an important problem in modern surgical practice. Studies in North America and Europe have found that medical professionals have limited understanding of the costs of medical care. No cost awareness studies have been undertaken in Australasia or specifically focusing on the surgical team. This study determined the cost of a range of commonly used diagnostic tests, procedures, and hospital resources associated with care of the surgical patient. The surgical teams' awareness of these costs was then assessed in a multicenter cross-sectional survey. In total, 14 general surgical consultants, 14 registrars, and 25 house officers working in three New Zealand hospitals were asked to estimate the costs of 14 items commonly associated with patient care. Cost estimations were considered correct if within 25% plus or minus of the actual cost. Accuracy was assessed by calculating the median, mean, and absolute percentage discrepancy. A total of 57 surveys were completed. Of which, four were incomplete and were not included in the analysis. Cost awareness was generally poor, and members of the surgical team were rarely able to estimate the costs to within 25%. The mean absolute percentage error was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.58-1.18) and underestimates were most common. There was no significant difference in estimate accuracy between consultants, registrars, or house officers, or between consultants working in both public/private practice compared with those working in public practice alone. There is poor awareness of surgical costs among consultant surgeons, registrars, and junior physicians working in Australasia. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lifestyle factors and multimorbidity: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lifestyle factors have been associated mostly with individual chronic diseases. We investigated the relationship between lifestyle factors (individual and combined) and the co-occurrence of multiple chronic diseases. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of results from the Program of Research on the Evolution of a Cohort Investigating Health System Effects (PRECISE) in Quebec, Canada. Subjects aged 45 years and older. A randomly-selected cohort in the general population recruited by telephone. Multimorbidity (3 or more chronic diseases) was measured by a simple count of self-reported chronic diseases from a list of 14. Five lifestyle factors (LFs) were evaluated: 1) smoking habit, 2) alcohol consumption, 3) fruit and vegetable consumption, 4) physical activity, and 5) body mass index (BMI). Each LF was given a score of 1 (unhealthy) if recommended behavioural targets were not achieved and 0 otherwise. The combined effect of unhealthy LFs (ULFs) was evaluated using the total sum of scores. Results A total of 1,196 subjects were analyzed. Mean number of ULFs was 2.6 ± 1.1 SD. When ULFs were considered separately, there was an increased likelihood of multimorbidity with low or high BMI [Odd ratio (95% Confidence Interval): men, 1.96 (1.11-3.46); women, 2.57 (1.65-4.00)], and present or past smoker [men, 3.16 (1.74-5.73)]. When combined, in men, 4-5 ULFs increased the likelihood of multimorbidity [5.23 (1.70-16.1)]; in women, starting from a threshold of 2 ULFs [1.95 (1.05-3.62)], accumulating more ULFs progressively increased the likelihood of multimorbidity. Conclusions The present study provides support to the association of lifestyle factors and multimorbidity. PMID:24996220

  3. Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.

    2012-03-05

    In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites,more » but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.« less

  4. Photodissociation in the atmosphere of Mars - Impact of high resolution, temperature-dependent CO2 cross-section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Allen, M.; Nair, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the impact of high resolution, temperature-dependent CO2 cross-section measurements, reported by Lewis and Carver (1983), on calculations of photodissociation rate coefficients in the Martian atmosphere. We find that the adoption of 50 A intervals for the purpose of computational efficiency results in errors in the calculated values for photodissociation of CO2, H2O, and O2 which are generally not above 10 percent, but as large as 20 percent in some instances. These are acceptably small errors, especially considering the uncertainties introduced by the large temperature dependence of the CO2 cross section. The inclusion of temperature-dependent CO2 cross sections is shown to lead to a decrease in the diurnally averaged rate of CO2 photodissociation as large as 33 percent at some altitudes, and increases of as much as 950 percent and 80 percent in the photodissociation rate coefficients of H2O and O2, respectively. The actual magnitude of the changes depends on the assumptions used to model the CO2 absorption spectrum at temperatures lower than the available measurements, and at wavelengths longward of 1970 A.

  5. UV photoabsorption cross sections of CO, N2, and SO2 for studies of the ISM and planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter L.; Rufus, J.; Yoshino, K.; Parkinson, W. H.; Stark, Glenn; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    We report high-resolution laboratory measurements of photoabsorption cross sections of CO, N2, and SO2 in the wavelength range 80 to 320 nm. The motivation is to provide the quantitative data that are needed to analyze observations of absorption by, and to model photochemical processes in, the interstellar medium and a number of planetary atmospheres. Because of the high resolution of the spectrometers used, we can minimize distortion of the spectrum that occurs when instrument widths are greater than the widths of spectral features being measured. In many cases, we can determine oscillator strengths of individual rotational lines - a unique feature of our work.

  6. Gonorrhoea in inner London: results of a cross sectional study.

    PubMed Central

    Low, N.; Daker-White, G.; Barlow, D.; Pozniak, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate population based incidence rates of gonorrhoea in an inner London area and examine relations with age, ethnic group, and socioeconomic deprivation. DESIGN: Cross sectional study. SETTING: 11 departments of genitourinary medicine in south and central London. SUBJECTS: 1978 first episodes of gonorrhoea diagnosed in 1994 and 1995 in residents of 73 electoral wards in the boroughs of Lambeth, Southwark, and Lewisham who attended any of the departments of genitourinary medicine. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Yearly age, sex, and ethnic group specific rates of gonorrhoea per 100,000 population aged 15-59 years; rate ratios for the effects of age and ethnic group on gonorrhoea rates in women and men before and after adjustment for confounding factors. RESULTS: Overall incidence rates of gonorrhoea in residents of Lambeth, Southwark, and Lewisham were 138.3 cases yearly per 100,000 women and 291.9 cases yearly per 100,000 men aged 15-59 years. At all ages gonorrhoea rates were higher in non-white minority ethnic groups. Rate ratios for the effect of age adjusted for ethnic group and underprivilege were 15.2 (95% confidence interval 11.6 to 19.7) for women and 2.0 (1.7 to 2.5) for men aged 15-19 years compared with those over 30. After deprivation score and age were taken into account, women from black minority groups were 10.5 (8.6 to 12.8) times as likely and men 11.0 (9.7 to 12.6) times as likely as white people to experience gonorrhoea. CONCLUSIONS: Gonorrhoea rates in Lambeth, Southwark, and Lewisham in 1994-5 were six to seven times higher than for England and Wales one year earlier. The presentation of national trends thus hides the disproportionate contribution of ongoing endemic transmission in the study area. Teenage women and young adult men, particularly those from black minority ethnic groups, are the most heavily affected, even when socioeconomic underprivilege is taken into account. There is urgent need for resources for culturally

  7. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Ontario: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, James M; Campbell, Kaitryn; Sutherland, Simone; Bartlett, Ann; Brooks, Dina; Qureshi, Riaz; Goldstein, Roger; Gershon, Andrea S; Prevost, Shelley; Samis, Lorelei; Kaplan, Alan G; Hopkins, Robert B; MacDougald, Craig; Nunes, Erica; O'Reilly, Daria J; Goeree, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a comprehensive intervention of exercise training, education, and behaviour change to improve the physical and psychological condition of people with chronic respiratory disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to promote long-term adherence to health-enhancing behaviours. Although PR is considered the standard of care for patients with COPD who remain symptomatic despite bronchodilator therapies, current evidence suggests that only 1.15% of COPD patients across Canada have access to PR facilities for care. Objectives The objectives of this study were to identify the number of health care facilities across Ontario providing PR services for patients with COPD, describe the scope of those services, and determine the province's current capacity to provide PR services relative to need, for the province as a whole and by local health integration network (LHIN). Methods The Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programs in Ontario (PRO) Survey was a province-wide, descriptive, cross-sectional survey of health care facilities (hospitals, family health teams, and community health centres). It was distributed to 409 facilities to collect information on various aspects of PR services in the province. Results Between April 2013 and February 2014, 187 facilities responded to the survey (46% response rate). Most responding centres (144) did not offer PR services, and only 43 were full PR sites providing a comprehensive program. Hospital-based programs made up the majority of sites offering full PR services (67%), followed by programs based at family health teams (19%) and community health centres (14%). More than 90% of PR programs are outpatient-based. The average wait time for outpatient PR was 6.9 weeks, and 58% of programs provide services 5 days per week. More than 80% of patients attending PR complete the full program. Across all program types, the total estimated provincial capacity for PR outpatient care is 4

  8. Electromagnetic Dissociation Cross Sections for High LET Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear interaction cross sections are used in space radiation transport codes to calculate the probability of fragment emission in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Strong interactions usually dominate in these collisions, but electromagnetic (EM) interactions can also sometimes be important. Strong interactions typically occur when the projectile nucleus hits a target nucleus, with a small impact parameter. For impact parameters larger than the sum of the nuclear radii, EM reactions dominate and the process is called electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) if one of the nuclei undergo fragmentation. Previous models of EMD have been used to calculate single proton (p) production, single neutron (n) production or light ion production, where a light ion is defined as an isotope of hydrogen (H) or helium (He), such as a deuteron (2H), a triton (3H), a helion (3He) or an alpha particle (4He). A new model is described which can also account for multiple nucleon production, such as 2p, 2n, 1p1n, 2p1n, 2p2n, etc. in addition to light ion production. Such processes are important to include for the following reasons. Consider, for example, the EMD reaction 56Fe + Al --> 52Cr + X + Al, for a 56Fe projectile impacting Al, which produces the high linear energy transfer (LET) fragment 52Cr. In this reaction, the most probable particles representing X are either 2p2n or 4He. Therefore, production of the high LET fragment 52Cr, must include the multiple nucleon production of 2p2n in addition to the light ion production of 4He. Previous models, such as the NUCFRG3 model, could only account for the 4He production process in this reaction and could not account for 2p2n. The new EMD model presented in this work accounts for both the light ion and multiple nucleon processes, and is therefore able to correctly account for the production of high LET products such as 52Cr. The model will be described and calculations will be presented that show the importance of light ion and multiple

  9. Sarcopenia among hospitalized patients - A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana S; Guerra, Rita S; Fonseca, Isabel; Pichel, Fernando; Amaral, Teresa F

    2015-12-01

    Data on the prevalence of sarcopenia among hospitalized older patients are scarce and there is no available information on the burden of sarcopenia among younger patients. The present study aims to increase the knowledge about the frequency of sarcopenia among hospitalized patients and to evaluate the influence of different diagnostic criteria in these estimates. A cross-sectional study was conducted in hospitalized adult patients. Sarcopenia was defined, according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), as the presence of both low muscle mass, assessed by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA), adjusted for height, and low muscle function (hand grip strength). Two other criteria were applied, also using hand grip strength for evaluating muscle function, one that also assessed muscle mass by BIA, but adjusted for weight, and another which estimated muscle mass based on mid-arm muscle circumference. Nutritional status was evaluated by Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment. The degree of agreement between the different diagnostic criteria was assessed using kappa. Multivariable logistic regression models were used in order to identify factors associated with sarcopenia. 608 hospitalized adult patients aged ≥18 years composed the study sample. According to EWGSOP's criteria, 25.3% patients were sarcopenic. However, depending on age and on the applied criteria, frequency of sarcopenia varied from 5% to 41.1% for men and from 4.9% to 38.3% for women. There was 95.7% (k = 0.89) agreement between criteria that estimated muscle mass by BIA. According to EWGSOP criteria approximately 20% of the non-undernourished patients were sarcopenic. Furthermore, 29.5% of overweight and 18.7% of obese patients were sarcopenic. Factors associated with sarcopenia were male gender, age ≥65 years, moderate or severe dependence, being undernourished and admitted to a medical ward. Sarcopenia is frequent among hospitalized patients and varies widely

  10. Overweight in adult cats: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Öhlund, Malin; Palmgren, Malin; Holst, Bodil Ström

    2018-01-19

    Overweight in cats is a major risk factor for diabetes mellitus and has also been associated with other disorders. Overweight and obesity are believed to be increasing problems in cats, as is currently seen in people, with important health consequences. The objectives of the present study were to determine the prevalence of overweight in cats from two different cohorts in a cross-sectional study design and to assess associations between overweight and diagnoses, and between overweight and demographic and environmental factors. Data were obtained from medical records for cats (n = 1072) visiting an academic medical center during 2013-2015, and from a questionnaire on insured cats (n = 1665). From the medical records, information on body condition score, breed, age, sex, neutering status, and diagnosis was obtained. The questionnaire included questions relating to the cat's body condition, breed, age, sex, neutering status, outdoor access, activity level, and diet. Data were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression. The prevalence of overweight was 45% in the medical records cohort and 22% in the questionnaire cohort, where owners judged their pet's body condition. Overweight cats in the medical records cohort were more likely to be diagnosed with lower urinary tract disease, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease, skin disorders, locomotor disease, and trauma. Eating predominantly dry food, being a greedy eater, and inactivity were factors associated with an increased risk of overweight in the final model in the questionnaire cohort. In both cohorts, the Birman and Persian breeds, and geriatric cats, were less likely to be overweight, and male cats were more likely to be overweight. The prevalence of overweight cats (45%) as assessed by trained personnel was high and in the same range as previously reported. Birman and Persian cats had a lower risk of overweight. The association with dry food found in adult, neutered cats is potentially important because

  11. Eating patterns of Turkish adolescents: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Adolescence is a crucial period for development of dietary behaviors that continue into adulthood and influence the risk of chronic diseases later in life. The aim of this study was to determine the eating patterns of adolescents' and their compliance with the Food Guide Pyramid. Methods 625 students, aged between 11-15 years, from an elementary school in Istanbul, Turkey were enrolled in this cross-sectional survey. A questionnaire of eating patterns (QEP) was administered to all participants. QEP is consisted of questions assessing the knowledge and behaviors on healthy eating, factors affecting food choice, physical activity status and demographical variables. Height and weight of all participants were measured. Physical activity status was determined by questioning about participation in regular sport activities, how much time spent watching TV, playing computer games or doing homework. Results The mean age of the participants was 12.15 ± 1.15 and 50.5% were female. According to body mass index (BMI) percentiles, 8.3% (52) were obese and 10.2% were overweight. 51% had breakfast every day and only 1.9% met all the recommendations of the Food Guide Pyramid. Among the participants, 31% have fast food at least once every day and 60.8% skip meals. When participants were asked to rate the factors effecting their food choice according to a 10 point Likert scale, the highest mean scores (high impact on food choice) were for the factors; family, health, body perception, teachers and friends; 7.5 ± 3.1, 7.4 ± 3.1, 6.1 ± 3.2, 4.8 ± 3.3 and 4.2 ± 3.0 respectively. Total mean time spent on all passive activities (TV, computer, reading homework etc) per day was 9.8 ± 4.7 hours. Conclusions In this study we have demonstrated that, adolescents do not have healthy eating patterns. Educational interventions should be planned to decrease the health risks attributable to their eating behaviors. PMID:21167070

  12. High-resolution photoabsorption cross sections of E1Pi - X1Sigma(+) vibrational bands of CO-12 and CO-13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, G.; Smith, P. L.; Ito, K.; Yoshino, K.

    1992-01-01

    Photodissociation following absorption of extreme-ultraviolet photons is an important factor in determining the abundance and isotropic fractionation of CO in diffuse and translucent interstellar clouds. The principal channel for destruction of CO-13 in such clouds begins with absorption in the (1,0) vibrational band of the E1Pi - X1Sigma(+) system; similarly, absorption in the (0,0) band begins a significant destruction channel for CO-12. Reliable modeling of the CO fractionation process depends critically upon the accuracy of the photoabsorption cross section for these bands. We have measured the cross sections for the relevant isotropic species and for the (1,0) band of CO-12. Our results, which are uncertain by about 10 percent, are for the most part larger than previous measurements.

  13. Calculation of total electron excitation cross-sections and partial electron ionization cross-sections for the elements. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Computer programs were used to calculate the total electron excitation cross-section for atoms and the partial ionization cross-section. The approximations to the scattering amplitude used are as follows: (1) Born, Bethe, and Modified Bethe for non-exchange excitation; (2) Ochkur for exchange excitation; and (3) Coulomb-Born of non-exchange ionization. The amplitudes are related to the differential cross-sections which are integrated to give the total excitation (or partial ionization) cross-section for the collision. The atomic wave functions used are Hartree-Fock-Slater functions for bound states and the coulomb wave function for the continuum. The programs are presented and the results are examined.

  14. Total reaction cross sections and neutron-removal cross sections of neutron-rich light nuclei measured by the COMBAS fragment-separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, B. M.; Isataev, T.; Erdemchimeg, B.; Artukh, A. G.; Aznabaev, D.; Davaa, S.; Klygin, S. A.; Kononenko, G. A.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Kuterbekov, K.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Mikhailova, T. I.; Maslov, V. A.; Mendibaev, K.; Sereda, Yu M.; Penionzhkevich, Yu E.; Vorontsov, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Preliminary results of measurements of the total reaction cross sections σR and neutron removal cross section σ-xn for weakly bound 6He, 8Li, 9Be and 10Be nuclei at energy range (20-35) A MeV with 28Si target is presented. The secondary beams of light nuclei were produced by bombardment of the 22Ne (35 A MeV) primary beam on Be target and separated by COMBAS fragment-separator. In dispersive focal plane a horizontal slit defined the momentum acceptance as 1% and a wedge degrader of 200 μm Al was installed. The Bρ of the second section of the fragment-separator was adjusted for measurements in energy range (20-35) A MeV. Two-neutron removal cross sections for 6He and 10Be and one -neutron removal cross sections 8Li and 9Be were measured.

  15. Rayleigh scattering cross sections of combustion species at 266, 355, and 532 nm for thermometry applications.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Jeffrey A; Driscoll, James F

    2004-11-15

    Rayleigh scattering cross sections are measured for nine combustion species (Ar, N2, O2, CO2, CO, H2, H2O, CH4, and C3H8) at wavelengths of 266, 355, and 532 nm and at temperatures ranging from 295 to 1525 K. Experimental results show that, as laser wavelengths become shorter, polarization effects become important and the depolarization ratio of the combustion species must be accounted for in the calculation of the Rayleigh scattering cross section. Temperature effects on the scattering cross section are also measured. Only a small temperature dependence is measured for cross sections at 355 nm, resulting in a 2-8% increase in cross section at temperatures of 1500 K. This temperature dependence increases slightly for measurements at 266 nm, resulting in a 5-11% increase in cross sections at temperatures of 1450 K.

  16. A comparison of total reaction cross section models used in particle and heavy ion transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihver, Lembit; Lantz, M.; Takechi, M.; Kohama, A.; Ferrari, A.; Cerutti, F.; Sato, T.

    To be able to calculate the nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections with precision is very important for studies of basic nuclear properties, e.g. nuclear structure. This is also of importance for particle and heavy ion transport calculations because, in all particle and heavy ion transport codes, the probability function that a projectile particle will collide within a certain distance x in the matter depends on the total reaction cross sections. Furthermore, the total reaction cross sections will also scale the calculated partial fragmentation cross sections. It is therefore crucial that accurate total reaction cross section models are used in the transport calculations. In this paper, different models for calculating nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections are compared and discussed.

  17. Parameterized Cross Sections for Pion Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, Steve R.; Swaminathan, Sudha R.; Kruger, Adam T.; Ngom, Moussa; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of cross sections for pion production in proton-proton collisions finds wide application in particle physics, astrophysics, cosmic ray physics, and space radiation problems, especially in situations where an incident proton is transported through some medium and knowledge of the output particle spectrum is required when given the input spectrum. In these cases, accurate parameterizations of the cross sections are desired. In this paper much of the experimental data are reviewed and compared with a wide variety of different cross section parameterizations. Therefore, parameterizations of neutral and charged pion cross sections are provided that give a very accurate description of the experimental data. Lorentz invariant differential cross sections, spectral distributions, and total cross section parameterizations are presented.

  18. Calculation of total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by primary benzene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Suvam; Naghma, Rahla; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2016-07-01

    The total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by benzene, halobenzenes, toluene, aniline, and phenol are reported over a wide energy domain. The multi-scattering centre spherical complex optical potential method has been employed to find the total elastic and inelastic cross sections. The total ionization cross section is estimated from total inelastic cross section using the complex scattering potential-ionization contribution method. In the present article, the first theoretical calculations for electron impact total and ionization cross section have been performed for most of the targets having numerous practical applications. A reasonable agreement is obtained compared to existing experimental observations for all the targets reported here, especially for the total cross section.

  19. Electron impact cross sections for the 2,2P state excitation of lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Trajmar, S.; Register, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the 2p 2P state of Li was studied at 10, 20, 60, 100, 150 and 200 eV. Relative differential cross sections in the angular range 3-120 deg were measured and then normalized to the absolute scale by using the optical f value. Integral and momentum transfer cross sections were obtained by extrapolating the differential cross sections to 0 deg and to 180 deg. The question of normalizing electron-metal-atom collision cross sections in general was examined and the method of normalization to optical f values in particular was investigated in detail. It has been concluded that the extrapolation of the apparent generalized oscillator strength (obtained from the measured differential cross sections) to the zero momentum transfer limit with an expression using even powers of the momentum transfer and normalization of the limit to the optical f value yields reliable absolute cross sections.

  20. Asymptotic form for the cross section for the Coulomb interacting rearrangement collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that in a rearrangement collision leading to the formation of the highly excited hydrogenlike states the cross section in all orders of the Born approximation behaves as 1/n sq, with n the principal quantum number, thus invalidating the Brinkman-Kramers approximation for large n. Similarly, in high energy inelastic electron-hydrogenlike atom collisions the exchange cross section for sufficiently large n dominates the direct excitation cross section.

  1. Asymptotic form for the cross section for the Coulomb interacting rearrangement collisions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that in a rearrangement collision leading to the formation of highly excited hydrogenlike states the cross section at high energies behaves as 1/n-squared, with n the principal quantum number, thus invalidating the Brinkman-Kramers approximation for large n. Similarly, in high-energy inelastic electron-hydrogenlike-atom collisions the exchange cross section for sufficiently large n dominates the direct excitation cross section.

  2. Bodies with noncircular cross sections and bank-to-turn missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, C. M., Jr.; Sawyer, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for the aerodynamics of missile configurations with noncircular cross-sections and bank-to-turn maneuvering systems, giving attention to cases with elliptical and square cross-sections, as well as bodies with variable cross-sections. The assessment of bank-to-turn missile performance notes inherent stability/control problems. A summary and index are provided for aerodynamic data on monoplanar configurations, including those which incorporate airbreathing propulsion systems.

  3. Generation of Collapsed Cross Sections for Hatch 1 Cycles 1-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, Brian J

    2012-11-01

    Under NRC JCN V6361, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked to develop and run SCALE/TRITON models for generation of collapsed few-group cross sections and to convert the cross sections to PMAXS format using the GENPMAXS conversion utility for use in PARCS/PATHS simulations of Hatch Unit 1, cycles 1-3. This letter report documents the final models used to produce the Hatch collapsed cross sections.

  4. Cross sections for H(-) and Cl(-) production from HCl by dissociative electron attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    A crossed target beam-electron beam collision geometry and a quadrupole mass spectrometer have been used to conduct dissociative electron attachment cross section measurements for the case of H(-) and Cl(-) production from HCl. The relative flow technique is used to determine the absolute values of cross sections. A tabulation is given of the attachment energies corresponding to various cross section maxima. Error sources contributing to total errors are also estimated.

  5. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section at the CERN pp collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnison, G.; Albrow, M. G.; Allkofer, O. C.; Astbury, A.; Aubert, B.; Bacci, C.; Batley, J. R.; Bauer, G.; Bettini, A.; Bézaguet, A.; Bock, R. K.; Bos, K.; Buckley, E.; Bunn, J.; Busetto, G.; Catz, P.; Cennini, P.; Centro, S.; Ceradini, F.; Ciapetti, G.; Cittolin, S.; Clarke, D.; Cline, D.; Cochet, C.; Colas, J.; Colas, P.; Corden, M.; Cox, G.; Dallman, D.; Dau, D.; Debeer, M.; Debrion, J. P.; Degiorgi, M.; della Negra, M.; Demoulin, M.; Denby, B.; Denegri, D.; Diciaccio, A.; Dobrzynski, L.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dowell, J. D.; Duchovni, E.; Edgecock, R.; Eggert, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N.; Erhard, P.; Faissner, H.; Fince Keeler, M.; Flynn, P.; Fontaine, G.; Frey, R.; Frühwirth, R.; Garvey, J.; Gee, D.; Geer, S.; Ghesquière, C.; Ghez, P.; Ghio, F.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, W. R.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Givernaud, A.; Gonidec, A.; Goodman, M.; Grassmann, H.; Grayer, G.; Guryn, W.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Haynes, W.; Haywood, S. J.; Hoffmann, H.; Holthuizen, D. J.; Homer, R. J.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A.; Jank, W.; Jimack, M.; Jorat, G.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Karimäri, V.; Keeler, R.; Kenyon, I.; Kernan, A.; Kienzle, W.; Kinnunen, R.; Kozanecki, W.; Kroll, J.; Kryn, D.; Kyberd, P.; Lacava, F.; Laugier, J. P.; Lees, J. P.; Leuchs, R.; Levegrun, S.; Lévêque, A.; Levi, M.; Linglin, D.; Locci, E.; Long, K.; Markiewicz, T.; Markytan, M.; Martin, T.; Maurin, F.; McMahon, T.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meneguzzo, A.; Meyer, O.; Meyer, T.; Minard, M.-N.; Mohammadi, M.; Morgan, K.; Moricca, M.; Moser, H.; Mours, B.; Muller, Th.; Nandi, A.; Naumann, L.; Norton, A.; Paoluzi, L.; Pascoli, D.; Pauss, F.; Perault, C.; Piano Mortari, G.; Pietarinen, E.; Pigot, C.; Pimiä, M.; Pitman, D.; Placci, A.; Porte, J.-P.; Radermacher, E.; Ransdell, J.; Redelberger, T.; Reithler, H.; Revol, J. P.; Richman, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rohlf, J.; Rossi, P.; Roberts, C.; Ruhm, W.; Rubbia, C.; Sajot, G.; Salvini, G.; Sass, J.; Sadoulet, B.; Samyn, D.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schinzel, D.; Schwartz, A.; Scott, W.; Scott, W.; Shah, T. P.; Sheer, I.; Siotis, I.; Smith, D.; Sobie, R.; Sphicas, P.; Strauss, J.; Streets, J.; Stubenrauch, C.; Summers, D.; Sumorok, K.; Szonczo, F.; Tao, C.; Ten Have, I.; Thompson, G.; Tscheslog, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; van Eijk, B.; Verecchia, P.; Vialle, J. P.; Virdee, T. S.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Schlippe, W.; Vrana, J.; Vuillemin, V.; Wahl, H. D.; Watkins, P.; Wilke, R.; Wilson, J.; Wingerter, I.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Wyatt, T.; Yvert, M.; Zacharov, I.; Zaganidis, N.; Zanello, L.; Zotto, P.

    1986-05-01

    The inclusive jet cross section has been measured in the UA1 experiment at the CERN pp Collider at centre-of-mass energies √s = 546 GeV and √s = 630 eV. The cross sections are found to be consistent with QCD predictions, The observed change in the cross section with the centre-of-mass energy √s is accounted for in terms of xT scaling.

  6. Activation cross section and isomeric cross-section ratio for the 151Eu(n,2n)150m,gEu process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junhua; Li, Suyuan; Jiang, Li

    2018-07-01

    The cross sections of 151Eu(n,2n)150m,gEu reactions and their isomeric cross section ratios σm/σt have been measured experimentally. Cross sections are measured, relative to a reference 93Nb(n,2n)92mNb reaction cross section, by means of the activation technique at three neutron energies 13.5, 14.1, and 14.8 MeV. Monoenergetic neutron beams were formed via the 3H(d,n)4He reaction and both Eu2O3 samples and Nb monitor foils were activated together to determine the reaction cross section and the incident neutron flux. The activities induced in the reaction products were measured using high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. Cross sections were also evaluated theoretically using the numerical nuclear model code, TALYS-1.8 with different level density options at neutron energies varying from the reaction threshold to 20 MeV. Results are discussed and compared with the corresponding literature.

  7. Activation cross section and isomeric cross section ratio for the 76Ge(n,2n)75m,gGe process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junhua; Jiang, Li; Wang, Xinxing

    2018-04-01

    We measured neutron-induced reaction cross sections for the 76Ge(n,2n)75m,gGe reactions and their isomeric cross section ratios σm/σg at three neutron energies between 13 and 15MeV by an activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique using the K-400 Neutron Generator at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). Ge samples and Nb monitor foils were activated together to determine the reaction cross section and the incident neutron flux. The monoenergetic neutron beams were formed via the 3H( d, n)4He reaction. The pure cross section of the ground state was derived from the absolute cross section of the metastable state and the residual nuclear decay analysis. The cross sections were also calculated using the nuclear model code TALYS-1.8 with different level density options at neutron energies varying from the reaction threshold to 20MeV. Results are discussed and compared with the corresponding literature data.

  8. Total Cross Sections as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture: An Opportunity to Accurately Constrain (n,γ) Cross Sections for Nuclides Beyond the Reach of Direct Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul E.

    2014-03-05

    There are many (n,γ) cross sections of great interest to radiochemical diagnostics and to nuclear astrophysics which are beyond the reach of current measurement techniques, and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. In contrast, total neutron cross sections currently are feasible for many of these nuclides and provide almost all the information needed to accurately calculate the (n,γ) cross sections via the nuclear statistical model (NSM). I demonstrate this for the case of 151Sm; NSM calculations constrained using average resonance parameters obtained from total cross section measurements made in 1975, are in excellent agreement with recent 151Sm (n,γ)more » measurements across a wide range of energy. Furthermore, I demonstrate through simulations that total cross section measurements can be made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for samples as small as 10μg. Samples of this size should be attainable for many nuclides of interest. Finally, I estimate that over half of the radionuclides identified ~20 years ago as having (n,γ) cross sections of importance to s-process nucleosynthesis studies (24/43) and radiochemical diagnostics (11/19), almost none of which have been measured, can be constrained using this technique.« less

  9. New Tools to Prepare ACE Cross-section Files for MCNP Analytic Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.

    Monte Carlo calculations using one-group cross sections, multigroup cross sections, or simple continuous energy cross sections are often used to: (1) verify production codes against known analytical solutions, (2) verify new methods and algorithms that do not involve detailed collision physics, (3) compare Monte Carlo calculation methods with deterministic methods, and (4) teach fundamentals to students. In this work we describe 2 new tools for preparing the ACE cross-section files to be used by MCNP ® for these analytic test problems, simple_ace.pl and simple_ace_mg.pl.

  10. Single- and double-photoionization cross sections of atomic nitrogen from threshold to 31 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, James A. R.; Angel, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    The relative photoionization cross section of atomic nitrogen for the production of singly and doubly charged ions has been measured from 44.3 to 275 A and from 520 to 852 A. The results have been made absolute by normalization to one-half of the molecular nitrogen cross section at short wavelengths. The smoothed atomic nitrogen cross sections sigma can be accurately represented, at short wavelengths, by the equation sigma(Mb) = 36,700 x (E exp-2.3) as a function of the photon energy E (eV), thereby allowing the cross sections to be extrapolated to the nitrogen K edge at 31 A.

  11. Effects of silicon cross section and neutron spectrum on the radial uniformity in neutron transmutation doping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haksung; Ho Pyeon, Cheol; Lim, Jae-Yong; Misawa, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The effects of silicon cross section and neutron spectrum on the radial uniformity of a Si-ingot are examined experimentally with various neutron spectrum conditions. For the cross section effect, the numerical results using silicon single crystal cross section reveal good agreements with experiments within relative difference of 6%, whereas the discrepancy is approximately 20% in free-gas cross section. For the neutron spectrum effect, the radial uniformity in hard neutron spectrum is found to be more flattening than that in soft spectrum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematics of isotopic production cross sections from interactions of relativistic 40Ca in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-X.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H. J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Knott, C. N.; Lindstrom, P. J.; McMahon, M.; Mitchell, J. W.; Potenza, R.; Russo, G. V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C. E.; Tuvé, C.; Waddington, C. J.; Webber, W. R.; Wefel, J. P.

    1997-09-01

    The isotopic production cross sections for 40Ca projectiles at 357, 565, and 763 MeV/nucleon interacting in a liquid hydrogen target have been measured by the Transport Collaboration at the LBL HISS facility. The systematics of these cross sections are studied, and the results indicate that nuclear structure effects are present in the isotope production process during the relativistic collisions. The newly measured cross sections are also compared with those predicted by semiempirical and parametric formulas, but the predictions do not fully describe the systematics such as the energy dependence. The consequences of the cross section systematics in galactic cosmic ray studies are also discussed.

  13. Electron-Impact Total Ionization Cross Sections of CH and C2H2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Ki; Ali, M. Asgar; Rudd, M. Eugene

    1997-01-01

    Electron-impact total ionization cross sections for the CH radical and C2H2 (acetylene) have been calculated using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model. The BEB model combines the Mott cross section and the asymptotic form of the Bethe theory, and has been shown to generate reliable ionization cross sections for a large variety of molecules. The BEB cross sections for CH and C2H2 are in good agreement with the available experimental data from ionization thresholds to hundreds of eV in incident energies. PMID:27805116

  14. Laser Induced Optical Pumping Measurements of Cross Sections for Fine and Hyperfine Structure Transitions in Sodium Induced by Collisions with Helium Argon Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Sung, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    Optical pumping of the ground states of sodium can radically alter the shape of the laser induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating measurements of temperature, pressure, etc., which are based on these spectra. Modeling of the fluorescence using rate equations for the eight hyperfine states of the sodium D manifolds can be used to quantify the contribution to the ground state pumping of transitions among the hyperfine excited states induced by collisions with buffer gas atoms. This model is used here to determine, from the shape of experimental spectra, cross sections for (Delta)F transitions of the P(sub 3/2) state induced by collisions with helium and argon atoms, for a range of values assumed for the P(sub 1/2), (Delta)F cross sections. The hyperfine cross sections measured using this method, which is thought to be novel, are compared with cross sections for transitions involving polarized magnetic substates, m(sub F), measured previously using polarization sensitive absorption. Also, fine structure transition ((Delta)J) cross sections were measured in the pumped vapor, giving agreement with previous measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  15. Laser-Induced Optical Pumping Measurements of Cross Section for Fine- and Hyperfine-Structure Transitions in Sodium Induced by Collisions with Helium and Argon Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Sung, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    Optical pumping of the ground states of sodium can radically alter the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating measurements of temperature, pressure, etc., which are based on these spectra. Modeling of the fluorescence using rate equations for the eight hyperfine states of the sodium D manifolds can be used to quantify the contribution to the ground state pumping of transitions among the hyperfine excited states induced by collisions with buffer gas atoms. This model is used here to determine, from the shape of experimental spectra, cross sections lor DELTA.F transitions of the P(sub 3/2) state induced by collisions with helium and argon atoms, for a range of values assumed for the P(sub 1/2), DELTA.F cross sections. The hyperfine cross sections measured using this method, which to our knowledge is novel, are compared with cross sections for transitions involving polarized magnetic substates m(sub F) measured previously using polarization sensitive absorption. Also, fine-structure transition cross sections were measured in the pumped vapor, giving agreement with previous measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  16. Hubble’s cross-section of the cosmos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-17

    This new Hubble image showcases a remarkable variety of objects at different distances from us, extending back over halfway to the edge of the observable Universe. The galaxies in this image mostly lie about five billion light-years from Earth but the field also contains other objects, both significantly closer and far more distant. Studies of this region of the sky have shown that many of the objects that appear to lie close together may actually be billions of light-years apart. This is because several groups of galaxies lie along our line of sight, creating something of an optical illusion. Hubble’s cross-section of the Universe is completed by distorted images of galaxies in the very distant background. These objects are sometimes distorted due to a process called gravitational lensing, an extremely valuable technique in astronomy for studying very distant objects [1]. This lensing is caused by the bending of the space-time continuum by massive galaxies lying close to our line of sight to distant objects. One of the lens systems visible here is called CLASS B1608+656, which appears as a small loop in the centre of the image. It features two foreground galaxies distorting and amplifying the light of a distant quasar the known as QSO-160913+653228. The light from this bright disc of matter, which is currently falling into a black hole, has taken nine billion years to reach us — two thirds of the age of the Universe. As well as CLASS B1608+656, astronomers have identified two other gravitational lenses within this image. Two galaxies, dubbed Fred and Ginger by the researchers who studied them, contain enough mass to visibly distort the light from objects behind them. Fred, also known more prosaically as [FMK2006] ACS J160919+6532, lies near the lens galaxies in CLASS B1608+656, while Ginger ([FMK2006] ACS J160910+6532) is markedly closer to us. Despite their different distances from us, both can be seen near to CLASS B1608+656 in the central region of this

  17. Simple, empirical approach to predict neutron capture cross sections from nuclear masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, A.; Casten, R. F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Background: Neutron capture cross sections are essential to understanding the astrophysical s and r processes, the modeling of nuclear reactor design and performance, and for a wide variety of nuclear forensics applications. Often, cross sections are needed for nuclei where experimental measurements are difficult. Enormous effort, over many decades, has gone into attempting to develop sophisticated statistical reaction models to predict these cross sections. Such work has met with some success but is often unable to reproduce measured cross sections to better than 40 % , and has limited predictive power, with predictions from different models rapidly differing by an order of magnitude a few nucleons from the last measurement. Purpose: To develop a new approach to predicting neutron capture cross sections over broad ranges of nuclei that accounts for their values where known and which has reliable predictive power with small uncertainties for many nuclei where they are unknown. Methods: Experimental neutron capture cross sections were compared to empirical mass observables in regions of similar structure. Results: We present an extremely simple method, based solely on empirical mass observables, that correlates neutron capture cross sections in the critical energy range from a few keV to a couple hundred keV. We show that regional cross sections are compactly correlated in medium and heavy mass nuclei with the two-neutron separation energy. These correlations are easily amenable to predict unknown cross sections, often converting the usual extrapolations to more reliable interpolations. It almost always reproduces existing data to within 25 % and estimated uncertainties are below about 40 % up to 10 nucleons beyond known data. Conclusions: Neutron capture cross sections display a surprisingly strong connection to the two-neutron separation energy, a nuclear structure property. The simple, empirical correlations uncovered provide model-independent predictions of

  18. Resonances in the Photoionization Cross Sections of Atomic Nitrogen Shape the Far-ultraviolet Spectrum of the Bright Star in 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V.; Chayer, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    The far-ultraviolet spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by local thermodynamic equilibrium models at wavelengths longer than Lyβ, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 Å and a deep absorption feature at 1072 Å none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s 2 2p 3 2 D 0 and 2 P 0). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon abundances, a pattern typical of post-asymptotic giant branch stars.

  19. Quantification of Material Fluorescence and Light Scattering Cross Sections Using Ratiometric Bandwidth-Varied Polarized Resonance Synchronous Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Joanna Xiuzhu; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Dongmao

    2018-05-25

    Presented herein is the ratiometric bandwidth-varied polarized resonance synchronous spectroscopy (BVPRS2) method for quantification of material optical activity spectra. These include the sample light absorption and scattering cross-section spectrum, the scattering depolarization spectrum, and the fluorescence emission cross-section and depolarization spectrum in the wavelength region where the sample both absorbs and emits