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Sample records for absorption angstrom exponent

  1. Inferring Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Exponent using satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Jethva, H. T.; Ahn, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE) is a parameter commonly used to characterize the wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD). It is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellite-based method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses multi-spectral measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols are present above clouds. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud top is attenuated by the absorption effects of the overlying aerosol layer. This attenuation effect can be described using an approximations of Beer's Law. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud-top in an aerosol-free atmospheric column is mainly a function of cloud optical depth (COD). In the proposed method of AAE derivation, the first step is determining COD which is retrieved using a previously developed color-ratio based approach. In the second step, the spectral AAOD is derived by an inversion of the measured spectral reflectance. The proposed technique will be discussed and application results making use of OMI multi-spectral measurements in the UV-Vis. will be presented.

  2. Application of AERONET Single Scattering Albedo and Absorption Angstrom Exponent to Classify Dominant Aerosol Types during DRAGON Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Schafer, J.; Crawford, J. H.; Kim, J.; Sano, I.; Liew, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Lim, H.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, M.; Kenny, P.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols can have major implications on human health by inducing respiratory diseases due to inhalation of fine particles from biomass burning smoke or industrial pollution and on radiative forcing whereby the presence of absorbing aerosol particles (e.g., black carbon) increases atmospheric heating. Aerosol classification techniques have utilized aerosol loading and aerosol properties derived from multi-spectral and multi-angle observations by ground-based (e.g., AERONET) and satellite instrumentation (e.g., MISR). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data have been utilized to determine aerosol types by implementing various combinations of measured aerosol optical depth or retrieved size and absorption aerosol properties (e.g., Gobbi et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010). Giles et al. [2012] showed single scattering albedo (SSA) relationship with extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) can provide an estimate of the general classification of dominant aerosol types (i.e., desert dust, urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, and mixtures) based on data from ~20 AERONET sites located in known aerosol source regions. In addition, the absorption Angstrom exponent relationship with EAE can provide an indication of the dominant absorbing aerosol type such as dust, black carbon, brown carbon, or mixtures of them. These classification techniques are applied to the AERONET Level 2.0 quality assured data sets collected during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network (DRAGON) campaigns in Maryland (USA), Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Penang (Malaysia), and California (USA). An analysis of aerosol type classification for DRAGON sites is performed as well as an assessment of the spatial variability of the aerosol types for selected DRAGON campaigns. Giles, D. M., B. N. Holben, T. F. Eck, A. Sinyuk, A. Smirnov, I. Slutsker, R. R. Dickerson, A. M. Thompson, and J. S. Schafer (2012), An analysis of AERONET aerosol absorption properties and classifications

  3. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  4. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (<0.1micron) were also collected at site T0 and T1 (Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, State of Mexico) from 5 am to 5 pm (day) and from 5 pm to 5 am (night) during the month of March 2006. Samples were collected on quartz fiber filters with high volume impactor samplers. Continuous absorption spectra of these aerosol samples have been obtained in the laboratory from 280 to 900nm with the use of an integrating sphere coupled to a UV spectrometer (Beckman DU with a Labsphere accessory). The integrating sphere allows the detector to collect and spatially integrate the total radiant flux reflected from the sample and therefore allows for the measurement of absorption on highly reflective or diffusely scattering samples. These continuous spectra have also been used to obtain the

  5. El Nino-Southern Oscillation Correlated Aerosol Angstrom Exponent Anomaly Over the Tropical Pacific Discovered in Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    El Nino.Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of interannual variability in the tropical atmosphere. ENSO could potentially impact local and global aerosol properties through atmospheric circulation anomalies and teleconnections. By analyzing aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (AE; often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer and the Sea ]viewing Wide Field ]of ]view Sensor for the period 2000.2011, we find a strong correlation between the AE data and the multivariate ENSO index (MEI) over the tropical Pacific. Over the western tropical Pacific (WTP), AE increases during El Nino events and decreases during La Nina events, while the opposite is true over the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP). The difference between AE anomalies in the WTP and ETP has a higher correlation coefficient (>0.7) with the MEI than the individual time series and could be considered another type of ENSO index. As no significant ENSO correlation is found in AOD over the same region, the change in AE (and hence aerosol size) is likely to be associated with aerosol composition changes due to anomalous meteorological conditions induced by the ENSO. Several physical parameters or mechanisms that might be responsible for the correlation are discussed. Preliminary analysis indicates surface wind anomaly might be the major contributor, as it reduces sea ]salt production and aerosol transport during El Nino events. Precipitation and cloud fraction are also found to be correlated with tropical Pacific AE. Possible mechanisms, including wet removal and cloud shielding effects, are considered. Variations in relative humidity, tropospheric ozone concentration, and ocean color during El Nino have been ruled out. Further investigation is needed to fully understand this AE ]ENSO covariability and the underlying physical processes responsible for

  6. Diurnal variation of aerosol optical depth and angstrom exponent from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) Yonsei AErosol Retrieval (YAER) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myungje; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Jaehwa

    2015-04-01

    Over the East Asia, aerosol optical properties (AOPs) can be changed very quickly and diversely during a day because mineral dust or heavy anthropogenic aerosol events occur sporadically and frequently. When severe aerosol event occurs from source region, long-range transported can be appeared over East Asia within one day so that multi-temporal satellite observation during a day is essential to detect aerosol diurnal variation in East Asia. Although it has been possible from previous meteorological sensors in geostationary earth orbit, only aerosol optical depth (AOD) at one channel can be retrieved and accuracy of retrieved AOD is worse than those of multi-channel sensors such as MODIS, SeaWiFS, or VIIRS because appropriate aerosol model selection is difficult using single channel information. The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) is one of sensor onboard COMS geostationary satellite. It has 8 channels in visible, which are similar with SeaWiFS and MODIS ocean color channels. It observes East Asia, including East China, Korean Peninsula, and Japan, hourly during the daytime (8 times observation in daytime). Because of geostationary and multi-channel characteristics, accurate AOPs such as AOD and Angstrom exponent (AE) can be retrieved from GOCI Yonsei Aerosol retrieval (YAER) algorithm as high spatial (6 km x 6 km) and temporal (1 hour) resolution. In this study, GOCI YAER AOD and AE are compared with those from AERONET (ground-based observation) and MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target and Deep Blue algorithm (satellite-based observation) as high frequency time series during a day and few days over AERONET sites. This can show the accuracy of GOCI YAER algorithm in compare with AERONET. In specific transport cases such as dust or haze, instantaneous increase of AOD and change of aerosol size from AE can be also detect from GOCI. These GOCI YEAR products can be used effectively as input observation data of air-quality monitoring and forecasting.

  7. Using the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo and Angstrom Exponent from AERONET to Determine Aerosol Origins and Mixing States over the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Slutsker, I.; Smirnov, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Ghauri, B.

    2012-12-01

    various fuel types (e.g., from open agricultural waste, forest, or dung burning), combustion phases, or aging processes including aggregation or mixing with ambient aerosols. Other intensive aerosol properties (e.g., depolarization ratio or absorption Angstrom exponent) may provide improved definition of fine mode dominated aerosol types from U/I and BB sources [Burton et al., 2012, Giles et al., 2012]. Additional sites in India and Pakistan are also analyzed using available AERONET Version 2, Level 2.0 data.

  8. Limitation of using Angstrom exponent for source apportionment of black carbon in complex environments - A case study from the North West Indo- Gangetic plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, S.; Sinha, B.; Sinha, V.; Chandra, P.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Gros, V.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the contribution of different sources to the total BC is necessary for targeted mitigation. Absorption Angstrom exponent (αabs) measurements of black carbon (BC) have recently been introduced as a novel tool to apportion the contribution of biomass burning sources to BC. Two-component Aethalometer model for apportioning BC to biomass burning sources and fossil fuel combustion sources, which uses αabs as a generic indicator of the source type, is widely used for determining the contribution of the two types of sources to the total BC. Our work studies BC emissions in the highly-populated, anthropogenic emissions-dominated Indo-Gangetic Plain and demonstrates that the αabs cannot be used as a generic tracer for biomass burning emissions in a complex environment. Simultaneously collected high time resolution data from a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE 42, Magee Scientific, USA) and a high sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction- Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) installed at a sub-urban site in Mohali (Punjab), India, were used to identify a number of biomass combustion plumes during which BC enhancements correlated strongly with an increase in acetonitrile (a well-established biomass burning tracer) mixing ratio. Each type of biomass combustion is classified and characterized by distinct emission ratios of aromatic compounds and oxygenated VOCs to acetonitrile. The identified types of biomass combustion include two different types of crop residue burning (paddy and wheat), burning of leaf-litter, and garbage burning. Traffic (fossil-fuel burning) plumes were also selected for comparison. We find that the two-component Aethalometer source-apportionment method cannot be extrapolated to all types of biomass combustion and αabs of traffic plumes can be >1 in developing countries like India, where use of adulterated fuel in vehicles is common. Thus in a complex environment, where multiple anthropogenic BC sources and air masses of variable photochemical age

  9. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-angstroms diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), ubiquitous absorption features in astronomical spectra, have been known since early this century and now number more than a hundred. Ranging from 4,400 angstroms to the near infrared, they differ markedly in depth, width and shape, making the concept of a single carrier unlikely. Whether they are due to gas or grains is not settled, but recent results suggest that the DIB carriers are quite separate from the grains that cause visual extinction. Among molecular candidates the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as the possible carriers of some of the DIBs, and we present here laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10+ in neon and argon matrices. The strongest absorption feature falls at 4,435 +/- 5 angstroms in the argon matrix and 4,395 +/- 5 angstroms in the neon matrix, both close to the strong 4,430-angstroms DIB. If this or a related pyrene-like species is responsible for this particular band, it must account for 0.2% of all cosmic carbon. The ion also shows an intense but puzzling broad continuum, extending from the ultraviolet to the visible, similar to what is seen in the naphthalene cation and perhaps therefore a common feature of all PAH cations. This may provide an explanation of how PAHs convert a large fraction of interstellar radiation from ultraviolet and visible wavelengths down to the infrared.

  10. One hundred angstrom niobium wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, H. E.; Rose, R. M.; Wulff, J.

    1968-01-01

    Composite of fine niobium wires in copper is used to study the size and proximity effects of a superconductor in a normal matrix. The niobium rod was drawn to a 100 angstrom diameter wire on a copper tubing.

  11. Whisper gallery mirrors reflectivities from 100 [angstrom] to 500 [angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Tsen-Yu; Hagelstein, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    We have examined optical constants and predicted reflectivities of candidate surface coatings for whisper gallery mirrors in the extreme ultraviolet (100 [Angstrom] to 500 [Angstrom]). Previous work of Vinogradov and coworkers have identified the spectral regime near 100-150 [Angstrom] as particularly promising due to the high whisper gallery mirror reflectivities of the noble metals in the vicinity of their Cooper minima in this regime. We confirm this basic result using newer optical data, and we have sought surface materials which would extend the range over which the whisper gallery mirrors may be used: between 100 to 500 [Angstrom]. We find that substantial whisper gallery mirror reflectivities (near or greater than 50%) are predicted for a variety of elements, and that the TE peak reflection is larger than TM peak reflection by on the order of 10%. However, most of the elements which do reflect well have surfaces that are vulnerable to oxygen contamination, which seriously degrades mirror performance. A cryogenic mirror design using a dynamic solid rare gas surface which has the potential to defeat such surface contaminations is described: it has peak reflectivity of more than 50% centered near 280 [Angstrom]. 8 figs, 18 refs.

  12. Whisper gallery mirrors reflectivities from 100 {angstrom} to 500 {angstrom}

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Tsen-Yu; Hagelstein, P.L.

    1990-12-31

    We have examined optical constants and predicted reflectivities of candidate surface coatings for whisper gallery mirrors in the extreme ultraviolet (100 {Angstrom} to 500 {Angstrom}). Previous work of Vinogradov and coworkers have identified the spectral regime near 100-150 {Angstrom} as particularly promising due to the high whisper gallery mirror reflectivities of the noble metals in the vicinity of their Cooper minima in this regime. We confirm this basic result using newer optical data, and we have sought surface materials which would extend the range over which the whisper gallery mirrors may be used: between 100 to 500 {Angstrom}. We find that substantial whisper gallery mirror reflectivities (near or greater than 50%) are predicted for a variety of elements, and that the TE peak reflection is larger than TM peak reflection by on the order of 10%. However, most of the elements which do reflect well have surfaces that are vulnerable to oxygen contamination, which seriously degrades mirror performance. A cryogenic mirror design using a dynamic solid rare gas surface which has the potential to defeat such surface contaminations is described: it has peak reflectivity of more than 50% centered near 280 {Angstrom}. 8 figs, 18 refs.

  13. Aerosol scattering and absorption Angström exponents as indicators of dust and dust-free days over Granada (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Lyamani, H.; Antón, M.; Titos, G.; Cazorla, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-03-01

    This paper focuses on the assessment of atmospheric aerosol optical properties at the surface and in atmospheric column during both desert dust and dust-free conditions over Granada, South-eastern Iberian Peninsula. Indeed, the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption and scattering properties is analyzed in detail. The analyzed period ranges from June 2008 to December 2010. On dusty days, the mean scattering Angström exponent value obtained in the atmospheric column (SAEcol) (0.5 ± 0.3) was lower than the observed at the surface level (SAEis) (1.3 ± 0.6), indicating higher contribution of coarse particles at high atmospheric level than at ground level during the analyzed dust events. In addition, it is noticed that the absorption Angström exponent in the atmospheric column (AAEcol) with mean value of 1.5 ± 0.2 and at the surface (AAEis) with mean value of 1.3 ± 0.2 obtained during dusty situations are indicative of mixture of desert dust and black carbon particles as dominant absorbers both in the atmospheric column and at the surface during dust intrusions over Granada. On the other hand, a non-parametric test (Kolmogorov-Smirnov) revealed that no significant statistical difference was found for AAEis between desert dust and free-dust conditions. This result may be due to the important contribution of urban absorbing aerosol (e.g. Black carbon) at ground level in the study location. Therefore, these parameters (AAEcol and AAEis) are not very useful to detect desert dust events without the use of other information (e.g., aerosol size) over urban area like Granada. A dust extreme event was analyzed in order to retrieve optical parameters during situation dominated by desert dust. The values of SAEcol and SAEis obtained during this extreme event were in agreement with the values showed above for the period 2008-2010, although the differences between dust-free and dust conditions are more noticeable in this special event.

  14. Parameterization of single-scattering albedo (SSA) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) with EC / OC for aerosol emissions from biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Rudra P.; Wagner, Nick L.; Langridge, Justin M.; Lack, Daniel A.; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Murphy, Shane M.

    2016-08-01

    Single-scattering albedo (SSA) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) are two critical parameters in determining the impact of absorbing aerosol on the Earth's radiative balance. Aerosol emitted by biomass burning represent a significant fraction of absorbing aerosol globally, but it remains difficult to accurately predict SSA and AAE for biomass burning aerosol. Black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and non-absorbing coatings all make substantial contributions to the absorption coefficient of biomass burning aerosol. SSA and AAE cannot be directly predicted based on fuel type because they depend strongly on burn conditions. It has been suggested that SSA can be effectively parameterized via the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) of a biomass burning event and that this would be useful because emission factors for CO and CO2, from which MCE can be calculated, are available for a large number of fuels. Here we demonstrate, with data from the FLAME-4 experiment, that for a wide variety of globally relevant biomass fuels, over a range of combustion conditions, parameterizations of SSA and AAE based on the elemental carbon (EC) to organic carbon (OC) mass ratio are quantitatively superior to parameterizations based on MCE. We show that the EC / OC ratio and the ratio of EC / (EC + OC) both have significantly better correlations with SSA than MCE. Furthermore, the relationship of EC / (EC + OC) with SSA is linear. These improved parameterizations are significant because, similar to MCE, emission factors for EC (or black carbon) and OC are available for a wide range of biomass fuels. Fitting SSA with MCE yields correlation coefficients (Pearson's r) of ˜ 0.65 at the visible wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm while fitting SSA with EC / OC or EC / (EC + OC) yields a Pearson's r of 0.94-0.97 at these same wavelengths. The strong correlation coefficient at 405 nm (r = 0.97) suggests that parameterizations based on EC / OC or EC / (EC + OC) have good predictive

  15. The Angstrom Project: a new microlensing candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, E.; Darnley, M. J.; Newsam, A. M.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Street, C. Han B.-G. Park R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new microlensing candidate in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). The candidate was discovered using difference imaging techniques by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  16. Singularity detection using holder exponent.

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, H.; Robertson, A. N.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    A signal processing technique called Holder exponent is presented to detect the presence of a discontinuity and when the discontinuity occurs in a dynamic signal. Wavelet transforms are incorporated with the Holder exponent to capture the time varying nature of discontinuities, and a classification procedure is developed to quantify when changes in the Holder exponent are significant, The proposed Holder exponent analysis is applied to acceleration response of a mechanical system with a rattling internal part. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the Holder exponent for identifying certain types of events that introduce discontinuities into the measured dynamic response data.

  17. Methods to Parameterize Brown Carbon, Distinguish Brown Carbon Absorption From Enhanced Black Carbon Absorption, and Assess the Stability of Brown Carbon to Photochemical Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. M.; Pokhrel, R. P.; Beamesderfer, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Langridge, J.; Lack, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present results obtained during the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment-4 (FLAME-4) with a combination of multi-wavelength photoacoustic and cavity ringdown spectrometers. It will be shown that the single scattering albedo and Angstrom exponent of biomass burning emissions can be better parameterized by the organic carbon to black carbon ratio than by the modified combustion efficiency. Two different methods to distinguish the contribution to aerosol absorption from brown carbon versus black carbon and enhanced black carbon absorption will be presented. One method is based on extending the absorption seen at 660 nm with an assumed Angstrom exponent while the other assumes a similar absorption enhancement (determined via thermal denuder) of black carbon at 660 and 405 nm. Potential errors and advantages of both methods will be discussed. Finally, chamber experiments that show degradation of brown carbon by photochemical oxidation will be presented along with a number of methods by which to assess the amount of brown carbon that is degraded.

  18. Conductivity exponents in stick percolation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Zhang, Shi-Li

    2010-02-01

    On the basis of Monte Carlo simulations, the present work systematically investigates how conductivity exponents depend on the ratio of stick-stick junction resistance to stick resistance for two-dimensional stick percolation. Simulation results suggest that the critical conductivity exponent extracted from size-dependent conductivities of systems exactly at the percolation threshold is independent of the resistance ratio and has a constant value of 1.280+/-0.014 . In contrast, the apparent conductivity exponent extracted from density-dependent conductivities of systems well above the percolation threshold monotonically varies with the resistance ratio, following an error function, and lies in the vicinity of the critical exponent.

  19. Sub-Angstrom electron microscopy for sub-Angstrom nano-metrology

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.

    2004-01-18

    The revolution in nanoscale science and technology requires instrumentation for observation and metrology - we must be able to see and measure what we build. Because nano-devices operate on the level of a few molecules, or even a few atoms, accurate atomic-scale imaging is called for. High-resolution aberration-corrected electron microscopes (both TEM and STEM) can provide valuable measurements at the sub-Angstrom level. Over the next decade, extension of TEM and STEM resolutions to half-Angstrom levels by next-generation aberration-corrected electron microscopes will advance the capabilities of these essential tools for atomic-scale structural characterization. Because improvements in resolution allow for separation of atom columns in many more projection directions, these microscopes will provide much improved three-dimensional characterization of the shape and internal structure of nanodevices and catalyst nanoparticles (perhaps even true 3-D imaging), and hence provide essential feedback in the nano-theory/construction/measurement loop.

  20. The Angstrom Project: two new microlensing/nova transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, Eamonn

    2008-11-01

    We report the discovery of two new optical transients in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). These transients were discovered using difference imaging techniques by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  1. Inference of the aerosol Angstrom coefficient from SAGE short-wavelength data. [Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenoble, J.; Pruvost, P.

    1983-01-01

    SAGE four-channel transmission profiles are inverted to retrieve the extinction profiles from which the aerosol Angstrom coefficient alpha is obtained. The procedure allows one to check the influence of the NO2 absorption profile, which is small below 25 km. The results compare well with those obtained by a completely different procedure at NASA Langley Research Center, and the main features of the alpha profiles seem to be significant, even considering the rather large error bars. The relation between the retrieved Angstrom coefficient, the particle effective radius and the asymmetry factor is considered.

  2. Contribution of particulate brown carbon to light absorption in the rural and urban Southeast US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, J. Jai; Bergin, Michael H.; Mckenzie, Michael; Schauer, James J.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol light absorption coefficients were carried out as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during the summer of 2013 to determine the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon (BrC) to total aerosol light absorption in a rural location (Centreville, AL) and an urban area (Atlanta, GA). The light absorption coefficients in the near UV and visible wavelengths were measured for both ambient air, as well as ambient air heated in a thermal denuder to 200 °C to remove the semi-volatile organic compounds. Atlanta measurements show dominance of semi-volatile brown carbon with an average absorption angstrom exponent (AAE) of 1.4 before heating and about 1.0 after heating. In urban Atlanta, a decrease of about ∼35% in the light absorption coefficient at 370 nm after heating indicates that light absorbing organic compounds are a substantial fraction of the light absorption budget. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the fraction of light absorption by the semi-volatile aerosol occurs during the daytime, likely linked with photochemistry. Measurements at rural Centerville, on the other hand, do not show any major change in AAE with values before and after heating of 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. Overall the results suggest that photochemical aged urban emissions result in the presence of light absorbing BrC, while at rural locations which are dominated by aged aerosol and local biogenic emissions (based on measurements of Angstrom exponents) BrC does not significantly contribute to light absorption.

  3. Light absorption from particulate impurities in snow and ice determined by spectrophotometric analysis of filters

    SciTech Connect

    Grenfell, Thomas C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Clarke, Antony D.; Warren, Stephen G.

    2011-05-10

    Light absorption by particulate impurities in snow and ice can affect the surface albedo and is important for the climate. The absorption properties of these particles can be determined by collecting and melting snow samples and extracting the particulate material by filtration of the meltwater. This paper describes the optical design and testing of a new instrument to measure the absorption spectrum from 400 to 750 nm wavelength of the particles collected on filters using an ''integrating-sandwich'' configuration. The measured absorption is shown to be unaffected by scattering of light from the deposited particulates. A set of calibration standards is used to derive an upper limit for the concentration of black carbon (BC) in the snow. The wavelength dependence of the absorption spectra from 450 to 600 nm is used to calculate an absorption Angstrom exponent for the aerosol. This exponent is used to estimate the actual BC concentration in the snow samples as well as the relative contributions of BC and non-BC constituents to the absorption of solar radiation integrated over the wavelength band 300 to 750 nm.

  4. Entanglement production and Lyapunov exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, Lucas; Bianchi, Eugenio; Yokomizo, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Squeezed vacua play a prominent role in quantum field theory in curved spacetime. Instabilities and resonances that arise from the coupling in the field to the background geometry, result in a large squeezing of the vacuum. In this talk, I discuss the relation between squeezing and Lyapunov exponents of the system. In particular, I derive a new formula for the rate of growth of the entanglement entropy expressed as the sum of the Lyapunov exponents. Examples of such a linear production regime can be found during inflation and in the preheating phase directly after inflation.

  5. The Morphosyntax of Discontinuous Exponence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Amy Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This thesis offers a systematic treatment of discontinuous exponence, a pattern of inflection in which a single feature or a set of features bundled in syntax is expressed by multiple, distinct morphemes. This pattern is interesting and theoretically relevant because it represents a deviation from the expected one-to-one relationship between…

  6. A continuously operating source of vacuum ultraviolet below 500 angstrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Duo plasmatron type source of ultraviolet radiation operates in the wavelength region below 500 angstrom. Since the spectra produced are determined almost completely by the gas injected, and because the source operates continuously, this arrangement is beneficial in the development and calibration of filters and detectors within discrete wavelength ranges.

  7. Observations on related ecological exponents

    PubMed Central

    Southwood, T. Richard E.; May, Robert M.; Sugihara, George

    2006-01-01

    We observe a relationship among three independently derived power laws in ecology: (i) total number of species versus area, (ii) species frequency versus species length, and (iii) maximal body size versus area. Aside from showing how these historically disparate phenomena are connected, we show how recent empirical results relating the maximal body size of top terrestrial vertebrates to the square root of land area conform to a prior theoretical expectation given by two of the above power laws. Of particular interest is the observation that the exponent relating species length to species frequency suggests a dimension for niche space for terrestrial vertebrate assemblages of D ≈ 3/2. This value, along with power law for maximal body size, versus area, gives rise to the canonical species area exponent z ≈ 1/4. PMID:16641099

  8. An Analysis of AERONET Aerosol Absorption Properties and Classifications Representative of Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Smirnov, Alexander; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (tau) and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0) ) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption [i.e., omega (sub 0) and absorption Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub abs))] and size [i.e., extinction Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub ext)) and fine mode fraction of tau] relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to: (1) determine the average omega (sub 0) and alpha(sub abs) at each site (expanding upon previous work); (2) perform a sensitivity study on alpha(sub abs) by varying the spectral omega (sub 0); and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral omega (sub 0) averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < delta omega (sub 0) <= 0.02 decrease) than in previous work and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of alpha(sub abs) show significant overlap among aerosol type categories and at least 10% of the alpha(sub abs) retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral omega (sub 0) by +/- 0.03 induces significant alpha(sub abs) changes from the unperturbed value by at least approx. +/- 0.6 for Dust, approx. +/-0.2 for Mixed, and approx. +/-0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The omega (sub 0)440nm and alpha(sub ext) 440-870nm relationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  9. Critical exponents of Nikolaevskii turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Dan

    2005-02-01

    We study the spatial power spectra of Nikolaevskii turbulence in one-dimensional space. First, we show that the energy distribution in wave-number space is extensive in nature. Then, we demonstrate that, when varying a particular parameter, the spectrum becomes qualitatively indistinguishable from that of Kuramoto-Sivashinsky turbulence. Next, we derive the critical exponents of turbulent fluctuations. Finally, we argue that in some previous studies, parameter values for which this type of turbulence does not appear were mistakenly considered, and we resolve inconsistencies obtained in previous studies.

  10. HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

    2005-04-06

    John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 Angstrom resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstrom levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstrom imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become common place for next-generation electron microscopes with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the micro-scope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the ''size'' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope.

  11. Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2005-01-03

    John Cowley and his group at ASU were pioneers in the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Three decades ago they achieved images showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4A resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  12. Triclinic lysozyme at 0.65 angstrom resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Dauter, M.; Alkire, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Dauter, Z.; Biosciences Division; SAIC-Frederick Inc.; National Cancer Inst.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of triclinic hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) has been refined against diffraction data extending to 0.65 {angstrom} resolution measured at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Refinement with anisotropic displacement parameters and with the removal of stereochemical restraints for the well ordered parts of the structure converged with a conventional R factor of 8.39% and an R{sub free} of 9.52%. The use of full-matrix refinement provided an estimate of the variances in the derived parameters. In addition to the 129-residue protein, a total of 170 water molecules, nine nitrate ions, one acetate ion and three ethylene glycol molecules were located in the electron-density map. Eight sections of the main chain and many side chains were modeled with alternate conformations. The occupancies of the water sites were refined and this step is meaningful when assessed by use of the free R factor. A detailed description and comparison of the structure are made with reference to the previously reported triclinic HEWL structures refined at 0.925 {angstrom} (at the low temperature of 120 K) and at 0.95 {angstrom} resolution (at room temperature).

  13. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution from which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.

  14. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    DOE PAGES

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution frommore » which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.« less

  15. Soft x-ray amplification in lithium-like Al XI (154 /angstrom/) and Si XII (129 /angstrom/)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Skinner, C.H.; Wouters, A.; Valeo, E.; Voorhees, D.; Suckewer, S.

    1988-03-01

    Recent experiments on soft x-ray amplification in lithium-like ions in a CO/sub 2/ laser-produced recombining plasma confined in a magnetic field are presented. The maximum gain-length products observed are GL approx. = 3 to 4 for the 154 /angstrom/, 4f-3d transition in Al XI and GL (approxreverse arrowequal/ 1 to 2 for the 129 /angstrom/, 4f-3d transition in Si XII, respectively. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic code with a collisional-radiative atomic model was used to model the plasma and the theoretical predictions of gain agree well with the observations. Descriptions of both hydrodynamic and atomic physics code are given. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Prospects for high power Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) development in the 1000{angstrom} {minus} 1{angstrom} wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1994-03-01

    Electron bunch requirements for single-pass saturation of a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating at full transverse coherence in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) mode include: (1) a high peak current, (2) a sufficiently low relative energy spread, and (3) a transverse emittance {var_epsilon}[r-m] satisfying the condition {var_epsilon} {le} {lambda}A/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength of the FEL. In the insertion device that induces the coherent amplification, the prepared electron bunch must be kept on a trajectory sufficiently collinear with the amplified photons without significant dilution of its transverse density. In this paper we discuss a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) based on a high energy accelerator such as, e.g., the 3km S-band structure at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), followed by a long high-precision undulator with superimposed quadrupole (FODO) focusing, to fulfill the given requirements for SASE operation in the 1000{Angstrom}--1{Angstrom} range. The electron source for the linac, an RF gun with a laser-excited photocathode featuring a normalized emittance in the 1--3 mm-mrad range, a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 3 ps, and approximately 10{sup {minus}9} C/bunch, is a primary determinant of the required low transverse and longitudinal emittances. Acceleration of the injected bunch to energies in the 5--25 GeV range is used to reduce the relative longitudinal energy spread in the bunch, as well as to reduce the transverse emittance to values consistent with the cited wavelength regime. Two longitudinal compression stages are employed to increase the peak bunch current to the 2--5 kA levels required for sufficiently rapid saturation. The output radiation is delivered, via a grazing-incidence mirror bank, to optical instrumentation and a multi-user beam line system. Technological requirements for LCLS operation at 40{Angstrom}, 4.5{Angstrom}, and 1.5{Angstrom} are examined.

  17. Finite-time braiding exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budišić, Marko; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-01

    Topological entropy of a dynamical system is an upper bound for the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents; in practice, it is strongly indicative of the presence of mixing in a subset of the domain. Topological entropy can be computed by partition methods, by estimating the maximal growth rate of material lines or other material elements, or by counting the unstable periodic orbits of the flow. All these methods require detailed knowledge of the velocity field that is not always available, for example, when ocean flows are measured using a small number of floating sensors. We propose an alternative calculation, applicable to two-dimensional flows, that uses only a sparse set of flow trajectories as its input. To represent the sparse set of trajectories, we use braids, algebraic objects that record how trajectories exchange positions with respect to a projection axis. Material curves advected by the flow are represented as simplified loop coordinates. The exponential rate at which a braid stretches loops over a finite time interval is the Finite-Time Braiding Exponent (FTBE). We study FTBEs through numerical simulations of the Aref Blinking Vortex flow, as a representative of a general class of flows having a single invariant component with positive topological entropy. The FTBEs approach the value of the topological entropy from below as the length and number of trajectories is increased; we conjecture that this result holds for a general class of ergodic, mixing systems. Furthermore, FTBEs are computed robustly with respect to the numerical time step, details of braid representation, and choice of initial conditions. We find that, in the class of systems we describe, trajectories can be re-used to form different braids, which greatly reduces the amount of data needed to assess the complexity of the flow.

  18. Superconductivity in 4 angstrom single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Z K; Zhang, L; Wang, N; Zhang, X X; Wen, G H; Li, G D; Wang, J N; Chan, C T; Sheng, P

    2001-06-29

    Investigation of the magnetic and transport properties of single-walled small-diameter carbon nanotubes embedded in a zeolite matrix revealed that at temperatures below 20 kelvin, 4 angstrom tubes exhibit superconducting behavior manifest as an anisotropic Meissner effect, with a superconducting gap and fluctuation supercurrent. The measured superconducting characteristics display smooth temperature variations owing to one-dimensional fluctuations, with a mean-field superconducting transition temperature of 15 kelvin. Statistical mechanic calculations based on the Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional yield predictions that are in excellent agreement with the experiments.

  19. Sub-angstrom surface metrology with a virtual reference interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freischlad, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    Non-contact, 3D optical interferometric profilers provide detailed topography measurements of super-smooth surfaces such as hard disk substrates and super-polished optics. However, the contribution of the interferometer system to the measurement can be significant for surfaces with an RMS roughness of one Angstrom and below. Special care must be taken to minimize random noise as well as to remove the systematic instrument error from the measured data. While the random noise can be addressed by low-noise design and averaging of measurements, the systematic instrument error is more difficult to eliminate. In this paper an interferometer configuration is presented that eliminates the mid to higher spatial frequencies from the reference beam. This configuration is called a virtual-reference interferometer, since there is no physical surface in focus conjugate to the test surface. This provides very smooth systematic instrument errors with essentially no contribution in the mid to high spatial frequencies of surface waviness and roughness. The virtual-reference interferometer has a midsize measurement area of 20x20 mm, is fully compensated for white light, extended source illumination, and enables data acquisition for both phase shifting and coherence scanning modes. Current performance data show a residual systematic tool waviness error of < 0.2 Angstrom RMS, with potential for improvement. Efficient stitching of subaperture measurements accommodates high resolution roughness and waviness maps of test surfaces up to 150 mm x100 mm.

  20. The 2.3-Angstrom Structure of Porcine Circovirus 2

    SciTech Connect

    Khayat, Reza; Brunn, Nicholas; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Hardham, John M.; Ankenbauer, Robert G.; Schneemann, Anette; Johnson, John E.

    2012-10-25

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is a T = 1 nonenveloped icosahedral virus that has had severe impact on the swine industry. Here we report the crystal structure of an N-terminally truncated PCV2 virus-like particle at 2.3-{angstrom} resolution, and the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) image reconstruction of a full-length PCV2 virus-like particle at 9.6-{angstrom} resolution. This is the first atomic structure of a circovirus. The crystal structure revealed that the capsid protein fold is a canonical viral jelly roll. The loops connecting the strands of the jelly roll define the limited features of the surface. Sulfate ions interacting with the surface and electrostatic potential calculations strongly suggest a heparan sulfate binding site that allows PCV2 to gain entry into the cell. The crystal structure also allowed previously determined epitopes of the capsid to be visualized. The cryo-EM image reconstruction showed that the location of the N terminus, absent in the crystal structure, is inside the capsid. As the N terminus was previously shown to be antigenic, it may externalize through viral 'breathing'.

  1. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  2. Invasion exponents in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetrius, Lloyd; Gundlach, Volker Matthias; Ochs, Gunter

    2009-03-01

    This article is concerned with the characterization of invasion exponents in biological networks defined by a population of replicating elements: molecules, cells, higher organisms. We show that the outcome of competition between an invader and a resident population is a stochastic process, determined by the rate at which a population returns to its steady state after a random perturbation in the parameters that characterize the replicating elements. This return rate is defined by the macroscopic parameter evolutionary entropy, a measure of the diversity of the interaction between the individuals in the population. We also show that the evolutionary stability of a population, that is the invulnerability of a resident to the introduction of an invader competing for the available resources, are given by extremal states of entropy. These results which pertain to networks of interacting molecules, cells and higher organisms, are generalizations of results established for demographic networks, that is populations of replicating organisms parametrized by the ages at which they reproduce and die.

  3. Spectra in the 60 )angstrom) to 345 )angstrom) wavelength region of elements injected into the PLT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, A.; Schwob, J.L.; Suckewer, S.; Seely, J.F.; Feldman, U.; Dave, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    High resolution spectra of the elements Fe, Ni, Zn, Ge, Se, and Mo injected into the PLT tokamak were recorded by the 2-meter Schwob-Fraenkel soft X-ray multichannel spectrometer (SOXMOS). Spectra were recorded every 50 ms during the time before and after injection. The spectral lines of the injected element were very strong in the spectrum recorded immedately after injection, and the transition in the injected element were easily distinguished from the transitions in te intrinsic elements (C, O, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Ni). An accurate wavelength scale was established using well-known reference transitions in the intrinsic elements. The spectra recorded just prior to injection were substracted from the spectra recorded after injection, and the resulting spectrum was composed almost entirely of transitions from the injected element. A large number of ..delta..n + 0 transitions between the ground and the first excited configurations in the Li I through K I isoelectronic sequences of the injected elements were identified in the wavelength region 60 )angstrom) to 345 )angstrom). 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. 40-{angstrom} FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H.; Pellegrini, C.

    1991-12-31

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. 40- angstrom FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C. ); Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Pellegrini, C. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Continuously Varying Critical Exponents Beyond Weak Universality

    PubMed Central

    Khan, N.; Sarkar, P.; Midya, A.; Mandal, P.; Mohanty, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    Renormalization group theory does not restrict the form of continuous variation of critical exponents which occurs in presence of a marginal operator. However, the continuous variation of critical exponents, observed in different contexts, usually follows a weak universality scenario where some of the exponents (e.g., β, γ, ν) vary keeping others (e.g., δ, η) fixed. Here we report ferromagnetic phase transition in (Sm1−yNdy)0.52Sr0.48MnO3 (0.5 ≤ y ≤ 1) single crystals where all three exponents β, γ, δ vary with Nd concentration y. Such a variation clearly violates both universality and weak universality hypothesis. We propose a new scaling theory that explains the present experimental results, reduces to the weak universality as a special case, and provides a generic route leading to continuous variation of critical exponents and multi-criticality. PMID:28327622

  7. Continuously Varying Critical Exponents Beyond Weak Universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Sarkar, P.; Midya, A.; Mandal, P.; Mohanty, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Renormalization group theory does not restrict the form of continuous variation of critical exponents which occurs in presence of a marginal operator. However, the continuous variation of critical exponents, observed in different contexts, usually follows a weak universality scenario where some of the exponents (e.g., β, γ, ν) vary keeping others (e.g., δ, η) fixed. Here we report ferromagnetic phase transition in (Sm1‑yNdy)0.52Sr0.48MnO3 (0.5 ≤ y ≤ 1) single crystals where all three exponents β, γ, δ vary with Nd concentration y. Such a variation clearly violates both universality and weak universality hypothesis. We propose a new scaling theory that explains the present experimental results, reduces to the weak universality as a special case, and provides a generic route leading to continuous variation of critical exponents and multi-criticality.

  8. Investigation of black and brown carbon multiple-wavelength-dependent light absorption from biomass and fossil fuel combustion source emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Michael R.; Victoria Garcia, Mercedes; Robinson, Michael A.; Van Rooy, Paul; Dietenberger, Mark A.; Bergin, Michael; Schauer, James Jay

    2015-07-01

    Quantification of the black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) components of source emissions is critical to understanding the impact combustion aerosols have on atmospheric light absorption. Multiple-wavelength absorption was measured from fuels including wood, agricultural biomass, coals, plant matter, and petroleum distillates in controlled combustion settings. Filter-based absorption measurements were corrected and compared to photoacoustic absorption results. BC absorption was segregated from the total light extinction to estimate the BrC absorption from individual sources. Results were compared to elemental carbon (EC)/organic carbon (OC) concentrations to determine composition's impact on light absorption. Multiple-wavelength absorption coefficients, Angstrom exponent (6.9 to <1.0), mass absorption cross section (MAC), and Delta C (97 µg m-3 to ~0 µg m-3) were highly variable. Sources such as incense and peat emissions showed ultraviolet wavelength (370 nm) BrC absorption over 175 and 80 times (respectively) the BC absorption but only 21 and 11 times (respectively) at 520 nm wavelength. The bulk EC MACEC, λ (average at 520 nm = 9.0 ± 3.7 m2 g-1; with OC fraction <0.85 = ~7.5 m2 g-1) and the BrC OC mass absorption cross sections (MACBrC,OC,λ) were calculated; at 370 nm ultraviolet wavelengths; the MACBrC,OC,λ ranged from 0.8 m2 g-1 to 2.29 m2 g-1 (lowest peat, highest kerosene), while at 520 nm wavelength MACBrC,OC,λ ranged from 0.07 m2 g-1 to 0.37 m2 g-1 (lowest peat, highest kerosene/incense mixture). These MAC results show that OC content can be an important contributor to light absorption when present in significant quantities (>0.9 OC/TC), source emissions have variable absorption spectra, and nonbiomass combustion sources can be significant contributors to BrC.

  9. Aerosol Absorption Retrieval at Ultraviolet Wavelengths in a Complex Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Raptis, Panagiotis; Kouremeti, Natalia; Amirdis, Vassilis; Arola, Antti; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Schuster, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    We have used total and diffuse UV irradiance measurements from a multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (UVMFR) in order to investigate aerosol absorption in the UV range for a 5-year period in Athens, Greece. This dataset was used as input to a radiative transfer model and the single scattering albedo (SSA) at 368 and 332 nm was calculated. Retrievals from a collocated CIMEL sun photometer were used to evaluate the products and study the absorption spectral behavior of retrieved SSA values. The UVMFR SSA, together with synchronous, CIMEL-derived retrievals of SSA at 440 nm, had a mean of 0.90, 0.87 and 0.83, with lowest values (higher absorption) encountered at the shorter wavelengths. In addition, noticeable diurnal variation of the SSA in all wavelengths is shown, with amplitudes up to 0.05. Strong SSA wavelength dependence is revealed for cases of low Angstrom exponents, accompanied by a SSA decrease with decreasing extinction optical depth, suggesting varying influence under different aerosol composition. However, part of this dependence for low aerosol optical depths is masked by the enhanced SSA retrieval uncertainty. Dust and brown carbon UV absorbing properties were also investigated to explain seasonal patterns.

  10. Dynamic exponents for potts model cluster algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Paul D.; Baillie, Clive F.

    We have studied the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster update algorithms for the Ising model in 2, 3 and 4 dimensions. The data indicate simple relations between the specific heat and the Wolff autocorrelations, and between the magnetization and the Swendsen-Wang autocorrelations. This implies that the dynamic critical exponents are related to the static exponents of the Ising model. We also investigate the possibility of similar relationships for the Q-state Potts model.

  11. Light Absorption of Brown Carbon Aerosol in the Pearl River Delta Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    X.F. Huang, J.F. Yuan, L.M. Cao, J. Cui, C.N. Huang, Z.J. Lan and L.Y. He Key Laboratory for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055, ChinaCorresponding author. Tel.: +86 755 26032532; fax: +86 755 26035332. E-mail address: huangxf@pku.edu.cn (X. F. Huang). Abstract: The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol has been recognized in recent decades. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) of ambient aerosol was widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of brown carbon at shorter wavelengths, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to unit. In this study, the AAE method was improved by statistical extrapolation based on ambient measurements in the polluted seasons in typical urban and rural areas in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. A three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the ambient measured AAE and the ratio of organic aerosol to BC aerosol, in order to extract the more realistic AAE by pure BC aerosol, which were found to be 0.86, 0.82 and 1.02 at 405nm and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 at 532nm in the campaigns of urban-winter, urban-fall, and rural-fall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiment results further supported the effectiveness of the obtained AAE for pure BC aerosol. In addition, biomass burning experiments proved higher spectral dependence of more-BrC environment and further verified the reliability of the instruments' response. Then, the average light absorption contribution of BrC aerosol was calculated to be 11.7, 6.3 and 12.1% (with total relative uncertainty of 7.5, 6.9 and 10.0%) at 405nm and 10.0, 4.1 and 5.5% (with total relative uncertainty of 6.5, 8.6 and 15.4%) at 532nm of the three campaigns, respectively. These results indicate that the

  12. Superconductivity in 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes--a short review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Shi, Wu; Lortz, Rolf; Sheng, Ping

    2012-01-07

    We give an up-to-date review of the superconducting phenomena in 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes embedded in aligned linear pores of the AlPO(4)-5 (AFI) zeolite, first discovered in 2001 as a fluctuation Meissner effect. With the introduction of a new approach to sample synthesis around 2007, new data confirming the superconductivity have been obtained. These comprise electrical, specific heat, and magnetic measurements which together yield a consistent yet complex physical picture of the superconducting state, largely owing to the one-dimensional (1D) nature of the 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes. For the electrical transport characteristics, two types of superconducting resistive behaviors were reproducibly observed in different samples. The first type is the quasi 1D fluctuation superconductivity that exhibits a smooth resistance drop with decreasing temperature, initiating at 15 K. At low temperatures the differential resistance also shows a smooth increase with increasing bias current (voltage). Both are unaffected by an applied magnetic field up to 11 Tesla. These manifestations are shown to be consistent with those of a quasi 1D superconductor with thermally activated phase slips as predicted by the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin (LAMH) theory. The second type is the quasi 1D to 3D superconducting crossover transition, which was observed to initiate at 15 K with a slow resistance decrease switching to a sharp order of magnitude drop at ∼7.5 K. The latter exhibits anisotropic magnetic field dependence and is attributed to a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT)-like transition that establishes quasi-long-range order in the plane transverse to the c-axis of the aligned nanotubes, thereby mediating a 1D to 3D crossover. The electrical data are complemented by magnetic and thermal specific heat bulk measurements. By using both the SQUID VSM and the magnetic torque technique, the onset of diamagnetism was observed to occur at ∼15 K, with a rapid increase of the

  13. Study of polytropic exponent based on high pressure switching expansion reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanyin; Luo, Yuxi; Xu, Zhipeng

    2011-10-01

    Switching expansion reduction (SER) uses a switch valve to substitute the throttle valve to reduce pressure for high pressure pneumatics. The experiments indicate that the simulation model well predicts the actual characteristics. The heat transfers and polytropic exponents of the air in expansion tank and supply tanks of SER have been studied on the basis of the experiments and the simulation model. Through the mathematical reasoning in this paper, the polytropic exponent can be calculated by the air mass, heat, and work exchanges of the pneumatic container. For the air in a constant volume tank, when the heat-absorption is large enough to raise air temperature in discharging process, the polytropic exponent is less than 1; when the air is experiencing a discharging and heat-releasing process, the polytropic exponent exceeds the specific heat ratio (the value of 1.4).

  14. Light absorption, optical and microphysical properties of trajectory-clustered aerosols at two AERONET sites in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawole, O. G.; Cai, X.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol remote sensing techniques and back-trajectory modeling can be combined to identify aerosol types. We have clustered 7 years of AERONET aerosol signals using trajectory analysis to identify dominant aerosol sources at two AERONET sites in West Africa: Ilorin (4.34 oE, 8.32 oN) and Djougou (1.60 oE, 9.76 oN). Of particular interest are air masses that have passed through the gas flaring region in the Niger Delta area, of Nigeria, en-route the AERONET sites. 7-day back trajectories were calculated using the UK UGAMP trajectory model driven by ECMWF wind analyses data. Dominant sources identified, using literature classifications, are desert dust (DD), Biomass burning (BB) and Urban-Industrial (UI). Below, we use a combination of synoptic trajectories and aerosol optical properties to distinguish a fourth source: that due to gas flaring. Gas flaring, (GF) the disposal of gas through stack in an open-air flame, is believed to be a prominent source of black carbon (BC) and greenhouse gases. For these different aerosol source signatures, single scattering albedo (SSA), refractive index , extinction Angstrom exponent (EEA) and absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) were used to classify the light absorption characteristics of the aerosols for λ = 440, 675, 870 and1020 nm. A total of 1625 daily averages of aerosol data were collected for the two sites. Of which 245 make up the GF cluster for both sites. For GF cluster, the range of fine-mode fraction is 0.4 - 0.7. Average values SSA(λ), for the total and GF clusters are 0.90(440), 0.93(675), 0.95(870) and 0.96(1020), and 0.93(440), 0.92(675), 0.9(870) and 0.9(1020), respectively. Values of for the GF clusters for both sites are 0.62 - 1.11, compared to 1.28 - 1.66 for the remainder of the clusters, which strongly indicates the dominance of carbonaceous particles (BC), typical of a highly industrial area. An average value of 1.58 for the real part of the refractive index at low SSA for aerosol in the GF cluster is also

  15. Non-trivial exponents in coarsening phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.

    1997-02-01

    One of the simplest examples of stochastic automata is the Glauber dynamics of ferromagnetic spin models such as Ising or Potts models. At zero temperature, if the initial condition is random, one observes a pattern of growing domains with a characteristic size which increases with time like t {1}/{2}. In this self-similar regime, the fraction of spins which never flip up to time t decreases like t- θ where the exponent θ is non-trivial and depends both on the number q of states of the Potts model and on the dimension of space. This exponent can be calculated exactly in one dimension. Similar non-trivial exponents are also present in even simpler models of coarsening, where the dynamical rule is deterministic.

  16. Neutrons measure phase behavior in pores at Angstrom size

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have measured the phase behavior of green house gases in pores at the Angstrom-level, using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Yuri Melnichenko, an instrument scientist on the General Purpose Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GP SANS) Diffractometer at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor, his postdoctoral associate Lilin He and collaborators Nidia Gallego and Cristian Contescu from the Material Sciences Division (ORNL) were engaged in the work. They were studying nanoporous carbons to assess their attractiveness as storage media for hydrogen, with a view to potential use for on-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. Nanoporous carbons can also serve as electrode material for supercapacitors and batteries. The researchers successfully determined that the most efficiently condensing pore size in a carbon nanoporous material for hydrogen storage is less than one nanometer. In a paper recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the collaborators used small angle neutron scattering to study how hydrogen condenses in small pores at ambient temperature. They discovered that the surface-molecule interactions create internal pressures in pores that may exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to 50. 'This is an exciting result,' Melnichenko said, 'as you achieve extreme densification in pores 'for free', i.e. without spending any energy. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored to maximize hydrogen storage capacities.' Another important factor that defines the adsorption capacity of sub-nanometer pores is their shape. In order to get accurate structural information and maximize sorption capacity, it is important that pores are small and of approximately uniform size. In collaboration with Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi who supplied the samples, Melnichenko and his collaborators used the GP SANS

  17. Lyapunov exponents for infinite dimensional dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mhuiris, Nessan Mac Giolla

    1987-01-01

    Classically it was held that solutions to deterministic partial differential equations (i.e., ones with smooth coefficients and boundary data) could become random only through one mechanism, namely by the activation of more and more of the infinite number of degrees of freedom that are available to such a system. It is only recently that researchers have come to suspect that many infinite dimensional nonlinear systems may in fact possess finite dimensional chaotic attractors. Lyapunov exponents provide a tool for probing the nature of these attractors. This paper examines how these exponents might be measured for infinite dimensional systems.

  18. Computing Lyapunov exponents of switching systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Nicola; Protasov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    We discuss a new approach for constructing polytope Lyapunov functions for continuous-time linear switching systems. The method we propose allows to decide the uniform stability of a switching system and to compute the Lyapunov exponent with an arbitrary precision. The method relies on the discretization of the system and provides - for any given discretization stepsize - a lower and an upper bound for the Lyapunov exponent. The efficiency of the new method is illustrated by numerical examples. For a more extensive discussion we remand the reader to [8].

  19. An Optimal Exposure Strategy for Cryoprotected Virus Crystals With Lattice Constants Greater Than 1000 Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, L.; Johnson, J.E.

    2009-05-18

    Studies of icosahedral virus capsids provide insights into the function of supramolecular machines. Virus capsid crystals have exceptionally large unit cells; as a result, they diffract weakly compared with protein crystals. HK97 is a dsDNA lambda-like bacteriophage whose 13 MDa capsid expands from 550 {angstrom} to 650 {angstrom} with large subunit conformational changes during virus maturation. The HK97 penultimate maturation intermediate was crystallized in a tetragonal unit cell that has lattice constants of 1010 {angstrom} x 1010 {angstrom} x 730 {angstrom}. The crystals could be cryoprotected, but diffracted to a modest resolution of 5 {angstrom} at a bending-magnet beamline. When these crystals were optimally exposed with two orders-of-magnitude more photons from a new insertion-device beamline, data extending to better than 3.8 {angstrom} resolution were obtained. Here, the strategies to collect and process such data are described. These strategies can be adapted for other crystals with large unit cells and for microcrystals.

  20. The Angstrom Project: M31 microlensing alert ANG-08B-M31-07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnley, M. J.; Kerins, E.; Newsam, A. M.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Street, C. Han B.-G. Park R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We report an ongoing microlensing candidate in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). The candidate was detected from difference imaging photometry generated by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  1. SNAP: fabrication of long coupled microresonator chains with sub-angstrom precision.

    PubMed

    Sumetsky, M; Dulashko, Y

    2012-12-03

    Based on the recently-introduced Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP) platform, we demonstrate a chain of 30 coupled SNAP microresonators spaced by 50 micron along an optical fiber, which is fabricated with the precision of 0.7 angstrom and a standard deviation of 0.12 angstrom in effective microresonator radius. To the best of our knowledge, this result surpasses those achieved in other super-low-loss photonic technologies developed to date by two orders of magnitude. The chain exhibits bandgaps in both the discrete and continuous spectrum in excellent agreement with theory. The developed method enables robust fabrication of SNAP devices with sub-angstrom precision.

  2. Cryogenic optical localization provides 3D protein structure data with Angstrom resolution.

    PubMed

    Weisenburger, Siegfried; Boening, Daniel; Schomburg, Benjamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2017-02-01

    We introduce Cryogenic Optical Localization in 3D (COLD), a method to localize multiple fluorescent sites within a single small protein with Angstrom resolution. We demonstrate COLD by determining the conformational state of the cytosolic Per-ARNT-Sim domain from the histidine kinase CitA of Geobacillus thermodenitrificans and resolving the four biotin sites of streptavidin. COLD provides quantitative 3D information about small- to medium-sized biomolecules on the Angstrom scale and complements other techniques in structural biology.

  3. Intermittency exponent of the turbulent energy cascade.

    PubMed

    Cleve, Jochen; Greiner, Martin; Pearson, Bruce R; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2004-06-01

    We consider the turbulent energy dissipation from one-dimensional records in experiments using air and gaseous helium at cryogenic temperatures, and obtain the intermittency exponent via the two-point correlation function of the energy dissipation. The air data are obtained in a number of flows in a wind tunnel and the atmospheric boundary layer at a height of about 35 m above the ground. The helium data correspond to the centerline of a jet exhausting into a container. The air data on the intermittency exponent are consistent with each other and with a trend that increases with the Taylor microscale Reynolds number, R(lambda), of up to about 1000 and saturates thereafter. On the other hand, the helium data cluster around a constant value at nearly all R(lambda), this being about half of the asymptotic value for the air data. Some possible explanation is offered for this anomaly.

  4. Bergman kernel and complex singularity exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Boyong; Lee, Hanjin

    2009-12-01

    We give a precise estimate of the Bergman kernel for the model domain defined by $\\Omega_F=\\{(z,w)\\in \\mathbb{C}^{n+1}:{\\rm Im}w-|F(z)|^2>0\\},$ where $F=(f_1,...,f_m)$ is a holomorphic map from $\\mathbb{C}^n$ to $\\mathbb{C}^m$, in terms of the complex singularity exponent of $F$.

  5. Lyapunov exponents for a Duffing oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeni, Andrea R.; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    With the help of a parallel computer we perform a systematic computation of Lyapunov exponents for a Duffing oscillator driven externally by a force proportional to cos( t). In contrast to the familiar situation in discrete-time systems where one finds “windows” of regularity embedded in intervals of chaos, we find the continuous-time Duffing oscillator to contain a quite regular epetition of relatively self-similar “islands of chaos” (i.e. regions characterized by positive exponents) embedded in large “seas of regularity” (negative exponents). We also investigate the effect of driving the oscillator with a Jacobian elliptic function cn( t, m). For m = 0 one has cn( t, 0) ≡ cos( t), the usual trigonometric pumping. For m = 1 one has cn( t, 1) ≡ sech( t), a hyperbolic pumping. When 0 < m < 1 the Jacobian function is an intermediary double-periodic function with periodicity depending on m and with Fourier spectrum consisting of a regular train of narrow lines with varying envelope. Using m to tune the drive appropriately one may displace the islands of chaos in parameter space. Thus, Jacobian pumping provides a possible way of “cleaning chaos” in regions of the parameter space for periodically driven systems.

  6. Spectral Light Absorption and Scattering by Aerosol Particles in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Holanda, B. A.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Cirino, G. G.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Martin, S. T.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/5, a detailed characterization of spectral light absorption and light scattering was performed at four research sites located in the central Amazon forest at different distances upwind and downwind of Manaus. The sites ATTO (T0a) and Embrapa (T0e) are located upwind of Manaus where it is possible to observe very pristine atmospheric conditions in wet season. The site Tiwa (T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 km downwind of Manaus and, finally, the Manacapuru (T3) site is located at about 60 km downwind of Manaus. The spectral dependence of light absorption and light scattering were measured using Aethalometers (7-wavelengths) and Nephelometers (3-wavelengths), respectively. By calculating the Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), it was possible to get information about the source of the aerosol whereas the Scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) gives information about its size distribution. Sunphotometers from the AERONET network were set up at T3 and T0e sites to measure column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). For all the stations, much higher absorption and scattering coefficients were observed during the dry season in comparison to the wet season, as a result of the larger concentration of BC and OC present in the biomass burning events. Additionally, we also observed Manaus plume pollution that alters the BC signal. There is also an increase of the AAE during the dry season due to the larger amount of aerosols from biomass burning compared with urban pollution. High values of AAE are also observed during the wet season, attributed to the presence of long-range transport of aerosols from Africa. The SAE for all the sites are lower during the wet season, with the dominance of large biological particles, and increases during the dry season as a consequence of fine particles emitted from both biomass and fossil fuel burning. The AOD at T0e and T3 (Jan-Jun/2014) showed very similar values ranging from 0.05 to

  7. Absorption Properties of Mediterranean Aerosols Obtained from Multi-year Ground-based and Satellite Remote Sensing Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallet, M.; Dubovik, O.; Nabat, P.; Dulac, F.; Kahn, R.; Sciare, J.; Paronis, D.; Leon, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol absorption properties are of high importance to assess aerosol impact on regional climate. This study presents an analysis of aerosol absorption products obtained over the Mediterranean Basin or land stations in the region from multi-year ground-based AERONET and satellite observations with a focus on the Absorbing Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and their spectral dependence. The AAOD and Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) data set is composed of daily averaged AERONET level 2 data from a total of 22 Mediterranean stations having long time series, mainly under the influence of urban-industrial aerosols and/or soil dust. This data set covers the 17 yr period 1996-2012 with most data being from 2003-2011 (approximately 89 percent of level-2 AAOD data). Since AERONET level-2 absorption products require a high aerosol load (AOD at 440 nm greater than 0.4), which is most often related to the presence of desert dust, we also consider level-1.5 SSA data, despite their higher uncertainty, and filter out data with an Angstrom exponent less than 1.0 in order to study absorption by carbonaceous aerosols. The SSA data set includes both AERONET level-2 and satellite level-3 products. Satellite-derived SSA data considered are monthly level 3 products mapped at the regional scale for the spring and summer seasons that exhibit the largest aerosol loads. The satellite SSA dataset includes the following products: (i) Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) over 2000-2011, (ii) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) near-UV algorithm over 2004-2010, and (iii) MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep-Blue algorithm over 2005-2011, derived only over land in dusty conditions. Sun-photometer observations show that values of AAOD at 440 nm vary between 0.024 +/- 0.01 (resp. 0.040 +/- 0.01) and 0.050 +/- 0.01 (0.055 +/- 0.01) for urban (dusty) sites. Analysis shows that the Mediterranean urban-industrial aerosols appear "moderately

  8. Universality of modulation length and time exponents.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Saurish; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir; Seidel, Alexander; Nussinov, Zohar

    2012-10-01

    We study systems with a crossover parameter λ, such as the temperature T, which has a threshold value λ(*) across which the correlation function changes from exhibiting fixed wavelength (or time period) modulations to continuously varying modulation lengths (or times). We introduce a hitherto unknown exponent ν(L) characterizing the universal nature of this crossover and compute its value in general instances. This exponent, similar to standard correlation length exponents, is obtained from motion of the poles of the momentum (or frequency) space correlation functions in the complex k-plane (or ω-plane) as the parameter λ is varied. Near the crossover (i.e., for λ→λ(*)), the characteristic modulation wave vector K(R) in the variable modulation length "phase" is related to that in the fixed modulation length "phase" q via |K(R)-q|[proportionality]|T-T(*)|(νL). We find, in general, that ν(L)=1/2. In some special instances, ν(L) may attain other rational values. We extend this result to general problems in which the eigenvalue of an operator or a pole characterizing general response functions may attain a constant real (or imaginary) part beyond a particular threshold value λ(*). We discuss extensions of this result to multiple other arenas. These include the axial next-nearest-neighbor Ising (ANNNI) model. By extending our considerations, we comment on relations pertaining not only to the modulation lengths (or times), but also to the standard correlation lengths (or times). We introduce the notion of a Josephson time scale. We comment on the presence of aperiodic "chaotic" modulations in "soft-spin" and other systems. These relate to glass-type features. We discuss applications to Fermi systems, with particular application to metal to band insulator transitions, change of Fermi surface topology, divergent effective masses, Dirac systems, and topological insulators. Both regular periodic and glassy (and spatially chaotic behavior) may be found in

  9. Diverging Fluctuations of the Lyapunov Exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazó, Diego; López, Juan M.; Politi, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We show that in generic one-dimensional Hamiltonian lattices the diffusion coefficient of the maximum Lyapunov exponent diverges in the thermodynamic limit. We trace this back to the long-range correlations associated with the evolution of the hydrodynamic modes. In the case of normal heat transport, the divergence is even stronger, leading to the breakdown of the usual single-function Family-Vicsek scaling ansatz. A similar scenario is expected to arise in the evolution of rough interfaces in the presence of suitably correlated background noise.

  10. The Lyapunov characteristic exponents and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froeschle, C.

    Lyapunov exponents (LE) are developed for the divergence of periodic orbits to delimit stochastic conditions within the framework of ergodic theory. A general periodic orbit is explored and LEs are derived in connection with Hamiltonian systems. Relationships between Kolmogorov entropy and LEs are discussed and numerical techniques are defined for calculating LEs, noting that beyond three degrees of freedom LEs are the only available means for estimating stochasticity. Finally, sample calculations are performed for the chaotic motion of a one-dimensional invertible map and for various dimensions of chaotic attractors, including the case of fractal dimensions.

  11. Optimal transport exponent in spatially embedded networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Reis, S. D. S.; Moreira, A. A.; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.

    2013-04-01

    The imposition of a cost constraint for constructing the optimal navigation structure surely represents a crucial ingredient in the design and development of any realistic navigation network. Previous works have focused on optimal transport in small-world networks built from two-dimensional lattices by adding long-range connections with Manhattan length rij taken from the distribution Pij˜rij-α, where α is a variable exponent. It has been shown that, by introducing a cost constraint on the total length of the additional links, regardless of the strategy used by the traveler (independent of whether it is based on local or global knowledge of the network structure), the best transportation condition is obtained with an exponent α=d+1, where d is the dimension of the underlying lattice. Here we present further support, through a high-performance real-time algorithm, on the validity of this conjecture in three-dimensional regular as well as in two-dimensional critical percolation clusters. Our results clearly indicate that cost constraint in the navigation problem provides a proper theoretical framework to justify the evolving topologies of real complex network structures, as recently demonstrated for the networks of the US airports and the human brain activity.

  12. Scale-free networks with exponent one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timár, G.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2016-08-01

    A majority of studied models for scale-free networks have degree distributions with exponents greater than two. Real networks, however, can demonstrate essentially more heavy-tailed degree distributions. We explore two models of scale-free equilibrium networks that have the degree distribution exponent γ =1 , P (q ) ˜q-γ . Such degree distributions can be identified in empirical data only if the mean degree of a network is sufficiently high. Our models exploit a rewiring mechanism. They are local in the sense that no knowledge of the network structure, apart from the immediate neighborhood of the vertices, is required. These models generate uncorrelated networks in the infinite size limit, where they are solved explicitly. We investigate finite size effects by the use of simulations. We find that both models exhibit disassortative degree-degree correlations for finite network sizes. In addition, we observe a markedly degree-dependent clustering in the finite networks. We indicate a real-world network with a similar degree distribution.

  13. Photoelectron holographic studies of As/Si(100) with sub-angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Paul J. E.; Miller, T.; Chiang, T.-C.

    2001-09-15

    The atomic structure of As-terminated Si(100) has been studied using the technique of derivative photoelectron holography. The resulting holographic images clearly resolve a 0.5-{angstrom} shift from the (1 x 1) geometry for each As atom as a result of dimerization. Detecting this shift requires a sub-angstrom resolution that has been difficult to achieve using photoelectron holography. The improvement in resolution can be attributed to a highly anisotropic electron-scattering factor resulting in an emission beacon that helps define the atomic images.

  14. Ultrahigh-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy with Sub-Angstrom-Sized Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, E.; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2005-01-01

    The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with an annular dark-field (ADF) detector provides atomic-resolution incoherent images, whose resolution is dominated, to a good approximation, by the size of convergent electron beams. Improving a spherical aberration of microscope objective lenses has been successful in converging the beam into sub-angstrom scale, promising a remarkably higher resolution for STEM. Here we describe the performance of aberration-corrected 300kV-STEM-the world-best STEM available today. The results clearly demonstrate that a sub-angstrom resolution has been indeed achieved for not only simple structures but also structurally complex systems (quasicrystals).

  15. Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption Properties from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jethva, H.; Ahn, Chang-Woo

    2012-01-01

    The Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE) is a parameter commonly used to characterize the wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD). It is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses multi-spectral measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measurement can be explained, using an approximations of Beer's Law (BL), as the upwelling reflectance at the cloud top attenuated by the absorption effects of the overlying aerosol layer. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud-top in an aerosol-free atmospheric column is mainly a function of cloud optical depth (COD). In the proposed method of AAE derivation, the first step is determining COD which is retrieved using a previously developed color-ratio based approach. In the second step, corrections for molecular scattering effects are applied to both the observed ad the calculated cloud reflectance terms, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by an inversion of the BL approximation. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results making use of OMI multi-spectral measurements in the UV-Vis. will be presented.

  16. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  17. Nonperturbative moduli superpotential with positive exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Seto, Osamu

    2008-07-01

    We study nonperturbative moduli superpotentials with positive exponents, i.e. the form like AeaT with a positive constant a and the modulus T. These effects can be generated, e.g., by D-branes which have negative Ramond-Ramond charge of the lower-dimensional D-brane. The scalar potentials including such terms have quite a rich structure. There are several local minima with different potential energies and a high barrier, whose height is of O(Mp4). We discuss their implications from the viewpoints of cosmology and particle phenomenology, e.g. the realization of inflation models, avoiding the overshooting problem. This type of potential would be useful to realize the inflation and low-energy supersymmetry breaking.

  18. Sub-Angstrom Atomic-Resolution Imaging of Heavy Atoms to Light Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2003-05-23

    Three decades ago John Cowley and his group at ASU achieved high-resolution electron microscope images showing the crystal unit cell contents at better than 4Angstrom resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with Cs-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Ultrafast Hydration Structure and Dynamics at Sub-Angstrom Lengthscales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coridan, Robert Henry

    2009-01-01

    This thesis outlines how meV-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering and causality-enforcing mathematics can be used to measure the dynamical density-density linear response function for liquid water with Angstrom spatial resolution and 50fs temporal resolution. The results are compared to high-resolution spectroscopic and scattering experiments and…

  20. Field calibration of multi-scattering correction factor for aethalometer aerosol absorption coefficient during CAPMEX Campaign, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.; Yoon, S. C.; Park, R.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Filter-based instrument, such as aethalometer, is being widely used to measure equivalent black carbon(EBC) mass concentration and aerosol absorption coefficient(AAC). However, many other previous studies have poited that AAC and its aerosol absorption angstrom exponent(AAE) are strongly affected by the multi-scattering correction factor(C) when we retrieve AAC from aethalometer EBC mass concentration measurement(Weingartner et al., 2003; Arnott et al., 2005; Schmid et al., 2006; Coen et al., 2010). We determined the C value using the method given in Weingartner et al. (2003) by comparing 7-wavelngth aethalometer (AE-31, Magee sci.) to 3-wavelength Photo-Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3, DMT) at Gosan climate observatory, Korea(GCO) during Cheju ABC plume-asian monsoon experiment(CAPMEX) campaign(August and September, 2008). In this study, C was estimated to be 4.04 ± 1.68 at 532 nm and AAC retrieved with this value was decreased as approximately 100% as than that retrieved with soot case value from Weingartner et al (2003). We compared the AAC determined from aethalomter measurements to that from collocated Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measurements from January 2012 to December 2013 at GCO and found good agreement in both AAC and AAE. This result suggests the determination of site-specific C is crucially needed when we calculate AAC from aethalometer measurements.

  1. Scaling of Lyapunov Exponents in Homogeneous, Isotropic DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Nicholas; Malaya, Nicholas; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Lyapunov exponents measure the rate of separation of initially infinitesimally close trajectories in a chaotic system. Using the exponents, we are able to probe the chaotic nature of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and study the instabilities of the chaotic field. The exponents are measured by calculating the instantaneous growth rate of a linear disturbance, evolved with the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, at each time step. In this talk, we examine these exponents in the context of homogeneous isotropic turbulence with two goals: 1) to investigate the scaling of the exponents with respect to the parameters of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and 2) to characterize the instabilities that lead to chaos in turbulence. Specifically, we explore the scaling of the Lyapunov exponents with respect to the Reynolds number and with respect to the ratio of the integral length scale and the computational domain size.

  2. Power law exponents characterizing human DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provata, A.; Oikonomou, Th.

    2007-05-01

    The size distributions of all known coding and noncoding DNA sequences are studied in all human chromosomes. In a unified approach, both introns and intergenic regions are treated as noncoding regions. The distributions of noncoding segments Pnc(S) of size S present long tails Pnc(S)˜S-1-μnc , with exponents μnc ranging between 0.71 (for chromosome 13) and 1.2 (for chromosome 19). On the contrary, the exponential, short-range decay terms dominate in the distributions of coding (exon) segments Pc(S) in all chromosomes. Aiming to address the emergence of these statistical features, minimal, stochastic, mean-field models are proposed, based on randomly aggregating DNA strings with duplication, influx and outflux of genomic segments. These minimal models produce both the short-range statistics in the coding and the observed power law and fractal statistics in the noncoding DNA. The minimal models also demonstrate that although the two systems (coding and noncoding) coexist, alternating on the same linear chain, they act independently: the coding as a closed, equilibrium system and the noncoding as an open, out-of-equilibrium one.

  3. Geometric Exponents of Dilute Loop Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencher, Guillaume; Saint-Aubin, Yvan; Pearce, Paul A.; Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2012-04-01

    The fractal dimensions of the hull, the external perimeter and of the red bonds are measured through Monte Carlo simulations for dilute minimal models, and compared with predictions from conformal field theory and SLE methods. The dilute models used are those first introduced by Nienhuis. Their loop fugacity is β=-2 \\cos(π/bar{kappa}) where the parameter bar{kappa} is linked to their description through conformal loop ensembles. It is also linked to conformal field theories through their central charges c(bar{kappa})=13-6(bar{kappa}+bar{kappa}^{-1}) and, for the minimal models of interest here, bar{kappa}=p/p' where p and p' are two coprime integers. The geometric exponents of the hull and external perimeter are studied for the pairs ( p, p')=(1,1),(2,3),(3,4),(4,5),(5,6),(5,7), and that of the red bonds for ( p, p')=(3,4). Monte Carlo upgrades are proposed for these models as well as several techniques to improve their speeds. The measured fractal dimensions are obtained by extrapolation on the lattice size H, V→∞. The extrapolating curves have large slopes; despite these, the measured dimensions coincide with theoretical predictions up to three or four digits. In some cases, the theoretical values lie slightly outside the confidence intervals; explanations of these small discrepancies are proposed.

  4. Hurst exponents for short time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jingchao; Yang, Huijie

    2011-12-01

    A concept called balanced estimator of diffusion entropy is proposed to detect quantitatively scalings in short time series. The effectiveness is verified by detecting successfully scaling properties for a large number of artificial fractional Brownian motions. Calculations show that this method can give reliable scalings for short time series with length ˜102. It is also used to detect scalings in the Shanghai Stock Index, five stock catalogs, and a total of 134 stocks collected from the Shanghai Stock Exchange Market. The scaling exponent for each catalog is significantly larger compared with that for the stocks included in the catalog. Selecting a window with size 650, the evolution of scaling for the Shanghai Stock Index is obtained by the window's sliding along the series. Global patterns in the evolutionary process are captured from the smoothed evolutionary curve. By comparing the patterns with the important event list in the history of the considered stock market, the evolution of scaling is matched with the stock index series. We can find that the important events fit very well with global transitions of the scaling behaviors.

  5. Fractal aircraft trajectories and nonclassical turbulent exponents.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, S; Schertzer, D; Tuck, A F

    2004-09-01

    The dimension (D) of aircraft trajectories is fundamental in interpreting airborne data. To estimate D, we studied data from 18 trajectories of stratospheric aircraft flights 1600 km long taken during a "Mach cruise" (near constant Mach number) autopilot flight mode of the ER-2 research aircraft. Mach cruise implies correlated temperature and wind fluctuations so that DeltaZ approximately Deltax (H(z) ) where Z is the (fluctuating) vertical and x the horizontal coordinate of the aircraft. Over the range approximately 3-300 km , we found H(z) approximately 0.58+/-0.02 close to the theoretical 5/9=0.56 and implying D=1+ H(z) =14/9 , i.e., the trajectories are fractal. For distances <3 km aircraft inertia smooths the trajectories, for distances >300 km , D=1 again because of a rise of 1 m/km due to fuel consumption. In the fractal regime, the horizontal velocity and temperature exponents are close to the nonclassical value 1/2 (rather than 1/3 ). We discuss implications for aircraft measurements as well as for the structure of the atmosphere.

  6. Development and applications of optical interferometric micrometrology in the angstrom and subangstrom range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, James L.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1988-01-01

    The recent development of the scanning electron tunneling microscope and the atomic force microscope requires absolute standards for measurements in the angstrom and subangstrom range. Optical interferometry with lasers and multiple mode laser resonances can provide absolute measurements as the laser wavelengths are very accurately known. A key feature of such measurements is the use of piezoelectric crystals as translators of the highest accuracy for very small disturbances. However, the dimensional changes of these crystals resulting from electrical potential changes depend on many variables, among them the method of mounting, so that accurate calibrations are necessary. Starting from advances in optical metrology made by physicists trying to find gravity waves, advances which led to measurements down to 10 to the -5 A, the author designed and built a much simpler system for the angstrom range. The major limiting factors were mechanical vibrations, air currents, thermal changes and laser instabilities.

  7. Emission Line Spectra in the Soft X-ray Region 20 - 75 Angstroms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EDIT-II, emission lines of argon and sulfur in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet region were studied. Observations of Ar IX through Ar XVI and S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 Angstrom are presented to illustrate our work.

  8. THE Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign DOUBLET AS AN AGE INDICATOR IN LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlieder, Joshua E.; Simon, Michal; Lepine, Sebastien; Rice, Emily; Fielding, Drummond; Tomasino, Rachael E-mail: schlieder@mpia-hd.mpg.de E-mail: erice@amnh.org E-mail: tomas1r@cmich.edu

    2012-05-15

    We investigate the use of the gravity sensitive neutral sodium (Na I) doublet at 8183 Angstrom-Sign and 8195 Angstrom-Sign (Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign doublet) as an age indicator for M dwarfs. We measured the Na doublet equivalent width (EW) in giants, old dwarfs, young dwarfs, and candidate members of the {beta} Pic moving group using medium-resolution spectra. Our Na 8200 A doublet EW analysis shows that the feature is useful as an approximate age indicator in M-type dwarfs with (V - K{sub s}) {>=} 5.0, reliably distinguishing stars older and younger than 100 Myr. A simple derivation of the dependence of the Na EW on temperature and gravity supports the observational results. An analysis of the effects of metallicity shows that this youth indicator is best used on samples with similar metallicity. The age estimation technique presented here becomes useful in a mass regime where traditional youth indicators are increasingly less reliable, is applicable to other alkali lines, and will help identify new low-mass members in other young clusters and associations.

  9. Calculating Lyapunov Exponents: Applying Products and Evaluating Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Two common examples of one-dimensional maps (the tent map and the logistic map) are generalized to cases where they have more than one control parameter. In the case of the tent map, this still allows the global Lyapunov exponent to be found analytically, and permits various properties of the resulting global Lyapunov exponents to be investigated…

  10. A finite-time exponent for random Ehrenfest gas

    SciTech Connect

    Moudgalya, Sanjay; Chandra, Sarthak; Jain, Sudhir R.

    2015-10-15

    We consider the motion of a system of free particles moving on a plane with regular hard polygonal scatterers arranged in a random manner. Calling this the Ehrenfest gas, which is known to have a zero Lyapunov exponent, we propose a finite-time exponent to characterize its dynamics. As the number of sides of the polygon goes to infinity, when polygon tends to a circle, we recover the usual Lyapunov exponent for the Lorentz gas from the exponent proposed here. To obtain this result, we generalize the reflection law of a beam of rays incident on a polygonal scatterer in a way that the formula for the circular scatterer is recovered in the limit of infinite number of vertices. Thus, chaos emerges from pseudochaos in an appropriate limit. - Highlights: • We present a finite-time exponent for particles moving in a plane containing polygonal scatterers. • The exponent found recovers the Lyapunov exponent in the limit of the polygon becoming a circle. • Our findings unify pseudointegrable and chaotic scattering via a generalized collision rule. • Stretch and fold:shuffle and cut :: Lyapunov:finite-time exponent :: fluid:granular mixing.

  11. Littlewood-Paley operators on Morrey spaces with variable exponent.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shuangping; Wang, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    By applying the vector-valued inequalities for the Littlewood-Paley operators and their commutators on Lebesgue spaces with variable exponent, the boundedness of the Littlewood-Paley operators, including the Lusin area integrals, the Littlewood-Paley g-functions and g μ *-functions, and their commutators generated by BMO functions, is obtained on the Morrey spaces with variable exponent.

  12. The impact of biogenic carbon emissions on aerosol absorption inMexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, N; Gaffney, J; Tackett, M J; Sturchio, N; Hearty, L; Martinez, N; Hardy, K D; Machany-Rivera, A; Guilderson, T P; MacMillan, A; Steelman, K

    2009-02-24

    In order to determine the wavelength dependence of atmospheric aerosol absorption in the Mexico City area, the absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs) were calculated from aerosol absorption measurements at seven wavelengths obtained with a seven-channel aethalometer during two field campaigns, the Mexico City Metropolitan Area study in April 2003 (MCMA 2003) and the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The AAEs varied from 0.76 to 1.56 in 2003 and from 0.54 to 1.52 in 2006. The AAE values determined in the afternoon were consistently higher than the corresponding morning values, suggesting the photochemical formation of absorbing secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the afternoon. The AAE values were compared to stable and radiocarbon isotopic measurements of aerosol samples collected at the same time to determine the sources of the aerosol carbon. The fraction of modern carbon (fM) in the aerosol samples, as determined from {sup 14}C analysis, showed that 70% of the carbonaceous aerosols in Mexico City were from modern sources, indicating a significant impact from biomass burning during both field campaigns. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of the aerosol samples illustrate the significant impact of Yucatan forest fires (C-3 plants) in 2003 and local grass fires (C-4 plants) at site T1 in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and calculated aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

  13. Universality of persistence exponents in two-dimensional Ostwald ripening.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Jordi; Braslavsky, Ido; Xu, Di; Krichevsky, Oleg; Stavans, Joel

    2009-11-27

    We measured persistence exponents theta(phi) of Ostwald ripening in two dimensions, as a function of the area fraction phi occupied by coarsening domains. The values of theta(phi) in two systems, succinonitrile and brine, quenched to their liquid-solid coexistence region, compare well with one another, providing compelling evidence for the universality of the one-parameter family of exponents. For small phi, theta(phi) approximately = 0.39phi, as predicted by a model that assumes no correlations between evolving domains. These constitute the first measurements of persistence exponents in the case of phase transitions with a conserved order parameter.

  14. Studies of hot B subdwarfs. Part 2: Energy distributions of three bright sdB/sdOB stars in the 950-5500 angstrom range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesemael, F.; Holberg, J. B.; Veilleux, S.; Lamontagne, R.; Fontaine, G.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the subdwarf B or OB stars HD 205805, UV 1758+36 and Feige 66 are presented. All three objects display the H I Layman series in absorption. These observations are combined with low dispersion IUE spectrophotometry and with Stroemgren photometry to construct virtually complete energy distributions, which extend over the range 950-5500 angstroms. Effective temperatures based on model atmosphere calculations for high gravity, hydrogen rich stars are determined. Our analyses yield T Sub e 28,200 + or - 1300 K for HD 205805, T sub e 31, 800 + or - 1100 K for UV 1758+36, and T sub e 35,700 + or - 1500 K for Feige 66. The importance of far ultraviolet observations below L sub alpha in reducing the uncertainties associated with the interstellar extinction and the degradation of the IUE sensitivity is emphasized.

  15. Structure of Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase from Staphylococcus aureus at 1.54 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett,T.; Wallen, J.; Karplus, P.; Sakai, H.; Tsukihara, T.; Claiborne, A.

    2006-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoASH) replaces glutathione as the major low molecular weight thiol in Staphylococcus aureus; it is maintained in the reduced state by coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR), a homodimeric enzyme similar to NADH peroxidase but containing a novel Cys43-SSCoA redox center. The crystal structure of S. aureus CoADR has been solved using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at a resolution of 1.54 {angstrom}. The resulting electron density maps define the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide conformation, with Cys43-S{gamma} located at the flavin si face, 3.2 {angstrom} from FAD-C4aF, and the CoAS- moiety lying in an extended conformation within a cleft at the dimer interface. A well-ordered chloride ion is positioned adjacent to the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide and receives a hydrogen bond from Tyr361'-OH of the complementary subunit, suggesting a role for Tyr361' as an acid-base catalyst during the reduction of CoAS-disulfide. Tyr419'-OH is located 3.2 {angstrom} from Tyr361'-OH as well and, based on its conservation in known functional CoADRs, also appears to be important for activity. Identification of residues involved in recognition of the CoAS-disulfide substrate and in formation and stabilization of the Cys43-SSCoA redox center has allowed development of a CoAS-binding motif. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that CoADR enzymes are broadly distributed in both bacterial and archaeal kingdoms, suggesting an even broader significance for the CoASH/CoAS-disulfide redox system in prokaryotic thiol/disulfide homeostasis.

  16. High-resolution crystal spectrometer for the 10-60 (angstrom) EUV region

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Goddard, R; Wargelin, B J

    2004-02-20

    A vacuum crystal spectrometer with nominal resolving power approaching 1000 is described for measuring emission lines with wavelength in the extreme ultraviolet region up to 60 Angstroms. The instrument utilizes a flat octadecyl hydrogen maleate (OHM) crystal and a thin-window 1-D position-sensitive gas proportional detector. This detector employs a 1 {micro}m-thick 100 x8 mm{sup 2} aluminized polyimide window and operates at one atmosphere pressure. The spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps. The performance of the instrument is illustrated in measurements of the newly discovered magnetic field-sensitive line in Ar{sup 8+}.

  17. Experimental and numerical study of the intermittency exponent mu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander

    1994-01-01

    After publication of the Kolmogorov refined similarity hypotheses, the small-scale intermittency of the energy dissipation field became a central problem in fully developed turbulence (FDT). This phenomenon has been studied in many different ways, e.g. by searching for corrections to scaling exponents in the inertial range velocity structure functions. A direct measure of this intermittency is, however, available by studying the local rate of energy dissipation, and it may be quantitatively characterized by the intermittency exponent mu. As far as we know, nobody has posed an obvious question: Is the intermittency exponent mu a unique constant, i.e., are the values mu(sub kappa), mu(sub epsilon), mu(sub r), mu(sub b), and mu(sub e) the same at high Reynolds numbers, or do they create a set of different (and perhaps independent) exponents? This paper addresses the above question using the high Reynolds number experiments.

  18. Asymptotic expansions of Feynman integrals of exponentials with polynomial exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtseva, A. K.; Smolyanov, O. G.; Shavgulidze, E. T.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper, an asymptotic expansion of path integrals of functionals having exponential form with polynomials in the exponent is constructed. The definition of the path integral in the sense of analytic continuation is considered.

  19. Reduction of Aerosol Absorption in Beijing Since 2007 from MODIS and AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Chin, M.; Streets, D. G.; Lu, Z.; Kahn, R.; Slutsker, I.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.; Tanre, D.; Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.-B.; Sinyuk, A.; Wang, Y.; Korkin, S.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the time series of MODIS-based and AERONET aerosol records over Beijing reveals two distinct periods, before and after 2007. The MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua satellites were processed with the new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. A comparison of MAIAC and AERONET AOT shows that whereas MAIAC consistently underestimated peak AOT values by 10-20% in the prior period, the bias mostly disappears after mid- 2007. Independent analysis of the AERONET dataset reveals little or no change in the effective radii of the fine and coarse fractions and of the Angstrom exponent. At the same time, it shows an increasing trend in the single scattering albedo, by 0.02 in 9 years. As MAIAC was using the same aerosol model for the entire 2000-2010 period, the decrease in AOT bias after 2007 can be explained only by a corresponding decrease of aerosol absorption caused by a reduction in local black carbon emissions. The observed changes correlate in time with the Chinese government's broad measures to improve air quality in Beijing during preparations for the Summer Olympics of 2008.

  20. Reduction of Aerosol Absorption in Beijing Since 2007 from MODIS and AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Chin, M.; Streets, D. G.; Lu, Z.; Kahn, R.; Slutsker, I.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.; Tanre, D.; Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.-B.; Sinyuk, A.; Wang, Y.; Korkin, S.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the time series of MODIS-based and AERONET aerosol records over Beijing reveals two distinct periods, before and after 2007. The MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua satellites were processed with the new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. A comparison of MAIAC and AERONET AOT shows that whereas MAIAC consistently underestimated peak AOT values by 10-20% in the prior period, the bias mostly disappears after mid-2007. Independent analysis of the AERONET dataset reveals little or no change in the effective radii of the fine and coarse fractions and of the Angstrom exponent. At the same time, it shows an increasing trend in the single scattering albedo, by approx.0.02 in 9 years. As MAIAC was using the same aerosol model for the entire 2000-2010 period, the decrease in AOT bias after 2007 can be explained only by a corresponding decrease of aerosol absorption caused by a reduction in local black carbon emissions. The observed changes correlate in time with the Chinese government's broad measures to improve air quality in Beijing during preparations for the Summer Olympics of 2008.

  1. Sample and population exponents of generalized Taylor’s law

    PubMed Central

    Giometto, Andrea; Formentin, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea; Cohen, Joel E.; Maritan, Amos

    2015-01-01

    Taylor’s law (TL) states that the variance V of a nonnegative random variable is a power function of its mean M; i.e., V=aMb. TL has been verified extensively in ecology, where it applies to population abundance, physics, and other natural sciences. Its ubiquitous empirical verification suggests a context-independent mechanism. Sample exponents b measured empirically via the scaling of sample mean and variance typically cluster around the value b=2. Some theoretical models of population growth, however, predict a broad range of values for the population exponent b pertaining to the mean and variance of population density, depending on details of the growth process. Is the widely reported sample exponent b≃2 the result of ecological processes or could it be a statistical artifact? Here, we apply large deviations theory and finite-sample arguments to show exactly that in a broad class of growth models the sample exponent is b≃2 regardless of the underlying population exponent. We derive a generalized TL in terms of sample and population exponents bjk for the scaling of the kth vs. the jth cumulants. The sample exponent bjk depends predictably on the number of samples and for finite samples we obtain bjk≃k/j asymptotically in time, a prediction that we verify in two empirical examples. Thus, the sample exponent b≃2 may indeed be a statistical artifact and not dependent on population dynamics under conditions that we specify exactly. Given the broad class of models investigated, our results apply to many fields where TL is used although inadequately understood. PMID:25941384

  2. Breaking the Attosecond, Angstrom and TV/M Field Barriers with Ultra-Fast Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, James; Andonian, Gerard; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Hemsing, Erik; Marcus, Gabriel; Marinelli, Agostino; Musumeci, Pietro; O'Shea, Brendan; O'Shea, Finn; Pellegrini, Claudio; Schiller, David; Travish, Gil; Bucksbaum, Philip; Hogan, Mark; Krejcik, Patrick; Ferrario, Massimo; Full, Steven; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-06-22

    Recent initiatives at UCLA concerning ultra-short, GeV electron beam generation have been aimed at achieving sub-fs pulses capable of driving X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) in single-spike mode. This use of very low Q beams may allow existing FEL injectors to produce few-100 attosecond pulses, with very high brightness. Towards this end, recent experiments at the LCLS have produced {approx}2 fs, 20 pC electron pulses. We discuss here extensions of this work, in which we seek to exploit the beam brightness in FELs, in tandem with new developments in cryogenic undulator technology, to create compact accelerator-undulator systems that can lase below 0.15 {angstrom}, or be used to permit 1.5 {angstrom} operation at 4.5 GeV. In addition, we are now developing experiments which use the present LCLS fs pulses to excite plasma wakefields exceeding 1 TV/m, permitting a table-top TeV accelerator for frontier high energy physics applications.

  3. Slow dynamics in glycerol: collective de gennes narrowing and independent angstrom motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Makina; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Ryo; Kurokuzu, Masayuki; Kitao, Shinji; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Seto, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    The slow dynamics of microscopic density correlations in supercooled glycerol was studied by time-domain interferometry using 57Fe-nuclear resonant scattering gamma rays of synchrotron radiation. The dependence of the relaxation time at 250 K on the momentum transfer q is maximum near the first peak of the static structure factor S( q) at q ˜ 15 nm -1. The q-dependent behavior of the relaxation time known as de Gennes narrowing was confirmed in glycerol. Conversely, de Gennes narrowing around the second and third peaks of S( q) at q ˜ 26 nm -1 and 54 nm -1 was not detected. The q dependence of the relaxation time was found to follow a power-law equation with power-law index of 1.9(2) in the q region well above the first peak of S( q) up to ˜ 60 nm -1, which corresponds to angstrom scale, within experimental error. This suggests that in the angstrom-scale dynamics of supercooled glycerol, independent motions dominate over collective motion.

  4. Streptococcus pneumonia YlxR at 1.35 {angstrom} shows a putative new fold.

    SciTech Connect

    Osipiuk, J.; Gornicki, P.; Maj, L.; Dementieva, I.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2001-11-01

    The structure of the YlxR protein of unknown function from Streptococcus pneumonia was determined to 1.35 Angstroms. YlxR is expressed from the nusA/infB operon in bacteria and belongs to a small protein family (COG2740) that shares a conserved sequence motif GRGA(Y/W). The family shows no significant amino-acid sequence similarity with other proteins. Three-wavelength diffraction MAD data were collected to 1.7 Angstroms from orthorhombic crystals using synchrotron radiation and the structure was determined using a semi-automated approach. The YlxR structure resembles a two-layer {alpha}/{beta} sandwich with the overall shape of a cylinder and shows no structural homology to proteins of known structure. Structural analysis revealed that the YlxR structure represents a new protein fold that belongs to the {alpha}-{beta} plait superfamily. The distribution of the electrostatic surface potential shows a large positively charged patch on one side of the protein, a feature often found in nucleic acid-binding proteins. Three sulfate ions bind to this positively charged surface. Analysis of potential binding sites uncovered several substantial clefts, with the largest spanning 3/4 of the protein. A similar distribution of binding sites and a large sharply bent cleft are observed in RNA-binding proteins that are unrelated in sequence and structure. It is proposed that YlxR is an RNA-binding protein.

  5. Quartz Microbalance Study of 400-angstrom Thick Films near the lambda Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Moses H. W.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent measurement we observed the thinning of an adsorbed helium film induced by the confinement of critical fluctuations a few millikelvin below the lambda point. A capacitor set-up was used to measure this Casimir effect. In this poster we will present our measurement of an adsorbed helium film of 400 angstroms near the lambda point with a quartz microbalance. For films this thick, we must take into account the non-linear dynamics of the shear waves in the fluid. In spite of the added complications, we were able to confirm the thinning of the film due to the Casimir effect and the onset of the superfluid transition. In addition, we observe a sharp anomaly at the bulk lambda point, most likely related to critical dissipation of the first sound. This work is carried out in collaboration with Rafael Garcia, Stephen Jordon and John Lazzaretti. This work is funded by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research under grant.

  6. Design of sub-Angstrom compact free-electron laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Rodolfo; Fares, Hesham; Ferrario, Massimo; McNeil, Brian W. J.; Robb, Gordon, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose for first time practical parameters to construct a compact sub-Angstrom Free Electron Laser (FEL) based on Compton backscattering. Our recipe is based on using picocoulomb electron bunch, enabling very low emittance and ultracold electron beam. We assume the FEL is operating in a quantum regime of Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). The fundamental quantum feature is a significantly narrower spectrum of the emitted radiation relative to classical SASE. The quantum regime of the SASE FEL is reached when the momentum spread of the electron beam is smaller than the photon recoil momentum. Following the formulae describing SASE FEL operation, realistic designs for quantum FEL experiments are proposed. We discuss the practical constraints that influence the experimental parameters. Numerical simulations of power spectra and intensities are presented and attractive radiation characteristics such as high flux, narrow linewidth, and short pulse structure are demonstrated.

  7. Membrane of Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanoplates with Angstrom-Level Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeongho; Li, Kunzhou; Yoon, Hong Sik; Yoon, Jeyong; Mok, Yeongbong; Lee, Yan; Lee, Hong H.; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2016-01-01

    Membranes with atomic level pores or constrictions are valuable for separation and catalysis. We report a graphene-based membrane with an interlayer spacing of 3.7 angstrom (Å). When graphene oxide nanoplates are functionalized and then reduced, the laminated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplates or functionalized rGO membrane is little affected by an intercalated fluid, and the interlayer spacing of 3.7 Å increases only to 4.4 Å in wetted state, in contrast to the graphene oxide (GO) membrane whose interlayer spacing increases from 9 Å to 13 Å in wetted state. When applied to ion separation, this membrane reduced the permeation rate of small ions such as K+ and Na+ by three orders of magnitude compared to the GO membrane. PMID:27306853

  8. Inner-Shell Photon-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45(Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Snavely, R; Da Silva, L

    2002-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Lab Wide (LW) project entitled, ''An Inner-Shell Photo-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45 {angstrom}'', tracking code 99-LW-042. The most significant accomplishments of this project include the design of a suitable x-ray laser target, the invention of a measurement technique for the determination of rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 femtoseconds, and a novel setup for generating a traveling wave with an ultrashort optical laser pulse. The pump probe technique for rise time measurement will allow us to detect ultrashort x-ray pulses, whose generation by means of a variety of 4th generation light sources is currently under planning elsewhere.

  9. Cesium Diffusion through Angstrom-Scale Open Spaces in Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Koichiro; Sato, Kiminori; Nakata, Masataka

    2017-03-01

    Saponite clay minerals possess the local molecular structures, where one and two nanosheets are inserted into interlayer spaces forming open spaces with their sizes of ˜3 and ˜9 Å, respectively. Here, Cs diffusion via the above-mentioned open spaces is highlighted based on the results of open space analysis using positronium (Ps) lifetime spectroscopy coupled with a conventional diffusion experiment. A population of Cs is found to significantly migrate in the saponite clay yielding a diffusion coefficient of ˜2.0 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 with an application of Fick's second law, which arises from overall diffusion contributed from open spaces with a variety of sizes. On the other hand, the diffusion coefficient solely attributable to the angstrom-scale open space is ˜2.5 × 10-8 cm2 s-1, which amounts to more than ˜10% than that of overall diffusion.

  10. UV absorption of the in-bore plasma emission from an EML using polycarbonate insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Clothiaux, E.J. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the in-bore continuum emission spectrum, laced by absorption lines, observed to be completely cutoff for wavelengths shorter than about 3000 {Angstrom}. This cutoff wavelength is seen to occur at longer wavelengths as the plasma armature moves down the launcher bore. A mechanism for the absorption of shortwave radiation by ablated and evaporated bore materials is given.

  11. Angstrom-resolved real-time dissection of electrochemically active noble metal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Buddha R; Baimpos, Theodoros; Raman, Sangeetha; Valtiner, Markus

    2014-06-24

    Electrochemical solid|liquid interfaces are critically important for technological applications and materials for energy storage, harvesting, and conversion. Yet, a real-time Angstrom-resolved visualization of dynamic processes at electrified solid|liquid interfaces has not been feasible. Here we report a unique real-time atomistic view into dynamic processes at electrochemically active metal interfaces using white light interferometry in an electrochemical surface forces apparatus. This method allows simultaneous deciphering of both sides of an electrochemical interface-the solution and the metal side-with microsecond resolution under dynamically evolving reactive conditions that are inherent to technological systems in operando. Quantitative in situ analysis of the potentiodynamic electrochemical oxidation/reduction of noble metal surfaces shows that Angstrom thick oxides formed on Au and Pt are high-ik materials; that is, they are metallic or highly defect-rich semiconductors, while Pd forms a low-ik oxide. In contrast, under potentiostatic growth conditions, all noble metal oxides exhibit a low-ik behavior. On the solution side, we reveal hitherto unknown strong electrochemical reaction forces, which are due to temporary charge imbalance in the electric double layer caused by depletion/generation of charged species. The real-time capability of our approach reveals significant time lags between electron transfer, oxide reduction/oxidation, and solution side reaction during a progressing electrode process. Comparing the kinetics of solution and metal side responses provides evidence that noble metal oxide reduction proceeds via a hydrogen adsorption and subsequent dissolution/redeposition mechanism. The presented approach may have important implications for designing emerging materials utilizing electrified interfaces and may apply to bioelectrochemical processes and signal transmission.

  12. Observation of Femtosecond, Sub-Angstrom Molecular Bond Relaxation Using Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaga, Cosmin I.; Dichiara, Anthony D.; Zhang, Kaikai; Sistrunk, Emily; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis F.; Xu, Junliang; Lin, Chii-Dong; Miller, Terry A.

    2011-06-01

    Imaging, or the determination of the atomic positions in molecules, has always occupied an essential role in physical, chemical and biological sciences. For structural determination, the well established methods of X-ray and electron diffraction easily achieve sub-Angstrom spatial resolution. However, these conventional approaches are not suitable for investigating structural transformations, such as the reaction of molecules or the function of biological systems that occur on the timescales faster than a picosecond. Over the past decade, major efforts directed at developing femtosecond pulsed sources, e.g. X-ray free-electron lasers and electron beams, have resulted in pioneering investigations on imaging large biological molecules and condensed phase dynamics. We report on a different approach, laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED), for achieving sub-femtosecond, sub-Angstrom spatio-temporal resolution for investigating gas-phase molecular dynamics. In contrast to the above mentioned techniques, the LIED method generates bursts of coherent electron wave packets directly from the molecule under interrogation. The study is performed by measuring the diffracted photoelectron momentum distribution produced by strong-field ionization of oxygen and nitrogen molecules at several mid-infrared wavelengths (1.7-2.3 μm). The bond lengths retrieved from the LIED analysis show sensitivity to a change of 0.05 Å in 1 fs. This initial report provides the first direct evidence of bond relaxation following an electronic excitation and establishes the foundation of the LIED method as a general approach for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics.

  13. Time-varying Hurst exponent for US stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Alvarez, Jesus; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Fernandez-Anaya, Guillermo

    2008-10-01

    In this work, the dynamical behavior of the US stock markets is characterized on the basis of the temporal variations of the Hurst exponent estimated with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) over moving windows for the historical Dow Jones (1928-2007) and the S&P-500 (1950-2007) daily indices. According to the results drawn: (i) the Hurst exponent displays an erratic dynamics with some episodes alternating low and high persistent behavior, (ii) the major breakthrough of the long-term trend of the scaling behavior occurred in 1972, at the end of the Bretton Woods system, when the Hurst exponent shifted form a positive to a negative long-term trend. Other effects, such as the 1987 crisis and the emergence of anti-correlated behavior in the recent two years, are also discussed.

  14. Anisotropies in magnetic field evolution and local Lyapunov exponents

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.Z.; Boozer, A.H.

    2000-01-13

    The natural occurrence of small scale structures and the extreme anisotropy in the evolution of a magnetic field embedded in a conducting flow is interpreted in terms of the properties of the local Lyapunov exponents along the various local characteristic (un)stable directions for the Lagrangian flow trajectories. The local Lyapunov exponents and the characteristic directions are functions of Lagrangian coordinates and time, which are completely determined once the flow field is specified. The characteristic directions that are associated with the spatial anisotropy of the problem, are prescribed in both Lagrangian and Eulerian frames. Coordinate transformation techniques are employed to relate the spatial distributions of the magnetic field, the induced current density, and the Lorentz force, which are usually followed in Eulerian frame, to those of the local Lyapunov exponents, which are naturally defined in Lagrangian coordinates.

  15. Low Hurst-Kolmogorov exponents: Estimation and possible underlying phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Luís; Ulloa, Marco; Carsteanu, Alin-Andrei

    2014-05-01

    The present work presents an estimation of the Hurst-Kolmogorov exponent for horizontal water velocity differences in a vertical profile taken in the sea, at a water depth of up to 20m in Playa Miramar, Tamaulipas (22.307 N, 97.773 W), for a period in February-May to 2012. The existence of a single exponent is suggested by the linearity of the transversal structure function that has been estimated from the data. The vertical velocity profile has been measured every 50cm, by means of an AWAC (R) acoustic Doppler device. The results indicate low values of the estimated exponent, situated around 0.17 - 0.18, which points to a negative correlation structure between eddies, a fact that is usually not encountered in homogeneos settings, and needs a careful phenomenological analysis.

  16. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    SciTech Connect

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George

    2013-12-15

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  17. Growth exponents of the etching model in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Evandro A.; Mello, Bernardo A.; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we generalize the etching model (Mello et al 2001 Phys. Rev. E 63 041113) to d + 1 dimensions. The dynamic exponents of this model are compatible with those of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class. We investigate the roughness dynamics with surfaces up to d = 6. We show that the data from all substrate lengths and for all dimensions can be collapsed into one common curve. We determine the dynamic exponents as a function of the dimension. Moreover, our results suggest that d = 4 is not an upper critical dimension for the etching model, and that it fulfills the Galilean invariance.

  18. Lyapunov exponents for multi-parameter tent and logistic maps.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Mark

    2011-12-01

    The behaviour of logistic and tent maps is studied in cases where the control parameter is dependent on iteration number. Analytic results for global Lyapunov exponent are presented in the case of the tent map and numerical results are presented in the case of the logistic map. In the case of a tent map with N control parameters, the fraction of parameter space for which the global Lyapunov exponent is positive is calculated. The case of bi-parameter maps of period N are investigated.

  19. Lyapunov exponent for aging process in induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Duygu; Ünnü, Sezen Yıdırım; Şeker, Serhat

    2012-09-01

    Nonlinear systems like electrical circuits and systems, mechanics, optics and even incidents in nature may pass through various bifurcations and steady states like equilibrium point, periodic, quasi-periodic, chaotic states. Although chaotic phenomena are widely observed in physical systems, it can not be predicted because of the nature of the system. On the other hand, it is known that, chaos is strictly dependent on initial conditions of the system [1-3]. There are several methods in order to define the chaos. Phase portraits, Poincaré maps, Lyapunov Exponents are the most common techniques. Lyapunov Exponents are the theoretical indicator of the chaos, named after the Russian mathematician Aleksandr Lyapunov (1857-1918). Lyapunov Exponents stand for the average exponential divergence or convergence of nearby system states, meaning estimating the quantitive measure of the chaotic attractor. Negative numbers of the exponents stand for a stable system whereas zero stands for quasi-periodic systems. On the other hand, at least if one of the exponents is positive, this situation is an indicator of the chaos. For estimating the exponents, the system should be modeled by differential equation but even in that case mathematical calculation of Lyapunov Exponents are not very practical and evaluation of these values requires a long signal duration [4-7]. For experimental data sets, it is not always possible to acquire the differential equations. There are several different methods in literature for determining the Lyapunov Exponents of the system [4, 5]. Induction motors are the most important tools for many industrial processes because they are cheap, robust, efficient and reliable. In order to have healthy processes in industrial applications, the conditions of the machines should be monitored and the different working conditions should be addressed correctly. To the best of our knowledge, researches related to Lyapunov exponents and electrical motors are mostly

  20. Ising Critical Exponents on Random Trees and Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommers, Sander; Giardinà, Cristian; van der Hofstad, Remco

    2014-05-01

    We study the critical behavior of the ferromagnetic Ising model on random trees as well as so-called locally tree-like random graphs. We pay special attention to trees and graphs with a power-law offspring or degree distribution whose tail behavior is characterized by its power-law exponent τ > 2. We show that the critical inverse temperature of the Ising model equals the hyperbolic arctangent of the reciprocal of the mean offspring or mean forward degree distribution. In particular, the critical inverse temperature equals zero when where this mean equals infinity. We further study the critical exponents δ, β and γ, describing how the (root) magnetization behaves close to criticality. We rigorously identify these critical exponents and show that they take the values as predicted by Dorogovstev et al. (Phys Rev E 66:016104, 2002) and Leone et al. (Eur Phys J B 28:191-197, 2002). These values depend on the power-law exponent τ, taking the same values as the mean-field Curie-Weiss model (Exactly solved models in statistical mechanics, Academic Press, London, 1982) for τ > 5, but different values for.

  1. Singularity detection for structural health monitoring using holder exponents.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. N.; Farrar, C. R.; Sohn, H.

    2003-01-01

    The majority of structural health monitoring studies reported in the technical literature focus on identifying damage sensitive features that can be extracted from dynamic response data . However, many of these studies assume the structure can be modeled as a linear system before and after damage and use parameters of these models as the damage sensitive features. The study summarized in this paper proposes a damage sensitive feature that takes advantage of the nonlinearities associated with discontinuities introduced into the dynamic response data as a result of certain types of damage. Specifically, the Holder exponent, a measure of the degree to which a signal is differentiable, is the feature that is used to detect the presence of damage and when that damage occurred . A procedure for capturing the time varying nature of the Holder exponent based on wavelet transforms is demonstrated through applications to non-stationary random signals with underlying discontinuities and then to a harmonically excited mechanical system that contains a loose part . Also, a classification procedure is developed to quantify when changes in the Holder exponent are significant . The results presented herein show the Holder exponent to be an effective feature for identifying damage that introduces discontinuities into the measured dynamic response data .

  2. Fermat's Last Theorem for Factional and Irrational Exponents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Fermat's Last Theorem says that for integers n greater than 2, there are no solutions to x[superscript n] + y[superscript n] = z[superscript n] among positive integers. What about rational exponents? Irrational n? Negative n? See what an undergraduate senior seminar discovered.

  3. River flow mass exponents with fractal channel networks and rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Over, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    An important problem in hydrologic science is understanding how river flow is influenced by rainfall properties and drainage basin characteristics. In this paper we consider one approach, the use of mass exponents, in examining the relation of river flow to rainfall and the channel network, which provides the primary conduit for transport of water to the outlet in a large basin. Mass exponents, which characterize the power-law behavior of moments as a function of scale, are ideally suited for defining scaling behavior of processes that exhibit a high degree of variability or intermittency. The main result in this paper is an expression relating the mass exponent of flow resulting from an instantaneous burst of rainfall to the mass exponents of spatial rainfall and that of the network width function. Spatial rainfall is modeled as a random multiplicative cascade and the channel network as a recursive replacement tree; these fractal models reproduce certain types of self-similar behavior seen in actual rainfall and networks. It is shown that under these modeling assumptions the scaling behavior of flow mirrors that of rainfall if rainfall is highly variable in space, and on the other hand flow mirrors the structure of the network if rainfall is not so highly variable. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Extending Rules for Exponents and Roots Utilizing Mathematical Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Michael J.; Kcenich, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers rules for multiplying exponential and radical expressions of different bases and exponents and/or roots. This paper demonstrates the development of mathematical concepts through the application of connections to other mathematical ideas. The developed rules and most of the employed connections are within the realm of secondary…

  5. Critical exponents from infinite-dimensional symplectic algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschüler, D.

    1985-11-01

    Unitary representations of the Virasoro algebra with centrala c = 1 - 6/(n + 2) are important in the study of two-dimensional models in statistical mechanics. It is shown that they can be constructed using Kac-Moody algebras of symplectic type. At the same time, this provides a simple derivation of the critical exponents.

  6. Inverted rank distributions: Macroscopic statistics, universality classes, and critical exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    An inverted rank distribution is an infinite sequence of positive sizes ordered in a monotone increasing fashion. Interlacing together Lorenzian and oligarchic asymptotic analyses, we establish a macroscopic classification of inverted rank distributions into five “socioeconomic” universality classes: communism, socialism, criticality, feudalism, and absolute monarchy. We further establish that: (i) communism and socialism are analogous to a “disordered phase”, feudalism and absolute monarchy are analogous to an “ordered phase”, and criticality is the “phase transition” between order and disorder; (ii) the universality classes are characterized by two critical exponents, one governing the ordered phase, and the other governing the disordered phase; (iii) communism, criticality, and absolute monarchy are characterized by sharp exponent values, and are inherently deterministic; (iv) socialism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by continuous power-law statistics; (v) feudalism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by discrete exponential statistics. The results presented in this paper yield a universal macroscopic socioeconophysical perspective of inverted rank distributions.

  7. Bayesian Estimation of the Logistic Positive Exponent IRT Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolfarine, Heleno; Bazan, Jorge Luis

    2010-01-01

    A Bayesian inference approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is developed for the logistic positive exponent (LPE) model proposed by Samejima and for a new skewed Logistic Item Response Theory (IRT) model, named Reflection LPE model. Both models lead to asymmetric item characteristic curves (ICC) and can be appropriate because a symmetric…

  8. Lyapunov exponents for one-dimensional aperiodic photonic bandgap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, Glen J.

    2011-10-01

    Existing in the "gray area" between perfectly periodic and purely randomized photonic bandgap structures are the socalled aperoidic structures whose layers are chosen according to some deterministic rule. We consider here a onedimensional photonic bandgap structure, a quarter-wave stack, with the layer thickness of one of the bilayers subject to being either thin or thick according to five deterministic sequence rules and binary random selection. To produce these aperiodic structures we examine the following sequences: Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, Period doubling, Rudin-Shapiro, as well as the triadic Cantor sequence. We model these structures numerically with a long chain (approximately 5,000,000) of transfer matrices, and then use the reliable algorithm of Wolf to calculate the (upper) Lyapunov exponent for the long product of matrices. The Lyapunov exponent is the statistically well-behaved variable used to characterize the Anderson localization effect (exponential confinement) when the layers are randomized, so its calculation allows us to more precisely compare the purely randomized structure with its aperiodic counterparts. It is found that the aperiodic photonic systems show much fine structure in their Lyapunov exponents as a function of frequency, and, in a number of cases, the exponents are quite obviously fractal.

  9. Stochastic Approximation of Dynamical Exponent at Quantum Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Hidemaro; Yasuda, Shinya; Todo, Synge

    We have developed a unified finite-size scaling method for quantum phase transitions that requires no prior knowledge of the dynamical exponent z. During a quantum Monte Carlo simulation, the temperature is automatically tuned by the Robbins-Monro stochastic approximation method, being proportional to the lowest gap of the finite-size system. The dynamical exponent is estimated in a straightforward way from the system-size dependence of the temperature. As a demonstration of our novel method, the two-dimensional S = 1 / 2 quantum XY model, or equivalently the hard-core boson system, in uniform and staggered magnetic fields is investigated in the combination of the world-line quantum Monte Carlo worm algorithm. In the absence of a uniform magnetic field, we obtain the fully consistent result with the Lorentz invariance at the quantum critical point, z = 1 . Under a finite uniform magnetic field, on the other hand, the dynamical exponent becomes two, and the mean-field universality with effective dimension (2+2) governs the quantum phase transition. We will discuss also the system with random magnetic fields, or the dirty boson system, bearing a non-trivial dynamical exponent.Reference: S. Yasuda, H. Suwa, and S. Todo Phys. Rev. B 92, 104411 (2015); arXiv:1506.04837

  10. Secondary School Students' Levels of Understanding in Computing Exponents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitta-Pantazi, Demetra; Christou, Constantinos; Zachariades, Theodossios

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and analyze students' levels of understanding of exponents within the context of procedural and conceptual learning via the conceptual change and prototypes' theory. The study was conducted with 202 secondary school students with the use of a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. The results suggest…

  11. 77 FR 19745 - Angstrom Microsystems Corp., Bedminster National Corp., Brake Headquarters U.S.A., Inc., and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Angstrom Microsystems Corp., Bedminster National Corp., Brake Headquarters U.S.A., Inc., and Brand... information concerning the securities of BrandPartners Group, Inc. because it has not filed any...

  12. Crystallization and Preliminary Structural Analysis of the Giant Haemoglobin from Glossoscolex paulistus at 3.2 Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    J Bachega; l Bleicher; E Horjales; p Santiago; R Garratt; M Tabak

    2011-12-31

    Glossoscolex paulistus is a free-living earthworm encountered in south-east Brazil. Its oxygen transport requirements are undertaken by a giant extracellular haemoglobin, or erythrocruorin (HbGp), which has an approximate molecular mass of 3.6 MDa and, by analogy with its homologue from Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt), is believed to be composed of a total of 180 polypeptide chains. In the present work the full 3.6 MDa particle in its cyanomet state was purified and crystallized using sodium citrate or PEG8000 as precipitant. The crystals contain one-quarter of the full particle in the asymmetric unit of the I222 cell and have parameters of a = 270.8 {angstrom}, b = 320.3 {angstrom} and c = 332.4 {angstrom}. Diffraction data were collected to 3.15 {angstrom} using synchrotron radiation on beamline X29A at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and represent the highest resolution data described to date for similar erythrocruorins. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using a search model corresponding to one-twelfth of its homologue from HbLt. This revealed that HbGp belongs to the type I class of erythrocruorins and provided an interpretable initial electron density map in which many features including the haem groups and disulfide bonds could be identified.

  13. Angstrom-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Single Molecules via Wave-Function Fingerprints of Nuclear Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wen-Long; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2016-08-01

    Single-molecule sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and angstrom resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the highest challenges in magnetic microscopy. Recent development in dynamical-decoupling- (DD) enhanced diamond quantum sensing has enabled single-nucleus NMR and nanoscale NMR. Similar to conventional NMR and MRI, current DD-based quantum sensing utilizes the "frequency fingerprints" of target nuclear spins. The frequency fingerprints by their nature cannot resolve different nuclear spins that have the same noise frequency or differentiate different types of correlations in nuclear-spin clusters, which limit the resolution of single-molecule MRI. Here we show that this limitation can be overcome by using "wave-function fingerprints" of target nuclear spins, which is much more sensitive than the frequency fingerprints to the weak hyperfine interaction between the targets and a sensor under resonant DD control. We demonstrate a scheme of angstrom-resolution MRI that is capable of counting and individually localizing single nuclear spins of the same frequency and characterizing the correlations in nuclear-spin clusters. A nitrogen-vacancy-center spin sensor near a diamond surface, provided that the coherence time is improved by surface engineering in the near future, may be employed to determine with angstrom resolution the positions and conformation of single molecules that are isotope labeled. The scheme in this work offers an approach to breaking the resolution limit set by the "frequency gradients" in conventional MRI and to reaching the angstrom-scale resolution.

  14. X-ray structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata at 2. 4- angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyan, J.; Xiangpeng Kong; Krishna, T.S.R.; Murgolo, N.J.; Field, H.; Cerami, A.; Henderson, G.B. ); Sweet, R.M. )

    1991-10-01

    Trypanosomes and related protozoan parasites lack glutathione reductase and possess instead a closely related enzyme that serves as the reductant of a bis(glutathione)-spermidien conjugate, trypanothione. The human and parasite enzymes have mutually exclusive substrate specificities, providing a route for the design of therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of the parasite enzyme. The authors report here the three-dimensional structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata and show that it closely resembles the structure of human glutathione reductase. In particular, the core structure surrounding the catalytic machinery is almost identical in the two enzymes. However, significant differences are found at the substrate binding sites. A cluster of basic residues in glutathione reductase is replaced by neutral, hydrophobic, or acidic residues in trypanothione reductase, consistent with the nature of the spermidine linkage and the change in overall charge of the substrate from {minus}2 to +1, respectively. The binding site is more open in trypanothione reductase due to rotations of about 4{degree} in the domains that form in site, with relative shifts of as much as 2-3 {angstrom} in residues that can interact with potential inhibitors and complement previous modeling and mutagenesis studies on the two enzymes.

  15. Near-ideal theoretical strength in gold nanowires containing angstrom scale twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiangwei; Sansoz, Frederic; Huang, Jianyu; Liu, Yi; Sun, Shouheng; Zhang, Ze; Mao, Scott X.

    2013-04-01

    Although nanoscale twinning is an effective means to enhance yield strength and tensile ductility in metals, nanotwinned metals generally fail well below their theoretical strength limit due to heterogeneous dislocation nucleation from boundaries or surface imperfections. Here we show that Au nanowires containing angstrom-scaled twins (0.7 nm in thickness) exhibit tensile strengths up to 3.12 GPa, near the ideal limit, with a remarkable ductile-to-brittle transition with decreasing twin size. This is opposite to the behaviour of metallic nanowires with lower-density twins reported thus far. Ultrahigh-density twins (twin thickness<2.8 nm) are shown to give rise to homogeneous dislocation nucleation and plastic shear localization, contrasting with the heterogeneous slip mechanism observed in single-crystalline or low-density-twinned nanowires. The twin size dependent dislocation nucleation and deformation represent a new type of size effect distinct from the sample size effects described previously.

  16. Cryoelectron Microscopy Structure of Purified gamma-Secretase at 12 angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Osenkowski, P.; Li, H.; Li, H.; Ye, W.; Li, D.; Aeschbach, L.; Fraering, P. C.; Wolfe, M. S.; Selkoe, D. J.

    2009-01-06

    {gamma}-Secretase, an integral membrane protein complex, catalyzes the intramembrane cleavage of the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) during the neuronal production of the amyloid {beta}-peptide. As such, the protease has emerged as a key target for developing agents to treat and prevent Alzheimer's disease. Existing biochemical studies conflict on the oligomeric assembly state of the protease complex, and its detailed structure is not known. Here, we report that purified active human {gamma}-secretase in digitonin has a total molecular mass of {approx} 230 kDa when measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy. This result supports a complex that is monomeric for each of the four component proteins. We further report the three-dimensional structure of the {gamma}-secretase complex at 12 {angstrom} resolution as obtained by cryoelectron microscopy and single-particle image reconstruction. The structure reveals several domains on the extracellular side, three solvent-accessible low-density cavities, and a potential substrate-binding surface groove in the transmembrane region of the complex.

  17. Near-ideal theoretical strength in gold nanowires containing angstrom scale twins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiangwei; Sansoz, Frederic; Huang, Jianyu; Liu, Yi; Sun, Shouheng; Zhang, Ze; Mao, Scott X.

    2013-01-01

    Although nanoscale twinning is an effective means to enhance yield strength and tensile ductility in metals, nanotwinned metals generally fail well below their theoretical strength limit due to heterogeneous dislocation nucleation from boundaries or surface imperfections. Here we show that Au nanowires containing angstrom-scaled twins (0.7 nm in thickness) exhibit tensile strengths up to 3.12 GPa, near the ideal limit, with a remarkable ductile-to-brittle transition with decreasing twin size. This is opposite to the behaviour of metallic nanowires with lower-density twins reported thus far. Ultrahigh-density twins (twin thickness<2.8 nm) are shown to give rise to homogeneous dislocation nucleation and plastic shear localization, contrasting with the heterogeneous slip mechanism observed in single-crystalline or low-density-twinned nanowires. The twin size dependent dislocation nucleation and deformation represent a new type of size effect distinct from the sample size effects described previously. PMID:23612283

  18. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of cholera toxin B subunit pentamer: Choleragenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M.L.; Maulik, P.R.; Reed, R.A.; Shipley, G.; Westbrook, E.M. |; Scott, D.L.; Otwinowski, Z.

    1996-02-01

    Cholera toxin, a heterohexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin released by Vibrio cholera, induces a profuse secretory diarrhea in susceptible hosts. Choleragenoid, the B subunit pentamer of cholera toxin, directs the enzymatic A subunit to its target by binding to GM{sub 1} gangliosides exposed on the luminal surface of intestinal epithelial cells. We have solved the crystal structure of choleragenoid at 2.3 {Angstrom} resolution by combining single isomorphous replacement with non-crystallographic symmetry averaging. The structure of the B subunits, and their pentameric arrangement, closely resembles that reported for the intact holotoxin (choleragen), the heat-labile enterotoxin from E. coli, and for a choleragenoid-GM{sub 1} pentasaccharide complex. In the absence of the A subunit the central cavity of the B pentamer is a highly solvated channel. The binding of the A subunit or the receptor pentasaccharide to choleragenoid has only a modest effect on the local stereochemistry and does not perceptibly alter the subunit interface.

  19. Molecular structure of an apolipoprotein determined at 2. 5- angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Breiter, D.R.; Benning, M.M.; Wesenberg, G.; Holden, H.M.; Rayment, I. ); Kanost, M.R.; Law, J.H.; Wells, M.A. )

    1991-01-22

    The three-dimensional structure of an apolipoprotein isolated from the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria has been determined by X-ray analysis to a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom}. The overall molecular architecture of this protein consists of five long {alpha}-helices connected by short loops. As predicted from amino acid sequence analyses, these helices are distinctly amphiphilic with the hydrophobic residues pointing in toward the interior of the protein and the hydrophilic side chains facing outward. The molecule falls into the general category of up-and-down {alpha}-helical bundles as previously observed, for example, in cytochrome c{prime}. Although the structure shows the presence of five long amphiphilic {alpha}-helices, the {alpha}-helical moment and hydrophobicity of the entire molecule fall into the range found for normal globular proteins. Thus, in order for the amphiphilic helices to play a role in the binding of the protein to a lipid surface, there must be a structural reorganization of the protein which exposes the hydrophobic interior to the lipid surface. The three dimensional motif of this apolipoprotein is compatible with a model in which the molecule binds to the lipid surface via a relatively nonpolar end and then spreads on the surface in such a way as to cause the hydrophobic side chains of the helices to come in contact with the lipid surface, the charged and polar residues to remain in contact with water, and the overall helical motif of the protein to be maintained.

  20. Estimation of Hurst Exponent for the Financial Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, J.; Manchanda, P.

    2009-07-01

    Till recently statistical methods and Fourier analysis were employed to study fluctuations in stock markets in general and Indian stock market in particular. However current trend is to apply the concepts of wavelet methodology and Hurst exponent, see for example the work of Manchanda, J. Kumar and Siddiqi, Journal of the Frankline Institute 144 (2007), 613-636 and paper of Cajueiro and B. M. Tabak. Cajueiro and Tabak, Physica A, 2003, have checked the efficiency of emerging markets by computing Hurst component over a time window of 4 years of data. Our goal in the present paper is to understand the dynamics of the Indian stock market. We look for the persistency in the stock market through Hurst exponent and fractal dimension of time series data of BSE 100 and NIFTY 50.

  1. Critical exponents of a self-propelled particles system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambui, Dorilson S.; de Arruda, Alberto S.; Godoy, Maurício

    2016-02-01

    The Vicsek model of self-propelled particles is an important tool in the study of the collective motion of live organisms. The model consists of particles that move with a constant velocity and adopt, in a region called the zone of repulsion, the average motion direction of their neighbors disturbed by an external noise. A second-order phase transition from a disordered state, with motion in random directions, to an ordered motion state was observed. In this work, we have estimated, using finite-size scaling arguments, the critical exponents β, γ and ν of the original Vicsek model as a function of parameters important to the model, such as the orientation radius size, density, and velocity modulus. Our results show that the critical exponents depend greatly on these parameters.

  2. Determination of critical exponents of inhomogeneous Gd films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Rivera, A.; Salazar, N. A.; Hovorka, O.; Idigoras, O.; Berger, A.

    2012-08-01

    The role of inhomogeneity on the critical behavior is studied for non-epitaxial Gd films. For this purpose, the film inhomogeneity was varied experimentally by annealing otherwise identical samples at different temperatures TAN=200, 400, and 500 °C. Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) was used for magnetization M vs. T measurements at different external fields H. A method based upon the linear superposition of different sample parts having different Curie temperatures TC was used to extract the critical exponents and the intrinsic distribution of Curie temperatures. We found that this method allows extracting reliable values of the critical exponents for all annealing temperatures, which enabled us to study the effects of disorder onto the universality class of Gd films.

  3. Geometric critical exponent inequalities for general random cluster models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaki, Hal

    1987-11-01

    A set of new critical exponent inequalities, d(1 -1 / δ)≥2 - η, dv(1 - 1/ δ)≥ γ, and dμ> 1, is proved for a general class of random cluster models, which includes (independent or dependent) percolations, lattice animals (with any interactions), and various stochastic cluster growth models. The inequalities imply that the critical phenomena in the models are inevitably not mean-field-like in the dimensions one, two, and three.

  4. Stochastic approximation of dynamical exponent at quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Shinya; Suwa, Hidemaro; Todo, Synge

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a unified finite-size scaling method for quantum phase transitions that requires no prior knowledge of the dynamical exponent z . During a quantum Monte Carlo simulation, the temperature is automatically tuned by the Robbins-Monro stochastic approximation method, being proportional to the lowest gap of the finite-size system. The dynamical exponent is estimated in a straightforward way from the system-size dependence of the temperature. As a demonstration of our novel method, the two-dimensional S =1 /2 quantum X Y model in uniform and staggered magnetic fields is investigated in the combination of the world-line quantum Monte Carlo worm algorithm. In the absence of a uniform magnetic field, we obtain the fully consistent result with the Lorentz invariance at the quantum critical point, z =1 , i.e., the three-dimensional classical X Y universality class. Under a finite uniform magnetic field, on the other hand, the dynamical exponent becomes two, and the mean-field universality with effective dimension (2 +2 ) governs the quantum phase transition.

  5. From Lyapunov modes to their exponents for hard disk systems.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tony; Truant, Daniel; Morriss, Gary P

    2010-06-01

    We demonstrate the preservation of the Lyapunov modes in a system of hard disks by the underlying tangent space dynamics. This result is exact for the Zero modes and correct to order ϵ for the Transverse and Longitudinal-Momentum modes, where ϵ is linear in the mode number. For sufficiently large mode numbers, the ϵ terms become significant and the dynamics no longer preserves the mode structure. We propose a modified Gram-Schmidt procedure based on orthogonality with respect to the center zero space that produces the exact numerical mode. This Gram-Schmidt procedure can also exploit the orthogonality between conjugate modes and their symplectic structure in order to find a simple relation that determines the Lyapunov exponent from the Lyapunov mode. This involves a reclassification of the modes into either direction preserving or form preserving. These analytic methods assume a knowledge of the ordering of the modes within the Lyapunov spectrum, but gives both predictive power for the values of the exponents from the modes and describes the modes in greater detail than was previously achievable. Thus the modes and the exponents contain the same information.

  6. Clustering of Casablanca stock market based on hurst exponent estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the problem of Casablanca Stock Exchange (CSE) topology modeling as a complex network during three different market regimes: general trend characterized by ups and downs, increasing trend, and decreasing trend. In particular, a set of seven different Hurst exponent estimates are used to characterize long-range dependence in each industrial sector generating process. They are employed in conjunction with hierarchical clustering approach to examine the co-movements of the Casablanca Stock Exchange industrial sectors. The purpose is to investigate whether cluster structures are similar across variable, increasing and decreasing regimes. It is observed that the general structure of the CSE topology has been considerably changed over 2009 (variable regime), 2010 (increasing regime), and 2011 (decreasing regime) time periods. The most important findings follow. First, in general a high value of Hurst exponent is associated to a variable regime and a small one to a decreasing regime. In addition, Hurst estimates during increasing regime are higher than those of a decreasing regime. Second, correlations between estimated Hurst exponent vectors of industrial sectors increase when Casablanca stock exchange follows an upward regime, whilst they decrease when the overall market follows a downward regime.

  7. Advances Toward Inner-Shell Photo-Ionization X-Ray Lasing at 45 (Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, S J; Weber, F A; Celliers, P M; Eder, D C

    2002-07-18

    The inner-shell photo-ionization (ISPI) scheme requires photon energies at least high enough to photo-ionize the K-shell. {approx}286 eV, in the case of carbon. As a consequence of the higher cross-section, the inner-shell are selectively knocked out, leaving a hole state 1s2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} in the singly charged carbon ion. This generates a population inversion to the radiatively connected state 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p in C+, leading to gain on the 1s-2p transition at 45 {angstrom}. The resonant character of the lasing transition in the single ionization state intrinsically allows much higher quantum efficiency compared to other schemes. Competing processes that deplete the population inversion include auto-ionization, Auger decay, and in particular collisional ionization of the outer-shell electrons by electrons generated during photo-ionization. These competing processes rapidly quench the gain. Consequently, the pump method must be capable of populating the inversion at a rate faster than the competing processes. This can be achieved by an ultra-fast, high intensity laser that is able to generate an ultra-fast, bright x-ray source. With current advances in the development of high-power, ultra-short pulse lasers it is possible to realize fast x-ray sources based that can deliver powerful pulses of light in the multiple hundred terawatt regime and beyond. They will discuss in greater detail concept, target design and a series of x-ray spectroscopy investigations they have conducted in order to optimize the absorber/x-ray converter--filter package.

  8. Exploring EUV Spicules Using 304 Angstrom He II Data from SDO AIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Ian R.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ron L.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from a statistical study of He II 304 Angstrom Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules at the limb of the Sun. We also measured properties of one macrospicule; macrospicules are longer than most spicules, and much broader in width than spicules. We use high-cadence (12 second) and high-resolution (0.6 arcseconds pixels) resolution data from the Atmospheric Imaging Array (AIA) instrument on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). All of the observed events occurred near the solar north pole, where quiet Sun or coronal hole environments ensued. We examined the maximum lengths, maximum rise velocities, and lifetimes of 33 Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules and the macrospicule. For the bulk of the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules these quantities are, respectively, approximately 10,000-40,000 kilometers, 20-100 kilometers per second, and approximately 100- approximately 1000 seconds. For the macrospicule the corresponding quantities were respectively approximately 60,000 kilometers, approximately 130 kilometers per second, approximately 1800 seconds, which is typical of macrospicules measured by other workers. Therefore macrospicules are taller, longer-lived, and faster than most Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules. The rise profiles of both the spicules and the macrospicules match well a second-order ("parabolic" ) trajectory, although the acceleration was often weaker than that of solar gravity in the profiles fitted to the trajectories. Our macrospicule also had an obvious brightening at its base at birth, while such brightening was not apparent for the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules. Most of the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules remained visible during their descent back to the solar surface, although a small percentage of the spicules and the macrospicule faded out before falling back to the surface. Our sample of macrospicules is not yet large enough to determine whether their initiation mechanism is identical to that of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV

  9. On the Lack of Correlation Between Mg II 2796, 2803 Angstrom and Lyman alpha Emission in Lensed Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane Rebecca; Bayliss, M. B.; Gladders, M. D.; Sharon, K.; Wuyts, E.; Dahle, H.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the Mg II 2796, 2803 Angstrom, Lyman alpha, and nebular line emission in five bright star-forming galaxies at 1.66 less than z less than 1.91 that have been gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxy clusters. All five galaxies show prominent Mg II emission and absorption in a P Cygni profile. We find no correlation between the equivalent widths of Mg II and Lyman alpha emission. The Mg II emission has a broader range of velocities than do the nebular emission line profiles; the Mg II emission is redshifted with respect to systemic by 100 to 200 km s(exp-1). When present, Lyman alpha is even more redshifted. The reddest components of Mg II and Lyman alpha emission have tails to 500-600 km s(exp-1), implying a strong outflow. The lack of correlation in the Mg II and Lyman alpha equivalent widths, the differing velocity profiles, and the high ratios of Mg II to nebular line fluxes together suggest that the bulk of Mg II emission does not ultimately arise as nebular line emission, but may instead be reprocessed stellar continuum emission.

  10. On Photospheric Fluorescence and the Nature of the 17.62 Angstrom Feature in Solar X-ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Greg; Kahn, S.

    1999-01-01

    The identification of the emission line feature at 17.62 Angstroms in solar x-ray spectra is re-examined. Using a Monte Carlo technique, we compute a realistic theoretical upper limit to the observed Fe L-alpha photospheric fluorescent line strength caused by irradiation from an overlying corona. These calculations demonstrate that the photospheric Fe L-alpha characteristic line is much too weak to account for the observed 17.62 Angstrom line flux. Instead, we identify this line with the configuration interaction 2s2p3p2P-2s2p6 2S transition in Fe XVIII seen in Electron Beam Ion Trap spectra and predicted in earlier theoretical work on the Fe XVIII x-ray spectrum.

  11. Hölder exponent spectra for human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.; Griffin, L.; West, B. J.

    2003-10-01

    The stride interval time series in normal human gait is not strictly constant, but fluctuates from step to step in a complex manner. More precisely, it has been shown that the control process for human gait is a fractal random phenomenon, that is, one with a long-term memory. Herein we study the Hölder exponent spectra for the slow, normal and fast gaits of 10 young healthy men in both free and metronomically triggered conditions and establish that the stride interval time series is more complex than a monofractal phenomenon. A slightly multifractal and non-stationary time series under the three different gait conditions emerges.

  12. Dependence of Lyapunov Exponents on Embedding Delay in Electrogastrography Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yasuyuki; Takada, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Kiyoko

    This study aims to examine the feasibility of applying a complex dynamical analysis method to electrogastrography (EGG). We analyzed EGGs using the maximum Lyapunov exponent (MLE), which is one of the indices of the chaotic characteristics of sequential biosignals. In the result, the chaotic process is considered to generate the EGGs irrespective of their embedding delay and dimension. The MLE decreased with an increase in the embedding dimension for a particular embedding delay. In nonlinear analysis, indices are required to be considered for calculations involving a constant embedding dimension and delay.

  13. Mass absorption efficiency of light absorbing organic aerosols from source region of paddy-residue burning emissions in the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, B.; Rastogi, N.; Sarin, M. M.; Singh, A.; Singh, D.

    2016-01-01

    The mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of light absorbing water-soluble organics, representing a significant fraction of brown carbon (BrC), has been studied in fine mode aerosols (PM2.5) from a source region (Patiala: 30.2 °N, 76.3 °E) of biomass burning emissions (BBEs) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). The mass absorption coefficient of BrC at 365 nm (babs-365), assessed from absorption spectra of aqueous extracts, exhibits significant linear relationship with water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) for day (R2 = 0.37) and night time (R2 = 0.77) samples; and slope of regression lines provides a measure of MAE of BrC (daytime: ˜0.75 m2 g-1 and night time: 1.13 m2 g-1). A close similarity in the temporal variability of babs-365 (for BrC) and K+ in all samples suggests their common source from BBEs. The babs-365 of BrC follows a power law (babs-λ ≈ λ-α; where α = angstrom exponent) and averages around 5.2 ± 2.0 M m-1 (where M = 10-6). A significant decrease in the MAE of BrC from the source region (this study) to the downwind oceanic region (over Bay of Bengal, Srinivas and Sarin, 2013) could be attributed to relative increase in the contribution of non-absorbing WSOC and/or photo-bleaching of BrC during long-range atmospheric transport. The atmospheric radiative forcing due to BrC over the study site accounts for ˜40% of that from elemental carbon (EC).

  14. Field-Line Dispersal and the Death of Lyapunov Exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragot, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Turbulent magnetic field lines have long been thought to be diverging from each other (or converging towards each other) at exponential rates known as Lyapunov exponents. It is now shown that in a turbulent magnetized plasma, subexponential divergence (convergence) and diffusive twist better characterize the dispersal of magnetic field lines than do the usual Lyapunov exponents or exponentiation rates. Pairs of nearby magnetic field lines diverge (converge) sub-exponentially rather than exponentially, and as soon as they diverge (converge) by a significant amount, they also experience substantial twist or rotation relative to each other. More distant magnetic field lines follow the same dynamics of twist and sub-exponential divergence (convergence), though at a slower rate. It is also found that on a very broad range of separation length scales, the statistics of the field-line separations are log-normal rather than Gaussian. Most importantly, the field-line dispersal can now be evaluated quantitatively and accurately. These results will be presented and some implications for the dispersal and mixing of solar wind magnetic field lines and particles will be discussed.

  15. Pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Liang; Zheng, Hong-Liang; Yang, Hong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Image segmentation remains an important, but hard-to-solve, problem since it appears to be application dependent with usually no a priori information available regarding the image structure. In recent years, many image segmentation algorithms have been developed, but they are often very complex and some undesired results occur frequently. In this paper, we propose a pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments. Firstly, the pixel-level image feature is extracted based on quaternion exponent moments (QEMs), which can capture effectively the image pixel content by considering the correlation between different color channels. Then, the pixel-level image feature is used as input of twin support vector machines (TSVM) classifier, and the TSVM model is trained by selecting the training samples with Arimoto entropy thresholding. Finally, the color image is segmented with the trained TSVM model. The proposed scheme has the following advantages: (1) the effective QEMs is introduced to describe color image pixel content, which considers the correlation between different color channels, (2) the excellent TSVM classifier is utilized, which has lower computation time and higher classification accuracy. Experimental results show that our proposed method has very promising segmentation performance compared with the state-of-the-art segmentation approaches recently proposed in the literature.

  16. Exact computation of the critical exponents of the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The jamming transition marks the emergence of rigidity in a system of amorphous and athermal grains. It is characterized by a divergent correlation length of the force-force correlation and non-trivial critical exponents that are independent of spatial dimension, suggesting that a mean field theory can correctly predict their values. I will discuss a mean field approach to the problem based on the exact solution of the hard sphere model in infinite dimension. An unexpected analogy with the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model emerges in the solution: as in the SK model, the glassy states turn out to be marginally stable, and are described by a Parisi equation. Marginal stability has a deep impact on the critical properties of the jamming transition and allows one to obtain analytic predictions for the critical exponents. The predictions are consistent with a recently developed scaling theory of the jamming transition, and with numerical simulations. Finally, I will briefly discuss some possible extensions of this approach to other open issues in the theory of glasses.

  17. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  18. Ultraviolet observations of Uranus and Neptune below 3,000 Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.; Wagener, R.

    1984-10-01

    From 2000 to 3000 A, both Uranus and Neptune have albedos that are about two times higher than Jupiter or Saturn's, implying that the outer giants have stratospheres that are relatively free of aerosol absorption. Uncertainties in the absolute calibration procedure allow discrepancies of order 15% between conservative models and the observations. A small amount of aerosol absorption is therefore possible. Below 2000 A the derived albedo is highly dependent on the solar spectrum source used in the data reduction. The most recent result for Uranus, first reported here, is consistent with a secular change in C2H2 mixing ratio from approximately three times ten to the minus eight in 1980 to less than or equal to ten to the minus ninth in 1983. These values are approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than the mixing ratios of this gas on Saturn, and comparable to the amount on Jupiter.

  19. Wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent and single scattering albedo observed by skyradiometer in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja-Ho; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Jaehwa; Eck, Thomas F.; Lee, Yun Gon; Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Mijin; Jung, Ukkyo; Yoon, Jongmin; Mok, Jungbin; Cho, Hi-Ku

    2016-11-01

    Absorption and scattering characteristics of various aerosol events are investigated using 2-years of measurements from a skyradiometer at Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. Both transported dust and anthropogenic aerosols are observed at distinct geo-location of Seoul, a megacity located a few thousand kilometers away from dust source regions in China. We focus on the wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA), showing the characteristics of regional aerosols. The correlation between spectral SSAs and AEs calculated using different wavelength pairs generally indicates relatively weak absorption of fine-mode aerosols (urban pollution and/or biomass burning) and strong absorption of coarse-mode aerosols (desert dust) at this location. AE ratio (AER), a ratio of AEs calculated using wavelength pair between shorter (340-675 nm) and longer wavelength pair (675-1020 nm) correlates differently with SSA according to the dominant size of local aerosols. Correlations between SSA and AER show strong absorption of aerosols for AER < 1.0 and weak absorption for AER > 2.0. Based on the seasonal pattern of wavelength dependence of AER and SSA, this correlation difference looks to reveal the separated characteristics of transported dust and anthropogenic particles from urban pollution respectively. The seasonal characteristics of AER and SSAs also show that the skyradiometer measurement with multiple wavelengths may be able to detect the water soluble brown carbon, one of the important secondary organic aerosols in the summertime atmospheric composition.

  20. Research and development toward a 4.5-1.5{angstrom} linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the theoretical and technical feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 {Angstrom}) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation include: (1) a peak current in the 3-7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, ad (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}{le}{lambda}/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.1-0.2% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 4-8 m for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to {approximately}20 {angstrom}, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 {angstrom} LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas. These include the construction and operation of a linac test stand for developing laser-driven photocathode rf guns with normalized emittances approaching 1 mm-mr; development of advanced beam compression, stability, an emittance control techniques at multi-GeV energies; the construction and operation of a FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE) for theoretical and experimental studies of SASE at IR wavelengths; an undulator development program to investigate superconducting, hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM), and pulsed-Cu technologies; theoretical and computational studies of high-gain FEL physics and LCLS component designs.

  1. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  2. Spectrum-based estimators of the bivariate Hurst exponent.

    PubMed

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2014-12-01

    We discuss two alternate spectrum-based estimators of the bivariate Hurst exponent in the power-law cross-correlations setting, the cross-periodogram and local X-Whittle estimators, as generalizations of their univariate counterparts. As the spectrum-based estimators are dependent on a part of the spectrum taken into consideration during estimation, a simulation study showing performance of the estimators under varying bandwidth parameter as well as correlation between processes and their specification is provided as well. These estimators are less biased than the already existent averaged periodogram estimator, which, however, has slightly lower variance. The spectrum-based estimators can serve as a good complement to the popular time domain estimators.

  3. GPU and APU computations of Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Christian; Rossinelli, Diego; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-03-01

    We present GPU and APU accelerated computations of Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) fields. The calculation of FTLEs is a computationally intensive process, as in order to obtain the sharp ridges associated with the Lagrangian Coherent Structures an extensive resampling of the flow field is required. The computational performance of this resampling is limited by the memory bandwidth of the underlying computer architecture. The present technique harnesses data-parallel execution of many-core architectures and relies on fast and accurate evaluations of moment conserving functions for the mesh to particle interpolations. We demonstrate how the computation of FTLEs can be efficiently performed on a GPU and on an APU through OpenCL and we report over one order of magnitude improvements over multi-threaded executions in FTLE computations of bluff body flows.

  4. Lyapunov Exponents and Covariant Vectors for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Murman, Scott; Fernandez, Pablo; Wang, Qiqi

    2016-11-01

    As computational power increases, engineers are beginning to use scale-resolving turbulent flow simulations for applications in which jets, wakes, and separation dominate. However, the chaotic dynamics exhibited by scale-resolving simulations poses problems for the conventional sensitivity analysis and stability analysis approaches that are vital for design and control. Lyapunov analysis is used to study the chaotic behavior of dynamical systems, including flow simulations. Lyapunov exponents are the growth or a decay rate of specific flow field perturbations called the Lyapunov covariant vectors. Recently, the authors have used Lyapunov analysis to study the breakdown in conventional sensitivity analysis and the cost of new shadowing-based sensitivity analysis. The current work reviews Lyapunov analysis and presents new results for a DNS of turbulent channel flow, wall-modeled channel flow, and a DNS of a low pressure turbine blade. Additionally, the implications of these Lyapunov analyses for computing sensitivities of these flow simulations will be discussed.

  5. Critical exponent of quantum phase transitions driven by colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, D.; Domokos, P.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that criticality in a driven-dissipative system is strongly influenced by the spectral properties of the bath. We study the open-system realization of the Dicke model, where a bosonic cavity mode couples to a large spin formed by two motional modes of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. The cavity mode is driven by a high-frequency laser and it decays to a Markovian bath, while the atomic mode interacts with a colored bath. We reveal that the soft mode fails to describe the characteristics of the criticality. We calculate the critical exponent of the superradiant phase transition and identify an inherent relation to the low-frequency spectral density function of the colored bath. We show that a finite temperature of the colored bath does not modify qualitatively this dependence on the spectral density function.

  6. Skeleton graph expansion of critical exponents in "cultural revolution" years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Bailin

    Kenneth Wilson's Nobel Prize winning breakthrough in the renormalization group theory of phase transition and critical phenomena almost overlapped with the violent "cultural revolution" years (1966-1976) in China. An unexpected chance in 1972 brought the author of these lines close to the Wilson-Fisher є-expansion of critical exponents and eventually led to a joint paper with Lu Yu published entirely in Chinese without any English title and abstract. Even the original acknowledgment was deleted because of mentioning foreign names like Kenneth Wilson and Kerson Huang. In this article I will tell the 40-year old story as a much belated tribute to Kenneth Wilson and to reproduce the essence of our work in English. At the end, I give an elementary derivation of the Callan-Symanzik equation without referring to field theory.

  7. Skeleton graph expansion of critical exponents in "cultural revolution" years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Bailin

    2014-04-01

    Kenneth Wilson's Nobel Prize winning breakthrough in the renormalization group theory of phase transition and critical phenomena almost overlapped with the violent "cultural revolution" years (1966-1976) in China. An unexpected chance in 1972 brought the author of these lines close to the Wilson-Fisher ɛ-expansion of critical exponents and eventually led to a joint paper with Lu Yu published entirely in Chinese without any English title and abstract. Even the original acknowledgment was deleted because of mentioning foreign names like Kenneth Wilson and Kerson Huang. In this article I will tell the 40-year old story as a much belated tribute to Kenneth Wilson and to reproduce the essence of our work in English. At the end, I give an elementary derivation of the Callan-Symanzik equation without referring to field theory.

  8. Weighted Sobolev theorem in Lebesgue spaces with variable exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samko, N. G.; Samko, S. G.; Vakulov, B. G.

    2007-11-01

    For the Riesz potential operator I[alpha] there are proved weighted estimates within the framework of weighted Lebesgue spaces Lp([dot operator])([Omega],w) with variable exponent. In case [Omega] is a bounded domain, the order [alpha]=[alpha](x) is allowed to be variable as well. The weight functions are radial type functions "fixed" to a finite point and/or to infinity and have a typical feature of Muckenhoupt-Wheeden weights: they may oscillate between two power functions. Conditions on weights are given in terms of their Boyd-type indices. An analogue of such a weighted estimate is also obtained for spherical potential operators on the unit sphere .

  9. Spectrum-based estimators of the bivariate Hurst exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2014-12-01

    We discuss two alternate spectrum-based estimators of the bivariate Hurst exponent in the power-law cross-correlations setting, the cross-periodogram and local X -Whittle estimators, as generalizations of their univariate counterparts. As the spectrum-based estimators are dependent on a part of the spectrum taken into consideration during estimation, a simulation study showing performance of the estimators under varying bandwidth parameter as well as correlation between processes and their specification is provided as well. These estimators are less biased than the already existent averaged periodogram estimator, which, however, has slightly lower variance. The spectrum-based estimators can serve as a good complement to the popular time domain estimators.

  10. The Effect of the Underlying Distribution in Hurst Exponent Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Trinidad, Juan E.; García, José; Fernández, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a heavy-tailed distribution approach is considered in order to explore the behavior of actual financial time series. We show that this kind of distribution allows to properly fit the empirical distribution of the stocks from S&P500 index. In addition to that, we explain in detail why the underlying distribution of the random process under study should be taken into account before using its self-similarity exponent as a reliable tool to state whether that financial series displays long-range dependence or not. Finally, we show that, under this model, no stocks from S&P500 index show persistent memory, whereas some of them do present anti-persistent memory and most of them present no memory at all. PMID:26020942

  11. Computation of entropy and Lyapunov exponent by a shift transform

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Chihiro; Hiraide, Koichi

    2015-10-15

    We present a novel computational method to estimate the topological entropy and Lyapunov exponent of nonlinear maps using a shift transform. Unlike the computation of periodic orbits or the symbolic dynamical approach by the Markov partition, the method presented here does not require any special techniques in computational and mathematical fields to calculate these quantities. In spite of its simplicity, our method can accurately capture not only the chaotic region but also the non-chaotic region (window region) such that it is important physically but the (Lebesgue) measure zero and usually hard to calculate or observe. Furthermore, it is shown that the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of the Sinai-Ruelle-Bowen measure (the physical measure) coincides with the topological entropy.

  12. On the exponent of G-spaces and isovariant extensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    The equivariant version of the Curtis-Schori-West theorem is investigated. It is proved that for a nondegenerate Peano G-continuum X with an action of the compact abelian Lie group G, the exponent \\exp X is equimorphic to the maximal equivariant Hilbert cube if and only if the free part X{free} is dense in X. We also show that the latter is sufficient for the equimorphy of \\exp X and Q in the case of an action of an arbitrary compact Lie group G. The key to the proof of these results lies in the theory of the universal G-space (in the sense of Palais). Bibliography: 28 titles.

  13. Boundary trace embedding theorems for variable exponent Sobolev spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xianling

    2008-03-01

    We study boundary trace embedding theorems for variable exponent Sobolev space W1,p([dot operator])([Omega]). Let [Omega] be an open (bounded or unbounded)[thin space]domain in satisfying strong local Lipschitz condition. Under the hypotheses that p[set membership, variant]L[infinity]([Omega]), 1[less-than-or-equals, slant]infp(x)[less-than-or-equals, slant]supp(x)N, we prove that there is a continuous boundary trace embedding W1,p([dot operator])([Omega])-->Lq([dot operator])([not partial differential][Omega]) provided q([dot operator]), a measurable function on [not partial differential][Omega], satisfies condition for x[set membership, variant][not partial differential][Omega].

  14. Generalized Hurst exponent approach to efficiency in MENA markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensoy, A.

    2013-10-01

    We study the time-varying efficiency of 15 Middle East and North African (MENA) stock markets by generalized Hurst exponent analysis of daily data with a rolling window technique. The study covers a time period of six years from January 2007 to December 2012. The results reveal that all MENA stock markets exhibit different degrees of long-range dependence varying over time and that the Arab Spring has had a negative effect on market efficiency in the region. The least inefficient market is found to be Turkey, followed by Israel, while the most inefficient markets are Iran, Tunisia, and UAE. Turkey and Israel show characteristics of developed financial markets. Reasons and implications are discussed.

  15. Adiabatic theory, Liapunov exponents, and rotation number for quadratic Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, François; Foulon, Patrick

    1987-11-01

    We consider the adiabatic problem for general time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonians and develop a method quite different from WKB. In particular, we apply our results to the Schrödinger equation in a strip. We show that there exists a first regular step (avoiding resonance problems) providing one adiabatic invariant, bounds on the Liapunov exponents, and estimates on the rotation number at any order of the perturbation theory. The further step is shown to be equivalent to a quantum adiabatic problem, which, by the usual adiabatic techniques, provides the other possible adiabatic invariants. In the special case of the Schrödinger equation our method is simpler and more powerful than the WKB techniques.

  16. The Spatial Meaning of Pareto's Scaling Exponent of City-Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanguang

    2013-04-01

    The scaling exponent of a hierarchy of cities used to be regarded as a fractional dimension. The Pareto exponent was treated as the fractal dimension of size distribution of cities, while the Zipf exponent was considered to be the reciprocal of the fractal dimension. However, this viewpoint is not exact. In this paper, I will present a new interpretation of the scaling exponent of rank-size distributions. The ideas from fractal measure relation and the principle of dimension consistency are employed to explore the essence of Pareto's and Zipf's scaling exponents. The Pareto exponent proved to be a ratio of the fractal dimension of a network of cities to the average dimension of city population. Accordingly, the Zipf exponent is the reciprocal of this dimension ratio. On a digital map, the Pareto exponent can be defined by the scaling relation between a map scale and the corresponding number of cities based on this scale. The cities of the United States of America in 1900, 1940, 1960, and 1980 and Indian cities in 1981, 1991, and 2001 are utilized to illustrate the geographical spatial meaning of Pareto's exponent. The results suggest that the Pareto exponent of city-size distributions is a dimension ratio rather than a fractal dimension itself. This conclusion is revealing for scientists to understand Zipf's law on the rank-size pattern and the fractal structure of hierarchies of cities.

  17. X-ray diffraction properties and applications of layered synthetic microstructures in the 1 to 10 angstrom region

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1980-08-06

    Layered synthetic microstructures have been built and tested for use as medium-resolution x-ray diffraction monochromators, in the 1 to 10 angstrom wavelength region. They can be employed to good advantage in spectrometry and imaging instruments that are used to determine the nature of the x-ray emission of high-temperature plasmas. When the micro-structures are used in spectrometers, we find that they gather much more light than natural crystals and are not troubled by high order diffraction response, yet have better spectral resolution than that provided by spectrometer channels formed by Ross filter or filter/fluorescer techniques. For use in imaging instruments such as the grazing-incidence reflection Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope, the microstructures provide high reflectivity at wavelengths shorter than the practical limit of total external reflection. We will present calibration data that describes the diffraction properties and piece-to-piece uniformity of microstructures built especially for use in the 1 to 10 angstrom region. We will also describe in detail two instruments that will be used at the Shiva laser system to determine the spectral and spatial distributions of x-rays radiated by inertial confinement fusion targets.

  18. Structure of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 1 at 1.9 angstrom Resolution and Low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Jasti,J.; Furukawa, H.; Gonzales, E.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, proton-activated receptors that belong to the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin family of ion channels and are implicated in perception of pain, ischaemic stroke, mechanosensation, learning and memory. Here we report the low-pH crystal structure of a chicken ASIC1 deletion mutant at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. Each subunit of the chalice-shaped homotrimer is composed of short amino and carboxy termini, two transmembrane helices, a bound chloride ion and a disulphide-rich, multidomain extracellular region enriched in acidic residues and carboxyl-carboxylate pairs within 3 Angstroms, suggesting that at least one carboxyl group bears a proton. Electrophysiological studies on aspartate-to-asparagine mutants confirm that these carboxyl-carboxylate pairs participate in proton sensing. Between the acidic residues and the transmembrane pore lies a disulphide-rich 'thumb' domain poised to couple the binding of protons to the opening of the ion channel, thus demonstrating that proton activation involves long-range conformational changes.

  19. Merits of a sub-harmonic approach to a single-pass, 1.5-{Angstrom} FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Nuhn, H.D.; Bonifacio, R.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1995-03-01

    SLAC/SSRL and collaborators elsewhere are studying th physics of a single-pass, FEL amplifier operating in th 1 -- 2 {Angstrom}, wavelength region based on electron beams from the SLAC linac at {approximately} 15 GeV energy. Hoping to reduce the total wiggler length needed to reach saturation when starting from shot noise, we have examined the benefits of making the first part of the wiggler resonant at a subharmonic wavelength (e.g. 4.5 {Angstrom}) at which the gain length can be significantly shorter. This leads to bunching of the electron beam at both the subharmonic and fundaments wavelengths, thus providing a strong coherent ``seed`` for exponential growth of radiation at the fundamental in the second part of the wiggler. Using both multi-harmonic and multi-frequency 2D FEL simulation codes, we have examined the predicted performance of such devices and the sensitivity to electron beam parameters such as current, emittance, and instantaneous energy spread.

  20. Experimental indication of a naphthalene-base molecular aggregate for the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Cronin, J. R.; McGehee, M. D.; Clemett, S. J.; Gillette, S.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments where the simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) naphthalene (C10H8) is subjected to the energetic environment of a plasma have resulted in the synthesis of a molecular aggregate that has ultraviolet spectral characteristics that suggest it provides insight into the nature of the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature and may be a laboratory analog. Ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and mass spectroscopy, along with gas chromatography, indicate that it is a molecular aggregate in which an aromatic double ring ("naphthalene") structural base serves as the electron "box" chromophore that gives rise to the envelope of the 2175 angstroms feature. This chromophore can also provide the peak of the feature or function as a mantle in concert with another peak provider such as graphite. The molecular base/chromophore manifests itself both as a structural component of an alkyl-aromatic polymer and as a substructure of hydrogenated PAH species. Its spectral and molecular characteristics are consistent with what is generally expected for a complex molecular aggregate that has a role as an interstellar constituent.

  1. Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol from Residential Wood Burning in Fresno, CA: Results from 2013 NASA DISCOVER-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Zhang, Q.; Young, D. E.; Parworth, C.

    2015-12-01

    Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol were investigated at Fresno, CA from 13 January to 11 February, 2013 as part of the NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign. The light absorption spectra of water soluble organic aerosol in PM2.5 was measured using a UV/vis diode array detector (DAD) coupled with a particle into liquid sampler (PILS) that sampled downstream of a PM2.5 cyclone (URG). The PILS was also coupled with two ion chromatographs (IC) to measure inorganic and organic ionic species in PM2.5. In addition, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at the same site to measure size-resolved chemical composition of submicrometer aerosol (PM1) in real time during this study. Light absorption at 365 nm (Abs365), which is typically used as a proxy of water-soluble brown carbon (BrC), showed strong enhancement during night time and appeared to correlate well (r = 0.71) with biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) from residential wood burning for heating in the Fresno area. The tight correlations between Abs365 and biomass burning relevant tracers such as acetonitrile (r = 0.69), AMS-signature ions for phenolic compounds (r = 0.52-0.71), PAH (r = 0.74), and potassium (r = 0.67) further confirm that biomass burning contributed significantly to water soluble brown carbon during this study. The absorption angstrom exponent (Åa) values fitted between 300 and 700 nm wavelength were 3.3 ± 1.1, 2.0 ± 0.9 and 4.0 ± 0.8, respectively, in the morning, afternoon and nighttime, indicating that BrC is prevalent at night in Fresno during wintertime. However, there are also indications that small amount of BrC existed during the daytime as well, likely due to daytime wood burning and other sources such as the formation of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Finally, light absorption at 300 nm, 330 nm, and 390 nm were found to correlate tightly with BBOA, which indicate that biomass burning also emits

  2. Absolute fluxes of six hot stars in the ultraviolet (912-1600 Angstroms)

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.N.

    1985-01-01

    Six hot stars were observed on 1984 March 2 from a Black Brant V sounding rocket (NASA 21.085UG). The absolute fluxes from ..gamma../sup 2/ Vel, zeta Pup, ..cap alpha.. CMa, ..gamma.. Ori, ..beta.. Tau, and epsilon Per were measured in the spectral region between 912 and 1600 A at 10 A resolution. Comparisons with revised Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer data (Holberg 1984) and previous sounding rocket data (Brune et al. 1979) are evaluated. In general, the two sounding rocket experiments are in good agreement, and the revised Voyager data and the sounding rocket data are in agreement except at wavelengths below 1000 A. Comparisons with stellar models (Kurucz 1979) are presented showing discrepancies near 1200 A and below 1000 A. Determination of interstellar absorption using the data on these stars proved to be unsatisfactory due partly to the inaccuracies of the stellar models; however, a list of hot stars suitable for deriving the interstellar extinction is included to aid future extreme ultraviolet experiments, such as the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT).

  3. Critical Exponents of the Superconducting Transition in Polycrystalline YBCO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. J.; Hallock, R. B.; Taylor, J. A.

    1996-03-01

    We present results of measurements designed to study superconducting I-V scaling in samples of bulk YBCO with varying morphologies and at selected magnetic fields 0.5<= H<= 10 T. I-V isotherm measurements performed near the superconducting transition on the samples are consistent with recent predictions of I-V scaling, with critical exponents ν≈ 1.2-1.5 and z≈ 2.6-4. The values for ν are comparable to those previously(T.K. Worthington, E. Olsson, C.S. Nichols, T.M. Shaw and D.R. Clarke, Phys. Rev. B 43), 10538 (1991) . reported(R.H. Koch, V. Foglietti, W.J. Gallagher,G. Koren, A. Gupta and M.P.A. Fisher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63), 1511 (1989).. The values for z are consistent with those reported by Tiernan and Hallock(W.M. Tiernan, R. Joshi and R.B. Hallock, Phys. Rev. B. 48), 3423 (1993). but are somewhat lower than what is predicted by the glassy models. The morpholoogy and magnetic field dependence of z will be described.

  4. A generalization of the power law distribution with nonlinear exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Faustino; Sarabia, José María

    2017-01-01

    The power law distribution is usually used to fit data in the upper tail of the distribution. However, commonly it is not valid to model data in all the range. In this paper, we present a new family of distributions, the so-called Generalized Power Law (GPL), which can be useful for modeling data in all the range and possess power law tails. To do that, we model the exponent of the power law using a non-linear function which depends on data and two parameters. Then, we provide some basic properties and some specific models of that new family of distributions. After that, we study a relevant model of the family, with special emphasis on the quantile and hazard functions, and the corresponding estimation and testing methods. Finally, as an empirical evidence, we study how the debt is distributed across municipalities in Spain. We check that power law model is only valid in the upper tail; we show analytically and graphically the competence of the new model with municipal debt data in the whole range; and we compare the new distribution with other well-known distributions including the Lognormal, the Generalized Pareto, the Fisk, the Burr type XII and the Dagum models.

  5. Influence of Cyclic Strain-Hardening Exponent on Fatigue Ductility Exponent for a Sn-Ag-Cu Micro-Solder Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Yoshihiko; Kariya, Yoshiharu; Oto, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The fatigue ductility exponent in the Coffin-Manson law for a Sn-Ag-Cu micro-solder joint was investigated in terms of the cyclic strain-hardening property and the inelastic strain energy in fracture for isothermal fatigue. The fatigue ductility exponent was found to increase with temperature and holding time under strain at high temperature. This exponent is closely related to the cyclic strain-hardening exponent, which displays the opposite behavior in that it decreases with increasing temperature and with coarsening of intermetallic compound particles while holding under strain at high temperature. This result differs from the creep damage mechanism (grain boundary fracture), which is a primary reason for the significant reduction in fatigue life for all strain ranges for large-size specimens.

  6. Crystal structure of intercalated four-stranded d(C3T) at 1.4 angstroms resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C. H.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of d(C3T), solved at 1.4 angstroms resolution, reveals that the molecule forms a four-stranded intercalated complex. It consists of two parallel-stranded duplexes, each of which is held together by cytosine-protonated cytosine base pairs. The two duplexes are intercalated with each other and have opposite strand orientation. The molecule has a flat, lath-like appearance, and the covalently bonded cytosines have a slow right-handed twist of 17.1 degrees. However, there is considerable asymmetry. On one of the flat sides, the phosphate groups are rotated away from the center of the molecule. They are held in this orientation by bridging water molecules that bind the NH of cytosine and a phosphate group of an opposite chain. There is also considerable microheterogeneity in the structure. The cytosine hemiprotonation occurs even at pH 7 where stable crystals form.

  7. A DSP-based controller for a linear actuator system with sub-angstrom resolution and 15-millimeter travel range

    SciTech Connect

    Smolyanitskiy, A.; Shu, D.; Wong, T.; Experimental Facilities Division; IIT

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and tested a new digital signal processor (DSP)-based closed-loop feedback controller for a linear actuator system with sub-angstrom resolution and 15-mm travel range. The linear actuator system consists of a laser Doppler encoder with multiple-reflection optics [1], a high-stiffness weak-link mechanism with high driving sensitivity and stability [2], and a Texas Instruments TMS320C40 DSP-based controller for high-performance closed-loop feedback control. In this paper, we discuss the DSP-based controller design, as well as recent test results yielding step sizes below 50 picometers obtained with the atomic force microprobe setup.

  8. Exploring the Angstrom Excursion of Au Nanoparticles Excited away from a Metal Surface by an Impulsive Acoustic Perturbation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Wan; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Liu, Yu; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2016-12-27

    We report the anharmonic angstrom dynamics of self-assembled Au nanoparticles (Au:NPs) away from a nickel surface on top of which they are coupled by their near-field interaction. The deformation and the oscillatory excursion away from the surface are induced by picosecond acoustic pulses and probed at the surface plasmon resonance with femtosecond laser pulses. The overall dynamics are due to an efficient transfer of translational momentum from the Ni surface to the Au:NPs, therefore avoiding usual thermal effects and energy redistribution among the electronic states. Two modes are clearly revealed by the oscillatory shift of the Au:NPs surface plasmon resonance-the quadrupole deformation mode due to the transient ellipsoid shape and the excursion mode when the Au:NPs bounce away from the surface. We find that, contrary to the quadrupole mode, the excursion mode is sensitive to the distance between Au:NPs and Ni. Importantly, the excursion dynamics display a nonsinusoidal motion that cannot be explained by a standard harmonic potential model. A detailed modeling of the dynamics using a Hamaker-type Lennard-Jones potential between two media is performed, showing that each Au:NPs coherently evolves in a nearly one-dimensional anharmonic potential with a total excursion of ∼1 Å. This excursion induces a shift of the surface plasmon resonance detectable because of the strong near-field interaction. This general method of observing the spatiotemporal dynamics with angstrom and picosecond resolutions can be directly transposed to many nanostructures or biosystems to reveal the interaction and contact mechanism with their surrounding medium while remaining in their fundamental electronic states.

  9. Joint Statistics of Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    Recently, the notion of Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) has gained attention as a tool for qualitative visualization of flow features. LCS visualize repelling and attracting manifolds marked by local ridges in the field of maximal and minimal finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE), respectively. To provide a quantitative characterization of FTLEs, the statistical theory of large deviations can be used based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms (with finite-size correction). We generalize the formalism to characterize the joint distributions of the two independent FTLEs in 3D. The ``joint Cramér function of turbulence'' is measured from the Johns Hopkins Turbulence Databases (JHTDB) isotropic simulation at Reλ = 433 and results are compared with those computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with those of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude and the most likely ratio of FTLEs changes from 4:1:-5 to 8:3:-11, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. Supported by NSF Graduate Fellowship (DGE-1232825), a JHU graduate Fellowship, and NSF Grant CMMI-0941530. CM thanks Prof. Luca Biferale for useful discussions on the subject.

  10. Backward Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents in Inertial Flows.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Tobias; Theisel, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Inertial particles are finite-sized objects that are carried by fluid flows and in contrast to massless tracer particles they are subject to inertia effects. In unsteady flows, the dynamics of tracer particles have been extensively studied by the extraction of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), such as hyperbolic LCS as ridges of the Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE). The extension of the rich LCS framework to inertial particles is currently a hot topic in the CFD literature and is actively under research. Recently, backward FTLE on tracer particles has been shown to correlate with the preferential particle settling of small inertial particles. For larger particles, inertial trajectories may deviate strongly from (massless) tracer trajectories, and thus for a better agreement, backward FTLE should be computed on inertial trajectories directly. Inertial backward integration, however, has not been possible until the recent introduction of the influence curve concept, which - given an observation and an initial velocity - allows to recover all sources of inertial particles as tangent curves of a derived vector field. In this paper, we show that FTLE on the influence curve vector field is in agreement with preferential particle settling and more importantly it is not only valid for small (near-tracer) particles. We further generalize the influence curve concept to general equations of motion in unsteady spatio-velocity phase spaces, which enables backward integration with more general equations of motion. Applying the influence curve concept to tracer particles in the spatio-velocity domain emits streaklines in massless flows as tangent curves of the influence curve vector field. We demonstrate the correlation between inertial backward FTLE and the preferential particle settling in a number of unsteady vector fields.

  11. Largest lyapunov-exponent estimation and selective prediction by means of simplex forecast algorithms

    PubMed

    Dunki

    2000-11-01

    Limited predictability is one of the remarkable features of deterministic chaos and this feature may be quantized in terms of Lyapunov exponents. Accordingly, Lyapunov-exponent estimates may be expected to follow in a natural way from forecast algorithms. Exploring this idea, we propose a method estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent from a time series which uses the behavior of so-called simplex forecasts. The method considers the estimation of properties of the distribution of local simplex expansion coefficients. These are also used for the definition of error bars for the Lyapunov-exponent estimates and allows for selective forecasts with improved prediction accuracy. We demonstrate these concepts on standard test examples and three realistic applications to time series concerning largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation of an experimentally obtained hyperchaotic NMR signal, brain state differentiation, and stock-market prediction.

  12. Largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation and selective prediction by means of simplex forecast algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünki, Rudolf M.

    2000-11-01

    Limited predictability is one of the remarkable features of deterministic chaos and this feature may be quantized in terms of Lyapunov exponents. Accordingly, Lyapunov-exponent estimates may be expected to follow in a natural way from forecast algorithms. Exploring this idea, we propose a method estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent from a time series which uses the behavior of so-called simplex forecasts. The method considers the estimation of properties of the distribution of local simplex expansion coefficients. These are also used for the definition of error bars for the Lyapunov-exponent estimates and allows for selective forecasts with improved prediction accuracy. We demonstrate these concepts on standard test examples and three realistic applications to time series concerning largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation of an experimentally obtained hyperchaotic NMR signal, brain state differentiation, and stock-market prediction.

  13. A theoretical analysis to current exponent variation regularity and electromigration-induced failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuexing; Yao, Yao

    2017-02-01

    The electric current exponent, typically with j-n form, is a key parameter to predict electromigration-induced failure lifetime. It is experimentally observed that the current exponent depends on different damage mechanisms. In the current research, the physical mechanisms including void initiation, void growth, and joule heating effect are all taken into account to investigate the current exponent variation regularity. Furthermore, a physically based model to predict the mean time to failure is developed and the traditional Black's equation is improved with clear physical meaning. It is found that the solution to the resulting void initiation and growth equation yields a current exponent of 2 and 1, respectively. On the other hand, joule heating plays an important role in failure time prediction and will induce the current exponent n > 2 based on the traditional semi-empirical model. The predictions are in agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Hurst exponent and prediction based on weak-form efficient market hypothesis of stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Cheoljun; Choi, Sunghoon; Oh, Gabjin; Jung, Woo-Sung

    2008-07-01

    We empirically investigated the relationships between the degree of efficiency and the predictability in financial time-series data. The Hurst exponent was used as the measurement of the degree of efficiency, and the hit rate calculated from the nearest-neighbor prediction method was used for the prediction of the directions of future price changes. We used 60 market indexes of various countries. We empirically discovered that the relationship between the degree of efficiency (the Hurst exponent) and the predictability (the hit rate) is strongly positive. That is, a market index with a higher Hurst exponent tends to have a higher hit rate. These results suggested that the Hurst exponent is useful for predicting future price changes. Furthermore, we also discovered that the Hurst exponent and the hit rate are useful as standards that can distinguish emerging capital markets from mature capital markets.

  15. Short-time Lyapunov exponent analysis and the transition to chaos in Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vastano, John A.; Moser, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The physical mechanism driving the weakly chaotic Taylor-Couette flow is investigated using the short-time Liapunov exponent analysis. In this procedure, the transition from quasi-periodicity to chaos is studied using direct numerical 3D simulations of axially periodic Taylor-Couette flow, and a partial Liapunov exponent spectrum for the flow is computed by simultaneously advancing the full solution and a set of perturbations. It is shown that the short-time Liapunov exponent analysis yields more information on the exponents and dimension than that obtained from the common Liapunov exponent calculations. Results show that the chaotic state studied here is caused by a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability of the outflow boundary jet of Taylor vortices.

  16. Controlled test for predictive power of Lyapunov exponents: Their inability to predict epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ying-Cheng; Harrison, Mary Ann F.; Frei, Mark G.; Osorio, Ivan

    2004-09-01

    Lyapunov exponents are a set of fundamental dynamical invariants characterizing a system's sensitive dependence on initial conditions. For more than a decade, it has been claimed that the exponents computed from electroencephalogram (EEG) or electrocorticogram (ECoG) signals can be used for prediction of epileptic seizures minutes or even tens of minutes in advance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictive power of Lyapunov exponents. Three approaches are employed. (1) We present qualitative arguments suggesting that the Lyapunov exponents generally are not useful for seizure prediction. (2) We construct a two-dimensional, nonstationary chaotic map with a parameter slowly varying in a range containing a crisis, and test whether this critical event can be predicted by monitoring the evolution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents. This can thus be regarded as a "control test" for the claimed predictive power of the exponents for seizure. We find that two major obstacles arise in this application: statistical fluctuations of the Lyapunov exponents due to finite time computation and noise from the time series. We show that increasing the amount of data in a moving window will not improve the exponents' detective power for characteristic system changes, and that the presence of small noise can ruin completely the predictive power of the exponents. (3) We report negative results obtained from ECoG signals recorded from patients with epilepsy. All these indicate firmly that, the use of Lyapunov exponents for seizure prediction is practically impossible as the brain dynamical system generating the ECoG signals is more complicated than low-dimensional chaotic systems, and is noisy.

  17. Numerical Analysis and Improved Algorithms for Lyapunov-Exponent Calculation of Discrete-Time Chaotic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianbin; Yu, Simin; Cai, Jianping

    2016-12-01

    Lyapunov exponent is an important index for describing chaotic systems behavior, and the largest Lyapunov exponent can be used to determine whether a system is chaotic or not. For discrete-time dynamical systems, the Lyapunov exponents are calculated by an eigenvalue method. In theory, according to eigenvalue method, the more accurate calculations of Lyapunov exponent can be obtained with the increment of iterations, and the limits also exist. However, due to the finite precision of computer and other reasons, the results will be numeric overflow, unrecognized, or inaccurate, which can be stated as follows: (1) The iterations cannot be too large, otherwise, the simulation result will appear as an error message of NaN or Inf; (2) If the error message of NaN or Inf does not appear, then with the increment of iterations, all Lyapunov exponents will get close to the largest Lyapunov exponent, which leads to inaccurate calculation results; (3) From the viewpoint of numerical calculation, obviously, if the iterations are too small, then the results are also inaccurate. Based on the analysis of Lyapunov-exponent calculation in discrete-time systems, this paper investigates two improved algorithms via QR orthogonal decomposition and SVD orthogonal decomposition approaches so as to solve the above-mentioned problems. Finally, some examples are given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the improved algorithms.

  18. Validating the Operational Bias and Hypothesis of Universal Exponent in Landslide Frequency-Area Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Teng, Tse-Yang; Chen, Yi-Chin; Huang, Cho-Ying; Lee, Cheing-Tung

    2014-01-01

    The exponent decay in landslide frequency-area distribution is widely used for assessing the consequences of landslides and with some studies arguing that the slope of the exponent decay is universal and independent of mechanisms and environmental settings. However, the documented exponent slopes are diverse and hence data processing is hypothesized for this inconsistency. An elaborated statistical experiment and two actual landslide inventories were used here to demonstrate the influences of the data processing on the determination of the exponent. Seven categories with different landslide numbers were generated from the predefined inverse-gamma distribution and then analyzed by three data processing procedures (logarithmic binning, LB, normalized logarithmic binning, NLB and cumulative distribution function, CDF). Five different bin widths were also considered while applying LB and NLB. Following that, the maximum likelihood estimation was used to estimate the exponent slopes. The results showed that the exponents estimated by CDF were unbiased while LB and NLB performed poorly. Two binning-based methods led to considerable biases that increased with the increase of landslide number and bin width. The standard deviations of the estimated exponents were dependent not just on the landslide number but also on binning method and bin width. Both extremely few and plentiful landslide numbers reduced the confidence of the estimated exponents, which could be attributed to limited landslide numbers and considerable operational bias, respectively. The diverse documented exponents in literature should therefore be adjusted accordingly. Our study strongly suggests that the considerable bias due to data processing and the data quality should be constrained in order to advance the understanding of landslide processes. PMID:24852019

  19. The Evolution of the Exponent of Zipf's Law in Language Ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Baixeries, Jaume; Elvevåg, Brita; Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that word frequencies arrange themselves according to Zipf's law. However, little is known about the dependency of the parameters of the law and the complexity of a communication system. Many models of the evolution of language assume that the exponent of the law remains constant as the complexity of a communication systems increases. Using longitudinal studies of child language, we analysed the word rank distribution for the speech of children and adults participating in conversations. The adults typically included family members (e.g., parents) or the investigators conducting the research. Our analysis of the evolution of Zipf's law yields two main unexpected results. First, in children the exponent of the law tends to decrease over time while this tendency is weaker in adults, thus suggesting this is not a mere mirror effect of adult speech. Second, although the exponent of the law is more stable in adults, their exponents fall below 1 which is the typical value of the exponent assumed in both children and adults. Our analysis also shows a tendency of the mean length of utterances (MLU), a simple estimate of syntactic complexity, to increase as the exponent decreases. The parallel evolution of the exponent and a simple indicator of syntactic complexity (MLU) supports the hypothesis that the exponent of Zipf's law and linguistic complexity are inter-related. The assumption that Zipf's law for word ranks is a power-law with a constant exponent of one in both adults and children needs to be revised. PMID:23516390

  20. Validating the operational bias and hypothesis of universal exponent in landslide frequency-area distribution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Teng, Tse-Yang; Chen, Yi-Chin; Huang, Cho-Ying; Lee, Cheing-Tung

    2014-01-01

    The exponent decay in landslide frequency-area distribution is widely used for assessing the consequences of landslides and with some studies arguing that the slope of the exponent decay is universal and independent of mechanisms and environmental settings. However, the documented exponent slopes are diverse and hence data processing is hypothesized for this inconsistency. An elaborated statistical experiment and two actual landslide inventories were used here to demonstrate the influences of the data processing on the determination of the exponent. Seven categories with different landslide numbers were generated from the predefined inverse-gamma distribution and then analyzed by three data processing procedures (logarithmic binning, LB, normalized logarithmic binning, NLB and cumulative distribution function, CDF). Five different bin widths were also considered while applying LB and NLB. Following that, the maximum likelihood estimation was used to estimate the exponent slopes. The results showed that the exponents estimated by CDF were unbiased while LB and NLB performed poorly. Two binning-based methods led to considerable biases that increased with the increase of landslide number and bin width. The standard deviations of the estimated exponents were dependent not just on the landslide number but also on binning method and bin width. Both extremely few and plentiful landslide numbers reduced the confidence of the estimated exponents, which could be attributed to limited landslide numbers and considerable operational bias, respectively. The diverse documented exponents in literature should therefore be adjusted accordingly. Our study strongly suggests that the considerable bias due to data processing and the data quality should be constrained in order to advance the understanding of landslide processes.

  1. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  2. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  3. Lyapunov exponent of chaos generated by acousto-optic modulators with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Anjan K.; Verma, Pramode

    2011-01-01

    Generation of chaos from acousto-optic modulators with an electronic feedback has been studied for several years. Such chaotic signals have an important application in providing secure encryption in free-space optical communication systems. Lyapunov exponent is an important parameter for analysis of chaos generated by a nonlinear system. The Lyapunov exponent of an acousto-optic system is determined and calculated in this paper to understand the dependence of the chaotic response on the system parameters such as bias, feedback gain, input intensity and initial condition exciting the cell. Analysis of chaos using Lyapunov exponent is consistent with bifurcation analysis and is useful in encrypting data signals.

  4. Critical exponent for the Anderson transition in the three-dimensional orthogonal universality class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slevin, Keith; Ohtsuki, Tomi

    2014-01-01

    We report a careful finite size scaling study of the metal-insulator transition in Anderson's model of localization. We focus on the estimation of the critical exponent ν that describes the divergence of the localization length. We verify the universality of this critical exponent for three different distributions of the random potential: box, normal and Cauchy. Our results for the critical exponent are consistent with the measured values obtained in experiments on the dynamical localization transition in the quantum kicked rotor realized in a cold atomic gas.

  5. Power-law exponent of the Bouchaud-Mézard model on regular random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinomiya, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    We study the Bouchaud-Mézard model on a regular random network. By assuming adiabaticity and independency, and utilizing the generalized central limit theorem and the Tauberian theorem, we derive an equation that determines the exponent of the probability distribution function of the wealth as x→∞. The analysis shows that the exponent can be smaller than 2, while a mean-field analysis always gives the exponent as being larger than 2. The results of our analysis are shown to be in good agreement with those of the numerical simulations.

  6. Can one make any crash prediction in finance using the local Hurst exponent idea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grech, D.; Mazur, Z.

    2004-05-01

    We apply the Hurst exponent idea for investigation of DJIA index time-series data. The behavior of the local Hurst exponent prior to drastic changes in financial series signal is analyzed. The optimal length of the time-window over which this exponent can be calculated in order to make some meaningful predictions is discussed. Our prediction hypothesis is verified with examples of 1929 and 1987 crashes, as well as with more recent phenomena in stock market from the period 1995 to 2003. Some interesting agreements are found.

  7. Existence and uniqueness theorems for solutions of parabolic equations with a variable nonlinearity exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhutov, Yu A; Zhikov, V V

    2014-03-31

    The paper is concerned with the solvability of the initial-boundary value problem for second-order parabolic equations with variable nonlinearity exponents. In the model case, this equation contains the p-Laplacian with a variable exponent p(x,t). The problem is shown to be uniquely solvable, provided the exponent p is bounded away from both 1 and ∞ and is log-Hölder continuous, and its solution satisfies the energy equality. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  8. Critical slowing down exponents in structural glasses: Random orthogonal and related models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caltagirone, F.; Ferrari, U.; Leuzzi, L.; Parisi, G.; Rizzo, T.

    2012-08-01

    An important prediction of mode-coupling theory is the relationship between the power-law decay exponents in the β regime and the consequent definition of the so-called exponent parameter λ. In the context of a certain class of mean-field glass models with quenched disorder, the physical meaning of λ has recently been understood, yielding a method to compute it exactly in a static framework. In this paper we exploit this new technique to compute the critical slowing down exponents for such models including, as special cases, the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, the p-spin model, and the random orthogonal model.

  9. Effect of angstrom-scale surface roughness on the self-assembly of polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane block copolymer

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Shreya; Ganesan, Ramakrishnan; Gaur, Nikita; Saifullah, Mohammad S. M.; Hussain, Hazrat; Yang, Hyunsoo; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly of block copolymers has been identified as a potential candidate for high density fabrication of nanostructures. However, the factors affecting its reliability and reproducibility as a patterning technique on various kinds of surfaces are not well-established. Studies pertaining to block copolymer self-assembly have been confined to ultra-flat substrates without taking into consideration the effect of surface roughness. Here, we show that a slight change in the angstrom-scale roughness arising from the surface of a material creates a profound effect on the self-assembly of polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane block copolymer. Its self-assembly was found to be dependent on both the root mean square roughness (Rrms) of the surface and the type of solvent annealing system used. It was observed that surface with Rrms< 5.0 Å showed self-assembly. Above this value, the kinetic hindrance posed by the surface roughness on the block copolymer leads to its conforming to the surface without observable phase separation. PMID:22943003

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Arginase l at 1.29-Angstrom Resolution and Exploration of Inhibition in the Immune Response

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo,L.; Sabio, G.; Mora, A.; Rodriguez, P.; Ochoa, A.; Centeno, F.; Christianson, D.

    2005-01-01

    Human arginase I is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in diseases linked to compromised L-arginine homeostasis. Here, we report high-affinity binding of the reaction coordinate analogue inhibitors 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH, Kd = 5 nM) and S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC, Kd = 270 nM) to human arginase I, and we report x-ray crystal structures of the respective enzyme-inhibitor complexes at 1.29- and 1.94-Angstrom resolution determined from crystals twinned by hemihedry. The ultrahigh-resolution structure of the human arginase I-ABH complex yields an unprecedented view of the binuclear manganese cluster and illuminates the structural basis for nanomolar affinity: bidentate inner-sphere boronate-manganese coordination interactions and fully saturated hydrogen bond networks with inhibitor {alpha}-amino and {alpha}-carboxylate groups. These interactions are therefore implicated in the stabilization of the transition state for L-arginine hydrolysis. Electron density maps also reveal that active-site residue H141 is protonated as the imidazolium cation. The location of H141 is such that it could function as a general acid to protonate the leaving amino group of L-ornithine during catalysis, and this is a revised mechanistic proposal for arginase. This work serves as a foundation for studying the structural and chemical biology of arginase I in the immune response, and we demonstrate the inhibition of arginase activity by ABH in human and murine myeloid cells.

  11. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    to carbonyl- and nitro- functional groups on conjugated and aromatic organic structures (e.g. PAH, and terpene derived products). Using 12-hour fine (0.1-1.0 micron) aerosol samples collected in the field on quartz filters, uv/vis and infrared spectra were obtained in the laboratory using integrating spheres and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, respectively. An inter-comparison of the "real-time" measurements made by the photo-acoustic, aethalometer and MAAP techniques have been described. In addition, the in situ aethalometer (seven-channel) results are compared with continuous integrating sphere uv-visible spectra to examine the angstrom absorption coefficient variance. These results will be briefly overviewed and the specific posters detailing these results will be highlighted highlighted. This work was performed as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City under the support of the Atmospheric Science Program. "This researchwas supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329.

  12. Extension of a result by Lindquist to Lebesgue spaces with variable exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jan; Méndez, Osvaldo

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the family of variable-exponent type eigenvalue problems -Δ pj (ṡ) u =λj| u | p (ṡ) - 2 u and prove the convergence of the eigenfunctions under suitable conditions on the sequence (pj).

  13. On the bound of the Lyapunov exponents for the fractional differential systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Changpin; Gong, Ziqing; Qian, Deliang; Chen, YangQuan

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, fractional(-order) differential equations have attracted increasing interests due to their applications in modeling anomalous diffusion, time dependent materials and processes with long range dependence, allometric scaling laws, and complex networks. Although an autonomous system cannot define a dynamical system in the sense of semigroup because of the memory property determined by the fractional derivative, we can still use the Lyapunov exponents to discuss its dynamical evolution. In this paper, we first define the Lyapunov exponents for fractional differential systems then estimate the bound of the corresponding Lyapunov exponents. For linear fractional differential system, the bounds of its Lyapunov exponents are conveniently derived which can be regarded as an example for the theoretical results established in this paper. Numerical example is also included which supports the theoretical analysis.

  14. Seismic Activity Seen Through Evolution of the Hurst Exponent Model in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño Ortiz, J.; Carreño Aguilera, R.; Balankin, A. S.; Patiño Ortiz, M.; Tovar Rodriguez, J. C.; Acevedo Mosqueda, M. A.; Martinez Cruz, M. A.; Yu, Wen

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics seismic activity occurred in the Cocos Plate - Mexico is analyzed through the evolution of Hurst exponent and 3D fractal dimension, under the mathematical fractal structure based on seismic activity time series, taking into account the magnitude (M) as the main parameter to be estimated. The seismic activity time series and, annual intervals are considered first for finding the Hurst exponent of each year since 1988 (the year in which the database is consistent) until 2012, and then the following years are accumulated describing the cumulative Hurst exponent. The seismic activity description is based on Cocos Plate data information; during a period conform from 1 January 1988 to 31 December 2012. Analyses were performed following methods, mainly considering that the Hurst exponent analysis provides the ability to find the seismicity behavior time-space, described by parameters obtained under the fractal dimension and complex systems.

  15. Application of local Lyapunov exponents to maneuver design and navigation in the three-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Rodney L.; Lo, Martin W.; Born, George H.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamical systems theory has recently been employed to design trajectories within the three-body problem for several missions. This research has applied one stability technique, the calculation of local Lyapunov exponents, to such trajectories. Local Lyapunov exponents give an indication of the effects that perturbations or maneuvers will have on trajectories over a specified time. A numerical comparison of local Lyapunov exponents was first made with the distance random perturbations traveled from a nominal trajectory, and the local Lyapunov exponents were found to correspond well with the perturbations that caused the greatest deviation from the nominal. This would allow them to be used as an indicator of the points where it would be important to reduce navigation uncertainties.

  16. Lyapunov Exponents and Kolmogorov-Sinai Entropy for the Lorentz Gas at Low Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijeren, Henk; Dorfman, J. R.

    1995-05-01

    The Lyapunov exponents and the Kolmogorov-Sinai (KS) entropy for a two-dimensional Lorentz gas at low densities are defined for general nonequilibrium states and calculated with the use of a Lorentz-Boltzmann type equation. In equilibrium the density dependence of these quantities, predicted by Krylov, is recovered and explicit expressions are obtained. The relationship between KS entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and diffusion coefficients, developed by Gaspard and Nicolis, is generalized to a wide class of nonequilibrium states.

  17. Lyapunov Exponents and Rotation Numbers of Linear Systems with Real Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-31

    that for nilpotent systems it is possible to compute an arbitrary number of terms in the asymptotic expansion of Lyapunov exponent in fractional...previously. These results were then extended to the case of the same nilpotent system driven by a finite-state Markov noise process. This was obtained by...cases of interest. 2 2. Nilpotent Systems. In a previous paper [5] we investigated the Lyapunov exponent for white noise systems with a nilpotent

  18. Statistical Analysis of Hurst Exponents of Essential/Nonessential Genes in 33 Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Baojin; Xu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Methods for identifying essential genes currently depend predominantly on biochemical experiments. However, there is demand for improved computational methods for determining gene essentiality. In this study, we used the Hurst exponent, a characteristic parameter to describe long-range correlation in DNA, and analyzed its distribution in 33 bacterial genomes. In most genomes (31 out of 33) the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the essential genes were significantly higher than for the corresponding full-gene-set, whereas the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the nonessential genes remained unchanged or increased only slightly. All of the Hurst exponents of essential genes followed a normal distribution, with one exception. We therefore propose that the distribution feature of Hurst exponents of essential genes can be used as a classification index for essential gene prediction in bacteria. For computer-aided design in the field of synthetic biology, this feature can build a restraint for pre- or post-design checking of bacterial essential genes. Moreover, considering the relationship between gene essentiality and evolution, the Hurst exponents could be used as a descriptive parameter related to evolutionary level, or be added to the annotation of each gene. PMID:26067107

  19. Application of largest Lyapunov exponent analysis on the studies of dynamics under external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odavić, Jovan; Mali, Petar; Tekić, Jasmina; Pantić, Milan; Pavkov-Hrvojević, Milica

    2017-06-01

    Dynamics of driven dissipative Frenkel-Kontorova model is examined by using largest Lyapunov exponent computational technique. Obtained results show that besides the usual way where behavior of the system in the presence of external forces is studied by analyzing its dynamical response function, the largest Lyapunov exponent analysis can represent a very convenient tool to examine system dynamics. In the dc driven systems, the critical depinning force for particular structure could be estimated by computing the largest Lyapunov exponent. In the dc+ac driven systems, if the substrate potential is the standard sinusoidal one, calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent offers a more sensitive way to detect the presence of Shapiro steps. When the amplitude of the ac force is varied the behavior of the largest Lyapunov exponent in the pinned regime completely reflects the behavior of Shapiro steps and the critical depinning force, in particular, it represents the mirror image of the amplitude dependence of critical depinning force. This points out an advantage of this technique since by calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent in the pinned regime we can get an insight into the dynamics of the system when driving forces are applied. Additionally, the system is shown to be not chaotic even in the case of incommensurate structures and large amplitudes of external force, which is a consequence of overdampness of the model and the Middleton's no passing rule.

  20. In situ structural characterization of ageing kinetics in aluminum alloy 2024 across angstrom-to-micrometer length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Levine, Lyle E.; Allen, Andrew J.; Campbell, Carelyn E.; Creuziger, Adam A.; Kazantseva, Nataliya; Ilavsky, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The precipitate structure and precipitation kinetics in an Al-Cu-Mg alloy (AA2024) aged at 190 °C, 208 °C, and 226 °C have been studied using ex situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and in situ synchrotron-based, combined ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) across a length scale from sub-Angstrom to several micrometers. TEM brings information concerning the nature, morphology, and size of the precipitates while SAXS and WAXS provide qualitative and quantitative information concerning the time-dependent size and volume fraction evolution of the precipitates at different stages of the precipitation sequence. Within the experimental time resolution, precipitation at these ageing temperatures involves dissolution of nanometer-sized small clusters and formation of the planar S phase precipitates. Using a three-parameter scattering model constructed on the basis of TEM results, we established the temperature-dependent kinetics for the cluster-dissolution and S-phase formation processes simultaneously. These two processes are shown to have different kinetic rates, with the cluster-dissolution rate approximately double the S-phase formation rate. We identified a dissolution activation energy at (149.5 ± 14.6) kJ mol-1, which translates to (1.55 ± 0.15) eV/atom, as well as an activation energy for the formation of S precipitates at (129.2 ± 5.4) kJ mol-1, i.e. (1.33 ± 0.06) eV/atom. Importantly, the SAXS/WAXS results show the absence of an intermediate Guinier-Preston Bagaryatsky 2 (GPB2)/S" phase in the samples under the experimental ageing conditions. These results are further validated by precipitation simulations that are based on Langer-Schwartz theory and a Kampmann-Wagner numerical method.

  1. Calcium binding in. alpha. -amylases: An X-ray diffraction study at 2. 1- angstrom resolution of two enzymes from Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Boel, E.; Jensen, V.J.; Petersen, S.B.; Thim, L. Woldike, H.F. ); Brady, L.; Brzozowski, AM.; Derewenda, Z.; Dodson, G.G.; Swift, H. )

    1990-07-03

    X-ray diffraction analysis (at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution) of an acid alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger allowed a detailed description of the stereochemistry of the calcium-binding sites. The primary site (which is essential in maintaining proper folding around the active site) contains a tightly bound Ca{sup 2+} with an unusually high number of eight ligands. A secondary binding site was identified at the bottom of the substrate binding cleft; it involves the residues presumed to play a catalytic role (Asp206 and Glu230). This explains the inhibitory effect of calcium observed at higher concentrations. Neutral Aspergillus oryzae (TAKA) {alpha}-amylase was also refined in a new crystal at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution. The structure of this homologous (over 80%) enzyme and addition kinetic studies support all the structural conclusions regarding both calcium-binding sites.

  2. Three-dimensional simulations of the generation of one Angstrom radiation by a self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.; Elliott, C.J.; Schmitt, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the generation of one Angstrom x-rays by a free-electron laser operating in the self-amplified spontaneous emission mode have been performed. Using model electron beam and wiggler parameters, we have investigated the length of wiggler needed to just avoid bandwidth broadening effects associated with gain saturation, and we have also obtained requirements for wiggler field errors to avoid significant loss of performance. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  4. Diffuse x-ray scattering from short-period W/C multilayers at in-plane momentum transfers 0.10-0.17 {angstrom}{sup -1}.

    SciTech Connect

    Headrick, R. L.; Liu, C. L.; Macrander, A. T.

    1999-04-20

    X-ray scattering measurements at 10 keV from multilayers having a period of 24.8 {angstrom} and consisting of 100 W/C bilayers are reported. Specular scans revealed first-order reflectivities in the range 73.5% to 78.0% with bandpasses in the range of 1.5% to 1.7%. Total roughness (or interface grading) values deduced from fitting to the specular data only were in the range 2.5 to 3.0 {angstrom} for the last-to-grow surface of the W layers. Diffuse scattering measurements were made in a geometry that permitted investigation of in-plane momentum transfers up to 0.17 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1}. This is roughly an order of magnitude larger than is possible in conventional rocking scans. Reasonable fitting results were obtained for an in-plane correlation function that has a Fourier transform proportional to exp(-vq{sub y}{sup 2}{vert_bar}z{sub i}-z{sub j}{vert_bar}), where z{sub i}-z{sub j} is the average separation between the i{sup th} and j{sup th} interfaces and q{sub y} is the in-plane momentum transfer.

  5. Relationships of exponents in two-dimensional multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Leung, Yee; Yu, Zu-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) is a generalization of the conventional multifractal analysis. It is extended from the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) which is developed for the purpose of detecting long-range correlation and fractal property in stationary and nonstationary time series. The MF-DFA and some corresponding relationships of the exponents have been subsequently extended to the two-dimensional space. We reexamine two extended relationships in this study and demonstrate that: (i) The invalidity of the relationship h(q)≡H for two-dimensional fractional Brownian motion, and h(q=2)≡H between the Hurst exponent H and the generalized Hurst exponent h(q) in the two-dimensional case. Two more logical relationships are proposed instead as h(q=2)=H for the stationary surface and h(q=2)=H+2 for the nonstationary signal. (ii) The invalidity of the expression τ(q)=qh(q)-D(f) stipulating the relationship between the standard partition-function-based multifractal exponent τ(q) and the generalized Hurst exponent h(q) in the two-dimensional case. Reasons for its invalidity are given from two perspectives.

  6. Laminar Flame Velocity and Temperature Exponent of Diluted DME-Air Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseer Mohammed, Abdul; Anwar, Muzammil; Juhany, Khalid A.; Mohammad, Akram

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the laminar flame velocity and temperature exponent diluted dimethyl ether (DME) air mixtures are reported. Laminar premixed mixture of DME-air with volumetric dilutions of carbon dioxides (CO2) and nitrogen (N2) are considered. Experiments were conducted using a preheated mesoscale high aspect-ratio diverging channel with inlet dimensions of 25 mm × 2 mm. In this method, flame velocities are extracted from planar flames that were stabilized near adiabatic conditions inside the channel. The flame velocities are then plotted against the ratio of mixture temperature and the initial reference temperature. A non-linear power law regression is observed suitable. This regression analysis gives the laminar flame velocity at the initial reference temperature and temperature exponent. Decrease in the laminar flame velocity and increase in temperature exponent is observed for CO2 and N2 diluted mixtures. The addition of CO2 has profound influence when compared to N2 addition on both flame velocity and temperature exponent. Numerical prediction of the similar mixture using a detailed reaction mechanism is obtained. The computational mechanism predicts higher magnitudes for laminar flame velocity and smaller magnitudes of temperature exponent compared to experimental data.

  7. Geometrical constraints on finite-time Lyapunov exponents in two and three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Boozer, Allen H.

    2001-03-01

    Constraints are found on the spatial variation of finite-time Lyapunov exponents of two- and three-dimensional systems of ordinary differential equations. In a chaotic system, finite-time Lyapunov exponents describe the average rate of separation, along characteristic directions, of neighboring trajectories. The solution of the equations is a coordinate transformation that takes initial conditions (the Lagrangian coordinates) to the state of the system at a later time (the Eulerian coordinates). This coordinate transformation naturally defines a metric tensor, from which the Lyapunov exponents and characteristic directions are obtained. By requiring that the Riemann curvature tensor vanish for the metric tensor (a basic result of differential geometry in a flat space), differential constraints relating the finite-time Lyapunov exponents to the characteristic directions are derived. These constraints are realized with exponential accuracy in time. A consequence of the relations is that the finite-time Lyapunov exponents are locally small in regions where the curvature of the stable manifold is large, which has implications for the efficiency of chaotic mixing in the advection-diffusion equation. The constraints also modify previous estimates of the asymptotic growth rates of quantities in the dynamo problem, such as the magnitude of the induced current. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Magnetic entropy change and critical exponents in double perovskite Y2NiMnO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G.; Tripathi, T. S.; Saha, J.; Patnaik, S.

    2014-11-01

    We report the magnetic entropy change (ΔSM) and the critical exponents in the double perovskite manganite Y2NiMnO6 with a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition TC~85 K. For a magnetic field change ΔH=80 kOe, a maximum magnetic entropy change ΔSM=-6.57 J/kg K is recorded around TC. The critical exponents β=0.363±0.05 and γ=1.331±0.09 obtained from power law fitting to spontaneous magnetization MS(T) and the inverse initial susceptibility χ0-1(T) satisfy well to values derived for a 3D-Heisenberg ferromagnet. The critical exponent δ=4.761±0.129 is determined from the isothermal magnetization at TC. The scaling exponents corresponding to second order phase transition are consistent with the exponents from Kouvel-Fisher analysis and satisfy Widom's scaling relation δ=1+(γ/β). Additionally, they also satisfy the single scaling equation M(H,ɛ)=ɛβf±(H/ɛ) according to which the magnetization-field-temperature data around TC should collapse into two curves for temperatures below and above TC.

  9. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  10. Fitting power-laws in empirical data with estimators that work for all exponents

    PubMed Central

    Hanel, Rudolf; Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Liu, Bo; Thurner, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Most standard methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimates of power-law exponents can only be reliably used to identify exponents smaller than minus one. The argument that power laws are otherwise not normalizable, depends on the underlying sample space the data is drawn from, and is true only for sample spaces that are unbounded from above. Power-laws obtained from bounded sample spaces (as is the case for practically all data related problems) are always free of such limitations and maximum likelihood estimates can be obtained for arbitrary powers without restrictions. Here we first derive the appropriate ML estimator for arbitrary exponents of power-law distributions on bounded discrete sample spaces. We then show that an almost identical estimator also works perfectly for continuous data. We implemented this ML estimator and discuss its performance with previous attempts. We present a general recipe of how to use these estimators and present the associated computer codes. PMID:28245249

  11. Stochastic model of Zipf's law and the universality of the power-law exponent.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2014-04-01

    We propose a stochastic model of Zipf's law, namely a power-law relation between rank and size, and clarify as to why a specific value of its power-law exponent is quite universal. We focus on the successive total of a multiplicative stochastic process. By employing properties of a well-known stochastic process, we concisely show that the successive total follows a stationary power-law distribution, which is directly related to Zipf's law. The formula of the power-law exponent is also derived. Finally, we conclude that the universality of the rank-size exponent is brought about by symmetry between an increase and a decrease in the random growth rate.

  12. Fitting power-laws in empirical data with estimators that work for all exponents.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Rudolf; Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Liu, Bo; Thurner, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Most standard methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimates of power-law exponents can only be reliably used to identify exponents smaller than minus one. The argument that power laws are otherwise not normalizable, depends on the underlying sample space the data is drawn from, and is true only for sample spaces that are unbounded from above. Power-laws obtained from bounded sample spaces (as is the case for practically all data related problems) are always free of such limitations and maximum likelihood estimates can be obtained for arbitrary powers without restrictions. Here we first derive the appropriate ML estimator for arbitrary exponents of power-law distributions on bounded discrete sample spaces. We then show that an almost identical estimator also works perfectly for continuous data. We implemented this ML estimator and discuss its performance with previous attempts. We present a general recipe of how to use these estimators and present the associated computer codes.

  13. The role of coupling-frequency weighting exponent on synchronization of a power network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-xin; Jiang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Second-order Kuramoto-like oscillators with dissimilar natural frequencies are used as a coarse-scale model for an electrical power network that contains generators and consumers. This paper proposes a new power network model with coupling-frequency weighting exponent. Furthermore, the influence of the weighting exponent on synchronization of a power network is investigated through numerical simulations. It is observed that the synchronizability is significantly influenced by the coupling-frequency weighting coefficient with different magnitude categories. Furthermore, the synchronization cost caused by phase differences of power plants on the synchronization of the proposed power network model is studied. Numerical simulation shows that the synchronization cost will get larger with the coupling-frequency weighting exponent increasing further.

  14. On the local Hurst exponent of geomagnetic field fluctuations: Spatial distribution for different geomagnetic activity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelis, Paola De; Consolini, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    This study attempts to characterize the spatial distribution of the scaling features of the short time scale magnetic field fluctuations obtained from 45 ground-based geomagnetic observatories distributed in the Northern Hemisphere. We investigate the changes of the scaling properties of the geomagnetic field fluctuations by evaluating the local Hurst exponent and reconstruct maps of this index as a function of the geomagnetic activity level. These maps permit us to localize the different latitudinal structures responsible for disturbances and related to the ionospheric current systems. We find that the geomagnetic field fluctuations associated with the different ionospheric current systems have different scaling features, which can be evidenced by the local Hurst exponent. We also find that in general, the local Hurst exponent for quiet magnetospheric periods is higher than that for more active periods suggesting that the dynamical processes that are activated during disturbed times are responsible for changes in the nature of the geomagnetic field fluctuations.

  15. Repair of Physiologic Time Series: Replacement of Anomalous Data Points to Preserve Fractal Exponents

    PubMed Central

    Shelhamer, Mark; Lowen, Steven B.

    2017-01-01

    Extraction of fractal exponents via the slope of the power spectrum is common in the analysis of many physiological time series. The fractal structure thus characterized is a manifestation of long-term correlations, for which the temporal order of the sample values is crucial. However, missing data points due to artifacts and dropouts are common in such data sets, which can seriously disrupt the computation of fractal parameters. We evaluated a number of methods for replacing missing data in time series to enable reliable extraction of the fractal exponent and make recommendations as to the preferred replacement method depending on the proportion of missing values and any a priori estimate of the fractal exponent. PMID:28271060

  16. Nonlinear analysis using Lyapunov exponents in breast thermograms to identify abnormal lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EtehadTavakol, M.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Lucas, C.; Sadri, S.; Ataei, M.

    2012-07-01

    Breast diseases are one of the major issues in women's health today. Early detection of breast cancer plays a significant role in reducing the mortality rate. Breast thermography is a potential early detection method which is non-invasive, non-radiating, passive, fast, painless, low cost, risk free with no contact with the body. By identifying and removing malignant tumors in early stages before they metastasize and spread to neighboring regions, cancer threats can be minimized. Cancer is often characterized as a chaotic, poorly regulated growth. Cancerous cells, tumors, and vasculature defy have irregular shapes which have potential to be described by a nonlinear dynamical system. Chaotic time series can provide the tools necessary to generate the procedures to evaluate the nonlinear system. Computing Lyapunov exponents is thus a powerful means of quantifying the degree of the chaos. In this paper, we present a novel approach using nonlinear chaotic dynamical system theory for estimating Lyapunov exponents in establishing possible difference between malignant and benign patterns. In order to develop the algorithm, the first hottest regions of breast thermal images are identified first, and then one dimensional scalar time series is obtained in terms of the distance between each subsequent boundary contour points and the center of the mass of the first hottest region. In the next step, the embedding dimension is estimated, and by time delay embedding method, the phase space is reconstructed. In the last step, the Lyapunov exponents are computed to analyze normality or abnormality of the lesions. Positive Lyapunov exponents indicates abnormality while negative Lyapunov exponents represent normality. The normalized errors show the algorithm is satisfactorily, and provide a measure of chaos. It is shown that nonlinear analysis of breast thermograms using Lyapunov exponents may potentially capable of improving reliability of thermography in breast tumor detection as

  17. Structured scale dependence in the Lyapunov exponent of a Boolean chaotic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Seth D.

    2015-04-01

    We report on structures in a scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent of an experimental chaotic map that arise due to discontinuities in the map. The chaos is realized in an autonomous Boolean network, which is constructed using asynchronous logic gates to form a map operator that outputs an unclocked pulse-train of varying widths. The map operator executes pulse-width stretching and folding and the operator's output is fed back to its input to continuously iterate the map. Using a simple model, we show that the structured scale-dependence in the system's Lyapunov exponent is the result of the discrete logic elements in the map operator's stretching function.

  18. Universal pulse shape scaling function and exponents: critical test for avalanche models applied to Barkhausen noise.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit P; Mills, Andrea C; Dahmen, Karin A; Sethna, James P

    2002-04-01

    In order to test if the universal aspects of Barkhausen noise in magnetic materials can be predicted from recent variants of the nonequilibrium zero-temperature Random Field Ising Model, we perform a quantitative study of the universal scaling function derived from the Barkhausen pulse shape in simulations and experiment. Through data collapses and scaling relations we determine the critical exponents tau and 1/sigma nu z in both simulation and experiment. Although we find agreement in the critical exponents, we find differences between theoretical and experimental pulse shape scaling functions as well as between different experiments.

  19. A Very Simple Method to Calculate the (Positive) Largest Lyapunov Exponent Using Interval Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Eduardo M. A. M.; Nepomuceno, Erivelton G.

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, a very simple method to calculate the positive Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE) based on the concept of interval extensions and using the original equations of motion is presented. The exponent is estimated from the slope of the line derived from the lower bound error when considering two interval extensions of the original system. It is shown that the algorithm is robust, fast and easy to implement and can be considered as alternative to other algorithms available in the literature. The method has been successfully tested in five well-known systems: Logistic, Hénon, Lorenz and Rössler equations and the Mackey-Glass system.

  20. Energy spectrum and critical exponents of the free parafermion Z N spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, Francisco C.; Batchelor, Murray T.; Liu, Zi-Zhong

    2017-04-01

    Results are given for the ground state energy and excitation spectrum of a simple N-state Z N spin chain described by free parafermions. The model is non-Hermitian for N≥slant 3 with a real ground state energy and a complex excitation spectrum. Although having a simpler Hamiltonian than the superintegrable chiral Potts model, the model is seen to share some properties with it, e.g. the specific heat exponent α =1-2/N and the anisotropic correlation length exponents {ν\\parallel}=1 and {ν\\bot}=2/N .

  1. Possible origin of the smaller-than-universal percolation-conductivity exponent in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balberg, I.; Azulay, D.; Goldstein, Y.; Jedrzejewski, J.

    2016-06-01

    For quite a few systems in the continuum, such as carbon nanotube polymer composites and segregated composites, percolation electrical conductivity exponents that are much smaller than the universal value have been reported. This is unexpected in view of the classical lattice percolation theory. Here we provide a simple general phenomenological model that accounts for such observations within the framework of universality. We suggest that these small value exponents are due to the interplay between the connectivity and the structural variations that follow the increase of the fractional volume content of the conducting phase.

  2. Possible origin of the smaller-than-universal percolation-conductivity exponent in the continuum.

    PubMed

    Balberg, I; Azulay, D; Goldstein, Y; Jedrzejewski, J

    2016-06-01

    For quite a few systems in the continuum, such as carbon nanotube polymer composites and segregated composites, percolation electrical conductivity exponents that are much smaller than the universal value have been reported. This is unexpected in view of the classical lattice percolation theory. Here we provide a simple general phenomenological model that accounts for such observations within the framework of universality. We suggest that these small value exponents are due to the interplay between the connectivity and the structural variations that follow the increase of the fractional volume content of the conducting phase.

  3. Semi-local scaling exponent estimation with box-penalty constraints and total-variation regularisation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James; Nafornita, Corina; Isar, Alexandru

    2016-04-06

    We here establish and exploit the result that 2-D isotropic self-similar fields beget quasi-decorrelated wavelet coefficients and that the resulting localised log sample second moment statistic is asymptotically normal. This leads to the development of a semi-local scaling exponent estimation framework with optimally modified weights. Furthermore, recent interest in penalty methods for least squares problems and generalised Lasso for scaling exponent estimation inspires the simultaneous incorporation of both bounding box constraints and total variation smoothing into an iteratively reweighted leastsquares estimator framework. Numerical results on fractional Brownian fields with global and piecewise constant, semi-local Hurst parameters illustrate the benefits of the new estimators.

  4. Application of automated deduction to the search for single axioms for exponent groups

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Wos, L.

    1992-02-11

    We present new results in axiomatic group theory obtained by using automated deduction programs. The results include single axioms, some with the identity and others without, for groups of exponents 3, 4, 5 and 7, and a general form for single axioms for groups of odd exponent. The results were obtained by using the programs in three separate ways: as a symbolic calculator, to search for proofs,and to search for couterexamples. We also touch on relations between logic programming and automated reasoning.

  5. Explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. The application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law allows interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  6. Brief communication: Possible explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Allen G.

    2016-04-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. Application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law may allow interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  7. The susceptibility critical exponent for a nonaqueous ionic binary mixture near a consolute point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Kai C.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.; Levelt Sengers, J. M. H.

    1992-01-01

    We report turbidity measurements of a nonaqueous ionic solution of triethyl n-hexylammonium triethyl n-hexylboride in diphenyl ether. A classical susceptibility critical exponent gamma = 1.01 +/- 0.01 is obtained over the reduced temperature range t between values of 0.1 and 0.0001. The best fits of the sample transmission had a standard deviation of 0.39 percent over this range. Ising and spherical model critical exponents are firmly excluded. The correlation length amplitude xi sub 0 from fitting is 1.0 +/- 0.2 nm which is much larger than values found in neutral fluids and some aqueous binary mixtures.

  8. Nonsequential two-photon absorption from the K shell in solid zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, Shambhu; Fuchs, Matthias; Hastings, Jerry; Herrmann, Sven C.; Inubushi, Yuichi; Pines, Jack; Shwartz, Sharon; Yabashi, Makina; Reis, David A.

    2016-10-01

    We report the observation of nonsequential two-photon absorption from the K shell of solid Zr (atomic number Z =40 ) using intense x-ray pulses from the Spring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser (SACLA). We determine the generalized nonlinear two-photon absorption cross section at the two-photon threshold in the range of 3.9-57 ×10-60cm4s bounded by the estimated uncertainty in the absolute intensity. The lower limit is consistent with the prediction of 3.1 ×10-60cm4s from the nonresonant Z-6 scaling for hydrogenic ions in the nonrelativistic, dipole limit.

  9. Landau-like theory for universality of critical exponents in quasistationary states of isolated mean-field systems.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shun; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Y

    2015-06-01

    An external force dynamically drives an isolated mean-field Hamiltonian system to a long-lasting quasistationary state, whose lifetime increases with population of the system. For second order phase transitions in quasistationary states, two nonclassical critical exponents have been reported individually by using a linear and a nonlinear response theories in a toy model. We provide a simple way to compute the critical exponents all at once, which is an analog of the Landau theory. The present theory extends the universality class of the nonclassical exponents to spatially periodic one-dimensional systems and shows that the exponents satisfy a classical scaling relation inevitably by using a key scaling of momentum.

  10. Comparison of the manganese oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of spinach and Synechococcus sp. with multinuclear manganese model compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DeRose, V.J.; Mukerji, I.; Latimer, M.J. ); Yachandra, V.K.; Klein, M.P. ); Sauer, K. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-15

    The evaluation of Mn X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) from photosystem II is described for preparations from both spinach and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. poised in the S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] states. In addition to reproducing previous results suggesting the presence of bis([mu]-oxo)-bridged Mn centers in the OEC, a Fourier transform peak due to scatterers at an average distance of > 3 [angstrom] is detected in both types of preparation. In addition, subtle but reproducible changes are found in the relative amplitudes of the Fourier transform peaks due to mainly O ([approximately]1.8 [angstrom]) and Mn ([approximately] 2.7 [angstrom]) neighbors upon cryogenic advance from the S[sub 1] to the S[sub 2] state. Analysis of the peak due to scatterers at [approximately] 3 [angstrom] favors assignment to (per 4 Mn in the OEC) 1-2 heavy atom (Mn, Ca) scatterers at an average distance of 3.3-3.4 [angstrom]. The EXAFS data of several multinuclear Mn model compounds containing such scattering interactions are analyzed and compared with the data for the OEC. Structural models for the OEC are evaluated on the basis of these results. 40 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Usefulness of the Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models in Educational Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    The logistic positive exponent family (LPEF) of models has been proposed by F. Samejima (1998) for dichotomous responses. This family of models is characterized by point-asymmetric item characteristic curves (ICCs). This paper introduces the LPEF family, and discusses its usefulness in educational measurement and the implications of its use.…

  12. Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models: Virtue of Asymmetric Item Characteristic Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    2000-01-01

    Discusses whether the tradition of accepting point-symmetric item characteristic curves is justified by uncovering the inconsistent relationship between the difficulties of items and the order of maximum likelihood estimates of ability. In this context, proposes a family of models, called the logistic positive exponent family, that provides…

  13. Modified periodogram method for estimating the Hurst exponent of fractional Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingjun; Liu, Yong; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Tianzi; Yang, Lihua

    2009-12-01

    Fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) is an important and widely used self-similar process, which is mainly parametrized by its Hurst exponent (H) . Many researchers have proposed methods for estimating the Hurst exponent of fGn. In this paper we put forward a modified periodogram method for estimating the Hurst exponent based on a refined approximation of the spectral density function. Generalizing the spectral exponent from a linear function to a piecewise polynomial, we obtained a closer approximation of the fGn's spectral density function. This procedure is significant because it reduced the bias in the estimation of H . Furthermore, the averaging technique that we used markedly reduced the variance of estimates. We also considered the asymptotical unbiasedness of the method and derived the upper bound of its variance and confidence interval. Monte Carlo simulations showed that the proposed estimator was superior to a wavelet maximum likelihood estimator in terms of mean-squared error and was comparable to Whittle's estimator. In addition, a real data set of Nile river minima was employed to evaluate the efficiency of our proposed method. These tests confirmed that our proposed method was computationally simpler and faster than Whittle's estimator.

  14. On relations among the entropic chaos degree, the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and the Lyapunov exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Kamizawa, T. Hara, T.; Ohya, M.

    2014-03-15

    There exist several criteria to describe the chaotic behaviour of a dynamical system. In this paper, we discuss the relations among three criteria: Entropic Chaos Degree, Kolmogorov-Shinai entropy, and Lyapunov exponent. Moreover, the problems of their computation are discussed.

  15. Two-exponent Lavalette function: A generalization for the case of adherents to a religious movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, Marcel

    2014-06-01

    The Lavalette function is generalized to a two-exponent function in order to represent data looking like a sigmoid on semilogarithmic plots. A Mandelbrot trick is suggested for further investigations, if more fit parameters are needed. The analyzed data is that of the number of adherents to the main religions in the 20th century.

  16. Exponents of intrachain correlation for self-avoiding walks and knotted self-avoiding polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Erica; Deguchi, Tetsuo

    2013-08-01

    We show numerically that critical exponents for two-point intrachain correlation of an infinite chain characterize those of finite chains in self-avoiding walk (SAW) and self-avoiding polygon (SAP) under a topological constraint. We evaluate short-distance exponents θ(i, j) through the probability distribution functions of the distance between the ith and jth vertices of N-step SAW (or SAP with a knot) for all pairs (1 ⩽ i, j ⩽ N). We construct the contour plot of θ(i, j), and express it as a function of i and j. We suggest that it has quite a simple structure. Here exponents θ(i, j) generalize des Cloizeaux’s three critical exponents for short-distance intrachain correlation of SAW, and we show the crossover among them. We also evaluate the diffusion coefficient of knotted SAP for a few knot types, which can be calculated with the probability distribution functions of the distance between two nodes.

  17. Stiffness dependence of critical exponents of semiflexible polymer chains situated on two-dimensional compact fractals.

    PubMed

    Zivić, Ivan; Elezović-Hadzić, Suncica; Milosević, Sava

    2009-12-01

    We present an exact and Monte Carlo renormalization group (MCRG) study of semiflexible polymer chains on an infinite family of the plane-filling (PF) fractals. The fractals are compact, that is, their fractal dimension df is equal to 2 for all members of the fractal family enumerated by the odd integer b(3exponents nu (associated with the mean squared end-to-end distances of polymer chain) and gamma (associated with the total number of different polymer chains). In addition, we calculate nu and gamma through the MCRG approach for b up to 201. Our results show that for each particular b, critical exponents are stiffness dependent functions, in such a way that the stiffer polymer chains (with smaller values of s) display enlarged values of nu, and diminished values of gamma. On the other hand, for any specific s, the critical exponent nu monotonically decreases, whereas the critical exponent gamma monotonically increases, with the scaling parameter b. We reflect on a possible relevance of the criticality of semiflexible polymer chains on the PF family of fractals to the same problem on the regular Euclidean lattices.

  18. Odd asymmetric factorization of Wiener-Hopf plus Hankel operators on variable exponent Lebesgue spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, L. P.; Silva, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to obtain an invertibility criterion for Wiener-Hopf plus Hankel operators acting between variable exponent Lebesgue spaces on the real line. This is obtained by a so-called odd asymmetric factorization which is applied to the Fourier symbols of the operators under study.

  19. Critical exponents of the quark-gluon bags model with a critical endpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanytskyi, A. I.; Bugaev, K. A.; Sorin, A. S.; Zinovjev, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    The critical indices α', β, γ', and δ of the Quark Gluon Bags with Surface Tension Model that has a critical endpoint are calculated and compared with the exponents of other models. These indices are expressed in terms of the most general parameters of the model. Despite the usual expectations the found critical indices do not depend on the Fisher exponent τ and on the parameter ϰ which relates the mean bag surface to its volume. The scaling relations for the obtained critical exponents are verified, and it is demonstrated that for the standard definition of the index α' the Fisher and the Griffiths scaling inequalities are not fulfilled in general case, whereas the Liberman scaling inequality is always obeyed. This is not surprising for the phase diagram with the asymmetric properties of pure phases, but the present model also provides us with the first and explicit example that the specially defined index αs' does not recover the scaling relations as well. Therefore, here we suggest the physically motivated definition of the index α'=αc' and demonstrate that such a definition recovers the Fisher scaling inequality, while it is shown that the Griffiths inequality should be generalized for the phase diagram with the asymmetric properties. The critical exponents of several systems that belong to different universality classes are successfully described by the parameters of the present model, and hence its equation of state can be used for a variety of practical applications.

  20. Direct test of the critical exponents at the sol-gel transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Demet; Pekcan, Önder; Yılmaz, Yaşar

    2004-01-01

    The steady state fluorescence technique was used to study the sol-gel transition for the solution-free radical cross-linking polymerization of acrylamide (AAm), with N,N'-methylenebis (acrylamide) as cross linker in the presence of ammonium persulfate as an initiator. Pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1, 3,6-trisulfonic acid, trisodium salt) is used as a fluoroprobe for monitoring the polymerization. Pyranine molecules start to bind to acrylamide polymer chains upon the initiation of the polymerization, thus the spectra of the bonded pyranines shift to the shorter wavelengths. Fluorescence spectra from the bonded pyranines allows one to monitor the sol-gel transition, without disturbing the system mechanically, and to test the universality of the sol-gel transition as a function of some kinetic parameters such as polymer concentration, cross-linker concentration, and temperature. Observations around the critical point show that there are three regimes for AAm concentration in which the exponents differ drastically. The gel fraction exponent β and the weight average degree of polymerization exponent γ agree best with the static percolation results for higher acrylamide concentrations above 1M, but they cross over from percolation to mean-field (Flory-Stockmayer) values when the AAm concentration is lower than 2M. For very low polymer concentrations, below which the system can not form the gel, the exponents differ considerably from both the percolation and the mean-field values.

  1. No ISCOs in Charged Myers Perry Spacetimes by Measuring Lyapunov Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-01-01

    By computing coordinate time Lyapunov exponent, we prove that for more than four spacetime dimensions (N ≥ 3), there are no Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) in charged Myers Perry blackhole spacetime.Using it, we show that the instability of equatorial circular geodesics, both massive and massless particles for such types of blackhole space-times.

  2. Graded Response Model Based on the Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models for Dichotomous Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    2008-01-01

    Samejima ("Psychometrika "65:319--335, 2000) proposed the logistic positive exponent family of models (LPEF) for dichotomous responses in the unidimensional latent space. The objective of the present paper is to propose and discuss a graded response model that is expanded from the LPEF, in the context of item response theory (IRT). This…

  3. Dynamical generalized Hurst exponent as a tool to monitor unstable periods in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Raffaello; Di Matteo, T.; Gramatica, Ruggero; Aste, Tomaso

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the use of the Hurst exponent, dynamically computed over a weighted moving time-window, to evaluate the level of stability/instability of financial firms. Financial firms bailed-out as a consequence of the 2007-2008 credit crisis show a neat increase with time of the generalized Hurst exponent in the period preceding the unfolding of the crisis. Conversely, firms belonging to other market sectors, which suffered the least throughout the crisis, show opposite behaviors. We find that the multifractality of the bailed-out firms increase at the crisis suggesting that the multi fractal properties of the time series are changing. These findings suggest the possibility of using the scaling behavior as a tool to track the level of stability of a firm. In this paper, we introduce a method to compute the generalized Hurst exponent which assigns larger weights to more recent events with respect to older ones. In this way large fluctuations in the remote past are less likely to influence the recent past. We also investigate the scaling associated with the tails of the log-returns distributions and compare this scaling with the scaling associated with the Hurst exponent, observing that the processes underlying the price dynamics of these firms are truly multi-scaling.

  4. Upper and lower critical decay exponents of Ising ferromagnets with long-range interaction.

    PubMed

    Horita, Toshiki; Suwa, Hidemaro; Todo, Synge

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the universality class of the finite-temperature phase transition of the two-dimensional Ising model with the algebraically decaying ferromagnetic long-range interaction, J_{ij}=|r[over ⃗]_{i}-r[over ⃗]_{j}|^{-(d+σ)}, where d (=2) is the dimension of the system and σ is the decay exponent, by means of the order-N cluster-algorithm Monte Carlo method. In particular, we focus on the upper and lower critical decay exponents, the boundaries between the mean-field-universality, intermediate, and short-range-universality regimes. At the critical decay exponents, it is found that the standard Binder ratio of magnetization at the critical temperature exhibits extremely slow convergence as a function of the system size. We propose more effective physical quantities, namely the combined Binder ratio and the self-combined Binder ratio, both of which cancel the leading finite-size corrections of the conventional Binder ratio. Utilizing these techniques, we clearly demonstrate that in two dimensions, the lower and upper critical decay exponents are σ=1 and 7/4, respectively, contrary to the recent Monte Carlo and renormalization-group studies [M. Picco, arXiv:1207.1018; T. Blanchard et al., Europhys. Lett. 101, 56003 (2013)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/101/56003].

  5. Upper and lower critical decay exponents of Ising ferromagnets with long-range interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horita, Toshiki; Suwa, Hidemaro; Todo, Synge

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the universality class of the finite-temperature phase transition of the two-dimensional Ising model with the algebraically decaying ferromagnetic long-range interaction, Ji j=|r⃗i-r⃗j| -(d +σ ) , where d (=2) is the dimension of the system and σ is the decay exponent, by means of the order-N cluster-algorithm Monte Carlo method. In particular, we focus on the upper and lower critical decay exponents, the boundaries between the mean-field-universality, intermediate, and short-range-universality regimes. At the critical decay exponents, it is found that the standard Binder ratio of magnetization at the critical temperature exhibits extremely slow convergence as a function of the system size. We propose more effective physical quantities, namely the combined Binder ratio and the self-combined Binder ratio, both of which cancel the leading finite-size corrections of the conventional Binder ratio. Utilizing these techniques, we clearly demonstrate that in two dimensions, the lower and upper critical decay exponents are σ =1 and 7/4, respectively, contrary to the recent Monte Carlo and renormalization-group studies [M. Picco, arXiv:1207.1018; T. Blanchard et al., Europhys. Lett. 101, 56003 (2013) 10.1209/0295-5075/101/56003].

  6. Physiological responses during matches and profile of elite pencak silat exponents.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Tan, Benedict; Teh, Kong Chuan

    2002-12-01

    This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study describing the physiological responses during competitive matches and profile of elite exponents of an emerging martial art sport, pencak silat. Thirty exponents (21 males and 9 females) were involved in the study. Match responses (i.e. heart rate (HR) throughout match and capillary blood lactate concentration, [La], at pre-match and at the end of every round) were obtained during actual competitive duels. Elite silat exponents' physiological attributes were assessed via anthropometry, vertical jump, isometric grip strength, maximal oxygen uptake, and the Wingate 30 s anaerobic test of the upper and lower body, in the laboratory. The match response data showed that silat competitors' mean HR was > 84% of estimated HR maximum and levels of [La] ranged from 6.7 - 18.7 mMol(-1) during matches. This suggests that competitive silat matches are characterised by high aerobic and anaerobic responses. In comparison to elite taekwondo and judo athletes' physiological characteristics, elite silat exponents have lower aerobic fitness and grip strength, but greater explosive leg power (vertical jump). Generally, they also possessed a similar anaerobic capability in the lower but markedly inferior anaerobic capability in the upper body.

  7. THE COMPUTATION OF CHARACTERISTIC EXPONENTS IN THE PLANAR RESTRICTED PROBLEM OF THREE BODIES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    methods are applied to evaluate the characteristic exponents of Rabe’s Trojan Orbits; they are found to be of the stable type for the ovals, and of...the unstable type for the horse -shoe shaped orbit. When the periodic orbit is symmetric with respect to the axis of syzygies, four independent

  8. On the Topological Changes of Local Hurst Exponent in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolini, G.; De Michelis, P.

    2014-12-01

    Geomagnetic activity during magnetic substorms and storms is related to the dinamical and topological changes of the current systems flowing in the Earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere. This is particularly true in the case of polar regions where the enhancement of auroral electrojet current system is responsible for the observed geomagnetic perturbations. Here, using the DMA-technique we evaluate the local Hurst exponent (H"older exponent) for a set of 46 geomagnetic observatories, widely distributed in the northern hemisphere, during one of the most famous and strong geomagnetic storm, the Bastille event, and reconstruct a sequence of polar maps showing the dinamical changes of the topology of the local Hurst exponent with the geomagnetic activity level. The topological evolution of local Hurst exponent maps is discussed in relation to the dinamical changes of the current systems flowing in the polar ionosphere. G. Consolini has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant agreement no. 313038/STORM for this research.

  9. Phase space reconstruction and estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent for gait kinematic data

    SciTech Connect

    Josiński, Henryk; Świtoński, Adam; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2015-03-10

    The authors describe an example of application of nonlinear time series analysis directed at identifying the presence of deterministic chaos in human motion data by means of the largest Lyapunov exponent. The method was previously verified on the basis of a time series constructed from the numerical solutions of both the Lorenz and the Rössler nonlinear dynamical systems.

  10. On identifying relationships between the flood scaling exponent and basin attributes.

    PubMed

    Medhi, Hemanta; Tripathi, Shivam

    2015-07-01

    Floods are known to exhibit self-similarity and follow scaling laws that form the basis of regional flood frequency analysis. However, the relationship between basin attributes and the scaling behavior of floods is still not fully understood. Identifying these relationships is essential for drawing connections between hydrological processes in a basin and the flood response of the basin. The existing studies mostly rely on simulation models to draw these connections. This paper proposes a new methodology that draws connections between basin attributes and the flood scaling exponents by using observed data. In the proposed methodology, region-of-influence approach is used to delineate homogeneous regions for each gaging station. Ordinary least squares regression is then applied to estimate flood scaling exponents for each homogeneous region, and finally stepwise regression is used to identify basin attributes that affect flood scaling exponents. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is tested by applying it to data from river basins in the United States. The results suggest that flood scaling exponent is small for regions having (i) large abstractions from precipitation in the form of large soil moisture storages and high evapotranspiration losses, and (ii) large fractions of overland flow compared to base flow, i.e., regions having fast-responding basins. Analysis of simple scaling and multiscaling of floods showed evidence of simple scaling for regions in which the snowfall dominates the total precipitation.

  11. Better bound on the exponent of the radius of the multipartite separable ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid; Barnum, Howard

    2005-09-01

    We show that for an m -qubit quantum system, there is a ball of radius asymptotically approaching κ 2-γm in Frobenius norm, centered at the identity matrix, of separable (unentangled) positive semidefinite matrices, for an exponent γ=0.5 (ln 3/ln 2-1) ≈0.292 481 25 much smaller in magnitude than the best previously known exponent, from our earlier work, of 1/2 . For normalized m -qubit states, we get a separable ball of radius 3m+1 / √(( 3m +3) )× 2- (1+γ) m ≡ 3m+1 / √(( 3m +3) )× 6-m/2 (note that κ=√(3) ), compared to the previous 2× 2-3m/2 . This implies that with parameters realistic for current experiments, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with standard pseudopure-state preparation techniques can access only unentangled states if 36 qubits or fewer are used (compared to 23 qubits via our earlier results). We also obtain an improved exponent for m -partite systems of fixed local dimension d0 , although approaching our earlier exponent as d0 →∞ .

  12. Regularity for the porous medium equation with variable exponent: The singular case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, Eurica

    We extend to the singular case the results of [E. Henriques, J.M. Urbano, Intrinsic scaling for PDEs with an exponential nonlinearity, Indiana Univ. Math. J. 55 (5) (2006) 1701-1721] concerning the regularity of weak solutions of the porous medium equation with variable exponent. The method of intrinsic scaling is used to show that local weak solutions are locally continuous.

  13. Modified periodogram method for estimating the Hurst exponent of fractional Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingjun; Liu, Yong; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Tianzi; Yang, Lihua

    2009-12-01

    Fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) is an important and widely used self-similar process, which is mainly parametrized by its Hurst exponent (H) . Many researchers have proposed methods for estimating the Hurst exponent of fGn. In this paper we put forward a modified periodogram method for estimating the Hurst exponent based on a refined approximation of the spectral density function. Generalizing the spectral exponent from a linear function to a piecewise polynomial, we obtained a closer approximation of the fGn’s spectral density function. This procedure is significant because it reduced the bias in the estimation of H . Furthermore, the averaging technique that we used markedly reduced the variance of estimates. We also considered the asymptotical unbiasedness of the method and derived the upper bound of its variance and confidence interval. Monte Carlo simulations showed that the proposed estimator was superior to a wavelet maximum likelihood estimator in terms of mean-squared error and was comparable to Whittle’s estimator. In addition, a real data set of Nile river minima was employed to evaluate the efficiency of our proposed method. These tests confirmed that our proposed method was computationally simpler and faster than Whittle’s estimator.

  14. Exponent Rummy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Leah

    2016-01-01

    Classroom teachers try to provide opportunities for students to practice and use the algebra skills they are learning in ways that are nonroutine. They also want to help students connect the big ideas of math with the skills they are learning as part of the balance between understanding concepts and procedures. Math games can be used to accomplish…

  15. Inter-relationship between scaling exponents for describing self-similar river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Soohyun; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Natural river networks show well-known self-similar characteristics. Such characteristics are represented by various power-law relationships, e.g., between upstream length and drainage area (exponent h) (Hack, 1957), and in the exceedance probability distribution of upstream area (exponent ɛ) (Rodriguez-Iturbe et al., 1992). It is empirically revealed that these power-law exponents are within narrow ranges. Power-law is also found in the relationship between drainage density (the total stream length divided by the total basin area) and specified source area (the minimum drainage area to form a stream head) (exponent η) (Moussa and Bocquillon, 1996). Considering that above three scaling relationships all refer to fundamental measures of 'length' and 'area' of a given drainage basin, it is natural to hypothesize plausible inter-relationship between these three scaling exponents. Indeed, Rigon et al. (1996) demonstrated the relationship between ɛ and h. In this study, we expand this to a more general ɛ-η-h relationship. We approach ɛ-η relationship in an analytical manner while η-h relationship is demonstrated for six study basins in Korea. Detailed analysis and implications will be presented. References Hack, J. T. (1957). Studies of longitudinal river profiles in Virginia and Maryland. US, Geological Survey Professional Paper, 294. Moussa, R., & Bocquillon, C. (1996). Fractal analyses of tree-like channel networks from digital elevation model data. Journal of Hydrology, 187(1), 157-172. Rigon, R., Rodriguez-Iturbe, I., Maritan, A., Giacometti. A., Tarboton, D. G., & Rinaldo, A. (1996). On Hack's Law. Water Resources Research, 32(11), 3367-3374. Rodríguez-Iturbe, I., Ijjasz-Vasquez, E. J., Bras, R. L., & Tarboton, D. G. (1992). Power law distributions of discharge mass and energy in river basins. Water Resources Research, 28(4), 1089-1093.

  16. An analysis of the financial crisis in the KOSPI market using Hurst exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Kyubin; Oh, Gabjin; Kim, Seunghwan

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the study of the financial crisis has progressed to include the concept of the complex system, thereby improving the understanding of this extreme event from a neoclassical economic perspective. To determine which variables are related to the financial event caused by the 2008 US subprime crisis using temporal correlations, we investigate the diverse variables that may explain the financial system. These variables include return, volatility, trading volume and inter-trade duration data sets within the TAQ data for 27 highly capitalized individual companies listed on the KOSPI stock market. During 2008 and 2009, the Hurst exponent for the return time series over the whole period was less than 0.5, and the Hurst exponents for other variables, such as the volatility, trading volume and inter-trade duration, were greater than 0.5. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between the variation of temporal correlation and market instability based on these Hurst exponents and the degree of multifractality. We find that for the data related to trading volume, the Hurst exponents do not allow us to detect changes in market status, such as changes from normal to abnormal status, whereas other variables, including the return, volatility and weekly inter-trade duration, indicate a significant change in market status after the Lehman Brothers' bankruptcy. In addition, the multifractality and the measurement defined by subtracting the Hurst exponent of the return time series from that of the volatility time series decrease sharply after the US subprime event and recover approximately 50 days after the Lehman Brothers' collapse. Our findings suggest that the temporal features of financial quantities in the TAQ data set and the market complexity perform very well at diagnosing financial market stability.

  17. The Nature of Associated Absorption and the UV--X-ray Connection in 3C 288.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, F.; Netzer, H.; Shields, J. C.

    1999-12-01

    We discuss new Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopy of the radio-loud quasar, 3C 288.1. The data cover 590 Angstroms to 1610 Angstroms in the quasar rest frame. They reveal a wealth of associated absorption lines (AALs) with no accompanying Lyman-limit absorption. The metallic AALs range in ionization from CIII and NIII to NeVIII and MgX. We use these data and photoionization models to derive the following properties of the AAL gas: 1) There are multiple ionization zones within the AAL region, spanning a factor of at least 50 in ionization parameter. 2) The overall ionization is consistent with the ``warm'' X-ray continuum absorbers measured in Seyfert 1 nuclei and other QSOs. However, 3) the column densities implied by the AALs in 3C 288.1 are too low to produce significant bound-free absorption at any UV--X-ray wavelengths. Substantial X-ray absorption would require yet another zone, having either a much higher ionization or much lower velocity dispersion than the main AAL region. 4) The total hydrogen column density in the AAL gas is log NH (cm-2) = 20.2. 5) The metallicity is roughly half solar. 6) The AALs have deconvolved widths of 900 km/s and their centroids are consistent with no shift from the quasar systemic velocity (conservatively within +/-1000 km/s). 7) There are no direct indicators of the absorber's location in our data, but the high ionization and high metallicity both suggest a close physical relationship to the quasar and/or its host galaxy. Finally, the UV continuum shape gives no indication of a ``blue bump'' at higher energies. There is a distinct break of unknown origin at 1030 Angstroms , and the decline toward higher energies (with spectral index α = -1.73, for fν ν α ) is even steeper than a single power-law interpolation from 1030 Angstroms to soft X-rays.

  18. Optical cavity and electron beam requirements for the operation of a 1.5 {angstrom} LCLS in a regenerative amplifier mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    Current conceptual designs for Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLSs) in the 100-1 {angstrom} wavelength range are based on Free Electron Lasers (FELs) that are designed to saturate in a single pass of the electron beam through the undulator. This, in practice, leads to insertion devices several tens of meters in length, which greatly dominates the component costs of the overall LCLS system. Although it is well known that amplification within a cavity would enable much shorter and more economical undulators to be employed, two major practical problems are currently adduced to discount the use of such configurations in the sub-100 {angstrom} wavelength regime: (1) the temporal jitter of the (sub-picosecond) electron bunches required for such FELs can be comparable to or larger that the durations of the bunches themselves, rendering reliable synchronization extremely difficult, and (2) the lack of optical elements of sufficient reflectivity and bandwidth out of which adequately efficient optical cavities can be constructed. In this paper we reasssess the requirements associated with these two aspects of x-ray optics as a possible approach to resolving or making more tractable the resolution of some of the basic problems involved.

  19. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode is described. The goal is to produce a {approximately}10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately}10 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM), 1.06 {mu}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately}1 {mu}s FWHM dye laser beam tuned to 5890 {Angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the NaI resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated charge-coupled-device camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately}0.1 {Angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5{endash}2 eV. Laser-induced fluorescence from {approximately}1{times}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} NaI 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately}{plus_minus}0.06 {Angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  1. Specific-heat exponent and modified hyperscaling in the 4D random-field Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytas, N. G.; Martín-Mayor, V.; Picco, M.; Sourlas, N.

    2017-03-01

    We report a high-precision numerical estimation of the critical exponent α of the specific heat of the random-field Ising model in four dimensions. Our result α =0.12(1) indicates a diverging specific-heat behavior and is consistent with the estimation coming from the modified hyperscaling relation using our estimate of θ via the anomalous dimensions η and \\barη . Our analysis benefited from a high-statistics zero-temperature numerical simulation of the model for two distributions of the random fields, namely a Gaussian and Poissonian distribution, as well as recent advances in finite-size scaling and reweighting methods for disordered systems. An original estimate of the critical slowing down exponent z of the maximum-flow algorithm used is also provided.

  2. The Hurst exponent over time: testing the assertion that emerging markets are becoming more efficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajueiro, Daniel O.; Tabak, Benjamin M.

    2004-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the assertion found in the financial literature that emerging markets are becoming more efficient over time. To verify whether this assertion is true or not, we propose the calculation of the Hurst exponent over time using a time window with 4 years of data. The data used here comprises the bulk of emerging markets for Latin America and Asia. Our empirical results show that this assertion seems to be true for most countries, but it does not hold for countries such as Brazil, The Philippines and Thailand. Moreover, in order to check whether or not these results depend on the short term memory and the volatility of returns common in such financial asset return data, we filter the data by an AR-GARCH procedure and present the Hurst exponents for this filtered data.

  3. Estimating the anomalous diffusion exponent for single particle tracking data with measurement errors - An alternative approach

    PubMed Central

    Burnecki, Krzysztof; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Sikora, Grzegorz; Weron, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Accurately characterizing the anomalous diffusion of a tracer particle has become a central issue in biophysics. However, measurement errors raise difficulty in the characterization of single trajectories, which is usually performed through the time-averaged mean square displacement (TAMSD). In this paper, we study a fractionally integrated moving average (FIMA) process as an appropriate model for anomalous diffusion data with measurement errors. We compare FIMA and traditional TAMSD estimators for the anomalous diffusion exponent. The ability of the FIMA framework to characterize dynamics in a wide range of anomalous exponents and noise levels through the simulation of a toy model (fractional Brownian motion disturbed by Gaussian white noise) is discussed. Comparison to the TAMSD technique, shows that FIMA estimation is superior in many scenarios. This is expected to enable new measurement regimes for single particle tracking (SPT) experiments even in the presence of high measurement errors. PMID:26065707

  4. Global integral gradient bounds for quasilinear equations below or near the natural exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuc, Nguyen Cong

    2014-10-01

    We obtain sharp integral potential bounds for gradients of solutions to a wide class of quasilinear elliptic equations with measure data. Our estimates are global over bounded domains that satisfy a mild exterior capacitary density condition. They are obtained in Lorentz spaces whose degrees of integrability lie below or near the natural exponent of the operator involved. As a consequence, nonlinear Calderón-Zygmund type estimates below the natural exponent are also obtained for -superharmonic functions in the whole space ℝ n . This answers a question raised in our earlier work (On Calderón-Zygmund theory for p- and -superharmonic functions, to appear in Calc. Var. Partial Differential Equations, DOI 10.1007/s00526-011-0478-8) and thus greatly improves the result there.

  5. Universality of the edge-tunneling exponent of fractional quantum Hall liquids.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xin; Evers, F; Rezayi, E H

    2005-04-29

    In a microscopic model of fractional quantum Hall liquids with electron-electron interactions and confinement, we calculate the edge Green's function via exact diagonalization. Our results for nu=1/3 and 2/3 suggest that, in the presence of Coulomb interaction, "external" parameters such as the sharpness of the edge and the strength of the edge confining potential, which can lead to edge reconstruction, may cause deviations from universality in the edge-tunneling I-V exponent. In particular, we do not find any direct dependence of this exponent on the range of the interaction potential as suggested by recent calculations in contradiction to the topological nature of the edge.

  6. Gaussian phase transition and critical exponents in spin-1 bond-alternative Heisenberg chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yao Heng; Chen, Ai Min; Xiang, Chunhuan; Wang, Honglei; Xia, Cai-Juan; Wang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    The quantum Gaussian phase transition is investigated for the infinite spin-1 bond-alternative Heisenberg model in one spatial dimension. By using a tensor network representation with an infinite matrix product state approach, the ground state energy, bipartite entanglement entropy, non-local string order, and fidelity per lattice site are calculated to characterize the phase transition. At the quantum phase transition point, the scaling behavior of various physical observables with respect to the finite truncation dimension are discussed for the ground state wavefunctions. In addition, the central charge is extracted from the finite entanglement entropies and the finite correlation lengths. Furthermore, the various critical exponents of the string order are calculated. The characteristic critical exponents and the central charge determine the universality class of the phase transition.

  7. On the use of relative velocity exponents for jet engine exhaust noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of flight on jet engine exhaust noise has often been presented in terms of a relative velocity exponent, n, as a function of radiation angle. The value of n is given by the OASPL reduction due to relative velocity divided by 10 times the logarithm of the ratio of relative jet velocity to absolute jet velocity. In such terms, classical subsonic jet noise theory would result in a value of n being approximately 7 at 90 degree angle to the jet axis with n decreasing, but remaining positive, as the inlet axis is approached and increasing as the jet axis is approached. However, flight tests have shown a wide range of results, including negative values of n in some cases. In this paper it is shown that the exponent n is positive for pure subsonic jet mixing noise and varies, in a systematic manner, as a function of flight conditions and jet velocity.

  8. Dissipative dynamics in a finite chaotic environment: Relationship between damping rate and Lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Xavier, J C; Strunz, W T; Beims, M W

    2015-08-01

    We consider the energy flow between a classical one-dimensional harmonic oscillator and a set of N two-dimensional chaotic oscillators, which represents the finite environment. Using linear response theory we obtain an analytical effective equation for the system harmonic oscillator, which includes a frequency dependent dissipation, a shift, and memory effects. The damping rate is expressed in terms of the environment mean Lyapunov exponent. A good agreement is shown by comparing theoretical and numerical results, even for environments with mixed (regular and chaotic) motion. Resonance between system and environment frequencies is shown to be more efficient to generate dissipation than larger mean Lyapunov exponents or a larger number of bath chaotic oscillators.

  9. Estimation of critical exponents from cluster coefficients and the application of this estimation to hard spheres

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, E.; Baram, A.

    2007-01-01

    For a large class of repulsive interaction models, the Mayer cluster integrals can be transformed into a tridiagonal real symmetric matrix Rmn, whose elements converge to two constants with 1/n2 correction. We find exact expressions in terms of these correction terms for the two critical exponents describing the density near the two singular termination points of the fluid phase. We apply the method to the hard-spheres model and find that the metastable fluid phase terminates at ρt = 0.751[5]. The density near the transition is given by ρt-ρ ∼ (zt − z)σ′, where the critical exponent is predicted to be σ′ = 0.0877[25]. Interestingly, the termination density is close to the observed glass transition; thus, the above critical behavior is expected to be associated with the onset of glassy behavior in hard spheres. PMID:17389362

  10. Stability analysis of a nonlinear vehicle model in plane motion using the concept of Lyapunov exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Sobhan; Wu, Christine

    2013-06-01

    For the first time, this paper investigates the application of the concept of Lyapunov exponents to the stability analysis of the nonlinear vehicle model in plane motion with two degrees of freedom. The nonlinearity of the model comes from the third-order polynomial expression between the lateral forces on the tyres and the tyre slip angles. Comprehensive studies on both system and structural stability analyses of the vehicle model are presented. The system stability analysis includes the stability, lateral stability region, and effects of driving conditions on the lateral stability region of the vehicle model in the state space. In the structural stability analysis, the ranges of driving conditions in which the stability of the vehicle model is guaranteed are given. Moreover, through examples, the largest Lyapunov exponent is suggested as an indicator of the convergence rate in which the disturbed vehicle model returns to its stable fixed point.

  11. Tricritical and Critical Exponents in Microcanonical Ensemble of Systems with Long-Range Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    We explore the tricritical points and the critical lines of both Blume-Emery-Grifnths and Ising model within long-range interactions in the microcanonical ensemble. For K = K MTP , the tricritical exponents take the values β = 1/4, 1 = γ- ≠ γ+ = 1/2 and 0 = α- ≠ α+ = -1/2, which disagree with classical (mean held) values. When K > K MTP , the phase transition becomes second order and the critical exponents have classical values except close to the canonical tricritical parameters (K CTP ), where the values of the critical expoents become β = 1/2, 1 = γ- ≠ γ+ = 2 and 0 = α- ≠ α+ = 1. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11104032

  12. Scaling laws for the largest Lyapunov exponent in long-range systems: A random matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Anteneodo, Celia; Vallejos, Raúl O

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the laws that rule the behavior of the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) in many particle systems with long-range interactions. We consider as a representative system the so-called Hamiltonian alpha-XY model where the adjustable parameter alpha controls the range of the interactions of N ferromagnetic spins in a lattice of dimension d. In previous work the dependence of the LLE with the system size N, for sufficiently high energies, was established through numerical simulations. In the thermodynamic limit, the LLE becomes constant for alpha>d whereas it decays as an inverse power law of N for alphaexponents are modeled by random simplectic matrices drawn from a suitable ensemble.

  13. Effective Power-Law Dependence of Lyapunov Exponents on the Central Mass in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Kalapotharakos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Using both numerical and analytical approaches, we demonstrate the existence of an effective power-law relation L alpha m(sup p) between themean Lyapunov exponent L of stellar orbits chaotically scattered by a supermassive black hole (BH) in the centre of a galaxy and the mass parameter m, i.e. ratio of the mass of the BH over the mass of the galaxy. The exponent p is found numerically to obtain values in the range p approximately equals 0.3-0.5. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these exponents, based on estimates of local 'stretching numbers', i.e. local Lyapunov exponents at successive transits of the orbits through the BH's sphere of influence. We thus predict p = 2/3 - q with q approximately equaling 0.1-0.2. Our basic model refers to elliptical galaxy models with a central core. However, we find numerically that an effective power-law scaling of L with m holds also in models with central cusp, beyond a mass scale up to which chaos is dominated by the influence of the cusp itself. We finally show numerically that an analogous law exists also in disc galaxies with rotating bars. In the latter case, chaotic scattering by the BH affects mainly populations of thick tube-like orbits surrounding some low-order branches of the x(sub 1) family of periodic orbits, as well as its bifurcations at low-order resonances, mainly the inner Lindblad resonance and the 4/1 resonance. Implications of the correlations between L and m to determining the rate of secular evolution of galaxies are discussed.

  14. A Lower Bound on the Lyapunov Exponent for the Generalized Harper's Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitomirskaya, Svetlana; Liu, Wencai

    2016-05-01

    We obtain a lower bound for the Lyapunov exponent of a family of discrete Schrödinger operators (Hu)_n=u_{n+1}+u_{n-1}+2a_1 cos 2π (θ +nα )u_n+2a_2 cos 4π (θ +nα )u_n , that incorporates both a_1 and a_2, thus going beyond the Herman's bound.

  15. Minority-spin dynamics in the nonhomogeneous Ising model: Diverging time scales and exponents.

    PubMed

    Mullick, Pratik; Sen, Parongama

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of the Ising model under a zero-temperature quench with the initial fraction of up spins 0≤x≤1. In one dimension, the known results for persistence probability are verified; it shows algebraic decay for both up and down spins asymptotically with different exponents. It is found that the conventional finite-size scaling is valid here. In two dimensions, however, the persistence probabilities are no longer algebraic; in particular for x≤0.5, persistence for the up (minority) spins shows the behavior P_{min}(t)∼t^{-γ}exp[-(t/τ)^{δ}] with time t, while for the down (majority) spins, P_{maj}(t) approaches a finite value. We find that the timescale τ diverges as (x_{c}-x)^{-λ}, where x_{c}=0.5 and λ≃2.31. The exponent γ varies as θ_{2d}+c_{0}(x_{c}-x)^{β} where θ_{2d}≃0.215 is very close to the persistence exponent in two dimensions; β≃1. The results in two dimensions can be understood qualitatively by studying the exit probability, which for different system size is found to have the form E(x)=f[(x-x_{c}/x_{c})L^{1/ν}], with ν≈1.47. This result suggests that τ∼L^{z[over ̃]}, where z[over ̃]=λ/ν=1.57±0.11 is an exponent not explored earlier.

  16. Lyapunov Exponent and Out-of-Time-Ordered Correlator's Growth Rate in a Chaotic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, Efim B.; Ganeshan, Sriram; Galitski, Victor

    2017-02-01

    It was proposed recently that the out-of-time-ordered four-point correlator (OTOC) may serve as a useful characteristic of quantum-chaotic behavior, because, in the semiclassical limit ℏ→0 , its rate of exponential growth resembles the classical Lyapunov exponent. Here, we calculate the four-point correlator C (t ) for the classical and quantum kicked rotor—a textbook driven chaotic system—and compare its growth rate at initial times with the standard definition of the classical Lyapunov exponent. Using both quantum and classical arguments, we show that the OTOC's growth rate and the Lyapunov exponent are, in general, distinct quantities, corresponding to the logarithm of the phase-space averaged divergence rate of classical trajectories and to the phase-space average of the logarithm, respectively. The difference appears to be more pronounced in the regime of low kicking strength K , where no classical chaos exists globally. In this case, the Lyapunov exponent quickly decreases as K →0 , while the OTOC's growth rate may decrease much slower, showing a higher sensitivity to small chaotic islands in the phase space. We also show that the quantum correlator as a function of time exhibits a clear singularity at the Ehrenfest time tE: transitioning from a time-independent value of t-1ln C (t ) at t tE. We note that the underlying physics here is the same as in the theory of weak (dynamical) localization [Aleiner and Larkin, Phys. Rev. B 54, 14423 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevB.54.14423; Tian, Kamenev, and Larkin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 124101 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.124101] and is due to a delay in the onset of quantum interference effects, which occur sharply at a time of the order of the Ehrenfest time.

  17. A Lower Bound on the Lyapunov Exponent for the Generalized Harper's Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitomirskaya, Svetlana; Liu, Wencai

    2017-02-01

    We obtain a lower bound for the Lyapunov exponent of a family of discrete Schrödinger operators (Hu)_n=u_{n+1}+u_{n-1}+2a_1 cos 2π (θ +nα )u_n+2a_2 cos 4π (θ +nα )u_n, that incorporates both a_1 and a_2, thus going beyond the Herman's bound.

  18. Switching Exponent Scaling near Bifurcation Points for Non-Gaussian Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-07

    REPORT Switching Exponent Scaling near Bifurcation Points for Non-Gaussian Noise 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We study noise-induced...which gives the logarithm of the switching rate, displays a non-power-law dependence on the distance to the bifurcation point . This dependence is...found for Poisson noise. Even weak additional Gaussian noise dominates switching sufficiently close to the bifurcation point , leading to a crossover in

  19. Modeling the Effect of Privatization on Behavior of Hurst Exponent Using Stochastic Catastrophe Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolgorian, Meysam; Raei, Reza

    In this paper using the global Hurst exponent, the impact of privatization of public companies in Iran on the degree of efficiency in Tehran Stock Exchange is assessed. The results show that selling public companies' share in Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE) leads to a structural break in degree of market development. To model this phenomenon a catastrophe approach is used and it is demonstrated that this structural break can be better explained by a cusp catastrophe model.

  20. Realistic Image Rendition Using a Variable Exponent Functional Model for Retinex

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Zeyang; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Bin; Yu, Xinyan; Han, Lu; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The goal of realistic image rendition is to recover the acquired image under imperfect illuminant conditions, where non–uniform illumination may degrade image quality with high contrast and low SNR. In this paper, the assumption regarding illumination is modified and a variable exponent functional model for Retinex is proposed to remove non–uniform illumination and reduce halo artifacts. The theoretical derivation is provided and experimental results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model. PMID:27338379

  1. Changes in the Hurst Exponent of Heart Rate Variability during Physical Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Naoko; Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-08-01

    We examine fractal scaling properties of heart rate variability using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), during physical activity in healthy subjects. We analyze 11 records of healthy subjects, which include both usual daily activity and experimental exercise. The subjects were asked to ride on a bicycle ergometer for 2.5 hours, and maintained a heartbeat interval of 500-600 ms. In order to estimate the long-range correlation in the series of heartbeat intervals during controlled physical activity, we apply DFA to the data set with the third-order polynomial trend removed. For all records during exercise, we observe a characteristic crossover phenomenon at ≈ 300 beats. The scaling exponent in the range > 300 beats (> 3 minutes) during exercise decreases and tends to be closer to white noise (≈ 0.5), which corresponds to uncorrelated behavior. The long-range scaling exponent during exercise is significantly lower than that during daily activity in this range. Contrary to the currently held view, our results indicate a breakdown in long-range correlations and 1/f-like scaling, rather than the increase in the Hurst exponent characteristic of a (congestive) increase in afterload and observed, e.g., in congestive heart failure (CHF) patients. Further, our results suggest an increased load imbalance induced departure from critical-like behavior, which has recently been reported in healthy human heart rate during daily activity.

  2. Structure Function Scaling Exponent and Intermittency in the Wake of a Wind Turbine Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseyev, Aleksandr; Ali, Naseem; Cal, Raul

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire measurements obtained in a 3 × 3 wind turbine array boundary layer are utilized to analyze high order structure functions, intermittency effects as well as the probability density functions of velocity increments at different scales within the energy cascade. The intermittency exponent is found to be greater in the far wake region in comparison to the near wake. At hub height, the intermittency exponent is found to be null. ESS scaling exponents of the second, fourth, and fifth order structure functions remain relatively constant as a function of height in the far-wake whereas in the near-wake these highly affected by the passage of the rotor thus showing a dependence on physical location. When comparing with proposed models, these generally over predict the structure functions in the far wake region. The pdf distributions in the far wake region display wider tails compared to the near wake region, and constant skewness hypothesis based on the local isotropy is verified in the wake. CBET-1034581.

  3. Percolation exponents and thresholds obtained from the nearly ideal continuum percolation system graphite-boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; McLachlan, D.S.

    1997-07-01

    Compressed disks made from graphite and, its mechanical but not electrical isomorph, boron nitride as well as graphite-boron nitride powders, undergoing compression, are nearly ideal continuum percolation systems, as the ratio of their conductivities is nearly 10{sup {minus}18} and the scatter of the experimental points near the critical volume fraction {phi}{sub c} is very small. The following measurements, with the characteristic exponent(s) in brackets, are made on some or all of the samples in (axial) and at right angles (radial) to the direction of compression, as a function of the volume fraction of graphite ({phi}); dc conductivity (s and t), dielectric constant (s), magnetoresistivity (t{sub {perpendicular}}), and noise power (K). The noise power is also measured as function of resistance (w) and volume (b{sup {prime}}). The {phi}{sub c}{close_quote}s obtained for all measurements are consistent and explicable. The results for the exponents are less well understood but, where possible, these results are compared with theoretical predictions and previous experiments. The reasons for the nonuniversality of t are clarified. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Critical exponents of the superfluid-Bose-glass transition in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhiyuan; da Costa, Karine P C; Kiselev, Mikhail; Prokof'ev, Nikolay

    2014-06-06

    Recent experimental and numerical studies of the critical-temperature exponent ϕ for the superfluid-Bose-glass universality in three-dimensional systems report strong violations of the key quantum critical relation, ϕ=νz, where z and ν are the dynamic and correlation-length exponents, respectively; these studies question the conventional scaling laws for this quantum critical point. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the disordered Bose-Hubbard model, we demonstrate that previous work on the superfluid-to-normal-fluid transition-temperature dependence on the chemical potential (or the magnetic field, in spin systems), T_{c}∝(μ-μ_{c})^{ϕ}, was misinterpreting transient behavior on approach to the fluctuation region with the genuine critical law. When the model parameters are modified to have a broad quantum critical region, simulations of both quantum and classical models reveal that the ϕ=νz law [with ϕ=2.7(2), z=3, and ν=0.88(5)] holds true, resolving the ϕ-exponent "crisis."

  5. Scaling exponent and dispersity of polymers in solution by diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Nathan H; Röding, Magnus; Miklavcic, Stanley J; Nydén, Magnus

    2017-05-01

    Molecular mass distribution measurements by pulsed gradient spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance (PGSE NMR) spectroscopy currently require prior knowledge of scaling parameters to convert from polymer self-diffusion coefficient to molecular mass. Reversing the problem, we utilize the scaling relation as prior knowledge to uncover the scaling exponent from within the PGSE data. Thus, the scaling exponent-a measure of polymer conformation and solvent quality-and the dispersity (Mw/Mn) are obtainable from one simple PGSE experiment. The method utilizes constraints and parametric distribution models in a two-step fitting routine involving first the mass-weighted signal and second the number-weighted signal. The method is developed using lognormal and gamma distribution models and tested on experimental PGSE attenuation of the terminal methylene signal and on the sum of all methylene signals of polyethylene glycol in D2O. Scaling exponent and dispersity estimates agree with known values in the majority of instances, leading to the potential application of the method to polymers for which characterization is not possible with alternative techniques.

  6. Improved estimation of anomalous diffusion exponents in single-particle tracking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepten, Eldad; Bronshtein, Irena; Garini, Yuval

    2013-05-01

    The mean square displacement is a central tool in the analysis of single-particle tracking experiments, shedding light on various biophysical phenomena. Frequently, parameters are extracted by performing time averages on single-particle trajectories followed by ensemble averaging. This procedure, however, suffers from two systematic errors when applied to particles that perform anomalous diffusion. The first is significant at short-time lags and is induced by measurement errors. The second arises from the natural heterogeneity in biophysical systems. We show how to estimate and correct these two errors and improve the estimation of the anomalous parameters for the whole particle distribution. As a consequence, we manage to characterize ensembles of heterogeneous particles even for rather short and noisy measurements where regular time-averaged mean square displacement analysis fails. We apply this method to both simulations and in vivo measurements of telomere diffusion in 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The motion of telomeres is found to be subdiffusive with an average exponent constant in time. Individual telomere exponents are normally distributed around the average exponent. The proposed methodology has the potential to improve experimental accuracy while maintaining lower experimental costs and complexity.

  7. Physiological Responses During Matches and Profile of Elite Pencak Silat Exponents

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Tan, Benedict; Teh, Kong Chuan

    2002-01-01

    This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study describing the physiological responses during competitive matches and profile of elite exponents of an emerging martial art sport, pencak silat. Thirty exponents (21 males and 9 females) were involved in the study. Match responses (i.e. heart rate (HR) throughout match and capillary blood lactate concentration, [La], at pre-match and at the end of every round) were obtained during actual competitive duels. Elite silat exponents’ physiological attributes were assessed via anthropometry, vertical jump, isometric grip strength, maximal oxygen uptake, and the Wingate 30 s anaerobic test of the upper and lower body, in the laboratory. The match response data showed that silat competitors’ mean HR was > 84% of estimated HR maximum and levels of [La] ranged from 6.7 - 18.7 mMol-1 during matches. This suggests that competitive silat matches are characterised by high aerobic and anaerobic responses. In comparison to elite taekwondo and judo athletes’ physiological characteristics, elite silat exponents have lower aerobic fitness and grip strength, but greater explosive leg power (vertical jump). Generally, they also possessed a similar anaerobic capability in the lower but markedly inferior anaerobic capability in the upper body. PMID:24748847

  8. Experimental Realization of a Multiscroll Chaotic Oscillator with Optimal Maximum Lyapunov Exponent

    PubMed Central

    Pano-Azucena, Ana Dalia; Carbajal-Gomez, Victor Hugo; Sanchez-Sanchez, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, different kinds of experimental realizations of chaotic oscillators have been already presented in the literature. However, those realizations do not consider the value of the maximum Lyapunov exponent, which gives a quantitative measure of the grade of unpredictability of chaotic systems. That way, this paper shows the experimental realization of an optimized multiscroll chaotic oscillator based on saturated function series. First, from the mathematical description having four coefficients (a, b, c, d1), an optimization evolutionary algorithm varies them to maximize the value of the positive Lyapunov exponent. Second, a realization of those optimized coefficients using operational amplifiers is given. Herein a, b, c, d1 are implemented with precision potentiometers to tune up to four decimals of the coefficients having the range between 0.0001 and 1.0000. Finally, experimental results of the phase-space portraits for generating from 2 to 10 scrolls are listed to show that their associated value for the optimal maximum Lyapunov exponent increases by increasing the number of scrolls, thus guaranteeing a more complex chaotic behavior. PMID:24883379

  9. Experimental realization of a multiscroll chaotic oscillator with optimal maximum Lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Tlelo-Cuautle, Esteban; Pano-Azucena, Ana Dalia; Carbajal-Gomez, Victor Hugo; Sanchez-Sanchez, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, different kinds of experimental realizations of chaotic oscillators have been already presented in the literature. However, those realizations do not consider the value of the maximum Lyapunov exponent, which gives a quantitative measure of the grade of unpredictability of chaotic systems. That way, this paper shows the experimental realization of an optimized multiscroll chaotic oscillator based on saturated function series. First, from the mathematical description having four coefficients (a, b, c, d1 ), an optimization evolutionary algorithm varies them to maximize the value of the positive Lyapunov exponent. Second, a realization of those optimized coefficients using operational amplifiers is given. Herein a, b, c, d1 are implemented with precision potentiometers to tune up to four decimals of the coefficients having the range between 0.0001 and 1.0000. Finally, experimental results of the phase-space portraits for generating from 2 to 10 scrolls are listed to show that their associated value for the optimal maximum Lyapunov exponent increases by increasing the number of scrolls, thus guaranteeing a more complex chaotic behavior.

  10. Accurate and unbiased estimation of power-law exponents from single-emitter blinking data.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Jacob P; den Otter, Wouter K; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2006-11-28

    Single emitter blinking with a power-law distribution for the on and off times has been observed on a variety of systems including semiconductor nanocrystals, conjugated polymers, fluorescent proteins, and organic fluorophores. The origin of this behavior is still under debate. Reliable estimation of power exponents from experimental data is crucial in validating the various models under consideration. We derive a maximum likelihood estimator for power-law distributed data and analyze its accuracy as a function of data set size and power exponent both analytically and numerically. Results are compared to least-squares fitting of the double logarithmically transformed probability density. We demonstrate that least-squares fitting introduces a severe bias in the estimation result and that the maximum likelihood procedure is superior in retrieving the correct exponent and reducing the statistical error. For a data set as small as 50 data points, the error margins of the maximum likelihood estimator are already below 7%, giving the possibility to quantify blinking behavior when data set size is limited, e.g., due to photobleaching.

  11. Application of percolation theory to microtomography of structured media: percolation threshold, critical exponents, and upscaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Percolation theory provides a tool for linking microstructure and macroscopic material properties. In this paper, percolation theory is applied to the analysis of microtomographic images for the purpose of deriving scaling laws for upscaling of properties. We have tested the acquisition of quantities such as percolation threshold, crossover length, fractal dimension, and critical exponent of correlation length from microtomography. By inflating or deflating the target phase and percolation analysis, we can get a critical model and an estimation of the percolation threshold. The crossover length is determined from the critical model by numerical simulation. The fractal dimension can be obtained either from the critical model or from the relative size distribution of clusters. Local probabilities of percolation are used to extract the critical exponent of the correlation length. For near-isotropic samples such as sandstone and bread, the approach works very well. For strongly anisotropic samples, such as highly deformed rock (mylonite) and a tree branch, the percolation threshold and fractal dimension can be assessed with accuracy. However, the uncertainty of the correlation length makes it difficult to accurately extract its critical exponents. Therefore, this aspect of percolation theory cannot be reliably used for upscaling properties of strongly anisotropic media. Other methods of upscaling have to be used for such media.

  12. Measuring the self-similarity exponent in Lévy stable processes of financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, M.; Sánchez-Granero, M. A.; Trinidad Segovia, J. E.

    2013-11-01

    Geometric method-based procedures, which will be called GM algorithms herein, were introduced in [M.A. Sánchez Granero, J.E. Trinidad Segovia, J. García Pérez, Some comments on Hurst exponent and the long memory processes on capital markets, Phys. A 387 (2008) 5543-5551], to efficiently calculate the self-similarity exponent of a time series. In that paper, the authors showed empirically that these algorithms, based on a geometrical approach, are more accurate than the classical algorithms, especially with short length time series. The authors checked that GM algorithms are good when working with (fractional) Brownian motions. Moreover, in [J.E. Trinidad Segovia, M. Fernández-Martínez, M.A. Sánchez-Granero, A note on geometric method-based procedures to calculate the Hurst exponent, Phys. A 391 (2012) 2209-2214], a mathematical background for the validity of such procedures to estimate the self-similarity index of any random process with stationary and self-affine increments was provided. In particular, they proved theoretically that GM algorithms are also valid to explore long-memory in (fractional) Lévy stable motions. In this paper, we prove empirically by Monte Carlo simulation that GM algorithms are able to calculate accurately the self-similarity index in Lévy stable motions and find empirical evidence that they are more precise than the absolute value exponent (denoted by AVE onwards) and the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) algorithms, especially with a short length time series. We also compare them with the generalized Hurst exponent (GHE) algorithm and conclude that both GM2 and GHE algorithms are the most accurate to study financial series. In addition to that, we provide empirical evidence, based on the accuracy of GM algorithms to estimate the self-similarity index in Lévy motions, that the evolution of the stocks of some international market indices, such as U.S. Small Cap and Nasdaq100, cannot be modelized by means of a

  13. Finite-time synchronization for second-order nonlinear multi-agent system via pinning exponent sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huazhou; Zhang, Qingling

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the finite-time synchronization for second-order multi-agent system via pinning exponent sliding mode control. Firstly, for the nonlinear multi-agent system, differential mean value theorem is employed to transfer the nonlinear system into linear system, then, by pinning only one node in the system with novel exponent sliding mode control, we can achieve synchronization in finite time. Secondly, considering the 3-DOF helicopter system with nonlinear dynamics and disturbances, the novel exponent sliding mode control protocol is applied to only one node to achieve the synchronization. Finally, the simulation results show the effectiveness and the advantages of the proposed method.

  14. The periodogram and Allan variance reveal fractal exponents greater than unity in auditory-nerve spike trains.

    PubMed

    Lowen, S B; Teich, M C

    1996-06-01

    Auditory-nerve spike trains exhibit fractal behavior, and therefore traditional renewal-point-process models fail to describe them adequately. Previous measures of the fractal exponent of these spike trains are based on the Fano factor and consequently cannot exceed unity. Two estimates of the fractal exponent are considered which do not suffer from this limit: one derived from the Allan variance, which was developed by the authors, and one based on the periodogram. These measures indicate that fractal exponents do indeed exceed unity for some nerve-spike recordings from stimulated primary afferent cat auditory-nerve fibers.

  15. Removing the effects of temperature and of inappropriate critical point proximity on the electrical resistivity percolation exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparecido-Ferreira, A.; Ribeiro, G. M.; Sampaio, J. F.

    2015-06-01

    Percolating systems have been widely studied, but questions remain elusive: How to define the critical range where the standard percolation equation would be properly applicable, and the universal exponent t would be found? How to remove external effects, such as temperature, which would dramatically have an influence on the t determination? The lack of clear answers may be the reason for the spread of t exponents reported in the literature. Here we suggest rational methods to rule out such spurious effects and to reliably find the t exponent. We hope our work will call the readers' attention to how to carefully carry out experiments on percolating systems.

  16. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Characterization of the Molybdenum Site of 'Escherichia Coli' Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Doonan, C.J.; Rothery, R.A.; Boroumand, N.; Weiner, J.H.; /Saskatchewan U. /Alberta U.

    2007-07-09

    Structural studies of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductases were hampered by modification of the active site during purification. We report an X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis of the molybdenum active site of Escherichia coli DMSO reductase contained within its native membranes. The enzyme in these preparations is expected to be very close to the form found in vivo. The oxidized active site was found to have four Mo-S ligands at 2.43 angstroms, one Mo=O at 1.71 angstroms, and a longer Mo-O at 1.90 angstroms. We conclude that the oxidized enzyme is a monooxomolybdenum(VI) species coordinated by two molybdopterin dithiolenes and a serine. The bond lengths determined for E. coli DMSO reductase are very similar to those determined for the well-characterized Rhodobacter sphaeroides DMSO reductase, suggesting similar active site structures for the two enzymes. Furthermore, our results suggest that the form found in vivo is the monooxobis(molybdopterin) species.

  17. Protein domain networks: Scale-free mixing of positive and negative exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, J. C.; Hayashida, M.; Akutsu, T.

    2006-07-01

    Many biological studies have been focused on the study of proteins, since proteins are essential for most cell functions. Although proteins are unique, they share certain common properties. For example, well-defined regions within a protein can fold independently from the rest of the protein and have their own function. They are called protein domains, and served as protein building blocks. In this article, we present a theoretical model for studying the protein domain networks, where one node of the network corresponds to one protein and two proteins are connected if they contain the same domain. The resulting distribution of nodes with a given degree, k, shows not only a power-law with negative exponent γ=-1, but it resembles the superposition of two power-law functions, one with a negative exponent and another with a positive exponent β=1. We call this distribution pattern “ scale-free mixing”. To explain the emergence of this superposition of power-laws, we propose a basic model with two main components: (1) mutation and (2) duplication of domains. Precisely, duplication gives rise to complete subgraphs (i.e., cliques) on the network, thus for several values of k a large number of nodes with degree k is produced, which explains the positive power-law branch of the degree distribution. In order to compare our model with experimental data, we generate protein domain networks with data from the UniProt Knowledgebase-Swissprot database for protein sequences and using InterPro, Pfam and Smart for domain databases. Our results indicate that the signal of this scale-free mixing pattern is also observed in the experimental data and it is conserved among organisms as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens.

  18. Dynamic Critical Exponents of Three-Dimensional Ising Models and Two-Dimensional Three-States Potts Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Yohsuke; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2008-01-01

    Values of dynamic critical exponents are numerically estimated for various models with the nonequilibrium relaxation method to test the dynamic universality hypothesis. The dynamics used here are single-spin update with Metropolis-type transition probabities. The estimated values of nonequilibrium relaxation exponent of magnetization λm (=β/zν) of Ising models on bcc and fcc lattices are estimated to be 0.251(3) and 0.252(3), respectively, which are consistent with the value of the model on simple-cubic lattice, 0.250(2). The dynamic critical exponents of three-states Potts models on square, honeycomb and triangular lattices are also estimated to be 2.193(5), 2.198(4), and 2.199(3), respectively. They are consistent within the error bars. It is also confirmed that Ising models with regularly modulated coupling constants on square lattice have the same dynamic critical exponents with the uniformly ferromagnetic Ising model.

  19. Maximal operator on variable Lebesgue spaces for almost monotone radial exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekvinda, Ales

    2008-01-01

    We study general Lebesgue spaces with variable exponent p. It is known that the classes and of functions p are such that the Hardy-Littlewood maximal operator is bounded on them provided . The class governs local properties of p and governs the behavior of p at infinity. In this paper we focus on the properties of p near infinity. We extend the class to a collection of functions p such that the Hardy-Littlewood maximal operator is bounded on the corresponding variable Lebesgue spaces provided and the class is essentially larger than . Moreover, the condition is quite easily verifiable in the practice.

  20. Symmetry properties of orthogonal and covariant Lyapunov vectors and their exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, Harald A.

    2013-06-01

    Lyapunov exponents are indicators for the chaotic properties of a classical dynamical system. They are most naturally defined in terms of the time evolution of a set of so-called covariant vectors, co-moving with the linearized flow in tangent space. Taking a simple spring pendulum and the Hénon-Heiles system as examples, we demonstrate the consequences of symplectic symmetry and of time-reversal invariance for such vectors, and study the transformation between different parameterizations of the flow. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’.

  1. Multifractality in the peripheral cardiovascular system from pointwise holder exponents of laser Doppler flowmetry signals.

    PubMed

    Humeau, Anne; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Rousseau, David; Tartas, Maylis; Fromy, Bérengère; Abraham, Pierre

    2007-12-15

    We study the dynamics of skin laser Doppler flowmetry signals giving a peripheral view of the cardiovascular system. The analysis of Hölder exponents reveals that the experimental signals are weakly multifractal for young healthy subjects at rest. We implement the same analysis on data generated by a standard theoretical model of the cardiovascular system based on nonlinear coupled oscillators with linear couplings and fluctuations. We show that the theoretical model, although it captures basic features of the dynamics, is not complex enough to reflect the multifractal irregularities of microvascular mechanisms.

  2. Existence and concentration of positive ground states for a Kirchhoff equation involving critical Sobolev exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhisu; Guo, Shangjiang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the following semilinear Kirchhoff type equation where is a small parameter, , a, b are positive constants, μ > 0 is a parameter, and the nonlinear growth of | u|4 u reaches the Sobolev critical exponent since 2* = 6 for three spatial dimensions. We prove the existence of a positive ground state solution with exponential decay at infinity for μ > 0 and sufficiently small under some suitable conditions on the nonnegative functions V, K and Q. Moreover, concentrates around a global minimum point of V as . The methods used here are based on the concentration-compactness principle of Lions.

  3. Exact exponent λ of the autocorrelation function for a soluble model of coarsening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, A. J.; Derrida, B.

    1995-03-01

    The exponent λ that describes the decay of the autocorrelation function A(t) in a phase ordering system, A(t)~L-(d-λ), where d is the dimension and L the characteristic length scale at time t, is calculated exactly for the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation in d=1. We find λ=0.3993835.... We also show explicitly that a small bias of positive domains over negative gives a magnetization which grows in time as M(t)~Lμ and prove that for the one-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau equation, μ=λ, exemplifying a general result.

  4. Critical exponents of isotropic-hexatic phase transition in the hard-disk system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Satoshi; Ozeki, Yukiyasu; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2004-04-01

    The hard-disk system is studied by observing the nonequilibrium relaxation behavior of a bond-orientational order parameter. The density dependence of characteristic relaxation time tau is estimated from the finite-time scaling analysis. The critical point between the fluid and the hexatic phase is refined to be 0.899 (1) by assuming the divergence behavior of the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. The value of the critical exponent eta is also studied by analyzing the fluctuation of the order parameter at the criticality and estimated as eta=0.25 (2). These results are consistent with the prediction by the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young theory.

  5. Changes in the Hurst exponent of heartbeat intervals during physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinis, M.; Knežević, A.; Krstačić, G.; Vargović, E.

    2004-07-01

    The fractal scaling properties of the heartbeat time series are studied in different controlled ergometric regimes using both the improved Hurst rescaled range (R/S) analysis and the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The long-time “memory effect” quantified by the value of the Hurst exponent H>0.5 is found to increase during progressive physical activity in healthy subjects, in contrast to those having stable angina pectoris, where it decreases. The results are also supported by the detrended fluctuation analysis. We argue that this finding may be used as a useful new diagnostic parameter for short heartbeat time series.

  6. Relaxation Monte Carlo for 3D branched polymers: The leading confluence exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, J. A. M. S.; Cadilhe, Antonio M. R.

    1989-09-01

    A relaxation study of simple-cubic site trees taking 18 months of CDC Cyber computer time is used to estimate the radius-of-gyration dependence on the size, both as regards the correlation exponent and the confluent correction. The latter is found to be compatible with an analytic term within the uncertainty limits. The radius prefactor is estimated as 0.542±0.005 and the limiting site perimeter-to-size ratio as 2.905±0.005.

  7. Empirical relations between static and dynamic exponents for Ising model cluster algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Paul D.; Baillie, Clive F.

    1992-02-01

    We have measured the autocorrelations for the Swendsen-Wang and the Wolff cluster update algorithms for the Ising model in two, three, and four dimensions. The data for the Wolff algorithm suggest that the autocorrelations are linearly related to the specific heat, in which case the dynamic critical exponent is zint,EW=α/ν. For the Swendsen-Wang algorithm, scaling the autocorrelations by the average maximum cluster size gives either a constant or a logarithm, which implies that zint,ESW=β/ν for the Ising model.

  8. Benford's law gives better scaling exponents in phase transitions of quantum XY models.

    PubMed

    Rane, Ameya Deepak; Mishra, Utkarsh; Biswas, Anindya; Sen De, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2014-08-01

    Benford's law is an empirical law predicting the distribution of the first significant digits of numbers obtained from natural phenomena and mathematical tables. It has been found to be applicable for numbers coming from a plethora of sources, varying from seismographic, biological, financial, to astronomical. We apply this law to analyze the data obtained from physical many-body systems described by the one-dimensional anisotropic quantum XY models in a transverse magnetic field. We detect the zero-temperature quantum phase transition and find that our method gives better finite-size scaling exponents for the critical point than many other known scaling exponents using measurable quantities like magnetization, entanglement, and quantum discord. We extend our analysis to the same system but at finite temperature and find that it also detects the finite-temperature phase transition in the model. Moreover, we compare the Benford distribution analysis with the same obtained from the uniform and Poisson distributions. The analysis is furthermore important in that the high-precision detection of the cooperative physical phenomena is possible even from low-precision experimental data.

  9. Aging Wiener-Khinchin theorem and critical exponents of 1 /fβ noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibovich, N.; Dechant, A.; Lutz, E.; Barkai, E.

    2016-11-01

    The power spectrum of a stationary process may be calculated in terms of the autocorrelation function using the Wiener-Khinchin theorem. We here generalize the Wiener-Khinchin theorem for nonstationary processes and introduce a time-dependent power spectrum I (t )I (t +τ ) St m(ω ) where tm is the measurement time. For processes with an aging autocorrelation function of the form tΥϕEA(τ /t ) , where ϕEA(x ) is a nonanalytic function when x is small, we find aging 1 /fβ noise. Aging 1 /fβ noise is characterized by five critical exponents. We derive the relations between the scaled autocorrelation function and these exponents. We show that our definition of the time-dependent spectrum retains its interpretation as a density of Fourier modes and discuss the relation to the apparent infrared divergence of 1 /fβ noise. We illustrate our results for blinking-quantum-dot models, single-file diffusion, and Brownian motion in a logarithmic potential.

  10. Relation Between Hertz Stress-Life Exponent, Ball-Race Conformity, and Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards based on Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory are normalized for ball bearings having inner- and outerrace conformities of 52 percent (0.52) and made from pre-1940 bearing steel. The Lundberg-Palmgren theory incorporates an inverse 9th power relation between Hertz stress and fatigue life for ball bearings. The effect of race conformity on ball set life independent of race life is not incorporated into the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. In addition, post-1960 vacuum-processed bearing steel exhibits a 12th power relation between Hertz stress and life. The work reported extends the previous work of Zaretsky, Poplawski, and Root to calculate changes in bearing life--that includes the life of the ball set--caused by race conformity, Hertz stress-life exponent, ball bearing type and bearing series. The bearing fatigue life in actual application will usually be equal to or greater than that calculated using the ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards that incorporate the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The relative fatigue life of an individual race is more sensitive to changes in race conformity for Hertz stress-life exponent n of 12 than where n = 9. However, when the effects are combined to predict actual bearing life for a specified set of conditions and bearing geometry, the predicted life of the bearing will be greater for a value of n = 12 than n = 9.

  11. Relation between Hertz Stress-Life Exponent, Ball-Race Conformity, and Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2006-01-01

    ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards based on Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory are normalized for ball bearings having inner- and outer-race conformities of 52 percent (0.52) and made from pre-1940 bearing steel. The Lundberg-Palmgren theory incorporates an inverse 9th power relation between Hertz stress and fatigue life for ball bearings. The effect of race conformity on ball set life independent of race life is not incorporated into the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. In addition, post-1960 vacuum-processed bearing steel exhibits a 12th power relation between Hertz stress and life. The work reported extends the previous work of Zaretsky, Poplawski, and Root to calculate changes in bearing life, that includes the life of the ball set, caused by race conformity, Hertz stress-life exponent, ball bearing type and bearing series. The bearing fatigue life in actual application will usually be equal to or greater than that calculated using the ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards that incorporate the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The relative fatigue life of an individual race is more sensitive to changes in race conformity for Hertz stress-life exponent n of 12 than where n = 9. However, when the effects are combined to predict actual bearing life for a specified set of conditions and bearing geometry, the predicted life of the bearing will be greater for a value of n = 12 than n = 9.

  12. Low complexity VLSI implementation of CORDIC-based exponent calculation for neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Supriya; Khare, Kavita

    2012-11-01

    This article presents a low hardware complexity for exponent calculations based on CORDIC. The proposed CORDIC algorithm is designed to overcome major drawbacks (scale-factor compensation, low range of convergence and optimal selection of micro-rotations) of the conventional CORDIC in hyperbolic mode of operation. The micro-rotations are identified using leading-one bit detection with uni-direction rotations to eliminate redundant iterations and improve throughput. The efficiency and performance of the processor are independent of the probability of rotation angles being known prior to implementation. The eight-staged pipelined architecture implementation requires an 8 × N ROM in the pre-processing unit for storing the initial coordinate values; it no longer requires the ROM for storing the elementary angles. It provides an area-time efficient design for VLSI implementation for calculating exponents in activation functions and Gaussain Potential Functions (GPF) in neural networks. The proposed CORDIC processor requires 32.68% less adders and 72.23% less registers compared to that of the conventional design. The proposed design when implemented on Virtex 2P (2vp50ff1148-6) device, dissipates 55.58% less power and has 45.09% less total gate count and 16.91% less delay as compared to Xilinx CORDIC Core. The detailed algorithm design along with FPGA implementation and area and time complexities is presented.

  13. Mass exponent spectrum analysis of human ECG signals and its application to complexity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Du, Sidan; Ning, Xinbao; Bian, Chunhua

    2008-06-01

    The complexity of electrocardiogram (ECG) signal may reflect the physiological function and healthy status of the heart. In this paper, we introduced two novel intermediate parameters of multifractality, the mass exponent spectrum curvature and area, to characterize the nonlinear complexity of ECG signal. These indicators express the nonlinear superposition of the discrepancies of singularity strengths from all the adjacent points of the spectrum curve and thus overall subsets of original fractal structure. The evaluation of binomial multifractal sets validated these two variables were entirely effective in exploring the complexity of this time series. We then studied the ECG mass exponent spectra taken from the cohorts of healthy, ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI) sufferer based on a large sets of 12 leads’ recordings, and took the statistical averages among each crowd. Experimental results suggest the two values from healthy ECG are apparently larger than those from the heart diseased. While the values from ECG of MI sufferer are much smaller than those from the other two groups. As for the ischemia sufferer, they are almost of moderate magnitude. Afterward, we compared these new indicators with the nonlinear parameters of singularity spectrum. The classification indexes and results of total separating ratios (TSR, defined in the paper) both indicated that our method could achieve a better effect. These conclusions may be of some values in early diagnoses and clinical applications.

  14. The emergence of different tail exponents in the distributions of firm size variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atushi; Fujimoto, Shouji; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Mizuno, Takayuki

    2013-05-01

    We discuss a mechanism through which inversion symmetry (i.e., invariance of a joint probability density function under the exchange of variables) and Gibrat’s law generate power-law distributions with different tail exponents. Using a dataset of firm size variables, that is, tangible fixed assets K, the number of workers L, and sales Y, we confirm that these variables have power-law tails with different exponents, and that inversion symmetry and Gibrat’s law hold. Based on these findings, we argue that there exists a plane in the three dimensional space (logK,logL,logY), with respect to which the joint probability density function for the three variables is invariant under the exchange of variables. We provide empirical evidence suggesting that this plane fits the data well, and argue that the plane can be interpreted as the Cobb-Douglas production function, which has been extensively used in various areas of economics since it was first introduced almost a century ago.

  15. Quantification of scaling exponents and dynamical complexity of microwave refractivity in a tropical climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuwape, Ibiyinka A.; Ogunjo, Samuel T.

    2016-12-01

    Radio refractivity index is used to quantify the effect of atmospheric parameters in communication systems. Scaling and dynamical complexities of radio refractivity across different climatic zones of Nigeria have been studied. Scaling property of the radio refractivity across Nigeria was estimated from the Hurst Exponent obtained using two different scaling methods namely: The Rescaled Range (R/S) and the detrended fluctuation analysis(DFA). The delay vector variance (DVV), Largest Lyapunov Exponent (λ1) and Correlation Dimension (D2) methods were used to investigate nonlinearity and the results confirm the presence of deterministic nonlinear profile in the radio refractivity time series. The recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) was used to quantify the degree of chaoticity in the radio refractivity across the different climatic zones. RQA was found to be a good measure for identifying unique fingerprint and signature of chaotic time series data. Microwave radio refractivity was found to be persistent and chaotic in all the study locations. The dynamics of radio refractivity increases in complexity and chaoticity from the Coastal region towards the Sahelian climate. The design, development and deployment of robust and reliable microwave communication link in the region will be greatly affected by the chaotic nature of radio refractivity in the region.

  16. Evaluation of nonlinear properties of epileptic activity using largest Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Tatiana M.; Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Sysoev, Ilya V.

    2016-04-01

    Absence seizures are known to be highly non-linear large amplitude oscillations with a well pronounced main time scale. Whilst the appearance of the main frequency is usually considered as a transition from noisy complex dynamics of baseline EEG to more regular absence activity, the dynamical properties of this type of epileptiformic activity in genetic absence models was not studied precisely. Here, the estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent from intracranial EEGs of 10 WAG/Rij rats (genetic model of absence epilepsy) was performed. Fragments of 10 seizures and 10 episodes of on-going EEG each of 4 s length were used for each animal, 3 cortical and 2 thalamic channels were analysed. The method adapted for short noisy data was implemented. The positive values of the largest Lyapunov exponent were found as for baseline as for spike wave discharges (SWDs), with values for SWDs being significantly less than for on-going activity. Current findings may indicate that SWD is a chaotic process with a well pronounced main timescale rather than a periodic regime. Also, the absence activity was shown to be less chaotic than the baseline one.

  17. Power Spectra, Power Law Exponents, and Anisotropy of Solar Wind Turbulence at Small Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podesta, J. J.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2006-01-01

    The Wind spacecraft provides simultaneous solar wind velocity and magnetic field measurements with 3- second time resolution, roughly an order of magnitude faster than previous measurements, enabling the small scale features of solar wind turbulence to be studied in unprecedented detail. Almost the entire inertial range can now be explored (the inertial range extends from approximately 1 to 10(exp 3) seconds in the spacecraft frame) although the dissipation range of the velocity fluctuations is still out of reach. Improved measurements of solar wind turbulence spectra at 1 AU in the ecliptic plane are presented including spectra of the energy and cross-helicity, the magnetic and kinetic energies, the Alfven ratio, the normalized cross-helicity, and the Elsasser ratio. Some recent observations and theoretical challenges are discussed including the observation that the velocity and magnetic field spectra often show different power law exponents with values close to 3/2 and 5/3, respectively; the energy (kinetic plus magnetic) and cross-helicity often have approximately equal power law exponents with values intermediate between 3/2 and 5/3; and the Alfven ratio, the ratio of the kinetic to magnetic energy spectra, is often a slowly increasing function of frequency increasing from around 0.4 to 1 for frequencies in the inertial range. Differences between high- and low-speed wind are also discussed. Comparisons with phenomenological turbulence theories show that important aspects of the physics are yet unexplained.

  18. Profile and scaling of the fractal exponent of percolations in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, T.; Nogawa, T.; Nemoto, K.

    2013-10-01

    We propose a novel finite-size scaling analysis for percolation transition observed in complex networks. While it is known that cooperative systems in growing networks often undergo an infinite-order transition with inverted Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless singularity, it is very hard for numerical simulations to determine the transition point precisely. Since the neighbor of the ordered phase is not a simple disordered phase but a critical phase, conventional finite-size scaling technique does not work. In our finite-size scaling, the forms of the scaling functions for the order parameter and the fractal exponent determine the transition point and critical exponents numerically for an infinite-order transition as well as a standard second-order transition. We confirm the validity of our scaling hypothesis through Monte Carlo simulations for bond percolations in some network models: the decorated (2,2)-flower and the random attachment growing network, where an infinite-order transition occurs, and the configuration model, where a second-order transition occurs.

  19. Lyapunov exponents from CHUA's circuit time series using artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, J. Jesus; Espinosa, Ismael E.; Fuentes, Alberto M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we present the general problem of identifying if a nonlinear dynamic system has a chaotic behavior. If the answer is positive the system will be sensitive to small perturbations in the initial conditions which will imply that there is a chaotic attractor in its state space. A particular problem would be that of identifying a chaotic oscillator. We present an example of three well known different chaotic oscillators where we have knowledge of the equations that govern the dynamical systems and from there we can obtain the corresponding time series. In a similar example we assume that we only know the time series and, finally, in another example we have to take measurements in the Chua's circuit to obtain sample points of the time series. With the knowledge about the time series the phase plane portraits are plotted and from them, by visual inspection, it is concluded whether or not the system is chaotic. This method has the problem of uncertainty and subjectivity and for that reason a different approach is needed. A quantitative approach is the computation of the Lyapunov exponents. We describe several methods for obtaining them and apply a little known method of artificial neural networks to the different examples mentioned above. We end the paper discussing the importance of the Lyapunov exponents in the interpretation of the dynamic behavior of biological neurons and biological neural networks.

  20. Power-law decay exponents: A dynamical criterion for predicting thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Távora, Marco; Torres-Herrera, E. J.; Santos, Lea F.

    2017-01-01

    From the analysis of the relaxation process of isolated lattice many-body quantum systems quenched far from equilibrium, we deduce a criterion for predicting when they are certain to thermalize. It is based on the algebraic behavior ∝t-γ of the survival probability at long times. We show that the value of the power-law exponent γ depends on the shape and filling of the weighted energy distribution of the initial state. Two scenarios are explored in detail: γ ≥2 and γ <1 . Exponents γ ≥2 imply that the energy distribution of the initial state is ergodically filled and the eigenstates are uncorrelated, so thermalization is guaranteed to happen. In this case, the power-law behavior is caused by bounds in the energy spectrum. Decays with γ <1 emerge when the energy eigenstates are correlated and signal lack of ergodicity. They are typical of systems undergoing localization due to strong onsite disorder and are found also in clean integrable systems.

  1. Estimation of Instantaneous Complex Dynamics through Lyapunov Exponents: A Study on Heartbeat Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Measures of nonlinearity and complexity, and in particular the study of Lyapunov exponents, have been increasingly used to characterize dynamical properties of a wide range of biological nonlinear systems, including cardiovascular control. In this work, we present a novel methodology able to effectively estimate the Lyapunov spectrum of a series of stochastic events in an instantaneous fashion. The paradigm relies on a novel point-process high-order nonlinear model of the event series dynamics. The long-term information is taken into account by expanding the linear, quadratic, and cubic Wiener-Volterra kernels with the orthonormal Laguerre basis functions. Applications to synthetic data such as the Hénon map and Rössler attractor, as well as two experimental heartbeat interval datasets (i.e., healthy subjects undergoing postural changes and patients with severe cardiac heart failure), focus on estimation and tracking of the Instantaneous Dominant Lyapunov Exponent (IDLE). The novel cardiovascular assessment demonstrates that our method is able to effectively and instantaneously track the nonlinear autonomic control dynamics, allowing for complexity variability estimations. PMID:25170911

  2. Identifying major depressive disorder using Hurst exponent of resting-state brain networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Maobin; Qin, Jiaolong; Yan, Rui; Li, Haoran; Yao, Zhijian; Lu, Qing

    2013-12-30

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) have revealed abnormalities of functional connectivity within or among the resting-state networks. They provide valuable insight into the pathological mechanisms of depression. However, few reports were involved in the "long-term memory" of fMRI signals. This study was to investigate the "long-term memory" of resting-state networks by calculating their Hurst exponents for identifying depressed patients from healthy controls. Resting-state networks were extracted from fMRI data of 20 MDD and 20 matched healthy control subjects. The Hurst exponent of each network was estimated by Range Scale analysis for further discriminant analysis. 95% of depressed patients and 85% of healthy controls were correctly classified by Support Vector Machine with an accuracy of 90%. The right fronto-parietal and default mode network constructed a deficit network (lower memory and more irregularity in MDD), while the left fronto-parietal, ventromedial prefrontal and salience network belonged to an excess network (longer memory in MDD), suggesting these dysfunctional networks may be related to a portion of the complex of emotional and cognitive disturbances. The abnormal "long-term memory" of resting-state networks associated with depression may provide a new possibility towards the exploration of the pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD.

  3. Atmospheric absorption cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    The measurement capability of the Avionics Laboratory IR Facility was used to evaluate an absorption cell that will be used to simulate atmospheric absorption over horizontal paths of 1 - 10 km in length. Band models were used to characterize the transmittance of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the cell. The measured transmittance was compared to the calculated values. Nitrous oxide is important in the 4 - 4.5 micron range in shaping the weak line absorption of carbon dioxide. The absorption cell is adequate for simulating atmospheric absorption over these paths.

  4. a Comparison of Three Hurst Exponent Approaches to Predict Nascent Bubbles in S&P500 Stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, M.; Sánchez-Granero, M. A.; Muñoz Torrecillas, M. J.; McKelvey, Bill

    Since the pioneer contributions due to Vandewalle and Ausloos, the Hurst exponent has been applied by econophysicists as a useful indicator to deal with investment strategies when such a value is above or below 0.5, the Hurst exponent of a Brownian motion. In this paper, we hypothesize that the self-similarity exponent of financial time series provides a reliable indicator for herding behavior (HB) in the following sense: if there is HB, then the higher the price, the more the people will buy. This will generate persistence in the stocks which we shall measure by their self-similarity exponents. Along this work, we shall explore whether there is some connections between the self-similarity exponent of a stock (as a HB indicator) and the stock’s future performance under the assumption that the HB will last for some time. With this aim, three approaches to calculate the self-similarity exponent of a time series are compared in order to determine which performs best to identify the transition from random efficient market behavior to HB and hence, to detect the beginning of a bubble. Generalized Hurst Exponent, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, and GM2 algorithms have been tested. Traditionally, researchers have focused on identifying the beginning of a crash. We study the beginning of the transition from efficient market behavior to a market bubble, instead. Our empirical results support that the higher (respectively the lower) the self-similarity index, the higher (respectively the lower) the mean of the price change, and hence, the better (respectively the worse) the performance of the corresponding stock. This would imply, as a consequence, that the transition process from random efficient market to HB has started. For experimentation purposes, S&P500 stock Index constituted our main data source.

  5. The Role of Atmospheric Instability and Importance of Wind Shear Exponent on Wind and Solar Energy Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamuk, Onur; Akyol, Altan; Aslan, Zafer

    2013-04-01

    Spatial and temporal distributions of wind and solar energy potential are function of atmospheric stability, wind shear exponent, aerosol contents, heat fluxes etc. Richardson number is one of the indicators of the evolution of atmospheric instability. It is a function of the static stability and wind shear exponent. The logarithmic wind profile is commonly used for wind energy evaluation processes in the atmospheric surface layer. Definition of the vertical variation of horizontal wind speeds above the ground by logarithmic profile is limited by 100 meters. The main objective of this study is to take into account atmospheric instability and wind shear exponent in wind power assessment. In the first part of this paper, stability parameters and wind shear exponent have been calculated by using radiosonde data and the wind measuring system for the local area of Istanbul; northwestern part of Turkey between 2011 and 2012. These data were analyzed to define hourly, daily, monthly and seasonal variations of the Richardson number and wind shear exponent. Analyses of early morning soundings produced negative skewwness and afternoon soundings produced a positive skewwness for Ri numbers. The larger negative values of Ri numbers (extremely unstable conditions) have been observed in early morning in winter at the lower levels of atmosphere. The second part of this study covers temporal variations of wind speed and daily total radiation in Istanbul. By using time series and wavelet techniques, small, meso and large scale factors and their roles on wind speed and total daily solar radiation variations have been analyzed. The second part of the paper underlines the role of atmospheric stability and importance of wind shear exponent on variations of wind and solar energy potential. The results of this study would be applicable in the field of wind and solar combined energy systems. Keywords: Wind shear exponent, total daily radiation, wavelet wind and solar energy. Corresponding

  6. The spectral gap and the dynamical critical exponent of an exact solvable probabilistic cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazo, M. J.; Ferreira, A. A.; Alcaraz, F. C.

    2015-11-01

    We obtained the exact solution of a probabilistic cellular automaton related to the diagonal-to-diagonal transfer matrix of the six-vertex model on a square lattice. The model describes the flow of ants (or particles), traveling on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites are small craters containing sleeping or awake ants (two kinds of particles). We found the Bethe ansatz equations and the spectral gap for the time-evolution operator of the cellular automaton. From the spectral gap we show that in the asymmetric case it belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class, exhibiting a dynamical critical exponent value z = 3/2. This result is also obtained from a direct Monte Carlo simulation, by evaluating the lattice-size dependence of the decay time to the stationary state.

  7. Fractality Evidence and Long-Range Dependence on Capital Markets: a Hurst Exponent Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprean, Camelia; Tănăsescu, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Since the existence of market memory could implicate the rejection of the efficient market hypothesis, the aim of this paper is to find any evidence that selected emergent capital markets (eight European and BRIC markets, namely Hungary, Romania, Estonia, Czech Republic, Brazil, Russia, India and China) evince long-range dependence or the random walk hypothesis. In this paper, the Hurst exponent as calculated by R/S fractal analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis is our measure of long-range dependence in the series. The results reinforce our previous findings and suggest that if stock returns present long-range dependence, the random walk hypothesis is not valid anymore and neither is the market efficiency hypothesis.

  8. A method to calculate finite-time Lyapunov exponents for inertial particles in incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaboa-Paz, D.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.

    2015-10-01

    The present study aims to improve the calculus of finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) applied to describe the transport of inertial particles in a fluid flow. To this aim, the deformation tensor is modified to take into account that the stretching rate between particles separated by a certain distance is influenced by the initial velocity of the particles. Thus, the inertial FTLEs (iFTLEs) are defined in terms of the maximum stretching between infinitesimally close trajectories that have different initial velocities. The advantages of this improvement, if compared to the standard method (Shadden et al., 2005), are discussed for the double-gyre flow and the meandering jet flow. The new method allows one to identify the initial velocity that inertial particles must have in order to maximize their dispersion.

  9. Computing Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents with Optimally Time Dependent Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaee, Hessam; Farazmand, Mohammad; Sapsis, Themis; Haller, George

    2016-11-01

    We present a method to compute Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) of a dynamical system using Optimally Time-Dependent (OTD) reduction recently introduced by H. Babaee and T. P. Sapsis. The OTD modes are a set of finite-dimensional, time-dependent, orthonormal basis {ui (x , t) } |i=1N that capture the directions associated with transient instabilities. The evolution equation of the OTD modes is derived from a minimization principle that optimally approximates the most unstable directions over finite times. To compute the FTLE, we evolve a single OTD mode along with the nonlinear dynamics. We approximate the FTLE from the reduced system obtained from projecting the instantaneous linearized dynamics onto the OTD mode. This results in a significant reduction in the computational cost compared to conventional methods for computing FTLE. We demonstrate the efficiency of our method for double Gyre and ABC flows. ARO project 66710-EG-YIP.

  10. Critical exponents of dynamical conductivity in 2D percolative superconductor-insulator transitions: three universality classes.

    PubMed

    Karki, Pragalv; Loh, Yen Lee

    2016-11-02

    We simulate three types of random inductor-capacitor (LC) networks on [Formula: see text] square lattices. We calculate the dynamical conductivity using an equation-of-motion method in which timestep error is eliminated and windowing error is minimized. We extract the critical exponent a such that [Formula: see text] at low frequencies. The results suggest that there are three different universality classes. The [Formula: see text] model, with capacitances from each site to ground, has a  =  0.314(4). The [Formula: see text] model, with capacitances along bonds, has a  =  0. The [Formula: see text] model, with both types of capacitances, has a  =  0.304(1). This implies that classical percolative 2D superconductor-insulator transitions (SITs) generically have [Formula: see text] as [Formula: see text]. Therefore, any experiments that give a constant conductivity as [Formula: see text] must be explained in terms of quantum effects.

  11. Critical Exponents of Dynamical Conductivity in 2D Percolative Superconductor-Insulator Transitions: Three Universality Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Pragalv; Loh, Yen Lee

    We simulate three types of random inductor-capacitor (LC) networks on 4000x4000 lattices. We calculate the dynamical conductivity using an equation-of-motion method in which timestep error is eliminated and windowing error is minimized. We extract the critical exponent a such that σ (ω) ~ω-a at low frequencies. The results suggest that there are three different universality classes. The LijCi model, with capacitances from each site to ground, has a = 0 . 32 . The LijCij model, with capacitances along bonds, has a = 0 . The LijCiCij model, with both types of capacitances, has a = 0 . 30 . This implies that classical percolative 2D superconductor-insulator transitions (SITs) generically have σ (ω) --> ∞ as ω --> 0 . Therefore, experiments that give a constant conductivity as ω --> 0 must be explained in terms of quantum effects.

  12. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Look, Nicole; Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; Kram, Rodger; McDermott, William J.; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics.

  13. Multiple positive solutions for Kirchhoff-type problems in R^3 involving critical Sobolev exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haining

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study the following nonlinear problem of Kirchhoff type with critical Sobolev exponent -(a+bintlimits_{R^3}|nabla u|^2dx)Δ u+u=λ f(x)u^{q-1}+g(x)u^5,quad xin R^3, uin H^1(R^3), where a, b > 0, 4 < q < 6, and {λ} is a positive parameter. Under certain assumptions on f( x) and g( x) and {λ} is small enough, we obtain a relationship between the number of positive solutions and the topology of the global maximum set of g. The Nehari manifold and Ljusternik-Schnirelmann category are the main tools in our study. Moreover, using the Mountain Pass Theorem, we give an existence result about {λ} large.

  14. Unconventional minimal subtraction and Bogoliubov-Parasyuk-Hepp-Zimmermann method: Massive scalar theory and critical exponents

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Paulo R. S.; Leite, Marcelo M.

    2013-09-15

    We introduce a simpler although unconventional minimal subtraction renormalization procedure in the case of a massive scalar λφ{sup 4} theory in Euclidean space using dimensional regularization. We show that this method is very similar to its counterpart in massless field theory. In particular, the choice of using the bare mass at higher perturbative order instead of employing its tree-level counterpart eliminates all tadpole insertions at that order. As an application, we compute diagrammatically the critical exponents η and ν at least up to two loops. We perform an explicit comparison with the Bogoliubov-Parasyuk-Hepp-Zimmermann (BPHZ) method at the same loop order, show that the proposed method requires fewer diagrams and establish a connection between the two approaches.

  15. Critical exponents of strongly correlated fermion systems from diagrammatic multiscale methods.

    PubMed

    Antipov, Andrey E; Gull, Emanuel; Kirchner, Stefan

    2014-06-06

    Self-consistent dynamical approximations for strongly correlated fermion systems are particularly successful in capturing the dynamical competition of local correlations. In these, the effect of spatially extended degrees of freedom is usually only taken into account in a mean field fashion or as a secondary effect. As a result, critical exponents associated with phase transitions have a mean field character. Here we demonstrate that diagrammatic multiscale methods anchored around local approximations are indeed capable of capturing the non-mean-field nature of the critical point of the lattice model encoded in a nonvanishing anomalous dimension and of correctly describing the transition to mean-field-like behavior as the number of spatial dimensions increases.

  16. Decrease in Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jian-Jun; Ning, Xin-Bao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Hou, Feng-Zhen; Huo, Cheng-Yu

    2008-03-01

    In this paper the decrease in the Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases was observed by using an improved rescaled range (R/S) analysis method. It indicates that the long-range correlations of gait rhythm from young healthy people are stronger than those from the healthy elderly and the diseased. The result further implies that fractal dynamics in human gait will be altered due to weakening or impairment of neural control on locomotion resulting from aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Due to analysing short-term data sequences rather than long datasets required by most nonlinear methods, the algorithm has the characteristics of simplicity and sensitivity, most importantly, fast calculation as well as powerful anti-noise capacities. These findings have implications for modelling locomotor control and also for quantifying gait dynamics in varying physiologic and pathologic states.

  17. A Model for Diagnosing Breast Cancerous Tissue from Thermal Images Using Active Contour and Lyapunov Exponent

    PubMed Central

    GHAYOUMI ZADEH, Hossein; HADDADNIA, Javad; MONTAZERI, Alimohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The segmentation of cancerous areas in breast images is important for the early detection of disease. Thermal imaging has advantages, such as being non-invasive, non-radiation, passive, quick, painless, inexpensive, and non-contact. Imaging technique is the focus of this research. Methods: The proposed model in this paper is a combination of surf and corners that are very resistant. Obtained features are resistant to changes in rotation and revolution then with the help of active contours, this feature has been used for segmenting cancerous areas. Results: Comparing the obtained results from the proposed method and mammogram show that proposed method is Accurate and appropriate. Benign and malignance of segmented areas are detected by Lyapunov exponent. Values obtained include TP=91.31%, FN=8.69%, FP=7.26%. Conclusion: The proposed method can classify those abnormally segmented areas of the breast, to the Benign and malignant cancer. PMID:27398339

  18. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index observed with the OMI satellite instrument to understand absorption by organic aerosols: implications for atmospheric oxidation and direct radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, M. S.; Martin, R. V.; van Donkelaar, A.; Buchard, V.; Torres, O.; Ridley, D. A.; Spurr, R. J. D.

    2015-10-01

    Satellite observations of the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index (UVAI) are sensitive to absorption of solar radiation by aerosols; this absorption affects photolysis frequencies and radiative forcing. We develop a global simulation of the UVAI using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the year 2007. Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.32 to -0.97) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We determine effective optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), and implement them into GEOS-Chem to better represent observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The addition of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.57 to -0.09 over West Africa in January, from -0.32 to +0.0002 over South Asia in April, from -0.97 to -0.22 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.33 over South America in September. The spectral dependence of absorption after adding BrC to the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with Absorbing Angstrom Exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.9 in the ultraviolet (UV) to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases OH by up to 35 % over South America in September, up to 25 % over southern Africa in July, and up to 20 % over other biomass burning regions. Global annual mean OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem decrease due to the presence of absorbing BrC, increasing the methyl chloroform lifetime from 5.62 to 5.68 years, thus

  19. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index Observed with the OMI Satellite Instrument to Understand Absorption by Organic Aerosols: Implications for Atmospheric Oxidation and Direct Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Melanie S.; Martin, Randall V.; Donkelaar, Aaron van; Buchard, Virginie; Torres, Omar; Ridley, David A.; Spurr, Robert J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI) are sensitive to absorption of solar radiation by aerosols; this absorption affects photolysis frequencies and radiative forcing. We develop a global simulation of the UVAI using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOSChem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the year 2007. Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.32 to -0.97) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We determine effective optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), and implement them into GEOS-Chem to better represent observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The inclusion of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.57 to -0.09 over West Africa in January, from -0.32 to +0.0002 over South Asia in April, from -0.97 to -0.22 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.33 over South America in September. The spectral dependence of absorption after including BrC in the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with absorbing Angstrom exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.9 in the ultraviolet (UV) to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases OH by up to 30% over South America in September, up to 20% over southern Africa in July, and up to 15% over other biomass burning regions. Global annual mean OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem decrease due to the presence of absorbing BrC, increasing the methyl chloroform lifetime from 5.62 to 5.68 years, thus

  20. The 2.6 Angstrom Crystal Structure of a Human A[subscript 2A] Adenosine Receptor Bound to an Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Griffith, Mark T.; Hanson, Michael A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Lane, J. Robert; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2009-01-15

    The adenosine class of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediates the important role of extracellular adenosine in many physiological processes and is antagonized by caffeine. We have determined the crystal structure of the human A{sub 2A} adenosine receptor, in complex with a high-affinity subtype-selective antagonist, ZM241385, to 2.6 angstrom resolution. Four disulfide bridges in the extracellular domain, combined with a subtle repacking of the transmembrane helices relative to the adrenergic and rhodopsin receptor structures, define a pocket distinct from that of other structurally determined GPCRs. The arrangement allows for the binding of the antagonist in an extended conformation, perpendicular to the membrane plane. The binding site highlights an integral role for the extracellular loops, together with the helical core, in ligand recognition by this class of GPCRs and suggests a role for ZM241385 in restricting the movement of a tryptophan residue important in the activation mechanism of the class A receptors.

  1. Subpicosecond and Sub-Angstrom Time and Space Studies by Means of Light, X-ray, and Electron Interaction with Matter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2014-01-02

    This Perspective article considers an experimental system that consists of ultrafast optical, electron, and X-ray time-resolved components. These techniques are used simultaneously on the same sample to study, in real time, the events that occur immediately upon disturbance with an ultrafast optical pulse. Excited states and metastable species are generated on the surface, and the electrical and mechanical waves propagating through the sample are recorded with subpicosecond and sub-Angstrom resolution. The characteristic of each technique is briefly described as a means of introducing the experimental system that intergrates these techniques. The processes evolved after femtosecond excitation of a Au single crystal have been monitored by these techniques. The data presented show changes with a resolution of 0.3 ± 0.1 ps in optical thermoreflectance, 1.0 ± 0.2 ps in electron Bragg diffraction, and 0.6 ± 0.1 ps in X-ray diffraction intensity accompanying shift and broadening.

  2. A novel method for detecting abrupt dynamic change based on the changing Hurst exponent of spatial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen-Ping; Liu, Qun-Qun; Gu, Bin; Zhao, Shan-Shan

    2016-10-01

    The climate system is a classical spatiotemporal evolutionary dynamic system with spatiotemporal correlation characteristics. Based on this, two-dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis (TD-DFA) is used to estimate the Hurst exponent of two-dimensional images. Then, we monitored the change of the Hurst exponent of the images to identify an abrupt dynamic change. We tested the performance of this method with a coupled spatiotemporal dynamic model and found that it works well. The changes in the Hurst exponents of the spatial images are stable when there is no dynamic change in the system, but there will be a clear non-stationary change of the Hurst exponents; for example, the abrupt mean values change if the dynamics of the system change. Thus, the TD-DFA method is suitable for detecting an abrupt dynamic change from natural and artificial images. The spatial images of the NCEP reanalysis of the daily average temperature exhibited fractality. Based on this, we found three non-stationary changes in the Hurst exponents for the NCEP reanalysis of the daily average temperature or for the annual average temperature in the region (60°S-60°N). It can be concluded that the climate system may have incurred three dynamic changes since 1961 on decadal timescales, i.e., in approximately the mid-1970s, the mid-1980s, and between the late 1990s and the early 2000s.

  3. Hurst exponent of very long birth time series in XX century Romania. Social and religious aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotundo, G.; Ausloos, M.; Herteliu, C.; Ileanu, B.

    2015-07-01

    The Hurst exponent of very long birth time series in Romania has been extracted from official daily records, i.e. over 97 years between 1905 and 2001 included. The series result from distinguishing between families located in urban (U) or rural (R) areas, and belonging (Ox) or not (NOx) to the orthodox religion. Four time series combining both criteria, (U,R) and (Ox, NOx), are also examined. A statistical information is given on these sub-populations measuring their XX-th century state as a snapshot. However, the main goal is to investigate whether the "daily" production of babies is purely noisy or is fluctuating according to some non trivial fractional Brownian motion, - in the four types of populations, characterized by either their habitat or their religious attitude, yet living within the same political regime. One of the goals was also to find whether combined criteria implied a different behavior. Moreover, we wish to observe whether some seasonal periodicity exists. The detrended fluctuation analysis technique is used for finding the fractal correlation dimension of such (9) signals. It has been first necessary, due to two periodic tendencies, to define the range regime in which the Hurst exponent is meaningfully defined. It results that the birth of babies in all cases is a very strongly persistent signal. It is found that the signal fractal correlation dimension is weaker (i) for NOx than for Ox, and (ii) or U with respect to R. Moreover, it is observed that the combination of U or R with NOx or OX enhances the UNOx, UOx, and ROx fluctuations, but smoothens the RNOx signal, thereby suggesting a stronger conditioning on religiosity rituals or rules.

  4. Radius exponent in elastic and rigid arterial models optimized by the least energy principle

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Awa, Shoichi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It was analyzed in normal physiological arteries whether the least energy principle would suffice to account for the radius exponent x. The mammalian arterial system was modeled as two types, the elastic or the rigid, to which Bernoulli's and Hagen‐Poiseuille's equations were applied, respectively. We minimized the total energy function E, which was defined as the sum of kinetic, pressure, metabolic and thermal energies, and loss of each per unit time in a single artery transporting viscous incompressible blood. Assuming a scaling exponent α between the vessel radius (r) and length (l) to be 1.0, x resulted in 2.33 in the elastic model. The rigid model provided a continuously changing x from 2.33 to 3.0, which corresponded to Uylings’ and Murray's theories, respectively, through a function combining Reynolds number with a proportional coefficient of the l − r relationship. These results were expanded to an asymmetric arterial fractal tree with the blood flow preservation rule. While x in the optimal elastic model accounted for around 2.3 in proximal systemic (r >1 mm) and whole pulmonary arteries (r ≥0.004 mm), optimal x in the rigid model explained 2.7 in elastic‐muscular (0.1 < r ≤1 mm) and 3.0 in peripheral resistive systemic arteries (0.004 ≤ r ≤0.1 mm), in agreement with data obtained from angiographic, cast‐morphometric, and in vivo experimental studies in the literature. The least energy principle on the total energy basis provides an alternate concept of optimality relating to mammalian arterial fractal dimensions under α = 1.0. PMID:24744905

  5. Strong Converse Exponents for a Quantum Channel Discrimination Problem and Quantum-Feedback-Assisted Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, Tom; Mosonyi, Milán; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper studies the difficulty of discriminating between an arbitrary quantum channel and a "replacer" channel that discards its input and replaces it with a fixed state. The results obtained here generalize those known in the theory of quantum hypothesis testing for binary state discrimination. We show that, in this particular setting, the most general adaptive discrimination strategies provide no asymptotic advantage over non-adaptive tensor-power strategies. This conclusion follows by proving a quantum Stein's lemma for this channel discrimination setting, showing that a constant bound on the Type I error leads to the Type II error decreasing to zero exponentially quickly at a rate determined by the maximum relative entropy registered between the channels. The strong converse part of the lemma states that any attempt to make the Type II error decay to zero at a rate faster than the channel relative entropy implies that the Type I error necessarily converges to one. We then refine this latter result by identifying the optimal strong converse exponent for this task. As a consequence of these results, we can establish a strong converse theorem for the quantum-feedback-assisted capacity of a channel, sharpening a result due to Bowen. Furthermore, our channel discrimination result demonstrates the asymptotic optimality of a non-adaptive tensor-power strategy in the setting of quantum illumination, as was used in prior work on the topic. The sandwiched Rényi relative entropy is a key tool in our analysis. Finally, by combining our results with recent results of Hayashi and Tomamichel, we find a novel operational interpretation of the mutual information of a quantum channel {mathcal{N}} as the optimal Type II error exponent when discriminating between a large number of independent instances of {mathcal{N}} and an arbitrary "worst-case" replacer channel chosen from the set of all replacer channels.

  6. Numerical computation of spherical harmonics of arbitrary degree and order by extending exponent of floating point numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2012-04-01

    By extending the exponent of floating point numbers with an additional integer as the power index of a large radix, we compute fully normalized associated Legendre functions (ALF) by recursion without underflow problem. The new method enables us to evaluate ALFs of extremely high degree as 232 = 4,294,967,296, which corresponds to around 1 cm resolution on the Earth's surface. By limiting the application of exponent extension to a few working variables in the recursion, choosing a suitable large power of 2 as the radix, and embedding the contents of the basic arithmetic procedure of floating point numbers with the exponent extension directly in the program computing the recurrence formulas, we achieve the evaluation of ALFs in the double-precision environment at the cost of around 10% increase in computational time per single ALF. This formulation realizes meaningful execution of the spherical harmonic synthesis and/or analysis of arbitrary degree and order.

  7. Numerical computation of spherical harmonics of arbitrary degree and order by extending exponent of floating point numbers: III integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2014-02-01

    The integrals of fully normalized associated Legendre function (fnALF) of extremely high degree and order such as 223=8 388 608 can be obtained without underflow problems if the point values of fnALF are properly given by using an exponent extension of the floating point numbers (Fukushima, T., 2012a. J. Geod., 86, 271-285; Fukushima, T., 2012c. J. Geod., 86, 1019-1028). A dynamic termination of the exponent extension during the fixed-order increasing-degree recursions significantly reduces the increase in CPU time caused by the exponent extension. Also, the sectorial integrals are found to be correctly obtained by the forward recursion only even when the backward recursion has been claimed to be necessary (Paul, M.K., 1978, Bull. Geod., 52, 177-190; Gerstl, M., 1980, Manuscr. Geod., 5, 181-199).

  8. Optimization of UV absorptivity of layered double hydroxide by intercalating organic UV-absorbent molecules.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Sumaiyah Megat Nabil; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Sarijo, Siti Halimah; Fakurazi, Sharida; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2014-08-01

    Intercalation of Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) with benzophenone 9 (B9), a strong ultraviolet (UV) absorber, had been carried out by two different routes; co-precipitation and ion exchange method. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns of co-precipitated (ZB9C) and ion exchanged product (ZB91) showed basal spacing of 15.9 angstrom and 16.6 angstrom, respectively, as a result of the intercalation of B9 anions into the lamellae spaces of LDH. Intercalation was further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur (CHNS) and thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric (TGA/DTG) studies. UV-vis absorption properties of the nanocomposite was investigated with diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectrometer and showed broader UV absorption range. Furthermore, stability of sunscreen molecules in LDH interlayer space was tested in deionized water, artificial sea water and skin pH condition to show slow deintercalation and high retention in host. Cytotoxicity study of the synthesized nanocomposites on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells shows no significant cytotoxicity after 24 h exposure for test concentrations up to 25 microg/mL.

  9. Scale exponents of blood pressure and heart rate during autonomic blockade as assessed by detrended fluctuation analysis.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Paolo; Parati, Gianfranco; Di Rienzo, Marco; Carabalona, Roberta; Cividjian, Andrei; Quintin, Luc

    2011-01-15

    How the autonomic nervous system influences the fractal dynamics of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) remains unclear. The purpose of our study was to separately assess cardiac vagal and sympathetic (cardiac vs. vascular) influences on fractal properties of HR and BP as described by scale exponents of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). R-R intervals, systolic and diastolic BP were measured in nine supine volunteers before and after administration of autonomic blocking agents (atropine, propranolol, atropine+propranolol, clonidine). Spectra of DFA scale exponents, α(t), were calculated for scales between 5 and 100 s. HR and BP scale structures differed at baseline, being α(t) of HR <1, with a minimum between 10 and 20 s followed by a higher plateau between 40 to 80 s, while α(t) of BP decreased with t from values >1. Comparison of atropine and propranolol with baseline and combined cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic blockade (atropine+propranolol) indicated opposite influences of vagal and cardiac sympathetic outflows on HR exponents. The vagal outflow adds white-noise components, amplifying differences with BP exponents; the cardiac sympathetic outflow adds Brownian motion components at short scales and contributes to the plateau between 40 and 80 s. Overall sympathetic inhibition by clonidine decreased short- and long-term exponents of HR, and short-term exponents of BP, so that their α(t) spectra had different means but similar profiles. Therefore, cardiac vagal, cardiac sympathetic and vascular sympathetic outflows contribute differently to HR and BP fractal structures. Results are explained by different distribution and dynamics of acetylcholine receptors and of α- and β-adrenergic receptors between heart and vasculature.

  10. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  11. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  12. All-loop order critical exponents for massless scalar field theory with Lorentz violation in the BPHZ method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Paulo R. S.

    2016-12-01

    We compute analytically the all-loop level critical exponents for a massless thermal Lorentz-violating (LV) O(N) self-interacting λϕ4 scalar field theory. For that, we evaluate, firstly explicitly up to next-to-leading loop order and later in a proof by induction up to any loop level, the respective β-function and anomalous dimensions in a theory renormalized in the massless BPHZ method, where a reduced set of Feynman diagrams to be calculated is needed. We investigate the effect of the Lorentz violation in the outcome for the critical exponents and present the corresponding mathematical explanation and physical interpretation.

  13. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  14. Revisiting the localization of Zn2+ cations sorbed on pathological apatite calcifications made through X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazin, D.; Carpentier, X.; Brocheriou, I.; Dorfmuller, P.; Aubert, S.; Chappard, C.; Thiaudiere, D.; Reguer, S.; Waychunas, G.; Jungers, P.; Daudon, M.

    2009-04-01

    The role of oligo-elements such as Zn in the genesis of pathological calcifications is widely debated in the literature. An essential element of discussion is given by their localization either at the surface or within the Ca apatite crystalline network. To determine the localization, X-ray absorption experiments have been performed at SOLEIL. The Exafs results suggest that Zn atoms, present in the Zn{sup 2+} form, are bound to about 4 O atoms at a distance of 2.00{angstrom}, while the interatomic distance R{sub CaO} ranges between 2.35 {angstrom} and 2.71 {angstrom}. Taking into account the content of Zn (around 1000 ppm) and the difference in ionic radius between Zn{sup 2+} (0.074 nm) and Ca{sup 2+} (0.099 nm), a significant longer interatomic distance would be expected in the case of Zn replacing Ca within the apatite crystalline network. We thus conclude that Zn atoms are localized at the surface and not in the apatite nanocrystal structure. Such structural result has essential biological implications for at least two reasons. Some oligoelements have a marked effect on the transformation of chemical phases, and may modify the morphology of crystals. These are both major issues because, in the case of kidney stones, the medical treatment depends strongly on the precise chemical phase and on the morphology of the biological entities at both macroscopic and mesoscopic scales.

  15. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Mn Coordination in Doped Perovskite SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V; Woicik, J; Tkach, A; Vilarinho, P

    2010-01-01

    The coordination of Mn in doped SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics having nominal compositions SrTi{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} and Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} was analyzed using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. As expected, Mn{sup 4+} substitution for Ti{sup 4+} leads to Mn occupancy of the octahedral B-sites of ABO{sub 3} perovskite lattice with a Mn-O bond distance of 1.902 {angstrom} (compared to 1.953 {angstrom} for Ti-O) and no significant local distortions around the Mn atoms. In contrast, for the composition Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sup 0.02}TiO{sub 3}, Mn segregates to both the A-sites (as Mn{sup 2+}) and the B-sites (predominantly as Mn{sup 4+}). Extended XAFS confirms strong ({approx} 0.77 {angstrom}) displacements of Mn{sup 2+} cations off the ideal A-site positions along <001> directions with a significant distortion of several coordination shells around the dopant atoms.

  16. Light absorption of organic aerosol from pyrolysis of corn stalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghua; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C.

    2016-11-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) can absorb solar radiation in the low-visible and ultra-violet wavelengths thereby modifying radiative forcing. Agricultural waste burning emits a large quantity of organic carbon in many developing countries. In this work, we improved the extraction and analysis method developed by Chen and Bond, and extended the spectral range of OC absorption. We examined light absorbing properties of primary OA from pyrolysis of corn stalk, which is a major type of agricultural wastes. Light absorption of bulk liquid extracts of OA was measured using a UV-vis recording spectrophotometer. OA can be extracted by methanol at 95%, close to full extent, and shows polar character. Light absorption of organic aerosol has strong spectral dependence (Absorption Ångström exponent = 7.7) and is not negligible at ultra-violet and low-visible regions. Higher pyrolysis temperature produced OA with higher absorption. Imaginary refractive index of organic aerosol (kOA) is 0.041 at 400 nm wavelength and 0.005 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively.

  17. An {alpha}{beta} T cell receptor structure at 2.5 {angstrom} and its orientation in the TCR-MHC complex

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, K.C.; Degano, M.; Stanfield, R.L.

    1996-10-11

    The central event in the cellular immune response to invading microorganisms is the specific recognition of foreign peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules by the {alpha}{beta} T cell receptor (TCR). The x-ray structure of the complete extracellular fragment of a glycosylated {alpha}{beta} TCR was determined at 2.5 angstrom, and its orientation bound to a class 1 MHC- peptide (pMHC) complex was elucidated from crystals of the TCR-pMHC complex. The TCR resembles an antibody in the variable V{alpha} and V{beta} domains but deviates in the constant C{alpha} domain and in the interdomain pairing of C{alpha} with C{beta}. Four of seven possible asparagine-linked glycosylation sites have ordered carbohydrate moieties, one of which lies in the C{alpha}-C{beta} interface. The TCR combining site is relatively flat except for a deep hydrophobic cavity between the hypervariable CDR3d (complementarity-determining regions) of the {alpha} and {beta} chains. The 2C TCR covers the class l MHC H-2K{sup b} binding groove so that the V{alpha} CDRs 1 and 2 are positioned over the amino-terminal region of the bound dEV8 peptide, the V{beta} chain CDRs 1 and 2 are over the carboxyl-terminal region of the peptide, and the V{alpha} and V{beta} CDR3s straddle the peptide between the helices around the central position of the peptide. 61 refs., 9 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Oxygen 6156-8 Angstroms Triplet in Chemically Peculiar Stars of the Upper Main Sequence: Do HgMn Stars Show an Oxygen Anomaly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi; Takada-Hidai, Masahide; Jugaku, Jun; Sakaue, Akihiko; Sadakane, Kozo

    1999-12-01

    An extensive spectrum-fitting analysis in the lambda ~ 6150 Angstroms region was performed for forty late-B and A chemically peculiar (HgMn, Ap, Am, weak-lined) and normal stars of the upper main sequence, in order to quantitatively establish the abundance of oxygen from the O I 6156-8 triplet and to study its behavior/anomaly for each peculiarity group, where special attention was paid to HgMn-type stars. Magnetic Ap variables (Si or SrCrEu type) generally show a remarkably large oxygen depletion (by ~ -1.6 dex to ~ -0.4 dex relative to the solar abundance), and classical Am stars also show a clear underabundance (by ~ -0.6 dex on the average). In contrast, the oxygen abundance in HgMn stars, exhibiting only a mild deficiency relative to the Sun typically by ~ 0.3-0.4 dex, is not markedly different from the tendency of normal stars, also showing a subsolar abundance ([O/H] =~ -0.2). In view of the recent observational implication that the present solar oxygen abundance is enriched by ~ 0.2-0.3 dex relative to the interstellar gas (from which young stars are formed), and thus unsuitable for the comparison standard, we concluded that the extent of the average O-deficiency in HgMn stars is appreciably reduced down to only ~ 0.1-0.2 dex (i.e., not much different from the initial composition), which contrasts with their well-known drastically large N-depletion. Yet, as can be seen from the delicate and tight O vs. Fe anticorrelation, this marginal deficiency should be real, and thus some physical process simultaneously producing O-depletion/Fe-enrichment must have actually worked in the atmosphere of HgMn stars.

  19. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  20. Orbital Exponent Optimization in Elementary VB Calculations of the Chemical Bond in the Ground State of Simple Molecular Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2008-01-01

    Orbital exponent optimization in the elementary ab-initio VB calculation of the ground states of H[subscript 2][superscript +], H[subscript 2], He[subscript 2][superscript +], He[subscript 2] gives a fair description of the exchange-overlap component of the interatomic interaction that is important in the bond region. Correct bond lengths and…

  1. A Monte-Carlo study for the critical exponents of the three-dimensional O(6) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loison, D.

    1999-09-01

    Using Wolff's single-cluster Monte-Carlo update algorithm, the three-dimensional O(6)-Heisenberg model on a simple cubic lattice is simulated. With the help of finite size scaling we compute the critical exponents ν, β, γ and η. Our results agree with the field-theory predictions but not so well with the prediction of the series expansions.

  2. Stability analysis via the concept of Lyapunov exponents: a case study in optimal controlled biped standing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuming; Wu, Christine Qiong

    2012-12-01

    Balancing control is important for biped standing. In spite of large efforts, it is very difficult to design balancing control strategies satisfying three requirements simultaneously: maintaining postural stability, improving energy efficiency and satisfying the constraints between the biped feet and the ground. In this article, a proportional-derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a standing biped, which is simplified as a two-link inverted pendulum with one additional rigid foot-link. The genetic algorithm (GA) is used to search for the control gain meeting all three requirements. The stability analysis of such a deterministic biped control system is carried out using the concept of Lyapunov exponents (LEs), based on which, the system stability, where the disturbance comes from the initial states, and the structural stability, where the disturbance comes from the PD gains, are examined quantitively in terms of stability region. This article contributes to the biped balancing control, more significantly, the method shown in the studied case of biped provides a general framework of systematic stability analysis for certain deterministic nonlinear dynamical systems.

  3. Calculating Hurst exponent and neutron monitor data in a single parallel algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussainov, A. S.; Kussainov, S. G.

    2015-09-01

    We implemented an algorithm for simultaneous parallel calculation of the Hurst exponent H and the fractal dimension D for the time series of interest. Parallel programming environment was provided by OpenMPI library installed on three machines networked in the virtual cluster and operated by Debian Wheeze operating system. We applied our program for a comparative analysis of week and a half long, one minute resolution, six channels data from neutron monitor. To ensure a faultless functioning of the written code we applied it to analysis of the random Gaussian noise signal and time series with manually introduced self-affinity features. Both of them have the well-known values of H and D. All results are in good correspondence with each other and supported by the modern theories on signal processing thus confirming the validity of the implemented algorithms. Our code could be used as a standalone tool for the different time series data analysis as well as for the further work on development and optimization of the parallel algorithms for the time series parameters calculations.

  4. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states

    PubMed Central

    Botha, André E.

    2016-01-01

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators – certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed. PMID:27374473

  5. Positive-overlap transition and critical exponents in mean field spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Alessandra; Barra, Adriano; DeSanctis, Luca

    2006-11-01

    In this paper we obtain two results for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, and we show that they both emerge from a single approach. First, we prove that the average of the overlap takes positive values when it is non-zero. More specifically, the average of the overlap, which is naively expected to take values in the whole interval [-1,+1], becomes positive if we 'first' apply an external field, so as to destroy the gauge invariance of the model, and 'then' remove it in the thermodynamic limit. This phenomenon emerges at the critical point. This first result is weaker than the one obtained by Talagrand (not limited to the average of the overlap), but we show here that, at least on average, the overlap is proven to be non-negative with no use of the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities. The latter are instead needed to obtain the second result, which is to control the behaviour of the overlap at the critical point: we find the critical exponents of all the overlap correlation functions.

  6. Quantification of scaling exponents and crossover phenomena in nonstationary heartbeat time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.-K.; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Goldberger, Ary L.

    1995-03-01

    The healthy heartbeat is traditionally thought to be regulated according to the classical principle of homeostasis whereby physiologic systems operate to reduce variability and achieve an equilibrium-like state [Physiol. Rev. 9, 399-431 (1929)]. However, recent studies [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1343-1346 (1993); Fractals in Biology and Medicine (Birkhauser-Verlag, Basel, 1994), pp. 55-65] reveal that under normal conditions, beat-to-beat fluctuations in heart rate display the kind of long-range correlations typically exhibited by dynamical systems far from equilibrium [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 381-384 (1987)]. In contrast, heart rate time series from patients with severe congestive heart failure show a breakdown of this long-range correlation behavior. We describe a new method—detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)—for quantifying this correlation property in non-stationary physiological time series. Application of this technique shows evidence for a crossover phenomenon associated with a change in short and long-range scaling exponents. This method may be of use in distinguishing healthy from pathologic data sets based on differences in these scaling properties.

  7. Adiabatic dynamics of an inhomogeneous quantum phase transition: the case of a z>1 dynamical exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziarmaga, Jacek; Rams, Marek M.

    2010-10-01

    We consider an inhomogeneous quantum phase transition across a multicritical point of the XY quantum spin chain. This is an example of a Lifshitz transition with a dynamical exponent z=2. Just like in the case z=1 considered by Dziarmaga and Rams (2010 New J. Phys. 12 055007), when a critical front propagates much faster than the maximal group velocity of quasiparticles vq, then the transition is effectively homogeneous: the density of excitations obeys a generalized Kibble-Zurek mechanism and scales with the sixth root of the transition rate. However, unlike for the case z=1, the inhomogeneous transition becomes adiabatic not below vq but at a lower threshold velocity \\hat{v} , proportional to the inhomogeneity of the transition, where the excitations are suppressed exponentially. Interestingly, the adiabatic threshold \\hat{v} is nonzero despite the vanishing minimal group velocity of low-energy quasiparticles. In the adiabatic regime below \\hat{v} , the inhomogeneous transition can be used for efficient adiabatic quantum state preparation in a quantum simulator: the time required for the critical front to sweep across a chain of N spins adiabatically is merely linear in N, while the corresponding time for a homogeneous transition across the multicritical point scales with the sixth power of N. What is more, excitations after the adiabatic inhomogeneous transition, if any, are brushed away by the critical front to the end of the spin chain.

  8. Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents and Lagrangian Coherent Structures in Uncertain Unsteady Flows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanqi; He, Wenbin; Peterka, Tom; Shen, Han-Wei; Collis, Scott; Helmus, Jonathan

    2016-02-29

    The objective of this paper is to understand transport behavior in uncertain time-varying flow fields by redefining the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) and Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) as stochastic counterparts of their traditional deterministic definitions. Three new concepts are introduced: the distribution of the FTLE (D-FTLE), the FTLE of distributions (FTLE-D), and uncertain LCS (U-LCS). The D-FTLE is the probability density function of FTLE values for every spatiotemporal location, which can be visualized with different statistical measurements. The FTLE-D extends the deterministic FTLE by measuring the divergence of particle distributions. It gives a statistical overview of how transport behaviors vary in neighborhood locations. The U-LCS, the probabilities of finding LCSs over the domain, can be extracted with stochastic ridge finding and density estimation algorithms. We show that our approach produces better results than existing variance-based methods do. Our experiments also show that the combination of D-FTLE, FTLE-D, and U-LCS can help users understand transport behaviors and find separatrices in ensemble simulations of atmospheric processes.

  9. The scaling exponent of residual nonwetting phase cluster size distributions in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglauer, Stefan; Wülling, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    During an imbibition process in two-phase subsurface flow the imbibing phase can displace the nonwetting phase up to an endpoint at which a residual saturation is reached (which cannot be reduced further by additional wetting phase flow due to the complex pore network of the rock and associated strong capillary forces which trap the nonwetting phase). The residual nonwetting phase is split into many disconnected clusters of different sizes. This size distribution is of key importance, for instance, in the context of hydrocarbon recovery, contaminant transport, or CO2 geostorage; and it is well established that this size distribution follows a power law. However, there is significant uncertainty associated with the exact value of the distribution exponent τ, which mathematically describes the size distribution. To reduce this uncertainty and to better constrain τ, we analyzed a representative experimental data set with mathematically rigorous methods, and we demonstrate that τ is substantially smaller (≈1.1) than previously suggested. This raises increasing doubt that simple percolation models can accurately predict subsurface fluid flow behavior; and this has serious consequences for subsurface flow processes: hydrocarbon recovery is easier than predicted, but CO2 geostorage dissolution trapping capacities are significantly reduced and potential remobilization of residual CO2 is more likely than previously believed.

  10. Chaotic dynamics of Halley's comet: Lyapunov exponents and survival-time prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, M.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Pichardo, B.

    2014-07-01

    We have explored the dynamical evolution of the comet 1P/Halley over 1 Myr with detailed numerical simulations, under the gravitational influence of all the planets in the present-day Solar System (except Mercury). To this purpose, we have employed the Mercury 6.2 code, including, in addition to the planets, the 9 largest minor bodies (among them those known as dwarf planets except for Sedna) to conduct the N-body simulation. The comet's fiduciary orbit, and a set of orbits surrounding it in the phase space (a-e), are solved as test particles in this problem. The ensemble of orbits explored is constructed as a mesh of 10,000 particles with different initial conditions covering the observational error of the orbit in the semimajor axis and eccentricity (± 10^{-6} au and ± 10^{-6}, respectively). We find that the comet's fate is highly sensitive to initial conditions. Survival time maps from the simulations and Laskar frequency analysis maps for the vicinity of Halley's comet are shown. Also, the maximum Lyapunov exponent for neighboring orbits is calculated. This shows that chaos is dominant for these highly eccentric orbits as found by Chirikov & Vecheslavov (1989) and produces large non-stable regions for the comet's surrounding phase space. We provide estimations of the probability of survival of Halley's comet and a general perspective about the dynamical evolution of comets on a wider region of phase-space which covers several currently known Halley-type comets.

  11. Designing Hyperchaotic Cat Maps With Any Desired Number of Positive Lyapunov Exponents.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhongyun; Yi, Shuang; Zhou, Yicong; Li, Chengqing; Wu, Yue

    2017-01-04

    Generating chaotic maps with expected dynamics of users is a challenging topic. Utilizing the inherent relation between the Lyapunov exponents (LEs) of the Cat map and its associated Cat matrix, this paper proposes a simple but efficient method to construct an n-dimensional (n-D) hyperchaotic Cat map (HCM) with any desired number of positive LEs. The method first generates two basic n-D Cat matrices iteratively and then constructs the final n-D Cat matrix by performing similarity transformation on one basic n-D Cat matrix by the other. Given any number of positive LEs, it can generate an n-D HCM with desired hyperchaotic complexity. Two illustrative examples of n-D HCMs were constructed to show the effectiveness of the proposed method, and to verify the inherent relation between the LEs and Cat matrix. Theoretical analysis proves that the parameter space of the generated HCM is very large. Performance evaluations show that, compared with existing methods, the proposed method can construct n-D HCMs with lower computation complexity and their outputs demonstrate strong randomness and complex ergodicity.

  12. Lyapunov exponents and adaptive mesh refinement for high-speed flows using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, R. C.; Silva, A. F. C.; Bigarella, E. D. V.; Fazenda, A. L.; Ortega, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes two important improvements to shock-capturing strategies using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme, namely, accurate shock identification via finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) operators and efficient shock treatment through a point-implicit discretization of a PDE-based artificial viscosity technique. The advocated approach is based on the FTLE operator, originally developed in the context of dynamical systems theory to identify certain types of coherent structures in a flow. We propose the application of FTLEs in the detection of shock waves and demonstrate the operator's ability to identify strong and weak shocks equally well. The detection algorithm is coupled with a mesh refinement procedure and applied to transonic and supersonic flows. While the proposed strategy can be used potentially with any numerical method, a high-order discontinuous Galerkin solver is used in this study. In this context, two artificial viscosity approaches are employed to regularize the solution near shocks: an element-wise constant viscosity technique and a PDE-based smooth viscosity model. As the latter approach is more sophisticated and preferable for complex problems, a point-implicit discretization in time is proposed to reduce the extra stiffness introduced by the PDE-based technique, making it more competitive in terms of computational cost.

  13. High temperature phase transitions and critical exponents of Samarium orthoferrite determined by in situ optical ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berini, B.; Fouchet, A.; Popova, E.; Scola, J.; Dumont, Y.; Franco, N.; da Silva, R. M. C.; Keller, N.

    2012-03-01

    Determining phase transitions has always been a great challenge in material science due to their important fundamental and technological aspects. Recently, iron-based perovskites (RFeO3), exhibiting phase transitions at high temperatures, have attracted much interest for their functional properties at room temperature, such as multiferroicity (BiFeO3) and ultrafast spin dynamics (TmFeO3). In this family of materials, Samarium orthoferrite (SmFeO3) is a weak ferromagnet, ordering at high temperatures and exhibiting an intrinsic spin reorientation transition above room temperature, which is "hidden" in macroscopic magnetization measurements in polycrystalline samples. In the present article, we show that the related magnetic high temperature phase transitions can be studied through their dielectric functions by spectroscopic ellipsometry in situ and without any need for an applied external magnetic field. The presence of this intrinsic spin reorientation transition is demonstrated for textured SmFeO3 films and we have determined a critical exponent of β = 0.45 ± 0.01 for the magnetic phase transition, coherently from optical, magneto-optical, and structural investigations.

  14. Critical exponents of dynamical conductivity in 2D percolative superconductor-insulator transitions: three universality classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Pragalv; Loh, Yen Lee

    2016-11-01

    We simulate three types of random inductor-capacitor (LC) networks on 6000× 6000 square lattices. We calculate the dynamical conductivity using an equation-of-motion method in which timestep error is eliminated and windowing error is minimized. We extract the critical exponent a such that σ ≤ft(ω \\right)\\propto {ω-a} at low frequencies. The results suggest that there are three different universality classes. The {{L}ij}{{C}i} model, with capacitances from each site to ground, has a  =  0.314(4). The {{L}ij}{{C}ij} model, with capacitances along bonds, has a  =  0. The {{L}ij}{{C}i}{{C}ij} model, with both types of capacitances, has a  =  0.304(1). This implies that classical percolative 2D superconductor-insulator transitions (SITs) generically have σ ≤ft(ω \\right)\\to ∞ as ω \\to 0 . Therefore, any experiments that give a constant conductivity as ω \\to 0 must be explained in terms of quantum effects.

  15. The structure of the extreme Lyapunov exponents in the inertial scales of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela-Martin, Alberto; Jimenez, Javier

    2016-11-01

    A fully reversible homogeneous isotropic turbulent system is constructed using inviscid LES to model energy fluxes in the far inertial range. Reversibility is exploited to efficiently calculate the highest/most unstable and lowest/most stable short-time Lyapunov exponents (STLE) of the system. When restricted to inertial modes, both extreme STLE have similar absolute value and inverse sign, suggesting the Hamiltonian nature of inertial dynamics. Their associated short-time Lyapunov vectors (STLV), which are complete flow fields that provide information on the perturbations to which the system is most/least sensitive, are found to be concentrated in small regions in physical space. The analysis of the structure of the STLV reveals that these small regions, where intense expansive and contractive events take place, are strongly dominated by the strain field of the flow. These regions are also characterized by a preferential alignment of the field of the STLV with the different eigenvectors of the strain tensor. However, no strong correlation of the STLV with the vorticity field is found. These results emphasize the active role of the strain in turbulence dynamics. Funded by the ERC COTURB project.

  16. Multiscale Analysis of Biological Data by Scale-Dependent Lyapunov Exponent

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianbo; Hu, Jing; Tung, Wen-wen; Blasch, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Physiological signals often are highly non-stationary (i.e., mean and variance change with time) and multiscaled (i.e., dependent on the spatial or temporal interval lengths). They may exhibit different behaviors, such as non-linearity, sensitive dependence on small disturbances, long memory, and extreme variations. Such data have been accumulating in all areas of health sciences and rapid analysis can serve quality testing, physician assessment, and patient diagnosis. To support patient care, it is very desirable to characterize the different signal behaviors on a wide range of scales simultaneously. The Scale-Dependent Lyapunov Exponent (SDLE) is capable of such a fundamental task. In particular, SDLE can readily characterize all known types of signal data, including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, random 1/fα processes, stochastic limit cycles, among others. SDLE also has some unique capabilities that are not shared by other methods, such as detecting fractal structures from non-stationary data and detecting intermittent chaos. In this article, we describe SDLE in such a way that it can be readily understood and implemented by non-mathematically oriented researchers, develop a SDLE-based consistent, unifying theory for the multiscale analysis, and demonstrate the power of SDLE on analysis of heart-rate variability (HRV) data to detect congestive heart failure and analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) data to detect seizures. PMID:22291653

  17. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, André E.

    2016-07-01

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators – certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed.

  18. The performance-variability paradox, financial decision making, and the curious case of negative Hurst exponents.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J; Reiter, Katherine; Shircel, Anton; Timm, Paul; Malon, Matthew; Fabisch, Megan

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between performance variability and actual performance of financial decision makers who were working under experimental conditions of increasing workload and fatigue. The rescaled range statistic, also known as the Hurst exponent (H) was used as an index of variability. Although H is defined as having a range between 0 and 1, 45% of the 172 time series generated by undergraduates were negative. Participants in the study chose the optimum investment out of sets of 3 to 5 options that were presented a series of 350 displays. The sets of options varied in both the complexity of the options and number of options under simultaneous consideration. One experimental condition required participants to make their choices within 15 sec, and the other condition required them to choose within 7.5 sec. Results showed that (a) negative H was possible and not a result of psychometric error; (b) negative H was associated with negative autocorrelations in a time series. (c) H was the best predictor of performance of the variables studied; (d) three other significant predictors were scores on an anagrams test and ratings of physical demands and performance demands; (e) persistence as evidenced by the autocorrelations was associated with ratings of greater time pressure. It was concluded, furthermore, that persistence and overall performance were correlated, that 'healthy' variability only exists within a limited range, and other individual differences related to ability and resistance to stress or fatigue are also involved in the prediction of performance.

  19. A unified econophysics explanation for the power-law exponents of stock market activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabaix, Xavier; Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Plerou, Vasiliki; Stanley, Eugene

    2007-08-01

    We survey a theory (first sketched in Nature in 2003, then fleshed out in the Quarterly Journal of Economics in 2006) of the economic underpinnings of the fat-tailed distributions of a number of financial variables, such as returns and trading volume. Our theory posits that they have a common origin in the strategic trading behavior of very large financial institutions in a relatively illiquid market. We show how the fat-tailed distribution of fund sizes can indeed generate extreme returns and volumes, even in the absence of fundamental news. Moreover, we are able to replicate the individually different empirical values of the power-law exponents for each distribution: 3 for returns, 3/2 for volumes, 1 for the assets under management of large investors. Large investors moderate their trades to reduce their price impact; coupled with a concave price impact function, this leads to volumes being more fat-tailed than returns but less fat-tailed than fund sizes. The trades of large institutions also offer a unified explanation for apparently disconnected empirical regularities that are otherwise a challenge for economic theory.

  20. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states.

    PubMed

    Botha, André E

    2016-07-04

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators - certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed.

  1. 20 years of reprocessed Lyapunov Exponents from altimetry available on AVISO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Marie-Isabelle; Faugere, Yannice; D'Ovidio, Francesco; Morrow, Rosemary; Bronner, Emilie; Picot, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    SARAL/AltiKa is able to sample the small mesoscale signal with a noise measurement error never reached in nadir conventional altimetry. The SARAL/AltiKa 1-Hz measurement is used in the SSALTO/DUACS system since July 2013 and largely contributes to the quality of the Level4 merged products. These products, are now widely used to define the surface geostrophic currents and beyond that they are used to provide proxies of (sub-)mesoscale transport fronts via the Lyapunov Exponents (LEs). The LEs are being increasingly used in physical, biogeochemical, and ecological applications, ranging from real-time support to field studies to co-localisation of animal tracking with Lagrangian Coherent Structures. In order to better serve the users need, and in collaboration with different laboratories (LOCEAN and CTOH), the LEs and vectors are computed over the 21 year altimeter period and over the global ocean within the SSALTO/DUACS project. This product provides the position, and intensity, and orientation of fronts induced by the mesoscale eddies and underlining part of sub-mesoscale activity. We present here the LEs that will be available on AVISO+ early 2015.

  2. Wavefunctions, quantum diffusion, and scaling exponents in golden-mean quasiperiodic tilings.

    PubMed

    Thiem, Stefanie; Schreiber, Michael

    2013-02-20

    We study the properties of wavefunctions and the wavepacket dynamics in quasiperiodic tight-binding models in one, two, and three dimensions. The atoms in the one-dimensional quasiperiodic chains are coupled by weak and strong bonds aligned according to the Fibonacci sequence. The associated d-dimensional quasiperiodic tilings are constructed from the direct product of d such chains, which yields either the hypercubic tiling or the labyrinth tiling. This approach allows us to consider fairly large systems numerically. We show that the wavefunctions of the system are multifractal and that their properties can be related to the structure of the system in the regime of strong quasiperiodic modulation by a renormalization group (RG) approach. We also study the dynamics of wavepackets to get information about the electronic transport properties. In particular, we investigate the scaling behaviour of the return probability of the wavepacket with time. Applying again the RG approach we show that in the regime of strong quasiperiodic modulation the return probability is governed by the underlying quasiperiodic structure. Further, we also discuss lower bounds for the scaling exponent of the width of the wavepacket and propose a modified lower bound for the absolute continuous regime.

  3. Wavefunctions, quantum diffusion, and scaling exponents in golden-mean quasiperiodic tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiem, Stefanie; Schreiber, Michael

    2013-02-01

    We study the properties of wavefunctions and the wavepacket dynamics in quasiperiodic tight-binding models in one, two, and three dimensions. The atoms in the one-dimensional quasiperiodic chains are coupled by weak and strong bonds aligned according to the Fibonacci sequence. The associated d-dimensional quasiperiodic tilings are constructed from the direct product of d such chains, which yields either the hypercubic tiling or the labyrinth tiling. This approach allows us to consider fairly large systems numerically. We show that the wavefunctions of the system are multifractal and that their properties can be related to the structure of the system in the regime of strong quasiperiodic modulation by a renormalization group (RG) approach. We also study the dynamics of wavepackets to get information about the electronic transport properties. In particular, we investigate the scaling behaviour of the return probability of the wavepacket with time. Applying again the RG approach we show that in the regime of strong quasiperiodic modulation the return probability is governed by the underlying quasiperiodic structure. Further, we also discuss lower bounds for the scaling exponent of the width of the wavepacket and propose a modified lower bound for the absolute continuous regime.

  4. Temperature effects on mass-scaling exponents in colonial animals: a manipulative test.

    PubMed

    Barneche, Diego R; White, Craig R; Marshall, Dustin J

    2017-01-01

    Body size and temperature are fundamental drivers of ecological processes because they determine metabolic rates at the individual level. Whether these drivers act independently on individual-level metabolic rates remains uncertain. Most studies of intraspecific scaling of unitary organisms must rely on preexisting differences in size to examine its relationship with metabolic rate, thereby potentially confounding size-correlated traits (e.g., age, nutrition) with size, which can affect metabolic rate. Here, we use a size manipulation approach to test whether metabolic mass scaling and temperature dependence interact in four species (two phyla) of colonial marine invertebrates. Size manipulation in colonial organisms allows tests of how ecological processes (e.g., predation) affect individual physiology and consequently population- and community-level energy flux. Body mass and temperature interacted in two species, with one species exhibiting decreased and the other increased mass-scaling exponents with increasing temperature. The allometric scaling of metabolic rate that we observe in three species contrasts with the isometric scaling of ingestion rates observed in some colonial marine invertebrates. Thus, we suggest that the often observed competitive superiority of colonial over unitary organisms may arise because the difference between energy intake and expenditure increases more strongly with size in colonial organisms.

  5. Quantification of scaling exponents and crossover phenomena in nonstationary heartbeat time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The healthy heartbeat is traditionally thought to be regulated according to the classical principle of homeostasis whereby physiologic systems operate to reduce variability and achieve an equilibrium-like state [Physiol. Rev. 9, 399-431 (1929)]. However, recent studies [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1343-1346 (1993); Fractals in Biology and Medicine (Birkhauser-Verlag, Basel, 1994), pp. 55-65] reveal that under normal conditions, beat-to-beat fluctuations in heart rate display the kind of long-range correlations typically exhibited by dynamical systems far from equilibrium [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 381-384 (1987)]. In contrast, heart rate time series from patients with severe congestive heart failure show a breakdown of this long-range correlation behavior. We describe a new method--detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)--for quantifying this correlation property in non-stationary physiological time series. Application of this technique shows evidence for a crossover phenomenon associated with a change in short and long-range scaling exponents. This method may be of use in distinguishing healthy from pathologic data sets based on differences in these scaling properties.

  6. Red-bond exponents of the critical and the tricritical Ising model in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Youjin; Blöte, Henk W. J.

    2004-11-01

    Using the Wolff and geometric cluster algorithms and finite-size scaling analysis, we investigate the critical Ising and the tricritical Blume-Capel models with nearest-neighbor interactions on the simple-cubic lattice. The sampling procedure involves the decomposition of the Ising configuration into geometric clusters, each of which consists of a set of nearest-neighboring spins of the same sign connected with bond probability p . These clusters include the well-known Kasteleyn-Fortuin clusters as a special case for p=1-exp(-2K) , where K is the Ising spin-spin coupling. Along the critical line K=Kc , the size distribution of geometric clusters is investigated as a function of p . We observe that, unlike in the case of two-dimensional tricriticality, the percolation threshold in both models lies at pc=1-exp(-2Kc) . Further, we determine the corresponding red-bond exponents as yr=0.757(2) and 0.501(5) for the critical Ising and the tricritical Blume-Capel models, respectively. On this basis, we conjecture yr=1/2 for the latter model.

  7. Red-bond exponents of the critical and the tricritical Ising model in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youjin; Blöte, Henk W J

    2004-11-01

    Using the Wolff and geometric cluster algorithms and finite-size scaling analysis, we investigate the critical Ising and the tricritical Blume-Capel models with nearest-neighbor interactions on the simple-cubic lattice. The sampling procedure involves the decomposition of the Ising configuration into geometric clusters, each of which consists of a set of nearest-neighboring spins of the same sign connected with bond probability p. These clusters include the well-known Kasteleyn-Fortuin clusters as a special case for p=1-exp(-2K) , where K is the Ising spin-spin coupling. Along the critical line K=Kc , the size distribution of geometric clusters is investigated as a function of p . We observe that, unlike in the case of two-dimensional tricriticality, the percolation threshold in both models lies at pc =1-exp(-2Kc) . Further, we determine the corresponding red-bond exponents as yr =0.757(2) and 0.501(5) for the critical Ising and the tricritical Blume-Capel models, respectively. On this basis, we conjecture yr =1/2 for the latter model.

  8. A perturbation method to the tent map based on Lyapunov exponent and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lv-Chen; Luo, Yu-Ling; Qiu, Sen-Hui; Liu, Jun-Xiu

    2015-10-01

    Perturbation imposed on a chaos system is an effective way to maintain its chaotic features. A novel parameter perturbation method for the tent map based on the Lyapunov exponent is proposed in this paper. The pseudo-random sequence generated by the tent map is sent to another chaos function — the Chebyshev map for the post processing. If the output value of the Chebyshev map falls into a certain range, it will be sent back to replace the parameter of the tent map. As a result, the parameter of the tent map keeps changing dynamically. The statistical analysis and experimental results prove that the disturbed tent map has a highly random distribution and achieves good cryptographic properties of a pseudo-random sequence. As a result, it weakens the phenomenon of strong correlation caused by the finite precision and effectively compensates for the digital chaos system dynamics degradation. Project supported by the Guangxi Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 2014GXNSFBA118271), the Research Project of Guangxi University, China (Grant No. ZD2014022), the Fund from Guangxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Multi-source Information Mining & Security, China (Grant No. MIMS14-04), the Fund from the Guangxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Wireless Wideband Communication & Signal Processing, China (Grant No. GXKL0614205), the Education Development Foundation and the Doctoral Research Foundation of Guangxi Normal University, the State Scholarship Fund of China Scholarship Council (Grant No. [2014]3012), and the Innovation Project of Guangxi Graduate Education, China (Grant No. YCSZ2015102).

  9. The estimation of scaling exponents for extreme flows in Europe and their dependence on river network structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardo, Stefano; Tsaknias, Dimosthenis; Tillmans, Stephan; Nicotina, Ludovico; Assteerawatt, Anongnart; Azemar, Frederic; Hilberts, Arno

    2014-05-01

    The spatial scaling of geophysical fluxes has been often observed in a variety of studies and disciplines. This process characteristic, usually referred to as 'scale invariance', arises from the non-linear interaction of different components of a geophysical system. An outstanding and very popular example of scale invariance in hydrology is represented by the observed power law relationship between discharge and drainage area. A number of studies have focused on the scaling of flow quantiles and, more recently, of extreme flow events with drainage area, reporting the existence of scale invariance in many cases of interest. The importance of these findings lies in the potential improvement and simplification of hydrological predictions, provided that the scaling exponent, α, is correctly estimated. For this reason, several studies have focused on relating α to physical basin characteristics, such as river network structure or climate, in order to provide a predictive framework for its value. However, as we show in this study, the estimation of α bears an intrinsic uncertainty due to the commonly used estimation method as well as the often limited data availability. In order to explore the physical basis of the scaling exponent it is therefore paramount to quantify the effect of the estimation uncertainty, and possibly separate it from the natural variability of α. In this study we use an extensive set of numerical simulations to assess the variability of α under controlled conditions. We then compute a set of event-based α's for 62 European river basins on the basis of data available for approximately 700 stations. We find that for a number of basins, the variability due to estimation uncertainty is significantly smaller than the one obtained from data, suggesting an actual, physical basis of the scaling exponent. Finally, for these basins we test the hypothesis that the river network structure is the first order control on the value of α. To this end we

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  11. The Absorption Spectrum of PKS 1756+237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J. M.; Roth, K. C.; Jim, K. T. C.

    1998-05-01

    We are involved in a program to investigate the relationship between damped Lyalpha absorption systems and the interstellar medium of our own galaxy and nearby galaxies. This ultimately requires the proper identification of the systems responsible for the absorption so that a connection may be drawn between the absorption characteristics and the physical characteristics of the absorber, such as galaxy morphology, size, brightness, and separation from the QSO line of sight (see Jim & Roth, Kolhatkar et al., and Roth et al. also presenting here). PKS 1756+237 is a relatively bright QSO (m_V~18.0) with an emission redshift of z=1.721. There are two strong intervening absorption line systems at redshifts of 1.426 and 1.673. Both systems exhibit strong low-ionization lines, and so are believed to originate in the inner regions of galactic systems at some stage of formation. We obtained two hours of high quality HIRES spectra on the Keck 10m telescope for this QSO in May, 1997. The 6.5 km/s (0.09 Angstroms FWHM) resolution of this data is a ten-fold improvement over existing data, providing kinematic information as well as significantly improved column density measurements. Preliminary analysis of the data suggests the existence of significant Ni II abundance at z=1.67, possibly indicating a damped absorber system. The spectra cover the C II and Si II lines, enabling us to search for associated fine-structure excitation. These spectra also cover several additional low and high-ionization species from which we derive abundance and kinematic information. Images of this QSO, acquired at the UH 2.2m telescope using the QUIRC infrared and Tek2048 optical cameras with UH's tip-tilt system, show possible candidates for absorber systems.

  12. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  13. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  14. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  15. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  16. Crystallisation kinetics of some archetypal ionic liquids: isothermal and non-isothermal determination of the Avrami exponent.

    PubMed

    Pas, Steven J; Dargusch, Matthew S; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2011-07-07

    The properties of ionic liquids give rise to applications in diverse technology areas including mechanical engineering, mining, aerospace and defence. The arbitrary physical property that defines an ionic liquid is a melting point below 100 °C, and as such, an understanding of crystallisation phenomena is extremely important. This is the first report dealing with the mechanism of crystallisation in ionic liquids. Assuming crystallisation of the ionic liquids is a thermal or mass diffusion-controlled process, the values of the isothermal Avrami exponent obtained from three different ionic liquids with three different anions and cations all indicate that growth occurs with a decreasing nucleation rate (n=1.8-2.2). For one of the ionic liquids it was possible to avoid crystallisation by fast cooling and then observe a devitrification upon heating through the glass transition. The isothermal Avrami exponent of devitrification suggested growth with an increasing nucleating rate (n=4.1), compared to a decreasing nucleation rate when crystallisation occurs on cooling from the melt (n=2.0). Two non-isothermal methods were employed to determine the Avrami exponent of devitrification. Both non-isothermal Avrami exponents were in agreement with the isothermal case (n=4.0-4.15). The applicability of JMAK theory suggests that the nucleation event in the ionic liquids selected is a random stochastic process in the volume of the material. Agreement between the isothermal and non-isothermal techniques for determining the Avrami exponent of devitrification suggests that the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy are independent of thermal history. The heating rate dependence of the glass transition enabled the calculation of the fragility index, which suggests that the ionic liquid is a "strong" glass former. This suggests that the temperature dependence of the rate constant could be close to Arrhenius, as assumed by JMAK theory. More generally, therefore, it can be

  17. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  18. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  19. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  20. Intranasal absorption of oxymorphone.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Aungst, B J

    1997-08-01

    The nasal bioavailability of oxymorphone HCI was determined. Rats were surgically prepared to isolate the nasal cavity, into which a solution of oxymorphone was administered. A reference group of rats was administered oxymorphone HCl intravenously. Plasma oxymorphone concentrations were determined by HPLC. Nasal absorption was rapid, nasal bioavailability was 43%, and the iv and nasal elimination profiles were similar. Oxymorphone HCI appears to have the solubility, potency, and absorption properties required for efficient nasal delivery, which is an alternative to injections.

  1. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  2. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  3. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent-based analysis for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, D. R.; Speth, R. L.; Gaitonde, D. V.; Lewis, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) technique has shown substantial success in analyzing incompressible flows by capturing the dynamics of coherent structures. Recent applications include river and ocean flow patterns, respiratory tract dynamics, and bio-inspired propulsors. In the present work, we extend FTLE to the compressible flow regime so that coherent structures, which travel at convective speeds, can be associated with waves traveling at acoustic speeds. This is particularly helpful in the study of jet acoustics. We first show that with a suitable choice of integration time interval, FTLE can extract wave dynamics from the velocity field. The integration time thus acts as a pseudo-filter separating coherent structures from waves. Results are confirmed by examining forward and backward FTLE coefficients for several simple, well-known acoustic fields. Next, we use this analysis to identify events associated with intermittency in jet noise pressure probe data. Although intermittent events are known to be dominant causes of jet noise, their direct source in the turbulent jet flow has remained unexplained. To this end, a Large-Eddy Simulation of a Mach 0.9 jet is subjected to FTLE to simultaneously examine, and thus expose, the causal relationship between coherent structures and the corresponding acoustic waves. Results show that intermittent events are associated with entrainment in the initial roll up region and emissive events downstream of the potential-core collapse. Instantaneous acoustic disturbances are observed to be primarily induced near the collapse of the potential core and continue propagating towards the far-field at the experimentally observed, approximately 30° angle relative to the jet axis.

  4. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent-based analysis for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    González, D R; Speth, R L; Gaitonde, D V; Lewis, M J

    2016-08-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) technique has shown substantial success in analyzing incompressible flows by capturing the dynamics of coherent structures. Recent applications include river and ocean flow patterns, respiratory tract dynamics, and bio-inspired propulsors. In the present work, we extend FTLE to the compressible flow regime so that coherent structures, which travel at convective speeds, can be associated with waves traveling at acoustic speeds. This is particularly helpful in the study of jet acoustics. We first show that with a suitable choice of integration time interval, FTLE can extract wave dynamics from the velocity field. The integration time thus acts as a pseudo-filter separating coherent structures from waves. Results are confirmed by examining forward and backward FTLE coefficients for several simple, well-known acoustic fields. Next, we use this analysis to identify events associated with intermittency in jet noise pressure probe data. Although intermittent events are known to be dominant causes of jet noise, their direct source in the turbulent jet flow has remained unexplained. To this end, a Large-Eddy Simulation of a Mach 0.9 jet is subjected to FTLE to simultaneously examine, and thus expose, the causal relationship between coherent structures and the corresponding acoustic waves. Results show that intermittent events are associated with entrainment in the initial roll up region and emissive events downstream of the potential-core collapse. Instantaneous acoustic disturbances are observed to be primarily induced near the collapse of the potential core and continue propagating towards the far-field at the experimentally observed, approximately 30° angle relative to the jet axis.

  5. Sound absorption in nonelectrolyte aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Harumi; Honda, Kazuyuki

    2001-10-01

    We indicate that the curve fitting for Debye-type relaxation spectrum of sound absorption (SA) cannot sufficiently account for the observed data of nonelectrolyte aqueous solutions (NEAS). To solve these problems, we introduce the distribution function of relaxation time [DFRT, F(τ)] from a diffusion equation of concentration fluctuations using the fluctuation dispersion theory. The SA expression is described by four-adjustable parameters. By use of the mixtures of 1-propanol, t-butanol, and monobutyl triethylene glycol with water, our calculation of SA shows the best fit between the observed and calculated curves, compared with other models. It was found that at lower frequencies the SA behaves as the square root of frequency. The approximate expression of DFRT was expressed in terms of a power law of relaxation time, F(τ)∝τ-γ, which is the same as the expression of dielectric relaxation by Matsumoto and Higashi. Our exponent (γ) of relaxation time is varied from 5/2 in hydrophilic solutes to 3/2 in hydrophobic solutes. The power (γ) of relaxation time was regarded as a parameter to explain the hydrophobic and hydrophilic in the dissolved states of a solute. Our SA expression of γ=5/2 for solutes of a small correlation length leads to that of Romanov-Solov'ev, where the value of 5/2 is that of the Debye distribution for the relaxation time in the Romanov-Solov'ev model.

  6. Dynamical lag correlation exponent based method for gas-solid flow velocity measurement using twin-plane electrical capacitance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qian; Wang, Huaxiang; Yang, Chengyi; Cui, Ziqiang

    2012-08-01

    In a twin-plane electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system, velocity measurement of two-phase flow is transformed into the time delay estimation problem, while the nongaussianity and nonstationarity of two-phase flow signals have put the validity of the conventional cross-correlation algorithm in jeopardy. To improve the robustness and reliability of flow velocity measurement, an alternative method is proposed based on the dynamical lag correlation exponent and applied to coal ash measurement in a pneumatic pipeline. Different from the cross-correlation method which picks the peak point of the cross-correlation function as the delayed frames between the upstream and downstream signals, the proposed method determines the delayed frames by finding the minimum point of the dynamical lag correlation exponent. The preliminary results of flow velocity measurement indicate that the proposed method is capable of detecting various velocities (8-25 m s-1), which is useful for monitoring and predicting flow instability.

  7. Lévy Walk Navigation in Complex Networks: A Distinct Relation between Optimal Transport Exponent and Network Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Tongfeng; Small, Michael; Zhang, Jie; Hui, Pan

    2015-11-01

    We investigate, for the first time, navigation on networks with a Lévy walk strategy such that the step probability scales as pij ~ dij-α, where dij is the Manhattan distance between nodes i and j, and α is the transport exponent. We find that the optimal transport exponent αopt of such a diffusion process is determined by the fractal dimension df of the underlying network. Specially, we theoretically derive the relation αopt = df + 2 for synthetic networks and we demonstrate that this holds for a number of real-world networks. Interestingly, the relationship we derive is different from previous results for Kleinberg navigation without or with a cost constraint, where the optimal conditions are α = df and α = df + 1, respectively. Our results uncover another general mechanism for how network dimension can precisely govern the efficient diffusion behavior on diverse networks.

  8. The basis property of the Legendre polynomials in the variable exponent Lebesgue space L^{p(x)}(-1,1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapudinov, Idris I.

    2009-02-01

    The paper looks at the problem of determining the conditions on a variable exponent p=p(x) so that the orthonormal system of Legendre polynomials \\{\\widehat P_n(x)\\}_{n=0}^\\infty is a basis in the Lebesgue space L^{p(x)}(-1,1) with norm \\displaystyle \\Vert f\\Vert _{p(\\,\\cdot\\,)}=\\inf\\biggl\\{\\alpha>0:\\int_{-1}^1\\biggl\\vert{\\frac{f(x)}{\\alpha}}\\biggr\\vert^{p(x)}\\,dx \\le1\\biggr\\}. Conditions on the exponent p=p(x), that are definitive in a certain sense, are obtained and guarantee that the system \\{\\widehat P_n(x)\\}_{n=0}^\\infty has the basis property in L^{p(x)}(-1,1). Bibliography: 31 titles.

  9. Zero-temperature transition and correlation-length exponent of the frustrated XY model on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, Enzo

    2012-02-01

    Phase coherence and vortex order in the fully frustrated XY model on a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice are studied by extensive Monte Carlo simulations using the parallel tempering method and finite-size scaling. No evidence is found for an equilibrium order-disorder or a spin/vortex-glass transition, suggested in previous simulation works. Instead, the scaling analysis of correlations of phase and vortex variables in the full equilibrated system is consistent with a phase transition where the critical temperature vanishes and the correlation lengths diverge as a power law with decreasing temperatures and corresponding critical exponents νph and νv. This behavior and the near agreement of the critical exponents suggest a zero-temperature transition scenario where phase and vortex variables remain coupled on large length scales.

  10. Lyapunov exponent and surrogation analysis of patterns of variability: profiles in new walkers with and without down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Beth A; Stergiou, Nick; Ulrich, Beverly D

    2010-01-01

    In previous studies we found that preadolescents with Down syndrome (DS) produce higher amounts of variability (Smith et al., 2007) and larger Lyapunov exponent (LyE) values (indicating more instability) during walking than their peers with typical development (TD) (Buzzi & Ulrich, 2004). Here we use nonlinear methods to examine the patterns that characterize gait variability as it emerges, in toddlers with TD and with DS, rather than after years of practice. We calculated Lyapunov exponent (LyE) values to assess stability of leg trajectories. We also tested the use of 3 algorithms for surrogation analysis to investigate mathematical periodicity of toddlers' strides. Results show that toddlers' LyE values were not different between groups or with practice and strides of both groups become more periodic with practice. The underlying control strategies are not different between groups at this point in developmental time, although control strategies do diverge between the groups by preadolescence.

  11. Backward and covariant Lyapunov vectors and exponents for hard-disk systems with a steady heat current.

    PubMed

    Truant, Daniel P; Morriss, Gary P

    2014-11-01

    The covariant Lyapunov analysis is generalized to systems attached to deterministic thermal reservoirs that create a heat current across the system and perturb it away from equilibrium. The change in the Lyapunov exponents as a function of heat current is described and explained. Both the nonequilibrium backward and covariant hydrodynamic Lyapunov modes are analyzed and compared. The movement of the converged angle between the hydrodynamic stable and unstable conjugate manifolds with the free flight time of the dynamics is accurately predicted for any nonequilibrium system simply as a function of their exponent. The nonequilibrium positive and negative LP mode frequencies are found to be asymmetrical, causing the negative mode to oscillate between the two functional forms of each mode in the positive conjugate mode pair. This in turn leads to the angular distributions between the conjugate modes to oscillate symmetrically about π/2 at a rate given by the difference between the positive and negative mode frequencies.

  12. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  13. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  14. Determination of wood burning and fossil fuel contribution of black carbon at Delhi, India using aerosol light absorption technique.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, S; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, A K; Bisht, D S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive measurement program of effective black carbon (eBC), fine particle (PM2.5), and carbon monoxide (CO) was undertaken during 1 December 2011 to 31 March 2012 (winter period) in Delhi, India. The mean mass concentrations of eBC, PM2.5, and CO were recorded as 12.1 ± 8.7 μg/m(3), 182.75 ± 114.5 μg/m(3), and 3.41 ± 1.6 ppm, respectively, during the study period. Also, the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) was estimated from eBC and varied from 0.38 to 1.29 with a mean value of 1.09 ± 0.11. The frequency of occurrence of AAE was ~17 % less than unity whereas ~83 % greater than unity was observed during the winter period in Delhi. The mass concentrations of eBC were found to be higher by ~34 % of the average value of eBC (12.1 μg/m(3)) during the study period. Sources of eBC were estimated, and they were ~94 % from fossil fuel (eBCff) combustion whereas only 6 % was from wood burning (eBCwb). The ratio between eBCff and eBCwb was 15, which indicates a higher impact from fossil fuels compared to biomass burning. When comparing eBCff during day and night, a factor of three higher concentrations was observed in nighttime than daytime, and it is due to combustion of fossil fuel (diesel vehicle emission) and shallow boundary layer conditions. The contribution of eBCwb in eBC was higher between 1800 and 2100 hours due to burning of wood/biomass. A significant correlation between eBC and PM2.5 (r = 0.78) and eBC and CO (r = 0.46) indicates the similarity in location sources. The mass concentration of eBC was highest (23.4 μg/m(3)) during the month of December when the mean visibility (VIS) was lowest (1.31 km). Regression analysis among wind speed (WS), VIS, soot particles, and CO was studied, and significant negative relationships were seen between VIS and eBC (-0.65), eBCff (-0.66), eBCwb (-0.34), and CO (-0.65); however, between WS and eBC (-0.68), eBCff (-0.67), eBCwb (-0.28), and CO (-0.53). The regression analysis indicated

  15. Research Of Polytropic Exponent Changing For Influence Evaluation Of Actual Mixture Composition On Hydrocarbons Concentration Decreasing On Deep Throttling Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolenskaya, N. M.; Smolenskii, V. V.; Bobrovskij, I.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present study of polytropic exponent as rating of thermodynamic process in internal combustion motor operating to deep throttling in a subcase of idle running. It is necessary to consider the influence of hydrocarbon part in exhaust gases in a process of development a new internal combustion engines especially on deep throttling operation: on combustion procedure, on irregularity of exhaust gases composition.

  16. Asymptotic behavior of the least-energy solutions of a semilinear elliptic equation with the Hardy-Sobolev critical exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Masato

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the existence, the non-existence and the asymptotic behavior of the least-energy solutions of a semilinear elliptic equation with the Hardy-Sobolev critical exponent. In the boundary singularity case, it is known that the mean curvature of the boundary at origin plays a crucial role on the existence of the least-energy solutions. In this paper, we study the relation between the asymptotic behavior of the solutions and the mean curvature at origin.

  17. Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Retrieving Aerosol Ångström Exponents from Calipso Measurements of Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yong-Xiang; Powell, Kathleen; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Hunt, William; Kar, Jayanta; Tackett, Jason; Getzewich, Brian; Lee, Kam-Pui

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter and extinction from water clouds are well-understood, both theoretically and experimentally, and thus changes to the expected measurement of layer-integrated attenuated backscatter can be used to infer the optical properties of overlying layers. In this paper we offer a first look at a new retrieval technique that uses CALIPSO measurements of opaque water clouds to derive optical depths and Ångström exponents for overlying aerosol layers.

  18. Predicting the Density-Scaling Exponent of a Glass-Forming Liquid from Prigogine-Defay Ratio Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    1: The dielectric relaxation time τ measured along different isotherms and along the atmo- spheric pressure isobar for the silicone oil DC704. The...frequency of the loss peak position, for DC704 as a function of density for different isotherms , as well as data taken at atmospheric pressure. pVT-data...the density-scaling exponent – characterizing how to scale density and temperature for different state points in order to have the relaxation times

  19. Autocorrelation analysis for the unbiased determination of power-law exponents in single-quantum-dot blinking.

    PubMed

    Houel, Julien; Doan, Quang T; Cajgfinger, Thomas; Ledoux, Gilles; Amans, David; Aubret, Antoine; Dominjon, Agnès; Ferriol, Sylvain; Barbier, Rémi; Nasilowski, Michel; Lhuillier, Emmanuel; Dubertret, Benoît; Dujardin, Christophe; Kulzer, Florian

    2015-01-27

    We present an unbiased and robust analysis method for power-law blinking statistics in the photoluminescence of single nanoemitters, allowing us to extract both the bright- and dark-state power-law exponents from the emitters' intensity autocorrelation functions. As opposed to the widely used threshold method, our technique therefore does not require discriminating the emission levels of bright and dark states in the experimental intensity timetraces. We rely on the simultaneous recording of 450 emission timetraces of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots at a frame rate of 250 Hz with single photon sensitivity. Under these conditions, our approach can determine ON and OFF power-law exponents with a precision of 3% from a comparison to numerical simulations, even for shot-noise-dominated emission signals with an average intensity below 1 photon per frame and per quantum dot. These capabilities pave the way for the unbiased, threshold-free determination of blinking power-law exponents at the microsecond time scale.

  20. Quantifying the degree of persistence in random amoeboid motion based on the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarava, Natallia; Menz, Stephan; Theves, Matthias; Huisinga, Wilhelm; Beta, Carsten; Holschneider, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Amoebae explore their environment in a random way, unless external cues like, e.g., nutrients, bias their motion. Even in the absence of cues, however, experimental cell tracks show some degree of persistence. In this paper, we analyzed individual cell tracks in the framework of a linear mixed effects model, where each track is modeled by a fractional Brownian motion, i.e., a Gaussian process exhibiting a long-term correlation structure superposed on a linear trend. The degree of persistence was quantified by the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion. Our analysis of experimental cell tracks of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum showed a persistent movement for the majority of tracks. Employing a sliding window approach, we estimated the variations of the Hurst exponent over time, which allowed us to identify points in time, where the correlation structure was distorted ("outliers"). Coarse graining of track data via down-sampling allowed us to identify the dependence of persistence on the spatial scale. While one would expect the (mode of the) Hurst exponent to be constant on different temporal scales due to the self-similarity property of fractional Brownian motion, we observed a trend towards stronger persistence for the down-sampled cell tracks indicating stronger persistence on larger time scales.

  1. Thermodynamics of loop formation in the denatured state of rhodopseudomonas palustris cytochrome c': scaling exponents and the reconciliation problem.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Sudhindra; Tzul, Franco O; Christian, Arwen K; Gordon, Tia N; Bowler, Bruce E

    2009-10-09

    The observation that denatured proteins yield scaling exponents, nu, consistent with random-coil behavior and yet can also have pockets of residual or nonrandom structure has been termed the "reconciliation problem". To provide greater insight into the denatured state of a foldable sequence, we have measured histidine-heme loop formation equilibria in the denatured state of a class II c-type cytochrome, cytochrome c' from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We have prepared a series of variants that provide His-heme loop stabilities, pK(loop)(His), for loop sizes ranging from 10 to 111 residues at intervals of 7 to 11 residues along the sequence of the protein. We observe a scaling exponent for loop formation, nu(3), of 2.5+/-0.3. Theoretical values for nu(3) range from 1.8 to 2.4; thus, the observed nu(3) is consistent with random-coil behavior. However, in contrast to data for loop formation as a function of loop size obtained with peptides of homogeneous sequence, we observe considerable scatter about the linear dependence of loop stability on loop size. Thus, foldable sequences behave very differently from homogeneous peptide sequences. The observed scatter suggests that there is considerable variation in the conformational properties along the backbone of a foldable sequence, consistent with alternating compact and extended regions. With regard to the reconciliation problem, it is evident that a scaling exponent consistent with a random coil is necessary but not sufficient to demonstrate random-coil behavior.

  2. Magnetic properties, Lyapunov exponent and superstability of the spin-{1}/{2} Ising-Heisenberg model on a diamond chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananikian, N.; Hovhannisyan, V.

    2013-05-01

    The exactly solvable spin-{1}/{2} Ising-Heisenberg model on a diamond chain has been considered. We have found the exact results for the magnetization using the recursion relation method. The existence of the magnetization plateau has been observed at one third of the saturation magnetization in the antiferromagnetic case. Some ground-state properties of the model are examined. At low temperatures, the system has two ferrimagnetic (FRI1 and FRI2) phases and one paramagnetic (PRM) phase. Lyapunov exponents for the various values of the exchange parameters and temperatures have been analyzed. It has also been shown that the maximal Lyapunov exponent exhibits plateau. Lyapunov exponents exhibit different behavior for two ferrimagnetic phases. We have found the existence of the supercritical point for the multi-dimensional rational mapping of the spin-{1}/{2} Ising-Heisenberg model on a diamond chain for the first time in the absence of the external magnetic field and T→0 in the antiferromagnetic case.

  3. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  4. Power spectral density and scaling exponent of high frequency global solar radiation sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calif, Rudy; Schmitt, François G.; Huang, Yongxiang

    2013-04-01

    invariance: Iq(f) ~ f-?(q) , ?(q) is the scaling exponent. This allows to characterize the scaling behavior of a process: fractal or multifractal with intermittent properties. For q = 2, the Hilbert spectrum is defined. In this work, The data are collected at the University site of Guadeloupe, an island in the West Indies, located at 16°15 N latitude 60°30 W longitude. Our measurements sampled at 1 Hz were performed during one year period. The analyzed data present a power spectral density E(f) displaying a power law of the form E(f) ~ f-β with 1.6 ˜ β ˜ 2.2 for frequencies f ˜ 0.1 Hz, corresponding to time scales T × 10 s. Furthermore, global solar radiation data possesses multifractal properties. For comparison, other multifractal analysis techniques such as structure functions, MDFA, wavelet leaders are also used. This preliminary work set the basis for further investigation dedicated to simulate and forecast a sequence of solar energy fluctuation under different meteorological conditions, in the multifractal framework.

  5. The confines of triple oxygen isotope exponents in elemental and complex mass-dependent processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2015-12-01

    Small differences in triple isotope relationships, or Δ17O in the case of oxygen, have been increasingly used to study a range of problems including hydrological cycles, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, biogeochemical pathways and fluxes, and the Moon's origin in the geochemical and cosmochemical communities. A Δ17O value depends on the triple isotope exponent θ of involved reaction steps. However, the probabilistic distribution of the intrinsic and apparent θ values has not been examined for elemental processes and for processes that are out of equilibrium or bearing reservoir-transport complexities. A lack of knowledge on the confines of θ may hamper our understanding of the subtle differences among mass-dependent processes and may result in mischaracterization of a set of mass-dependent processes as being in violation of mass-dependent rules. Here we advocate a reductionist approach and explore θ confines starting from kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) within the framework of transition state theory (TST). The advantage of our KIE approach is that any elemental or composite, equilibrium or non-equilibrium process can be reduced to a set of KIEs with corresponding θKIE. We establish that the KIE between a reactant and a transition state (TS) is intrinsic. Given a range of KIEs known for Earth processes involving oxygen, we use a Monte Carlo calculation method and a range of oxygen-bonded molecular masses to obtain a distribution of θKIE values and subsequently that of θeq. Next, complexities are examined by looking into expected effects due to reaction progress, unbalanced fluxes, and reference frame. Finally, compounded reservoir-transport effects are examined using two simple processes - Rayleigh Distillation (RD) and Fractional Distillation (FD). Our results show that the apparent θ values between two species or two states of the same evolving species have much broader confines than the commonly used "canonical" confines of 0.51-0.53, particularly

  6. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  7. Diode-laser absorption spectroscopy of supersonic carbon cluster beams: the nu 3 spectrum of C5.

    PubMed

    Heath, J R; Cooksy, A L; Gruebele, M H; Schmuttenmaer, C A; Saykally, R J

    1989-05-05

    A new spectroscopic experiment has been developed in which rovibrational transitions of supersonically cooled carbon clusters, which were produced by laser vaporization of graphite, have been measured by direct-absorption diode-laser spectroscopy. Thirty-six sequential rovibrational lines of the nu 3 band of the C5 carbon cluster have been measured with Doppler-limited resolution. The absorption spectrum is characteristic of a linear molecule with a center of symmetry. Least-squares analysis of the spectrum indicates an effective carbon-carbon bond length of 1.283 angstroms, in good agreement with ab initio quantum chemical calculations. This work confirms the detection of C5 in IRC + 10216 reported in the accompanying paper.

  8. Aerosol absorption retrieval at ultraviolet wavelengths in a complex environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Raptis, Panagiotis; Kouremeti, Natalia; Amiridis, Vassilis; Arola, Antti; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Schuster, Gregory L.

    2016-12-01

    We have used total and diffuse UV irradiance measurements from a multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (UVMFR) in order to investigate aerosol absorption in the UV range for a 5-year period in Athens, Greece. This dataset was used as input to a radiative transfer model and the single scattering albedo (SSA) at 368 and 332 nm was calculated. Retrievals from a collocated CIMEL sun photometer were used to evaluate the products and study the absorption spectral behavior of retrieved SSA values. The UVMFR SSA, together with synchronous, CIMEL-derived retrievals of SSA at 440 nm, had a mean of 0.90, 0.87 and 0.83, with lowest values (higher absorption) encountered at the shorter wavelengths. In addition, noticeable diurnal variation of the SSA in all wavelengths is shown, with amplitudes up to 0.05. Strong SSA wavelength dependence is revealed for cases of low Ångström exponents, accompanied by a SSA decrease with decreasing extinction optical depth, suggesting varying influence under different aerosol composition. However, part of this dependence for low aerosol optical depths is masked by the enhanced SSA retrieval uncertainty. Dust and brown carbon UV absorbing properties were also investigated to explain seasonal patterns.

  9. Quantum absorption refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amikam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-02-17

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold, and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified; the cooling power J(c) vanishes as J(c) ∝ T(c)(α), when T(c)→0, where α=d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  10. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  11. Bioacoustic Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    seas in co-operation with fisheries biologists. The first planned experiment will be in the seas off California in co-operation with the Southwest... Fisheries Science Center of NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service. These experiments will be designed to investigate the “signatures” of the two major...formulating environmental adaptation strategies for tactical sonars. Fisheries applications: These results suggest that bioacoustic absorptivity can be used to

  12. Vehicular impact absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Wilson, A. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved vehicular impact absorption system characterized by a plurality of aligned crash cushions of substantially cubic configuration is described. Each consists of a plurality of voided aluminum beverage cans arranged in substantial parallelism within a plurality of superimposed tiers and a covering envelope formed of metal hardware cloth. A plurality of cables is extended through the cushions in substantial parallelism with an axis of alignment for the cushions adapted to be anchored at each of the opposite end thereof.

  13. Hydrogen Absorption by Niobium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    incorporate an independent means for ascertaining surface cleanliness (e.g. AES). The form of the absorption curve in Fig. 7 appears to agree with that...very interesting study and is well within the capabilities of the systen designed, if the surface cleanliness can be assured. Wire specimens have a...assessing surface cleanliness would be an important supporting technique for understanding the results of these measurements. The simple kinetic

  14. Frequency of Oxygen VI in Intervening QSO Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burles, Scott; Tytler, David

    1994-12-01

    We have conducted the first survey for QSO with O VI lambda lambda 1032,1038 absorption lines. We obtained medium resolution (R ~ 1300), high signal-to-noise (~ 20) spectra of 11 QSOs (0.53<= zem <=2.08) taken with the Faint Object Spectrograph from the Hubble Space Telescope Archive. The O VI doublet is found exclusively in the Lyman-alpha forest. All previous surveys of metal lines in QSO absorption systems were done redward of Lyalpha emission, avoiding blending due to Lyman-alpha forest clouds. The higher density of lines in the Lyman-alpha forest demands new stringent criteria to ensure the identification of the O VI doublet. We used simulated spectra to determine the statistical significance of lines indentified in the Lyman-alpha forest. We found 12 O VI doublets and 9 are expected to be real. Six constitute a uniform sample with both lines exceeding a rest equivalent width of W_r =0.21 Angstroms. The number of O VI doublets per unit redshift is = 1.0 +/-0.6 at a mean absorption redshift of zave = 0.9. For comparable W_r the density of O VI absorbers is similar to Mg II (Tytler et al 1986; Steidel & Sargent 1992) and C IV absorbers (Sargent et al 1988; Bahcall et al 1993). We searched for other common ions in the O VI absorption systems. Out of 8 O VI absorption systems in which C IV is also found, C IV is stronger in all except zabs=1.0828 towards PG1206+459 which we believe is collisionally ionized. A rough estimate of the cosmological mass density of O VI is carried out. If we assume that O VI lines are linear, we get a lower limit of Omega (OVI) >= 3 times 10(-9) h(-1}_{100) . Since O > O VI, if the mean metal abundance were below 0.002 solar, then the accompanying Hydrogen and Helium would account for all baryons in the universe. We conclude that mean abundances are above 0.002 solar, and much greater if the gas is not highly ionized (O >> O VI).

  15. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  16. Absorptivity of brown carbon in fresh and photo-chemically aged biomass-burning emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, R.; Hennigan, C. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; Chuang, W. K.; Robinson, E. S.; Coe, H.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2013-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate light absorption of organic aerosol (OA) in fresh and photo-chemically aged biomass-burning emissions. The experiments considered residential hardwood fuel (oak) and fuels commonly consumed in wild-land and prescribed fires in the United States (pocosin pine and gallberry). Photo-chemical aging was performed in an environmental chamber. We constrained the light-absorption properties of the OA using conservative limiting assumptions, and found that both primary organic aerosol (POA) in the fresh emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by photo-chemical aging absorb light to a significant extent, and are categorized as brown carbon. This work presents the first direct evidence that SOA produced in aged biomass-burning emissions is absorptive. For the investigated fuels, SOA is less absorptive than POA in the long visible, but exhibits steeper wavelength-dependence (larger Absorption Ångström Exponent) and is more absorptive in the short visible and near-UV. Light absorption by SOA in biomass-burning emissions might be an important contributor to the global radiative forcing budget.

  17. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  18. Visualizing interfacial charge transfer in dye sensitized nanoparticles using x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. Y.; Smolentsev, G.; Guo, J.; Attenkofer, K.; Kurtz, C.; Jennings, G.; Lockard, J. V.; Stickrath, A. B.; Chen, L. X.

    2011-01-01

    A molecular level understanding of the structural reorganization accompanying interfacial electron transfer is important for rational design of solar cells. Here we have applied XTA (X-ray transient absorption) spectroscopy to study transient structures in a heterogeneous interfacial system mimicking the charge separation process in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with Ru(dcbpy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (RuN3) dye adsorbed to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle surfaces. The results show that the average Ru-NCS bond length reduces by 0.06 {angstrom}, whereas the average Ru-N(dcbpy) bond length remains nearly unchanged after the electron injection. The differences in bond-order change and steric hindrance between two types of ligands are attributed to their structural response in the charge separation. This study extends the application of XTA into optically opaque hybrid interfacial systems relevant to the solar energy conversion.

  19. X-ray absorption studies of Ti/polymer and Cr/polymer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Opila, R.L.; Konstadinidis, K.; Ibidunni, A.O; Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1993-11-01

    The interface formed between metals, Ti and Cr, and polymers, epoxy, and triazine, have been studied, non-destructively, using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The metals were sputtered onto the polymer surfaces. Titanium reacts extensively, up to Ti thickness of 100 {Angstrom} while Cr remains primarily metallic. In situ heating at 200{degree}C increases the extent of reaction for both metals. Heating has a greater effect on metal/epoxy interfaces than metal/triazine. Titanium and Cr were ion implanted into the polymer in order to determine the interactions of isolated metal atoms with the polymer. Titanium and Cr appear to form oxides as the final reaction product, and the Ti is tetrahedrally coordinated.

  20. Critical exponents, hyperscaling, and universal amplitude ratios for two- and three-dimensional self-avoiding walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Madras, Neal; Sokal, Alan D.

    1995-08-01

    We make a high-precision Monte Carlo study of two- and three-dimensional self-avoiding walks (SAWs) of length up to 80,000 steps, using the pivot algorithm and the Karp-Luby algorithm. We study the critical exponents v and 2 Δ 4 - γ as well as several universal amplitude ratios; in particular, we make an extremely sensitive test of the hyperscaling relation dv = 2 Δ 4 - γ. In two dimensions, we confirm the predicted exponent v=3/4 and the hyperscaling relation; we estimate the universal ratios < R {/g 2}>/< R {/e 2}>=0.14026±0.00007, < R {/m 2}>/< R {/e 2}>=0.43961±0.00034, and Ψ*=0.66296±0.00043 (68% confidence limits). In three dimensions, we estimate v=0.5877±0.0006 with a correctionto-scaling exponent Δ 1=0.56±0.03 (subjective 68% confidence limits). This value for v agrees excellently with the field-theoretic renormalization-group prediction, but there is some discrepancy for Δ 1. Earlier Monte Carlo estimates of v, which were ≈0.592, are now seen to be biased by corrections to scaling. We estimate the universal ratios < R {/g 2}>/< R {/e 2}>=0.1599±0.0002 and Ψ*=0.2471±0.0003; since Ψ*>0, hyperscaling holds. The approach to Ψ* is from above, contrary to the prediction of the two-parameter renormalization-group theory. We critically reexamine this theory, and explain where the error lies. In an appendix, we prove rigorously (modulo some standard scaling assumptions) the hyperscaling relation dv = 2 Δ 4 - γ for two-dimensional SAWs.

  1. Electronic and molecular structure of photoexcited [Ru(II)(bpy)3]2+ probed by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gawelda, Wojciech; Johnson, Melanie; de Groot, Frank M F; Abela, Rafael; Bressler, Christian; Chergui, Majed

    2006-04-19

    L(2,3) X-ray absorption spectra of aqueous [Ru(II)(bpy)3]2+ have been recorded in its ground and excited states, 50 ps after short pulse laser excitation. Significant changes in both the XANES (X-ray Near-Edge Absorption Structure) and the EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) regions of the excited state complex are detected. The XANES line shapes have been quantitatively simulated using a crystal field multiplet code in trigonal symmetry. In addition, spectral changes in the EXAFS region of both ground and excited states are analyzed in order to extract structural parameters of their corresponding molecular structures. We obtain a Ru-N bond contraction by approximately 0.03 angstroms in the excited-state complex, as compared to the ground-state compound. This contraction results from electrostatic and polarization contributions, limited by steric constraints on the bpy ligands.

  2. TECHNICAL DESIGN NOTE: Identification of the flow-rate characteristics of a pneumatic valve by the instantaneous polytropic exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ye; Xiang, Meng Guo

    2008-05-01

    A novel method of the identification of the flow-rate characteristics of pneumatic valves using the instantaneous polytropic exponents during a discharge process is proposed. The method can determine the sonic conductance C, the critical pressure ratio b and the subsonic index ms of a pneumatic valve with a single discharge process. The method is based on a new hybrid natural and forced convection heat transfer criterion model. The procedure of the identification of the flow-rate characteristics of the pneumatic valve has been derived. Some examples of the calculation are given and the results are graphically illustrated. Experimental results show that the model has good accuracy and universality.

  3. Profiled Roller Stress/Fatigue Life Analysis Methodology and Establishment of an Appropriate Stress/Life Exponent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the three dimensional volumetric stress field, surface pressure distribution and actual contact area between a 0.50" square roller with different crown profiles and a flat raceway surface using Finite Element Analysis. The 3-dimensional stress field data was used in conjunction with several bearing fatigue life theories to extract appropriate values for stress-life exponents. Also, results of the FEA runs were used to evaluate the laminated roller model presently used for stress and life prediction.

  4. Exact First-Passage Exponents of 1D Domain Growth: Relation to a Reaction-Diffusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard; Hakim, Vincent; Pasquier, Vincent

    1995-07-01

    In the zero temperature Glauber dynamics of the ferromagnetic Ising or q-state Potts model, the size of domains is known to grow like t1/2. Recent simulations have shown that the fraction r\\(q,t\\) of spins, which have never flipped up to time t, decays like the power law r\\(q,t\\)~t-θ\\(q\\) with a nontrivial dependence of the exponent θ\\(q\\) on q and on space dimension. By mapping the problem on an exactly soluble one-species coagulation model ( A+A-->A), we obtain the exact expression of θ\\(q\\) in dimension one.

  5. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  6. Patchy intergalactic He II absorption in HE 2347-4342. II. The possible discovery of the epoch of He-reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, D.; Kohler, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Groote, D.; Rodriguez-Pascual, P.; Wamsteker, W.

    1997-11-01

    We report on observations of redshifted Heii303.8 Angstroms absorption in the high-redshift QSO HE2347-4342 (z=2.885, V=16.1) with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on board HST in its low resolution mode (bigtriangleup lambda = 0.7 Angstroms). With f_λ=3.6\\ 10(-15) ergcm(-2) s(-1) Angstroms(-1) at the expected position of Heii304 Angstroms absorption it is the most UV-bright high redshift QSO discovered so far. We show that the Heii opacity as a function of redshift is patchy showing spectral regions with low Heii opacity (``voids'') and regions with high Heii opacity (blacked-out ``troughs'') and no detectable flux. Combination with high-resolution optical spectra of the Lyalpha forest using CASPEC at the 3.6m telescope shows that the voids can be explained either exclusively by Lyalpha forest cloud absorption with a moderate N_{subs {He{sc ii}}}/N_{subs {H{sc i}}} ratio eta <=100 and turbulent line broadening or by a combination of Lyalpha forest with eta = 45 and thermal broadening plus a diffuse medium with tau_ {subs {GP}}({subs {He{sc ) ii}}} ~ 0.3. Since the latter is a minimum assumption for the Lyalpha forest, a strict upper limit to a diffuse medium is Omega_ {subs {diff}}<0.02 h50(-1.5) at z=2.8. In the troughs in addition to the Lyalpha forest opacity a continuous Heii 304 Angstroms opacity tau = 4.8(+infty }_{-2) is required. In case of photoionization, the troughs would require a diffuse component with a density close to Omega =~ 0.077(eta /45)(-0.5) h50(-1.5) , i.e. all baryons in the universe, which is inconsistent, however, with the observed absence of such a component in the voids. A tentative interpretation is that we observe the epoch of partial Heii reionization of the universe with patches not yet reionized. In that case a diffuse component with Omega_ {subs {diff}}>= 1.3\\ 10(-4) h(-1}_{50) would be sufficient to explain the ``trough'' opacity. The size of the 1163--1172 Angstroms trough is ~ 6 h50(-1) Mpc or ~ 2300 kms(-1

  7. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  8. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  9. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  10. Crossover fluctuations of DFA-exponents of geoelectrical signals possibly linked to seismic activity in the South Pacific Mexican Coast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Ramirez, Israel; Guzman Vargas, Lev; Angulo Brown, Fernando; Ramirez Rojas, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    Since the ends of 2012 we have continuously measured the electric self-potential of the ground at two sites in the south pacific Mexican coast. The two geoelectrical stations (16o21'33″N, 98o14'52″O in Oaxaca, and 17o29'29″N, 101o57'08″O in Guerrero, Mex.) are very near to the border of the Cocos and The north American tectonic plates. The registered signals are in the Ultra Low frequency (ULF) range and are analyzed by means of the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA). In the log-log DFA plane the analyzed signals typically shows two scaling regimes; one in the 'large' scales range with α ≡ 0.5 (white noise) and other in the 'low' scales range when α ≡ 1.5 (Brownian noise). However, in some cases the crossover disappears and α1 = α2 = α with α in the interval (0.7,1.3). Interestingly, in several occasions, specially when the collapsed exponent α is close to 1/f noise some few days after this, a seismic event with M ≥ 4.5 occurs inside a circle of around 100km centered in the station. Besides, we discuss some additional statistical features of the evolution of scaling exponents for almost 1-year period.

  11. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Xu, M; Pollard, A; Mi, J

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/D(e) < 40, where D(e) denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50,000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number R(λ) varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=m(t)+(lnγ(-0.0173))(1/2), where m(t) denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions.

  12. Lyapunov exponents, covariant vectors and shadowing sensitivity analysis of 3D wakes: from laminar to chaotic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiqi; Rigas, Georgios; Esclapez, Lucas; Magri, Luca; Blonigan, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Bluff body flows are of fundamental importance to many engineering applications involving massive flow separation and in particular the transport industry. Coherent flow structures emanating in the wake of three-dimensional bluff bodies, such as cars, trucks and lorries, are directly linked to increased aerodynamic drag, noise and structural fatigue. For low Reynolds laminar and transitional regimes, hydrodynamic stability theory has aided the understanding and prediction of the unstable dynamics. In the same framework, sensitivity analysis provides the means for efficient and optimal control, provided the unstable modes can be accurately predicted. However, these methodologies are limited to laminar regimes where only a few unstable modes manifest. Here we extend the stability analysis to low-dimensional chaotic regimes by computing the Lyapunov covariant vectors and their associated Lyapunov exponents. We compare them to eigenvectors and eigenvalues computed in traditional hydrodynamic stability analysis. Computing Lyapunov covariant vectors and Lyapunov exponents also enables the extension of sensitivity analysis to chaotic flows via the shadowing method. We compare the computed shadowing sensitivities to traditional sensitivity analysis. These Lyapunov based methodologies do not rely on mean flow assumptions, and are mathematically rigorous for calculating sensitivities of fully unsteady flow simulations.

  13. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Xu, M.; Pollard, A.; Mi, J.

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/De < 40, where De denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50 000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number Rλ varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=mt+(lnγ-0.0173)1/2, where mt denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions.

  14. Hurst exponent used as a tool to differentiate between magmatic and fluid-induced processes as reflected in crystal geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domonik, A.; Słaby, E.; Śmigielski, M.

    2012-04-01

    A self-similarity parameter, the Hurst exponent (H) (called also roughness exponent) has been used to show the long-range dependence of element behaviour during the processes. The H value ranges between 0 and 1; a value of 0.5 indicates a random distribution indistinguishable from noise. For values greater or less than 0.5, the system shows non-linear dynamics. H < 0.5 represents anti-persistent (more chaotic) behaviour, whereas H > 0.5 corresponds to increasing persistence (less chaotic). Such persistence is characterized as an effect of a long-term memory, and thus by a large degree of positive correlation. In theory, the preceding data constantly affect the next in the whole temporal series. Applied to chaotic dynamics, the system shows a subtle sensitivity to initial conditions. The process can show some degree of chaos, due to local variations, but generally, the trend preserves its persistent character through time. If the exponent value is low, the process shows frequent and sudden reversals e.g. the trends of such a process show mutual negative correlation of the succeding values in the data series. Thus, the system can be described as having a high degree of deterministic chaos. Alkali feldspar megacrysts grown from mixed magmas and recrystallized due to interaction with fluids have been selected for the study (Słaby et al., 2011). Hurst exponent variability has been calculated within some primary-magmatic and secondary-recrystallized crystal domains for some elements redistributed by crystal fluid interaction. Based on the Hurst exponent value two different processes can easily be recognized. In the core of the megacrysts the element distribution can be ascribed to magmatic growth. By contrast, the marginal zones can relate to inferred late crystal-fluid interactions. Both processes are deterministic, not random. The spatial distribution of elements in the crystal margins is irregular, with high-H values identifying the process as persistent. The trace

  15. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  16. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  17. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  18. Two absorption furosemide prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Mombrú, A W; Mariezcurrena, R A; Suescun, L; Pardo, H; Manta, E; Prandi, C

    1999-03-15

    The structures of two absorption furosemide prodrugs, hexanoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoyl-anthranilate (C19H23CIN2O7S), (I), and benzoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoylanthranilate (C20H17CIN2O7S), (II), are described in this paper and compared with furosemide and four other prodrugs. The molecular conformations of both compounds are similar to those of the other prodrugs; the packing and the crystal system are the primary differences. Compound (I) crystallizes in the trigonal space group R3 and compound (II) in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n. The packing of both structures is stabilized by a three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network.

  19. Estimating the fractal dimension of the atmosphere and the predictability via Lyapunov exponents for the Caribbean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadee, X. T.

    2007-05-01

    The fractal dimension, Lyapunov-exponent spectrum, and predictability are analyzed for chaotic attractors in the atmosphere by analyzing the time series of daily wind speeds over the Caribbean region. It can be shown that this dimension is greater than 8. However, the number of data points may be too small to obtain a reliable estimate of the Grassberger-Procaccia (1983a) correlation dimension because of the limitations discussed by Ruelle (1990). These results lead us to claim that there probably exist no low-dimensional strange attractors in the atmosphere. Because the fractal dimension has not yet been saturated, the Kolmogorov entropy and the error-doubling time obtained by the method of Grassberger and Procaccia (1983b) are sensitive to the selection of the time delay and are thus unreliable. A practical and more reliable method for estimating the Kolmogorov entropy and error-doubling time involves the computation of the Lyapunov-exponent spectrum using the algorithm of Zeng et al. (1991). Using this method, it is found that the error-doubling time is 2-3 days for time series over the Caribbean region. This is comparable to the predictability time found by Waelbrock (1995) for a single station in Mexico. The predictability time over land is slightly less than that over ocean which tends to have higher climatic signal-to-noise ratio. This analysis impacts on the selection of prediction tools (deterministic chaotic linear and non-linear maps or linear stochastic modeling) for wind speeds in the short term for wind energy farm resource planning and management. We conclude that short term wind predictions in the Caribbean region, for a few days ahead, may be best done with a stochastic model instead of a deterministic chaotic model. References Grassberger, P., and I. Procaccia. 1983a. Measuring the strangeness of attractors. Physica D 9: 189-208. Grassberger, P., and I. Procaccia. 1983b. Estimating the Kolmogorov entropy from a chaotic signal. Phys. Rev. A. 28

  20. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Horstemeyer, Mark

    2012-02-10

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained {approx}170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 {angstrom} of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-{Sigma} grain boundaries (e.g., the {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and {Sigma} designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have {approx}80% more grain boundary sites per area and {approx}300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 {angstrom} versus 10-11 {angstrom} for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  1. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  2. BASIC STUDIES IN PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FATTY ACIDS, *SKIN(ANATOMY), ABSORPTION, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, DIFFUSION, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, HUMIDITY, LABORATORY ANIMALS, LIPIDS, ORGANIC SOLVENTS, PENETRATION, PRIVATION, PROTEINS, RATS, TEMPERATURE, WATER

  3. Testing the Self-Similarity Exponent to Feature Extraction in Motor Imagery Based Brain Computer Interface Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Bermúdez, Germán; Sánchez-Granero, Miguel Ángel; García-Laencina, Pedro J.; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel; Serna, José; Roca-Dorda, Joaquín

    2015-12-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system is a tool not requiring any muscle action to transmit information. Acquisition, preprocessing, feature extraction (FE), and classification of electroencephalograph (EEG) signals constitute the main steps of a motor imagery BCI. Among them, FE becomes crucial for BCI, since the underlying EEG knowledge must be properly extracted into a feature vector. Linear approaches have been widely applied to FE in BCI, whereas nonlinear tools are not so common in literature. Thus, the main goal of this paper is to check whether some Hurst exponent and fractal dimension based estimators become valid indicators to FE in motor imagery BCI. The final results obtained were not optimal as expected, which may be due to the fact that the nature of the analyzed EEG signals in these motor imagery tasks were not self-similar enough.

  4. Henry Currey FRIBA (1820-1900): leading Victorian hospital architect, and early exponent of the "pavilion principle".

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    2002-06-01

    The "pavilion plan" for hospital design originated in France in the 18th century and was popularised in England by John Roberton and George Godwin in the mid-19th century; the underlying rationale was that with improved ventilation the mortality rate (at that time exceedingly high) was significantly reduced. Among the enthusiasts for this new style was Florence Nightingale (herself a miasmatist)--who had experienced astronomically high death rates in the hospital at Scutari during the Crimean War (1854-6). One of the leading exponents of this style of hospital architecture was Henry Currey (1820-1900) whose greatest achievement was undoubtedly the design for the new St Thomas's Hospital on the Lambeth Palace Road.

  5. Isobars, the coexistence curve, and the critical exponent β of N-isopropylacrylamide gels obtained using a simple experimental method.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kohei D; Saito, Azusa; Ito, Kazuki; Uematsu, Yuuki; Ueno, Takahiro; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Izumi

    2013-02-01

    We have obtained "iso-osmobars," which refer to lines with constant osmotic pressures, and coexistence curve of the volume phase transition of N-isopropylacrylamide gel using a very simple method: hanging gels above NaCl solution having a given concentration in a sealed container that was placed in a temperature controlled bath. Since the chemical potential of the water molecules in the gel is equal to that of the water molecules in the NaCl solution, the osmotic pressure of the gel became the same value with that of the NaCl solution. Thus, air that separated the gel and the NaCl solution played a role of infinitely flexible semipermeable membrane. We have succeeded to obtain the coexistence curve and related critical exponent β from the series of the iso-osmobars of the gel. The value of β we obtained was 0.38(1.5).

  6. Determining the power-law wind-profile exponent under near-neutral stability conditions at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, S. A.; Meindl, Eric A.; Gilhousen, David B.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of 30 samples from near-simultaneous overwater measurements by pairs of anemometers located at different heights in the Gulf of Mexico and off the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, the mean and standard deviation for the exponent of the power-law wind profile over the ocean under near-neutral atmospheric stability conditions were determined to be 0.11 +/- 0.03. Because this mean value is obtained from both deep and shallow water environments, it is recommended for use at sea to adjust the wind speed measurements at different heights to the standard height of 10 m above the mean sea surface. An example to apply this P value to estimate the momentum flux or wind stress is provided.

  7. Effect of large-scale intermittency and mean shear on scaling-range exponents in a turbulent jet.

    PubMed

    Mi, J; Antonia, R A

    2001-08-01

    The present study investigates the combined impact of the intermittency associated with the turbulent-nonturbulent interface and the mean shear rate in an axisymmetric jet on the structure of turbulence in the scaling range, where the spectrum exhibits a power-law behavior. Second-order structure functions, autocorrelations of the dissipation rate, and spectra of both the longitudinal velocity fluctuation and the passive temperature fluctuation are measured at a distance of 40 diameter downstream from the nozzle exit. All the scaling range exponents are influenced by the large-scale intermittency and the mean shear. The scalar fluctuation is much more sensitive to the variation in large-scale intermittency than the velocity fluctuation.

  8. Determining copper and lead binding in Larrea tridentata through chemical modification and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Polette, L.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Chianelli, R.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.

    1997-12-31

    Metal contamination in soils has become a widespread problem. Emerging technologies, such as phytoremediation, may offer low cost cleanup methods. The authors have identified a desert plant, Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), which naturally grows and uptakes copper and lead from a contaminated area near a smelting operation. They determined, through chemical modification of carboxyl groups with methanol, that these functional groups may be responsible for a portion of copper(II) binding. In contrast, lead binding was minimally affected by modification of carboxyl groups. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) further support copper binding to oxygen-coordinated ligands and also imply that the binding is not solely due to phytochelatins. The EXAFS data indicate the presence of both Cu-O and Cu-S back scatters, no short Cu-Cu interactions, but with significant Cu-Cu back scattering at 3.7 {angstrom} (unlike phytochelatins with predominantly Cu-S coordination and short Cu-Cu interactions at 2.7 {angstrom}). Cu EXAFS of roots and leaves also vary depending on the level of heavy metal contamination in the environment from which the various creosote samples were obtained. In contrast, Pb XANES data of roots and leaves of creosote collected from different contaminated sites indicate no difference in valence states or ligand coordination.

  9. Exponents of the spectral functions and dynamical structure factor of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Sacramento, P. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the (k , ω) -plane finite-energy line shape of the zero-temperature one-boson removal spectral function (ω < 0) , one-boson addition spectral function (ω > 0) , and charge dynamical structure factor (ω > 0) of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas with repulsive boson interaction c > 0. Our analysis of the problem focuses on the line shape at finite excitation energies in the vicinity of these functions spectrum upper (ω < 0) or lower (ω > 0) threshold. Specifically, we derive the exact momentum, interaction, and density dependences of the exponents controlling such a line shape in each of the N = 1 , 2 , 3 , … momentum subdomains k ∈ [(N - 1) 2 πn , N 2 πn ] . Here n = N / L is the boson density, N the boson number, and L the system length. In the thermodynamic limit considered in our study nearly all spectral weight of the dynamical correlation functions is for large values of n / c contained in the N = 1 momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] . As n / c decreases a small fraction of that weight is transferred to the remaining set of N = 2 , 3 , 4 , … momentum subdomains, particularly to the N = 2 subdomain. In the case of the momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] , our exact results agree with those of previous studies. For that subdomain the above exponents are plotted as a function of the momentum for several n / c values. Our derivation of the line shapes of the three dynamical correlation functions relies on the use of a simplified form of the pseudofermion dynamical theory of the fermionic 1D Hubbard model suitably modified in this paper for the 1D Bose gas.

  10. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.

  11. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  12. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  13. Interface free-energy exponent in the one-dimensional Ising spin glass with long-range interactions in both the droplet and broken replica symmetry regions.

    PubMed

    Aspelmeier, T; Wang, Wenlong; Moore, M A; Katzgraber, Helmut G

    2016-08-01

    The one-dimensional Ising spin-glass model with power-law long-range interactions is a useful proxy model for studying spin glasses in higher space dimensions and for finding the dimension at which the spin-glass state changes from having broken replica symmetry to that of droplet behavior. To this end we have calculated the exponent that describes the difference in free energy between periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions. Numerical work is done to support some of the assumptions made in the calculations and to determine the behavior of the interface free-energy exponent of the power law of the interactions. Our numerical results for the interface free-energy exponent are badly affected by finite-size problems.

  14. Interface free-energy exponent in the one-dimensional Ising spin glass with long-range interactions in both the droplet and broken replica symmetry regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspelmeier, T.; Wang, Wenlong; Moore, M. A.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-08-01

    The one-dimensional Ising spin-glass model with power-law long-range interactions is a useful proxy model for studying spin glasses in higher space dimensions and for finding the dimension at which the spin-glass state changes from having broken replica symmetry to that of droplet behavior. To this end we have calculated the exponent that describes the difference in free energy between periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions. Numerical work is done to support some of the assumptions made in the calculations and to determine the behavior of the interface free-energy exponent of the power law of the interactions. Our numerical results for the interface free-energy exponent are badly affected by finite-size problems.

  15. Edge physics of the quantum spin Hall insulator from a quantum dot excited by optical absorption.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Romain; Moore, Joel E

    2014-04-11

    The gapless edge modes of the quantum spin Hall insulator form a helical liquid in which the direction of motion along the edge is determined by the spin orientation of the electrons. In order to probe the Luttinger liquid physics of these edge states and their interaction with a magnetic (Kondo) impurity, we consider a setup where the helical liquid is tunnel coupled to a semiconductor quantum dot that is excited by optical absorption, thereby inducing an effective quantum quench of the tunneling. At low energy, the absorption spectrum is dominated by a power-law singularity. The corresponding exponent is directly related to the interaction strength (Luttinger parameter) and can be computed exactly using boundary conformal field theory thanks to the unique nature of the quantum spin Hall edge.

  16. [A new retrieval method for ozone concentration at the troposphere based on differential absorption lidar].

    PubMed

    Fan, Guang-Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Lu, Yi-Huai; Zhang, Tian-Shu; Dong, Yun-Sheng; Zhao, Xue-Song

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols interfere with differential absorption lidar ozone concentration measurement and can introduce significant errors. A new retrieval method was introduced, and ozone concentration and aerosol extinction coefficient were gained simultaneously based on the retrieval method. The variables were analyzed by experiment including aerosol lidar ratio, aerosol wavelength exponent, and aerosol-molecular ratio at the reference point. The results show that these parameters introduce error less than 8% below 1 km. The measurement error derives chiefly from signal noise and the parameters introduce error less than 3% above 1 km. Finally the vertical profile of tropospheric ozone concentration and aerosol extinction coefficient were derived by using this algorithm. The retrieval results of the algorithm and traditional dual-wavelength difference algorithm are compared and analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the algorithm is feasible, and the algorithm can reduce differential absorption lidar measurement error introduced by aerosol.

  17. A X-Ray Absorption Study on Melting, Double Electron Excitation and Hemerythrin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke.

    In this study, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is applied to three systems: xenon atoms; an oxygen transport protein--hemerythrin; and mercury impurities in lead metal. An X-ray absorption experiment on xenon gas shows a clear evidence of the electron shaking up (off) from the valence shells when an L-shell electron is excited. A (DELTA)SCF (self consistent field) calculation in the dipole approximation was performed, which used a local exchange potential and the sudden approximation. The calculation shows that the (DELTA)SCF model is qualitatively and semi -quantitatively correct. The lowest lying shake up channel was found to be more than 70 percent of the total double excitation strength. The model was also used to investigate the many-body effect in the EXAFS. Various forms of hemerythrin (Hr) and their model compounds have been measured by EXAFS. The data analysis shows that the oxy-form of Hr is similar to the met-forms. On release of O(,2) in oxy-Hr, the (mu)-oxo bridge with Fe -O distance of 1.8 (ANGSTROM) is converted to a (mu)-OH bridge of 2.0 (ANGSTROM) and the iron-iron distance is changed from 3.24 (ANGSTROM) to 3.50 (ANGSTROM). Accompanying this change is a large increase in vibrational amplitude around the active site. The entropy increase associated with this vibrational change contributes most of the entropy change driving the transition. A new error analysis procedure is introduced to estimate the fitting errors introduced by modeling the unknown with the standards. It is found that the dominant part of the errors was introduced by the modeling itself, namely, the standards used are not quite transferable with the unknowns. The EXAFS on the samples of Hg impurities in Pb and pure Pb have been measured in the temperature range from 10 K to right below the melting temperatures. The measurement focuses on the local structure of both lead and mercury atoms, which is an advantage provided by the technique. The Debye-Waller factor (DWF) change exhibits

  18. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  19. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  20. Modeling the Oxygen K Absorption in the Interstellar Medium: An XMM-Newton View of Sco X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Ramirez, J. M.; Kallman, T. R.; Witthoeft, M.; Bautista, M. A.; Mendoza, C.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the absorption structure of the oxygen in the interstellar medium by analyzing XMM-Newton observations of the low mass X-ray binary Sco X-1. We use simple models based on the O I atomic cross section from different sources to fit the data and evaluate the impact of the atomic data in the interpretation of astrophysical observations. We show that relatively small differences in the atomic calculations can yield spurious results. We also show that the most complete and accurate set of atomic cross sections successfully reproduce the observed data in the 21 - 24.5 Angstrom wavelength region of the spectrum. Our fits indicate that the absorption is mainly due to neutral gas with an ionization parameter of Epsilon = 10(exp -4) erg/sq cm, and an oxygen column density of N(sub O) approx. = 8-10 x 10(exp 17)/sq cm. Our models are able to reproduce both the K edge and the K(alpha) absorption line from O I, which are the two main features in this region. We find no conclusive evidence for absorption by other than atomic oxygen.