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Sample records for absorption angstrom exponent

  1. Application of AERONET Single Scattering Albedo and Absorption Angstrom Exponent to Classify Dominant Aerosol Types during DRAGON Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Schafer, J.; Crawford, J. H.; Kim, J.; Sano, I.; Liew, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Lim, H.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, M.; Kenny, P.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols can have major implications on human health by inducing respiratory diseases due to inhalation of fine particles from biomass burning smoke or industrial pollution and on radiative forcing whereby the presence of absorbing aerosol particles (e.g., black carbon) increases atmospheric heating. Aerosol classification techniques have utilized aerosol loading and aerosol properties derived from multi-spectral and multi-angle observations by ground-based (e.g., AERONET) and satellite instrumentation (e.g., MISR). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data have been utilized to determine aerosol types by implementing various combinations of measured aerosol optical depth or retrieved size and absorption aerosol properties (e.g., Gobbi et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010). Giles et al. [2012] showed single scattering albedo (SSA) relationship with extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) can provide an estimate of the general classification of dominant aerosol types (i.e., desert dust, urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, and mixtures) based on data from ~20 AERONET sites located in known aerosol source regions. In addition, the absorption Angstrom exponent relationship with EAE can provide an indication of the dominant absorbing aerosol type such as dust, black carbon, brown carbon, or mixtures of them. These classification techniques are applied to the AERONET Level 2.0 quality assured data sets collected during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network (DRAGON) campaigns in Maryland (USA), Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Penang (Malaysia), and California (USA). An analysis of aerosol type classification for DRAGON sites is performed as well as an assessment of the spatial variability of the aerosol types for selected DRAGON campaigns. Giles, D. M., B. N. Holben, T. F. Eck, A. Sinyuk, A. Smirnov, I. Slutsker, R. R. Dickerson, A. M. Thompson, and J. S. Schafer (2012), An analysis of AERONET aerosol absorption properties and classifications

  2. Limitation of the Use of the Absorption Angstrom Exponent for Source Apportionment of Equivalent Black Carbon: a Case Study from the North West Indo-Gangetic Plain.

    PubMed

    Garg, Saryu; Chandra, Boggarapu Praphulla; Sinha, Vinayak; Sarda-Esteve, Roland; Gros, Valerie; Sinha, Baerbel

    2016-01-19

    Angstrom exponent measurements of equivalent black carbon (BCeq) have recently been introduced as a novel tool to apportion the contribution of biomass burning sources to the BCeq mass. The BCeq is the mass of ideal BC with defined optical properties that, upon deposition on the aethalometer filter tape, would cause equal optical attenuation of light to the actual PM2.5 aerosol deposited. The BCeq mass hence is identical to the mass of the total light-absorbing carbon deposited on the filter tape. Here, we use simultaneously collected data from a seven-wavelength aethalometer and a high-sensitivity proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometer installed at a suburban site in Mohali (Punjab), India, to identify a number of biomass combustion plumes. The identified types of biomass combustion include paddy- and wheat-residue burning, leaf litter, and garbage burning. Traffic plumes were selected for comparison. We find that the combustion efficiency, rather than the fuel used, determines αabs, and consequently, the αabs can be ∼1 for flaming biomass combustion and >1 for older vehicles that operate with poorly optimized engines. Thus, the absorption angstrom exponent is not representative of the fuel used and, therefore, cannot be used as a generic tracer to constrain source contributions.

  3. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  4. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (<0.1micron) were also collected at site T0 and T1 (Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, State of Mexico) from 5 am to 5 pm (day) and from 5 pm to 5 am (night) during the month of March 2006. Samples were collected on quartz fiber filters with high volume impactor samplers. Continuous absorption spectra of these aerosol samples have been obtained in the laboratory from 280 to 900nm with the use of an integrating sphere coupled to a UV spectrometer (Beckman DU with a Labsphere accessory). The integrating sphere allows the detector to collect and spatially integrate the total radiant flux reflected from the sample and therefore allows for the measurement of absorption on highly reflective or diffusely scattering samples. These continuous spectra have also been used to obtain the

  5. El Nino-Southern Oscillation Correlated Aerosol Angstrom Exponent Anomaly Over the Tropical Pacific Discovered in Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    El Nino.Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of interannual variability in the tropical atmosphere. ENSO could potentially impact local and global aerosol properties through atmospheric circulation anomalies and teleconnections. By analyzing aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (AE; often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer and the Sea ]viewing Wide Field ]of ]view Sensor for the period 2000.2011, we find a strong correlation between the AE data and the multivariate ENSO index (MEI) over the tropical Pacific. Over the western tropical Pacific (WTP), AE increases during El Nino events and decreases during La Nina events, while the opposite is true over the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP). The difference between AE anomalies in the WTP and ETP has a higher correlation coefficient (>0.7) with the MEI than the individual time series and could be considered another type of ENSO index. As no significant ENSO correlation is found in AOD over the same region, the change in AE (and hence aerosol size) is likely to be associated with aerosol composition changes due to anomalous meteorological conditions induced by the ENSO. Several physical parameters or mechanisms that might be responsible for the correlation are discussed. Preliminary analysis indicates surface wind anomaly might be the major contributor, as it reduces sea ]salt production and aerosol transport during El Nino events. Precipitation and cloud fraction are also found to be correlated with tropical Pacific AE. Possible mechanisms, including wet removal and cloud shielding effects, are considered. Variations in relative humidity, tropospheric ozone concentration, and ocean color during El Nino have been ruled out. Further investigation is needed to fully understand this AE ]ENSO covariability and the underlying physical processes responsible for

  6. Using the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo and Angstrom Exponent from AERONET to Determine Aerosol Origins and Mixing States over the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Slutsker, I.; Smirnov, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Ghauri, B.

    2012-12-01

    various fuel types (e.g., from open agricultural waste, forest, or dung burning), combustion phases, or aging processes including aggregation or mixing with ambient aerosols. Other intensive aerosol properties (e.g., depolarization ratio or absorption Angstrom exponent) may provide improved definition of fine mode dominated aerosol types from U/I and BB sources [Burton et al., 2012, Giles et al., 2012]. Additional sites in India and Pakistan are also analyzed using available AERONET Version 2, Level 2.0 data.

  7. Limitation of using Angstrom exponent for source apportionment of black carbon in complex environments - A case study from the North West Indo- Gangetic plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, S.; Sinha, B.; Sinha, V.; Chandra, P.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Gros, V.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the contribution of different sources to the total BC is necessary for targeted mitigation. Absorption Angstrom exponent (αabs) measurements of black carbon (BC) have recently been introduced as a novel tool to apportion the contribution of biomass burning sources to BC. Two-component Aethalometer model for apportioning BC to biomass burning sources and fossil fuel combustion sources, which uses αabs as a generic indicator of the source type, is widely used for determining the contribution of the two types of sources to the total BC. Our work studies BC emissions in the highly-populated, anthropogenic emissions-dominated Indo-Gangetic Plain and demonstrates that the αabs cannot be used as a generic tracer for biomass burning emissions in a complex environment. Simultaneously collected high time resolution data from a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE 42, Magee Scientific, USA) and a high sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction- Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) installed at a sub-urban site in Mohali (Punjab), India, were used to identify a number of biomass combustion plumes during which BC enhancements correlated strongly with an increase in acetonitrile (a well-established biomass burning tracer) mixing ratio. Each type of biomass combustion is classified and characterized by distinct emission ratios of aromatic compounds and oxygenated VOCs to acetonitrile. The identified types of biomass combustion include two different types of crop residue burning (paddy and wheat), burning of leaf-litter, and garbage burning. Traffic (fossil-fuel burning) plumes were also selected for comparison. We find that the two-component Aethalometer source-apportionment method cannot be extrapolated to all types of biomass combustion and αabs of traffic plumes can be >1 in developing countries like India, where use of adulterated fuel in vehicles is common. Thus in a complex environment, where multiple anthropogenic BC sources and air masses of variable photochemical age

  8. Absorption spectroscopy with sub-angstrom beams: ELS in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, John C. H.

    2006-03-01

    Electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) performed using a modern transmission scanning electron microscope (STEM) now offers sub-nanometre spatial resolution and an energy resolution down to 200 meV or less, in favourable cases. The absorption spectra, which probe empty states, cover the soft x-ray region and may be obtained under conditions of well-defined momentum transfer (angle-resolved), providing a double projection onto crystallographic site and symmetry within the density of states. By combining the very high brightness of field-emission electron sources (brighter than a synchrotron) with the high cross-section of electron scattering, together with parallel detection (not possible with scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy), a form of spectroscopy ideally suited to the study of nanostructures, interfacial states and defects in materials is obtained with uniquely high spatial resolution. We review the basic theory, the relationship of EELS to optical properties and the dielectric response function, the removal of multiple scattering artefacts and channelling effects. We consider applications in the light of recent developments in aberration corrector and electron monochromator design. Examples are cited of inner-shell spectra obtained from individual atoms within thin crystals, of the detection of interfacial electronic states in semiconductors, of inner-shell near edge structure mapped with sub-nanometre spatial resolution in glasses and of spectra obtained from individual carbon nanotubes, amongst many others.

  9. Combining AOT, Angstrom Exponent and PM concentration data, with PSCF model, to distinguish fine and coarse aerosol intrusions in Southern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a cluster analysis of backward air mass trajectories, arriving in Avignon (Southern France), was combined with a Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) model on a 0.5° × 0.5° resolution grid, in order to indicate possible aerosol intrusions. A strict triple criterion was constructed from Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), Angstrom Exponent (AE), and PM (PM10 and PM2.5) concentration measurements, aiming to distinguish more effectively Episodes of Fine, Coarse and Overall Aerosols (FAE, CAE and OAE respectively). Large fractions of FAE (60.0%) and CAE (40.6%) were strongly attributed to the prevalence of Eastern and South-Southwest (S-SW) airflows respectively, whereas these distinct trajectory clusters also gathered large fractions of OAE (90.2% cumulatively). According to PSCF results, FAE events were strongly associated with the influence of air masses traveling over North Italy and Southern Germany, hence the impact of urban and industrial combustion was emerged. Main sources of coarse aerosols were principally isolated over the Mediterranean, thus the import of sea spray and dust from the Sahara desert is presumed. Satellite AOT observations were used for a more detailed identification of an intense 5-day intrusion of coarse aerosols. Short range slow moving air mass trajectories, were proven to be a clear marker of atmospheric stagnation, based on a wind speed analysis, triggering the accumulation of locally emitted anthropogenic aerosols (mainly PM2.5) and lack of city ventilation.

  10. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-angstroms diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), ubiquitous absorption features in astronomical spectra, have been known since early this century and now number more than a hundred. Ranging from 4,400 angstroms to the near infrared, they differ markedly in depth, width and shape, making the concept of a single carrier unlikely. Whether they are due to gas or grains is not settled, but recent results suggest that the DIB carriers are quite separate from the grains that cause visual extinction. Among molecular candidates the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as the possible carriers of some of the DIBs, and we present here laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10+ in neon and argon matrices. The strongest absorption feature falls at 4,435 +/- 5 angstroms in the argon matrix and 4,395 +/- 5 angstroms in the neon matrix, both close to the strong 4,430-angstroms DIB. If this or a related pyrene-like species is responsible for this particular band, it must account for 0.2% of all cosmic carbon. The ion also shows an intense but puzzling broad continuum, extending from the ultraviolet to the visible, similar to what is seen in the naphthalene cation and perhaps therefore a common feature of all PAH cations. This may provide an explanation of how PAHs convert a large fraction of interstellar radiation from ultraviolet and visible wavelengths down to the infrared.

  11. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-angstroms diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    PubMed

    Salama, F; Allamandola, L J

    1992-07-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), ubiquitous absorption features in astronomical spectra, have been known since early this century and now number more than a hundred. Ranging from 4,400 angstroms to the near infrared, they differ markedly in depth, width and shape, making the concept of a single carrier unlikely. Whether they are due to gas or grains is not settled, but recent results suggest that the DIB carriers are quite separate from the grains that cause visual extinction. Among molecular candidates the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as the possible carriers of some of the DIBs, and we present here laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10+ in neon and argon matrices. The strongest absorption feature falls at 4,435 +/- 5 angstroms in the argon matrix and 4,395 +/- 5 angstroms in the neon matrix, both close to the strong 4,430-angstroms DIB. If this or a related pyrene-like species is responsible for this particular band, it must account for 0.2% of all cosmic carbon. The ion also shows an intense but puzzling broad continuum, extending from the ultraviolet to the visible, similar to what is seen in the naphthalene cation and perhaps therefore a common feature of all PAH cations. This may provide an explanation of how PAHs convert a large fraction of interstellar radiation from ultraviolet and visible wavelengths down to the infrared.

  12. The regime of aerosol asymmetry parameter and Angstrom exponent over Europe, Mediterranean and Middle East based on MODIS satellite data. Intercomparison of MODIS-Aqua C051 and C006 retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras-Carraca, Marios Bruno; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Gkikas, Antonis; Papadimas, Christos; Sayers, Andy

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In the present work, we study two of the most important optical properties of aerosols, the asymmetry parameter (gaer) and the Angstrom exponent (α). Both gaer and α are related with aerosol size, which is a very important parameter for climate and human health. The study region comprises North Africa, the Arabian peninsula, Europe, and the Mediterranean basin. These areas are of great interest, because of the variety of aerosol types they host, both anthropogenic and natural. Urban, industrial or biomass-burning aerosols are usually fine, while desert dust or sea-salt are basically coarse, making thus possible the establishment of a relationship between the type and the size of aerosols. Using satellite data from the collection 051 of MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Aqua), we investigate the spatio-temporal characteristics of the asymmetry parameter and Angstrom exponent. We generally find significant spatial variability, with larger gaer values over regions dominated by larger size particles, e.g. outside the Atlantic coasts of north-western Africa, where desert-dust outflow is taking place. The gaer values tend to decrease with increasing wavelength, especially over areas dominated by small particulates. The intra-annual variability is found to be small in desert-dust areas, with maximum values during summer, while in all other areas larger values are reported during the cold season and smaller during the warm. Significant intra-annual and inter-annual variability is observed around the Black Sea. However, the inter-annual trends of gaer are found to be generally small. The geographical distributions for α (given for the pair of wavelengths 550-865 nm) affirm the conclusions drawn from the asymmetry parameter as regards the aerosol size over

  13. Remote sensing of soot carbon - Part 2: Understanding the absorption Ångström exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, some authors have suggested that the absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) can be used to deduce the component aerosol absorption optical depths (AAODs) of carbonaceous aerosols in the AERONET database. This AAE approach presumes that AAE ≪ 1 for soot carbon, which contrasts the traditional small particle limit of AAE = 1 for soot carbon. Thus, we provide an overview of the AERONET retrieval, and we investigate how the microphysics of carbonaceous aerosols can be interpreted in the AERONET AAE product. We find that AAE ≪ 1 in the AERONET database requires large coarse mode fractions and/or imaginary refractive indices that increase with wavelength. Neither of these characteristics are consistent with the current definition of soot carbon, so we explore other possibilities for the cause of AAE ≪ 1. AAE is related to particle size, and coarse mode particles have a smaller AAE than fine mode particles for a given aerosol mixture of species. We also note that the mineral goethite has an imaginary refractive index that increases with wavelength, is very common in dust regions, and can easily contribute to AAE ≪ 1. We find that AAE ≪ 1 can not be caused by soot carbon, unless soot carbon has an imaginary refractive index that increases with wavelength throughout the visible and near-infrared spectrums. Finally, AAE is not a robust parameter for separating carbonaceous absorption from dust aerosol absorption in the AERONET database.

  14. Differences in aerosol absorption Ångström exponents between correction algorithms for particle soot absorption photometer measured on South African Highveld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, J.; Virkkula, A.; Vakkari, V.; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, P.; Josipovic, M.; Piketh, S.; Tiitta, P.; Chiloane, K.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Laakso, L.

    2014-09-01

    Absorption Ångstrom exponents (AAE) calculated from filter-based absorption measurements are often used to give information on the origin of the ambient aerosol, for example to distinguish between urban pollution and biomass burning aerosol. Filter-based absorption measurements are a widely used method and are commonly used at aerosol monitoring stations globally. Several correction algorithms are used to account for the artifacts associated with filter-based absorption techniques. These algorithms are of profound importance when determining the absolute amount of absorption by the aerosol. However, this study shows that there are significant differences between the AAEs calculated from these corrections. The study also shows that the difference between AAEs calculated using different corrections can lead to conflicting conclusions on the type of aerosol for the same data set. In this work the AAEs were calculated from data measured with a three-wavelength Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) at Elandsfontein on deployed on the South African Highveld for 23 months. The sample air of the PSAP was diluted to prolong filter change intervals. The dilution-corrected PSAP showed a good agreement with a non-diluted MAAP. Thus, the study also shows that the applicability of the PSAP can be extended to remote sites are not often visited or suffer from high levels of pollution.

  15. Differences in aerosol absorption Ångström exponents between correction algorithms for a particle soot absorption photometer measured on the South African Highveld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, J.; Virkkula, A.; Vakkari, V.; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, P. G.; Josipovic, M.; Piketh, S.; Tiitta, P.; Chiloane, K.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Laakso, L.

    2014-12-01

    Absorption Ångström exponents (AAEs) calculated from filter-based absorption measurements are often used to give information on the origin of the ambient aerosol, for example, to distinguish between urban pollution and biomass burning aerosol. Filter-based absorption measurements are widely used and are common at aerosol monitoring stations globally. Several correction algorithms are used to account for artefacts associated with filter-based absorption techniques. These algorithms are of profound importance when determining the absolute amount of absorption by the aerosol. However, this study shows that there are substantial differences between the AAEs calculated from these corrections. Depending on the used correction, AAEs can change by as much as 46%. The study also highlights that the difference between AAEs calculated using different corrections can lead to conflicting conclusions on the type of aerosol when using the same data set. The AAE ranged between 1.17 for non-corrected data to 1.96 for the correction that gave the greatest values. Furthermore, the study implies that the AAEs reported for a site depend on at which filter transmittance the filter is changed. In this work, the AAEs were calculated from data measured with a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) at Elandsfontein on the South African Highveld for 23 months. The sample air of the PSAP was diluted to prolong filter change intervals, by a factor of 15. The correlation coefficient between the dilution-corrected PSAP and a non-diluted Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) was 0.9. Thus, the study also shows that the applicability of the PSAP can be extended to remote sites that are not often visited or suffer from high levels of pollution.

  16. Correlations between absorption Angström exponent (AAE) of wintertime ambient urban aerosol and its physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Filep, Á.; Pintér, M.; Török, Zs.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-07-01

    Based on a two-week measurement campaign in an environment heavily polluted both by transit traffic and household heating in the inner city of Szeged (Hungary), correlations between the absorption Angström exponent (AAE) fitted to the optical absorption coefficients measured with a four wavelength (1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm) photoacoustic aerosol measuring system (4λ-PAS) and various aerosol parameters were identified. AAE was found to depend linearly on OCwb/EC and on NGM100/NGMD20, i.e. on the ratio of mass concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) to the fraction of organic carbon associated with wood burning (OCwb), and on the ratio of aerosol number concentrations in the 20 nm (NGMD20) to 100 nm (NGMD100) modes, with a regression coefficient of R = 0.95 and R = 0.86, respectively. In the daily fluctuation of AAE two minima were identified, which coincide with the morning and afternoon rush hours, during which NGMD20 exhibits maximum values. During the campaign the shape of the aerosol volume size distribution (dV/dlogD) was found to be largely invariant, supporting the assumption that the primary driver for the AAE variation was aerosol chemical composition rather than particle size. Furthermore, when wavelength segregated AAE values were calculated, AAE for the shorter wavelengths (AAE355-266) was also found to depend linearly on the above mentioned ratios with similar regression coefficients but with a much steeper correlation line, while the AAE for the longer wavelengths (AAE1064-532) exhibits only a considerably weaker correlation. These results prove the unique advantages of real time multi-wavelength photoacoustic measurement of optical absorption in case the wavelength range includes the ultra-violet too.

  17. Sources, composition and absorption Ångström exponent of light-absorbing organic components in aerosol extracts from the Los Angeles Basin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Surratt, Jason D; Weber, Rodney J

    2013-04-16

    We investigate the sources, chemical composition, and spectral properties of light-absorbing organic aerosol extracts (i.e., brown carbon, or BrC) in the Los Angeles (LA) Basin during the CalNex-2010 field campaign. Light absorption of PM2.5 water-soluble components at 365 nm (Abs365), used as a proxy for water-soluble BrC, was well correlated with water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) (r(2) = 0.55-0.65), indicating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from anthropogenic emissions was the major source of water-soluble BrC in this region. Normalizing Abs365 to WSOC mass yielded an average solution mass absorption efficiency (MAE365) of 0.71 m(2) g(-1) C. Detailed chemical speciation of filter extracts identified eight nitro-aromatic compounds that were correlated with Abs365. These compounds accounted for ∼4% of the overall water-soluble BrC absorption. Methanol-extracted BrC in LA was approximately 3 and 21 times higher than water-soluble BrC at 365 and 532 nm, respectively, and had a MAE365 of 1.58 m(2) g(-1) C (Abs365 normalized to organic carbon mass). The water-insoluble BrC was strongly correlated with ambient elemental carbon concentration, suggesting similar sources. Absorption Ångström exponent (Å(a)) (fitted between 300 and 600 nm wavelengths) was 3.2 (±1.2) for the PILS water-soluble BrC measurement, compared to 4.8 (±0.5) and 7.6 (±0.5) for methanol- and water-soluble BrC from filter extracts, respectively. These results show that fine particle BrC was prevalent in the LA basin during CalNex, yet many of its properties and potential impacts remain unknown.

  18. Aerosol scattering and absorption Angström exponents as indicators of dust and dust-free days over Granada (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Lyamani, H.; Antón, M.; Titos, G.; Cazorla, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-03-01

    This paper focuses on the assessment of atmospheric aerosol optical properties at the surface and in atmospheric column during both desert dust and dust-free conditions over Granada, South-eastern Iberian Peninsula. Indeed, the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption and scattering properties is analyzed in detail. The analyzed period ranges from June 2008 to December 2010. On dusty days, the mean scattering Angström exponent value obtained in the atmospheric column (SAEcol) (0.5 ± 0.3) was lower than the observed at the surface level (SAEis) (1.3 ± 0.6), indicating higher contribution of coarse particles at high atmospheric level than at ground level during the analyzed dust events. In addition, it is noticed that the absorption Angström exponent in the atmospheric column (AAEcol) with mean value of 1.5 ± 0.2 and at the surface (AAEis) with mean value of 1.3 ± 0.2 obtained during dusty situations are indicative of mixture of desert dust and black carbon particles as dominant absorbers both in the atmospheric column and at the surface during dust intrusions over Granada. On the other hand, a non-parametric test (Kolmogorov-Smirnov) revealed that no significant statistical difference was found for AAEis between desert dust and free-dust conditions. This result may be due to the important contribution of urban absorbing aerosol (e.g. Black carbon) at ground level in the study location. Therefore, these parameters (AAEcol and AAEis) are not very useful to detect desert dust events without the use of other information (e.g., aerosol size) over urban area like Granada. A dust extreme event was analyzed in order to retrieve optical parameters during situation dominated by desert dust. The values of SAEcol and SAEis obtained during this extreme event were in agreement with the values showed above for the period 2008-2010, although the differences between dust-free and dust conditions are more noticeable in this special event.

  19. Photometric observations of Jupiter at 2400 angstroms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, C. W.; West, R. A.; Simmons, K. E.; Coffeen, D. L.; Sato, M.; Lane, A. L.; Bergstralh, J. T.

    1979-01-01

    The photopolarimeter instrument on Voyager 2 was used to obtain a map of Jupiter at an effective wavelength of 2400 angstroms. Analysis of a typical north-south swath used to make this map shows strong absorption at high latitudes by a molecular or particulate constituent in the Jovian atmosphere. At 65 deg north latitude, the absorbing constituent extends to altitudes above the 50-millibar pressure level

  20. Parameterization of single-scattering albedo (SSA) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) with EC / OC for aerosol emissions from biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Rudra P.; Wagner, Nick L.; Langridge, Justin M.; Lack, Daniel A.; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Murphy, Shane M.

    2016-08-01

    Single-scattering albedo (SSA) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) are two critical parameters in determining the impact of absorbing aerosol on the Earth's radiative balance. Aerosol emitted by biomass burning represent a significant fraction of absorbing aerosol globally, but it remains difficult to accurately predict SSA and AAE for biomass burning aerosol. Black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and non-absorbing coatings all make substantial contributions to the absorption coefficient of biomass burning aerosol. SSA and AAE cannot be directly predicted based on fuel type because they depend strongly on burn conditions. It has been suggested that SSA can be effectively parameterized via the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) of a biomass burning event and that this would be useful because emission factors for CO and CO2, from which MCE can be calculated, are available for a large number of fuels. Here we demonstrate, with data from the FLAME-4 experiment, that for a wide variety of globally relevant biomass fuels, over a range of combustion conditions, parameterizations of SSA and AAE based on the elemental carbon (EC) to organic carbon (OC) mass ratio are quantitatively superior to parameterizations based on MCE. We show that the EC / OC ratio and the ratio of EC / (EC + OC) both have significantly better correlations with SSA than MCE. Furthermore, the relationship of EC / (EC + OC) with SSA is linear. These improved parameterizations are significant because, similar to MCE, emission factors for EC (or black carbon) and OC are available for a wide range of biomass fuels. Fitting SSA with MCE yields correlation coefficients (Pearson's r) of ˜ 0.65 at the visible wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm while fitting SSA with EC / OC or EC / (EC + OC) yields a Pearson's r of 0.94-0.97 at these same wavelengths. The strong correlation coefficient at 405 nm (r = 0.97) suggests that parameterizations based on EC / OC or EC / (EC + OC) have good predictive

  1. One hundred angstrom niobium wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, H. E.; Rose, R. M.; Wulff, J.

    1968-01-01

    Composite of fine niobium wires in copper is used to study the size and proximity effects of a superconductor in a normal matrix. The niobium rod was drawn to a 100 angstrom diameter wire on a copper tubing.

  2. Whisper gallery mirrors reflectivities from 100 [angstrom] to 500 [angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Tsen-Yu; Hagelstein, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    We have examined optical constants and predicted reflectivities of candidate surface coatings for whisper gallery mirrors in the extreme ultraviolet (100 [Angstrom] to 500 [Angstrom]). Previous work of Vinogradov and coworkers have identified the spectral regime near 100-150 [Angstrom] as particularly promising due to the high whisper gallery mirror reflectivities of the noble metals in the vicinity of their Cooper minima in this regime. We confirm this basic result using newer optical data, and we have sought surface materials which would extend the range over which the whisper gallery mirrors may be used: between 100 to 500 [Angstrom]. We find that substantial whisper gallery mirror reflectivities (near or greater than 50%) are predicted for a variety of elements, and that the TE peak reflection is larger than TM peak reflection by on the order of 10%. However, most of the elements which do reflect well have surfaces that are vulnerable to oxygen contamination, which seriously degrades mirror performance. A cryogenic mirror design using a dynamic solid rare gas surface which has the potential to defeat such surface contaminations is described: it has peak reflectivity of more than 50% centered near 280 [Angstrom]. 8 figs, 18 refs.

  3. Whisper gallery mirrors reflectivities from 100 {angstrom} to 500 {angstrom}

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Tsen-Yu; Hagelstein, P.L.

    1990-12-31

    We have examined optical constants and predicted reflectivities of candidate surface coatings for whisper gallery mirrors in the extreme ultraviolet (100 {Angstrom} to 500 {Angstrom}). Previous work of Vinogradov and coworkers have identified the spectral regime near 100-150 {Angstrom} as particularly promising due to the high whisper gallery mirror reflectivities of the noble metals in the vicinity of their Cooper minima in this regime. We confirm this basic result using newer optical data, and we have sought surface materials which would extend the range over which the whisper gallery mirrors may be used: between 100 to 500 {Angstrom}. We find that substantial whisper gallery mirror reflectivities (near or greater than 50%) are predicted for a variety of elements, and that the TE peak reflection is larger than TM peak reflection by on the order of 10%. However, most of the elements which do reflect well have surfaces that are vulnerable to oxygen contamination, which seriously degrades mirror performance. A cryogenic mirror design using a dynamic solid rare gas surface which has the potential to defeat such surface contaminations is described: it has peak reflectivity of more than 50% centered near 280 {Angstrom}. 8 figs, 18 refs.

  4. Absorption Ångström exponents of aerosols and light absorbing carbon (LAC) obtained from in situ data in Covilhã, central Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mogo, S; Cachorro, V E; de Frutos, A; Rodrigues, A

    2012-12-01

    A field campaign was conducted from October 2009 to July 2010 at Covilhã, a small town located in the region of Beira Interior (Portugal) in the interior of the Iberian Peninsula. The ambient light-absorption coefficient, σ(a) (522 nm), obtained from a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), presented a daily mean value of 12.1 Mm⁻¹ (StD = 7.3 Mm⁻¹). The wavelength dependence of aerosol light absorption is investigated through the Ångström parameter, α(a). The α(a) values for the pair of wavelengths 470-660 nm ranged from 0.86 to 1.47 during the period of measurements. The PSAP data were used to infer the mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC) and the daily mean varied from 0.1 to 6.8 μg m⁻³. A detailed study of special events with different aerosol characteristics is carried out and, to support data interpretation, air masses trajectory analysis is performed.

  5. Singularity detection using holder exponent.

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, H.; Robertson, A. N.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    A signal processing technique called Holder exponent is presented to detect the presence of a discontinuity and when the discontinuity occurs in a dynamic signal. Wavelet transforms are incorporated with the Holder exponent to capture the time varying nature of discontinuities, and a classification procedure is developed to quantify when changes in the Holder exponent are significant, The proposed Holder exponent analysis is applied to acceleration response of a mechanical system with a rattling internal part. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the Holder exponent for identifying certain types of events that introduce discontinuities into the measured dynamic response data.

  6. Aerosol Absorption Near Beijing During EAST-AIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Howell, S.; Huebert, B.; Zhuang, J.

    2006-12-01

    To understand the aerosol absorption that had been observed offshore during ACE-Asia, we took a suite of instruments (including a 7 wavelength aethalometer) to a site 70 km ESE of Beijing in March of 2005 to measure the wavelength dependence of aerosol absorption as a part of the EAST-AIRE program. Confidence in filter methods suffers a bit because several corrections are required to estimate ambient absorption from particles on a filter: there is enhancement by multiple scatter from the filter's matrix, shadowing by thick cakes of collected particles, and scattering by co-collected aerosols, to name a few. We encountered mild dust, heavy pollution, relatively clean air, coal-burning chimney plumes, industrial plumes, and biomass burning, often at separate times. The absorption Angstrom exponent was always greater than 1, averaging 1.5: in the UV and violet there is an enhanced absorption over what one would expect of black carbon. If we assume that BC is responsible for all the absorption at 950 nm and that it has an Angstrom coefficient of 1.0 (yielding a specific absorbance of about 9 m2g-1 at 550 nm), the remaining absorption Angstrom exponent in the visible averaged 3.2. However, the 370-950 nm absorption spectrum of the remainder looked very much like the clay and hematite absorption spectra published by Sokolik and Toon, including a striking UV absorption and a characteristic dip around 660 nm (e.g., not a power law shape). This is not surprising, since clay is both a frequent component of dust and is used as a binder in the charcoal briquettes that are widely used in China for heating and cooking. We found single-scatter albedos virtually always less than 0.9, averaging 0.82. In the presence of dust, the SSA increased toward the IR. We also find that the clay spectrum explains virtually all the non-BC absorption, so there must not be much brown carbon present. Our confidence in these on-filter absorption measurements is increased by the fact that we

  7. The High Temperature Response of the TRACE 171 Angstrom and 195 Angstrom Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Chifor, C.; Landi, E.

    2005-01-01

    The CHIANTI spectral code is used to estimate line and continuum intensity contributions to the TRACE 171 Angstrom and 195 Angstrom channels, widely used for imaging a variety of solar features and phenomena, including quiet Sun and active region loops and solar flares. It is shown that the 171 Angstrom channel has a high-temperature response, so high-temperature (approx. 10 MK) features in flares, prominent in TRACE 195 approx.\\AA\\ images as well as X-ray images from Yohkoh and RHESSI, are sometimes visible in images made in the 171 Angstrom channel. Such features consist of hot loop-top emission, either confined spots or 'spine' structures in loop arcades. This is illustrated with TRACE and X-ray flare images.

  8. Methods to Parameterize Brown Carbon, Distinguish Brown Carbon Absorption From Enhanced Black Carbon Absorption, and Assess the Stability of Brown Carbon to Photochemical Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. M.; Pokhrel, R. P.; Beamesderfer, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Langridge, J.; Lack, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present results obtained during the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment-4 (FLAME-4) with a combination of multi-wavelength photoacoustic and cavity ringdown spectrometers. It will be shown that the single scattering albedo and Angstrom exponent of biomass burning emissions can be better parameterized by the organic carbon to black carbon ratio than by the modified combustion efficiency. Two different methods to distinguish the contribution to aerosol absorption from brown carbon versus black carbon and enhanced black carbon absorption will be presented. One method is based on extending the absorption seen at 660 nm with an assumed Angstrom exponent while the other assumes a similar absorption enhancement (determined via thermal denuder) of black carbon at 660 and 405 nm. Potential errors and advantages of both methods will be discussed. Finally, chamber experiments that show degradation of brown carbon by photochemical oxidation will be presented along with a number of methods by which to assess the amount of brown carbon that is degraded.

  9. 212-Angstrom neonlike zinc laser of LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamelot, Gerard; Jaegle, Pierre; Rus, Bedrich; Carillon, Antoine; Klisnick, Annie; Nantel, Marc; Sebban, Stephane; Albert, F.; Zeitoun, Philippe; Plankl, E.; Sirgand, A.; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Tallents, Gregory J.; Krishnan, J.; Holden, M.

    1995-09-01

    The main feature of x-ray laser research at LULI is the development of a saturated laser at 212 angstrom with a relatively small pump laser of 0.4 kJ in 600 ps. The laser works with the 3p- 3s J equals O yields 1 transition of neon-like zinc, by using the double-pass of amplified radiation in the active medium. Plasma parameters (temperature, density, homogeneity), and x-ray laser emission properties (intensity, pointing angle, divergence, and coherence) have been studied. Lasing action needs the main laser pulse to be preceded by a ten-prepulse train (contrast ratio less than 103) due to the remnant oscillator. The effect of a single prepulse was investigated as a function of contrast ratio and delay between the prepulse and the main pulse.

  10. Contribution of particulate brown carbon to light absorption in the rural and urban Southeast US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, J. Jai; Bergin, Michael H.; Mckenzie, Michael; Schauer, James J.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol light absorption coefficients were carried out as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during the summer of 2013 to determine the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon (BrC) to total aerosol light absorption in a rural location (Centreville, AL) and an urban area (Atlanta, GA). The light absorption coefficients in the near UV and visible wavelengths were measured for both ambient air, as well as ambient air heated in a thermal denuder to 200 °C to remove the semi-volatile organic compounds. Atlanta measurements show dominance of semi-volatile brown carbon with an average absorption angstrom exponent (AAE) of 1.4 before heating and about 1.0 after heating. In urban Atlanta, a decrease of about ∼35% in the light absorption coefficient at 370 nm after heating indicates that light absorbing organic compounds are a substantial fraction of the light absorption budget. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the fraction of light absorption by the semi-volatile aerosol occurs during the daytime, likely linked with photochemistry. Measurements at rural Centerville, on the other hand, do not show any major change in AAE with values before and after heating of 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. Overall the results suggest that photochemical aged urban emissions result in the presence of light absorbing BrC, while at rural locations which are dominated by aged aerosol and local biogenic emissions (based on measurements of Angstrom exponents) BrC does not significantly contribute to light absorption.

  11. The Morphosyntax of Discontinuous Exponence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Amy Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This thesis offers a systematic treatment of discontinuous exponence, a pattern of inflection in which a single feature or a set of features bundled in syntax is expressed by multiple, distinct morphemes. This pattern is interesting and theoretically relevant because it represents a deviation from the expected one-to-one relationship between…

  12. New method to determine Angstrom`s turbidity coefficient: Its application for Valencia

    SciTech Connect

    Pinazo, J.M.; Canada, J.; Bosca, J.V.

    1995-04-01

    Traditionally the Angstrom turbidity coefficient has been derived from either spectral direct solar radiation measurements or broadband direct solar radiation and precipitable water measurements. The new method for calculating the Angstrom turbidity coefficient presented here is based on the ratio of direct solar radiation to global solar radiation on a horizontal surface and on the `C` model of Iqbal. For this method, it is not necessary to know the precipitable water and the ozone content of the atmosphere. The results of the present model are compared against those of a prior study using experimental data measured at Valencia during 1989-1990. Finally, a graphic method to calculate $beta for any location and standard meteorological conditions is presented. 8 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Light absorption from particulate impurities in snow and ice determined by spectrophotometric analysis of filters

    SciTech Connect

    Grenfell, Thomas C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Clarke, Antony D.; Warren, Stephen G.

    2011-05-10

    Light absorption by particulate impurities in snow and ice can affect the surface albedo and is important for the climate. The absorption properties of these particles can be determined by collecting and melting snow samples and extracting the particulate material by filtration of the meltwater. This paper describes the optical design and testing of a new instrument to measure the absorption spectrum from 400 to 750 nm wavelength of the particles collected on filters using an ''integrating-sandwich'' configuration. The measured absorption is shown to be unaffected by scattering of light from the deposited particulates. A set of calibration standards is used to derive an upper limit for the concentration of black carbon (BC) in the snow. The wavelength dependence of the absorption spectra from 450 to 600 nm is used to calculate an absorption Angstrom exponent for the aerosol. This exponent is used to estimate the actual BC concentration in the snow samples as well as the relative contributions of BC and non-BC constituents to the absorption of solar radiation integrated over the wavelength band 300 to 750 nm.

  14. Observations on related ecological exponents

    PubMed Central

    Southwood, T. Richard E.; May, Robert M.; Sugihara, George

    2006-01-01

    We observe a relationship among three independently derived power laws in ecology: (i) total number of species versus area, (ii) species frequency versus species length, and (iii) maximal body size versus area. Aside from showing how these historically disparate phenomena are connected, we show how recent empirical results relating the maximal body size of top terrestrial vertebrates to the square root of land area conform to a prior theoretical expectation given by two of the above power laws. Of particular interest is the observation that the exponent relating species length to species frequency suggests a dimension for niche space for terrestrial vertebrate assemblages of D ≈ 3/2. This value, along with power law for maximal body size, versus area, gives rise to the canonical species area exponent z ≈ 1/4. PMID:16641099

  15. Sub-Angstrom electron microscopy for sub-Angstrom nano-metrology

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.

    2004-01-18

    The revolution in nanoscale science and technology requires instrumentation for observation and metrology - we must be able to see and measure what we build. Because nano-devices operate on the level of a few molecules, or even a few atoms, accurate atomic-scale imaging is called for. High-resolution aberration-corrected electron microscopes (both TEM and STEM) can provide valuable measurements at the sub-Angstrom level. Over the next decade, extension of TEM and STEM resolutions to half-Angstrom levels by next-generation aberration-corrected electron microscopes will advance the capabilities of these essential tools for atomic-scale structural characterization. Because improvements in resolution allow for separation of atom columns in many more projection directions, these microscopes will provide much improved three-dimensional characterization of the shape and internal structure of nanodevices and catalyst nanoparticles (perhaps even true 3-D imaging), and hence provide essential feedback in the nano-theory/construction/measurement loop.

  16. Molecular structure of leucine aminopeptidase at 2. 7- angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Burley, S.K. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); David, P.R.; Lipscomb, W.N. ); Taylor, A. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-dimensional structure of bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase complexed with bestatin, a slow-binding inhibitor, has been solved to 3.0-{angstrom} resolution by the multiple isomorphous replacement method with phase combination and density modification. In addition, the structure of the isomorphous native enzyme has been refined at 2.7-{angstrom} resolution, and the current crystallographic R factor is 0.169 for a model that includes the two zinc ions and all 487 amino acid residues comprising the asymmetric unit. The enzyme is physiologically active as a hexamer, which has 32 symmetry and is triangular in shape with a triangle edge length of 115 {angstrom} and maximal thickness of 90 {angstrom}. The monomers are crystallographically equivalent and each is folded into two unequal {alpha}/{beta} domains connected by an {alpha}-helix to give a comma-like shape with approximate maximal dimensions of 90 x 55 x 55 {angstrom}{sup 3}. The secondary structural composition is 40% {alpha}-helix and 19% {beta}-strand. The active site also contains two positively charged residues, Lys-250 and Arg-336. The six active sites are themselves located in the interior of the hexamer, where they line a disk-shaped cavity of radius 15 {angstrom} and thickness 10 {angstrom}. Access to this cavity is provided by solvent channels that run along the twofold symmetry axes.

  17. Inference of the aerosol Angstrom coefficient from SAGE short-wavelength data. [Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenoble, J.; Pruvost, P.

    1983-01-01

    SAGE four-channel transmission profiles are inverted to retrieve the extinction profiles from which the aerosol Angstrom coefficient alpha is obtained. The procedure allows one to check the influence of the NO2 absorption profile, which is small below 25 km. The results compare well with those obtained by a completely different procedure at NASA Langley Research Center, and the main features of the alpha profiles seem to be significant, even considering the rather large error bars. The relation between the retrieved Angstrom coefficient, the particle effective radius and the asymmetry factor is considered.

  18. Critical exponents from cluster coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, Z.; Eisenberg, E.

    2009-09-01

    For a large class of repulsive interaction models, the Mayer cluster integrals can be transformed into a tridiagonal real symmetric matrix Rmn , whose elements converge to two constants. This allows for an effective extrapolation of the equation of state for these models. Due to a nearby (nonphysical) singularity on the negative real z axis, standard methods (e.g., Padé approximants based on the cluster integrals expansion) fail to capture the behavior of these models near the ordering transition, and, in particular, do not detect the critical point. A recent work [E. Eisenberg and A. Baram, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 5755 (2007)] has shown that the critical exponents σ and σ' , characterizing the singularity of the density as a function of the activity, can be exactly calculated if the decay of the R matrix elements to their asymptotic constant follows a 1/n2 law. Here we employ renormalization group (RG) arguments to extend this result and analyze cases for which the asymptotic approach of the R matrix elements toward their limiting value is of a more general form. The relevant asymptotic correction terms (in RG sense) are identified, and we then present a corrected exact formula for the critical exponents. We identify the limits of usage of the formula and demonstrate one physical model, which is beyond its range of validity. The formula is validated numerically and then applied to analyze a number of concrete physical models.

  19. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution from which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.

  20. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    DOE PAGES

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution frommore » which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.« less

  1. An Analysis of AERONET Aerosol Absorption Properties and Classifications Representative of Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Smirnov, Alexander; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (tau) and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0) ) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption [i.e., omega (sub 0) and absorption Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub abs))] and size [i.e., extinction Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub ext)) and fine mode fraction of tau] relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to: (1) determine the average omega (sub 0) and alpha(sub abs) at each site (expanding upon previous work); (2) perform a sensitivity study on alpha(sub abs) by varying the spectral omega (sub 0); and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral omega (sub 0) averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < delta omega (sub 0) <= 0.02 decrease) than in previous work and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of alpha(sub abs) show significant overlap among aerosol type categories and at least 10% of the alpha(sub abs) retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral omega (sub 0) by +/- 0.03 induces significant alpha(sub abs) changes from the unperturbed value by at least approx. +/- 0.6 for Dust, approx. +/-0.2 for Mixed, and approx. +/-0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The omega (sub 0)440nm and alpha(sub ext) 440-870nm relationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  2. Finite-time braiding exponents.

    PubMed

    Budišić, Marko; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-01

    Topological entropy of a dynamical system is an upper bound for the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents; in practice, it is strongly indicative of the presence of mixing in a subset of the domain. Topological entropy can be computed by partition methods, by estimating the maximal growth rate of material lines or other material elements, or by counting the unstable periodic orbits of the flow. All these methods require detailed knowledge of the velocity field that is not always available, for example, when ocean flows are measured using a small number of floating sensors. We propose an alternative calculation, applicable to two-dimensional flows, that uses only a sparse set of flow trajectories as its input. To represent the sparse set of trajectories, we use braids, algebraic objects that record how trajectories exchange positions with respect to a projection axis. Material curves advected by the flow are represented as simplified loop coordinates. The exponential rate at which a braid stretches loops over a finite time interval is the Finite-Time Braiding Exponent (FTBE). We study FTBEs through numerical simulations of the Aref Blinking Vortex flow, as a representative of a general class of flows having a single invariant component with positive topological entropy. The FTBEs approach the value of the topological entropy from below as the length and number of trajectories is increased; we conjecture that this result holds for a general class of ergodic, mixing systems. Furthermore, FTBEs are computed robustly with respect to the numerical time step, details of braid representation, and choice of initial conditions. We find that, in the class of systems we describe, trajectories can be re-used to form different braids, which greatly reduces the amount of data needed to assess the complexity of the flow.

  3. Universality of modulation length exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Saurish; Seidel, Alexander; Nussinov, Zohar

    2012-02-01

    We study systems (classical or quantum) with general pairwise interactions. Our prime interest is in frustrated spin systems. First, we focus on systems with a crossover temperature T^* across which the correlation function changes from exhibiting commensurate to incommensurate modulations. We report on a new exponent, νL, characterizing the universal nature of this crossover. Near the crossover, the characteristic wave-vector k on the incommensurate side differs from that on the commensurate side, q by |k-q||T-T^*|^νL. We find, in general, that νL=1/2, or in some special cases, other rational numbers. We discuss applications to the axial next nearest neighbor Ising model, Fermi systems (with application to the metal to band insulator transition) and Bose systems. Second, we obtain a universal form of the high temperature correlation function in general systems. From this, we show the existence of a diverging correlation length in the presence of long range interactions. Such a correlation length tends to the screening length in the presence of screening. We also find a way of obtaining the pairwise interaction potentials in the high temperature phase from the correlation functions.

  4. Developing Students' Understanding of Exponents and Logarithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith

    In this paper, we describe instruction designed to teach students about exponents and logarithms and report a pilot study to test the effectiveness of this instruction. Based on the theoretical work of Dubinsky and Sfard, we postulate a set of mental constructions that a student could make to understand the concepts of exponents and logarithms. We…

  5. Response of diamond photoconductors to soft x-ray in the spectral range 125 {angstrom} to 240 {angstrom}

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Wagner, R.S.; Gullikson, E.

    1995-12-01

    Due to the large bandgap of diamond, it is transparent to the visible spectrum, making it an attractive material for soft x-ray detection. Response of diamond photoconductors fabricated using Polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond to soft x-rays has been measured using x-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma source in the spectral range 125 {Angstrom} to 240 {Angstrom}. These photoconductors have interdigitated electrode structure in order to increase the active area as well as detector sensitivity. Contributions to the detector sensitivity by the photoelectrons is discussed.

  6. Direct Measurements of Brown Carbon Absorption in A Wide Range of Biomass Burning Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. M.; Pokhrel, R. P.; Beamesderfer, E.; Lack, D.; Langridge, J.; Wagner, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest global sources of absorbing aerosol. Despite the importance of biomass burning emissions on the Earth's radiative balance, there remains significant uncertainty about the optical properties of emitted particles. Of particular interest is the impact of lensing on black carbon absorption and the impact of brown carbon. This presentation describes results from the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment-4 (FLAME-4), which occurred in October 2012. Multi-channel photoacoustic (PAS) and Cavity Ringdown (CRDS) spectrometers were used to measure absorption, extinction, and absorption enhancement of aerosol particles produced from a wide range of globally relevant biomass fuels. Measurements were made at 405, 532, and 660 nm with duplicate channels at 405 and 660 measuring denuded particles, allowing for direct observation of the enhancement of absorption by black carbon particles caused by clear and brown organic coatings. Fuels were chosen based on their contribution to global wildfire emissions and a wide range of fuels will be discussed including some of the first optical measurements of Indonesian peat. The SSA and absorption angstrom exponent (AAE) of different biomass fuels will be explored and the relative importance of black and brown carbon emitted from different biomass fuels will be assessed, demonstrating that for certain fuels absorption from brown carbon is as important, or even more important than absorption from black carbon.

  7. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  8. Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2005-01-03

    John Cowley and his group at ASU were pioneers in the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Three decades ago they achieved images showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4A resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  9. Triclinic lysozyme at 0.65 angstrom resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Dauter, M.; Alkire, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Dauter, Z.; Biosciences Division; SAIC-Frederick Inc.; National Cancer Inst.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of triclinic hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) has been refined against diffraction data extending to 0.65 {angstrom} resolution measured at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Refinement with anisotropic displacement parameters and with the removal of stereochemical restraints for the well ordered parts of the structure converged with a conventional R factor of 8.39% and an R{sub free} of 9.52%. The use of full-matrix refinement provided an estimate of the variances in the derived parameters. In addition to the 129-residue protein, a total of 170 water molecules, nine nitrate ions, one acetate ion and three ethylene glycol molecules were located in the electron-density map. Eight sections of the main chain and many side chains were modeled with alternate conformations. The occupancies of the water sites were refined and this step is meaningful when assessed by use of the free R factor. A detailed description and comparison of the structure are made with reference to the previously reported triclinic HEWL structures refined at 0.925 {angstrom} (at the low temperature of 120 K) and at 0.95 {angstrom} resolution (at room temperature).

  10. HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

    2005-04-06

    John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 Angstrom resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstrom levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstrom imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become common place for next-generation electron microscopes with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the micro-scope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the ''size'' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope.

  11. Investigation of black and brown carbon multiple-wavelength-dependent light absorption from biomass and fossil fuel combustion source emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Michael R.; Victoria Garcia, Mercedes; Robinson, Michael A.; Van Rooy, Paul; Dietenberger, Mark A.; Bergin, Michael; Schauer, James Jay

    2015-07-01

    Quantification of the black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) components of source emissions is critical to understanding the impact combustion aerosols have on atmospheric light absorption. Multiple-wavelength absorption was measured from fuels including wood, agricultural biomass, coals, plant matter, and petroleum distillates in controlled combustion settings. Filter-based absorption measurements were corrected and compared to photoacoustic absorption results. BC absorption was segregated from the total light extinction to estimate the BrC absorption from individual sources. Results were compared to elemental carbon (EC)/organic carbon (OC) concentrations to determine composition's impact on light absorption. Multiple-wavelength absorption coefficients, Angstrom exponent (6.9 to <1.0), mass absorption cross section (MAC), and Delta C (97 µg m-3 to ~0 µg m-3) were highly variable. Sources such as incense and peat emissions showed ultraviolet wavelength (370 nm) BrC absorption over 175 and 80 times (respectively) the BC absorption but only 21 and 11 times (respectively) at 520 nm wavelength. The bulk EC MACEC, λ (average at 520 nm = 9.0 ± 3.7 m2 g-1; with OC fraction <0.85 = ~7.5 m2 g-1) and the BrC OC mass absorption cross sections (MACBrC,OC,λ) were calculated; at 370 nm ultraviolet wavelengths; the MACBrC,OC,λ ranged from 0.8 m2 g-1 to 2.29 m2 g-1 (lowest peat, highest kerosene), while at 520 nm wavelength MACBrC,OC,λ ranged from 0.07 m2 g-1 to 0.37 m2 g-1 (lowest peat, highest kerosene/incense mixture). These MAC results show that OC content can be an important contributor to light absorption when present in significant quantities (>0.9 OC/TC), source emissions have variable absorption spectra, and nonbiomass combustion sources can be significant contributors to BrC.

  12. Sub-Angstrom transmission electron microscopy at 300keV

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Nelson, E. Christian; Turner, John H.; Thust, Andreas

    2001-02-14

    We have demonstrated sub-Angstrom TEM to a resolution of 0.78 Angstrom with the one-Angstrom microscope (OAM) project at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The OAM combines a modified CM300FEG-UT with computer software able to generate sub-Angstrom images from experimental image series. We achieved sub-Angstrom resolution with the OAM by paying close attention to detail. We placed the TEM in a favorable environment. We reduced its three-fold astigmatism A2 from 2.46mm to 300 Angstrom (corresponding to transfer of 0.68 Angstrom spacings at a pi/4 phase limit). We improved its information limit by minimizing high-voltage and lens current ripple. Energy spread of 0.93eV FWHH gave a focus spread of 20 Angstrom and an information limit of 0.78 Angstrom, allowing successful resolution of the 0.89 Angstrom (400) atom spacings in [110] diamond. As a further test, we reduced the electron gun extraction voltage to 3kV to improve our information limit to 0.75 Angstrom, and then imaged 0 .7 Angstrom (444) atom spacings in [112] silicon as distinct pairs of 'white atoms' near an alpha-null defocus of -3783 Angstrom.

  13. Estimation of Renyi exponents in random cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, Brent M.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    1999-01-01

    We consider statistical estimation of the Re??nyi exponent ??(h), which characterizes the scaling behaviour of a singular measure ?? defined on a subset of Rd. The Re??nyi exponent is defined to be lim?????0 [{log M??(h)}/(-log ??)], assuming that this limit exists, where M??(h) = ??i??h(??i) and, for ??>0, {??i} are the cubes of a ??-coordinate mesh that intersect the support of ??. In particular, we demonstrate asymptotic normality of the least-squares estimator of ??(h) when the measure ?? is generated by a particular class of multiplicative random cascades, a result which allows construction of interval estimates and application of hypothesis tests for this scaling exponent. Simulation results illustrating this asymptotic normality are presented. ?? 1999 ISI/BS.

  14. Prospects for high power Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) development in the 1000{angstrom} {minus} 1{angstrom} wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1994-03-01

    Electron bunch requirements for single-pass saturation of a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating at full transverse coherence in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) mode include: (1) a high peak current, (2) a sufficiently low relative energy spread, and (3) a transverse emittance {var_epsilon}[r-m] satisfying the condition {var_epsilon} {le} {lambda}A/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength of the FEL. In the insertion device that induces the coherent amplification, the prepared electron bunch must be kept on a trajectory sufficiently collinear with the amplified photons without significant dilution of its transverse density. In this paper we discuss a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) based on a high energy accelerator such as, e.g., the 3km S-band structure at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), followed by a long high-precision undulator with superimposed quadrupole (FODO) focusing, to fulfill the given requirements for SASE operation in the 1000{Angstrom}--1{Angstrom} range. The electron source for the linac, an RF gun with a laser-excited photocathode featuring a normalized emittance in the 1--3 mm-mrad range, a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 3 ps, and approximately 10{sup {minus}9} C/bunch, is a primary determinant of the required low transverse and longitudinal emittances. Acceleration of the injected bunch to energies in the 5--25 GeV range is used to reduce the relative longitudinal energy spread in the bunch, as well as to reduce the transverse emittance to values consistent with the cited wavelength regime. Two longitudinal compression stages are employed to increase the peak bunch current to the 2--5 kA levels required for sufficiently rapid saturation. The output radiation is delivered, via a grazing-incidence mirror bank, to optical instrumentation and a multi-user beam line system. Technological requirements for LCLS operation at 40{Angstrom}, 4.5{Angstrom}, and 1.5{Angstrom} are examined.

  15. Light Absorption of Brown Carbon Aerosol in the Pearl River Delta Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    X.F. Huang, J.F. Yuan, L.M. Cao, J. Cui, C.N. Huang, Z.J. Lan and L.Y. He Key Laboratory for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055, ChinaCorresponding author. Tel.: +86 755 26032532; fax: +86 755 26035332. E-mail address: huangxf@pku.edu.cn (X. F. Huang). Abstract: The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol has been recognized in recent decades. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) of ambient aerosol was widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of brown carbon at shorter wavelengths, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to unit. In this study, the AAE method was improved by statistical extrapolation based on ambient measurements in the polluted seasons in typical urban and rural areas in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. A three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the ambient measured AAE and the ratio of organic aerosol to BC aerosol, in order to extract the more realistic AAE by pure BC aerosol, which were found to be 0.86, 0.82 and 1.02 at 405nm and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 at 532nm in the campaigns of urban-winter, urban-fall, and rural-fall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiment results further supported the effectiveness of the obtained AAE for pure BC aerosol. In addition, biomass burning experiments proved higher spectral dependence of more-BrC environment and further verified the reliability of the instruments' response. Then, the average light absorption contribution of BrC aerosol was calculated to be 11.7, 6.3 and 12.1% (with total relative uncertainty of 7.5, 6.9 and 10.0%) at 405nm and 10.0, 4.1 and 5.5% (with total relative uncertainty of 6.5, 8.6 and 15.4%) at 532nm of the three campaigns, respectively. These results indicate that the

  16. Kovalevskaya exponents of systems with exponential interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Emel'yanov, K V; Tsygvintsev, A V

    2000-10-31

    The Kovalevskaya exponents are calculated for a class of systems generalizing Toda chains: systems with exponential interaction. It is shown that the known cases of algebraic integrability have no direct analogues in the case of spaces with pseudo-Euclidean metrics because the full-parameter expansions of the general solution contain complex powers of the independent variable.

  17. Kovalevskaya exponents of systems with exponential interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, K. V.; Tsygvintsev, A. V.

    2000-10-01

    The Kovalevskaya exponents are calculated for a class of systems generalizing Toda chains: systems with exponential interaction. It is shown that the known cases of algebraic integrability have no direct analogues in the case of spaces with pseudo-Euclidean metrics because the full-parameter expansions of the general solution contain complex powers of the independent variable.

  18. Modeling the 6,300- angstrom low-latitude nightglow

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, C.G. ); Abreu, V.J. )

    1987-02-01

    Observations of the 6,300-{angstrom} nightglow form the Visible Airglow Experiment (VAE) instrument on AE-E are presented for spring equinox, solar cycle maximum conditions. The data comprise altitude profiles and integrated column brightness maps from {approximately}1,800 to 0400 LT and within {plus minus}30{degrees} of the dip equator. The data clearly show near-midnight enhancements of the 6,300-{angstrom} emission. Attempts to model the column brightness maps indicated that these enhancements are due to tidal effects: the enhancements were only reproduced in the theoretical calculations which included upward propagating tidal components in the neutral winds. Further, low equatorial intensities were observed by the VCAE which could only be simulated by assuming that the phase of the E {times} B drift by shifted 1 hour LT; i.e., upward drift persists until 2,000 LT instead of 1,900 LT. The VAE observations could be reasonably simulated with the phase shift in the E {times} B drift and with the dip and geographic equators offset. The major discrepancy is in the magnitude of the nightglow maxima: the calculated intensities are a maximum of 2 times too large. Possible sources are uncertainties in the neutral densities, chemistry, and rate coefficients and in the neutral winds.

  19. The 2.3-Angstrom Structure of Porcine Circovirus 2

    SciTech Connect

    Khayat, Reza; Brunn, Nicholas; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Hardham, John M.; Ankenbauer, Robert G.; Schneemann, Anette; Johnson, John E.

    2012-10-25

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is a T = 1 nonenveloped icosahedral virus that has had severe impact on the swine industry. Here we report the crystal structure of an N-terminally truncated PCV2 virus-like particle at 2.3-{angstrom} resolution, and the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) image reconstruction of a full-length PCV2 virus-like particle at 9.6-{angstrom} resolution. This is the first atomic structure of a circovirus. The crystal structure revealed that the capsid protein fold is a canonical viral jelly roll. The loops connecting the strands of the jelly roll define the limited features of the surface. Sulfate ions interacting with the surface and electrostatic potential calculations strongly suggest a heparan sulfate binding site that allows PCV2 to gain entry into the cell. The crystal structure also allowed previously determined epitopes of the capsid to be visualized. The cryo-EM image reconstruction showed that the location of the N terminus, absent in the crystal structure, is inside the capsid. As the N terminus was previously shown to be antigenic, it may externalize through viral 'breathing'.

  20. Sub-angstrom microscopy through incoherent imaging and image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Jesson, D. E.; Chisholm, M. F.; Ferridge, A. G.; Seddon, M. J.

    1992-03-01

    Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a high-angle annular detector breaks the coherence of the imaging process, and provides an incoherent image of a crystal projection. Even in the presence of strong dynamical diffraction, the image can be accurately described as a convolution between an object function, sharply peaked at the projected atomic sites, and the probe intensity profile. Such an image can be inverted intuitively without the need for model structures, and therefore provides the important capability to reveal unanticipated interfacial arrangements. It represents a direct image of the crystal projection, revealing the location of the atomic columns and their relative high-angle scattering power. Since no phase is associated with a peak in the object function or the contrast transfer function, extension to higher resolution is also straightforward. Image restoration techniques such as maximum entropy, in conjunction with the 1.3 (Angstrom) probe anticipated for a 300 kV STEM, appear to provide a simple and robust route to the achievement of sub-(Angstrom) resolution electron microscopy.

  1. Light absorption, optical and microphysical properties of trajectory-clustered aerosols at two AERONET sites in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawole, O. G.; Cai, X.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol remote sensing techniques and back-trajectory modeling can be combined to identify aerosol types. We have clustered 7 years of AERONET aerosol signals using trajectory analysis to identify dominant aerosol sources at two AERONET sites in West Africa: Ilorin (4.34 oE, 8.32 oN) and Djougou (1.60 oE, 9.76 oN). Of particular interest are air masses that have passed through the gas flaring region in the Niger Delta area, of Nigeria, en-route the AERONET sites. 7-day back trajectories were calculated using the UK UGAMP trajectory model driven by ECMWF wind analyses data. Dominant sources identified, using literature classifications, are desert dust (DD), Biomass burning (BB) and Urban-Industrial (UI). Below, we use a combination of synoptic trajectories and aerosol optical properties to distinguish a fourth source: that due to gas flaring. Gas flaring, (GF) the disposal of gas through stack in an open-air flame, is believed to be a prominent source of black carbon (BC) and greenhouse gases. For these different aerosol source signatures, single scattering albedo (SSA), refractive index , extinction Angstrom exponent (EEA) and absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) were used to classify the light absorption characteristics of the aerosols for λ = 440, 675, 870 and1020 nm. A total of 1625 daily averages of aerosol data were collected for the two sites. Of which 245 make up the GF cluster for both sites. For GF cluster, the range of fine-mode fraction is 0.4 - 0.7. Average values SSA(λ), for the total and GF clusters are 0.90(440), 0.93(675), 0.95(870) and 0.96(1020), and 0.93(440), 0.92(675), 0.9(870) and 0.9(1020), respectively. Values of for the GF clusters for both sites are 0.62 - 1.11, compared to 1.28 - 1.66 for the remainder of the clusters, which strongly indicates the dominance of carbonaceous particles (BC), typical of a highly industrial area. An average value of 1.58 for the real part of the refractive index at low SSA for aerosol in the GF cluster is also

  2. 5-D Choptuik critical exponent and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, J.; Kunstatter, G.

    2007-05-01

    Recently, a holographic argument was used to relate the saturation exponent, γBFKL, of 4-dimensional Yang-Mills theory in the Regge limit to the Choptuik critical scaling exponent, γ5d, in 5-dimensional black hole formation via scalar field collapse [L. Álvarez-Gaumé, C. Gómez, and M. A. Vázquez-Mozo, arXiv:hep-th/0611312.]. Remarkably, the numerical value of the former agreed quite well with previous calculations of the latter. We present new results of an improved calculation of γ5d with substantially decreased numerical error. Our current result is γ5d=0.4131±0.0001, which is close to, but not in strict agreement with, the value of γBFKL=0.409552 quoted in [L. Álvarez-Gaumé, C. Gómez, and M. A. Vázquez-Mozo, arXiv:hep-th/0611312.].

  3. Static and Dynamic Exponents of Disordered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rintoul, Mark Daniel

    The primary focus of this work is to obtain precise values of critical exponents associated with randomly disordered media. First, using efficient new techniques, the backbone of critical percolation clusters in 2 and 3 dimensions is extracted, and the fractal dimension, d_ {f}, is carefully measured. The larger sized samples in this work yield a slightly different value than previous works and this is explained on the basis of finite size effects. Next we study the behavior of diffusing particles on the backbones of three dimensional percolation clusters. The walk dimension, d_{w}, and the spectral dimension, d_{s}, are extracted using new numerical techniques which allow for a precise determination of their values. First, a transfer matrix which reflects the transitions probabilities between sites on the percolation cluster is created. The eigenvalue and eigenvector spectrum of the transition matrix are then mathematically related to the exponents in question. Finally the eigenvalues and eigenvectors themselves are extracted using a special mathematical technique developed by Arnoldi and Saad, which is based on the Lanczos method. This technique allows us to study very large matrices which correspond to large percolation clusters. The final part of this work consists of the study of polymer chains on disordered media. Percolation clusters are again used to represent the disordered media, and self -avoiding walks (SAW's) are used to represent the chains. The mean-square end-to-end distance exponent, nu , and the free energy fluctuation exponent, chi, are determined for a number of different conditions using exact enumeration methods. These conditions include all cluster vs. infinite cluster averages, chain averaging vs. kinetic averaging, and weak dilution vs. critical dilution. The value of nu is shown to be clearly different from its full lattice value, and inconsistencies with previous Monte Carlo results are explained.

  4. Protein Folding Stages and Universal Exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kerson

    We propose three stages in protein folding, based on physical arguements involving the interplay between the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding, and computer simulations using the CSAW (conditioned self-avoiding walk) model. These stages are characterized by universal exponents ν = 3/5, 3/7, 2/5 in the power law R ~ Nν, where R is the radius of gyration and N is the number of residues. They correspond to the experimentally observed stages: unfolded, preglobule, molten globule.

  5. Protein Folding Stages and Universal Exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kerson

    2011-11-01

    We propose three stages in protein folding, based on physical arguements involving the interplay between the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding, and computer simulations using the CSAW (conditioned self-avoiding walk) model. These stages are characterized by universal exponents ν = 3/5, 3/7, 2/5 in the power law R ˜ Nν, where R is the radius of gyration and N is the number of residues. They correspond to the experimentally observed stages: unfolded, preglobule, molten globule.

  6. Critical exponents of the explosive percolation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2014-04-01

    In a new type of percolation phase transition, which was observed in a set of nonequilibrium models, each new connection between vertices is chosen from a number of possibilities by an Achlioptas-like algorithm. This causes preferential merging of small components and delays the emergence of the percolation cluster. First simulations led to a conclusion that a percolation cluster in this irreversible process is born discontinuously, by a discontinuous phase transition, which results in the term "explosive percolation transition." We have shown that this transition is actually continuous (second order) though with an anomalously small critical exponent of the percolation cluster. Here we propose an efficient numerical method enabling us to find the critical exponents and other characteristics of this second-order transition for a representative set of explosive percolation models with different number of choices. The method is based on gluing together the numerical solutions of evolution equations for the cluster size distribution and power-law asymptotics. For each of the models, with high precision, we obtain critical exponents and the critical point.

  7. 40-{angstrom} FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H.; Pellegrini, C.

    1991-12-31

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. 40- angstrom FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C. ); Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Pellegrini, C. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The 825-1110 angstroms EUV spectrum of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. A.; Slater, D. C.; Gladstone, G. R.; Wilkenson, E.; Cash, W. C.; Green, J. C.; Hunten, D. M.; Owen, T. C.; Paxton, L.

    1996-01-01

    On 15 August 1994 we launched the EUVS sounding rocket payload to observe the 825-1110 angstrom region of Venus's far ultraviolet airglow spectrum. The EUVS telescope/spectrograph obtained good data at five times higher spectral resolution than was previously available in the far ultraviolet. We present these data and compare our results to those obtained by the Galileo UVS and Venera 11/12 UV spectrophotometers. We identify several new spectral emission features, including both singly ionized nitrogen and molecular nitrogen in Venus's spectrum. We also see evidence for electron-impact-induced emission from CO. Finally, the EUVS data indicate that the "Ar" emissions detected in Venus's far ultraviolet spectrum by Venera 11/12 spectrophotometers are in fact not due to argon, thus eliminating the discrepancy between in situ and remote sensing measurements.

  10. The 825-1110 angstroms EUV spectrum of Venus.

    PubMed

    Stern, S A; Slater, D C; Gladstone, G R; Wilkenson, E; Cash, W C; Green, J C; Hunten, D M; Owen, T C; Paxton, L

    1996-07-01

    On 15 August 1994 we launched the EUVS sounding rocket payload to observe the 825-1110 angstrom region of Venus's far ultraviolet airglow spectrum. The EUVS telescope/spectrograph obtained good data at five times higher spectral resolution than was previously available in the far ultraviolet. We present these data and compare our results to those obtained by the Galileo UVS and Venera 11/12 UV spectrophotometers. We identify several new spectral emission features, including both singly ionized nitrogen and molecular nitrogen in Venus's spectrum. We also see evidence for electron-impact-induced emission from CO. Finally, the EUVS data indicate that the "Ar" emissions detected in Venus's far ultraviolet spectrum by Venera 11/12 spectrophotometers are in fact not due to argon, thus eliminating the discrepancy between in situ and remote sensing measurements.

  11. Diverging Fluctuations of the Lyapunov Exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazó, Diego; López, Juan M.; Politi, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We show that in generic one-dimensional Hamiltonian lattices the diffusion coefficient of the maximum Lyapunov exponent diverges in the thermodynamic limit. We trace this back to the long-range correlations associated with the evolution of the hydrodynamic modes. In the case of normal heat transport, the divergence is even stronger, leading to the breakdown of the usual single-function Family-Vicsek scaling ansatz. A similar scenario is expected to arise in the evolution of rough interfaces in the presence of suitably correlated background noise.

  12. Convective lyapunov exponents and propagation of correlations

    PubMed

    Giacomelli; Hegger; Politi; Vassalli

    2000-10-23

    We conjecture that in one-dimensional spatially extended systems the propagation velocity of correlations coincides with a zero of the convective Lyapunov spectrum. This conjecture is successfully tested in three different contexts: (i) a Hamiltonian system (a Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain of oscillators); (ii) a general model for spatiotemporal chaos (the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation); (iii) experimental data taken from a CO2 laser with delayed feedback. In the last case, the convective Lyapunov exponent is determined directly from the experimental data.

  13. Scale-free networks with exponent one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timár, G.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2016-08-01

    A majority of studied models for scale-free networks have degree distributions with exponents greater than two. Real networks, however, can demonstrate essentially more heavy-tailed degree distributions. We explore two models of scale-free equilibrium networks that have the degree distribution exponent γ =1 , P (q ) ˜q-γ . Such degree distributions can be identified in empirical data only if the mean degree of a network is sufficiently high. Our models exploit a rewiring mechanism. They are local in the sense that no knowledge of the network structure, apart from the immediate neighborhood of the vertices, is required. These models generate uncorrelated networks in the infinite size limit, where they are solved explicitly. We investigate finite size effects by the use of simulations. We find that both models exhibit disassortative degree-degree correlations for finite network sizes. In addition, we observe a markedly degree-dependent clustering in the finite networks. We indicate a real-world network with a similar degree distribution.

  14. Scale-free networks with exponent one.

    PubMed

    Timár, G; Dorogovtsev, S N; Mendes, J F F

    2016-08-01

    A majority of studied models for scale-free networks have degree distributions with exponents greater than two. Real networks, however, can demonstrate essentially more heavy-tailed degree distributions. We explore two models of scale-free equilibrium networks that have the degree distribution exponent γ=1, P(q)∼q^{-γ}. Such degree distributions can be identified in empirical data only if the mean degree of a network is sufficiently high. Our models exploit a rewiring mechanism. They are local in the sense that no knowledge of the network structure, apart from the immediate neighborhood of the vertices, is required. These models generate uncorrelated networks in the infinite size limit, where they are solved explicitly. We investigate finite size effects by the use of simulations. We find that both models exhibit disassortative degree-degree correlations for finite network sizes. In addition, we observe a markedly degree-dependent clustering in the finite networks. We indicate a real-world network with a similar degree distribution. PMID:27627312

  15. High harmonics from solids probe Angstrom scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yong Sing; Reis, David; Ghimire, Shambhu

    2016-05-01

    The basic microscopic mechanism for the high harmonics generation (HHG) in isolated atoms and molecules has been understood in the 90's. Since then the gas harmonics have been utilized widely in ultrafast x-ray science, from attosecond pulse generation to imaging molecular orbitals of the target molecule. In contrast, the solid-state harmonic generation mechanism is currently being investigated following the recent experimental discovery in zinc oxide crystal. In particular, because of the fundamental differences, attributed to the high density and periodicity of the crystal, it was not clear if the solid-state harmonics could be used to reveal bonding structures in crystals. Here we report our experimental results on generation of XUV harmonics in single crystal MgO subjected to the field strengths on the order of 1V/Å without damage. High harmonics in MgO show strong crystal orientation dependence as well as a strong laser ellipticity dependence. By exploiting these unique characteristics, we demonstrate that XUV harmonics from bulk crystals can probe Angstrom scale electronic structure of the crystal.

  16. HRTEM at half-Angstrom resolution: From OAM to TEAM

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2003-02-17

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at sub-Angstrom resolution is important for nanotechnology. Identifying atom positions requires appropriate resolution, the ability to separate distinct objects in images. With Cs corrected, the information limit of the TEM controls resolution. The OAM has demonstrated that a resolution of 0.78A is possible. The TEAM (transmission electron achromatic microscope) will be a TEM using hardware correction of Cs with a monochromator to improve its information limit beyond that of the OAM by improvement of the electron-beam energy spread. It is shown that A 300keV HRTEM TEAM does not require a Cc corrector to reach 0.5A as long as beam energy spread and objective-lens current ripple are lowered sufficiently. A lower-voltage TEAM will require stricter limits on objective-lens current ripple to reach the targeted 0.5A resolution. No improvement in HT ripple or noise is required to improve the information limit per se since the monochromator determines the energy spread in the beam. However, improved HT ripple and noise will improve the beam current statistics (number of electrons passing through the monochromator) by placing more of the electrons closer to the center of the energy-spread distribution

  17. Spectral Light Absorption and Scattering by Aerosol Particles in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Holanda, B. A.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Cirino, G. G.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Martin, S. T.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/5, a detailed characterization of spectral light absorption and light scattering was performed at four research sites located in the central Amazon forest at different distances upwind and downwind of Manaus. The sites ATTO (T0a) and Embrapa (T0e) are located upwind of Manaus where it is possible to observe very pristine atmospheric conditions in wet season. The site Tiwa (T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 km downwind of Manaus and, finally, the Manacapuru (T3) site is located at about 60 km downwind of Manaus. The spectral dependence of light absorption and light scattering were measured using Aethalometers (7-wavelengths) and Nephelometers (3-wavelengths), respectively. By calculating the Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), it was possible to get information about the source of the aerosol whereas the Scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) gives information about its size distribution. Sunphotometers from the AERONET network were set up at T3 and T0e sites to measure column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). For all the stations, much higher absorption and scattering coefficients were observed during the dry season in comparison to the wet season, as a result of the larger concentration of BC and OC present in the biomass burning events. Additionally, we also observed Manaus plume pollution that alters the BC signal. There is also an increase of the AAE during the dry season due to the larger amount of aerosols from biomass burning compared with urban pollution. High values of AAE are also observed during the wet season, attributed to the presence of long-range transport of aerosols from Africa. The SAE for all the sites are lower during the wet season, with the dominance of large biological particles, and increases during the dry season as a consequence of fine particles emitted from both biomass and fossil fuel burning. The AOD at T0e and T3 (Jan-Jun/2014) showed very similar values ranging from 0.05 to

  18. Preparation of triple junction a-Si:H nip based solar cells at deposition rates of 10{angstrom}/s using a very high frequency technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.J.; Deng, X.; Liu, T.; Izu, M.

    1999-07-01

    In an effort to find an alternative deposition method to the standard low deposition rate 13.56 MHz PECVD technique, the feasibility of using a 70 MHz rf plasma frequency to prepare a-Si:H based i-layer materials at high rates for nip based triple-junction solar cells has been tested. As a prelude to multi-junction cell fabrication, the deposition conditions used to make single-junction a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H cells using this Very High Frequency (VHF) method have been varied to optimize the material quality and the cell efficiencies. It was found that the efficiencies and the light stability for both a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H single-junction cells remain relatively constant as the i-layer deposition rate is varied from 1 to 10 {angstrom}/s. Also these stable efficiencies are similar to those for cells made at low deposition rates (1 {angstrom}/s) using the standard 13.56 MHz PECVD technique and the same deposition equipment. Using the knowledge obtained in the fabrication of the single-junction devices, a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H triple-junction solar cells have been fabricated with all of the i-layers prepared using the VHF technique and deposition rates near 10 {angstrom}/s. Thin doped layers for these devices were prepared using the standard 13.56 MHz rf frequency and deposition rates near 1 {angstrom}/s. Pre-light soaked efficiencies of greater than 10% have been obtained for these cells prepared at the high rates. In addition, after 600 hrs. of light soaking under white light conditions, the cell efficiencies degraded by only 10--13%, values similar to the degree of degradation for high efficiency triple-junction cells made by the standard 13.56 MHz method using i-layer deposition rates near 1 {angstrom}/s. Thus, use of this VHF method in the production of large area a-Si:H based multi-junction solar modules will allow for higher i-layer deposition rates, higher module throughput and reduced module cost.

  19. Absorption Properties of Mediterranean Aerosols Obtained from Multi-year Ground-based and Satellite Remote Sensing Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallet, M.; Dubovik, O.; Nabat, P.; Dulac, F.; Kahn, R.; Sciare, J.; Paronis, D.; Leon, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol absorption properties are of high importance to assess aerosol impact on regional climate. This study presents an analysis of aerosol absorption products obtained over the Mediterranean Basin or land stations in the region from multi-year ground-based AERONET and satellite observations with a focus on the Absorbing Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and their spectral dependence. The AAOD and Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) data set is composed of daily averaged AERONET level 2 data from a total of 22 Mediterranean stations having long time series, mainly under the influence of urban-industrial aerosols and/or soil dust. This data set covers the 17 yr period 1996-2012 with most data being from 2003-2011 (approximately 89 percent of level-2 AAOD data). Since AERONET level-2 absorption products require a high aerosol load (AOD at 440 nm greater than 0.4), which is most often related to the presence of desert dust, we also consider level-1.5 SSA data, despite their higher uncertainty, and filter out data with an Angstrom exponent less than 1.0 in order to study absorption by carbonaceous aerosols. The SSA data set includes both AERONET level-2 and satellite level-3 products. Satellite-derived SSA data considered are monthly level 3 products mapped at the regional scale for the spring and summer seasons that exhibit the largest aerosol loads. The satellite SSA dataset includes the following products: (i) Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) over 2000-2011, (ii) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) near-UV algorithm over 2004-2010, and (iii) MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep-Blue algorithm over 2005-2011, derived only over land in dusty conditions. Sun-photometer observations show that values of AAOD at 440 nm vary between 0.024 +/- 0.01 (resp. 0.040 +/- 0.01) and 0.050 +/- 0.01 (0.055 +/- 0.01) for urban (dusty) sites. Analysis shows that the Mediterranean urban-industrial aerosols appear "moderately

  20. An Optimal Exposure Strategy for Cryoprotected Virus Crystals With Lattice Constants Greater Than 1000 Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, L.; Johnson, J.E.

    2009-05-18

    Studies of icosahedral virus capsids provide insights into the function of supramolecular machines. Virus capsid crystals have exceptionally large unit cells; as a result, they diffract weakly compared with protein crystals. HK97 is a dsDNA lambda-like bacteriophage whose 13 MDa capsid expands from 550 {angstrom} to 650 {angstrom} with large subunit conformational changes during virus maturation. The HK97 penultimate maturation intermediate was crystallized in a tetragonal unit cell that has lattice constants of 1010 {angstrom} x 1010 {angstrom} x 730 {angstrom}. The crystals could be cryoprotected, but diffracted to a modest resolution of 5 {angstrom} at a bending-magnet beamline. When these crystals were optimally exposed with two orders-of-magnitude more photons from a new insertion-device beamline, data extending to better than 3.8 {angstrom} resolution were obtained. Here, the strategies to collect and process such data are described. These strategies can be adapted for other crystals with large unit cells and for microcrystals.

  1. Neutrons measure phase behavior in pores at Angstrom size

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have measured the phase behavior of green house gases in pores at the Angstrom-level, using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Yuri Melnichenko, an instrument scientist on the General Purpose Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GP SANS) Diffractometer at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor, his postdoctoral associate Lilin He and collaborators Nidia Gallego and Cristian Contescu from the Material Sciences Division (ORNL) were engaged in the work. They were studying nanoporous carbons to assess their attractiveness as storage media for hydrogen, with a view to potential use for on-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. Nanoporous carbons can also serve as electrode material for supercapacitors and batteries. The researchers successfully determined that the most efficiently condensing pore size in a carbon nanoporous material for hydrogen storage is less than one nanometer. In a paper recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the collaborators used small angle neutron scattering to study how hydrogen condenses in small pores at ambient temperature. They discovered that the surface-molecule interactions create internal pressures in pores that may exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to 50. 'This is an exciting result,' Melnichenko said, 'as you achieve extreme densification in pores 'for free', i.e. without spending any energy. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored to maximize hydrogen storage capacities.' Another important factor that defines the adsorption capacity of sub-nanometer pores is their shape. In order to get accurate structural information and maximize sorption capacity, it is important that pores are small and of approximately uniform size. In collaboration with Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi who supplied the samples, Melnichenko and his collaborators used the GP SANS

  2. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  3. Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption Properties from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jethva, H.; Ahn, Chang-Woo

    2012-01-01

    The Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE) is a parameter commonly used to characterize the wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD). It is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses multi-spectral measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measurement can be explained, using an approximations of Beer's Law (BL), as the upwelling reflectance at the cloud top attenuated by the absorption effects of the overlying aerosol layer. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud-top in an aerosol-free atmospheric column is mainly a function of cloud optical depth (COD). In the proposed method of AAE derivation, the first step is determining COD which is retrieved using a previously developed color-ratio based approach. In the second step, corrections for molecular scattering effects are applied to both the observed ad the calculated cloud reflectance terms, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by an inversion of the BL approximation. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results making use of OMI multi-spectral measurements in the UV-Vis. will be presented.

  4. Fractal aircraft trajectories and nonclassical turbulent exponents.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, S; Schertzer, D; Tuck, A F

    2004-09-01

    The dimension (D) of aircraft trajectories is fundamental in interpreting airborne data. To estimate D, we studied data from 18 trajectories of stratospheric aircraft flights 1600 km long taken during a "Mach cruise" (near constant Mach number) autopilot flight mode of the ER-2 research aircraft. Mach cruise implies correlated temperature and wind fluctuations so that DeltaZ approximately Deltax (H(z) ) where Z is the (fluctuating) vertical and x the horizontal coordinate of the aircraft. Over the range approximately 3-300 km , we found H(z) approximately 0.58+/-0.02 close to the theoretical 5/9=0.56 and implying D=1+ H(z) =14/9 , i.e., the trajectories are fractal. For distances <3 km aircraft inertia smooths the trajectories, for distances >300 km , D=1 again because of a rise of 1 m/km due to fuel consumption. In the fractal regime, the horizontal velocity and temperature exponents are close to the nonclassical value 1/2 (rather than 1/3 ). We discuss implications for aircraft measurements as well as for the structure of the atmosphere.

  5. The Hurst exponent in energy futures prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serletis, Apostolos; Rosenberg, Aryeh Adam

    2007-07-01

    This paper extends the work in Elder and Serletis [Long memory in energy futures prices, Rev. Financial Econ., forthcoming, 2007] and Serletis et al. [Detrended fluctuation analysis of the US stock market, Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos, forthcoming, 2007] by re-examining the empirical evidence for random walk type behavior in energy futures prices. In doing so, it uses daily data on energy futures traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange, over the period from July 2, 1990 to November 1, 2006, and a statistical physics approach-the ‘detrending moving average’ technique-providing a reliable framework for testing the information efficiency in financial markets as shown by Alessio et al. [Second-order moving average and scaling of stochastic time series, Eur. Phys. J. B 27 (2002) 197-200] and Carbone et al. [Time-dependent hurst exponent in financial time series. Physica A 344 (2004) 267-271; Analysis of clusters formed by the moving average of a long-range correlated time series. Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 026105]. The results show that energy futures returns display long memory and that the particular form of long memory is anti-persistence.

  6. Hurst exponents for short time series.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jingchao; Yang, Huijie

    2011-12-01

    A concept called balanced estimator of diffusion entropy is proposed to detect quantitatively scalings in short time series. The effectiveness is verified by detecting successfully scaling properties for a large number of artificial fractional Brownian motions. Calculations show that this method can give reliable scalings for short time series with length ~10(2). It is also used to detect scalings in the Shanghai Stock Index, five stock catalogs, and a total of 134 stocks collected from the Shanghai Stock Exchange Market. The scaling exponent for each catalog is significantly larger compared with that for the stocks included in the catalog. Selecting a window with size 650, the evolution of scaling for the Shanghai Stock Index is obtained by the window's sliding along the series. Global patterns in the evolutionary process are captured from the smoothed evolutionary curve. By comparing the patterns with the important event list in the history of the considered stock market, the evolution of scaling is matched with the stock index series. We can find that the important events fit very well with global transitions of the scaling behaviors.

  7. Lyapunov Exponents for Surface Group Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroin, Bertrand; Dujardin, Romain

    2015-12-01

    Let be a holomorphic family of representations of a surface group into , where S is a topological (possibly punctured) surface with negative Euler characteristic. Given a structure of Riemann surface of finite type on S we construct a bifurcation current on the parameter space Λ, that is a (1,1) positive closed current attached to the bifurcations of the family. It is defined as the dd c of the Lyapunov exponent of the representation with respect to the Brownian motion on the Riemann surface S, endowed with its Poincaré metric. We show that this bifurcation current describes the asymptotic distribution of various codimension 1 phenomena in Λ. For instance, the random hypersurfaces of Λ defined by the condition that a random closed geodesic on S is mapped under ρ λ to a parabolic element or the identity are asymptotically equidistributed with respect to the bifurcation current. The proofs are based on our previous work (Deroin and Dujardin, Invent Math 190:57-118, 2012), and on a careful control of a discretization procedure of the Brownian motion.

  8. Ultraviolet Observations of Uranus and Neptune Below 3000 Angstrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, J.; Wagener, R.; Owen, T.; Combes, M.; Encrenaz, T.

    1984-01-01

    From 2000 to 3000 A, both Uranus and Neptune have albedos that are about two times higher than Jupiter or Saturn's, implying that the outer giants have stratospheres that are relatively free of aerosol absorption. Uncertainties in the absolute calibration procedure allow discrepancies of order 15% between conservative models and the observations. A small amount of aerosol absorption is therefore possible. Below 2000 A the derived albedo is highly dependent on the solar spectrum source used in the data reduction. The most recent result for Uranus, first reported here, is consistent with a secular change in C2H2 mixing ratio from approximately three times ten to the minus eight in 1980 to less than or equal to ten to the minus ninth in 1983. These values are approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than the mixing ratios of this gas on Saturn, and comparable to the amount on Jupiter.

  9. Generation of Tunable Coherent Radiation Below 1000 Angstroms Applied to High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Xenon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Keith Donald

    This thesis involves the study of the problem of generating broadly tunable, narrowband, coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation and using it to perform high -resolution spectroscopic studies of xenon. The coherent XUV radiation was efficiently generated by two-photon resonant four-wave mixing in krypton. The input laser beams to the nonlinear generation process were produced using a Nd:YAG driver laser at 1.064 (mu)m. This was doubled to 5320 (ANGSTROM) in order to pump a pulsed fluorescein dye laser at 5440 (ANGSTROM). The 5440 (ANGSTROM) radiation was doubled to 2720 (ANGSTROM) and this radiation was summed with the original 1.064 (mu)m beam to yield light at 2166.6 (ANGSTROM) (the 4p('6 1)S(,0) (--->) 5p 5/2 (,2) two-photon resonance in krypton). A second tunable dye laser produced laser pulses with wavelengths between 6100 (ANGSTROM) - 7250 (ANGSTROM). This laser system enabled us to produce XUV radiation at various regions between 921 (ANGSTROM) and 943 (ANGSTROM). Power efficiencies as high as 10(' -5) were achieved and the linewidth of the coherent XUV was (TURN)0.3 cm('-1). Since a two-photon resonance was used to enhance the XUV output efficiency, electric-dipole two-photon selection rules were derived for the most general case of two input photons with unequal frequencies. In order to perform high-resolution spectroscopic studies with this system, we utilized a Fizeau interferometer based wavemeter to measure the input wavelengths to the four-wave mixing process to an accuracy of 2 parts in 10('6). The Fizeau wavemeter and the coherent XUV radiation system enabled us to study the autoionization region of xenon between its two ionization limits at 1022.1 (ANGSTROM) and 922.76 (ANGSTROM) with extremely high resolution. Altogether a total of 12 autoionizing resonances were scanned in frequency. The results include a combination of photoabsorption and ionization measurements. The agreement between the coherent XUV results and the best available

  10. Calculating Lyapunov Exponents: Applying Products and Evaluating Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Two common examples of one-dimensional maps (the tent map and the logistic map) are generalized to cases where they have more than one control parameter. In the case of the tent map, this still allows the global Lyapunov exponent to be found analytically, and permits various properties of the resulting global Lyapunov exponents to be investigated…

  11. A finite-time exponent for random Ehrenfest gas

    SciTech Connect

    Moudgalya, Sanjay; Chandra, Sarthak; Jain, Sudhir R.

    2015-10-15

    We consider the motion of a system of free particles moving on a plane with regular hard polygonal scatterers arranged in a random manner. Calling this the Ehrenfest gas, which is known to have a zero Lyapunov exponent, we propose a finite-time exponent to characterize its dynamics. As the number of sides of the polygon goes to infinity, when polygon tends to a circle, we recover the usual Lyapunov exponent for the Lorentz gas from the exponent proposed here. To obtain this result, we generalize the reflection law of a beam of rays incident on a polygonal scatterer in a way that the formula for the circular scatterer is recovered in the limit of infinite number of vertices. Thus, chaos emerges from pseudochaos in an appropriate limit. - Highlights: • We present a finite-time exponent for particles moving in a plane containing polygonal scatterers. • The exponent found recovers the Lyapunov exponent in the limit of the polygon becoming a circle. • Our findings unify pseudointegrable and chaotic scattering via a generalized collision rule. • Stretch and fold:shuffle and cut :: Lyapunov:finite-time exponent :: fluid:granular mixing.

  12. Field calibration of multi-scattering correction factor for aethalometer aerosol absorption coefficient during CAPMEX Campaign, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.; Yoon, S. C.; Park, R.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Filter-based instrument, such as aethalometer, is being widely used to measure equivalent black carbon(EBC) mass concentration and aerosol absorption coefficient(AAC). However, many other previous studies have poited that AAC and its aerosol absorption angstrom exponent(AAE) are strongly affected by the multi-scattering correction factor(C) when we retrieve AAC from aethalometer EBC mass concentration measurement(Weingartner et al., 2003; Arnott et al., 2005; Schmid et al., 2006; Coen et al., 2010). We determined the C value using the method given in Weingartner et al. (2003) by comparing 7-wavelngth aethalometer (AE-31, Magee sci.) to 3-wavelength Photo-Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3, DMT) at Gosan climate observatory, Korea(GCO) during Cheju ABC plume-asian monsoon experiment(CAPMEX) campaign(August and September, 2008). In this study, C was estimated to be 4.04 ± 1.68 at 532 nm and AAC retrieved with this value was decreased as approximately 100% as than that retrieved with soot case value from Weingartner et al (2003). We compared the AAC determined from aethalomter measurements to that from collocated Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measurements from January 2012 to December 2013 at GCO and found good agreement in both AAC and AAE. This result suggests the determination of site-specific C is crucially needed when we calculate AAC from aethalometer measurements.

  13. The Hurst Exponent of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, Eda; MacLachlan, Glen A.; Dhuga, Kalvir S.; Landay, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Using a wavelet decomposition technique, we have extracted the Hurst exponent for a sample of long and short Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) aboard the Swift satellite. The Hurst exponent is a scaling parameter that can be used to gauge the long-range behavior in a time series. The mean Hurst exponent for the short GRB sample is significantly smaller than that for the long GRB sample, suggesting that this index may serve as an unbiased criterion for distinguishing short and long GRBs. In addition, a K-S test for the two samples suggest that the null hypothesis can be rejected.

  14. Statistics of Lyapunov exponent spectrum in randomly coupled Kuramoto oscillators.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumen K; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of spatiotemporal dynamics of coupled oscillatory systems can be done by computing the Lyapunov exponents. We study the spatiotemporal dynamics of randomly coupled network of Kuramoto oscillators and find that the spectral statistics obtained from the Lyapunov exponent spectrum show interesting sensitivity to the coupling matrix. Our results indicate that in the weak coupling limit the gap distribution of the Lyapunov spectrum is Poissonian, while in the limit of strong coupling the gap distribution shows level repulsion. Moreover, the oscillators settle to an inhomogeneous oscillatory state, and it is also possible to infer the random network properties from the Lyapunov exponent spectrum.

  15. Experimental and numerical study of the intermittency exponent mu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander

    1994-01-01

    After publication of the Kolmogorov refined similarity hypotheses, the small-scale intermittency of the energy dissipation field became a central problem in fully developed turbulence (FDT). This phenomenon has been studied in many different ways, e.g. by searching for corrections to scaling exponents in the inertial range velocity structure functions. A direct measure of this intermittency is, however, available by studying the local rate of energy dissipation, and it may be quantitatively characterized by the intermittency exponent mu. As far as we know, nobody has posed an obvious question: Is the intermittency exponent mu a unique constant, i.e., are the values mu(sub kappa), mu(sub epsilon), mu(sub r), mu(sub b), and mu(sub e) the same at high Reynolds numbers, or do they create a set of different (and perhaps independent) exponents? This paper addresses the above question using the high Reynolds number experiments.

  16. Revisiting the Generalization of Entropy for Non-positive Distribution: Application for Exponent Spectra Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaidzidis, Yannis L.; Gopta, Oxana; Kalaidzidis, Inna V.

    2009-12-01

    Originally the maximum entropy method for exponent deconvolution was restricted to the positive exponent's amplitudes by the entropy S(f, m) definition. It limits application of the method, since many experimental kinetics show both the rise and the decay, which manifest themselves as positive and negative amplitudes in the exponent spectrum. The generalization of entropy formulation for non-negative distribution (S. F. Gull and J. Skilling) overcomes this limitation. The drawback of the approach was, that m lost the meaning of the prior distribution, since that maximum of generalized S(f, m) is independent on m and achieved at f ≡ 0. It is significant problem when there are apriori information about possible spectrum behaviour. In the present work some assumptions of the entropy generalization was relaxed and alternative entropy formulation, with non-uniform prior was used for analysis of simulated and experimental data. The new approach was applied to spectra analysis of the absorption kinetics of the bacteriorhodopsin (bR—light driven proton pump from archea Halobacterium salinarium) photocycle. It was shown that the process of the intermediate M formation is non-exponential in the wild type bR. The non-exponential process could be interpreted as result of the protein conformational changes during proton transfer from the Shiff-base of bR.

  17. Relations between static and dynamic exponents in nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badii, R.; Broggi, G.

    1990-01-01

    The rules governing the evolution of nonlinear dynamical systems are systematically detected by constructing a hierarchical tree of symbol sequences. Relations between local partial dimensions and Lyapunov exponents are obtained from equations for the probabilities of symbol sequences on the logic tree. These relations are nonlinear and involve an open hierarchy of equations, which shows that the dimension spectrum f(α) cannot be obtained in closed form from the sole knowledge of the local Lyapunov exponents.

  18. Sample and population exponents of generalized Taylor's law.

    PubMed

    Giometto, Andrea; Formentin, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea; Cohen, Joel E; Maritan, Amos

    2015-06-23

    Taylor's law (TL) states that the variance V of a nonnegative random variable is a power function of its mean M; i.e., V = aM(b). TL has been verified extensively in ecology, where it applies to population abundance, physics, and other natural sciences. Its ubiquitous empirical verification suggests a context-independent mechanism. Sample exponents b measured empirically via the scaling of sample mean and variance typically cluster around the value b = 2. Some theoretical models of population growth, however, predict a broad range of values for the population exponent b pertaining to the mean and variance of population density, depending on details of the growth process. Is the widely reported sample exponent b ≃ 2 the result of ecological processes or could it be a statistical artifact? Here, we apply large deviations theory and finite-sample arguments to show exactly that in a broad class of growth models the sample exponent is b ≃ 2 regardless of the underlying population exponent. We derive a generalized TL in terms of sample and population exponents b(jk) for the scaling of the kth vs. the jth cumulants. The sample exponent b(jk) depends predictably on the number of samples and for finite samples we obtain b(jk) ≃ k = j asymptotically in time, a prediction that we verify in two empirical examples. Thus, the sample exponent b ≃ 2 may indeed be a statistical artifact and not dependent on population dynamics under conditions that we specify exactly. Given the broad class of models investigated, our results apply to many fields where TL is used although inadequately understood.

  19. The impact of biogenic carbon emissions on aerosol absorption inMexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, N; Gaffney, J; Tackett, M J; Sturchio, N; Hearty, L; Martinez, N; Hardy, K D; Machany-Rivera, A; Guilderson, T P; MacMillan, A; Steelman, K

    2009-02-24

    In order to determine the wavelength dependence of atmospheric aerosol absorption in the Mexico City area, the absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs) were calculated from aerosol absorption measurements at seven wavelengths obtained with a seven-channel aethalometer during two field campaigns, the Mexico City Metropolitan Area study in April 2003 (MCMA 2003) and the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The AAEs varied from 0.76 to 1.56 in 2003 and from 0.54 to 1.52 in 2006. The AAE values determined in the afternoon were consistently higher than the corresponding morning values, suggesting the photochemical formation of absorbing secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the afternoon. The AAE values were compared to stable and radiocarbon isotopic measurements of aerosol samples collected at the same time to determine the sources of the aerosol carbon. The fraction of modern carbon (fM) in the aerosol samples, as determined from {sup 14}C analysis, showed that 70% of the carbonaceous aerosols in Mexico City were from modern sources, indicating a significant impact from biomass burning during both field campaigns. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of the aerosol samples illustrate the significant impact of Yucatan forest fires (C-3 plants) in 2003 and local grass fires (C-4 plants) at site T1 in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and calculated aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

  20. Hurst exponent for fractal characterization of LANDSAT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdiviezo-N., Juan C.; Castro, Raul; Cristóbal, Gabriel; Carbone, Anna

    2014-10-01

    In this research the Hurst exponent H is used for quantifying the fractal features of LANDSAT images. The Hurst exponent is estimated by means of the Detrending Moving Average (DMA), an algorithm based on a generalized high-dimensional variance around a moving average low-pass filter. Hence, for a two-dimensional signal, the algorithm first generates an average response for different subarrays by varying the size of the moving low-pass filter. For each subarray the corresponding variance value is calculated by the difference between the original and the averaged signals. The value of the variance obtained at each subarray is then plotted on log-log axes, with the slope of the regression line corresponding to the Hurst exponent. The application of the algorithm to a set of LANDSAT imagery has allowed us to estimate the Hurst exponent of specific areas on Earth surface at subsequent time instances. According to the presented results, the value of the Hurst exponent is directly related to the changes in land use, showing a decreasing value when the area under study has been modified by natural processes or human intervention. Interestingly, natural areas presenting a gradual growth of man made activities or an increasing degree of pollution have a considerable reduction in their corresponding Hurst exponent.

  1. Photoelectron holographic studies of As/Si(100) with sub-angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Paul J. E.; Miller, T.; Chiang, T.-C.

    2001-09-15

    The atomic structure of As-terminated Si(100) has been studied using the technique of derivative photoelectron holography. The resulting holographic images clearly resolve a 0.5-{angstrom} shift from the (1 x 1) geometry for each As atom as a result of dimerization. Detecting this shift requires a sub-angstrom resolution that has been difficult to achieve using photoelectron holography. The improvement in resolution can be attributed to a highly anisotropic electron-scattering factor resulting in an emission beacon that helps define the atomic images.

  2. Brown carbon in atmospheric outflow from the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Mass absorption efficiency and temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Bikkina; Sarin, M. M.

    2014-06-01

    The simultaneous measurements of brown carbon (BrC) and elemental carbon (EC) are made in ambient aerosols (PM2.5), collected from a site in north-east India during November'09-March'10, representing the atmospheric outflow from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) to the Bay of Bengal (BoB). The absorption coefficient of BrC (babs), assessed from water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) at 365 nm, varies from 2 to 21 M m-1 and exhibits significant linear relationship (P < 0.05) with WSOC concentration (3-29 μg m-3). The angstrom exponent (α: 8.3 ± 2.6, where babs ≈ λ-α.) is consistent with that reported for humic-like substances (HULIS) from biomass burning emissions (BBE). The impact of BBE is also discernible from mass ratios of nss-K+/EC (0.2-1.4) and OC/EC (3.4-11.5). The mass fraction of WSOC (10-23%) in PM2.5 and mass absorption efficiency of BrC (σabs-BrC: 0.5-1.2 m2 g-1) bring to focus the significance of brown carbon in atmospheric radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Plain.

  3. Sub-Angstrom Atomic-Resolution Imaging of Heavy Atoms to Light Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2003-05-23

    Three decades ago John Cowley and his group at ASU achieved high-resolution electron microscope images showing the crystal unit cell contents at better than 4Angstrom resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with Cs-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  4. Atomic emission line wavelength calculations below 2000 angstroms for Lithium II through Cobalt XXVI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1971-01-01

    Atomic-emission-line wavelengths are presented which were calculated from wavelengths of previously identified transition sequences using second-degree polynomials fitted to known wave numbers by the least squares method. Wavelengths less than 2000 angstroms are included for ions from Li II to Co XXVI. The computer program written in FORTRAN 4 is also included.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Ultrafast Hydration Structure and Dynamics at Sub-Angstrom Lengthscales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coridan, Robert Henry

    2009-01-01

    This thesis outlines how meV-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering and causality-enforcing mathematics can be used to measure the dynamical density-density linear response function for liquid water with Angstrom spatial resolution and 50fs temporal resolution. The results are compared to high-resolution spectroscopic and scattering experiments and…

  6. Exact Lyapunov exponents of the generalized Boole transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeno, Ken; Okubo, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    The generalized Boole transformations have rich behavior ranging from the mixing phase with the Cauchy invariant measure to the dissipative phase through the infinite ergodic phase with the Lebesgue measure. In this letter, by giving the proof of mixing property for 0<α <1, we show an analytic formula of the Lyapunov exponents λ that are explicitly parameterized in terms of the parameter α of the generalized Boole transformations for the whole region α >0 and bridge these three phases continuously. We find different scale behaviors of the Lyapunov exponent near α =1 using an analytic formula with the parameter α . In particular, for 0<α <1, we then prove the existence of the extremely sensitive dependence of Lyapunov exponents, where the absolute values of the derivative of the Lyapunov exponents with respect to the parameter α diverge to infinity in the limits of α to 0 and α to 1. This result shows the computational complexity of the numerical simulations of the Lyapunov exponents near α ˜eq 0, 1.

  7. Reduction of Aerosol Absorption in Beijing Since 2007 from MODIS and AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Chin, M.; Streets, D. G.; Lu, Z.; Kahn, R.; Slutsker, I.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.; Tanre, D.; Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.-B.; Sinyuk, A.; Wang, Y.; Korkin, S.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the time series of MODIS-based and AERONET aerosol records over Beijing reveals two distinct periods, before and after 2007. The MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua satellites were processed with the new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. A comparison of MAIAC and AERONET AOT shows that whereas MAIAC consistently underestimated peak AOT values by 10-20% in the prior period, the bias mostly disappears after mid- 2007. Independent analysis of the AERONET dataset reveals little or no change in the effective radii of the fine and coarse fractions and of the Angstrom exponent. At the same time, it shows an increasing trend in the single scattering albedo, by 0.02 in 9 years. As MAIAC was using the same aerosol model for the entire 2000-2010 period, the decrease in AOT bias after 2007 can be explained only by a corresponding decrease of aerosol absorption caused by a reduction in local black carbon emissions. The observed changes correlate in time with the Chinese government's broad measures to improve air quality in Beijing during preparations for the Summer Olympics of 2008.

  8. Reduction of Aerosol Absorption in Beijing Since 2007 from MODIS and AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Chin, M.; Streets, D. G.; Lu, Z.; Kahn, R.; Slutsker, I.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.; Tanre, D.; Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.-B.; Sinyuk, A.; Wang, Y.; Korkin, S.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the time series of MODIS-based and AERONET aerosol records over Beijing reveals two distinct periods, before and after 2007. The MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua satellites were processed with the new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. A comparison of MAIAC and AERONET AOT shows that whereas MAIAC consistently underestimated peak AOT values by 10-20% in the prior period, the bias mostly disappears after mid-2007. Independent analysis of the AERONET dataset reveals little or no change in the effective radii of the fine and coarse fractions and of the Angstrom exponent. At the same time, it shows an increasing trend in the single scattering albedo, by approx.0.02 in 9 years. As MAIAC was using the same aerosol model for the entire 2000-2010 period, the decrease in AOT bias after 2007 can be explained only by a corresponding decrease of aerosol absorption caused by a reduction in local black carbon emissions. The observed changes correlate in time with the Chinese government's broad measures to improve air quality in Beijing during preparations for the Summer Olympics of 2008.

  9. Invariant functions for the Lyapunov exponents of random matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Protasov, Vladimir Yu

    2011-01-31

    A new approach to the study of Lyapunov exponents of random matrices is presented. We prove that any family of nonnegative (dxd)-matrices has a continuous concave invariant functional on R{sup d}{sub +}. Under some standard assumptions on the matrices, this functional is strictly positive, and the coefficient corresponding to it is equal to the largest Lyapunov exponent. As a corollary we obtain asymptotics for the expected value of the logarithm of norms of matrix products and of their spectral radii. Another corollary gives new upper and lower bounds for the Lyapunov exponent, and an algorithm for computing it for families of nonnegative matrices. We consider possible extensions of our results to general nonnegative matrix families and present several applications and examples. Bibliography: 29 titles.

  10. Anisotropies in magnetic field evolution and local Lyapunov exponents

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.Z.; Boozer, A.H.

    2000-01-13

    The natural occurrence of small scale structures and the extreme anisotropy in the evolution of a magnetic field embedded in a conducting flow is interpreted in terms of the properties of the local Lyapunov exponents along the various local characteristic (un)stable directions for the Lagrangian flow trajectories. The local Lyapunov exponents and the characteristic directions are functions of Lagrangian coordinates and time, which are completely determined once the flow field is specified. The characteristic directions that are associated with the spatial anisotropy of the problem, are prescribed in both Lagrangian and Eulerian frames. Coordinate transformation techniques are employed to relate the spatial distributions of the magnetic field, the induced current density, and the Lorentz force, which are usually followed in Eulerian frame, to those of the local Lyapunov exponents, which are naturally defined in Lagrangian coordinates.

  11. Testing universality in critical exponents: The case of rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, Anna; Puig, Pedro; Corral, Álvaro

    2016-04-01

    One of the key clues to consider rainfall as a self-organized critical phenomenon is the existence of power-law distributions for rain-event sizes. We have studied the problem of universality in the exponents of these distributions by means of a suitable statistic whose distribution is inferred by several variations of a permutational test. In contrast to more common approaches, our procedure does not suffer from the difficulties of multiple testing and does not require the precise knowledge of the uncertainties associated to the power-law exponents. When applied to seven sites monitored by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program the tests lead to the rejection of the universality hypothesis, despite the fact that the exponents are rather close to each other. We discuss the reasons of the rejection.

  12. Vertex Exponents of Two-Colored Extremal Ministrong Digraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwilo, Saib

    2011-06-01

    The exponent of a vertex v in a two-colored digraph D(2) is the smallest positive integer h+k such that for each vertex x in D(2) there is a walk of length h+k consisting of h red arcs and k blue arcs. Let D(2) be a primitive two-colored extremalministrong digraphon n vertices. If D(2) has one blue arc, the exponent of the vertices of D(2) lieson the interval [n2-5n+8,n2-3n+1]. If D(2) has two blue arcs, the exponent of the vertices in D(2) lies on the interval [n2-4n+4,n2-n].

  13. Lyapunov exponents of stochastic systems—from micro to macro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffargue, Tanguy; Tailleur, Julien; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Lyapunov exponents of dynamical systems are defined from the rates of divergence of nearby trajectories. For stochastic systems, one typically assumes that these trajectories are generated under the ‘same noise realization’. The purpose of this work is to critically examine what this expression means. For Brownian particles, we consider two natural interpretations of the noise: intrinsic to the particles or stemming from the fluctuations of the environment. We show how they lead to different distributions of the largest Lyapunov exponent as well as different fluctuating hydrodynamics for the collective density field. We discuss, both at microscopic and macroscopic levels, the limits in which these noise prescriptions become equivalent. We close this paper by providing an estimate of the largest Lyapunov exponent and of its fluctuations for interacting particles evolving with Dean-Kawasaki dynamics.

  14. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George

    2013-12-01

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  15. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    SciTech Connect

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George

    2013-12-15

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  16. Quantum computation of multifractal exponents through the quantum wavelet transform

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Mata, Ignacio; Giraud, Olivier; Georgeot, Bertrand

    2009-05-15

    We study the use of the quantum wavelet transform to extract efficiently information about the multifractal exponents for multifractal quantum states. We show that, combined with quantum simulation algorithms, it enables to build quantum algorithms for multifractal exponents with a polynomial gain compared to classical simulations. Numerical results indicate that a rough estimate of fractality could be obtained exponentially fast. Our findings are relevant, e.g., for quantum simulations of multifractal quantum maps and of the Anderson model at the metal-insulator transition.

  17. Scaling Exponent for the Healthy and Diseased Heartbeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, Toru; Tanaka, Katsunori

    `Alternans' is an arrhythmia exhibiting alternating amplitude or alternating interval from heartbeat to heartbeat, which was first described in 1872 by Traube. Recently alternans was finally recognized as the harbinger of a cardiac disease because physicians noticed that an ischemic heart exhibits alternans. To quantify irregularity of the heartbeat including alternans, we used the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). We revealed that in both, animal models and humans, the alternans rhythm lowers the scaling exponent. This correspondence describes that the scaling exponent calculated by the DFA reflects a risk for the `failing' heart.

  18. Correction-to-scaling exponent for two-dimensional percolation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziff, Robert M.

    2011-02-15

    We show that the correction-to-scaling exponents in two-dimensional percolation are bounded by {Omega}{<=}72/91, {omega}=D{Omega}{<=}3/2, and {Delta}{sub 1}={nu}{omega}{<=}2, based upon Cardy's result for the crossing probability on an annulus. The upper bounds are consistent with many previous measurements of site percolation on square and triangular lattices and new measurements for bond percolation, suggesting that they are exact. They also agree with exponents for hulls proposed recently by Aharony and Asikainen, based upon results of den Nijs. A corrections scaling form evidently applicable to site percolation is also found.

  19. Identification of key aerosol populations through their size and composition resolved spectral scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabile, F.; Barnaba, F.; Angelini, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    Characterizing chemical and physical aerosol properties is important to understand their sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms in the atmosphere. This study proposes a scheme to classify aerosol populations based on their spectral optical properties (absorption and scattering). The scheme is obtained thanks to the outstanding set of information on particle size and composition these properties contain. The spectral variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo (dSSA), and the extinction, scattering and absorption Angstrom exponents (EAE, SAE and AAE, respectively) were observed on the basis of two-year measurements of aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients at blue, green and red wavelengths) performed in the suburbs of Rome (Italy). Optical measurements of various aerosol types were coupled to measurements of particle number size distributions and relevant optical properties simulations (Mie theory). These latter allowed the investigation of the role of the particle size and composition in the bulk aerosol properties observed. The combination of simulations and measurements suggested a general "paradigm" built on dSSA, SAE and AAE to optically classify aerosols. The paradigm proved suitable to identify the presence of key aerosol populations, including soot, biomass burning, organics, dust and marine particles. The work highlights that (i) aerosol populations show distinctive combinations of SAE and dSSA times AAE, these variables being linked by a linear inverse relation varying with varying SSA; (ii) fine particles show EAE > 1.5, whilst EAE < 2 is found for both coarse particles and ultrafine soot-rich aerosols; (iii) fine and coarse particles both show SSA > 0.8, whilst ultrafine urban Aitken mode and soot particles show SSA < 0.8. The proposed paradigm agrees with aerosol observations performed during past major field campaigns, this indicating that relations concerning the paradigm have a general validity.

  20. Stochastic Approximation of Dynamical Exponent at Quantum Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Hidemaro; Yasuda, Shinya; Todo, Synge

    We have developed a unified finite-size scaling method for quantum phase transitions that requires no prior knowledge of the dynamical exponent z. During a quantum Monte Carlo simulation, the temperature is automatically tuned by the Robbins-Monro stochastic approximation method, being proportional to the lowest gap of the finite-size system. The dynamical exponent is estimated in a straightforward way from the system-size dependence of the temperature. As a demonstration of our novel method, the two-dimensional S = 1 / 2 quantum XY model, or equivalently the hard-core boson system, in uniform and staggered magnetic fields is investigated in the combination of the world-line quantum Monte Carlo worm algorithm. In the absence of a uniform magnetic field, we obtain the fully consistent result with the Lorentz invariance at the quantum critical point, z = 1 . Under a finite uniform magnetic field, on the other hand, the dynamical exponent becomes two, and the mean-field universality with effective dimension (2+2) governs the quantum phase transition. We will discuss also the system with random magnetic fields, or the dirty boson system, bearing a non-trivial dynamical exponent.Reference: S. Yasuda, H. Suwa, and S. Todo Phys. Rev. B 92, 104411 (2015); arXiv:1506.04837

  1. Singularity detection for structural health monitoring using holder exponents.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. N.; Farrar, C. R.; Sohn, H.

    2003-01-01

    The majority of structural health monitoring studies reported in the technical literature focus on identifying damage sensitive features that can be extracted from dynamic response data . However, many of these studies assume the structure can be modeled as a linear system before and after damage and use parameters of these models as the damage sensitive features. The study summarized in this paper proposes a damage sensitive feature that takes advantage of the nonlinearities associated with discontinuities introduced into the dynamic response data as a result of certain types of damage. Specifically, the Holder exponent, a measure of the degree to which a signal is differentiable, is the feature that is used to detect the presence of damage and when that damage occurred . A procedure for capturing the time varying nature of the Holder exponent based on wavelet transforms is demonstrated through applications to non-stationary random signals with underlying discontinuities and then to a harmonically excited mechanical system that contains a loose part . Also, a classification procedure is developed to quantify when changes in the Holder exponent are significant . The results presented herein show the Holder exponent to be an effective feature for identifying damage that introduces discontinuities into the measured dynamic response data .

  2. Inverted rank distributions: Macroscopic statistics, universality classes, and critical exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    An inverted rank distribution is an infinite sequence of positive sizes ordered in a monotone increasing fashion. Interlacing together Lorenzian and oligarchic asymptotic analyses, we establish a macroscopic classification of inverted rank distributions into five “socioeconomic” universality classes: communism, socialism, criticality, feudalism, and absolute monarchy. We further establish that: (i) communism and socialism are analogous to a “disordered phase”, feudalism and absolute monarchy are analogous to an “ordered phase”, and criticality is the “phase transition” between order and disorder; (ii) the universality classes are characterized by two critical exponents, one governing the ordered phase, and the other governing the disordered phase; (iii) communism, criticality, and absolute monarchy are characterized by sharp exponent values, and are inherently deterministic; (iv) socialism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by continuous power-law statistics; (v) feudalism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by discrete exponential statistics. The results presented in this paper yield a universal macroscopic socioeconophysical perspective of inverted rank distributions.

  3. River flow mass exponents with fractal channel networks and rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Over, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    An important problem in hydrologic science is understanding how river flow is influenced by rainfall properties and drainage basin characteristics. In this paper we consider one approach, the use of mass exponents, in examining the relation of river flow to rainfall and the channel network, which provides the primary conduit for transport of water to the outlet in a large basin. Mass exponents, which characterize the power-law behavior of moments as a function of scale, are ideally suited for defining scaling behavior of processes that exhibit a high degree of variability or intermittency. The main result in this paper is an expression relating the mass exponent of flow resulting from an instantaneous burst of rainfall to the mass exponents of spatial rainfall and that of the network width function. Spatial rainfall is modeled as a random multiplicative cascade and the channel network as a recursive replacement tree; these fractal models reproduce certain types of self-similar behavior seen in actual rainfall and networks. It is shown that under these modeling assumptions the scaling behavior of flow mirrors that of rainfall if rainfall is highly variable in space, and on the other hand flow mirrors the structure of the network if rainfall is not so highly variable. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fermat's Last Theorem for Factional and Irrational Exponents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Fermat's Last Theorem says that for integers n greater than 2, there are no solutions to x[superscript n] + y[superscript n] = z[superscript n] among positive integers. What about rational exponents? Irrational n? Negative n? See what an undergraduate senior seminar discovered.

  5. Secondary School Students' Levels of Understanding in Computing Exponents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitta-Pantazi, Demetra; Christou, Constantinos; Zachariades, Theodossios

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and analyze students' levels of understanding of exponents within the context of procedural and conceptual learning via the conceptual change and prototypes' theory. The study was conducted with 202 secondary school students with the use of a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. The results suggest…

  6. Bayesian Estimation of the Logistic Positive Exponent IRT Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolfarine, Heleno; Bazan, Jorge Luis

    2010-01-01

    A Bayesian inference approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is developed for the logistic positive exponent (LPE) model proposed by Samejima and for a new skewed Logistic Item Response Theory (IRT) model, named Reflection LPE model. Both models lead to asymmetric item characteristic curves (ICC) and can be appropriate because a symmetric…

  7. Anomalous charge storage exponents of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Pradeep; Dwivedi, Raaz; Kumar, Goutam; Dept of Electrical Engineering, IIT Bombay Team

    2013-03-01

    Organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices are increasingly being researched for low cost solar energy conversion. The efficiency of such solar cells is dictated by various recombination processes involved. While it is well known that the ideality factor and hence the charge storage exponents of conventional PN junction diodes are influenced by the recombination processes, the same aspects are not so well understood for organic solar cells. While dark currents of such devices typically show an ideality factor of 1 (after correcting for shunt resistance effects, if any), surprisingly, a wide range of charge storage exponents for such devices are reported in literature alluding to apparent concentration dependence for bi-molecular recombination rates. In this manuscript we critically analyze the role of bi-molecular recombination processes on charge storage exponents of organic solar cells. Our results indicate that the charge storage exponents are fundamentally influenced by the electrostatics and recombination processes and can be correlated to the dark current ideality factors. We believe that our findings are novel, and advance the state-of the art understanding on various recombination processes that dictate the performance limits of organic solar cells. The authors would like to thank the Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics (CEN) and the National Centre for Photovoltaic Research and Education (NCPRE), IIT Bombay for computational and financial support

  8. Development and applications of optical interferometric micrometrology in the angstrom and subangstrom range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, James L.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1988-01-01

    The recent development of the scanning electron tunneling microscope and the atomic force microscope requires absolute standards for measurements in the angstrom and subangstrom range. Optical interferometry with lasers and multiple mode laser resonances can provide absolute measurements as the laser wavelengths are very accurately known. A key feature of such measurements is the use of piezoelectric crystals as translators of the highest accuracy for very small disturbances. However, the dimensional changes of these crystals resulting from electrical potential changes depend on many variables, among them the method of mounting, so that accurate calibrations are necessary. Starting from advances in optical metrology made by physicists trying to find gravity waves, advances which led to measurements down to 10 to the -5 A, the author designed and built a much simpler system for the angstrom range. The major limiting factors were mechanical vibrations, air currents, thermal changes and laser instabilities.

  9. Emission Line Spectra in the Soft X-ray Region 20 - 75 Angstroms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EDIT-II, emission lines of argon and sulfur in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet region were studied. Observations of Ar IX through Ar XVI and S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 Angstrom are presented to illustrate our work.

  10. An Economical High Resolution Spectrograph Optimized for Radial Velocity Measurements at 5000 Angstroms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, D.; Arion, D. N.

    2004-12-01

    A high resolution spectrometer was built and calibrated on an optical bench. The target resolution of the instrument was designed to allow accurate measurement of the Doppler shifts of the 5007 Angstrom O III line in planetary nebulae due to their expansion. The optical components of the instrument include two Meade ETX 90 Maksutov-Cassegrain telescopes, a Richardson Grating Laboratory reflection diffraction grating, nickel-plated glass slides used as slit apertures, and an SBIG ST-8E CCD imaging camera. The mounts for each of the optical components were machined out of aluminum bar and plate stock. The instrument was calibrated using He and Hg gas discharge tubes generating spectra of known wavelengths. A total of four sets of lines were imaged and analyzed to calibrate the instrument. The line shapes in the images were manually fit with functions approximating the pressure and Doppler broadening of the lines, as expected for the behavior of the lines emitted by the spectrum tubes. These fits were used to identify the line peak positions, which were then compared to standard line wavelengths to determine the instrument calibration. The He I line at 5015.678 Angstrom line was carefully analyzed to determine the system wavelength uncertainty, which determines the smallest resolvable difference in wavelength that the instrument can determine. The resulting operating resolution at 5007 Angstroms was found to be 206474, making the instrument capable of resolving Doppler shifts at 5007 Angstroms corresponding to +/- 1.4 kilometers per second. The program was thus successful in developing an instrument suitable for a variety of relatively low velocity Doppler measurements, especially those associated with planetary nebula expansions. Future work entails developing a mounting system to rigidly hold the instrument on a suitable telescope, while maintaining the necessary precision to retain the instrumental resolution. This work was supported in part by Carthage College

  11. Numerical investigation on the Ångström exponent of black carbon aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Liu, Chao; Yin, Yan; Kumar, K. Raghavendra

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) plays an important role on the global and regional climate, whereas there are significant uncertainties on its optical properties. Among various optical properties, the Ångström exponent (AE) indicates the spectral variation of the particle-optic interaction and is widely used to understand the aerosol properties. We consider the influence of BC geometry on its optical properties and assess the sensitivity of the AE to particle geometry and size distribution. The fractal aggregates with different fractal dimensions are used to represent realistic BC particles, and popular equivalent volume spherical and spheroidal models are also considered for comparison. Even if the fractal aggregates become highly compact and spherical, their optical properties are still significantly different from those of equivalent volume spheres or spheroids. Meanwhile, the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation can hardly provide accurate results for all optical quantities of aggregates with different dimensions. The extinction Ångström exponent (EAE) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) are sensitive to both particle geometry and size distribution. With BC becoming more compact (from fractal aggregate to spheroid and to sphere), the AE becomes more sensitive to particle size distribution. The EAE and AAE of aggregates with different size distributions vary between 1.10-1.63 and 0.87-1.50, respectively, whereas those of the spheres or spheroids have wider ranges. Furthermore, the AE at smaller wavelengths (between 0.35 µm and 0.55 µm) is more sensitive to geometry and size distribution than that given by optical properties at larger wavelengths (between 0.55 µm and 0.88 µm).

  12. A STRONG EMISSION LINE NEAR 24.8 Angstrom-Sign IN THE X-RAY BINARY SYSTEM MAXI J0556-332: GRAVITATIONAL REDSHIFT OR UNUSUAL DONOR?

    SciTech Connect

    Maitra, Dipankar; Miller, Jon M.; Reynolds, Mark T.; Raymond, John C.

    2011-12-10

    We report the discovery of a strong emission line near 24.8 Angstrom-Sign (0.5 keV) in the newly discovered X-ray binary system MAXI J0556-332 with the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The X-ray light curve morphology during these observations is complex and shows occasional dipping behavior. Here we present time- and rate-selected spectra from the RGS and show that this strong emission line is unambiguously present in all the XMM observations. The measured line center is consistent with the Ly{alpha} transition of N VII in the rest frame. While the spectra contain imprints of absorption lines and edges, there appear to be no other significantly prominent narrow line due to the source itself, thus making the identification of the 24.8 Angstrom-Sign line uncertain. We discuss possible physical scenarios, including a gravitationally redshifted O VIII Ly{alpha} line originating at the surface of a neutron star or an unusual donor with an extremely high N/O abundance (>57) relative to solar that may have produced this comparatively strong emission line.

  13. THE Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign DOUBLET AS AN AGE INDICATOR IN LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlieder, Joshua E.; Simon, Michal; Lepine, Sebastien; Rice, Emily; Fielding, Drummond; Tomasino, Rachael E-mail: schlieder@mpia-hd.mpg.de E-mail: erice@amnh.org E-mail: tomas1r@cmich.edu

    2012-05-15

    We investigate the use of the gravity sensitive neutral sodium (Na I) doublet at 8183 Angstrom-Sign and 8195 Angstrom-Sign (Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign doublet) as an age indicator for M dwarfs. We measured the Na doublet equivalent width (EW) in giants, old dwarfs, young dwarfs, and candidate members of the {beta} Pic moving group using medium-resolution spectra. Our Na 8200 A doublet EW analysis shows that the feature is useful as an approximate age indicator in M-type dwarfs with (V - K{sub s}) {>=} 5.0, reliably distinguishing stars older and younger than 100 Myr. A simple derivation of the dependence of the Na EW on temperature and gravity supports the observational results. An analysis of the effects of metallicity shows that this youth indicator is best used on samples with similar metallicity. The age estimation technique presented here becomes useful in a mass regime where traditional youth indicators are increasingly less reliable, is applicable to other alkali lines, and will help identify new low-mass members in other young clusters and associations.

  14. Critical exponents of a self-propelled particles system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambui, Dorilson S.; de Arruda, Alberto S.; Godoy, Maurício

    2016-02-01

    The Vicsek model of self-propelled particles is an important tool in the study of the collective motion of live organisms. The model consists of particles that move with a constant velocity and adopt, in a region called the zone of repulsion, the average motion direction of their neighbors disturbed by an external noise. A second-order phase transition from a disordered state, with motion in random directions, to an ordered motion state was observed. In this work, we have estimated, using finite-size scaling arguments, the critical exponents β, γ and ν of the original Vicsek model as a function of parameters important to the model, such as the orientation radius size, density, and velocity modulus. Our results show that the critical exponents depend greatly on these parameters.

  15. Estimation of Hurst Exponent for the Financial Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, J.; Manchanda, P.

    2009-07-01

    Till recently statistical methods and Fourier analysis were employed to study fluctuations in stock markets in general and Indian stock market in particular. However current trend is to apply the concepts of wavelet methodology and Hurst exponent, see for example the work of Manchanda, J. Kumar and Siddiqi, Journal of the Frankline Institute 144 (2007), 613-636 and paper of Cajueiro and B. M. Tabak. Cajueiro and Tabak, Physica A, 2003, have checked the efficiency of emerging markets by computing Hurst component over a time window of 4 years of data. Our goal in the present paper is to understand the dynamics of the Indian stock market. We look for the persistency in the stock market through Hurst exponent and fractal dimension of time series data of BSE 100 and NIFTY 50.

  16. Superdiffusive Motion With Fractional Power-Law Exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajitz, M.; Metzner, C.; Raupach, C.; Fabry, B.

    2008-07-01

    The spontaneous random motion of microbeads bound to the actomyosin network of living cells is a non-Brownian process [1]. The mean-squared-displacement (MSD) of the bead shows a sub-to-superdiffusive transition, which has recently been traced back to the interplay of noise, dominating at short, and persistent traction forces dominating at long time scales [2]. The MSD increases at long times according to a powerlaw with fractional exponent between 1 and 2, which so far remained unexplained. We propose three different models of cytoskeletal dynamics producing such a fractional exponent. The traction forces are explained by the spontaneous formation and gradual self-assembly of stress fibers, attached to the microbead. While mature fibers constitute an elastic network for the bead, pre-mature fibers produce an increasing level of prestress with long-time powerlaw correlations. Our models focus on different biochemical mechanisms that give rise to such correlations.

  17. Nonlinear analysis of anesthesia dynamics by Fractal Scaling Exponent.

    PubMed

    Gifani, P; Rabiee, H R; Hashemi, M R; Taslimi, P; Ghanbari, M

    2006-01-01

    The depth of anesthesia estimation has been one of the most research interests in the field of EEG signal processing in recent decades. In this paper we present a new methodology to quantify the depth of anesthesia by quantifying the dynamic fluctuation of the EEG signal. Extraction of useful information about the nonlinear dynamic of the brain during anesthesia has been proposed with the optimum Fractal Scaling Exponent. This optimum solution is based on the best box sizes in the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) algorithm which have meaningful changes at different depth of anesthesia. The Fractal Scaling Exponent (FSE) Index as a new criterion has been proposed. The experimental results confirm that our new Index can clearly discriminate between aware to moderate and deep anesthesia levels. Moreover, it significantly reduces the computational complexity and results in a faster reaction to the transients in patients' consciousness levels in relations with the other algorithms.

  18. Practical applications of Lyapunov characteristic exponents in celestial mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broucke, R. A.

    1991-08-01

    Several practical implementations of the calculation of Liapunov characteristic exponents with the use of Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization are described. The value of these algorithms in their applications to mappings and systems of ODEs is compared. The Anosov Map and the Lorentz system for these comparisons are described. The detailed flow charts as well as some of the FORTRAN Subroutines that were developed are given. Information about the rate of convergence of the algorithms is also provided.

  19. A local Echo State Property through the largest Lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Wainrib, Gilles; Galtier, Mathieu N

    2016-04-01

    Echo State Networks are efficient time-series predictors, which highly depend on the value of the spectral radius of the reservoir connectivity matrix. Based on recent results on the mean field theory of driven random recurrent neural networks, enabling the computation of the largest Lyapunov exponent of an ESN, we develop a cheap algorithm to establish a local and operational version of the Echo State Property.

  20. Critical exponents for solvent extraction resolved using SAXS.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ross J

    2014-01-01

    The solvent extraction of an ionizable solute (H3PO4) from water into a water-in-oil microemulsion, and subsequent organic phase splitting (known as third phase formation), has been recast as a critical phenomenon by linking system structure to solute concentration via a critical exponent. The transuranic extraction (TRUEX) system was investigated by extracting increasing concentrations of H3PO4 into a microemulsion--consisting of two extractant amphiphiles (CMPO and TBP) and water in n-dodecane--and taking small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements from the resulting solutions. The H3PO4 concentration at which phase splitting occurred was defined as the critical concentration (XC), and this was related to the precritical concentrations (X) by the reduced parameter ε = (X(C) - X)/X(C). The scattering intensity at the zero angle I(0), relating to the interaction between reverse micellar aggregates, conformed to the relation I(0) = I0ε(-γ), with critical exponent γ = 2.20. To check γ, SAXS measurements were taken from the organic phase in situ with variable temperature through the point at which third phase formation initiates (the critical temperature), giving I(0) = I0t(-γ), where t = (T - T(C))/T(C) and T(C) and T are the critical and precritical temperatures, with critical exponent γ = 2.55. These γ values suggest third phase formation is a universal phenomenon manifest from a critical double point. Thus, solvent extraction is reduced to its fundamental physical roots where the system is not defined by detailed analysis of metrical properties but by linking the fundamental order to thermodynamic parameters via an exponent, working toward a more predictive understanding of third phase formation.

  1. Studies of hot B subdwarfs. Part 2: Energy distributions of three bright sdB/sdOB stars in the 950-5500 angstrom range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesemael, F.; Holberg, J. B.; Veilleux, S.; Lamontagne, R.; Fontaine, G.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the subdwarf B or OB stars HD 205805, UV 1758+36 and Feige 66 are presented. All three objects display the H I Layman series in absorption. These observations are combined with low dispersion IUE spectrophotometry and with Stroemgren photometry to construct virtually complete energy distributions, which extend over the range 950-5500 angstroms. Effective temperatures based on model atmosphere calculations for high gravity, hydrogen rich stars are determined. Our analyses yield T Sub e 28,200 + or - 1300 K for HD 205805, T sub e 31, 800 + or - 1100 K for UV 1758+36, and T sub e 35,700 + or - 1500 K for Feige 66. The importance of far ultraviolet observations below L sub alpha in reducing the uncertainties associated with the interstellar extinction and the degradation of the IUE sensitivity is emphasized.

  2. Light scattering and absorption properties of aerosol particles in the urban environment of Granada, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    Surface measurements of optical and physical aerosol properties were made at an urban site, Granada (Spain) (37.18°N, 3.58°W, 680 m a.s.l), during winter 2005-2006. Measurements included the aerosol scattering, σsca, and backscattering coefficients, σbsca, at three wavelengths (450, 550 and 700 nm) measured at low relative humidity (RH<50%) by an integrating nephelometer, the absorption coefficient at 670 nm, σabs, measured with a multi-angle absorption photometer, and aerosol size distribution in the 0.5-20 μm aerodynamic diameter range registered by an aerodynamic aerosol sizer (APS-3321, TSI). The hourly average of σsca (550 nm) ranged from 2 to 424 M m -1 with an average value of 84±62 M m -1 (±S.D.). The Angstrom exponent presented an average value of 1.8±0.3, suggesting a large fraction of fine particles at the site, an observation confirmed by aerosol size distribution measurements. The hourly average of σabs (670 nm) ranged from 1.7 to 120.5 M m -1 with an average value of 28±20 M m -1. The results indicate that the aerosol absorption coefficient in Granada was relatively large. The largest σsca value was associated with air masses that passed over heavily polluted European areas and local stagnation conditions. High absorbing aerosol level was obtained during dust transport from North Africa probably due to the presence of hematite. Based on the measured scattering and absorption coefficients, a very low average value of the single scattering albedo of 0.66±0.11 at 670 nm was calculated, suggesting that urban aerosols in this region contain a large fraction of absorbing material. A clear diurnal pattern was observed in scattering and absorption coefficients and particle concentrations with two local maxima occurring in early morning and late evening. This behavior can be explained in terms of local conditions that control the particle sources associated with traffic and upward mixing of the aerosol during the daytime development of a

  3. Light absorption of brown carbon aerosol in the PRD region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.-F.; Huang, X.-F.; Cao, L.-M.; Cui, J.; Zhu, Q.; Huang, C.-N.; Lan, Z.-J.; He, L.-Y.

    2016-02-01

    The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol is regarded to influence aerosol's radiative forcing significantly. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) method has been widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of BrC at shorter wavelengths for ambient aerosols, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of "pure" black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to 1.0. In this study, the AAE method was applied to both urban and rural environments in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China, with an improvement of constraining the realistic AAE of "pure" BC through statistical analysis of on-line measurement data. A three-wavelength photo-acoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the measured AAE and the relative abundance of organic aerosol to BC. The regression and extrapolation analysis revealed that more realistic AAE values for "pure" BC aerosol (AAEBC) were 0.86, 0.82, and 1.02 between 405 and 781 nm, and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 between 532 and 781 nm, in the campaigns of urbanwinter, urbanfall, and ruralfall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiments were conducted and the results further confirmed the representativeness of the obtained AAEBC values for the urban environment. Finally, the average light absorption contributions of BrC (± relative uncertainties) at 405 nm were quantified to be 11.7 % (±5 %), 6.3 % (±4 %), and 12.1 % (±7 %) in the campaigns of urbanwinter, urbanfall, and ruralfall, respectively, and those at 532 nm were 10.0 % (±2 %), 4.1 % (±3 %), and 5.5 % (±5 %), respectively. The relatively higher BrC absorption contribution at 405 nm in the ruralfall campaign could be reasonably attributed to the biomass burning events nearby, which was then directly supported by the biomass burning simulation experiments performed in this study. This paper indicates that the BrC contribution to total aerosol light absorption at shorter

  4. Light absorption of brown carbon aerosol in the PRD region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.-F.; Huang, X.-F.; Cao, L.-M.; Cui, J.; Zhu, Q.; Huang, C.-N.; Lan, Z.-J.; He, L.-Y.

    2015-10-01

    The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol is regarded to influence aerosol's radiative forcing significantly. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) method was widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of BrC at shorter wavelengths for ambient aerosol, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of "pure" black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to 1.0. In this study, the previous AAE method was improved by statistical analysis and applied in both urban and rural environments in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. A three-wavelength photo-acoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the measured AAE and the relative abundance of organic aerosol to BC. The regression and extrapolation analysis revealed that the more realistic AAE values for "pure" BC aerosol were 0.86, 0.82, and 1.02 at 405 nm, and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 at 532 nm, in the campaigns of urban_winter, urban_fall, and rural_fall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiments were also conducted, and the results further supported the representativeness of the obtained AAE values for "pure" BC aerosol in the urban environments. Finally, the average aerosol light absorption contribution of BrC was quantified to be 11.7, 6.3, and 12.1 % (with relative uncertainties of 4, 4, and 7 %) at 405 nm, and 10.0, 4.1, and 5.5 % (with relative uncertainties of 2, 2, and 5 %) at 532 nm, in the campaigns of urban_winter, urban_fall, and rural_fall, respectively. The relatively higher BrC absorption contribution at 405 nm in the rural_fall campaign was likely a result of the biomass burning events nearby, which was supported by the biomass burning simulation experiments performed in this study. The results of this paper indicate that the brown carbon contribution to aerosol light absorption at shorter wavelengths is not negligible in the highly urbanized and industrialized PRD region.

  5. Clustering of Casablanca stock market based on hurst exponent estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the problem of Casablanca Stock Exchange (CSE) topology modeling as a complex network during three different market regimes: general trend characterized by ups and downs, increasing trend, and decreasing trend. In particular, a set of seven different Hurst exponent estimates are used to characterize long-range dependence in each industrial sector generating process. They are employed in conjunction with hierarchical clustering approach to examine the co-movements of the Casablanca Stock Exchange industrial sectors. The purpose is to investigate whether cluster structures are similar across variable, increasing and decreasing regimes. It is observed that the general structure of the CSE topology has been considerably changed over 2009 (variable regime), 2010 (increasing regime), and 2011 (decreasing regime) time periods. The most important findings follow. First, in general a high value of Hurst exponent is associated to a variable regime and a small one to a decreasing regime. In addition, Hurst estimates during increasing regime are higher than those of a decreasing regime. Second, correlations between estimated Hurst exponent vectors of industrial sectors increase when Casablanca stock exchange follows an upward regime, whilst they decrease when the overall market follows a downward regime.

  6. Stochastic approximation of dynamical exponent at quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Shinya; Suwa, Hidemaro; Todo, Synge

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a unified finite-size scaling method for quantum phase transitions that requires no prior knowledge of the dynamical exponent z . During a quantum Monte Carlo simulation, the temperature is automatically tuned by the Robbins-Monro stochastic approximation method, being proportional to the lowest gap of the finite-size system. The dynamical exponent is estimated in a straightforward way from the system-size dependence of the temperature. As a demonstration of our novel method, the two-dimensional S =1 /2 quantum X Y model in uniform and staggered magnetic fields is investigated in the combination of the world-line quantum Monte Carlo worm algorithm. In the absence of a uniform magnetic field, we obtain the fully consistent result with the Lorentz invariance at the quantum critical point, z =1 , i.e., the three-dimensional classical X Y universality class. Under a finite uniform magnetic field, on the other hand, the dynamical exponent becomes two, and the mean-field universality with effective dimension (2 +2 ) governs the quantum phase transition.

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in NO(2) distributions over Beijing, China measured by imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanlim; Kim, Young J; Jung, Jinsang; Lee, Chulkyu; Heue, Klaus-Peter; Platt, Ulrich; Hu, Min; Zhu, Tong

    2009-04-01

    During the CAREBEIJING campaign in 2006, imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy (I-DOAS) measurements were made from 08:00 to 16:00 on September 9 and 10 over Beijing, China. Detailed images of the near-surface NO(2) differential slant column density (DSCD) distribution over Beijing were obtained. Images with less than a 30-min temporal resolution showed both horizontal and vertical variations in NO(2) distributions. For DSCD to mixing ratio conversion, path length along the lines of I-DOAS lines of sight was estimated using the light-extinction coefficient and Angstrom exponent data obtained by a transmissometer and a sunphotometer, respectively. Mixing ratios measured by an in-situ NO(2) analyzer were compared with those estimated by the I-DOAS instrument. The obtained temporal and spatial variations in NO(2) distributions measured by I-DOAS for the two days are interpreted with consideration of the locations of the major NO(x) sources and local wind conditions. I-DOAS measurements have been applied in this study for estimating NO(2) distribution over an urban area with multiple and distributed emission sources. Results are obtained for estimated temporal and spatial NO(2) distributions over the urban atmosphere; demonstrating the capability of the I-DOAS technique. We discuss in this paper the use of I-DOAS measurements to estimate the NO(2) distribution over an urban area with multiple distributed emission sources. PMID:19111964

  8. Scaling exponents of forced polymer translocation through a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Morrison, W. H.; Luo, K.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Ying, S.-C.; Milchev, A.; Binder, K.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate several properties of a translocating homopolymer through a thin pore driven by an external field present inside the pore only using Langevin Dynamics (LD) simulations in three dimensions (3D). Motivated by several recent theoretical and numerical studies that are apparently at odds with each other, we estimate the exponents describing the scaling with chain length (Nof the average translocation time ensuremath <τ> , the average velocity of the center of mass ensuremath < vCM> , and the effective radius of gyration ensuremath < {R}_g> during the translocation process defined as ensuremath <τ> ˜ Nα , ensuremath < vCM > ˜ N-δ , and ensuremath {R}g ˜ Nbarν} respectively, and the exponent of the translocation coordinate (s -coordinate) as a function of the translocation time ensuremath < s^2(t)>˜ tβ . We find ensuremath α=1.36 ± 0.01 , ensuremath β=1.60 ± 0.01 for ensuremath < s^2(t)>˜ τβ and ensuremath bar{β=1.44 ± 0.02 for ensuremath <Δ s^2(t)>˜τbarβ} , ensuremath δ=0.81 ± 0.04 , and ensuremath bar{ν≃ν=0.59 ± 0.01 , where ν is the equilibrium Flory exponent in 3D. Therefore, we find that ensuremath <τ>˜ N1.36 is consistent with the estimate of ensuremath <τ>˜< Rg >/< vCM > . However, as observed previously in Monte Carlo (MC) calculations by Kantor and Kardar (Y. Kantor, M. Kardar, Phys. Rev. E 69, 021806 (2004)) we also find the exponent α = 1.36 ± 0.01 < 1 + ν. Further, we find that the parallel and perpendicular components of the gyration radii, where one considers the “cis” and “trans” parts of the chain separately, exhibit distinct out-of-equilibrium effects. We also discuss the dependence of the effective exponents on the pore geometry for the range of N studied here. in here

  9. Structure of Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase from Staphylococcus aureus at 1.54 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett,T.; Wallen, J.; Karplus, P.; Sakai, H.; Tsukihara, T.; Claiborne, A.

    2006-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoASH) replaces glutathione as the major low molecular weight thiol in Staphylococcus aureus; it is maintained in the reduced state by coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR), a homodimeric enzyme similar to NADH peroxidase but containing a novel Cys43-SSCoA redox center. The crystal structure of S. aureus CoADR has been solved using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at a resolution of 1.54 {angstrom}. The resulting electron density maps define the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide conformation, with Cys43-S{gamma} located at the flavin si face, 3.2 {angstrom} from FAD-C4aF, and the CoAS- moiety lying in an extended conformation within a cleft at the dimer interface. A well-ordered chloride ion is positioned adjacent to the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide and receives a hydrogen bond from Tyr361'-OH of the complementary subunit, suggesting a role for Tyr361' as an acid-base catalyst during the reduction of CoAS-disulfide. Tyr419'-OH is located 3.2 {angstrom} from Tyr361'-OH as well and, based on its conservation in known functional CoADRs, also appears to be important for activity. Identification of residues involved in recognition of the CoAS-disulfide substrate and in formation and stabilization of the Cys43-SSCoA redox center has allowed development of a CoAS-binding motif. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that CoADR enzymes are broadly distributed in both bacterial and archaeal kingdoms, suggesting an even broader significance for the CoASH/CoAS-disulfide redox system in prokaryotic thiol/disulfide homeostasis.

  10. Crystal Structure of a Bacterial Albumin-Binding Domain at 1.4 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, J.F.; Nordberg, P.A.; Hajdu, J.; Lejon, S.; /Uppsala U. /Aalborg U. /Astra Tech, Molndal /SLAC

    2007-11-26

    The albumin-binding domain, or GA module, of the peptostreptococcal albumin-binding protein expressed in pathogenic strains of Finegoldia magna is believed to be responsible for the virulence and increased growth rate of these strains. Here we present the 1.4 Angstrom crystal structure of this domain, and compare it with the crystal structure of the GA-albumin complex. An analysis of protein-protein interactions in the two crystals, and the presence of multimeric GA species in solution, indicate the GA module is 'sticky', and is capable of forming contacts with a range of protein surfaces. This might lead to interactions with different host proteins.

  11. Electromagnetic Saturation of Angstrom-Sized Quantum Barriers at Terahertz Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahk, Young-Mi; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Yong Seung; Kim, Joon-Yeon; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Tae Yun; Kang, Taehee; Rhie, Jiyeah; Han, Sanghoon; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Metal-graphene-metal hybrid structures allow angstrom-scale van der Waals gaps, across which electron tunneling occurs. We squeeze terahertz electromagnetic waves through these λ /10 000 000 gaps, accompanied by giant field enhancements. Unprecedented transmission reduction of 97% is achieved with the transient voltage across the gap saturating at 5 V. Electron tunneling facilitated by the transient electric field strongly modifies the gap index, starting a self-limiting process related to the barrier height. Our work enables greater interplay between classical optics and quantum tunneling, and provides optical indices to the van der Waals gaps.

  12. Electromagnetic Saturation of Angstrom-Sized Quantum Barriers at Terahertz Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Bahk, Young-Mi; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Yong Seung; Kim, Joon-Yeon; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Tae Yun; Kang, Taehee; Rhie, Jiyeah; Han, Sanghoon; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2015-09-18

    Metal-graphene-metal hybrid structures allow angstrom-scale van der Waals gaps, across which electron tunneling occurs. We squeeze terahertz electromagnetic waves through these λ/10 000 000 gaps, accompanied by giant field enhancements. Unprecedented transmission reduction of 97% is achieved with the transient voltage across the gap saturating at 5 V. Electron tunneling facilitated by the transient electric field strongly modifies the gap index, starting a self-limiting process related to the barrier height. Our work enables greater interplay between classical optics and quantum tunneling, and provides optical indices to the van der Waals gaps. PMID:26431000

  13. Zipf exponent of trajectory distribution in the hidden Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, V. V.; Lerner, E. Yu

    2014-03-01

    This paper is the first step of generalization of the previously obtained full classification of the asymptotic behavior of the probability for Markov chain trajectories for the case of hidden Markov models. The main goal is to study the power (Zipf) and nonpower asymptotics of the frequency list of trajectories of hidden Markov frequencys and to obtain explicit formulae for the exponent of the power asymptotics. We consider several simple classes of hidden Markov models. We prove that the asymptotics for a hidden Markov model and for the corresponding Markov chain can be essentially different.

  14. A critical exponent of an aniseed-based liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga, A.; Thompson, D.

    1996-05-01

    We present the results of a simple experiment suitable for the undergraduate laboratory in which the onset of turbidity when an aniseed-based liquor is diluted with water is observed. The optical transmission shows the behavior typical of the order parameter in a second-order phase transition. The changes in the transmission are due to the precipitation of terpenes and the amount of precipitated terpenes also shows critical behavior of the form n=k'(c-cc)y, where c is the fraction of water in the solution. The critical exponent is determined to be y=1.01±0.06.

  15. Streptococcus pneumonia YlxR at 1.35 {angstrom} shows a putative new fold.

    SciTech Connect

    Osipiuk, J.; Gornicki, P.; Maj, L.; Dementieva, I.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2001-11-01

    The structure of the YlxR protein of unknown function from Streptococcus pneumonia was determined to 1.35 Angstroms. YlxR is expressed from the nusA/infB operon in bacteria and belongs to a small protein family (COG2740) that shares a conserved sequence motif GRGA(Y/W). The family shows no significant amino-acid sequence similarity with other proteins. Three-wavelength diffraction MAD data were collected to 1.7 Angstroms from orthorhombic crystals using synchrotron radiation and the structure was determined using a semi-automated approach. The YlxR structure resembles a two-layer {alpha}/{beta} sandwich with the overall shape of a cylinder and shows no structural homology to proteins of known structure. Structural analysis revealed that the YlxR structure represents a new protein fold that belongs to the {alpha}-{beta} plait superfamily. The distribution of the electrostatic surface potential shows a large positively charged patch on one side of the protein, a feature often found in nucleic acid-binding proteins. Three sulfate ions bind to this positively charged surface. Analysis of potential binding sites uncovered several substantial clefts, with the largest spanning 3/4 of the protein. A similar distribution of binding sites and a large sharply bent cleft are observed in RNA-binding proteins that are unrelated in sequence and structure. It is proposed that YlxR is an RNA-binding protein.

  16. Interfacial atomic structure analysis at sub-angstrom resolution using aberration-corrected STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Lai, Fang-I.; Chen, Wei-Chun

    2014-10-01

    The atomic structure of a SiGe/Si epitaxial interface grown via molecular beam epitaxy on a single crystal silicon substrate was investigated using an aberration-corrected scanning transmittance electron microscope equipped with a high-angle annular dark-field detector and an energy-dispersive spectrometer. The accuracy required for compensation of the various residual aberration coefficients to achieve sub-angstrom resolution with the electron optics system was also evaluated. It was found that the interfacial layer was composed of a silicon single crystal, connected coherently to epitaxial SiGe nanolaminates. In addition, the distance between the dumbbell structures of the Si and Ge atoms was approximately 0.136 nm at the SiGe/Si interface in the [110] orientation. The corresponding fast Fourier transform exhibited a sub-angstrom scale point resolution of 0.78 Å. Furthermore, the relative positions of the atoms in the chemical composition line scan signals could be directly interpreted from the corresponding incoherent high-angle annular dark-field image.

  17. Breaking the Attosecond, Angstrom and TV/M Field Barriers with Ultra-Fast Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, James; Andonian, Gerard; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Hemsing, Erik; Marcus, Gabriel; Marinelli, Agostino; Musumeci, Pietro; O'Shea, Brendan; O'Shea, Finn; Pellegrini, Claudio; Schiller, David; Travish, Gil; Bucksbaum, Philip; Hogan, Mark; Krejcik, Patrick; Ferrario, Massimo; Full, Steven; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-06-22

    Recent initiatives at UCLA concerning ultra-short, GeV electron beam generation have been aimed at achieving sub-fs pulses capable of driving X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) in single-spike mode. This use of very low Q beams may allow existing FEL injectors to produce few-100 attosecond pulses, with very high brightness. Towards this end, recent experiments at the LCLS have produced {approx}2 fs, 20 pC electron pulses. We discuss here extensions of this work, in which we seek to exploit the beam brightness in FELs, in tandem with new developments in cryogenic undulator technology, to create compact accelerator-undulator systems that can lase below 0.15 {angstrom}, or be used to permit 1.5 {angstrom} operation at 4.5 GeV. In addition, we are now developing experiments which use the present LCLS fs pulses to excite plasma wakefields exceeding 1 TV/m, permitting a table-top TeV accelerator for frontier high energy physics applications.

  18. The Hurst Exponent and Long-time Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Antar, G.; Devynck, P.

    2000-10-01

    Important aspects of plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas remain a mystery in modern plasma physics research. Self-organized-criticality (SOC) has been suggested recently as an important contributing mechanism. To identify the existence of transport by avalanches, which is characteristic of SOC systems, the rescaled-range-statistics (R/S) method is invoked [B. A. Carreras et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3632 (1998)] to detect the long-time correlation induced by an avalanche-type transport. In their work, the Hurst exponent (H) in several devices is calculated to be well above 0.5, which is interpreted to indicate the existence of long-time correlation in the plasma edge turbulence. We apply the R/S method to the ion-saturation-current fluctuations at the edge of the tokamak Tore Supra to evaluate H. Data-block randomization is carried out on the data set in order to investigate the relationship between the Hurst exponent and long-time correlation. It is observed that H is well above 0.5 in the long-time self-similar range. However, the information which leads to H>0.5 is found to be entirely contained in the short time correlation and no link to long times is found. This brings into question the use of the SOC mechanism to interpret plasma edge turbulence.

  19. Exact computation of the critical exponents of the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The jamming transition marks the emergence of rigidity in a system of amorphous and athermal grains. It is characterized by a divergent correlation length of the force-force correlation and non-trivial critical exponents that are independent of spatial dimension, suggesting that a mean field theory can correctly predict their values. I will discuss a mean field approach to the problem based on the exact solution of the hard sphere model in infinite dimension. An unexpected analogy with the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model emerges in the solution: as in the SK model, the glassy states turn out to be marginally stable, and are described by a Parisi equation. Marginal stability has a deep impact on the critical properties of the jamming transition and allows one to obtain analytic predictions for the critical exponents. The predictions are consistent with a recently developed scaling theory of the jamming transition, and with numerical simulations. Finally, I will briefly discuss some possible extensions of this approach to other open issues in the theory of glasses.

  20. Pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Liang; Zheng, Hong-Liang; Yang, Hong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Image segmentation remains an important, but hard-to-solve, problem since it appears to be application dependent with usually no a priori information available regarding the image structure. In recent years, many image segmentation algorithms have been developed, but they are often very complex and some undesired results occur frequently. In this paper, we propose a pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments. Firstly, the pixel-level image feature is extracted based on quaternion exponent moments (QEMs), which can capture effectively the image pixel content by considering the correlation between different color channels. Then, the pixel-level image feature is used as input of twin support vector machines (TSVM) classifier, and the TSVM model is trained by selecting the training samples with Arimoto entropy thresholding. Finally, the color image is segmented with the trained TSVM model. The proposed scheme has the following advantages: (1) the effective QEMs is introduced to describe color image pixel content, which considers the correlation between different color channels, (2) the excellent TSVM classifier is utilized, which has lower computation time and higher classification accuracy. Experimental results show that our proposed method has very promising segmentation performance compared with the state-of-the-art segmentation approaches recently proposed in the literature.

  1. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  2. Pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Liang; Zheng, Hong-Liang; Yang, Hong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Image segmentation remains an important, but hard-to-solve, problem since it appears to be application dependent with usually no a priori information available regarding the image structure. In recent years, many image segmentation algorithms have been developed, but they are often very complex and some undesired results occur frequently. In this paper, we propose a pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments. Firstly, the pixel-level image feature is extracted based on quaternion exponent moments (QEMs), which can capture effectively the image pixel content by considering the correlation between different color channels. Then, the pixel-level image feature is used as input of twin support vector machines (TSVM) classifier, and the TSVM model is trained by selecting the training samples with Arimoto entropy thresholding. Finally, the color image is segmented with the trained TSVM model. The proposed scheme has the following advantages: (1) the effective QEMs is introduced to describe color image pixel content, which considers the correlation between different color channels, (2) the excellent TSVM classifier is utilized, which has lower computation time and higher classification accuracy. Experimental results show that our proposed method has very promising segmentation performance compared with the state-of-the-art segmentation approaches recently proposed in the literature. PMID:26618250

  3. Controlling chaos experimentally in systems exhibiting large effective Lyapunov exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübinger, B.; Doerner, R.; Martienssen, W.; Herdering, M.; Pitka, R.; Dressler, U.

    1994-08-01

    We investigate experimentally the performance of the Ott, Grebogi, and Yorke [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1196 (1989)] feedback concept to control chaotic motion. The experimental systems are a driven pendulum and a driven bronze ribbon. Both setups have unstable periodic orbits characterized by large effective Lyapunov exponents. All control vectors for the feedback control are extracted from the experimental data. To do this for the pendulum a global model obtained by the flow field analysis of Cremers and Hübler [Z. Naturforsch. 42a, 797 (1987)] is used, and for the bronze ribbon linear approximations in embedding space are exploited. We analyze the problems that arise due to the amplification of noise by large effective Lyapunov exponents in the determination of the control values as well as in the performance of the experimental control. Successful control can be achieved in our experiments by applying the ``local control method'' which allows a quasicontinuous adjustment of the control parameter in contrast to adjusting the control parameter only once per return time of the Poincaré map.

  4. COS observations below 1150Angstrom with R > 10, 000: Calibrations for a new G130M/1222 central wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penton, Steven

    2011-10-01

    We fully calibrate a new COS/G130M wavelength setting in this program. This setting, G130M/1222, places Geocoronal Lya on the detector gap {to mitigate FUV detector gain sag} and covers the astrophysically important UV bandpass of 1065-1327 Angstrom. At the focus mechanism position requested {-850}, this mode provides 4-10 times the resolution of the G130M/1055 and G130M/1096 central wavelength settings at the same sensitivity. The sensitivity, waveband, and increased resolution of the G130M/1222 central wavelength {R=17,000 at 1065 Angstrom, 15,000 at 1222 Angstrom, and 12,000 at 1369 Angstrom} is beneficial to many UV scientific studies, including, but not limited to, molecular hydrogen in planetary nebulae and translucent clouds, the HeII lyman-alpha forest in the epoch of HeII re-ionization, AGN intrinsic absorbers and high-ionization outflows, low-redshift IGM, galaxy halos, galaxy feedback, and the WHIM using O VI, MgX, NeVIII, Lyman beta, and other important atomic and molecular transitions. At 1100 Angstrom, this mode has 10 times the effective area of FUSE {per channel} with almost non-existent detector background. This program is designed to completely calibrate this wavelength setting with minimal use of STScI personnel and resources.

  5. Membrane of Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanoplates with Angstrom-Level Channels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeongho; Li, Kunzhou; Yoon, Hong Sik; Yoon, Jeyong; Mok, Yeongbong; Lee, Yan; Lee, Hong H; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2016-01-01

    Membranes with atomic level pores or constrictions are valuable for separation and catalysis. We report a graphene-based membrane with an interlayer spacing of 3.7 angstrom (Å). When graphene oxide nanoplates are functionalized and then reduced, the laminated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplates or functionalized rGO membrane is little affected by an intercalated fluid, and the interlayer spacing of 3.7 Å increases only to 4.4 Å in wetted state, in contrast to the graphene oxide (GO) membrane whose interlayer spacing increases from 9 Å to 13 Å in wetted state. When applied to ion separation, this membrane reduced the permeation rate of small ions such as K(+) and Na(+) by three orders of magnitude compared to the GO membrane. PMID:27306853

  6. Development of XUV-interferometry (155 {angstrom}) using a soft x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W.; Cauble, R.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past several years the authors have developed a variety of techniques for probing plasmas with x-ray lasers. These have included direct high resolution plasma imaging to quantify laser produced plasma uniformities and moire deflectometry to measure electron density profiles in one-dimension. Although these techniques have been valuable, a need existed for direct two dimensional measurements of electron densities in large high density plasmas. For this reason the authors have worked on developing a xuv interferometer compatible with the harsh environment of laser produced plasmas. This paper describes the design and presents some results showing excellent fringe visibility using the neon-like yttrium x-ray laser operating at 155 {angstrom}. The coherence properties of this x-ray laser source were measured using interferometry and are also discussed.

  7. Inner-Shell Photon-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45(Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Snavely, R; Da Silva, L

    2002-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Lab Wide (LW) project entitled, ''An Inner-Shell Photo-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45 {angstrom}'', tracking code 99-LW-042. The most significant accomplishments of this project include the design of a suitable x-ray laser target, the invention of a measurement technique for the determination of rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 femtoseconds, and a novel setup for generating a traveling wave with an ultrashort optical laser pulse. The pump probe technique for rise time measurement will allow us to detect ultrashort x-ray pulses, whose generation by means of a variety of 4th generation light sources is currently under planning elsewhere.

  8. Membrane of Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanoplates with Angstrom-Level Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeongho; Li, Kunzhou; Yoon, Hong Sik; Yoon, Jeyong; Mok, Yeongbong; Lee, Yan; Lee, Hong H.; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2016-01-01

    Membranes with atomic level pores or constrictions are valuable for separation and catalysis. We report a graphene-based membrane with an interlayer spacing of 3.7 angstrom (Å). When graphene oxide nanoplates are functionalized and then reduced, the laminated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplates or functionalized rGO membrane is little affected by an intercalated fluid, and the interlayer spacing of 3.7 Å increases only to 4.4 Å in wetted state, in contrast to the graphene oxide (GO) membrane whose interlayer spacing increases from 9 Å to 13 Å in wetted state. When applied to ion separation, this membrane reduced the permeation rate of small ions such as K+ and Na+ by three orders of magnitude compared to the GO membrane. PMID:27306853

  9. Quartz Microbalance Study of 400-angstrom Thick Films near the lambda Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Moses H. W.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent measurement we observed the thinning of an adsorbed helium film induced by the confinement of critical fluctuations a few millikelvin below the lambda point. A capacitor set-up was used to measure this Casimir effect. In this poster we will present our measurement of an adsorbed helium film of 400 angstroms near the lambda point with a quartz microbalance. For films this thick, we must take into account the non-linear dynamics of the shear waves in the fluid. In spite of the added complications, we were able to confirm the thinning of the film due to the Casimir effect and the onset of the superfluid transition. In addition, we observe a sharp anomaly at the bulk lambda point, most likely related to critical dissipation of the first sound. This work is carried out in collaboration with Rafael Garcia, Stephen Jordon and John Lazzaretti. This work is funded by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research under grant.

  10. Membrane of Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanoplates with Angstrom-Level Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeongho; Li, Kunzhou; Yoon, Hong Sik; Yoon, Jeyong; Mok, Yeongbong; Lee, Yan; Lee, Hong H.; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2016-06-01

    Membranes with atomic level pores or constrictions are valuable for separation and catalysis. We report a graphene-based membrane with an interlayer spacing of 3.7 angstrom (Å). When graphene oxide nanoplates are functionalized and then reduced, the laminated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplates or functionalized rGO membrane is little affected by an intercalated fluid, and the interlayer spacing of 3.7 Å increases only to 4.4 Å in wetted state, in contrast to the graphene oxide (GO) membrane whose interlayer spacing increases from 9 Å to 13 Å in wetted state. When applied to ion separation, this membrane reduced the permeation rate of small ions such as K+ and Na+ by three orders of magnitude compared to the GO membrane.

  11. Wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent and single scattering albedo observed by skyradiometer in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja-Ho; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Jaehwa; Eck, Thomas F.; Lee, Yun Gon; Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Mijin; Jung, Ukkyo; Yoon, Jongmin; Mok, Jungbin; Cho, Hi-Ku

    2016-11-01

    Absorption and scattering characteristics of various aerosol events are investigated using 2-years of measurements from a skyradiometer at Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. Both transported dust and anthropogenic aerosols are observed at distinct geo-location of Seoul, a megacity located a few thousand kilometers away from dust source regions in China. We focus on the wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA), showing the characteristics of regional aerosols. The correlation between spectral SSAs and AEs calculated using different wavelength pairs generally indicates relatively weak absorption of fine-mode aerosols (urban pollution and/or biomass burning) and strong absorption of coarse-mode aerosols (desert dust) at this location. AE ratio (AER), a ratio of AEs calculated using wavelength pair between shorter (340-675 nm) and longer wavelength pair (675-1020 nm) correlates differently with SSA according to the dominant size of local aerosols. Correlations between SSA and AER show strong absorption of aerosols for AER < 1.0 and weak absorption for AER > 2.0. Based on the seasonal pattern of wavelength dependence of AER and SSA, this correlation difference looks to reveal the separated characteristics of transported dust and anthropogenic particles from urban pollution respectively. The seasonal characteristics of AER and SSAs also show that the skyradiometer measurement with multiple wavelengths may be able to detect the water soluble brown carbon, one of the important secondary organic aerosols in the summertime atmospheric composition.

  12. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  13. Lyapunov exponent of magnetospheric activity from AL time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1991-01-01

    A correlation dimension analysis of the AE index indicates that the magnetosphere behaves as a low-dimensional chaotic system with a dimension close to 4. Similar techniques are used to determine if the system's behavior is due to an intrinsic sensitivity to initial conditions and thus is truly chaotic. The quantity used to measure the sensitivity to initial conditions is the Liapunov exponent. Its calculation for AL shows that it is nonzero (0.11 + or - 0.05/min). This gives the exponential rate at which initially similar configurations of the magnetosphere evolve into completely different states. Also, predictions of deterministic nonlinear models are expected to deviate from the observed behavior at the same rate.

  14. Analysis of cancellation exponents in two-dimensional Vlasov turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    De Vita, G.; Valentini, F.; Servidio, S.; Primavera, L.; Carbone, V.; Veltri, P.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.

    2014-07-15

    Statistical properties of plasma turbulence are investigated by means of two-dimensional Vlasov simulations. In particular, a classical technique called signed measure is used to characterize the scaling behavior and the topology of sign-oscillating structures in simulations of the hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell model. Exploring different turbulence regimes, varying both the plasma β and the level of fluctuations, it is observed that Vlasov turbulence manifests two ranges with different exponents, the transition being observed near the ion skin depth. These results, which may have applications to both laboratory and astrophysical systems, further confirm the singular nature of small scale fluctuations in a plasma, mainly classified as intermittent, narrow, and intense current sheets.

  15. Computation of entropy and Lyapunov exponent by a shift transform

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Chihiro; Hiraide, Koichi

    2015-10-15

    We present a novel computational method to estimate the topological entropy and Lyapunov exponent of nonlinear maps using a shift transform. Unlike the computation of periodic orbits or the symbolic dynamical approach by the Markov partition, the method presented here does not require any special techniques in computational and mathematical fields to calculate these quantities. In spite of its simplicity, our method can accurately capture not only the chaotic region but also the non-chaotic region (window region) such that it is important physically but the (Lebesgue) measure zero and usually hard to calculate or observe. Furthermore, it is shown that the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of the Sinai-Ruelle-Bowen measure (the physical measure) coincides with the topological entropy.

  16. Generalized Hurst exponent approach to efficiency in MENA markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensoy, A.

    2013-10-01

    We study the time-varying efficiency of 15 Middle East and North African (MENA) stock markets by generalized Hurst exponent analysis of daily data with a rolling window technique. The study covers a time period of six years from January 2007 to December 2012. The results reveal that all MENA stock markets exhibit different degrees of long-range dependence varying over time and that the Arab Spring has had a negative effect on market efficiency in the region. The least inefficient market is found to be Turkey, followed by Israel, while the most inefficient markets are Iran, Tunisia, and UAE. Turkey and Israel show characteristics of developed financial markets. Reasons and implications are discussed.

  17. GPU and APU computations of Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Christian; Rossinelli, Diego; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-03-01

    We present GPU and APU accelerated computations of Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) fields. The calculation of FTLEs is a computationally intensive process, as in order to obtain the sharp ridges associated with the Lagrangian Coherent Structures an extensive resampling of the flow field is required. The computational performance of this resampling is limited by the memory bandwidth of the underlying computer architecture. The present technique harnesses data-parallel execution of many-core architectures and relies on fast and accurate evaluations of moment conserving functions for the mesh to particle interpolations. We demonstrate how the computation of FTLEs can be efficiently performed on a GPU and on an APU through OpenCL and we report over one order of magnitude improvements over multi-threaded executions in FTLE computations of bluff body flows.

  18. The Effect of the Underlying Distribution in Hurst Exponent Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Trinidad, Juan E.; García, José; Fernández, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a heavy-tailed distribution approach is considered in order to explore the behavior of actual financial time series. We show that this kind of distribution allows to properly fit the empirical distribution of the stocks from S&P500 index. In addition to that, we explain in detail why the underlying distribution of the random process under study should be taken into account before using its self-similarity exponent as a reliable tool to state whether that financial series displays long-range dependence or not. Finally, we show that, under this model, no stocks from S&P500 index show persistent memory, whereas some of them do present anti-persistent memory and most of them present no memory at all. PMID:26020942

  19. Growth exponents in surface models with non-active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Figueiredo, W.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we studied the role played by the inactive sites present on the substrate of a growing surface. In our model, one particle sticks at the surface if the site where it falls is an active site. However, we allow the deposited particle to diffuse along the surface in accordance with some mechanism previously defined. Using Monte Carlo simulations, and some analytical results, we have investigated the model in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions considering different relaxation mechanisms. We show that the consideration of non-active sites is a crucial point in the model. In fact, we have seen that the saturation regime is not observed for any value of the density of inactive sites. Besides, the growth exponent β turns to be one, at long times, whatever the mechanism of diffusion we consider in one and two dimensions.

  20. Skeleton graph expansion of critical exponents in "cultural revolution" years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Bailin

    Kenneth Wilson's Nobel Prize winning breakthrough in the renormalization group theory of phase transition and critical phenomena almost overlapped with the violent "cultural revolution" years (1966-1976) in China. An unexpected chance in 1972 brought the author of these lines close to the Wilson-Fisher є-expansion of critical exponents and eventually led to a joint paper with Lu Yu published entirely in Chinese without any English title and abstract. Even the original acknowledgment was deleted because of mentioning foreign names like Kenneth Wilson and Kerson Huang. In this article I will tell the 40-year old story as a much belated tribute to Kenneth Wilson and to reproduce the essence of our work in English. At the end, I give an elementary derivation of the Callan-Symanzik equation without referring to field theory.

  1. Skeleton graph expansion of critical exponents in "cultural revolution" years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Bailin

    2014-04-01

    Kenneth Wilson's Nobel Prize winning breakthrough in the renormalization group theory of phase transition and critical phenomena almost overlapped with the violent "cultural revolution" years (1966-1976) in China. An unexpected chance in 1972 brought the author of these lines close to the Wilson-Fisher ɛ-expansion of critical exponents and eventually led to a joint paper with Lu Yu published entirely in Chinese without any English title and abstract. Even the original acknowledgment was deleted because of mentioning foreign names like Kenneth Wilson and Kerson Huang. In this article I will tell the 40-year old story as a much belated tribute to Kenneth Wilson and to reproduce the essence of our work in English. At the end, I give an elementary derivation of the Callan-Symanzik equation without referring to field theory.

  2. Spectrum-based estimators of the bivariate Hurst exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2014-12-01

    We discuss two alternate spectrum-based estimators of the bivariate Hurst exponent in the power-law cross-correlations setting, the cross-periodogram and local X -Whittle estimators, as generalizations of their univariate counterparts. As the spectrum-based estimators are dependent on a part of the spectrum taken into consideration during estimation, a simulation study showing performance of the estimators under varying bandwidth parameter as well as correlation between processes and their specification is provided as well. These estimators are less biased than the already existent averaged periodogram estimator, which, however, has slightly lower variance. The spectrum-based estimators can serve as a good complement to the popular time domain estimators.

  3. Hybrid Percolation Transition in Cluster Merging Processes: Continuously Varying Exponents.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y S; Lee, J S; Herrmann, H J; Kahng, B

    2016-01-15

    Consider growing a network, in which every new connection is made between two disconnected nodes. At least one node is chosen randomly from a subset consisting of g fraction of the entire population in the smallest clusters. Here we show that this simple strategy for improving connection exhibits a more unusual phase transition, namely a hybrid percolation transition exhibiting the properties of both first-order and second-order phase transitions. The cluster size distribution of finite clusters at a transition point exhibits power-law behavior with a continuously varying exponent τ in the range 2<τ(g)≤2.5. This pattern reveals a necessary condition for a hybrid transition in cluster aggregation processes, which is comparable to the power-law behavior of the avalanche size distribution arising in models with link-deleting processes in interdependent networks. PMID:26824550

  4. Analytic lyapunov exponents in a classical nonlinear field equation

    PubMed

    Franzosi; Gatto; Pettini; Pettini

    2000-04-01

    It is shown that the nonlinear wave equation partial differential(2)(t)straight phi- partial differential2xstraight phi-&mgr;(0) partial differential(x)( partial differential(x)straight phi)(3)=0, which is the continuum limit of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam beta model, has a positive Lyapunov exponent lambda(1), whose analytic energy dependence is given. The result (a first example for field equations) is achieved by evaluating the lattice-spacing dependence of lambda(1) for the FPU model within the framework of a Riemannian description of Hamiltonian chaos. We also discuss a difficulty of the statistical mechanical treatment of this classical field system, which is absent in the dynamical description.

  5. X-ray line and continuum spectra of solar flares from 0.5 to 8.5 angstroms.

    PubMed

    Meekins, J F; Kreplin, R W; Chubb, T A; Friedman, H

    1968-11-22

    Two crystal spectrometers aboard the orbiting solar observatory OSO-4 cover the wavelength ranges 0.5 to 3.9 angstroms and 1.0 to 8.5 angstroms. Within this range, there appear emission lines from hydrogen-like and helium-like states of calcium, sulfur, silicon, magnesium, and aluminum. The Mg XII Lyman-alpha is present strongly in all x-ray flares. The most intense flares (such as class 3) produce strong Si XIV Lyman-alpha and often S XVI Lyman-alpha. Emission, in the form of Ka lines of highly ionized states of calcium, iron, aluminum, and silicon is usually present. The continuum from 1 to 10 angstroms always dominates the line emission by more than an order of magnitude. Electron temperatures derived from the slope of the continuum spectrum are in the range of 10(7) to 10(8) degrees K, considerably higher than theoretical ionization equilibrium temperatures.

  6. Spectra Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Laboratory and Urban Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, Madhu S.

    Atmospheric aerosols considerably influence the climate, reduce visibility, and cause problems in human health. Aerosol light absorption and scattering are the important factors in the radiation transfer models. However, these properties are associated with large uncertainties in climate modeling. In addition, atmospheric aerosols widely vary in composition and size; their optical properties are highly wavelength dependent. This work presents the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering throughout the ultraviolet to near-infrared regions. Data were collected in Reno, NV from 2008 to 2010. Also presented in this study are the aerosol optical and physical properties during carbonaceous aerosols and radiative effects study (CARES) conducted in Sacramento area during 2010. Measurements were made using photoacoustic instruments (PA), including a novel UV 355 nm PA of our design and manufacture. Comparative analyses are presented for three main categories: (1) aerosols produced by wildfires and traffic emissions, (2) laboratory-generated and wintertime ambient urban aerosols, and (3) urban plume and biogenic emissions. In these categories, key questions regarding the light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOA), so-called brown carbon (BrC), and black carbon (BC) will be discussed. An effort is made to model the emission and aging of urban and biomass burning aerosol by applying shell-core calculations. Multispectral PA measurements of aerosols light absorption and scattering coefficients were used to calculate the Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The AEA and SSA values were analyzed to differentiate the aerosol sources. The California wildfire aerosols exhibited strong wavelength dependence of aerosol light absorption with AEA as lambda -1 for 405 and 870 nm, in contrast to the relatively weak wavelength dependence of traffic emissions aerosols for which AEA varied approximately as lambda-1. By using

  7. High-pressure x-ray diffraction, absorption, luminescence, and Raman-scattering study of Cs{sub 2}MoS{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, B.; Orgzall, I.; Dorhout, P.K.; Raymond, C.C.; Brister, K.; Weishaupt, K.; DAdamo, R.; Hochheimer, H.D.

    1997-02-01

    Cesium thiomolybdate, Cs{sub 2}MoS{sub 4}, has been investigated at pressures up to 12 GPa. Two phase transitions have been detected by absorption measurements, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray diffraction. The first phase transition to a monoclinic phase II [a=14.061(9) {Angstrom}, b=11.552(7) {Angstrom}, c=9.852(6) {Angstrom}, {beta}=97.14(6){degree}] has been observed at 8.0 GPa. The second transition at 9.7 GPa has been observed from the monoclinic phase II to an orthorhombic phase III [a=12.085(4) {Angstrom}, b=15.707(6) {Angstrom}, c=11.828(5) {Angstrom}]. Absorption and luminescence measurements have indicated an increase in the absorption edge energy with pressure up to {approximately}3 GPa. At pressures greater than 3.5 GPa, the absorption energy decreases. Raman spectroscopy has revealed a low-frequency phonon mode with a negative pressure shift in the low-pressure phase I. The pressure-temperature phase diagram has been determined up to 250{degree}C. The transition pressures decrease linearly with slopes of {approximately}{minus}0.013 GPa/{degree}C. Models for the pressure-induced structural and electronic transitions are proposed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the NIR. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the absorption Ångström exponent, defined as the negative slope of absorption versus wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70 % of the absorption Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest absorption Ångström exponents (90 % of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with low Ångström exponents. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia have a weaker spectral dependence for absorption than biomass burning aerosols, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. In a first order assessment, results indicate a small (<1 %) effect of variations in absorption Ångström exponents on 24-h aerosol forcings, at least in the spectral

  9. Mass absorption efficiency of light absorbing organic aerosols from source region of paddy-residue burning emissions in the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, B.; Rastogi, N.; Sarin, M. M.; Singh, A.; Singh, D.

    2016-01-01

    The mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of light absorbing water-soluble organics, representing a significant fraction of brown carbon (BrC), has been studied in fine mode aerosols (PM2.5) from a source region (Patiala: 30.2 °N, 76.3 °E) of biomass burning emissions (BBEs) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). The mass absorption coefficient of BrC at 365 nm (babs-365), assessed from absorption spectra of aqueous extracts, exhibits significant linear relationship with water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) for day (R2 = 0.37) and night time (R2 = 0.77) samples; and slope of regression lines provides a measure of MAE of BrC (daytime: ˜0.75 m2 g-1 and night time: 1.13 m2 g-1). A close similarity in the temporal variability of babs-365 (for BrC) and K+ in all samples suggests their common source from BBEs. The babs-365 of BrC follows a power law (babs-λ ≈ λ-α; where α = angstrom exponent) and averages around 5.2 ± 2.0 M m-1 (where M = 10-6). A significant decrease in the MAE of BrC from the source region (this study) to the downwind oceanic region (over Bay of Bengal, Srinivas and Sarin, 2013) could be attributed to relative increase in the contribution of non-absorbing WSOC and/or photo-bleaching of BrC during long-range atmospheric transport. The atmospheric radiative forcing due to BrC over the study site accounts for ˜40% of that from elemental carbon (EC).

  10. Crystallization and Preliminary Structural Analysis of the Giant Haemoglobin from Glossoscolex paulistus at 3.2 Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    J Bachega; l Bleicher; E Horjales; p Santiago; R Garratt; M Tabak

    2011-12-31

    Glossoscolex paulistus is a free-living earthworm encountered in south-east Brazil. Its oxygen transport requirements are undertaken by a giant extracellular haemoglobin, or erythrocruorin (HbGp), which has an approximate molecular mass of 3.6 MDa and, by analogy with its homologue from Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt), is believed to be composed of a total of 180 polypeptide chains. In the present work the full 3.6 MDa particle in its cyanomet state was purified and crystallized using sodium citrate or PEG8000 as precipitant. The crystals contain one-quarter of the full particle in the asymmetric unit of the I222 cell and have parameters of a = 270.8 {angstrom}, b = 320.3 {angstrom} and c = 332.4 {angstrom}. Diffraction data were collected to 3.15 {angstrom} using synchrotron radiation on beamline X29A at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and represent the highest resolution data described to date for similar erythrocruorins. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using a search model corresponding to one-twelfth of its homologue from HbLt. This revealed that HbGp belongs to the type I class of erythrocruorins and provided an interpretable initial electron density map in which many features including the haem groups and disulfide bonds could be identified.

  11. 77 FR 19745 - Angstrom Microsystems Corp., Bedminster National Corp., Brake Headquarters U.S.A., Inc., and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Angstrom Microsystems Corp., Bedminster National Corp., Brake Headquarters U.S.A., Inc., and Brand... information concerning the securities of BrandPartners Group, Inc. because it has not filed any...

  12. Angstrom-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Single Molecules via Wave-Function Fingerprints of Nuclear Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wen-Long; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2016-08-01

    Single-molecule sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and angstrom resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the highest challenges in magnetic microscopy. Recent development in dynamical-decoupling- (DD) enhanced diamond quantum sensing has enabled single-nucleus NMR and nanoscale NMR. Similar to conventional NMR and MRI, current DD-based quantum sensing utilizes the "frequency fingerprints" of target nuclear spins. The frequency fingerprints by their nature cannot resolve different nuclear spins that have the same noise frequency or differentiate different types of correlations in nuclear-spin clusters, which limit the resolution of single-molecule MRI. Here we show that this limitation can be overcome by using "wave-function fingerprints" of target nuclear spins, which is much more sensitive than the frequency fingerprints to the weak hyperfine interaction between the targets and a sensor under resonant DD control. We demonstrate a scheme of angstrom-resolution MRI that is capable of counting and individually localizing single nuclear spins of the same frequency and characterizing the correlations in nuclear-spin clusters. A nitrogen-vacancy-center spin sensor near a diamond surface, provided that the coherence time is improved by surface engineering in the near future, may be employed to determine with angstrom resolution the positions and conformation of single molecules that are isotope labeled. The scheme in this work offers an approach to breaking the resolution limit set by the "frequency gradients" in conventional MRI and to reaching the angstrom-scale resolution.

  13. Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents for magnetically confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda; Krishnan, Harinarayan

    2012-10-01

    Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLEs) are applied for the first time to magnetically confined plasmas. The FTLE measures the local divergence or convergence of n-dimensional vector fields. Time-dependent FTLEs are directly related to Lagrangian Coherent Structures, which form the underlying structure of turbulent flows. Modern FTLE methods, developed over the past decade, are evolving rapidly and leading to new practical and theoretical insights into turbulent fluid dynamics. In contrast to fluids, an MHD plasma has two vector fields, the magnetic field and the plasma flow. Accurate methods for computing and visualizing FTLEs for the MHD fields have been developed, based on the VisIt visualization package. They are applied to time slices of a large sawtooth crash in a toroidal plasma, computed by the M3D extended MHD code. The plasma structures for both B and v have unexpected properties that are not brought out by conventional analyses. The sawtooth crash is also found to have well-organized ``flow'' structures in v±B. The FTLE appears to be a sensitive diagnostic for the structure of stochastic magnetic fields. The methods are not restricted to MHD, since they apply to almost any vector field.

  14. Equifinality and the Scaling Exponent of the Structure Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitton, G. F.; Mezematy, Y.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2014-12-01

    In turbulence the structure function is by far the most widely used tool for the empirical analysis of the velocity field. This is due mainly to the work of Kolmogorov (1941) who hypothesised a homogeneous flux of energy and derived the famous 2/3 power law for the second-order structure function; — which corresponds to a 5/3 law for the energy spectrum (Obukhov, 1942). In 1962 Kolmogorov refined his hypothesis to take into account the intermittency of the flux, with the consequence that the exponent ξ(q) of the structure function is not longer proportional to its statistical order q. In this communication, we first show that the refined hypothesis can lead to different models that can have opposite intermittency corrections. Secondly, we demonstrate that the inverse problem, i.e., starting from a given expression of ξ(q) to recover the involved flux leads to an interesting problem of equifinality for the definition of this flux. This is done in particular in the framework of the Fractionally Integrated Flux model that gives a precise meaning to the refined hypothesis. The theoretical and practical consequences are illustrated with the help data analysis and simulations of turbulence in wind farms and urban lakes.

  15. Isotope exponent in disordered underdoped and overdoped La214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqib, S. H.; Islam, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The effect of oxygen isotope substitution on Tc has been analyzed for heavily underdoped and overdoped La2-xSrxCu1-yZnyO4 compounds with different Zn contents in the CuO2 plane. The effect of Zn on the isotope exponent, α, was more pronounced in the case of the underdoped (x = 0.09) compounds compared to the overdoped (x = 0.22) ones. The variation of α with in-plane disorder can be described quite well within a model based solely on impurity induced Cooper pair-breaking in the case of the underdoped compounds. This model, on the other hand, fails to describe the behavior of α(y) for the overdoped samples, even though Zn still breaks pairs quite effectively at this hole (Sr) content. We discuss the implications of these finding in details by considering the Zn induced magnetism, stripe correlations, and possible changes in the superconducting order parameter as number of charge carriers in the CuO2 plane, p (≡ x), is varied.

  16. [A Standing Balance Evaluation Method Based on Largest Lyapunov Exponent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang; Zhao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of human standing balance scientifically, we in this study proposed a new evaluation method based on the chaos nonlinear analysis theory. In this method, a sinusoidal acceleration stimulus in forward/backward direction was forced under the subjects' feet, which was supplied by a motion platform. In addition, three acceleration sensors, which were fixed to the shoulder, hip and knee of each subject, were applied to capture the balance adjustment dynamic data. Through reconstructing the system phase space, we calculated the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) of the dynamic data of subjects' different segments, then used the sum of the squares of the difference between each LLE (SSDLLE) as the balance capabilities evaluation index. Finally, 20 subjects' indexes were calculated, and compared with evaluation results of existing methods. The results showed that the SSDLLE were more in line with the subjects' performance during the experiment, and it could measure the body's balance ability to some extent. Moreover, the results also illustrated that balance level was determined by the coordinate ability of various joints, and there might be more balance control strategy in the process of maintaining balance. PMID:27079089

  17. Probabilistic neural networks employing Lyapunov exponents for analysis of Doppler ultrasound signals.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2008-01-01

    The implementation of probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) with the Lyapunov exponents for Doppler ultrasound signals classification is presented. This study is directly based on the consideration that Doppler ultrasound signals are chaotic signals. This consideration was tested successfully using the nonlinear dynamics tools, like the computation of Lyapunov exponents. Decision making was performed in two stages: computation of Lyapunov exponents as representative features of the Doppler ultrasound signals and classification using the PNNs trained on the extracted features. The present research demonstrated that the Lyapunov exponents are the features which well represent the Doppler ultrasound signals and the PNNs trained on these features achieved high classification accuracies. PMID:17709103

  18. The Scaling Exponent Distinguishes the Injured Sick Hearts Against Normal Healthy Hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, Toru; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2009-05-01

    We analyzed heartbeat-intervals with our own program of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to quantify the irregularity of the heartbeat. The present analysis revealed that normal healthy subjects have the scaling exponent of 1.0, and ischemic heart disease pushes the scaling exponent up to 1.2-1.5. We conclude that the scaling exponent, calculated by the DFA, reflects a risk for the "failing" heart. The scaling exponents could determine whether the subjects are under sick or in healthy conditions on the basis of cardiac physiology.

  19. Near-ideal theoretical strength in gold nanowires containing angstrom scale twins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiangwei; Sansoz, Frederic; Huang, Jianyu; Liu, Yi; Sun, Shouheng; Zhang, Ze; Mao, Scott X.

    2013-01-01

    Although nanoscale twinning is an effective means to enhance yield strength and tensile ductility in metals, nanotwinned metals generally fail well below their theoretical strength limit due to heterogeneous dislocation nucleation from boundaries or surface imperfections. Here we show that Au nanowires containing angstrom-scaled twins (0.7 nm in thickness) exhibit tensile strengths up to 3.12 GPa, near the ideal limit, with a remarkable ductile-to-brittle transition with decreasing twin size. This is opposite to the behaviour of metallic nanowires with lower-density twins reported thus far. Ultrahigh-density twins (twin thickness<2.8 nm) are shown to give rise to homogeneous dislocation nucleation and plastic shear localization, contrasting with the heterogeneous slip mechanism observed in single-crystalline or low-density-twinned nanowires. The twin size dependent dislocation nucleation and deformation represent a new type of size effect distinct from the sample size effects described previously. PMID:23612283

  20. Cryoelectron Microscopy Structure of Purified gamma-Secretase at 12 angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Osenkowski, P.; Li, H.; Li, H.; Ye, W.; Li, D.; Aeschbach, L.; Fraering, P. C.; Wolfe, M. S.; Selkoe, D. J.

    2009-01-06

    {gamma}-Secretase, an integral membrane protein complex, catalyzes the intramembrane cleavage of the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) during the neuronal production of the amyloid {beta}-peptide. As such, the protease has emerged as a key target for developing agents to treat and prevent Alzheimer's disease. Existing biochemical studies conflict on the oligomeric assembly state of the protease complex, and its detailed structure is not known. Here, we report that purified active human {gamma}-secretase in digitonin has a total molecular mass of {approx} 230 kDa when measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy. This result supports a complex that is monomeric for each of the four component proteins. We further report the three-dimensional structure of the {gamma}-secretase complex at 12 {angstrom} resolution as obtained by cryoelectron microscopy and single-particle image reconstruction. The structure reveals several domains on the extracellular side, three solvent-accessible low-density cavities, and a potential substrate-binding surface groove in the transmembrane region of the complex.

  1. X-ray structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata at 2. 4- angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyan, J.; Xiangpeng Kong; Krishna, T.S.R.; Murgolo, N.J.; Field, H.; Cerami, A.; Henderson, G.B. ); Sweet, R.M. )

    1991-10-01

    Trypanosomes and related protozoan parasites lack glutathione reductase and possess instead a closely related enzyme that serves as the reductant of a bis(glutathione)-spermidien conjugate, trypanothione. The human and parasite enzymes have mutually exclusive substrate specificities, providing a route for the design of therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of the parasite enzyme. The authors report here the three-dimensional structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata and show that it closely resembles the structure of human glutathione reductase. In particular, the core structure surrounding the catalytic machinery is almost identical in the two enzymes. However, significant differences are found at the substrate binding sites. A cluster of basic residues in glutathione reductase is replaced by neutral, hydrophobic, or acidic residues in trypanothione reductase, consistent with the nature of the spermidine linkage and the change in overall charge of the substrate from {minus}2 to +1, respectively. The binding site is more open in trypanothione reductase due to rotations of about 4{degree} in the domains that form in site, with relative shifts of as much as 2-3 {angstrom} in residues that can interact with potential inhibitors and complement previous modeling and mutagenesis studies on the two enzymes.

  2. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of cholera toxin B subunit pentamer: Choleragenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M.L.; Maulik, P.R.; Reed, R.A.; Shipley, G.; Westbrook, E.M. |; Scott, D.L.; Otwinowski, Z.

    1996-02-01

    Cholera toxin, a heterohexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin released by Vibrio cholera, induces a profuse secretory diarrhea in susceptible hosts. Choleragenoid, the B subunit pentamer of cholera toxin, directs the enzymatic A subunit to its target by binding to GM{sub 1} gangliosides exposed on the luminal surface of intestinal epithelial cells. We have solved the crystal structure of choleragenoid at 2.3 {Angstrom} resolution by combining single isomorphous replacement with non-crystallographic symmetry averaging. The structure of the B subunits, and their pentameric arrangement, closely resembles that reported for the intact holotoxin (choleragen), the heat-labile enterotoxin from E. coli, and for a choleragenoid-GM{sub 1} pentasaccharide complex. In the absence of the A subunit the central cavity of the B pentamer is a highly solvated channel. The binding of the A subunit or the receptor pentasaccharide to choleragenoid has only a modest effect on the local stereochemistry and does not perceptibly alter the subunit interface.

  3. Molecular structure of an apolipoprotein determined at 2. 5- angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Breiter, D.R.; Benning, M.M.; Wesenberg, G.; Holden, H.M.; Rayment, I. ); Kanost, M.R.; Law, J.H.; Wells, M.A. )

    1991-01-22

    The three-dimensional structure of an apolipoprotein isolated from the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria has been determined by X-ray analysis to a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom}. The overall molecular architecture of this protein consists of five long {alpha}-helices connected by short loops. As predicted from amino acid sequence analyses, these helices are distinctly amphiphilic with the hydrophobic residues pointing in toward the interior of the protein and the hydrophilic side chains facing outward. The molecule falls into the general category of up-and-down {alpha}-helical bundles as previously observed, for example, in cytochrome c{prime}. Although the structure shows the presence of five long amphiphilic {alpha}-helices, the {alpha}-helical moment and hydrophobicity of the entire molecule fall into the range found for normal globular proteins. Thus, in order for the amphiphilic helices to play a role in the binding of the protein to a lipid surface, there must be a structural reorganization of the protein which exposes the hydrophobic interior to the lipid surface. The three dimensional motif of this apolipoprotein is compatible with a model in which the molecule binds to the lipid surface via a relatively nonpolar end and then spreads on the surface in such a way as to cause the hydrophobic side chains of the helices to come in contact with the lipid surface, the charged and polar residues to remain in contact with water, and the overall helical motif of the protein to be maintained.

  4. Sub-Angstrom Low Voltage Performance of a Monochromated, Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Russo, Christopher J.; Benner, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Lowering the electron energy in the transmission electron microscope allows for a significant improvement in contrast of light elements, and reduces knock-on damage for most materials. If low-voltage electron microscopes are defined as those with accelerating voltages below 100 kV, the introduction of aberration correctors and monochromators to the electron microscope column enables Ångstrom-level resolution, which was previously reserved for higher voltage instruments. Decreasing electron energy has three important advantages: 1) knock-on damage is lower, which is critically important for sensitive materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes; 2) cross sections for electron-energy-loss spectroscopy increase, improving signal-to-noise for chemical analysis; 3) elastic scattering cross sections increase, improving contrast in high-resolution, zero-loss images. The results presented indicate that decreasing the acceleration voltage from 200 kV to 80 kV in a monochromated, aberration-corrected microscope enhances the contrast while retaining sub-angstrom resolution. These improvements in low-voltage performance are expected to produce many new results and enable a wealth of new experiments in materials science. PMID:20598206

  5. Nonstoichiometric complex of gramicidin D with KI at 0.80 [angstrom] resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Olczak, A.; Glowka, M.L.; Szczesio, M.; Bojarsk, J.; Duax, W.L.; Burkhart, B.M.; Wawrzak, Z.

    2010-03-08

    The crystal structure of a nonstoichiometric complex of gramicidin D (gD) with KI has been determined at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The final R factor was 0.106 for 83 988 observed reflections (Friedel pairs were not merged) collected to 0.80 {angstrom}. The structure consists of four independent pentadecapeptides and numerous solvent molecules and salt ions. The general architecture of the antiparallel double-stranded gramicidin dimers in the crystal (a right-handed antiparallel DS{beta}H{sub R} form) closely resembles that of previously published cation complexes of gD. However, a significantly different mixture of gramicidin isomers is found in the crystal of the KI complex, including partial occupancy of phenylalanine at position 11. Only three sites in each of the two crystallographically independent channels are partially occupied by potassium cations instead of the commonly observed seven sites. The sum of the partial occupancies of K{sup +} (1.10 per two dimers) is consistent with the sum of the iodide occupancies (1.095 over eight sites), which is also confirmed by the anomalous signal of the iodide. There was a significant asymmetry of the distribution and occupancies of cations in the crystallographically independent gramicidin channels, in contrast to the distribution found in the rubidium chloride complex with gD.

  6. Joint Statistics of Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    Recently, the notion of Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) has gained attention as a tool for qualitative visualization of flow features. LCS visualize repelling and attracting manifolds marked by local ridges in the field of maximal and minimal finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE), respectively. To provide a quantitative characterization of FTLEs, the statistical theory of large deviations can be used based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms (with finite-size correction). We generalize the formalism to characterize the joint distributions of the two independent FTLEs in 3D. The ``joint Cramér function of turbulence'' is measured from the Johns Hopkins Turbulence Databases (JHTDB) isotropic simulation at Reλ = 433 and results are compared with those computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with those of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude and the most likely ratio of FTLEs changes from 4:1:-5 to 8:3:-11, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. Supported by NSF Graduate Fellowship (DGE-1232825), a JHU graduate Fellowship, and NSF Grant CMMI-0941530. CM thanks Prof. Luca Biferale for useful discussions on the subject.

  7. On the Lack of Correlation Between Mg II 2796, 2803 Angstrom and Lyman alpha Emission in Lensed Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane Rebecca; Bayliss, M. B.; Gladders, M. D.; Sharon, K.; Wuyts, E.; Dahle, H.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the Mg II 2796, 2803 Angstrom, Lyman alpha, and nebular line emission in five bright star-forming galaxies at 1.66 less than z less than 1.91 that have been gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxy clusters. All five galaxies show prominent Mg II emission and absorption in a P Cygni profile. We find no correlation between the equivalent widths of Mg II and Lyman alpha emission. The Mg II emission has a broader range of velocities than do the nebular emission line profiles; the Mg II emission is redshifted with respect to systemic by 100 to 200 km s(exp-1). When present, Lyman alpha is even more redshifted. The reddest components of Mg II and Lyman alpha emission have tails to 500-600 km s(exp-1), implying a strong outflow. The lack of correlation in the Mg II and Lyman alpha equivalent widths, the differing velocity profiles, and the high ratios of Mg II to nebular line fluxes together suggest that the bulk of Mg II emission does not ultimately arise as nebular line emission, but may instead be reprocessed stellar continuum emission.

  8. Exploring EUV Spicules Using 304 Angstrom He II Data from SDO AIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Ian R.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ron L.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from a statistical study of He II 304 Angstrom Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules at the limb of the Sun. We also measured properties of one macrospicule; macrospicules are longer than most spicules, and much broader in width than spicules. We use high-cadence (12 second) and high-resolution (0.6 arcseconds pixels) resolution data from the Atmospheric Imaging Array (AIA) instrument on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). All of the observed events occurred near the solar north pole, where quiet Sun or coronal hole environments ensued. We examined the maximum lengths, maximum rise velocities, and lifetimes of 33 Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules and the macrospicule. For the bulk of the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules these quantities are, respectively, approximately 10,000-40,000 kilometers, 20-100 kilometers per second, and approximately 100- approximately 1000 seconds. For the macrospicule the corresponding quantities were respectively approximately 60,000 kilometers, approximately 130 kilometers per second, approximately 1800 seconds, which is typical of macrospicules measured by other workers. Therefore macrospicules are taller, longer-lived, and faster than most Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules. The rise profiles of both the spicules and the macrospicules match well a second-order ("parabolic" ) trajectory, although the acceleration was often weaker than that of solar gravity in the profiles fitted to the trajectories. Our macrospicule also had an obvious brightening at its base at birth, while such brightening was not apparent for the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules. Most of the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spicules remained visible during their descent back to the solar surface, although a small percentage of the spicules and the macrospicule faded out before falling back to the surface. Our sample of macrospicules is not yet large enough to determine whether their initiation mechanism is identical to that of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV

  9. Advances Toward Inner-Shell Photo-Ionization X-Ray Lasing at 45 (Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, S J; Weber, F A; Celliers, P M; Eder, D C

    2002-07-18

    The inner-shell photo-ionization (ISPI) scheme requires photon energies at least high enough to photo-ionize the K-shell. {approx}286 eV, in the case of carbon. As a consequence of the higher cross-section, the inner-shell are selectively knocked out, leaving a hole state 1s2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} in the singly charged carbon ion. This generates a population inversion to the radiatively connected state 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p in C+, leading to gain on the 1s-2p transition at 45 {angstrom}. The resonant character of the lasing transition in the single ionization state intrinsically allows much higher quantum efficiency compared to other schemes. Competing processes that deplete the population inversion include auto-ionization, Auger decay, and in particular collisional ionization of the outer-shell electrons by electrons generated during photo-ionization. These competing processes rapidly quench the gain. Consequently, the pump method must be capable of populating the inversion at a rate faster than the competing processes. This can be achieved by an ultra-fast, high intensity laser that is able to generate an ultra-fast, bright x-ray source. With current advances in the development of high-power, ultra-short pulse lasers it is possible to realize fast x-ray sources based that can deliver powerful pulses of light in the multiple hundred terawatt regime and beyond. They will discuss in greater detail concept, target design and a series of x-ray spectroscopy investigations they have conducted in order to optimize the absorber/x-ray converter--filter package.

  10. Short-time Lyapunov exponent analysis and the transition to chaos in Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vastano, John A.; Moser, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The physical mechanism driving the weakly chaotic Taylor-Couette flow is investigated using the short-time Liapunov exponent analysis. In this procedure, the transition from quasi-periodicity to chaos is studied using direct numerical 3D simulations of axially periodic Taylor-Couette flow, and a partial Liapunov exponent spectrum for the flow is computed by simultaneously advancing the full solution and a set of perturbations. It is shown that the short-time Liapunov exponent analysis yields more information on the exponents and dimension than that obtained from the common Liapunov exponent calculations. Results show that the chaotic state studied here is caused by a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability of the outflow boundary jet of Taylor vortices.

  11. Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol from Residential Wood Burning in Fresno, CA: Results from 2013 NASA DISCOVER-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Zhang, Q.; Young, D. E.; Parworth, C.

    2015-12-01

    Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol were investigated at Fresno, CA from 13 January to 11 February, 2013 as part of the NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign. The light absorption spectra of water soluble organic aerosol in PM2.5 was measured using a UV/vis diode array detector (DAD) coupled with a particle into liquid sampler (PILS) that sampled downstream of a PM2.5 cyclone (URG). The PILS was also coupled with two ion chromatographs (IC) to measure inorganic and organic ionic species in PM2.5. In addition, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at the same site to measure size-resolved chemical composition of submicrometer aerosol (PM1) in real time during this study. Light absorption at 365 nm (Abs365), which is typically used as a proxy of water-soluble brown carbon (BrC), showed strong enhancement during night time and appeared to correlate well (r = 0.71) with biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) from residential wood burning for heating in the Fresno area. The tight correlations between Abs365 and biomass burning relevant tracers such as acetonitrile (r = 0.69), AMS-signature ions for phenolic compounds (r = 0.52-0.71), PAH (r = 0.74), and potassium (r = 0.67) further confirm that biomass burning contributed significantly to water soluble brown carbon during this study. The absorption angstrom exponent (Åa) values fitted between 300 and 700 nm wavelength were 3.3 ± 1.1, 2.0 ± 0.9 and 4.0 ± 0.8, respectively, in the morning, afternoon and nighttime, indicating that BrC is prevalent at night in Fresno during wintertime. However, there are also indications that small amount of BrC existed during the daytime as well, likely due to daytime wood burning and other sources such as the formation of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Finally, light absorption at 300 nm, 330 nm, and 390 nm were found to correlate tightly with BBOA, which indicate that biomass burning also emits

  12. Surface-enhanced infrared absorption of nucleic acids on gold substrate in FTIR reflectance mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovbeshko, G. I.; Chegel, Vladimir I.; Gridina, Nina Y.; Repnytska, O. P.; Sekirin, I. V.; Shirshov, Yuri M.

    2001-06-01

    Data on surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) of nucleic acids deposited on the metal surface have been obtained in the experiment in FTIR reflectance mode. As metal surface, we used Au of 200 - 500 Angstrom thickness on quartz substrate. Roughness of Au was not greater than 50 Angstrom. In our experimental conditions, the enhancement factor of SEIRA was about 3 - 7. We obtained different enhancement factors for different vibrations of nuclei acids. Application of this method to the tumour brain nucleic acid gave a possibility to reveal some structural peculiarities of their sugar-phosphate backbone.

  13. A Synthetic Precedent for the [Fe**IV(2)(Angstrom-O)(2)] Diamond Core Proposed for Methane Monooxygenase Intermediate Q

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, G.; Wang, D.; Hont, R.De; Fiedler, A.T.; Shan, X.; Munck, E.; Que, L.; Jr.

    2009-06-04

    Intermediate Q, the methane-oxidizing species of soluble methane monooxygenase, is proposed to have an [Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}] diamond core. In an effort to obtain a synthetic precedent for such a core, bulk electrolysis at 900 mV (versus Fc{sup +/0}) has been performed in MeCN at -40{sup o}C on a valence-delocalized [Fe{sup III}Fe{sup IV}({mu}-O){sub 2}(L{sup b}){sub 2}]{sup 8+} complex (1b) (E{sub 1/2} = 760 mV versus Fc{sup +/0}). Oxidation of 1b results in the near-quantitative formation of a deep red complex, designated 2b, that exhibits a visible spectrum with {lambda}{sub max} at 485 nm (9,800 M{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup -1}) and 875 nm (2,200 M{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup -1}). The 4.2 K Moessbauer spectrum of 2b exhibits a quadrupole doublet with {delta} = -0.04(1) mm{center_dot}s{sup -1} and {Delta}E{sub Q} = 2.09(2) mm{center_dot}s{sup -1}, parameters typical of an iron(IV) center. The Moessbauer patterns observed in strong applied fields show that 2b is an antiferromagnetically coupled diiron(IV) center. Resonance Raman studies reveal the diagnostic vibration mode of the [Fe{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}] core at 674 cm{sup -1}, downshifting 30 cm{sup 01} upon {sup 18}O labeling. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis shows two O/N scatterers at 1.78 {angstrom} and an Fe scatterer at 2.73 {angstrom}. Based on the accumulated spectroscopic evidence, 2b thus can be formulated as [Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}(L{sup b}){sub 2}]{sup 4+}, the first synthetic complex with an [Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}] core. A comparison of 2b and its mononuclear analog [Fe{sup IV}(O)(L{sup b})(NCMe)]{sup 2+} (4b) reveals that 4b is 100-fold more reactive than 2b in oxidizing weak C-H bonds. This surprising observation may shed further light on how intermediate Q carries out the hydroxylation of methane.

  14. On Photospheric Fluorescence and the Nature of the 17.62 Angstrom Feature in Solar X-ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Greg; Kahn, S.

    1999-01-01

    The identification of the emission line feature at 17.62 Angstroms in solar x-ray spectra is re-examined. Using a Monte Carlo technique, we compute a realistic theoretical upper limit to the observed Fe L-alpha photospheric fluorescent line strength caused by irradiation from an overlying corona. These calculations demonstrate that the photospheric Fe L-alpha characteristic line is much too weak to account for the observed 17.62 Angstrom line flux. Instead, we identify this line with the configuration interaction 2s2p3p2P-2s2p6 2S transition in Fe XVIII seen in Electron Beam Ion Trap spectra and predicted in earlier theoretical work on the Fe XVIII x-ray spectrum.

  15. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the visible. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the Ångström exponent for absorption, defined as the negative slope of absorption vs. wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70% of the Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest Ångström exponents (90% of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with Ångström exponents below 1.0. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia may have a weak spectral dependence for absorption, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. Nevertheless, additional measurements should be taken in the future, to provide a complete picture of biogenic aerosol absorption spectral characteristics from different seasons and geographic locations. The

  16. Validating the Operational Bias and Hypothesis of Universal Exponent in Landslide Frequency-Area Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Teng, Tse-Yang; Chen, Yi-Chin; Huang, Cho-Ying; Lee, Cheing-Tung

    2014-01-01

    The exponent decay in landslide frequency-area distribution is widely used for assessing the consequences of landslides and with some studies arguing that the slope of the exponent decay is universal and independent of mechanisms and environmental settings. However, the documented exponent slopes are diverse and hence data processing is hypothesized for this inconsistency. An elaborated statistical experiment and two actual landslide inventories were used here to demonstrate the influences of the data processing on the determination of the exponent. Seven categories with different landslide numbers were generated from the predefined inverse-gamma distribution and then analyzed by three data processing procedures (logarithmic binning, LB, normalized logarithmic binning, NLB and cumulative distribution function, CDF). Five different bin widths were also considered while applying LB and NLB. Following that, the maximum likelihood estimation was used to estimate the exponent slopes. The results showed that the exponents estimated by CDF were unbiased while LB and NLB performed poorly. Two binning-based methods led to considerable biases that increased with the increase of landslide number and bin width. The standard deviations of the estimated exponents were dependent not just on the landslide number but also on binning method and bin width. Both extremely few and plentiful landslide numbers reduced the confidence of the estimated exponents, which could be attributed to limited landslide numbers and considerable operational bias, respectively. The diverse documented exponents in literature should therefore be adjusted accordingly. Our study strongly suggests that the considerable bias due to data processing and the data quality should be constrained in order to advance the understanding of landslide processes. PMID:24852019

  17. Validating the operational bias and hypothesis of universal exponent in landslide frequency-area distribution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Teng, Tse-Yang; Chen, Yi-Chin; Huang, Cho-Ying; Lee, Cheing-Tung

    2014-01-01

    The exponent decay in landslide frequency-area distribution is widely used for assessing the consequences of landslides and with some studies arguing that the slope of the exponent decay is universal and independent of mechanisms and environmental settings. However, the documented exponent slopes are diverse and hence data processing is hypothesized for this inconsistency. An elaborated statistical experiment and two actual landslide inventories were used here to demonstrate the influences of the data processing on the determination of the exponent. Seven categories with different landslide numbers were generated from the predefined inverse-gamma distribution and then analyzed by three data processing procedures (logarithmic binning, LB, normalized logarithmic binning, NLB and cumulative distribution function, CDF). Five different bin widths were also considered while applying LB and NLB. Following that, the maximum likelihood estimation was used to estimate the exponent slopes. The results showed that the exponents estimated by CDF were unbiased while LB and NLB performed poorly. Two binning-based methods led to considerable biases that increased with the increase of landslide number and bin width. The standard deviations of the estimated exponents were dependent not just on the landslide number but also on binning method and bin width. Both extremely few and plentiful landslide numbers reduced the confidence of the estimated exponents, which could be attributed to limited landslide numbers and considerable operational bias, respectively. The diverse documented exponents in literature should therefore be adjusted accordingly. Our study strongly suggests that the considerable bias due to data processing and the data quality should be constrained in order to advance the understanding of landslide processes.

  18. The Evolution of the Exponent of Zipf's Law in Language Ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Baixeries, Jaume; Elvevåg, Brita; Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that word frequencies arrange themselves according to Zipf's law. However, little is known about the dependency of the parameters of the law and the complexity of a communication system. Many models of the evolution of language assume that the exponent of the law remains constant as the complexity of a communication systems increases. Using longitudinal studies of child language, we analysed the word rank distribution for the speech of children and adults participating in conversations. The adults typically included family members (e.g., parents) or the investigators conducting the research. Our analysis of the evolution of Zipf's law yields two main unexpected results. First, in children the exponent of the law tends to decrease over time while this tendency is weaker in adults, thus suggesting this is not a mere mirror effect of adult speech. Second, although the exponent of the law is more stable in adults, their exponents fall below 1 which is the typical value of the exponent assumed in both children and adults. Our analysis also shows a tendency of the mean length of utterances (MLU), a simple estimate of syntactic complexity, to increase as the exponent decreases. The parallel evolution of the exponent and a simple indicator of syntactic complexity (MLU) supports the hypothesis that the exponent of Zipf's law and linguistic complexity are inter-related. The assumption that Zipf's law for word ranks is a power-law with a constant exponent of one in both adults and children needs to be revised. PMID:23516390

  19. Validating the operational bias and hypothesis of universal exponent in landslide frequency-area distribution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Teng, Tse-Yang; Chen, Yi-Chin; Huang, Cho-Ying; Lee, Cheing-Tung

    2014-01-01

    The exponent decay in landslide frequency-area distribution is widely used for assessing the consequences of landslides and with some studies arguing that the slope of the exponent decay is universal and independent of mechanisms and environmental settings. However, the documented exponent slopes are diverse and hence data processing is hypothesized for this inconsistency. An elaborated statistical experiment and two actual landslide inventories were used here to demonstrate the influences of the data processing on the determination of the exponent. Seven categories with different landslide numbers were generated from the predefined inverse-gamma distribution and then analyzed by three data processing procedures (logarithmic binning, LB, normalized logarithmic binning, NLB and cumulative distribution function, CDF). Five different bin widths were also considered while applying LB and NLB. Following that, the maximum likelihood estimation was used to estimate the exponent slopes. The results showed that the exponents estimated by CDF were unbiased while LB and NLB performed poorly. Two binning-based methods led to considerable biases that increased with the increase of landslide number and bin width. The standard deviations of the estimated exponents were dependent not just on the landslide number but also on binning method and bin width. Both extremely few and plentiful landslide numbers reduced the confidence of the estimated exponents, which could be attributed to limited landslide numbers and considerable operational bias, respectively. The diverse documented exponents in literature should therefore be adjusted accordingly. Our study strongly suggests that the considerable bias due to data processing and the data quality should be constrained in order to advance the understanding of landslide processes. PMID:24852019

  20. Existence and uniqueness theorems for solutions of parabolic equations with a variable nonlinearity exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhutov, Yu A; Zhikov, V V

    2014-03-31

    The paper is concerned with the solvability of the initial-boundary value problem for second-order parabolic equations with variable nonlinearity exponents. In the model case, this equation contains the p-Laplacian with a variable exponent p(x,t). The problem is shown to be uniquely solvable, provided the exponent p is bounded away from both 1 and ∞ and is log-Hölder continuous, and its solution satisfies the energy equality. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  1. Ising spin glasses: Corrections to finite size scaling, freezing temperatures, and critical exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, P. O.; Campbell, I. A.

    1999-03-01

    We compare simulation data from different sources on two canonical three-dimensional Ising spin glasses (ISGs): the binomial +/-J near-neighbor interaction ISG and the Gaussian interaction ISG. We allow for the possibility of corrections to finite size scaling and estimate the correction exponent w. Consistent estimates for the critical temperatures Tg and for the critical exponents for each system are obtained. The data strongly indicate that critical exponents in the two systems are significantly different from each other. These results thus confirm a breakdown of standard universality rules in Ising spin glasses.

  2. Power-law exponent of the Bouchaud-Mézard model on regular random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinomiya, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    We study the Bouchaud-Mézard model on a regular random network. By assuming adiabaticity and independency, and utilizing the generalized central limit theorem and the Tauberian theorem, we derive an equation that determines the exponent of the probability distribution function of the wealth as x→∞. The analysis shows that the exponent can be smaller than 2, while a mean-field analysis always gives the exponent as being larger than 2. The results of our analysis are shown to be in good agreement with those of the numerical simulations.

  3. Ultraviolet observations of Uranus and Neptune below 3,000 Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.; Wagener, R.

    1984-10-01

    From 2000 to 3000 A, both Uranus and Neptune have albedos that are about two times higher than Jupiter or Saturn's, implying that the outer giants have stratospheres that are relatively free of aerosol absorption. Uncertainties in the absolute calibration procedure allow discrepancies of order 15% between conservative models and the observations. A small amount of aerosol absorption is therefore possible. Below 2000 A the derived albedo is highly dependent on the solar spectrum source used in the data reduction. The most recent result for Uranus, first reported here, is consistent with a secular change in C2H2 mixing ratio from approximately three times ten to the minus eight in 1980 to less than or equal to ten to the minus ninth in 1983. These values are approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than the mixing ratios of this gas on Saturn, and comparable to the amount on Jupiter.

  4. Asymptotics of finite system Lyapunov exponents for some random matrix ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Peter J.

    2015-05-01

    For products PN of N random matrices of size d× d, there is a natural notion of finite N Lyapunov exponents \\{{{μ }i}\\}i=1d. In the case of standard Gaussian random matrices with real, complex or real quaternion elements, and extended to the general variance case for {{μ }1}, methods known for the computation of \\mathop{lim }\\limitsN\\to ∞ < {{μ }i}> are used to compute the large N form of the variances of the exponents. Analogous calculations are performed in the case that the matrices making up PN are products of sub-blocks of random unitary matrices with Haar measure. Furthermore, we make some remarks relating to the coincidence of the Lyapunov exponents and the stability exponents relating to the eigenvalues of PN.

  5. The effective exponent γ(Q) and the slope of the β function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    The slope of the β function at a fixed point is commonly thought to be RG invariant and to be the critical exponent γ* that governs the approach of any physical quantity R to its fixed-point limit: R* - R ∝Qγ*. Chýla has shown that this is not quite true. Here we define a proper RG invariant, the "effective exponent" γ (Q), whose fixed-point limit is the true γ*.

  6. Proposed sets of critical exponents for randomly branched polymers, using a known string theory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, N. H.; Moreno, A. J.

    2016-06-01

    The critical exponent ν for randomly branched polymers with dimensionality d equal to 3, is known exactly as 1/2. Here, we invoke an already available string theory model to predict the remaining static critical exponents. Utilizing results of Hsu et al. (Comput Phys Commun. 2005;169:114-116), results are added for d = 8. Experiment plus simulation would now be important to confirm, or if necessary to refine, the proposed values.

  7. p-exponent and p-leaders, Part II: Multifractal analysis. Relations to detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonarduzzi, R.; Wendt, H.; Abry, P.; Jaffard, S.; Melot, C.; Roux, S. G.; Torres, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    Multifractal analysis studies signals, functions, images or fields via the fluctuations of their local regularity along time or space, which capture crucial features of their temporal/spatial dynamics. It has become a standard signal and image processing tool and is commonly used in numerous applications of different natures. In its common formulation, it relies on the Hölder exponent as a measure of local regularity, which is by nature restricted to positive values and can hence be used for locally bounded functions only. In this contribution, it is proposed to replace the Hölder exponent with a collection of novel exponents for measuring local regularity, the p-exponents. One of the major virtues of p-exponents is that they can potentially take negative values. The corresponding wavelet-based multiscale quantities, the p-leaders, are constructed and shown to permit the definition of a new multifractal formalism, yielding an accurate practical estimation of the multifractal properties of real-world data. Moreover, theoretical and practical connections to and comparisons against another multifractal formalism, referred to as multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis, are achieved. The performance of the proposed p-leader multifractal formalism is studied and compared to previous formalisms using synthetic multifractal signals and images, illustrating its theoretical and practical benefits. The present contribution is complemented by a companion article studying in depth the theoretical properties of p-exponents and the rich classification of local singularities it permits.

  8. Statistical Analysis of Hurst Exponents of Essential/Nonessential Genes in 33 Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Baojin; Xu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Methods for identifying essential genes currently depend predominantly on biochemical experiments. However, there is demand for improved computational methods for determining gene essentiality. In this study, we used the Hurst exponent, a characteristic parameter to describe long-range correlation in DNA, and analyzed its distribution in 33 bacterial genomes. In most genomes (31 out of 33) the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the essential genes were significantly higher than for the corresponding full-gene-set, whereas the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the nonessential genes remained unchanged or increased only slightly. All of the Hurst exponents of essential genes followed a normal distribution, with one exception. We therefore propose that the distribution feature of Hurst exponents of essential genes can be used as a classification index for essential gene prediction in bacteria. For computer-aided design in the field of synthetic biology, this feature can build a restraint for pre- or post-design checking of bacterial essential genes. Moreover, considering the relationship between gene essentiality and evolution, the Hurst exponents could be used as a descriptive parameter related to evolutionary level, or be added to the annotation of each gene. PMID:26067107

  9. p-exponent and p-leaders, Part I: Negative pointwise regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffard, S.; Melot, C.; Leonarduzzi, R.; Wendt, H.; Abry, P.; Roux, S. G.; Torres, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    Multifractal analysis aims to characterize signals, functions, images or fields, via the fluctuations of their local regularity along time or space, hence capturing crucial features of their temporal/spatial dynamics. Multifractal analysis is becoming a standard tool in signal and image processing, and is nowadays widely used in numerous applications of different natures. Its common formulation relies on the measure of local regularity via the Hölder exponent, by nature restricted to positive values, and thus to locally bounded functions or signals. It is here proposed to base the quantification of local regularity on p-exponents, a novel local regularity measure potentially taking negative values. First, the theoretical properties of p-exponents are studied in detail. Second, wavelet-based multiscale quantities, the p-leaders, are constructed and shown to permit accurate practical estimation of p-exponents. Exploiting the potential dependence with p, it is also shown how the collection of p-exponents enriches the classification of locally singular behaviors in functions, signals or images. The present contribution is complemented by a companion article developing the p-leader based multifractal formalism associated to p-exponents.

  10. Research and development toward a 4.5-1.5{angstrom} linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the theoretical and technical feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 {Angstrom}) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation include: (1) a peak current in the 3-7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, ad (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}{le}{lambda}/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.1-0.2% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 4-8 m for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to {approximately}20 {angstrom}, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 {angstrom} LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas. These include the construction and operation of a linac test stand for developing laser-driven photocathode rf guns with normalized emittances approaching 1 mm-mr; development of advanced beam compression, stability, an emittance control techniques at multi-GeV energies; the construction and operation of a FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE) for theoretical and experimental studies of SASE at IR wavelengths; an undulator development program to investigate superconducting, hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM), and pulsed-Cu technologies; theoretical and computational studies of high-gain FEL physics and LCLS component designs.

  11. The 13 angstroms structure of a chaperonin GroEL-protein substrate complex by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Falke, Scott; Tama, Florence; Brooks, Charles L; Gogol, Edward P; Fisher, Mark T

    2005-04-22

    The 13 angstroms resolution structures of GroEL bound to a single monomer of the protein substrate glutamine synthetase (GS(m)), as well as that of unliganded GroEL have been determined from a heterogeneous image population using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) coupled with single-particle image classification and reconstruction techniques. We combined structural data from cryo-EM maps and dynamic modeling, taking advantage of the known X-ray crystallographic structure and normal mode flexible fitting (NMFF) analysis, to describe the changes that occur in GroEL structure induced by GS(m) binding. The NMFF analysis reveals that the molecular movements induced by GS(m) binding propagate throughout the GroEL structure. The modeled molecular motions show that some domains undergo en bloc movements, while others show more complex independent internal movements. Interestingly, the substrate-bound apical domains of both the cis (GS(m)-bound ring) and trans (the opposite substrate-free ring) show counterclockwise rotations, in the same direction (though not as dramatic) as those documented for the ATP-GroEL-induced structure changes. The structural changes from the allosteric substrate protein-induced negative cooperativity between the GroEL rings involves upward concerted movements of both cis and trans equatorial domains toward the GS(m)-bound ring, while the inter-ring distances between the heptamer contact residues are maintained. Furthermore, the NMFF analysis identifies the secondary structural elements that are involved in the observed approximately 5 angstroms reduction in the diameter of the cavity opening in the unbound trans ring. Understanding the molecular basis of these substrate protein-induced structural changes across the heptamer rings provides insight into the origins of the allosteric negative cooperative effects that are transmitted over long distances (approximately 140 angstroms). PMID:15808865

  12. The effect of pressure on the surface plasmon absorption spectra of colloidal gold and silver particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coffer, J.L.; Shapley, J.R.; Drickamer, H.G. )

    1990-05-09

    The first measurements of the effect of pressure on the peak position ({omega}{sub sp}) and line width (fwhm) of the surface plasmon absorption in several Au and Ag hydrosols have been recorded up to 10 kbar. Red shifts of the plasmon peak with increasing pressure are observed for relatively large metal particles prepared by the citrate procedure (Au, {anti d} = 265 {angstrom}; Ag, {anti d} = 230 {angstrom}). The shift for silver is over twice that of gold ({minus}420 cm{sup {minus}1} vs {minus} 200 cm{sup {minus}1}). These red shifts are interpreted in terms of pressure-induced volume changes within the context of a free-electron model. In contrast, particles prepared by the Faraday method (Au, {anti d} = 54 {angstrom}; Ag, d{anti d} = 60 {angstrom}) show initial blue shifts with pressure, with the magnitude again larger for silver. Upon aging (as well as upon heating in the case of Au), the Au and Ag Faraday sols exhibit an increase in their average particle size and degree of aggregation. Correspondingly, the pressure response of their plasmon absorption approaches that of the citrate sols.

  13. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    to carbonyl- and nitro- functional groups on conjugated and aromatic organic structures (e.g. PAH, and terpene derived products). Using 12-hour fine (0.1-1.0 micron) aerosol samples collected in the field on quartz filters, uv/vis and infrared spectra were obtained in the laboratory using integrating spheres and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, respectively. An inter-comparison of the "real-time" measurements made by the photo-acoustic, aethalometer and MAAP techniques have been described. In addition, the in situ aethalometer (seven-channel) results are compared with continuous integrating sphere uv-visible spectra to examine the angstrom absorption coefficient variance. These results will be briefly overviewed and the specific posters detailing these results will be highlighted highlighted. This work was performed as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City under the support of the Atmospheric Science Program. "This researchwas supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329.

  14. Uranus - Narrow-waveband disk profiles in the spectral region 6000 to 8500 Angstroms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, M. J.; Franz, O. G.

    1979-01-01

    New narrow-band (100 A) photoelectric slit scan photometry of Uranus has been obtained in the spectral region 6000 to 8500 A. Coarse radial intensity profiles in seven wavebands are presented. Results of the investigation confirm earlier studies of limb brightening on the Uranus disk, but not all strong CH4 absorption bands are found to exhibit limb brightening. Specifically, the CH4 bands at 8000 and 8500 A show pronounced apparent limb darkening. Polar brightening may be responsible for the phenomenon. If so, an aerosol haze with a local optical thickness of approximately 0.5 or greater would be required. Visibility of the dense cloud layer located deep in the atmosphere might also cause apparent limb darkening. If so, the maximum permitted CH4/H2 mixing ratio in the visible atmosphere would correspond to 3 times the solar value.

  15. Structure of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 1 at 1.9 angstrom Resolution and Low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Jasti,J.; Furukawa, H.; Gonzales, E.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, proton-activated receptors that belong to the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin family of ion channels and are implicated in perception of pain, ischaemic stroke, mechanosensation, learning and memory. Here we report the low-pH crystal structure of a chicken ASIC1 deletion mutant at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. Each subunit of the chalice-shaped homotrimer is composed of short amino and carboxy termini, two transmembrane helices, a bound chloride ion and a disulphide-rich, multidomain extracellular region enriched in acidic residues and carboxyl-carboxylate pairs within 3 Angstroms, suggesting that at least one carboxyl group bears a proton. Electrophysiological studies on aspartate-to-asparagine mutants confirm that these carboxyl-carboxylate pairs participate in proton sensing. Between the acidic residues and the transmembrane pore lies a disulphide-rich 'thumb' domain poised to couple the binding of protons to the opening of the ion channel, thus demonstrating that proton activation involves long-range conformational changes.

  16. A remark on the theory of measuring thermal diffusivity by the modified Angstrom's method. [in lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horai, K.-I.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a sample by the modified Angstrom method is developed for the case in which radiative heat loss from the end surface of the sample is not negligible, and applied to measurements performed on lunar samples. Formulas allowing sample thermal diffusivity to be determined from the amplitude decay and phase lag of a temperature wave traveling through the sample are derived for a flat disk sample for which only heat loss from the end surface is important, and a sample of finite diameter and length for which heat loss through the end and side surfaces must be considered. It is noted that in the case of a flat disk, measurements at a single angular frequency of the temperature wave are sufficient, while the sample of finite diameter and length requires measurements at two discrete angular frequencies. Comparison of the values of the thermal diffusivities of two lunar samples of dimensions approximately 1 x 1 x 2 cm derived by the present methods and by the Angstrom theory for a finite bar reveals them to differ by not more than 5%, and indicates that more refined data are required as the measurement theory becomes more complicated.

  17. 2.0 Angstrom Structure of Prostaglandin H2 Synthase-1 Reconstituted with a Manganese Porphyrin Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,K.; Selinsky, B.; Loll, P.

    2006-01-01

    Prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase (EC 1.14.99.1) is a clinically important drug target that catalyzes two key steps in the biosynthesis of the eicosanoid hormones. The enzyme contains spatially distinct cyclooxygenase and peroxidase active sites, both of which require a heme cofactor. Substitution of ferric heme by Mn{sup III} protoporphyrin IX greatly diminishes the peroxidase activity, but has little effect on the cyclooxygenase activity. Here, the 2.0 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of the Mn{sup III} form of ovine prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase-1 is described (R = 21.8%, R{sub free} = 23.7%). Substitution of Mn{sup III} for Fe{sup III} causes no structural perturbations in the protein. However, the out-of-plane displacement of the manganese ion with respect to the porphyrin is greater than that of the iron by approximately 0.2 Angstroms. This perturbation may help to explain the altered catalytic properties of the manganese enzyme.

  18. Merits of a sub-harmonic approach to a single-pass, 1.5-{Angstrom} FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Nuhn, H.D.; Bonifacio, R.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1995-03-01

    SLAC/SSRL and collaborators elsewhere are studying th physics of a single-pass, FEL amplifier operating in th 1 -- 2 {Angstrom}, wavelength region based on electron beams from the SLAC linac at {approximately} 15 GeV energy. Hoping to reduce the total wiggler length needed to reach saturation when starting from shot noise, we have examined the benefits of making the first part of the wiggler resonant at a subharmonic wavelength (e.g. 4.5 {Angstrom}) at which the gain length can be significantly shorter. This leads to bunching of the electron beam at both the subharmonic and fundaments wavelengths, thus providing a strong coherent ``seed`` for exponential growth of radiation at the fundamental in the second part of the wiggler. Using both multi-harmonic and multi-frequency 2D FEL simulation codes, we have examined the predicted performance of such devices and the sensitivity to electron beam parameters such as current, emittance, and instantaneous energy spread.

  19. Experimental indication of a naphthalene-base molecular aggregate for the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Cronin, J. R.; McGehee, M. D.; Clemett, S. J.; Gillette, S.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments where the simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) naphthalene (C10H8) is subjected to the energetic environment of a plasma have resulted in the synthesis of a molecular aggregate that has ultraviolet spectral characteristics that suggest it provides insight into the nature of the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature and may be a laboratory analog. Ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and mass spectroscopy, along with gas chromatography, indicate that it is a molecular aggregate in which an aromatic double ring ("naphthalene") structural base serves as the electron "box" chromophore that gives rise to the envelope of the 2175 angstroms feature. This chromophore can also provide the peak of the feature or function as a mantle in concert with another peak provider such as graphite. The molecular base/chromophore manifests itself both as a structural component of an alkyl-aromatic polymer and as a substructure of hydrogenated PAH species. Its spectral and molecular characteristics are consistent with what is generally expected for a complex molecular aggregate that has a role as an interstellar constituent.

  20. Experimental indication of a naphthalene-base molecular aggregate for the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature.

    PubMed

    Beegle, L W; Wdowiak, T J; Robinson, M S; Cronin, J R; McGehee, M D; Clemett, S J; Gillette, S

    1997-10-01

    Experiments where the simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) naphthalene (C10H8) is subjected to the energetic environment of a plasma have resulted in the synthesis of a molecular aggregate that has ultraviolet spectral characteristics that suggest it provides insight into the nature of the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature and may be a laboratory analog. Ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and mass spectroscopy, along with gas chromatography, indicate that it is a molecular aggregate in which an aromatic double ring ("naphthalene") structural base serves as the electron "box" chromophore that gives rise to the envelope of the 2175 angstroms feature. This chromophore can also provide the peak of the feature or function as a mantle in concert with another peak provider such as graphite. The molecular base/chromophore manifests itself both as a structural component of an alkyl-aromatic polymer and as a substructure of hydrogenated PAH species. Its spectral and molecular characteristics are consistent with what is generally expected for a complex molecular aggregate that has a role as an interstellar constituent.

  1. The Multivariate Largest Lyapunov Exponent as an Age-Related Metric of Quiet Standing Balance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang

    2015-01-01

    The largest Lyapunov exponent has been researched as a metric of the balance ability during human quiet standing. However, the sensitivity and accuracy of this measurement method are not good enough for clinical use. The present research proposes a metric of the human body's standing balance ability based on the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent which can quantify the human standing balance. The dynamic multivariate time series of ankle, knee, and hip were measured by multiple electrical goniometers. Thirty-six normal people of different ages participated in the test. With acquired data, the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent was calculated. Finally, the results of the proposed approach were analysed and compared with the traditional method, for which the largest Lyapunov exponent and power spectral density from the centre of pressure were also calculated. The following conclusions can be obtained. The multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent has a higher degree of differentiation in differentiating balance in eyes-closed conditions. The MLLE value reflects the overall coordination between multisegment movements. Individuals of different ages can be distinguished by their MLLE values. The standing stability of human is reduced with the increment of age. PMID:26064182

  2. Predicting the evolutionary dynamic behavior of a laser with injected signal using Lyapunov exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandy, D. K.; Hall, J. R.; Denker, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    We show that the role of the Lyapunov exponents can be extended beyond the customary local instability, such as limit cycle behavior, to include its use as an evolutionary predictor of the dynamics of a laser with injected signal (LIS). Numerical studies of LIS reveal that as a function of the input-signal strength the evolution of two nonzero Lyapunov exponents (generally equal) distinctively predicts the evolutionary trend of the fundamental frequency of the laser output signal (an important dynamic characteristic of the LIS) even with the presence of some noise. This globally predictive behavior of the Lyapunov exponents includes also the dynamic behavior of the individual coexisting attractors. Different coexisting attractors of LIS and configurations of Lyapunov exponents for both individual attractors and the global system are reported. Two LIS case studies are considered: (I) a high-gain system with a rich history of nonlinear behavior but not experimentally accessible, and (II) a low-gain system that has complex dynamics and is experimentally accessible for Class B lasers. Universality arguments support the thesis that these different configurations and the extended role of the Lyapunov exponents as an evolutionary predictor of the dynamics will be observed in other nonlinear, dynamic dissipative systems as well.

  3. Non-mean-field critical exponent in a mean-field model: dynamics versus statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shun; Patelli, Aurelio; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Y

    2014-03-01

    Mean-field theory tells us that the classical critical exponent of susceptibility is twice that of magnetization. However, linear response theory based on the Vlasov equation, which is naturally introduced by the mean-field nature, makes the former exponent half of the latter for families of quasistationary states having second order phase transitions in the Hamiltonian mean-field model and its variances, in the low-energy phase. We clarify that this strange exponent is due to the existence of Casimir invariants which trap the system in a quasistationary state for a time scale diverging with the system size. The theoretical prediction is numerically confirmed by N-body simulations for the equilibrium states and a family of quasistationary states. PMID:24730814

  4. Evaluation on the coefficient and exponent of runoff energy in MUSLE in forest watersed of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehoon; Choi, Hyung Tae; Lim, Hong-geun

    2016-04-01

    MUSLE is one of evaluation method of erosion and has been widely applied various areas. However, the coefficient and exponent of runoff energy in MUSLE was developed from US areas, especially Nebraska and Texas areas. Thus, when these values are applied in Korean forest watershed they should be modified due to the difference conditions such as topography, forest type and slope. This study was carried out to examine the coefficient and exponent of runoff energy in MUSLE for small forest watershed in Korea. Peak discharge, runoff volume and sediment yield were measured in forest watershed and the coefficient and exponent of runoff energy were calculated to 0.002 and 0.81 respectively. These values were based on undisturbed forest watershed and could be larger in disturbed forest including forest management or forest fires.

  5. Nonlinear analysis using Lyapunov exponents in breast thermograms to identify abnormal lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EtehadTavakol, M.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Lucas, C.; Sadri, S.; Ataei, M.

    2012-07-01

    Breast diseases are one of the major issues in women's health today. Early detection of breast cancer plays a significant role in reducing the mortality rate. Breast thermography is a potential early detection method which is non-invasive, non-radiating, passive, fast, painless, low cost, risk free with no contact with the body. By identifying and removing malignant tumors in early stages before they metastasize and spread to neighboring regions, cancer threats can be minimized. Cancer is often characterized as a chaotic, poorly regulated growth. Cancerous cells, tumors, and vasculature defy have irregular shapes which have potential to be described by a nonlinear dynamical system. Chaotic time series can provide the tools necessary to generate the procedures to evaluate the nonlinear system. Computing Lyapunov exponents is thus a powerful means of quantifying the degree of the chaos. In this paper, we present a novel approach using nonlinear chaotic dynamical system theory for estimating Lyapunov exponents in establishing possible difference between malignant and benign patterns. In order to develop the algorithm, the first hottest regions of breast thermal images are identified first, and then one dimensional scalar time series is obtained in terms of the distance between each subsequent boundary contour points and the center of the mass of the first hottest region. In the next step, the embedding dimension is estimated, and by time delay embedding method, the phase space is reconstructed. In the last step, the Lyapunov exponents are computed to analyze normality or abnormality of the lesions. Positive Lyapunov exponents indicates abnormality while negative Lyapunov exponents represent normality. The normalized errors show the algorithm is satisfactorily, and provide a measure of chaos. It is shown that nonlinear analysis of breast thermograms using Lyapunov exponents may potentially capable of improving reliability of thermography in breast tumor detection as

  6. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  7. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  8. Application of automated deduction to the search for single axioms for exponent groups

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Wos, L.

    1992-02-11

    We present new results in axiomatic group theory obtained by using automated deduction programs. The results include single axioms, some with the identity and others without, for groups of exponents 3, 4, 5 and 7, and a general form for single axioms for groups of odd exponent. The results were obtained by using the programs in three separate ways: as a symbolic calculator, to search for proofs,and to search for couterexamples. We also touch on relations between logic programming and automated reasoning.

  9. Extracting critical exponents for sequences of numerical data via series extrapolation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cöster, Kris; Schmidt, Kai Phillip

    2016-08-01

    We describe a generic scheme to extract critical exponents of quantum lattice models from sequences of numerical data, which is, for example, relevant for nonperturbative linked-cluster expansions or nonperturbative variants of continuous unitary transformations. The fundamental idea behind our approach is a reformulation of the numerical data sequences as a series expansion in a pseudoparameter. This allows us to utilize standard series expansion extrapolation techniques to extract critical properties such as critical points and critical exponents. The approach is illustrated for the deconfinement transition of the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain.

  10. Extracting critical exponents for sequences of numerical data via series extrapolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Cöster, Kris; Schmidt, Kai Phillip

    2016-08-01

    We describe a generic scheme to extract critical exponents of quantum lattice models from sequences of numerical data, which is, for example, relevant for nonperturbative linked-cluster expansions or nonperturbative variants of continuous unitary transformations. The fundamental idea behind our approach is a reformulation of the numerical data sequences as a series expansion in a pseudoparameter. This allows us to utilize standard series expansion extrapolation techniques to extract critical properties such as critical points and critical exponents. The approach is illustrated for the deconfinement transition of the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain. PMID:27627240

  11. Explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. The application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law allows interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  12. Brief communication: Possible explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Allen G.

    2016-04-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. Application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law may allow interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  13. Extracting critical exponents for sequences of numerical data via series extrapolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Cöster, Kris; Schmidt, Kai Phillip

    2016-08-01

    We describe a generic scheme to extract critical exponents of quantum lattice models from sequences of numerical data, which is, for example, relevant for nonperturbative linked-cluster expansions or nonperturbative variants of continuous unitary transformations. The fundamental idea behind our approach is a reformulation of the numerical data sequences as a series expansion in a pseudoparameter. This allows us to utilize standard series expansion extrapolation techniques to extract critical properties such as critical points and critical exponents. The approach is illustrated for the deconfinement transition of the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain.

  14. The susceptibility critical exponent for a nonaqueous ionic binary mixture near a consolute point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Kai C.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.; Levelt Sengers, J. M. H.

    1992-01-01

    We report turbidity measurements of a nonaqueous ionic solution of triethyl n-hexylammonium triethyl n-hexylboride in diphenyl ether. A classical susceptibility critical exponent gamma = 1.01 +/- 0.01 is obtained over the reduced temperature range t between values of 0.1 and 0.0001. The best fits of the sample transmission had a standard deviation of 0.39 percent over this range. Ising and spherical model critical exponents are firmly excluded. The correlation length amplitude xi sub 0 from fitting is 1.0 +/- 0.2 nm which is much larger than values found in neutral fluids and some aqueous binary mixtures.

  15. Experimental study of critical exponents of electrical conductivity in a two-dimensional continuum percolation system

    PubMed

    Okazaki; Horibe; Maruyama; Miyazima

    2000-06-01

    In this paper an experimental study is presented for critical exponents of electrical conductivity in an inverse Swiss-cheese model. Filled circles are drawn on random positions of square paper in drawing ink with an X-Y plotter, and electrical resistance between both opposite sides is measured automatically by the use of general purpose interface bus system. Electrical conductivity is obtained from the inverse of the electrical resistance. Electrical conductivity in a bond process is also measured with the same system. It is confirmed that the critical exponent of electrical conductivity of a continuum two-dimensional inverse Swiss-cheese model is different from that of a discrete one.

  16. Critical exponents in U(1) lattice gauge theory with a monopole term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, G.; Kerler, W.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate critical properties of the phase transition in the four-dimensional compact U(1) lattice gauge theory supplemented by a monopole term for values of the monopole coupling λ such that the transition is of second order. It has been previously shown that at λ = 0.9 the critical exponent is already characteristic of a second-order transition and that it is different from the one of the Gaussian case. In the present study we perform a finite size analysis at λ = 1.1 to get information wether the value of this exponent is universal.

  17. Possible origin of the smaller-than-universal percolation-conductivity exponent in the continuum.

    PubMed

    Balberg, I; Azulay, D; Goldstein, Y; Jedrzejewski, J

    2016-06-01

    For quite a few systems in the continuum, such as carbon nanotube polymer composites and segregated composites, percolation electrical conductivity exponents that are much smaller than the universal value have been reported. This is unexpected in view of the classical lattice percolation theory. Here we provide a simple general phenomenological model that accounts for such observations within the framework of universality. We suggest that these small value exponents are due to the interplay between the connectivity and the structural variations that follow the increase of the fractional volume content of the conducting phase. PMID:27415233

  18. Crystal structure of intercalated four-stranded d(C3T) at 1.4 angstroms resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C. H.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of d(C3T), solved at 1.4 angstroms resolution, reveals that the molecule forms a four-stranded intercalated complex. It consists of two parallel-stranded duplexes, each of which is held together by cytosine-protonated cytosine base pairs. The two duplexes are intercalated with each other and have opposite strand orientation. The molecule has a flat, lath-like appearance, and the covalently bonded cytosines have a slow right-handed twist of 17.1 degrees. However, there is considerable asymmetry. On one of the flat sides, the phosphate groups are rotated away from the center of the molecule. They are held in this orientation by bridging water molecules that bind the NH of cytosine and a phosphate group of an opposite chain. There is also considerable microheterogeneity in the structure. The cytosine hemiprotonation occurs even at pH 7 where stable crystals form.

  19. Generation of GW-Level, Sub-Angstrom Radiation in the LCLS Using a Second-Harmonic Radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z

    2004-09-14

    Electron beams are strongly microbunched near the high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) saturation with a rich harmonic content in the beam current. While the coherent harmonic emission is possible in a planar undulator, the third-harmonic radiation typically dominates with about 1% of the fundamental power at saturation. In this paper, we discuss the second-harmonic radiation in the Linac Coherent Light Source. We show that by a suitable design of an second-stage undulator with its fundamental frequency tuned to the second harmonic of the first undulator, coherent second-harmonic radiation much more intense than the third-harmonic is emitted. Numerical simulations predict that GW-level, sub-Angstrom x-ray pulses can be generated in a relatively short second-harmonic radiator.

  20. The Interstellar Polarization Feature Associated with the 2175 Angstrom Extinction Bump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Wolff, Michael J.; Kim, S. H.; Martin, P. G.; Anderson, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    The most successful model at fitting the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction consists of two populations of bare silicate and graphite grains (Mathis, Rumpl & Nordsieck, (MRN)). The graphite grains are needed to fit the strong 2175 A extinction bump, with the silicates providing most of the smooth extinction seen at other wavelengths. From observations of the IR silicate absorption features, it was inferred that the silicate grains, non-spherical and aligned to the Galactic magnetic field, were responsible for the interstellar polarization. Aligned silicate grains make a very good fit to the smooth featureless UV polarization curves that comprise most of the observed sample. The lines of sight showing a UV polarization feature require something different, perhaps a second population of grains as do the fits to the extinction curve. The polarization wavelength dependence of HD 197770 can be fit by a MRN-like mixture of aligned bare silicate and graphite grains. However, none of the popular grain models including MRN envisaged an aligned bump grain population. It has been suggested that the extinction bump is not due to graphite but rather to a population of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). If the observed UV polarization features could be associated with the 2175 A bump then it would strengthen the argument that the bump must be due to grains rather than PAHs which are not likely to be aligned to the Galactic Magnetic field. The reality of ultraviolet polarization features has been confirmed by observations with ASTRO-2. The original detection toward HD 197770 has been confirmed and a new feature has been detected toward HD 147933-4. Both features have centroids lying close to 2175 A the location of the UV extinction bump. Two possibilities are considered for the source of the polarization bump, alignment of graphite grains responsible for the extinction bump or changes in the size distribution of the aligned silicate grains responsible for the

  1. The Angstrom Project: a microlensing survey of the structure and composition of the bulge of the Andromeda galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, E.; Darnley, M. J.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Newsam, A.; Park, B.-G.

    2006-02-01

    The Andromeda Galaxy Stellar Robotic Microlensing Project (The Angstrom Project) aims to use stellar microlensing events to trace the structure and composition of the inner regions of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). We present microlensing rate and time-scale predictions and spatial distributions for stellar and sub-stellar lens populations in combined disc and barred bulge models of M31. We show that at least half of the stellar microlenses in and around the bulge are expected to have characteristic durations between 1 and 10 d, rising to as much as 80 per cent for brown-dwarf dominated mass functions. These short-duration events are mostly missed by current microlensing surveys that are looking for Macho candidates in the M31 dark matter halo. Our models predict that an intensive monitoring survey programme, such as Angstrom, which will be able to detect events of durations upwards of a day, could detect around 30 events per season within ~5 arcmin of the M31 centre due to ordinary low-mass stars and remnants. This yield increases to more than 60 events for brown-dwarf dominated mass functions. The overall number of events and their average duration are sensitive diagnostics of the bulge mass, in particular the contribution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. The combination of an inclined disc, an offset bar-like bulge, and differences in the bulge and disc luminosity functions results in a four-way asymmetry in the number of events expected in each quadrant defined by the M31 disc axes. The asymmetry is sensitive to the bar prolongation, orientation and mass.

  2. Exponent Rummy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Leah

    2016-01-01

    Classroom teachers try to provide opportunities for students to practice and use the algebra skills they are learning in ways that are nonroutine. They also want to help students connect the big ideas of math with the skills they are learning as part of the balance between understanding concepts and procedures. Math games can be used to accomplish…

  3. How local factors affect the exponents of forced polymer translocation through a nano-pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyaa, Aniket

    2010-02-01

    We study polymer translocation through a narrow pore driven by a bias present inside the pore with an aim to compare predictions of the existing theoretical results with those that we obtain using Langevin dynamics simulation in three dimensions(3D). We find that the translocation exponent α(< τ > ˜Nα) decreases from 1.35 to 1.2 as the width of the pore is decreased from 1.5 σ to 1.1 σ. The exponent ℵ = 1.2 (extracted from chain lengths up to N = 256) not only violates the lower limit 1 + ν proposed by Kantor and Kardar (Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, Phys. Rev. E, 69, 021806 (2004)) earlier but also lower than the more recently proposed lower limit (1 + 2 ν) /(1 + ν) by Vocks et al. (H. Vocks, D. Panja, G. T. Barkema, and R. C. Ball, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 20, 095224 (2008)). We find that the average calculated during the entire translocation process is dominated by the equilibrium configurations at the cis side and therefore, relatively insensitive to the pore width and approximately described by the equilibrium Flory exponent ν. The velocity of the center of mass of the translocating chain on the contrary exhibits a systematic variation. Therefore, if we assume (< τ > ˜ / ) , the dependence of on the pore width appears to be the primary factor that affects the translocation exponent.

  4. Hurst exponent estimation of self-affine time series using quantile graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanharo, Andriana S. L. O.; Ramos, Fernando M.

    2016-02-01

    In the context of dynamical systems, time series analysis is frequently used to identify the underlying nature of a phenomenon of interest from a sequence of observations. For signals with a self-affine structure, like fractional Brownian motions (fBm), the Hurst exponent H is one of the key parameters. Here, the use of quantile graphs (QGs) for the estimation of H is proposed. A QG is generated by mapping the quantiles of a time series into nodes of a graph. H is then computed directly as the power-law scaling exponent of the mean jump length performed by a random walker on the QG, for different time differences between the time series data points. The QG method for estimating the Hurst exponent was applied to fBm with different H values. Comparison with the exact H values used to generate the motions showed an excellent agreement. For a given time series length, estimation error depends basically on the statistical framework used for determining the exponent of the power-law model. The QG method is numerically simple and has only one free parameter, Q, the number of quantiles/nodes. With a simple modification, it can be extended to the analysis of fractional Gaussian noises.

  5. On relations among the entropic chaos degree, the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and the Lyapunov exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Kamizawa, T. Hara, T.; Ohya, M.

    2014-03-15

    There exist several criteria to describe the chaotic behaviour of a dynamical system. In this paper, we discuss the relations among three criteria: Entropic Chaos Degree, Kolmogorov-Shinai entropy, and Lyapunov exponent. Moreover, the problems of their computation are discussed.

  6. No ISCOs in Charged Myers Perry Spacetimes by Measuring Lyapunov Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-01-01

    By computing coordinate time Lyapunov exponent, we prove that for more than four spacetime dimensions (N ≥ 3), there are no Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) in charged Myers Perry blackhole spacetime.Using it, we show that the instability of equatorial circular geodesics, both massive and massless particles for such types of blackhole space-times.

  7. Minority-spin dynamics in the nonhomogeneous Ising model: Diverging time scales and exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullick, Pratik; Sen, Parongama

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of the Ising model under a zero-temperature quench with the initial fraction of up spins 0 ≤x ≤1 . In one dimension, the known results for persistence probability are verified; it shows algebraic decay for both up and down spins asymptotically with different exponents. It is found that the conventional finite-size scaling is valid here. In two dimensions, however, the persistence probabilities are no longer algebraic; in particular for x ≤0.5 , persistence for the up (minority) spins shows the behavior Pmin(t ) ˜t-γexp[-(t/τ ) δ] with time t , while for the down (majority) spins, Pmaj(t ) approaches a finite value. We find that the timescale τ diverges as (xc-x ) -λ, where xc=0.5 and λ ≃2.31 . The exponent γ varies as θ2 d+c0(xc-x ) β where θ2 d≃0.215 is very close to the persistence exponent in two dimensions; β ≃1 . The results in two dimensions can be understood qualitatively by studying the exit probability, which for different system size is found to have the form E (x ) =f [(x/-xc xc) L1 /ν] , with ν ≈1.47 . This result suggests that τ ˜Lz ˜ , where z ˜=λ/ν =1.57 ±0.11 is an exponent not explored earlier.

  8. Stiffness dependence of critical exponents of semiflexible polymer chains situated on two-dimensional compact fractals.

    PubMed

    Zivić, Ivan; Elezović-Hadzić, Suncica; Milosević, Sava

    2009-12-01

    We present an exact and Monte Carlo renormalization group (MCRG) study of semiflexible polymer chains on an infinite family of the plane-filling (PF) fractals. The fractals are compact, that is, their fractal dimension df is equal to 2 for all members of the fractal family enumerated by the odd integer b(3exponents nu (associated with the mean squared end-to-end distances of polymer chain) and gamma (associated with the total number of different polymer chains). In addition, we calculate nu and gamma through the MCRG approach for b up to 201. Our results show that for each particular b, critical exponents are stiffness dependent functions, in such a way that the stiffer polymer chains (with smaller values of s) display enlarged values of nu, and diminished values of gamma. On the other hand, for any specific s, the critical exponent nu monotonically decreases, whereas the critical exponent gamma monotonically increases, with the scaling parameter b. We reflect on a possible relevance of the criticality of semiflexible polymer chains on the PF family of fractals to the same problem on the regular Euclidean lattices.

  9. Estimating the self-similar exponent of broad-sense self-similar processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Guijun; Tong, Changqing

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm about the self-similar exponent of self-similar processes is introduced which is used to explore long memory in financial time series. This method can work for more general broad-sense self-similar processes. We prove that this algorithm performs much better than the classical methods.

  10. On identifying relationships between the flood scaling exponent and basin attributes.

    PubMed

    Medhi, Hemanta; Tripathi, Shivam

    2015-07-01

    Floods are known to exhibit self-similarity and follow scaling laws that form the basis of regional flood frequency analysis. However, the relationship between basin attributes and the scaling behavior of floods is still not fully understood. Identifying these relationships is essential for drawing connections between hydrological processes in a basin and the flood response of the basin. The existing studies mostly rely on simulation models to draw these connections. This paper proposes a new methodology that draws connections between basin attributes and the flood scaling exponents by using observed data. In the proposed methodology, region-of-influence approach is used to delineate homogeneous regions for each gaging station. Ordinary least squares regression is then applied to estimate flood scaling exponents for each homogeneous region, and finally stepwise regression is used to identify basin attributes that affect flood scaling exponents. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is tested by applying it to data from river basins in the United States. The results suggest that flood scaling exponent is small for regions having (i) large abstractions from precipitation in the form of large soil moisture storages and high evapotranspiration losses, and (ii) large fractions of overland flow compared to base flow, i.e., regions having fast-responding basins. Analysis of simple scaling and multiscaling of floods showed evidence of simple scaling for regions in which the snowfall dominates the total precipitation.

  11. Regularity for the porous medium equation with variable exponent: The singular case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, Eurica

    We extend to the singular case the results of [E. Henriques, J.M. Urbano, Intrinsic scaling for PDEs with an exponential nonlinearity, Indiana Univ. Math. J. 55 (5) (2006) 1701-1721] concerning the regularity of weak solutions of the porous medium equation with variable exponent. The method of intrinsic scaling is used to show that local weak solutions are locally continuous.

  12. Critical slowing down and critical exponents in LD/PIN optically-bistable semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Lichen; Guo Yili

    1988-04-01

    Critical slowing down for LD/PIN bistable optical semiconductor lasers and the critical exponents ..gamma.. for this system have been experimentally investigated. The experimental value ..gamma..approx.0.53 is basically in agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.5.

  13. On identifying relationships between the flood scaling exponent and basin attributes.

    PubMed

    Medhi, Hemanta; Tripathi, Shivam

    2015-07-01

    Floods are known to exhibit self-similarity and follow scaling laws that form the basis of regional flood frequency analysis. However, the relationship between basin attributes and the scaling behavior of floods is still not fully understood. Identifying these relationships is essential for drawing connections between hydrological processes in a basin and the flood response of the basin. The existing studies mostly rely on simulation models to draw these connections. This paper proposes a new methodology that draws connections between basin attributes and the flood scaling exponents by using observed data. In the proposed methodology, region-of-influence approach is used to delineate homogeneous regions for each gaging station. Ordinary least squares regression is then applied to estimate flood scaling exponents for each homogeneous region, and finally stepwise regression is used to identify basin attributes that affect flood scaling exponents. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is tested by applying it to data from river basins in the United States. The results suggest that flood scaling exponent is small for regions having (i) large abstractions from precipitation in the form of large soil moisture storages and high evapotranspiration losses, and (ii) large fractions of overland flow compared to base flow, i.e., regions having fast-responding basins. Analysis of simple scaling and multiscaling of floods showed evidence of simple scaling for regions in which the snowfall dominates the total precipitation. PMID:26232978

  14. Dynamical generalized Hurst exponent as a tool to monitor unstable periods in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Raffaello; Di Matteo, T.; Gramatica, Ruggero; Aste, Tomaso

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the use of the Hurst exponent, dynamically computed over a weighted moving time-window, to evaluate the level of stability/instability of financial firms. Financial firms bailed-out as a consequence of the 2007-2008 credit crisis show a neat increase with time of the generalized Hurst exponent in the period preceding the unfolding of the crisis. Conversely, firms belonging to other market sectors, which suffered the least throughout the crisis, show opposite behaviors. We find that the multifractality of the bailed-out firms increase at the crisis suggesting that the multi fractal properties of the time series are changing. These findings suggest the possibility of using the scaling behavior as a tool to track the level of stability of a firm. In this paper, we introduce a method to compute the generalized Hurst exponent which assigns larger weights to more recent events with respect to older ones. In this way large fluctuations in the remote past are less likely to influence the recent past. We also investigate the scaling associated with the tails of the log-returns distributions and compare this scaling with the scaling associated with the Hurst exponent, observing that the processes underlying the price dynamics of these firms are truly multi-scaling.

  15. Physiological responses during matches and profile of elite pencak silat exponents.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Tan, Benedict; Teh, Kong Chuan

    2002-12-01

    This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study describing the physiological responses during competitive matches and profile of elite exponents of an emerging martial art sport, pencak silat. Thirty exponents (21 males and 9 females) were involved in the study. Match responses (i.e. heart rate (HR) throughout match and capillary blood lactate concentration, [La], at pre-match and at the end of every round) were obtained during actual competitive duels. Elite silat exponents' physiological attributes were assessed via anthropometry, vertical jump, isometric grip strength, maximal oxygen uptake, and the Wingate 30 s anaerobic test of the upper and lower body, in the laboratory. The match response data showed that silat competitors' mean HR was > 84% of estimated HR maximum and levels of [La] ranged from 6.7 - 18.7 mMol(-1) during matches. This suggests that competitive silat matches are characterised by high aerobic and anaerobic responses. In comparison to elite taekwondo and judo athletes' physiological characteristics, elite silat exponents have lower aerobic fitness and grip strength, but greater explosive leg power (vertical jump). Generally, they also possessed a similar anaerobic capability in the lower but markedly inferior anaerobic capability in the upper body.

  16. Direct test of the critical exponents at the sol-gel transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Demet; Pekcan, Önder; Yılmaz, Yaşar

    2004-01-01

    The steady state fluorescence technique was used to study the sol-gel transition for the solution-free radical cross-linking polymerization of acrylamide (AAm), with N,N'-methylenebis (acrylamide) as cross linker in the presence of ammonium persulfate as an initiator. Pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1, 3,6-trisulfonic acid, trisodium salt) is used as a fluoroprobe for monitoring the polymerization. Pyranine molecules start to bind to acrylamide polymer chains upon the initiation of the polymerization, thus the spectra of the bonded pyranines shift to the shorter wavelengths. Fluorescence spectra from the bonded pyranines allows one to monitor the sol-gel transition, without disturbing the system mechanically, and to test the universality of the sol-gel transition as a function of some kinetic parameters such as polymer concentration, cross-linker concentration, and temperature. Observations around the critical point show that there are three regimes for AAm concentration in which the exponents differ drastically. The gel fraction exponent β and the weight average degree of polymerization exponent γ agree best with the static percolation results for higher acrylamide concentrations above 1M, but they cross over from percolation to mean-field (Flory-Stockmayer) values when the AAm concentration is lower than 2M. For very low polymer concentrations, below which the system can not form the gel, the exponents differ considerably from both the percolation and the mean-field values.

  17. Graded Response Model Based on the Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models for Dichotomous Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    2008-01-01

    Samejima ("Psychometrika "65:319--335, 2000) proposed the logistic positive exponent family of models (LPEF) for dichotomous responses in the unidimensional latent space. The objective of the present paper is to propose and discuss a graded response model that is expanded from the LPEF, in the context of item response theory (IRT). This specific…

  18. Two-exponent Lavalette function: A generalization for the case of adherents to a religious movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, Marcel

    2014-06-01

    The Lavalette function is generalized to a two-exponent function in order to represent data looking like a sigmoid on semilogarithmic plots. A Mandelbrot trick is suggested for further investigations, if more fit parameters are needed. The analyzed data is that of the number of adherents to the main religions in the 20th century.

  19. Phase space reconstruction and estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent for gait kinematic data

    SciTech Connect

    Josiński, Henryk; Świtoński, Adam; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2015-03-10

    The authors describe an example of application of nonlinear time series analysis directed at identifying the presence of deterministic chaos in human motion data by means of the largest Lyapunov exponent. The method was previously verified on the basis of a time series constructed from the numerical solutions of both the Lorenz and the Rössler nonlinear dynamical systems.

  20. a Multiple Riccati Equations Rational-Exponent Method and its Application to Whitham-Broer Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Zi-Hua; Jia, Dong-Li

    2013-03-01

    According to two dependent solutions to a generalized Riccati equation together with the equation itself, a multiple Riccati equations rational-exponent method is proposed and applied to Whitham-Broer-Kaup equation. It shows that this method is a more concise and efficient approach and can uniformly derive many types of combined solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations.

  1. Landau-like theory for universality of critical exponents in quasistationary states of isolated mean-field systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shun; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Y.

    2015-06-01

    An external force dynamically drives an isolated mean-field Hamiltonian system to a long-lasting quasistationary state, whose lifetime increases with population of the system. For second order phase transitions in quasistationary states, two nonclassical critical exponents have been reported individually by using a linear and a nonlinear response theories in a toy model. We provide a simple way to compute the critical exponents all at once, which is an analog of the Landau theory. The present theory extends the universality class of the nonclassical exponents to spatially periodic one-dimensional systems and shows that the exponents satisfy a classical scaling relation inevitably by using a key scaling of momentum.

  2. Inter-relationship between scaling exponents for describing self-similar river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Soohyun; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Natural river networks show well-known self-similar characteristics. Such characteristics are represented by various power-law relationships, e.g., between upstream length and drainage area (exponent h) (Hack, 1957), and in the exceedance probability distribution of upstream area (exponent ɛ) (Rodriguez-Iturbe et al., 1992). It is empirically revealed that these power-law exponents are within narrow ranges. Power-law is also found in the relationship between drainage density (the total stream length divided by the total basin area) and specified source area (the minimum drainage area to form a stream head) (exponent η) (Moussa and Bocquillon, 1996). Considering that above three scaling relationships all refer to fundamental measures of 'length' and 'area' of a given drainage basin, it is natural to hypothesize plausible inter-relationship between these three scaling exponents. Indeed, Rigon et al. (1996) demonstrated the relationship between ɛ and h. In this study, we expand this to a more general ɛ-η-h relationship. We approach ɛ-η relationship in an analytical manner while η-h relationship is demonstrated for six study basins in Korea. Detailed analysis and implications will be presented. References Hack, J. T. (1957). Studies of longitudinal river profiles in Virginia and Maryland. US, Geological Survey Professional Paper, 294. Moussa, R., & Bocquillon, C. (1996). Fractal analyses of tree-like channel networks from digital elevation model data. Journal of Hydrology, 187(1), 157-172. Rigon, R., Rodriguez-Iturbe, I., Maritan, A., Giacometti. A., Tarboton, D. G., & Rinaldo, A. (1996). On Hack's Law. Water Resources Research, 32(11), 3367-3374. Rodríguez-Iturbe, I., Ijjasz-Vasquez, E. J., Bras, R. L., & Tarboton, D. G. (1992). Power law distributions of discharge mass and energy in river basins. Water Resources Research, 28(4), 1089-1093.

  3. An analysis of the financial crisis in the KOSPI market using Hurst exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Kyubin; Oh, Gabjin; Kim, Seunghwan

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the study of the financial crisis has progressed to include the concept of the complex system, thereby improving the understanding of this extreme event from a neoclassical economic perspective. To determine which variables are related to the financial event caused by the 2008 US subprime crisis using temporal correlations, we investigate the diverse variables that may explain the financial system. These variables include return, volatility, trading volume and inter-trade duration data sets within the TAQ data for 27 highly capitalized individual companies listed on the KOSPI stock market. During 2008 and 2009, the Hurst exponent for the return time series over the whole period was less than 0.5, and the Hurst exponents for other variables, such as the volatility, trading volume and inter-trade duration, were greater than 0.5. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between the variation of temporal correlation and market instability based on these Hurst exponents and the degree of multifractality. We find that for the data related to trading volume, the Hurst exponents do not allow us to detect changes in market status, such as changes from normal to abnormal status, whereas other variables, including the return, volatility and weekly inter-trade duration, indicate a significant change in market status after the Lehman Brothers' bankruptcy. In addition, the multifractality and the measurement defined by subtracting the Hurst exponent of the return time series from that of the volatility time series decrease sharply after the US subprime event and recover approximately 50 days after the Lehman Brothers' collapse. Our findings suggest that the temporal features of financial quantities in the TAQ data set and the market complexity perform very well at diagnosing financial market stability.

  4. The Exponent of High-frequency Source Spectral Falloff and Contribution to Source Parameter Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, R.; Mori, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    As a way to understand the characteristics of the earthquake source, studies of source parameters (such as radiated energy and stress drop) and their scaling are important. In order to estimate source parameters reliably, often we must use appropriate source spectrum models and the omega-square model is most frequently used. In this model, the spectrum is flat in lower frequencies and the falloff is proportional to the angular frequency squared. However, Some studies (e.g. Allmann and Shearer, 2009; Yagi et al., 2012) reported that the exponent of the high frequency falloff is other than -2. Therefore, in this study we estimate the source parameters using a spectral model for which the falloff exponent is not fixed. We analyze the mainshock and larger aftershocks of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake. Firstly, we calculate the P wave and SH wave spectra using empirical Green functions (EGF) to remove the path effect (such as attenuation) and site effect. For the EGF event, we select a smaller earthquake that is highly-correlated with the target event. In order to obtain the stable results, we calculate the spectral ratios using a multitaper spectrum analysis (Prieto et al., 2009). Then we take a geometric mean from multiple stations. Finally, using the obtained spectra ratios, we perform a grid search to determine the high frequency falloffs, as well as corner frequency of both of events. Our results indicate the high frequency falloff exponent is often less than 2.0. We do not observe any regional, focal mechanism, or depth dependencies for the falloff exponent. In addition, our estimated corner frequencies and falloff exponents are consistent between the P wave and SH wave analysis. In our presentation, we show differences in estimated source parameters using a fixed omega-square model and a model allowing variable high-frequency falloff.

  5. Lyapunov Exponents for Branching Processes in a Random Environment: The Effect of Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautphenne, Sophie; Latouche, Guy

    2016-04-01

    We consider multitype branching processes evolving in a Markovian random environment. To determine whether or not the branching process becomes extinct almost surely is akin to computing the maximal Lyapunov exponent of a sequence of random matrices, which is a notoriously difficult problem. We define Markov chains associated to the branching process, and we construct bounds for the Lyapunov exponent. The bounds are obtained by adding or by removing information: to add information results in a lower bound, to remove information results in an upper bound, and we show that adding less information improves the lower bound. We give a few illustrative examples and we observe that the upper bound is generally more accurate than the lower bounds.

  6. Using two scaling exponents to describe the mechanical properties of swollen elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Dai; Kondo, Akifumi; Ohno, Nobutada

    2016-05-01

    We study the ability of two scaling exponents to describe the mechanical properties of swollen elastomers. Swelling effects on the Young's modulus and osmotic pressure of swollen elastomers at equilibrium swelling are investigated using literature data and the Flory-Rehner free energy function. An extended model is developed by introducing two scaling exponents into elastic strain energy functions that are separated into deviatoric and volumetric components. This extended model satisfactorily reproduces the two different swelling effects, and also predicts swelling-induced rupture. The predicted tendency readily explains experimental observations well, i.e., swelling-induced rupture occurs when small extensions are applied in good solvents, and elucidates the mechanism of swelling-induced rupture of elastomers.

  7. Estimating the anomalous diffusion exponent for single particle tracking data with measurement errors - An alternative approach

    PubMed Central

    Burnecki, Krzysztof; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Sikora, Grzegorz; Weron, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Accurately characterizing the anomalous diffusion of a tracer particle has become a central issue in biophysics. However, measurement errors raise difficulty in the characterization of single trajectories, which is usually performed through the time-averaged mean square displacement (TAMSD). In this paper, we study a fractionally integrated moving average (FIMA) process as an appropriate model for anomalous diffusion data with measurement errors. We compare FIMA and traditional TAMSD estimators for the anomalous diffusion exponent. The ability of the FIMA framework to characterize dynamics in a wide range of anomalous exponents and noise levels through the simulation of a toy model (fractional Brownian motion disturbed by Gaussian white noise) is discussed. Comparison to the TAMSD technique, shows that FIMA estimation is superior in many scenarios. This is expected to enable new measurement regimes for single particle tracking (SPT) experiments even in the presence of high measurement errors. PMID:26065707

  8. Method for estimating critical exponents in percolation processes with low sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastas, N.; Kosmidis, K.; Giazitzidis, P.; Maragakis, M.

    2014-12-01

    In phase-transition phenomena, the estimation of the critical point is crucial for the calculation of the various critical exponents and the determination of the universality class they belong to. However, this is not an easy task, since a large amount of realizations is needed to eliminate the noise in the data. In this paper, we introduce a novel method for the simultaneous estimation of the critical point pc and the critical exponent β /ν , applied for the case of "explosive" bond percolation on two-dimensional square lattices and Erdös-Rényi networks. The results show that with only a few hundred realizations, it is possible to acquire accurate values for these quantities. Guidelines are given at the end for the applicability of the method to other cases as well.

  9. Doping dependence of the dynamic critical exponent in Pr2-xCexCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M. C.; Sousa, J.; Salvaggio, M.; Greene, R. L.

    2008-03-01

    Scaling analysis of voltage vs. current isotherms is a favorite tool to study the normal-superconducting phase transition in cuprate superconductors. This measurement has never been performed on the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Pr2-xCexCuO4, despite unusual behaviors which may alter this phase transition and yield interesting results (behaviors such as the extended doping range of the anti-ferromagnetic phase and the quantum critical point). This is perhaps due to the lack of consensus regarding the analysis of voltage vs. current isotherms, due in part to finite-thickness effects even in thick (d 3000å) films. If finite-thickness effects are taken into consideration, we can find the dynamic critical exponent z in our Pr2-xCexCuO4 films. We present our results of the dynamic critical scaling exponent z as a function of doping.

  10. Estimating the anomalous diffusion exponent for single particle tracking data with measurement errors - An alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnecki, Krzysztof; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Sikora, Grzegorz; Weron, Aleksander

    2015-06-01

    Accurately characterizing the anomalous diffusion of a tracer particle has become a central issue in biophysics. However, measurement errors raise difficulty in the characterization of single trajectories, which is usually performed through the time-averaged mean square displacement (TAMSD). In this paper, we study a fractionally integrated moving average (FIMA) process as an appropriate model for anomalous diffusion data with measurement errors. We compare FIMA and traditional TAMSD estimators for the anomalous diffusion exponent. The ability of the FIMA framework to characterize dynamics in a wide range of anomalous exponents and noise levels through the simulation of a toy model (fractional Brownian motion disturbed by Gaussian white noise) is discussed. Comparison to the TAMSD technique, shows that FIMA estimation is superior in many scenarios. This is expected to enable new measurement regimes for single particle tracking (SPT) experiments even in the presence of high measurement errors.

  11. Critical exponents at the unconventional disorder-driven transition in a Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syzranov, S. V.; Ostrovsky, P. M.; Gurarie, V.; Radzihovsky, L.

    2016-04-01

    Disordered noninteracting systems in sufficiently high dimensions have been predicted to display a non-Anderson disorder-driven transition that manifests itself in the critical behavior of the density of states and other physical observables. Recently, the critical properties of this transition have been extensively studied for the specific case of Weyl semimetals by means of numerical and renormalisation-group approaches. Despite this, the values of the critical exponents at such a transition in a Weyl semimetal are currently under debate. We present an independent calculation of the critical exponents using a two-loop renormalization-group approach for Weyl fermions in 2 -ɛ dimensions and resolve controversies currently existing in the literature.

  12. Critical exponents at the unconventional disorder-driven transition in a Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syzranov, Sergey; Ostrovsky, Pavel; Gurarie, Victor; Radzihovsky, Leo

    Disordered non-interacting systems in sufficiently high dimensions have been predicted to display a non-Anderson disorder-driven transition that manifests itself in the critical behaviour of the density of states and other physical observables. Recently the critical properties of this transition have been extensively studied for the specific case of Weyl semimetals by means of numerical and renormalisation-group approaches. Despite this, the values of the critical exponents at such a transition in a Weyl semimetal are currently under debate. We present an independent calculation of the critical exponents using a two-loop renormalisation-group approach for Dirac fermions in 2 + ɛ dimensions and resolve controversies currently existing in the literature.

  13. Fractal dimension, walk dimension and conductivity exponent of karst networks around Tulum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrick, Martin; Renard, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the complex structure of karst networks is a challenge. In this work, we characterize the fractal properties of some of the largest coastal karst network systems in the world. They are located near the town of Tulum (Quintana Roo, Mexico). Their fractal dimension d_f, conductivity exponent tilde{mu} and walk dimension d_w are estimated using real space renormalization and numerical simulations. We obtain the following values for these exponents: d_f≈ 1.5, d_w≈ 2.4, tilde{mu}≈ 0.9. We observe that the Einstein relation holds for these structures tilde{mu} ≈ -d_f + d_w. These results indicate that coastal karst networks can be considered as critical systems and this provides some foundations to model them within this framework.

  14. Dissipative dynamics in a finite chaotic environment: Relationship between damping rate and Lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Xavier, J C; Strunz, W T; Beims, M W

    2015-08-01

    We consider the energy flow between a classical one-dimensional harmonic oscillator and a set of N two-dimensional chaotic oscillators, which represents the finite environment. Using linear response theory we obtain an analytical effective equation for the system harmonic oscillator, which includes a frequency dependent dissipation, a shift, and memory effects. The damping rate is expressed in terms of the environment mean Lyapunov exponent. A good agreement is shown by comparing theoretical and numerical results, even for environments with mixed (regular and chaotic) motion. Resonance between system and environment frequencies is shown to be more efficient to generate dissipation than larger mean Lyapunov exponents or a larger number of bath chaotic oscillators.

  15. On the use of relative velocity exponents for jet engine exhaust noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of flight on jet engine exhaust noise has often been presented in terms of a relative velocity exponent, n, as a function of radiation angle. The value of n is given by the OASPL reduction due to relative velocity divided by 10 times the logarithm of the ratio of relative jet velocity to absolute jet velocity. In such terms, classical subsonic jet noise theory would result in a value of n being approximately 7 at 90 degree angle to the jet axis with n decreasing, but remaining positive, as the inlet axis is approached and increasing as the jet axis is approached. However, flight tests have shown a wide range of results, including negative values of n in some cases. In this paper it is shown that the exponent n is positive for pure subsonic jet mixing noise and varies, in a systematic manner, as a function of flight conditions and jet velocity.

  16. Parafermionic excitations and critical exponents of random cluster and O(n) models

    SciTech Connect

    Delfino, Gesualdo

    2013-06-15

    We introduce the notion of parafermionic fields as the chiral fields which describe particle excitations in two-dimensional conformal field theory, and argue that the parafermionic conformal dimensions can be determined using scale invariant scattering theory. Together with operator product arguments this may provide new information, in particular for non-rational conformal theories. We obtain in this way the field theoretical derivation of the critical exponents of the random cluster and O(n) models, which in the limit of vanishing central charge yield percolation and self-avoiding walks. A simple derivation of the relation between S-matrix and Lagrangian couplings of sine–Gordon model is also given. -- Highlights: •Two-dimensional scale invariant scattering theory is characterized. •Exponents of random cluster and O(n) models are obtained from field theory. •Universal role of parafermions is explained in the continuum.

  17. Weighted scale-free networks with variable power-law exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takuma; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2008-06-01

    We present a weighted scale-free network model, in which the power-law exponents can be controlled by the model parameters. The network is generated through the weight-driven preferential attachment of new nodes to existing nodes and the growth of the weights of existing links. The simplicity of the model enables us to derive analytically the various statistical properties, such as the distributions of degree, strength, and weight, the degree-strength and degree-weight relationship, and the dependencies of these power-law exponents on the model parameters. Finally, we demonstrate that networks of words, coauthorship of researchers, and collaboration of actor/actresses are quantitatively well described by this model.

  18. Kovalevskaya exponents and the space of initial conditions of a quasi-homogeneous vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Hayato

    2015-12-01

    Formal series solutions and the Kovalevskaya exponents of a quasi-homogeneous polynomial system of differential equations are studied by means of a weighted projective space and dynamical systems theory. A necessary and sufficient condition for the series solution to be a convergent Laurent series is given, which improves the well-known Painlevé test. In particular, if a given system has the Painlevé property, an algorithm to construct Okamoto's space of initial conditions is given. The space of initial conditions is obtained by weighted blow-ups of the weighted projective space, where the weights for the blow-ups are determined by the Kovalevskaya exponents. The results are applied to the first Painlevé hierarchy (2m-th order first Painlevé equation).

  19. Detection of anomalous diffusion using confidence intervals of the scaling exponent with application to preterm neonatal heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, David R.; Verklan, M. Terese; Moon, Jon

    1998-11-01

    The scaling exponent of the root mean square (rms) displacement quantifies the roughness of fractal or multifractal time series; it is equivalent to other second-order measures of scaling, such as the power-law exponents of the spectral density and autocorrelation function. For self-similar time series, the rms scaling exponent equals the Hurst parameter, which is related to the fractal dimension. A scaling exponent of 0.5 implies that the process is normal diffusion, which is equivalent to an uncorrelated random walk; otherwise, the process can be modeled as anomalous diffusion. Higher exponents indicate that the increments of the signal have positive correlations, while exponents below 0.5 imply that they have negative correlations. Scaling exponent estimates of successive segments of the increments of a signal are used to test the null hypothesis that the signal is normal diffusion, with the alternate hypothesis that the diffusion is anomalous. Dispersional analysis, a simple technique which does not require long signals, is used to estimate the scaling exponent from the slope of the linear regression of the logarithm of the standard deviation of binned data points on the logarithm of the number of points per bin. Computing the standard error of the scaling exponent using successive segments of the signal is superior to previous methods of obtaining the standard error, such as that based on the sum of squared errors used in the regression; the regression error is more of a measure of the deviation from power-law scaling than of the uncertainty of the scaling exponent estimate. Applying this test to preterm neonate heart rate data, it is found that time intervals between heart beats can be modeled as anomalous diffusion with negatively correlated increments. This corresponds to power spectra between 1/f2 and 1/f, whereas healthy adults are usually reported to have 1/f spectra, suggesting that the immaturity of the neonatal nervous system affects the scaling

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  1. Effect of angstrom-scale surface roughness on the self-assembly of polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane block copolymer

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Shreya; Ganesan, Ramakrishnan; Gaur, Nikita; Saifullah, Mohammad S. M.; Hussain, Hazrat; Yang, Hyunsoo; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly of block copolymers has been identified as a potential candidate for high density fabrication of nanostructures. However, the factors affecting its reliability and reproducibility as a patterning technique on various kinds of surfaces are not well-established. Studies pertaining to block copolymer self-assembly have been confined to ultra-flat substrates without taking into consideration the effect of surface roughness. Here, we show that a slight change in the angstrom-scale roughness arising from the surface of a material creates a profound effect on the self-assembly of polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane block copolymer. Its self-assembly was found to be dependent on both the root mean square roughness (Rrms) of the surface and the type of solvent annealing system used. It was observed that surface with Rrms< 5.0 Å showed self-assembly. Above this value, the kinetic hindrance posed by the surface roughness on the block copolymer leads to its conforming to the surface without observable phase separation. PMID:22943003

  2. Demonstration of resonant photopumping of Mo VII by Mo XII for a VUV laser near 600 {Angstrom}

    SciTech Connect

    Ilcisin, K.J.; Aumayr, F.; Schwob, J.L.; Suckewer, S.

    1993-09-01

    We present data of experiments on the resonant photopumping of Mo VII by Mo XII as a method of generating a coherent VUV source near 600 {angstrom}. The experiment is based on a scheme proposed by Feldman and Reader in which the 4p{sup 6} -- 4p{sup 5}6s transition in Mo VII in resonantly photopumped by the 5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} -- 4p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} transition in Mo XII. Results of the laser produced plasma experiments show the successful enhancement of the population of the Mo VII 4p{sup 5}6s upper lasing level when pumped by an adjacent Mo VII plasma. No enhancement was seen in a control experiment where the Mo VII plasma was pumped by a Zr X plasma. Improvements of the intensity of the Mo XII pump source, achieved using an additional pump laser, lead to the generation of a population inversion for the VUV transition.

  3. Effective Power-Law Dependence of Lyapunov Exponents on the Central Mass in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Kalapotharakos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Using both numerical and analytical approaches, we demonstrate the existence of an effective power-law relation L alpha m(sup p) between themean Lyapunov exponent L of stellar orbits chaotically scattered by a supermassive black hole (BH) in the centre of a galaxy and the mass parameter m, i.e. ratio of the mass of the BH over the mass of the galaxy. The exponent p is found numerically to obtain values in the range p approximately equals 0.3-0.5. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these exponents, based on estimates of local 'stretching numbers', i.e. local Lyapunov exponents at successive transits of the orbits through the BH's sphere of influence. We thus predict p = 2/3 - q with q approximately equaling 0.1-0.2. Our basic model refers to elliptical galaxy models with a central core. However, we find numerically that an effective power-law scaling of L with m holds also in models with central cusp, beyond a mass scale up to which chaos is dominated by the influence of the cusp itself. We finally show numerically that an analogous law exists also in disc galaxies with rotating bars. In the latter case, chaotic scattering by the BH affects mainly populations of thick tube-like orbits surrounding some low-order branches of the x(sub 1) family of periodic orbits, as well as its bifurcations at low-order resonances, mainly the inner Lindblad resonance and the 4/1 resonance. Implications of the correlations between L and m to determining the rate of secular evolution of galaxies are discussed.

  4. On the characteristic exponents of the general three-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of some properties of the characteristic exponents of the general three-body problem. The variational equations on which the analysis is based are obtained by linearizing the Lagrangian equations of motion in the neighborhood of a given known solution. Attention is given to the fundamental matrix of solutions, the characteristic equation, the three trivial solutions of the variational equations of the three-body problem, symmetric periodic orbits, and the half-period properties of symmetric periodic orbits.

  5. Modeling the Effect of Privatization on Behavior of Hurst Exponent Using Stochastic Catastrophe Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolgorian, Meysam; Raei, Reza

    In this paper using the global Hurst exponent, the impact of privatization of public companies in Iran on the degree of efficiency in Tehran Stock Exchange is assessed. The results show that selling public companies' share in Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE) leads to a structural break in degree of market development. To model this phenomenon a catastrophe approach is used and it is demonstrated that this structural break can be better explained by a cusp catastrophe model.

  6. A Lower Bound on the Lyapunov Exponent for the Generalized Harper's Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitomirskaya, Svetlana; Liu, Wencai

    2016-05-01

    We obtain a lower bound for the Lyapunov exponent of a family of discrete Schrödinger operators (Hu)_n=u_{n+1}+u_{n-1}+2a_1 cos 2π (θ +nα )u_n+2a_2 cos 4π (θ +nα )u_n , that incorporates both a_1 and a_2, thus going beyond the Herman's bound.

  7. Cycle expansion for the Lyapunov exponent of a product of random matrices.

    PubMed

    Mainieri, Ronnie

    1992-01-01

    Using cycle expansion for the thermodynamic zeta function, a formula is derived for the Lyapunov exponent of a product of random hyperbolic matrices chosen from a discrete set. This allows for an accurate numerical solution of the Ising model in one dimension with quenched disorder. The formula is compared with weak disorder expansions and with the microcanonical approximation and shown to apply to matrices with degenerate eigenvalues.

  8. Realistic Image Rendition Using a Variable Exponent Functional Model for Retinex.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zeyang; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Bin; Yu, Xinyan; Han, Lu; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The goal of realistic image rendition is to recover the acquired image under imperfect illuminant conditions, where non-uniform illumination may degrade image quality with high contrast and low SNR. In this paper, the assumption regarding illumination is modified and a variable exponent functional model for Retinex is proposed to remove non-uniform illumination and reduce halo artifacts. The theoretical derivation is provided and experimental results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model. PMID:27338379

  9. Complex Critical Exponents for Percolation Transitions in Josephson-Junction Arrays, Antiferromagnets, and Interacting Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rafael M.; Schmalian, Jörg

    2011-02-01

    We show that the critical behavior of the XY quantum-rotor model undergoing a percolation transition is dramatically affected by its topological Berry phase 2πρ. In particular, for irrational ρ, its low-energy excitations emerge as spinless fermions with fractal spectrum. As a result, critical properties not captured by the usual Ginzburg-Landau-Wilson description of phase transitions arise, such as complex critical exponents, log-periodic oscillations and dynamically broken scale invariance.

  10. Effective power-law dependence of Lyapunov exponents on the central mass in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Kalapotharakos, C.

    2015-04-01

    Using both numerical and analytical approaches, we demonstrate the existence of an effective power-law relation L ∝ mp between the mean Lyapunov exponent L of stellar orbits chaotically scattered by a supermassive black hole (BH) in the centre of a galaxy and the mass parameter m, i.e. ratio of the mass of the BH over the mass of the galaxy. The exponent p is found numerically to obtain values in the range p ≈ 0.3-0.5. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these exponents, based on estimates of local `stretching numbers', i.e. local Lyapunov exponents at successive transits of the orbits through the BH's sphere of influence. We thus predict p = 2/3 - q with q ≈ 0.1-0.2. Our basic model refers to elliptical galaxy models with a central core. However, we find numerically that an effective power-law scaling of L with m holds also in models with central cusp, beyond a mass scale up to which chaos is dominated by the influence of the cusp itself. We finally show numerically that an analogous law exists also in disc galaxies with rotating bars. In the latter case, chaotic scattering by the BH affects mainly populations of thick tube-like orbits surrounding some low-order branches of the x1 family of periodic orbits, as well as its bifurcations at low-order resonances, mainly the inner Lindblad resonance and the 4/1 resonance. Implications of the correlations between L and m to determining the rate of secular evolution ofx galaxies are discussed.

  11. Realistic Image Rendition Using a Variable Exponent Functional Model for Retinex

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Zeyang; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Bin; Yu, Xinyan; Han, Lu; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The goal of realistic image rendition is to recover the acquired image under imperfect illuminant conditions, where non–uniform illumination may degrade image quality with high contrast and low SNR. In this paper, the assumption regarding illumination is modified and a variable exponent functional model for Retinex is proposed to remove non–uniform illumination and reduce halo artifacts. The theoretical derivation is provided and experimental results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model. PMID:27338379

  12. Critical exponents of the superfluid-Bose-glass transition in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhiyuan; da Costa, Karine P C; Kiselev, Mikhail; Prokof'ev, Nikolay

    2014-06-01

    Recent experimental and numerical studies of the critical-temperature exponent ϕ for the superfluid-Bose-glass universality in three-dimensional systems report strong violations of the key quantum critical relation, ϕ=νz, where z and ν are the dynamic and correlation-length exponents, respectively; these studies question the conventional scaling laws for this quantum critical point. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the disordered Bose-Hubbard model, we demonstrate that previous work on the superfluid-to-normal-fluid transition-temperature dependence on the chemical potential (or the magnetic field, in spin systems), T_{c}∝(μ-μ_{c})^{ϕ}, was misinterpreting transient behavior on approach to the fluctuation region with the genuine critical law. When the model parameters are modified to have a broad quantum critical region, simulations of both quantum and classical models reveal that the ϕ=νz law [with ϕ=2.7(2), z=3, and ν=0.88(5)] holds true, resolving the ϕ-exponent "crisis." PMID:24949775

  13. Percolation exponents and thresholds obtained from the nearly ideal continuum percolation system graphite-boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; McLachlan, D.S.

    1997-07-01

    Compressed disks made from graphite and, its mechanical but not electrical isomorph, boron nitride as well as graphite-boron nitride powders, undergoing compression, are nearly ideal continuum percolation systems, as the ratio of their conductivities is nearly 10{sup {minus}18} and the scatter of the experimental points near the critical volume fraction {phi}{sub c} is very small. The following measurements, with the characteristic exponent(s) in brackets, are made on some or all of the samples in (axial) and at right angles (radial) to the direction of compression, as a function of the volume fraction of graphite ({phi}); dc conductivity (s and t), dielectric constant (s), magnetoresistivity (t{sub {perpendicular}}), and noise power (K). The noise power is also measured as function of resistance (w) and volume (b{sup {prime}}). The {phi}{sub c}{close_quote}s obtained for all measurements are consistent and explicable. The results for the exponents are less well understood but, where possible, these results are compared with theoretical predictions and previous experiments. The reasons for the nonuniversality of t are clarified. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Improved estimation of anomalous diffusion exponents in single-particle tracking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepten, Eldad; Bronshtein, Irena; Garini, Yuval

    2013-05-01

    The mean square displacement is a central tool in the analysis of single-particle tracking experiments, shedding light on various biophysical phenomena. Frequently, parameters are extracted by performing time averages on single-particle trajectories followed by ensemble averaging. This procedure, however, suffers from two systematic errors when applied to particles that perform anomalous diffusion. The first is significant at short-time lags and is induced by measurement errors. The second arises from the natural heterogeneity in biophysical systems. We show how to estimate and correct these two errors and improve the estimation of the anomalous parameters for the whole particle distribution. As a consequence, we manage to characterize ensembles of heterogeneous particles even for rather short and noisy measurements where regular time-averaged mean square displacement analysis fails. We apply this method to both simulations and in vivo measurements of telomere diffusion in 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The motion of telomeres is found to be subdiffusive with an average exponent constant in time. Individual telomere exponents are normally distributed around the average exponent. The proposed methodology has the potential to improve experimental accuracy while maintaining lower experimental costs and complexity.

  15. Characterizing two-timescale nonlinear dynamics using finite-time Lyapunov exponents and subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mease, K. D.; Topcu, U.; Aykutluğ, E.; Maggia, M.

    2016-07-01

    Finite-time Lyapunov exponents and subspaces are used to define and diagnose boundary-layer type, two-timescale behavior in the tangent linear dynamics and to determine the associated manifold structure in the flow of a finite-dimensional nonlinear autonomous dynamical system. Two-timescale behavior is characterized by a slow-fast splitting of the tangent bundle for a state space region. The slow-fast splitting is defined using finite-time Lyapunov exponents and vectors, guided by the asymptotic theory of partially hyperbolic sets, with important modifications for the finite-time case; for example, finite-time Lyapunov analysis relies more heavily on the Lyapunov vectors due to their relatively fast convergence compared to that of the corresponding exponents. The splitting is used to characterize and locate points approximately on normally hyperbolic center manifolds via tangency conditions for the vector field. Determining manifolds from tangent bundle structure is more generally applicable than approaches, such as the singular perturbation method, that require special normal forms or other a priori knowledge. The use, features, and accuracy of the approach are illustrated via several detailed examples.

  16. Experimental realization of a multiscroll chaotic oscillator with optimal maximum Lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Tlelo-Cuautle, Esteban; Pano-Azucena, Ana Dalia; Carbajal-Gomez, Victor Hugo; Sanchez-Sanchez, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, different kinds of experimental realizations of chaotic oscillators have been already presented in the literature. However, those realizations do not consider the value of the maximum Lyapunov exponent, which gives a quantitative measure of the grade of unpredictability of chaotic systems. That way, this paper shows the experimental realization of an optimized multiscroll chaotic oscillator based on saturated function series. First, from the mathematical description having four coefficients (a, b, c, d1 ), an optimization evolutionary algorithm varies them to maximize the value of the positive Lyapunov exponent. Second, a realization of those optimized coefficients using operational amplifiers is given. Herein a, b, c, d1 are implemented with precision potentiometers to tune up to four decimals of the coefficients having the range between 0.0001 and 1.0000. Finally, experimental results of the phase-space portraits for generating from 2 to 10 scrolls are listed to show that their associated value for the optimal maximum Lyapunov exponent increases by increasing the number of scrolls, thus guaranteeing a more complex chaotic behavior.

  17. Changes in the Hurst Exponent of Heart Rate Variability during Physical Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Naoko; Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-08-01

    We examine fractal scaling properties of heart rate variability using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), during physical activity in healthy subjects. We analyze 11 records of healthy subjects, which include both usual daily activity and experimental exercise. The subjects were asked to ride on a bicycle ergometer for 2.5 hours, and maintained a heartbeat interval of 500-600 ms. In order to estimate the long-range correlation in the series of heartbeat intervals during controlled physical activity, we apply DFA to the data set with the third-order polynomial trend removed. For all records during exercise, we observe a characteristic crossover phenomenon at ≈ 300 beats. The scaling exponent in the range > 300 beats (> 3 minutes) during exercise decreases and tends to be closer to white noise (≈ 0.5), which corresponds to uncorrelated behavior. The long-range scaling exponent during exercise is significantly lower than that during daily activity in this range. Contrary to the currently held view, our results indicate a breakdown in long-range correlations and 1/f-like scaling, rather than the increase in the Hurst exponent characteristic of a (congestive) increase in afterload and observed, e.g., in congestive heart failure (CHF) patients. Further, our results suggest an increased load imbalance induced departure from critical-like behavior, which has recently been reported in healthy human heart rate during daily activity.

  18. Physiological Responses During Matches and Profile of Elite Pencak Silat Exponents

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Tan, Benedict; Teh, Kong Chuan

    2002-01-01

    This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study describing the physiological responses during competitive matches and profile of elite exponents of an emerging martial art sport, pencak silat. Thirty exponents (21 males and 9 females) were involved in the study. Match responses (i.e. heart rate (HR) throughout match and capillary blood lactate concentration, [La], at pre-match and at the end of every round) were obtained during actual competitive duels. Elite silat exponents’ physiological attributes were assessed via anthropometry, vertical jump, isometric grip strength, maximal oxygen uptake, and the Wingate 30 s anaerobic test of the upper and lower body, in the laboratory. The match response data showed that silat competitors’ mean HR was > 84% of estimated HR maximum and levels of [La] ranged from 6.7 - 18.7 mMol-1 during matches. This suggests that competitive silat matches are characterised by high aerobic and anaerobic responses. In comparison to elite taekwondo and judo athletes’ physiological characteristics, elite silat exponents have lower aerobic fitness and grip strength, but greater explosive leg power (vertical jump). Generally, they also possessed a similar anaerobic capability in the lower but markedly inferior anaerobic capability in the upper body. PMID:24748847

  19. Effect of disorder on the exponent in the coherence region in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Srinivasan, R.; Mehta, G. K.; Kanjilal, D.; Pinto, R.; Ogale, S. B.; Mohan, S.; Ganesan, V.

    2006-09-01

    Effect of disorder on the electrical resistance near the superconducting transition temperature in the paracoherence region of high temperature YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) thin film superconductor is reported. For this, c-axis oriented YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ thin films having superconducting transition width varying between 0.27 K and 6 K were deposited using laser ablation and high pressure oxygen sputtering techniques. Disorder in these films was further created by using 100 MeV oxygen and 200 MeV silver ions with varying fluences. It is observed that the critical exponent in the paracoherence region for films with high transition temperature and small transition width is in agreement with the theoretically predicted value ( γ = 1.33) and is not affected by disorder, while for films with lower transition temperature and larger transition width the value of exponent is much larger as compared to that theoretically predicted and it varies from sample to sample and usually changes with disorder induced by radiation. This difference in the behaviour of the exponent has been explained on the basis of differences in the strength of weak links and the transition between temperatures Tm and Tc is interpreted as a percolation like transition with disorder.

  20. Measuring the self-similarity exponent in Lévy stable processes of financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, M.; Sánchez-Granero, M. A.; Trinidad Segovia, J. E.

    2013-11-01

    Geometric method-based procedures, which will be called GM algorithms herein, were introduced in [M.A. Sánchez Granero, J.E. Trinidad Segovia, J. García Pérez, Some comments on Hurst exponent and the long memory processes on capital markets, Phys. A 387 (2008) 5543-5551], to efficiently calculate the self-similarity exponent of a time series. In that paper, the authors showed empirically that these algorithms, based on a geometrical approach, are more accurate than the classical algorithms, especially with short length time series. The authors checked that GM algorithms are good when working with (fractional) Brownian motions. Moreover, in [J.E. Trinidad Segovia, M. Fernández-Martínez, M.A. Sánchez-Granero, A note on geometric method-based procedures to calculate the Hurst exponent, Phys. A 391 (2012) 2209-2214], a mathematical background for the validity of such procedures to estimate the self-similarity index of any random process with stationary and self-affine increments was provided. In particular, they proved theoretically that GM algorithms are also valid to explore long-memory in (fractional) Lévy stable motions. In this paper, we prove empirically by Monte Carlo simulation that GM algorithms are able to calculate accurately the self-similarity index in Lévy stable motions and find empirical evidence that they are more precise than the absolute value exponent (denoted by AVE onwards) and the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) algorithms, especially with a short length time series. We also compare them with the generalized Hurst exponent (GHE) algorithm and conclude that both GM2 and GHE algorithms are the most accurate to study financial series. In addition to that, we provide empirical evidence, based on the accuracy of GM algorithms to estimate the self-similarity index in Lévy motions, that the evolution of the stocks of some international market indices, such as U.S. Small Cap and Nasdaq100, cannot be modelized by means of a

  1. Multiscale and Fractal Analysis of Silicon Content Time Series Observed in Blast Furnace Hot Metal Using Hurst Exponent Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shihua; Guo, Fan; Lai, Dejian; Yan, Fang; Tang, Feilai

    2015-09-01

    Hurst exponent is an important measure of nonlinearity of dynamical time series. In this paper, using rescaled-range (R/S) analysis, multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) methods, the multiscale Hurst exponent (MHE) and the multiscale generalized Hurst exponent (MGHE) of coarse-grained silicon content ([Si]) time series in blast furnace (BF) hot metal were calculated. First, we collected these [Si] time series from No. 1 BF of Nanchang Iron and Steel Co. and No. 10 BF of Xinyu Iron and Steel Co. in Jiangxi Province, China. Then, we analyzed and compared the estimated Hurst exponents and the generalized Hurst exponent of these observed time series with some simulated time series. Our results show that the observed time series from these BFs have negative correlation with the Hurst exponent less than 0.5, the generalized Hurst exponent H(q) is a nonlinear function of q, and such negative correlation and local various structure persist in their moving averages of the observed time series up to lag 5 or 10.

  2. Comparison of the manganese oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of spinach and Synechococcus sp. with multinuclear manganese model compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DeRose, V.J.; Mukerji, I.; Latimer, M.J. ); Yachandra, V.K.; Klein, M.P. ); Sauer, K. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-15

    The evaluation of Mn X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) from photosystem II is described for preparations from both spinach and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. poised in the S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] states. In addition to reproducing previous results suggesting the presence of bis([mu]-oxo)-bridged Mn centers in the OEC, a Fourier transform peak due to scatterers at an average distance of > 3 [angstrom] is detected in both types of preparation. In addition, subtle but reproducible changes are found in the relative amplitudes of the Fourier transform peaks due to mainly O ([approximately]1.8 [angstrom]) and Mn ([approximately] 2.7 [angstrom]) neighbors upon cryogenic advance from the S[sub 1] to the S[sub 2] state. Analysis of the peak due to scatterers at [approximately] 3 [angstrom] favors assignment to (per 4 Mn in the OEC) 1-2 heavy atom (Mn, Ca) scatterers at an average distance of 3.3-3.4 [angstrom]. The EXAFS data of several multinuclear Mn model compounds containing such scattering interactions are analyzed and compared with the data for the OEC. Structural models for the OEC are evaluated on the basis of these results. 40 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Structure of Acostatin, a Dimeric Disintegrin From Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon Contortrix Contortrix), at 1.7 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseeva, N.; Bau, R.; Swenson, S.D.; Marklund, F.S.; Jr.; Choe, J.-Y.; Liu, Z.-J.; Allaire, M.

    2009-05-26

    Disintegrins are a family of small (4-14 kDa) proteins that bind to another class of proteins, integrins. Therefore, as integrin inhibitors, they can be exploited as anticancer and antiplatelet agents. Acostatin, an {alpha}{beta} heterodimeric disintegrin, has been isolated from the venom of Southern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix). The three-dimensional structure of acostatin has been determined by macromolecular crystallography using the molecular-replacement method. The asymmetric unit of the acostatin crystals consists of two heterodimers. The structure has been refined to an R{sub work} and R{sub free} of 18.6% and 21.5%, respectively, using all data in the 20-1.7 {angstrom} resolution range. The structure of all subunits is similar and is well ordered into N-terminal and C-terminal clusters with four intramolecular disulfide bonds. The overall fold consists of short {beta}-sheets, each of which is formed by a pair of antiparallel {beta}-strands connected by {beta}-turns and flexible loops of different lengths. Conformational flexibility is found in the RGD loops and in the C-terminal segment. The interaction of two N-terminal clusters via two intermolecular disulfide bridges anchors the {alpha}{beta}chains of the acostatin dimers. The C-terminal clusters of the heterodimer project in opposite directions and form a larger angle between them in comparison with other dimeric disintegrins. Extensive interactions are observed between two heterodimers, revealing an {alpha}{beta}{beta}{alpha} acostatin tetramer. Further experiments are required to identify whether the {alpha}{beta}{beta}{alpha} acostatin complex plays a functional role in vivo.

  4. Renormalization group calculation of the universal critical exponents of a polymer molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belohorec, Peter

    In this work the excluded volume problem of a linear flexible polymer molecule in a solution was investigated using a new method. The Domb-Joyce (DJ) lattice model (Domb C. and Joyce G. S. (1972). J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 5 956) was used to describe the polymer chain with a varying excluded volume parameterramateur w and bond number N. Monte Carlo (MC) generated data for the mean square end-to-end distance Rsbsp{N}{2} and the second virial coefficient Asb{2,N} were analyzed by a renormalization group technique that is a generalization of the one-parameter recursion model (Nickel B. G. (1991). Macromolecules 24, 1358). By defining the effective exponents nusb{R}(N,psi) and nusb{A}(N,psi ) using 2sp{2nusb{R}} = Rsbsp{2N}{2}/Rsbsp{N}{2} and 2sp{3nusb{A}} = Asb{2,2N}/Asb{2,N} where psi = {1/4}({6/pi})sp{3/2}{{Asb{2,N}}/{Rsbsp{N}{3}}} is the interpenetration function, the corrections varying as Nsp{-Delta} were eliminated from nusb{R}(N,psi) and nusb{A}(N,psi) and both universal critical exponents nu and Delta of the expected long chain behaviors Rsbsp{N}{2}~ asb{R}Nsp{2nu}(1 + bsb{R}Nsp{-Delta} +\\...) and Asb{2,N}~ asb{A}Nsp{3nu}(1 + bsb{A}Nsp{-Delta} +\\...) were determined very accurately. The problems encountered by standard methods when extracting the values of the leading exponent nu and the correction to scaling exponent Delta from the finite chain data were eliminated by the simultaneous use of many models (i.e., w in the range of 0 < omega ≤ 1) and by the use of the effective exponent transformation. Other universal quantities such as the asymptotic value psi* of the interpenetration function proportional to the dimensionless ratio of leading scaling amplitudes asb{A}/asbsp{R}{3/2} as well as the ratio of correction to scaling amplitudes bsb{A}/bsb{R} were also calculated with a very good precision. The results are nu = 0.58756(5),\\ Delta = 0.5310(33), psi* = 0.23221(11) and bsb{A}/bsb{R} = -.0.9028(132). The numerical solution of the DJ model

  5. Calcium binding in. alpha. -amylases: An X-ray diffraction study at 2. 1- angstrom resolution of two enzymes from Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Boel, E.; Jensen, V.J.; Petersen, S.B.; Thim, L. Woldike, H.F. ); Brady, L.; Brzozowski, AM.; Derewenda, Z.; Dodson, G.G.; Swift, H. )

    1990-07-03

    X-ray diffraction analysis (at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution) of an acid alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger allowed a detailed description of the stereochemistry of the calcium-binding sites. The primary site (which is essential in maintaining proper folding around the active site) contains a tightly bound Ca{sup 2+} with an unusually high number of eight ligands. A secondary binding site was identified at the bottom of the substrate binding cleft; it involves the residues presumed to play a catalytic role (Asp206 and Glu230). This explains the inhibitory effect of calcium observed at higher concentrations. Neutral Aspergillus oryzae (TAKA) {alpha}-amylase was also refined in a new crystal at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution. The structure of this homologous (over 80%) enzyme and addition kinetic studies support all the structural conclusions regarding both calcium-binding sites.

  6. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  7. Interactive computation and rendering of Finite-time Lyapunov Exponent fields.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Samer; Garth, Christoph; Tricoche, Xavier

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel technique that allows for the coupled computation and visualization of salient flow structures at interactive frame rates. Our approach is built upon a hierarchical representation of the Finite-time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which is adaptively sampled and rendered to meet the need of the current visual setting. The performance of our method allows the user to explore large and complex data sets across scales and to inspect their features at arbitrary resolution. The paper discusses an efficient implementation of this strategy on graphics hardware and provides results for an analytical flow and several CFD simulation data sets.

  8. Lagrangian coherent structures and the smallest finite-time Lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Haller, George; Sapsis, Themistoklis

    2011-06-01

    We point out that local minimizing curves, or troughs, of the smallest finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field computed over a time interval [t(0), t] and graphed over trajectory positions at time t mark attracting Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) at t. For two-dimensional area-preserving flows, we conclude that computing the largest forward-time FTLE field by itself is sufficient for locating both repelling LCSs at t(0) and attracting LCSs at t. We illustrate our results on analytic examples, as well as on a two-dimensional experimental velocity field measured near a swimming jellyfish.

  9. Propagation of the power-exponent-phase vortex beam in paraxial ABCD system.

    PubMed

    Lao, Guanming; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-08-01

    The general analytical formula for the propagation of the power-exponent-phase vortex (PEPV) beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system is derived. On that basis the evolution of the intensity distribution of such a beam in free space and the focusing system is investigated. In addition, some experiments are carried out, which verify the theoretical predictions. Both of the theoretical and experimental results show that the beam's profile can be modulated by the topological charge and the power order of the PEPV beam. PMID:27505774

  10. Critical exponents for anisotropic thermal expansion at ferroelectric Curie temperatures: Evidence for defect mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. F.

    2013-11-01

    The defect dynamical model of Sigov and Levanyuk is used to analyze a heretofore unsolved problem in ferroelectricity: the temperature change of anisotropic thermal expansion along the polar axis. For brominated tris-sarcosine calcium chloride a new expansion exponent \\Lambda=3/2 in reduced temperature t=(T_{c}-T)/T_{c} is found, in agreement with the Sigov-Levanyuk theoretical value, under the assumption that the change in thermal diffusion is proportional to the change in thermal expansion near Tc.

  11. Statistical analysis of digital images of periodic fibrous structures using generalized Hurst exponent distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowicz, Tomasz; Ehrmann, Andrea; Domino, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    Distinction of diverse two-dimensional periodic structures can be based on a large number of methods and parameters, while the quantitative description of differences between similar samples is usually difficult. This article aims, by the use of statistical random walk in a generalized q-order dimensional space, at introducing a methodology to qualify the networked structures on the basis of exemplary textile samples. The presented results were obtained at 1-bit monochromatic maps obtained from optical microscopic pictures. Significant features of samples were represented by the obtained distributions of Hurst exponents and Shannon entropy calculations.

  12. Existence and concentration of positive ground states for a Kirchhoff equation involving critical Sobolev exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhisu; Guo, Shangjiang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the following semilinear Kirchhoff type equation where is a small parameter, , a, b are positive constants, μ > 0 is a parameter, and the nonlinear growth of | u|4 u reaches the Sobolev critical exponent since 2* = 6 for three spatial dimensions. We prove the existence of a positive ground state solution with exponential decay at infinity for μ > 0 and sufficiently small under some suitable conditions on the nonnegative functions V, K and Q. Moreover, concentrates around a global minimum point of V as . The methods used here are based on the concentration-compactness principle of Lions.

  13. Calculation of the critical exponents by a renormalization of the Ornstein-Zernike equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Badiali, J. P.

    1991-09-01

    We calculate the critical exponents at the liquid-vapor critical point by using the classical ingredients of the liquid-state theory. Two coupling constants are defined at a microscopic level. The closure of the Ornstein-Zernike equation is given by the Callan-Symanzik equation from which we determine the position of the fixed point. The role of the three-body direct-correlation function is emphasized. A comparison between this work and the standard theory of critical phenomena based on the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson Hamiltonian is presented.

  14. The backward phase flow method for the Eulerian finite time Lyapunov exponent computations

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Shingyu

    2013-12-15

    We propose a simple Eulerian approach to compute the moderate to long time flow map for approximating the Lyapunov exponent of a (periodic or aperiodic) dynamical system. The idea is to generalize a recently proposed backward phase flow method which is specially designed for long time level set propagation. Unlike the original phase flow method or the backward phase flow method, which is applicable only to autonomous systems, the current approach can also be applied to any time-dependent (periodic or aperiodic) flow. We will discuss the stability of the proposed method. Numerical examples will be given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  15. Influence of progressive central hypovolemia on Hölder exponent distributions of cardiac interbeat intervals.

    PubMed

    West, Bruce J; Scafetta, Nicola; Cooke, William H; Balocchi, Rita

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the dependency of the statistical properties of the R to R interval (RRI) time series on progressive central hypovolemia with lower body negative pressure. Two data-processing techniques based on wavelet transforms were used to determine the change in the nonstationary nature of the RRI time series with changing negative pressure. The results suggest that autonomic neural mechanism driving cardiac interbeat intervals during central hypovolemia go through various levels of multifractality, as determined by Hölder exponent distributions. PMID:15446504

  16. Changes in the Hurst exponent of heartbeat intervals during physical activity.

    PubMed

    Martinis, M; Knezević, A; Krstacić, G; Vargović, E

    2004-07-01

    The fractal scaling properties of the heartbeat time series are studied in different controlled ergometric regimes using both the improved Hurst rescaled range (R/S) analysis and the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The long-time "memory effect" quantified by the value of the Hurst exponent H>0.5 is found to increase during progressive physical activity in healthy subjects, in contrast to those having stable angina pectoris, where it decreases. The results are also supported by the detrended fluctuation analysis. We argue that this finding may be used as a useful new diagnostic parameter for short heartbeat time series.

  17. Changes in the Hurst exponent of heartbeat intervals during physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinis, M.; Knežević, A.; Krstačić, G.; Vargović, E.

    2004-07-01

    The fractal scaling properties of the heartbeat time series are studied in different controlled ergometric regimes using both the improved Hurst rescaled range (R/S) analysis and the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The long-time “memory effect” quantified by the value of the Hurst exponent H>0.5 is found to increase during progressive physical activity in healthy subjects, in contrast to those having stable angina pectoris, where it decreases. The results are also supported by the detrended fluctuation analysis. We argue that this finding may be used as a useful new diagnostic parameter for short heartbeat time series.

  18. Doping dependence of the dynamic and static critical exponents in Pr2-xCexCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M. C.; Isaacs, R.; Olson, J. B.; Sousa, J.; Salvaggio, M.; Greene, R. L.

    2009-03-01

    Scaling analysis of voltage vs. current isotherms is a favorite tool to study the normal-superconducting phase transition in cuprate superconductors. This measurement has never been performed on the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Pr2-xCexCuO4, due in part to difficulties which result from finite-thickness effects, even in thick (d 3000å) films. If finite-thickness effects are taken into consideration, we can find the critical isotherm and the dynamic critical exponent, and we can use small magnetic fields to find the static critical exponent. Similar measurements have been made on the more familiar hole-doped cuprates such as YBa2Cu3O7-δ. We present our results of the dynamic critical scaling exponent z and static critical exponent ν in our Pr2-xCexCuO4 films as a function of doping.

  19. Triosmium Clusters on a Support: Determination of Structure by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and High-Resolution Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shareghe, Mehraeen; Chi, Miaofang; Browning, Nigel D.

    2011-01-01

    The structures of small, robust metal clusters on a solid support were determined by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods: extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and aberration-corrected STEM. The samples were synthesized from [Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] on MgO powder to provide supported clusters intended to be triosmium. The results demonstrate that the supported clusters are robust in the absence of oxidants. Conventional high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM images demonstrate a high degree of uniformity of the clusters, with root-mean-square (rms) radii of 2.03 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. The EXAFS OsOs coordination number of 2.1 {+-} 0.4 confirms the presence of triosmium clusters on average and correspondingly determines an average rms cluster radius of 2.02 {+-} 0.04 {angstrom}. The high-resolution STEM images show the individual Os atoms in the clusters, confirming the triangular structures of their frames and determining OsOs distances of 2.80 {+-} 0.14 {angstrom}, matching the EXAFS value of 2.89 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. IR and EXAFS spectra demonstrate the presence of CO ligands on the clusters. This set of techniques is recommended as optimal for detailed and reliable structural characterization of supported clusters.

  20. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  1. Variations in cementation exponent (m) and fracture porosity, Permian Delaware Mountain Group sandstones, Reeves and Culberson counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Thomerson, M.D.; Arnold, M.D.; Asquith, G.B. )

    1994-03-01

    To calculate accurate volumetric oil reserves in the Permian Delaware Mountain Group, reliable values for cementation exponent (m) are required in addition to the other reservoir parameters. The porosity in these siltstone and very fine-grain sandstone reservoirs is intergranular and therefore the cementation exponent should be approximately 2.0. However, crossplots of core derived porosity vs. the formation resistivity factor (Fr) indicate an average cementation exponent (m) of 1.80. the lower cementation exponent is a result of minor amounts of fracture porosity. Comparison of the Delaware Mountain Group porosity vs. the Fr crossplot with the laboratory data of Rasmus (1987), reveals a similar decrease in Fr with a decrease in porosity due to the presence of a 1% fracture porosity. The lower cementation exponent (1.80) results in the calculation of substantially lower water saturations, which increases the amount of volumetric oil reserves. Analysis of three zones in the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon formations of the Delaware Mountain Group using standard methods of calculating water saturation resulted in volumetric oil reserves (based on 40 ac drainage) of 1.37 to 1.42 million bbl. However, using a cementation exponent of 1.80 resulted in volumetric oil reserves of 1.55 million bbl. The 9% to 13% increase in volumetric oil reserves from only three zones in the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon formations illustrates the critical importance of combining core analysis with log analysis when doing volumetric reserve calculations.

  2. Estimation of Instantaneous Complex Dynamics through Lyapunov Exponents: A Study on Heartbeat Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Measures of nonlinearity and complexity, and in particular the study of Lyapunov exponents, have been increasingly used to characterize dynamical properties of a wide range of biological nonlinear systems, including cardiovascular control. In this work, we present a novel methodology able to effectively estimate the Lyapunov spectrum of a series of stochastic events in an instantaneous fashion. The paradigm relies on a novel point-process high-order nonlinear model of the event series dynamics. The long-term information is taken into account by expanding the linear, quadratic, and cubic Wiener-Volterra kernels with the orthonormal Laguerre basis functions. Applications to synthetic data such as the Hénon map and Rössler attractor, as well as two experimental heartbeat interval datasets (i.e., healthy subjects undergoing postural changes and patients with severe cardiac heart failure), focus on estimation and tracking of the Instantaneous Dominant Lyapunov Exponent (IDLE). The novel cardiovascular assessment demonstrates that our method is able to effectively and instantaneously track the nonlinear autonomic control dynamics, allowing for complexity variability estimations. PMID:25170911

  3. Lyapunov exponents from CHUA's circuit time series using artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, J. Jesus; Espinosa, Ismael E.; Fuentes, Alberto M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we present the general problem of identifying if a nonlinear dynamic system has a chaotic behavior. If the answer is positive the system will be sensitive to small perturbations in the initial conditions which will imply that there is a chaotic attractor in its state space. A particular problem would be that of identifying a chaotic oscillator. We present an example of three well known different chaotic oscillators where we have knowledge of the equations that govern the dynamical systems and from there we can obtain the corresponding time series. In a similar example we assume that we only know the time series and, finally, in another example we have to take measurements in the Chua's circuit to obtain sample points of the time series. With the knowledge about the time series the phase plane portraits are plotted and from them, by visual inspection, it is concluded whether or not the system is chaotic. This method has the problem of uncertainty and subjectivity and for that reason a different approach is needed. A quantitative approach is the computation of the Lyapunov exponents. We describe several methods for obtaining them and apply a little known method of artificial neural networks to the different examples mentioned above. We end the paper discussing the importance of the Lyapunov exponents in the interpretation of the dynamic behavior of biological neurons and biological neural networks.

  4. Scaling and Exponent Equalities in Island Nucleation: Novel Results and Application to Organic Films

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is known in thin-film deposition that the density of nucleated clusters N varies with the deposition rate F as a power law, N ∼ Fα. The exponent α is a function of the critical nucleus size i in a way that changes with the aggregation limiting process. We extend here the derivation of the analytical capture-zone distribution function Pβ(s) = aß·sβ·exp(-bβs2) of Pimpinelli and Einstein to generic aggregation-limiting processes. We show that the parameter β is generally related to the critical nucleus size i and to the exponent α by the equality α·β = i, in the case of compact islands. This remarkable result allows one to measure i with no a priori knowledge of the actual aggregation mechanism. We apply this equality to measuring the critical nucleus size for pentacene deposition on mica. This system shows a crossover from diffusion-limited to attachment-limited aggregation with increasing deposition rates. PMID:24660052

  5. On the scaling of probability density functions with apparent power-law exponents less than unity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, K.; Farid, N.; Pruessner, G.; Stapleton, M.

    2008-04-01

    We derive general properties of the finite-size scaling of probability density functions and show that when the apparent exponent tilde{tau} of a probability density is less than 1, the associated finite-size scaling ansatz has a scaling exponent τ equal to 1, provided that the fraction of events in the universal scaling part of the probability density function is non-vanishing in the thermodynamic limit. We find the general result that τ≥1 and tau ge tilde{tau}. Moreover, we show that if the scaling function mathcal{G}(x) approaches a non-zero constant for small arguments, lim_{x to 0} mathcal{G}(x) > 0, then tau = tilde{tau}. However, if the scaling function vanishes for small arguments, lim_{x to 0} mathcal{G}(x) = 0, then τ= 1, again assuming a non-vanishing fraction of universal events. Finally, we apply the formalism developed to examples from the literature, including some where misunderstandings of the theory of scaling have led to erroneous conclusions.

  6. Logarithmic scaling of Lyapunov exponents in disordered chiral two-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoš, P.; Schweitzer, L.

    2010-05-01

    We analyze the scaling behavior of the two smallest Lyapunov exponents for electrons propagating on two-dimensional lattices with energies within a very narrow interval around the chiral critical point at E=0 in the presence of a perpendicular random magnetic flux. By a numerical analysis of the energy and size dependence we confirm that the two smallest Lyapunov exponents are functions of a single parameter. The latter is given by lnL/lnξ(E) , which is the ratio of the logarithm of the system width L to the logarithm of the correlation length ξ(E) . Close to the chiral critical point and energy |E|≪E0 , we find a logarithmically divergent energy dependence lnξ(E)∝|ln(E0/|E|)|1/2 , where E0 is a characteristic energy scale. Our data are in agreement with the theoretical prediction of Fabrizio and Castelliani [Nucl. Phys. B 583, 542 (2000)] and resolve an inconsistency of previous numerical work.

  7. Spectral analysis of structure functions and their scaling exponents in forced isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    McComb, W D; Yoffe, S R; Linkmann, M F; Berera, A

    2014-11-01

    The pseudospectral method, in conjunction with a technique for obtaining scaling exponents ζ_{n} from the structure functions S_{n}(r), is presented as an alternative to the extended self-similarity (ESS) method and the use of generalized structure functions. We propose plotting the ratio |S_{n}(r)/S_{3}(r)| against the separation r in accordance with a standard technique for analyzing experimental data. This method differs from the ESS technique, which plots S_{n}(r) against S_{3}(r), with the assumption S_{3}(r)∼r. Using our method for the particular case of S_{2}(r) we obtain the result that the exponent ζ_{2} decreases as the Taylor-Reynolds number increases, with ζ_{2}→0.679±0.013 as R_{λ}→∞. This supports the idea of finite-viscosity corrections to the K41 prediction for S_{2}, and is the opposite of the result obtained by ESS. The pseudospectral method also permits the forcing to be taken into account exactly through the calculation of the energy input in real space from the work spectrum of the stirring forces. PMID:25493884

  8. The emergence of different tail exponents in the distributions of firm size variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atushi; Fujimoto, Shouji; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Mizuno, Takayuki

    2013-05-01

    We discuss a mechanism through which inversion symmetry (i.e., invariance of a joint probability density function under the exchange of variables) and Gibrat’s law generate power-law distributions with different tail exponents. Using a dataset of firm size variables, that is, tangible fixed assets K, the number of workers L, and sales Y, we confirm that these variables have power-law tails with different exponents, and that inversion symmetry and Gibrat’s law hold. Based on these findings, we argue that there exists a plane in the three dimensional space (logK,logL,logY), with respect to which the joint probability density function for the three variables is invariant under the exchange of variables. We provide empirical evidence suggesting that this plane fits the data well, and argue that the plane can be interpreted as the Cobb-Douglas production function, which has been extensively used in various areas of economics since it was first introduced almost a century ago.

  9. Characterization of multiscroll attractors using Lyapunov exponents and Lagrangian coherent structures.

    PubMed

    Fazanaro, Filipe I; Soriano, Diogo C; Suyama, Ricardo; Attux, Romis; Madrid, Marconi K; de Oliveira, José Raimundo

    2013-06-01

    The present work aims to apply a recently proposed method for estimating Lyapunov exponents to characterize-with the aid of the metric entropy and the fractal dimension-the degree of information and the topological structure associated with multiscroll attractors. In particular, the employed methodology offers the possibility of obtaining the whole Lyapunov spectrum directly from the state equations without employing any linearization procedure or time series-based analysis. As a main result, the predictability and the complexity associated with the phase trajectory were quantified as the number of scrolls are progressively increased for a particular piecewise linear model. In general, it is shown here that the trajectory tends to increase its complexity and unpredictability following an exponential behaviour with the addition of scrolls towards to an upper bound limit, except for some degenerated situations where a non-uniform grid of scrolls is attained. Moreover, the approach employed here also provides an easy way for estimating the finite time Lyapunov exponents of the dynamics and, consequently, the Lagrangian coherent structures for the vector field. These structures are particularly important to understand the stretching/folding behaviour underlying the chaotic multiscroll structure and can provide a better insight of phase space partition and exploration as new scrolls are progressively added to the attractor.

  10. Power Spectra, Power Law Exponents, and Anisotropy of Solar Wind Turbulence at Small Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podesta, J. J.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2006-01-01

    The Wind spacecraft provides simultaneous solar wind velocity and magnetic field measurements with 3- second time resolution, roughly an order of magnitude faster than previous measurements, enabling the small scale features of solar wind turbulence to be studied in unprecedented detail. Almost the entire inertial range can now be explored (the inertial range extends from approximately 1 to 10(exp 3) seconds in the spacecraft frame) although the dissipation range of the velocity fluctuations is still out of reach. Improved measurements of solar wind turbulence spectra at 1 AU in the ecliptic plane are presented including spectra of the energy and cross-helicity, the magnetic and kinetic energies, the Alfven ratio, the normalized cross-helicity, and the Elsasser ratio. Some recent observations and theoretical challenges are discussed including the observation that the velocity and magnetic field spectra often show different power law exponents with values close to 3/2 and 5/3, respectively; the energy (kinetic plus magnetic) and cross-helicity often have approximately equal power law exponents with values intermediate between 3/2 and 5/3; and the Alfven ratio, the ratio of the kinetic to magnetic energy spectra, is often a slowly increasing function of frequency increasing from around 0.4 to 1 for frequencies in the inertial range. Differences between high- and low-speed wind are also discussed. Comparisons with phenomenological turbulence theories show that important aspects of the physics are yet unexplained.

  11. Identifying major depressive disorder using Hurst exponent of resting-state brain networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Maobin; Qin, Jiaolong; Yan, Rui; Li, Haoran; Yao, Zhijian; Lu, Qing

    2013-12-30

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) have revealed abnormalities of functional connectivity within or among the resting-state networks. They provide valuable insight into the pathological mechanisms of depression. However, few reports were involved in the "long-term memory" of fMRI signals. This study was to investigate the "long-term memory" of resting-state networks by calculating their Hurst exponents for identifying depressed patients from healthy controls. Resting-state networks were extracted from fMRI data of 20 MDD and 20 matched healthy control subjects. The Hurst exponent of each network was estimated by Range Scale analysis for further discriminant analysis. 95% of depressed patients and 85% of healthy controls were correctly classified by Support Vector Machine with an accuracy of 90%. The right fronto-parietal and default mode network constructed a deficit network (lower memory and more irregularity in MDD), while the left fronto-parietal, ventromedial prefrontal and salience network belonged to an excess network (longer memory in MDD), suggesting these dysfunctional networks may be related to a portion of the complex of emotional and cognitive disturbances. The abnormal "long-term memory" of resting-state networks associated with depression may provide a new possibility towards the exploration of the pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD.

  12. Relation between Hertz Stress-Life Exponent, Ball-Race Conformity, and Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2006-01-01

    ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards based on Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory are normalized for ball bearings having inner- and outer-race conformities of 52 percent (0.52) and made from pre-1940 bearing steel. The Lundberg-Palmgren theory incorporates an inverse 9th power relation between Hertz stress and fatigue life for ball bearings. The effect of race conformity on ball set life independent of race life is not incorporated into the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. In addition, post-1960 vacuum-processed bearing steel exhibits a 12th power relation between Hertz stress and life. The work reported extends the previous work of Zaretsky, Poplawski, and Root to calculate changes in bearing life, that includes the life of the ball set, caused by race conformity, Hertz stress-life exponent, ball bearing type and bearing series. The bearing fatigue life in actual application will usually be equal to or greater than that calculated using the ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards that incorporate the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The relative fatigue life of an individual race is more sensitive to changes in race conformity for Hertz stress-life exponent n of 12 than where n = 9. However, when the effects are combined to predict actual bearing life for a specified set of conditions and bearing geometry, the predicted life of the bearing will be greater for a value of n = 12 than n = 9.

  13. Relation Between Hertz Stress-Life Exponent, Ball-Race Conformity, and Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards based on Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory are normalized for ball bearings having inner- and outerrace conformities of 52 percent (0.52) and made from pre-1940 bearing steel. The Lundberg-Palmgren theory incorporates an inverse 9th power relation between Hertz stress and fatigue life for ball bearings. The effect of race conformity on ball set life independent of race life is not incorporated into the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. In addition, post-1960 vacuum-processed bearing steel exhibits a 12th power relation between Hertz stress and life. The work reported extends the previous work of Zaretsky, Poplawski, and Root to calculate changes in bearing life--that includes the life of the ball set--caused by race conformity, Hertz stress-life exponent, ball bearing type and bearing series. The bearing fatigue life in actual application will usually be equal to or greater than that calculated using the ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards that incorporate the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The relative fatigue life of an individual race is more sensitive to changes in race conformity for Hertz stress-life exponent n of 12 than where n = 9. However, when the effects are combined to predict actual bearing life for a specified set of conditions and bearing geometry, the predicted life of the bearing will be greater for a value of n = 12 than n = 9.

  14. Predicting the long tail of book sales: Unearthing the power-law exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenner, Trevor; Levene, Mark; Loizou, George

    2010-06-01

    The concept of the long tail has recently been used to explain the phenomenon in e-commerce where the total volume of sales of the items in the tail is comparable to that of the most popular items. In the case of online book sales, the proportion of tail sales has been estimated using regression techniques on the assumption that the data obeys a power-law distribution. Here we propose a different technique for estimation based on a generative model of book sales that results in an asymptotic power-law distribution of sales, but which does not suffer from the problems related to power-law regression techniques. We show that the proportion of tail sales predicted is very sensitive to the estimated power-law exponent. In particular, if we assume that the power-law exponent of the cumulative distribution is closer to 1.1 rather than to 1.2 (estimates published in 2003, calculated using regression by two groups of researchers), then our computations suggest that the tail sales of Amazon.com, rather than being 40% as estimated by Brynjolfsson, Hu and Smith in 2003, are actually closer to 20%, the proportion estimated by its CEO.

  15. Spectral analysis of structure functions and their scaling exponents in forced isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    McComb, W D; Yoffe, S R; Linkmann, M F; Berera, A

    2014-11-01

    The pseudospectral method, in conjunction with a technique for obtaining scaling exponents ζ_{n} from the structure functions S_{n}(r), is presented as an alternative to the extended self-similarity (ESS) method and the use of generalized structure functions. We propose plotting the ratio |S_{n}(r)/S_{3}(r)| against the separation r in accordance with a standard technique for analyzing experimental data. This method differs from the ESS technique, which plots S_{n}(r) against S_{3}(r), with the assumption S_{3}(r)∼r. Using our method for the particular case of S_{2}(r) we obtain the result that the exponent ζ_{2} decreases as the Taylor-Reynolds number increases, with ζ_{2}→0.679±0.013 as R_{λ}→∞. This supports the idea of finite-viscosity corrections to the K41 prediction for S_{2}, and is the opposite of the result obtained by ESS. The pseudospectral method also permits the forcing to be taken into account exactly through the calculation of the energy input in real space from the work spectrum of the stirring forces.

  16. Evaluation of nonlinear properties of epileptic activity using largest Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Tatiana M.; Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Sysoev, Ilya V.

    2016-04-01

    Absence seizures are known to be highly non-linear large amplitude oscillations with a well pronounced main time scale. Whilst the appearance of the main frequency is usually considered as a transition from noisy complex dynamics of baseline EEG to more regular absence activity, the dynamical properties of this type of epileptiformic activity in genetic absence models was not studied precisely. Here, the estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent from intracranial EEGs of 10 WAG/Rij rats (genetic model of absence epilepsy) was performed. Fragments of 10 seizures and 10 episodes of on-going EEG each of 4 s length were used for each animal, 3 cortical and 2 thalamic channels were analysed. The method adapted for short noisy data was implemented. The positive values of the largest Lyapunov exponent were found as for baseline as for spike wave discharges (SWDs), with values for SWDs being significantly less than for on-going activity. Current findings may indicate that SWD is a chaotic process with a well pronounced main timescale rather than a periodic regime. Also, the absence activity was shown to be less chaotic than the baseline one.

  17. Multi-wavelength measurements of aerosol optical absorption coefficients using a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Yao; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-06-01

    The atmospheric aerosol absorption capacity is a critical parameter determining its direct and indirect effects on climate. Accurate measurement is highly desired for the study of the radiative budget of the Earth. A multi-wavelength (405 nm, 532 nm, 780 nm) aerosol absorption meter based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) invovling a single cylindrical acoustic resonator is developed for measuring the aerosol optical absorption coefficients (OACs). A sensitivity of 1.3 Mm-1 (at 532 nm) is demonstrated. The aerosol absorption meter is successfully tested through measuring the OACs of atmospheric nigrosin and ambient aerosols in the suburbs of Hefei city. The absorption cross section and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) for ambient aerosol are determined for characterizing the component of the ambient aerosol.

  18. Light absorption from particulate impurities in snow and ice determined by spectrophotometric analysis of filters.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Thomas C; Doherty, Sarah J; Clarke, Antony D; Warren, Stephen G

    2011-05-10

    Light absorption by particulate impurities in snow and ice can affect the surface albedo and is important for the climate. The absorption properties of these particles can be determined by collecting and melting snow samples and extracting the particulate material by filtration of the meltwater. This paper describes the optical design and testing of a new instrument to measure the absorption spectrum from 400 to 750 nm wavelength of the particles collected on filters using an "integrating-sandwich" configuration. The measured absorption is shown to be unaffected by scattering of light from the deposited particulates. A set of calibration standards is used to derive an upper limit for the concentration of black carbon (BC) in the snow. The wavelength dependence of the absorption spectra from 450 to 600 nm is used to calculate an absorption Ångstrom exponent for the aerosol. This exponent is used to estimate the actual BC concentration in the snow samples as well as the relative contributions of BC and non-BC constituents to the absorption of solar radiation integrated over the wavelength band 300 to 750 nm. PMID:21556105

  19. Near infrared light absorption in magnetic nanoemulsion under external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Mahendran, V.; Lahiri, B. B.; Philip, John

    2014-07-01

    We study the magnetic field dependent near infrared photon absorption behavior in a magnetically polarizable oil-in-water emulsion of droplet radius ~110 nm. The absorption of near infrared photons in magnetic nanoemulsion is found to be dependent on the volume fraction and applied magnetic field, which is attributed to the variation in the Mie absorption efficiency during the structural transitions of nanoemulsion droplets in dispersion. Also, the absorption linearly increases with incident near infrared photon energy up to certain external magnetic field. The imaginary part of the refractive index (k1) of magnetic nanoemulsion obtained from the near infrared absorption profile in the Rayleigh regime is found to vary with external magnetic field and the sample volume fraction (ϕ). The measured k1 follows a power law increment with sample volume fraction (k1~ϕ, where p is the exponent). The exponent (p) decreases with external magnetic field implying that the structural transition of nanoemulsion droplets increases k1. After a critical magnetic field (beyond Rayleigh regime), field induced absorption of near infrared photons decreases because of the increase in the aspect ratio of the chain like aggregates and interchain spacing which in turn reduces the Mie absorption efficiency.

  20. Horton laws for Hydraulic-Geometric variables and their scaling exponents in self-similar river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. K.; Mesa, O. J.

    2014-04-01

    An analytical theory is presented to predict Horton laws for five Hydraulic-Geometric (H-G) variables (stream discharge Q, width W, depth D, velocity U, slope S, and friction n'). The theory builds on the concept of dimensional analysis, and identifies six independent dimensionless River-Basin numbers. We consider self-similar Tokunaga networks and derive a mass conservation equation in the limit of large network order in terms of Horton bifurcation and discharge ratios. It is applied to obtain self-similar solutions of type-1 (SS-1), and predict Horton laws for width, depth and velocity as asymptotic relationships. Exponents of width and the Reynold's number are predicted. Assuming that SS-1 is valid for slope, depth and velocity, corresponding Horton laws and the H-G exponents are derived. The exponent values agree with that for the Optimal Channel Network (OCN) model, but do not agree with values from three field experiments. The deviations are substantial, suggesting that H-G in network does not obey optimality or SS-1. It fails because slope, a dimensionless River-Basin number, goes to 0 as network order increases, but, it cannot be eliminated from the asymptotic limit. Therefore, a generalization of SS-1, based in self-similar solutions of Type-2 (SS-2) is considered. It introduces two anomalous scaling exponents as free parameters, which enables us to show the existence of Horton laws for channel depth, velocity, slope and Manning's friction. The Manning's friction exponent, y, is predicted and tested against observed exponents from three field studies. We briefly sketch how the two anomalous scaling exponents could be estimated from the transport of suspended sediment load and the bed load. Statistical variability in the Horton laws for the H-G variables is also discussed. Both are important open problems for future research.

  1. On the improvement of Wiener attack on RSA with small private exponent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mu-En; Chen, Chien-Ming; Lin, Yue-Hsun; Sun, Hung-Min

    2014-01-01

    RSA system is based on the hardness of the integer factorization problem (IFP). Given an RSA modulus N = pq, it is difficult to determine the prime factors p and q efficiently. One of the most famous short exponent attacks on RSA is the Wiener attack. In 1997, Verheul and van Tilborg use an exhaustive search to extend the boundary of the Wiener attack. Their result shows that the cost of exhaustive search is 2r + 8 bits when extending the Weiner's boundary r bits. In this paper, we first reduce the cost of exhaustive search from 2r + 8 bits to 2r + 2 bits. Then, we propose a method named EPF. With EPF, the cost of exhaustive search is further reduced to 2r - 6 bits when we extend Weiner's boundary r bits. It means that our result is 2(14) times faster than Verheul and van Tilborg's result. Besides, the security boundary is extended 7 bits.

  2. Refining finite-time Lyapunov exponent ridges and the challenges of classifying them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    While more rigorous and sophisticated methods for identifying Lagrangian based coherent structures exist, the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field remains a straightforward and popular method for gaining some insight into transport by complex, time-dependent two-dimensional flows. In light of its enduring appeal, and in support of good practice, we begin by investigating the effects of discretization and noise on two numerical approaches for calculating the FTLE field. A practical method to extract and refine FTLE ridges in two-dimensional flows, which builds on previous methods, is then presented. Seeking to better ascertain the role of a FTLE ridge in flow transport, we adapt an existing classification scheme and provide a thorough treatment of the challenges of classifying the types of deformation represented by a FTLE ridge. As a practical demonstration, the methods are applied to an ocean surface velocity field data set generated by a numerical model.

  3. Fast computation of finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields for unsteady flows.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Steven L; Rowley, Clarence W

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents new efficient methods for computing finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields in unsteady flows. The methods approximate the particle flow map, eliminating redundant particle integrations in neighboring flow map calculations. Two classes of flow map approximations are investigated based on composition of intermediate flow maps; unidirectional approximation constructs a time-T map by composing a number of smaller time-h maps, while bidirectional approximation constructs a flow map by composing both positive- and negative-time maps. The unidirectional method is shown to be fast and accurate, although it is memory intensive. The bidirectional method is also fast and uses significantly less memory; however, it is prone to error which is large in regions where the opposite-time FTLE field is large, rendering it unusable. The algorithms are implemented and compared on three example fluid flows: a double gyre, a low Reynolds number pitching flat plate, and an unsteady ABC flow.

  4. 3D Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents in a left ventricle laboratory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazia Badas, Maria; Espa, Stefania; Fortini, Stefania; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLEs) are a powerful means to infer characteristic features of the flow that cannot be revealed by other Eulerian criteria. Recently FTLEs are becoming popular also in the medical context, for instance in the analysis of vascular flow measured by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, many of the FTLE experimental works are based only on two-dimensional velocity fields, moreover those computed on in-vivo data cannot be obtained under controlled and repeatable conditions. Here we present the 3D FTLE evolution inside a Left Ventricle (LV) laboratory model mimicking physiological human conditions. The investigation of FTLE fields highlights distinctive features of the cardiac flow and gives an insight on the physiological development of the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) that optimize the LV refill.

  5. Refining finite-time Lyapunov exponent ridges and the challenges of classifying them.

    PubMed

    Allshouse, Michael R; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    While more rigorous and sophisticated methods for identifying Lagrangian based coherent structures exist, the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field remains a straightforward and popular method for gaining some insight into transport by complex, time-dependent two-dimensional flows. In light of its enduring appeal, and in support of good practice, we begin by investigating the effects of discretization and noise on two numerical approaches for calculating the FTLE field. A practical method to extract and refine FTLE ridges in two-dimensional flows, which builds on previous methods, is then presented. Seeking to better ascertain the role of a FTLE ridge in flow transport, we adapt an existing classification scheme and provide a thorough treatment of the challenges of classifying the types of deformation represented by a FTLE ridge. As a practical demonstration, the methods are applied to an ocean surface velocity field data set generated by a numerical model.

  6. Pressure Distribution and Critical Exponent in Statically Jammed and Shear-Driven Frictionless Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitel, Stephen; Vågberg, Daniel; Wu, Yegang; Olsson, Peter

    2014-03-01

    We numerically study the distributions of global pressure that are found in ensembles of statically jammed and quasistatically sheared systems of bidisperse, frictionless, disks at fixed packing fraction ϕ in two dimensions. We use these distributions to address the question of how pressure increases as ϕ increases above the jamming point ϕJ, p ~ | ϕ - ϕJ|y . For statically jammed ensembles, our results are consistent with the exponent y being simply related to the power law of the interparticle soft-core interaction. For sheared systems, however, the value of y is consistent with a non-trivial value, as found previously in rheological simulations. Supported by NSF grant DMR-1205800 and Swedish Research Council grant 2010-3725. Resources provided by Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC) at PDC and HPC2N, and Center for Integrated Ressearch Computing (CIRC) at the Univ of Rochester.

  7. The spectral gap and the dynamical critical exponent of an exact solvable probabilistic cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazo, M. J.; Ferreira, A. A.; Alcaraz, F. C.

    2015-11-01

    We obtained the exact solution of a probabilistic cellular automaton related to the diagonal-to-diagonal transfer matrix of the six-vertex model on a square lattice. The model describes the flow of ants (or particles), traveling on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites are small craters containing sleeping or awake ants (two kinds of particles). We found the Bethe ansatz equations and the spectral gap for the time-evolution operator of the cellular automaton. From the spectral gap we show that in the asymmetric case it belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class, exhibiting a dynamical critical exponent value z = 3/2. This result is also obtained from a direct Monte Carlo simulation, by evaluating the lattice-size dependence of the decay time to the stationary state.

  8. Scaling exponent of the maximum growth probability in diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mogens H; Mathiesen, Joachim; Procaccia, Itamar

    2003-04-01

    An early (and influential) scaling relation in the multifractal theory of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) is the Turkevich-Scher conjecture that relates the exponent alpha(min) that characterizes the "hottest" region of the harmonic measure and the fractal dimension D of the cluster, i.e., D=1+alpha(min). Due to lack of accurate direct measurements of both D and alpha(min), this conjecture could never be put to a serious test. Using the method of iterated conformal maps, D was recently determined as D=1.713+/-0.003. In this paper, we determine alpha(min) accurately with the result alpha(min)=0.665+/-0.004. We thus conclude that the Turkevich-Scher conjecture is incorrect for DLA. PMID:12786408

  9. Fractality Evidence and Long-Range Dependence on Capital Markets: a Hurst Exponent Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprean, Camelia; Tănăsescu, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Since the existence of market memory could implicate the rejection of the efficient market hypothesis, the aim of this paper is to find any evidence that selected emergent capital markets (eight European and BRIC markets, namely Hungary, Romania, Estonia, Czech Republic, Brazil, Russia, India and China) evince long-range dependence or the random walk hypothesis. In this paper, the Hurst exponent as calculated by R/S fractal analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis is our measure of long-range dependence in the series. The results reinforce our previous findings and suggest that if stock returns present long-range dependence, the random walk hypothesis is not valid anymore and neither is the market efficiency hypothesis.

  10. Predictability of epileptic seizures: a comparative study using Lyapunov exponent and entropy based measures.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Shivkumar; Narayanan, K; Prasad, Awadhesh; Spanias, A; Sackellares, J C; Iasemidis, L D

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a comparative study involving measures from the theory of chaos, namely the short-term largest Lyapunov exponent, Shannon and Kullback-Leibler entropies from information theory, has been carried out in terms of their predictability of temporal lobe epileptic seizures. These three measures are estimated from electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings with sub-dural and in-depth electrodes from various brain locations in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Techniques from optimization theory are applied to select optimal sets of electrodes whose dynamics is then followed over time. Results from analysis of multiple seizures in two epileptic patients with these measures are presented and compared in terms of their ability to identify pre-ictal dynamical entrainment well ahead of seizure onset time. PMID:12724881

  11. Critical exponents of dynamical conductivity in 2D percolative superconductor-insulator transitions: three universality classes.

    PubMed

    Karki, Pragalv; Loh, Yen Lee

    2016-11-01

    We simulate three types of random inductor-capacitor (LC) networks on [Formula: see text] square lattices. We calculate the dynamical conductivity using an equation-of-motion method in which timestep error is eliminated and windowing error is minimized. We extract the critical exponent a such that [Formula: see text] at low frequencies. The results suggest that there are three different universality classes. The [Formula: see text] model, with capacitances from each site to ground, has a  =  0.314(4). The [Formula: see text] model, with capacitances along bonds, has a  =  0. The [Formula: see text] model, with both types of capacitances, has a  =  0.304(1). This implies that classical percolative 2D superconductor-insulator transitions (SITs) generically have [Formula: see text] as [Formula: see text]. Therefore, any experiments that give a constant conductivity as [Formula: see text] must be explained in terms of quantum effects.

  12. Relationship among shock-wave velocity, particle velocity, and adiabatic exponent for dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In H.; Hong, Sang H.; Jhung, Kyu S.; Oh, Ki-Hwan; Yoon, Yo K.

    1991-07-01

    Using the results of the detailed numerical calculations, it is shown that the relationship between the shock-wave velocity U sub s and the particle velocity U sub p for shock-compressed dry air can be represented accurately by the linear relation U sub s = a(P0) + b(P0)U sub p in a wide range of U sub p (U sub p = 2 to 9 ) km/s and initial pressure P0 = 10 to the -6th to 1 atm, where a and b are given by the cubic polynomials of log10P0. Based on the linear U sub s - U sub p relation, an analytic expression has been obtained for the adiabatic exponent gamma as a function of particle velocity.

  13. Multiple positive solutions for Kirchhoff-type problems in R^3 involving critical Sobolev exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haining

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study the following nonlinear problem of Kirchhoff type with critical Sobolev exponent -(a+bintlimits_{R^3}|nabla u|^2dx)Δ u+u=λ f(x)u^{q-1}+g(x)u^5,quad xin R^3, uin H^1(R^3), where a, b > 0, 4 < q < 6, and {λ} is a positive parameter. Under certain assumptions on f( x) and g( x) and {λ} is small enough, we obtain a relationship between the number of positive solutions and the topology of the global maximum set of g. The Nehari manifold and Ljusternik-Schnirelmann category are the main tools in our study. Moreover, using the Mountain Pass Theorem, we give an existence result about {λ} large.

  14. A Model for Diagnosing Breast Cancerous Tissue from Thermal Images Using Active Contour and Lyapunov Exponent

    PubMed Central

    GHAYOUMI ZADEH, Hossein; HADDADNIA, Javad; MONTAZERI, Alimohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The segmentation of cancerous areas in breast images is important for the early detection of disease. Thermal imaging has advantages, such as being non-invasive, non-radiation, passive, quick, painless, inexpensive, and non-contact. Imaging technique is the focus of this research. Methods: The proposed model in this paper is a combination of surf and corners that are very resistant. Obtained features are resistant to changes in rotation and revolution then with the help of active contours, this feature has been used for segmenting cancerous areas. Results: Comparing the obtained results from the proposed method and mammogram show that proposed method is Accurate and appropriate. Benign and malignance of segmented areas are detected by Lyapunov exponent. Values obtained include TP=91.31%, FN=8.69%, FP=7.26%. Conclusion: The proposed method can classify those abnormally segmented areas of the breast, to the Benign and malignant cancer. PMID:27398339

  15. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Look, Nicole; Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; Kram, Rodger; McDermott, William J.; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics.

  16. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Look, Nicole; Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; McDermott, William J.; Kram, Rodger; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics.

  17. On the Improvement of Wiener Attack on RSA with Small Private Exponent

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Ming; Lin, Yue-Hsun

    2014-01-01

    RSA system is based on the hardness of the integer factorization problem (IFP). Given an RSA modulus N = pq, it is difficult to determine the prime factors p and q efficiently. One of the most famous short exponent attacks on RSA is the Wiener attack. In 1997, Verheul and van Tilborg use an exhaustive search to extend the boundary of the Wiener attack. Their result shows that the cost of exhaustive search is 2r + 8 bits when extending the Weiner's boundary r bits. In this paper, we first reduce the cost of exhaustive search from 2r + 8 bits to 2r + 2 bits. Then, we propose a method named EPF. With EPF, the cost of exhaustive search is further reduced to 2r − 6 bits when we extend Weiner's boundary r bits. It means that our result is 214 times faster than Verheul and van Tilborg's result. Besides, the security boundary is extended 7 bits. PMID:24982974

  18. Order parameter and its critical exponent for some binary mixtures showing induced nematic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sudipta Kumar; Das, Malay Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Refractive index measurements as a function of temperature have been performed for an induced nematic binary system by means of thin prism technique. The temperature dependence of the birefringence (Δn) has been assessed from the measured refractive index data. A direct extrapolation method has been employed to determine the orientational order parameter for the investigated mixtures and the order parameter so obtained has also been compared with the mean field values. The Haller type fitting expression results in a relatively lower value of the order parameter critical exponent (β) compared to the theoretically predicted values. Therefore, a four-parameter power law expression, consistent with the mean field theory as well as the first-order character of the nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition have been used to explore the critical behavior of the order parameter near the N-I transition.

  19. A method to calculate finite-time Lyapunov exponents for inertial particles in incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaboa-Paz, D.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.

    2015-10-01

    The present study aims to improve the calculus of finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) applied to describe the transport of inertial particles in a fluid flow. To this aim, the deformation tensor is modified to take into account that the stretching rate between particles separated by a certain distance is influenced by the initial velocity of the particles. Thus, the inertial FTLEs (iFTLEs) are defined in terms of the maximum stretching between infinitesimally close trajectories that have different initial velocities. The advantages of this improvement, if compared to the standard method (Shadden et al., 2005), are discussed for the double-gyre flow and the meandering jet flow. The new method allows one to identify the initial velocity that inertial particles must have in order to maximize their dispersion.

  20. On the validity of the conjugate pairing rule for Lyapunov exponents

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetto, F.; Cohen, E.G.D.; Pugh, C.

    1998-08-01

    For Hamiltonian systems subject to an external potential which in the presence of a thermostat will reach a nonequilibrium stationary state Dettmann and Morriss proved a strong conjugate pairing rule (SCPR) for pairs of Lyapunov exponents in the case of isokinetic (IK) stationary states which have a given kinetic energy. This SCPR holds for all initial phases of the system, all times t, and all numbers of particles N. This proof was generalized by Wojtkowski and Liverani to include hard interparticle potentials. A geometrical reformulation of those results is presented. The present paper proves numerically, using periodic orbits for the Lorentz gas, that SCPR cannot hold for isoenergetic (IE) stationary states which have a given total internal energy. In that case strong evidence is obtained for CPR to hold for large N and t, where it can be conjectured that the larger N, the smaller t will be. This suffices for statistical mechanics.

  1. Critical Exponents and Pressure Dependence of Tc of La(Ca)MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Jose A.; White, B. D.; Neumeier, J. J.; Yu, Y.-K.; Dos Santos, C. A. M.

    2007-03-01

    Measurements of heat capacity and thermal expansion for La1- xCaxMnO3 with x = 0, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30, 0.35, 0.40, 0.45, and 1 are reported. Using a model proposed previously (Souza et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 207209 (2005)), which utilizes both heat capacity (CP) and thermal expansion coefficient (μ) data, the pressure dependencies of Tc, dTc/dP, are obtained for all samples. dTc/dP decreases as the Ca doping increases. Critical behavior using both CP and μ is evaluated for the samples. The critical exponent α increases from 0.13, for LaMnO3 to 0.97 for x = 0.30. As Ca content is increased further, α drops reaching 0.11, for CaMnO3.

  2. Strong Converse Exponents for a Quantum Channel Discrimination Problem and Quantum-Feedback-Assisted Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, Tom; Mosonyi, Milán; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper studies the difficulty of discriminating between an arbitrary quantum channel and a "replacer" channel that discards its input and replaces it with a fixed state. The results obtained here generalize those known in the theory of quantum hypothesis testing for binary state discrimination. We show that, in this particular setting, the most general adaptive discrimination strategies provide no asymptotic advantage over non-adaptive tensor-power strategies. This conclusion follows by proving a quantum Stein's lemma for this channel discrimination setting, showing that a constant bound on the Type I error leads to the Type II error decreasing to zero exponentially quickly at a rate determined by the maximum relative entropy registered between the channels. The strong converse part of the lemma states that any attempt to make the Type II error decay to zero at a rate faster than the channel relative entropy implies that the Type I error necessarily converges to one. We then refine this latter result by identifying the optimal strong converse exponent for this task. As a consequence of these results, we can establish a strong converse theorem for the quantum-feedback-assisted capacity of a channel, sharpening a result due to Bowen. Furthermore, our channel discrimination result demonstrates the asymptotic optimality of a non-adaptive tensor-power strategy in the setting of quantum illumination, as was used in prior work on the topic. The sandwiched Rényi relative entropy is a key tool in our analysis. Finally, by combining our results with recent results of Hayashi and Tomamichel, we find a novel operational interpretation of the mutual information of a quantum channel {mathcal{N}} as the optimal Type II error exponent when discriminating between a large number of independent instances of {mathcal{N}} and an arbitrary "worst-case" replacer channel chosen from the set of all replacer channels.

  3. Hurst exponent of very long birth time series in XX century Romania. Social and religious aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotundo, G.; Ausloos, M.; Herteliu, C.; Ileanu, B.

    2015-07-01

    The Hurst exponent of very long birth time series in Romania has been extracted from official daily records, i.e. over 97 years between 1905 and 2001 included. The series result from distinguishing between families located in urban (U) or rural (R) areas, and belonging (Ox) or not (NOx) to the orthodox religion. Four time series combining both criteria, (U,R) and (Ox, NOx), are also examined. A statistical information is given on these sub-populations measuring their XX-th century state as a snapshot. However, the main goal is to investigate whether the "daily" production of babies is purely noisy or is fluctuating according to some non trivial fractional Brownian motion, - in the four types of populations, characterized by either their habitat or their religious attitude, yet living within the same political regime. One of the goals was also to find whether combined criteria implied a different behavior. Moreover, we wish to observe whether some seasonal periodicity exists. The detrended fluctuation analysis technique is used for finding the fractal correlation dimension of such (9) signals. It has been first necessary, due to two periodic tendencies, to define the range regime in which the Hurst exponent is meaningfully defined. It results that the birth of babies in all cases is a very strongly persistent signal. It is found that the signal fractal correlation dimension is weaker (i) for NOx than for Ox, and (ii) or U with respect to R. Moreover, it is observed that the combination of U or R with NOx or OX enhances the UNOx, UOx, and ROx fluctuations, but smoothens the RNOx signal, thereby suggesting a stronger conditioning on religiosity rituals or rules.

  4. Radius exponent in elastic and rigid arterial models optimized by the least energy principle

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Awa, Shoichi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It was analyzed in normal physiological arteries whether the least energy principle would suffice to account for the radius exponent x. The mammalian arterial system was modeled as two types, the elastic or the rigid, to which Bernoulli's and Hagen‐Poiseuille's equations were applied, respectively. We minimized the total energy function E, which was defined as the sum of kinetic, pressure, metabolic and thermal energies, and loss of each per unit time in a single artery transporting viscous incompressible blood. Assuming a scaling exponent α between the vessel radius (r) and length (l) to be 1.0, x resulted in 2.33 in the elastic model. The rigid model provided a continuously changing x from 2.33 to 3.0, which corresponded to Uylings’ and Murray's theories, respectively, through a function combining Reynolds number with a proportional coefficient of the l − r relationship. These results were expanded to an asymmetric arterial fractal tree with the blood flow preservation rule. While x in the optimal elastic model accounted for around 2.3 in proximal systemic (r >1 mm) and whole pulmonary arteries (r ≥0.004 mm), optimal x in the rigid model explained 2.7 in elastic‐muscular (0.1 < r ≤1 mm) and 3.0 in peripheral resistive systemic arteries (0.004 ≤ r ≤0.1 mm), in agreement with data obtained from angiographic, cast‐morphometric, and in vivo experimental studies in the literature. The least energy principle on the total energy basis provides an alternate concept of optimality relating to mammalian arterial fractal dimensions under α = 1.0. PMID:24744905

  5. Chaotic dynamics of Comet 1P/Halley: Lyapunov exponent and survival time expectancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, M. A.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Pichardo, B.

    2015-03-01

    The orbital elements of Comet Halley are known to a very high precision, suggesting that the calculation of its future dynamical evolution is straightforward. In this paper we seek to characterize the chaotic nature of the present day orbit of Comet Halley and to quantify the time-scale over which its motion can be predicted confidently. In addition, we attempt to determine the time-scale over which its present day orbit will remain stable. Numerical simulations of the dynamics of test particles in orbits similar to that of Comet Halley are carried out with the MERCURY 6.2 code. On the basis of these we construct survival time maps to assess the absolute stability of Halley's orbit, frequency analysis maps to study the variability of the orbit, and we calculate the Lyapunov exponent for the orbit for variations in initial conditions at the level of the present day uncertainties in our knowledge of its orbital parameters. On the basis of our calculations of the Lyapunov exponent for Comet Halley, the chaotic nature of its motion is demonstrated. The e-folding time-scale for the divergence of initially very similar orbits is approximately 70 yr. The sensitivity of the dynamics on initial conditions is also evident in the self-similarity character of the survival time and frequency analysis maps in the vicinity of Halley's orbit, which indicates that, on average, it is unstable on a time-scale of hundreds of thousands of years. The chaotic nature of Halley's present day orbit implies that a precise determination of its motion, at the level of the present-day observational uncertainty, is difficult to predict on a time-scale of approximately 100 yr. Furthermore, we also find that the ejection of Halley from the Solar system or its collision with another body could occur on a time-scale as short as 10 000 yr.

  6. A novel method for detecting abrupt dynamic change based on the changing Hurst exponent of spatial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen-Ping; Liu, Qun-Qun; Gu, Bin; Zhao, Shan-Shan

    2016-10-01

    The climate system is a classical spatiotemporal evolutionary dynamic system with spatiotemporal correlation characteristics. Based on this, two-dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis (TD-DFA) is used to estimate the Hurst exponent of two-dimensional images. Then, we monitored the change of the Hurst exponent of the images to identify an abrupt dynamic change. We tested the performance of this method with a coupled spatiotemporal dynamic model and found that it works well. The changes in the Hurst exponents of the spatial images are stable when there is no dynamic change in the system, but there will be a clear non-stationary change of the Hurst exponents; for example, the abrupt mean values change if the dynamics of the system change. Thus, the TD-DFA method is suitable for detecting an abrupt dynamic change from natural and artificial images. The spatial images of the NCEP reanalysis of the daily average temperature exhibited fractality. Based on this, we found three non-stationary changes in the Hurst exponents for the NCEP reanalysis of the daily average temperature or for the annual average temperature in the region (60°S-60°N). It can be concluded that the climate system may have incurred three dynamic changes since 1961 on decadal timescales, i.e., in approximately the mid-1970s, the mid-1980s, and between the late 1990s and the early 2000s.

  7. Strong associated C 4 absorption in low redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David

    1990-01-01

    IUE spectra of quasars were used to determine the frequency of occurrence of strong associated C 4 absorption systems at low red shifts. Four systems are found with rest frame equivalent width (REW) greater than 5 angstroms in the spectra of 38 quasars. This rate of occurrence of 0.12 is not significantly different from the rate of 0.064 determined for high red shift quasars. The detected strong associated systems are all in low red shift quasars which have been imaged from the ground. One of the quasars is unusual, having two nuclei, a close companion and distorted isotopes. Two of the others also have close companion galaxies at projected distances of under 100 kpc. The conclusion was made that a much larger sample is needed.

  8. Observation of x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in well-characterized iron-cobalt-platinum multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Waddill, G.D.; Tobin, J.G.

    1993-04-01

    Magnetic circular dichroism in the Fe 2p x-ray absorption is observed in multilayers of(Fe9.5{Angstrom}/Pt9.5{Angstrom}){sub 92}. The magnetization and helicity are both in the plane of this multilayer which is prepared by magnetron sputter deposition. This sample is part of a study to examine magnetization in the ternary multilayer system of FeCo/Pt. Lattice and layer pair spacings are measured using x-ray scattering. The atomic concentration profiles of the multilayer films are characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy coupled with depth profiling. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the thin film, growth morphology and atomic structure.

  9. Estimate of the Critical Exponent of the Anderson Transition in the Three and Four-Dimensional Unitary Universality Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slevin, Keith; Ohtsuki, Tomi

    2016-10-01

    Disordered non-interacting systems are classified into ten symmetry classes, with the unitary class being the most fundamental. The three and four-dimensional unitary universality classes are attracting renewed interest because of their relation to three-dimensional Weyl semi-metals and four-dimensional topological insulators. Determining the critical exponent of the correlation/localisation length for the Anderson transition in these classes is important both theoretically and experimentally. Using the transfer matrix technique, we report numerical estimations of the critical exponent in a U(1) model in three and four dimensions.

  10. The use of the Hurst exponent to investigate the global maximum of the Warsaw Stock Exchange WIG20 index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domino, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The WIG20 index-the index of the 20 biggest companies traded on the Warsaw Stock Exchange-reached the global maximum on 29th October 2007. I have used the local DFA (Detrended Functional Analysis) to obtain the Hurst exponent (diffusion exponent) and investigate the signature of anti-correlation of share price evolution around the maximum. The analysis was applied to the share price evolution for variable DFA parameters. For many values of parameters, the evidence of anti-correlation near the WIG20 maximum was pointed out.

  11. Optical cavity and electron beam requirements for the operation of a 1.5 {angstrom} LCLS in a regenerative amplifier mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    Current conceptual designs for Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLSs) in the 100-1 {angstrom} wavelength range are based on Free Electron Lasers (FELs) that are designed to saturate in a single pass of the electron beam through the undulator. This, in practice, leads to insertion devices several tens of meters in length, which greatly dominates the component costs of the overall LCLS system. Although it is well known that amplification within a cavity would enable much shorter and more economical undulators to be employed, two major practical problems are currently adduced to discount the use of such configurations in the sub-100 {angstrom} wavelength regime: (1) the temporal jitter of the (sub-picosecond) electron bunches required for such FELs can be comparable to or larger that the durations of the bunches themselves, rendering reliable synchronization extremely difficult, and (2) the lack of optical elements of sufficient reflectivity and bandwidth out of which adequately efficient optical cavities can be constructed. In this paper we reasssess the requirements associated with these two aspects of x-ray optics as a possible approach to resolving or making more tractable the resolution of some of the basic problems involved.

  12. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  13. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index Observed with the OMI Satellite Instrument to Understand Absorption by Organic Aerosols: Implications for Atmospheric Oxidation and Direct Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Melanie S.; Martin, Randall V.; Donkelaar, Aaron van; Buchard, Virginie; Torres, Omar; Ridley, David A.; Spurr, Robert J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI) are sensitive to absorption of solar radiation by aerosols; this absorption affects photolysis frequencies and radiative forcing. We develop a global simulation of the UVAI using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOSChem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the year 2007. Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.32 to -0.97) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We determine effective optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), and implement them into GEOS-Chem to better represent observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The inclusion of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.57 to -0.09 over West Africa in January, from -0.32 to +0.0002 over South Asia in April, from -0.97 to -0.22 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.33 over South America in September. The spectral dependence of absorption after including BrC in the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with absorbing Angstrom exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.9 in the ultraviolet (UV) to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases OH by up to 30% over South America in September, up to 20% over southern Africa in July, and up to 15% over other biomass burning regions. Global annual mean OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem decrease due to the presence of absorbing BrC, increasing the methyl chloroform lifetime from 5.62 to 5.68 years, thus

  14. Light absorption of organic aerosol from pyrolysis of corn stalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghua; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C.

    2016-11-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) can absorb solar radiation in the low-visible and ultra-violet wavelengths thereby modifying radiative forcing. Agricultural waste burning emits a large quantity of organic carbon in many developing countries. In this work, we improved the extraction and analysis method developed by Chen and Bond, and extended the spectral range of OC absorption. We examined light absorbing properties of primary OA from pyrolysis of corn stalk, which is a major type of agricultural wastes. Light absorption of bulk liquid extracts of OA was measured using a UV-vis recording spectrophotometer. OA can be extracted by methanol at 95%, close to full extent, and shows polar character. Light absorption of organic aerosol has strong spectral dependence (Absorption Ångström exponent = 7.7) and is not negligible at ultra-violet and low-visible regions. Higher pyrolysis temperature produced OA with higher absorption. Imaginary refractive index of organic aerosol (kOA) is 0.041 at 400 nm wavelength and 0.005 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively.

  15. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states

    PubMed Central

    Botha, André E.

    2016-01-01

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators – certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed. PMID:27374473

  16. Competitive autocatalytic reactions in chaotic flows with diffusion: Prediction using finite-time Lyapunov exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Conor P.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate chaotic advection and diffusion in autocatalytic reactions for time-periodic sine flow computationally using a mapping method with operator splitting. We specifically consider three different autocatalytic reaction schemes: a single autocatalytic reaction, competitive autocatalytic reactions, which can provide insight into problems of chiral symmetry breaking and homochirality, and competitive autocatalytic reactions with recycling. In competitive autocatalytic reactions, species B and C both undergo an autocatalytic reaction with species A such that A +B→2B and A +C→2C. Small amounts of initially spatially localized B and C and a large amount of spatially homogeneous A are advected by the velocity field, diffuse, and react until A is completely consumed and only B and C remain. We find that local finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) can accurately predict the final average concentrations of B and C after the reaction completes. The species that starts in the region with the larger FTLE has, with high probability, the larger average concentration at the end of the reaction. If B and C start in regions with similar FTLEs, their average concentrations at the end of the reaction will also be similar. When a recycling reaction is added, the system evolves towards a single species state, with the FTLE often being useful in predicting which species fills the entire domain and which is depleted. The FTLE approach is also demonstrated for competitive autocatalytic reactions in journal bearing flow, an experimentally realizable flow that generates chaotic dynamics.

  17. Integrated computation of finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields during direct numerical simulation of unsteady flows.

    PubMed

    Finn, Justin; Apte, Sourabh V

    2013-03-01

    The computation of Lagrangian coherent structures typically involves post-processing of experimentally or numerically obtained fluid velocity fields to obtain the largest finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field. However, this procedure can be tedious for large-scale complex flows of general interest. In this work, an alternative approach involving computation of the FTLE on-the-fly during direct numerical simulation of the full three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is developed. The implementation relies on Lagrangian particle tracking to compose forward time flow maps, and an Eulerian treatment of the backward time flow map [S. Leung, J. Comput. Phys. 230, 3500-3524 (2011)] coupled with a semi-Lagrangian advection scheme. The flow maps are accurately constructed from a sequence of smaller sub-steps stored on disk [S. Brunton and C. Rowley, Chaos 20, 017503 (2010)], resulting in low CPU and memory requirements to compute evolving FTLE fields. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the capability and parallel scalability of the approach for a variety of two and three dimensional flows.

  18. Integrated computation of finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields during direct numerical simulation of unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Justin; Apte, Sourabh V.

    2013-03-01

    The computation of Lagrangian coherent structures typically involves post-processing of experimentally or numerically obtained fluid velocity fields to obtain the largest finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field. However, this procedure can be tedious for large-scale complex flows of general interest. In this work, an alternative approach involving computation of the FTLE on-the-fly during direct numerical simulation of the full three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is developed. The implementation relies on Lagrangian particle tracking to compose forward time flow maps, and an Eulerian treatment of the backward time flow map [S. Leung, J. Comput. Phys. 230, 3500-3524 (2011)] coupled with a semi-Lagrangian advection scheme. The flow maps are accurately constructed from a sequence of smaller sub-steps stored on disk [S. Brunton and C. Rowley, Chaos 20, 017503 (2010)], resulting in low CPU and memory requirements to compute evolving FTLE fields. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the capability and parallel scalability of the approach for a variety of two and three dimensional flows.

  19. The Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent Field of N Interacting Vortices in the Zero Viscosity Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, Richard; Green, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    We present an analysis of the Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field of interacting vortices in the potential flow limit. This work is based on an inviscid approximation, but develops a useful tool that will aid in the effort of understanding the interactions of vortices and turbulence in viscous fluids. The FTLE field of N interacting vortices is computed numerically in two dimensions in different physical scenarios: i) orbiting one another with no initial velocities, ii) approaching each other given an initial velocity and iii) as periodically produced behind a circular cylinder. For situation ii) we expand on the cases where the approach velocities of the vortices are less than or greater than a critical capture velocity, that is, the velocity necessary to escape a captured orbit between co-rotating vortices. We focus on the evolution and interaction of the Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) in these scenarios to determine if there is a way to anticipate the character of vortex interaction by the initial structure of the LCS. Additional remarks will be made on the extrapolation of observations to a large number of interacting vortices (large N). This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0210.

  20. Local finite time Lyapunov exponent, local sampling and probabilistic source and destination regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, A. E.; Ross, S. D.; Schmale, D. G., III

    2015-05-01

    The time-varying finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is a powerful Lagrangian concept widely used for describing large-scale flow patterns and transport phenomena. However, field experiments usually have modest scales. Therefore, it is necessary to bridge between the powerful concept of FTLE and (local) field experiments. In this paper a new interpretation of the local FTLE, the time series of a FTLE field at a fixed location, is proposed. This concept can practically assist in field experiments where samples are collected at a fixed location and it is necessary to attribute long distance transport phenomena and location of source points to the characteristic variation of the sampled particles. Also, results of this study have the potential to aid in planning of optimal local sampling of passive particles for maximal diversity monitoring of assemblages of microorganisms. Assuming a deterministic flow field, one can use the proposed theorem to (i) estimate the differential distances between the source (or destination) points of the collected (or released) particles when consecutive sampling (or releasing) is performed at a fixed location, (ii) estimate the local FTLE as a function of known differential distances between the source (or destination) points. In addition to the deterministic flows, the more realistic case of unresolved turbulence and low resolution flow data that yield the probabilistic source (or destination) regions are studied. It is shown that similar to deterministic flows, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) separate probabilistic source (or destination) regions corresponding to consecutive collected (or released) particles.

  1. Lagrangian-based investigation of multiphase flows by finite-time Lyapunov exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jia-Ning; Tseng, Chien-Chou; Wang, Ning-Fei

    2012-06-01

    Multiphase flows are ubiquitous in our daily life and engineering applications. It is important to investigate the flow structures to predict their dynamical behaviors effectively. Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) defined by the ridges of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is utilized in this study to elucidate the multiphase interactions in gaseous jets injected into water and time-dependent turbulent cavitation under the framework of Navier-Stokes flow computations. For the gaseous jets injected into water, the highlighted phenomena of the jet transportation can be observed by the LCS method, including expansion, bulge, necking/breaking, and back-attack. Besides, the observation of the LCS reveals that the back-attack phenomenon arises from the fact that the injected gas has difficulties to move toward downstream region after the necking/breaking. For the turbulent cavitating flow, the ridge of the FTLE field can form a LCS to capture the front and boundary of the re-entraint jet when the adverse pressure gradient is strong enough. It represents a barrier between particles trapped inside the circulation region and those moving downstream. The results indicate that the FTLE field has the potential to identify the structures of multiphase flows, and the LCS can capture the interface/barrier or the vortex/circulation region.

  2. Lyapunov exponents and adaptive mesh refinement for high-speed flows using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, R. C.; Silva, A. F. C.; Bigarella, E. D. V.; Fazenda, A. L.; Ortega, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes two important improvements to shock-capturing strategies using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme, namely, accurate shock identification via finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) operators and efficient shock treatment through a point-implicit discretization of a PDE-based artificial viscosity technique. The advocated approach is based on the FTLE operator, originally developed in the context of dynamical systems theory to identify certain types of coherent structures in a flow. We propose the application of FTLEs in the detection of shock waves and demonstrate the operator's ability to identify strong and weak shocks equally well. The detection algorithm is coupled with a mesh refinement procedure and applied to transonic and supersonic flows. While the proposed strategy can be used potentially with any numerical method, a high-order discontinuous Galerkin solver is used in this study. In this context, two artificial viscosity approaches are employed to regularize the solution near shocks: an element-wise constant viscosity technique and a PDE-based smooth viscosity model. As the latter approach is more sophisticated and preferable for complex problems, a point-implicit discretization in time is proposed to reduce the extra stiffness introduced by the PDE-based technique, making it more competitive in terms of computational cost.

  3. Competitive autocatalytic reactions in chaotic flows with diffusion: prediction using finite-time Lyapunov exponents.

    PubMed

    Schlick, Conor P; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2014-03-01

    We investigate chaotic advection and diffusion in autocatalytic reactions for time-periodic sine flow computationally using a mapping method with operator splitting. We specifically consider three different autocatalytic reaction schemes: a single autocatalytic reaction, competitive autocatalytic reactions, which can provide insight into problems of chiral symmetry breaking and homochirality, and competitive autocatalytic reactions with recycling. In competitive autocatalytic reactions, species B and C both undergo an autocatalytic reaction with species A such that [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Small amounts of initially spatially localized B and C and a large amount of spatially homogeneous A are advected by the velocity field, diffuse, and react until A is completely consumed and only B and C remain. We find that local finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) can accurately predict the final average concentrations of B and C after the reaction completes. The species that starts in the region with the larger FTLE has, with high probability, the larger average concentration at the end of the reaction. If B and C start in regions with similar FTLEs, their average concentrations at the end of the reaction will also be similar. When a recycling reaction is added, the system evolves towards a single species state, with the FTLE often being useful in predicting which species fills the entire domain and which is depleted. The FTLE approach is also demonstrated for competitive autocatalytic reactions in journal bearing flow, an experimentally realizable flow that generates chaotic dynamics.

  4. Competitive autocatalytic reactions in chaotic flows with diffusion: Prediction using finite-time Lyapunov exponents

    SciTech Connect

    Schlick, Conor P.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2014-03-15

    We investigate chaotic advection and diffusion in autocatalytic reactions for time-periodic sine flow computationally using a mapping method with operator splitting. We specifically consider three different autocatalytic reaction schemes: a single autocatalytic reaction, competitive autocatalytic reactions, which can provide insight into problems of chiral symmetry breaking and homochirality, and competitive autocatalytic reactions with recycling. In competitive autocatalytic reactions, species B and C both undergo an autocatalytic reaction with species A such that A+B→2B and A+C→2C. Small amounts of initially spatially localized B and C and a large amount of spatially homogeneous A are advected by the velocity field, diffuse, and react until A is completely consumed and only B and C remain. We find that local finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) can accurately predict the final average concentrations of B and C after the reaction completes. The species that starts in the region with the larger FTLE has, with high probability, the larger average concentration at the end of the reaction. If B and C start in regions with similar FTLEs, their average concentrations at the end of the reaction will also be similar. When a recycling reaction is added, the system evolves towards a single species state, with the FTLE often being useful in predicting which species fills the entire domain and which is depleted. The FTLE approach is also demonstrated for competitive autocatalytic reactions in journal bearing flow, an experimentally realizable flow that generates chaotic dynamics.

  5. Local finite-time Lyapunov exponent, local sampling and probabilistic source and destination regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, A. E.; Ross, S. D.; Schmale, D. G., III

    2015-11-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is a powerful Lagrangian concept widely used for describing large-scale flow patterns and transport phenomena. However, field experiments usually have modest scales. Therefore, it is necessary to bridge the gap between the concept of FTLE and field experiments. In this paper, two independent observations are discussed: (i) approximation of the local FTLE time series at a fixed location as a function of known distances between the destination (or source) points of released (or collected) particles and local velocity, and (ii) estimation of the distances between the destination (or source) points of the released (or collected) particles when consecutive release (or sampling) events are performed at a fixed location. These two observations lay the groundwork for an ansatz methodology that can practically assist in field experiments where consecutive samples are collected at a fixed location, and it is desirable to attribute source locations to the collected particles, and also in planning of optimal local sampling of passive particles for maximal diversity monitoring of atmospheric assemblages of microorganisms. In addition to deterministic flows, the more realistic case of unresolved turbulence and low-resolution flow data that yield probabilistic source (or destination) regions are studied. It is shown that, similar to deterministic flows, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) and local FTLE can describe the separation of probabilistic source (or destination) regions corresponding to consecutively collected (or released) particles.

  6. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states.

    PubMed

    Botha, André E

    2016-07-04

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators - certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed.

  7. Positive-overlap transition and critical exponents in mean field spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Alessandra; Barra, Adriano; DeSanctis, Luca

    2006-11-01

    In this paper we obtain two results for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, and we show that they both emerge from a single approach. First, we prove that the average of the overlap takes positive values when it is non-zero. More specifically, the average of the overlap, which is naively expected to take values in the whole interval [-1,+1], becomes positive if we 'first' apply an external field, so as to destroy the gauge invariance of the model, and 'then' remove it in the thermodynamic limit. This phenomenon emerges at the critical point. This first result is weaker than the one obtained by Talagrand (not limited to the average of the overlap), but we show here that, at least on average, the overlap is proven to be non-negative with no use of the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities. The latter are instead needed to obtain the second result, which is to control the behaviour of the overlap at the critical point: we find the critical exponents of all the overlap correlation functions.

  8. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states.

    PubMed

    Botha, André E

    2016-01-01

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators - certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed. PMID:27374473

  9. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for classification of ECG signals using Lyapunov exponents.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes the application of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) model for classification of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. Decision making was performed in two stages: feature extraction by computation of Lyapunov exponents and classification by the ANFIS trained with the backpropagation gradient descent method in combination with the least squares method. Four types of ECG beats (normal beat, congestive heart failure beat, ventricular tachyarrhythmia beat, and atrial fibrillation beat) obtained from the PhysioBank database were classified by four ANFIS classifiers. To improve diagnostic accuracy, the fifth ANFIS classifier (combining ANFIS) was trained using the outputs of the four ANFIS classifiers as input data. The proposed ANFIS model combined the neural network adaptive capabilities and the fuzzy logic qualitative approach. Some conclusions concerning the saliency of features on classification of the ECG signals were obtained through analysis of the ANFIS. The performance of the ANFIS model was evaluated in terms of training performance and classification accuracies and the results confirmed that the proposed ANFIS model has potential in classifying the ECG signals. PMID:19084286

  10. The Tail Exponent for Stock Returns in Bursa Malaysia for 2003-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusli, N. H.; Gopir, G.; Usang, M. D.

    2010-07-01

    A developed discipline of econophysics that has been introduced is exhibiting the application of mathematical tools that are usually applied to the physical models for the study of financial models. In this study, an analysis of the time series behavior of several blue chip and penny stock companies in Main Market of Bursa Malaysia has been performed. Generally, the basic quantity being used is the relative price changes or is called the stock price returns, contains daily-sampled data from the beginning of 2003 until the end of 2008, containing 1555 trading days recorded. The aim of this paper is to investigate the tail exponent in tails of the distribution for blue chip stocks and penny stocks financial returns in six years period. By using a standard regression method, it is found that the distribution performed double scaling on the log-log plot of the cumulative probability of the normalized returns. Thus we calculate α for a small scale return as well as large scale return. Based on the result obtained, it is found that the power-law behavior for the probability density functions of the stock price absolute returns P(z)˜z-α with values lying inside and outside the Lévy stable regime with values α>2. All the results were discussed in detail.

  11. 20 years of reprocessed Lyapunov Exponents from altimetry available on AVISO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Marie-Isabelle; Faugere, Yannice; D'Ovidio, Francesco; Morrow, Rosemary; Bronner, Emilie; Picot, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    SARAL/AltiKa is able to sample the small mesoscale signal with a noise measurement error never reached in nadir conventional altimetry. The SARAL/AltiKa 1-Hz measurement is used in the SSALTO/DUACS system since July 2013 and largely contributes to the quality of the Level4 merged products. These products, are now widely used to define the surface geostrophic currents and beyond that they are used to provide proxies of (sub-)mesoscale transport fronts via the Lyapunov Exponents (LEs). The LEs are being increasingly used in physical, biogeochemical, and ecological applications, ranging from real-time support to field studies to co-localisation of animal tracking with Lagrangian Coherent Structures. In order to better serve the users need, and in collaboration with different laboratories (LOCEAN and CTOH), the LEs and vectors are computed over the 21 year altimeter period and over the global ocean within the SSALTO/DUACS project. This product provides the position, and intensity, and orientation of fronts induced by the mesoscale eddies and underlining part of sub-mesoscale activity. We present here the LEs that will be available on AVISO+ early 2015.

  12. 20 years of reprocessed Lyapunov Exponents from altimetry available on AVISO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Marie-Isabelle; Faugere, Yannice; D'Ovidio, Francesco; Morrow, Rosemary; Bronner, Emilie; Picot, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Altimetry-derived maps of Lyapunov exponents (LEs) provide proxies of (sub-)mesoscale transport fronts. They are being increasingly used in physical, biogeochemical, and ecological applications, ranging from real-time support to field studies to co-localisation of animal tracking with Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Their calculation however is more complex than standard Eulerian diagnostics, because it requires a Lagrangian algorithms which integrates the velocity field. During the past 20 years, in parallel with the altimeter measurement Level2 (a.k.a [O/I]GDR) to Level3 and Level4 (along-track cross-calibrated SLA, and multiple sensor merged maps) processing, different applications and derivated Level4+ products were developed by AVISO+. In order to better serve the users need, and in collaboration with different laboratories (LOCEAN and CTOH), the LEs and vectors are computed over the 21-year altimeter period and over the global ocean within the SSALTO/DUACS project. This product provides the position, and intensity, and orientation of fronts induced by the mesoscale eddies and underlining part of sub-mesoscale activity. We present here the Lyapunov products that will be available on AVISO+ early 2015, and some examples of applications.

  13. Quantification of scaling exponents and crossover phenomena in nonstationary heartbeat time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.-K.; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Goldberger, Ary L.

    1995-03-01

    The healthy heartbeat is traditionally thought to be regulated according to the classical principle of homeostasis whereby physiologic systems operate to reduce variability and achieve an equilibrium-like state [Physiol. Rev. 9, 399-431 (1929)]. However, recent studies [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1343-1346 (1993); Fractals in Biology and Medicine (Birkhauser-Verlag, Basel, 1994), pp. 55-65] reveal that under normal conditions, beat-to-beat fluctuations in heart rate display the kind of long-range correlations typically exhibited by dynamical systems far from equilibrium [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 381-384 (1987)]. In contrast, heart rate time series from patients with severe congestive heart failure show a breakdown of this long-range correlation behavior. We describe a new method—detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)—for quantifying this correlation property in non-stationary physiological time series. Application of this technique shows evidence for a crossover phenomenon associated with a change in short and long-range scaling exponents. This method may be of use in distinguishing healthy from pathologic data sets based on differences in these scaling properties.

  14. Multiscale Analysis of Biological Data by Scale-Dependent Lyapunov Exponent

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianbo; Hu, Jing; Tung, Wen-wen; Blasch, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Physiological signals often are highly non-stationary (i.e., mean and variance change with time) and multiscaled (i.e., dependent on the spatial or temporal interval lengths). They may exhibit different behaviors, such as non-linearity, sensitive dependence on small disturbances, long memory, and extreme variations. Such data have been accumulating in all areas of health sciences and rapid analysis can serve quality testing, physician assessment, and patient diagnosis. To support patient care, it is very desirable to characterize the different signal behaviors on a wide range of scales simultaneously. The Scale-Dependent Lyapunov Exponent (SDLE) is capable of such a fundamental task. In particular, SDLE can readily characterize all known types of signal data, including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, random 1/fα processes, stochastic limit cycles, among others. SDLE also has some unique capabilities that are not shared by other methods, such as detecting fractal structures from non-stationary data and detecting intermittent chaos. In this article, we describe SDLE in such a way that it can be readily understood and implemented by non-mathematically oriented researchers, develop a SDLE-based consistent, unifying theory for the multiscale analysis, and demonstrate the power of SDLE on analysis of heart-rate variability (HRV) data to detect congestive heart failure and analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) data to detect seizures. PMID:22291653

  15. Universal Scaling Law for the Largest Lyapunov Exponent in Coupled Map Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiming; Ding, E.-Jiang; Ding, Mingzhou

    1996-03-01

    We consider coupled map lattices of the type xi\\(n+1\\) = \\(1-ɛ\\)f\\(xi\\(n\\)\\)+\\(ɛ/2\\) [ f\\(xi-1\\(n\\)\\)+f\\(xi+1\\(n\\)\\)], where for concreteness we take f\\(x\\) = 1-\\(μ/4\\) \\|1-2x\\|p, with p>1. We show that near ɛ = 0 (no coupling) and μ = 4 the envelope of the largest Lyapunov exponent of the full system obeys the scaling law Λ¯ = Λ0-[aɛ+b\\(4-μ\\)]1/p. We further argue that this law is universal in that it is independent of the details of f\\(x\\) insofar as f\\(x\\) has a single critical point xc in the interval [0,1] and its lowest order power expansion about xc has the form \\|x-xc\\|p. The dependence of Λ¯ on the size of the lattice as well as on the range of the coupling is also discussed.

  16. Quantification of scaling exponents and crossover phenomena in nonstationary heartbeat time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The healthy heartbeat is traditionally thought to be regulated according to the classical principle of homeostasis whereby physiologic systems operate to reduce variability and achieve an equilibrium-like state [Physiol. Rev. 9, 399-431 (1929)]. However, recent studies [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1343-1346 (1993); Fractals in Biology and Medicine (Birkhauser-Verlag, Basel, 1994), pp. 55-65] reveal that under normal conditions, beat-to-beat fluctuations in heart rate display the kind of long-range correlations typically exhibited by dynamical systems far from equilibrium [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 381-384 (1987)]. In contrast, heart rate time series from patients with severe congestive heart failure show a breakdown of this long-range correlation behavior. We describe a new method--detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)--for quantifying this correlation property in non-stationary physiological time series. Application of this technique shows evidence for a crossover phenomenon associated with a change in short and long-range scaling exponents. This method may be of use in distinguishing healthy from pathologic data sets based on differences in these scaling properties.

  17. Presence of nonlinearity in intracranial EEG recordings: detected by Lyapunov exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang-Chia; Shiau, Deng-Shan; Chaovalitwongse, W. Art; Pardalos, Panos M.; Sackellares, J. C.

    2007-11-01

    In this communication, we performed nonlinearity analysis in the EEG signals recorded from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The largest Lyapunov exponent (Lmax) and phase randomization surrogate data technique were employed to form the statistical test. EEG recordings were acquired invasively from three patients in six brain regions (left and right temporal depth, sub-temporal and orbitofrontal) with 28-32 depth electrodes placed in depth and subdural of the brain. All three patients in this study have unilateral epileptic focus region on the right hippocampus(RH). Nonlinearity was detected by comparing the Lmax profiles of the EEG recordings to its surrogates. The nonlinearity was seen in all different states of the patient with the highest found in post-ictal state. Further our results for all patients exhibited higher degree of differences, quantified by paired t-test, in Lmax values between original and its surrogate from EEG signals recorded from epileptic focus regions. The results of this study demonstrated the Lmax is capable to capture spatio-temporal dynamics that may not be able to detect by linear measurements in the intracranial EEG recordings.

  18. Development of a novel sort of exponent-sine-shaped flexure hinges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongqi; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2013-09-01

    Various types of flexure hinges have been developed to construct flexural mechanisms, however, all these hinges may have limited moving accuracies, blocking performance improvements of the flexural mechanisms. In this paper, a novel sort of exponent-sine-shaped flexure hinges (ESSFHs) with asymmetric structures is proposed to achieve much higher motion accuracy. To characterize elastic deformation behavior of the ESSFHs, a novel finite beam based matrix modeling (FBMM) method is employed to calculate the compliance matrix and the defined non-dimensional precision factors without executing laborious integration operations. Furthermore, finite element analysis is conducted and compared with the FBMM method, the maximum deviation of the obtained compliances and the precision factors by the two methods is less than 8%, well demonstrating the efficiency of the analytical method. Comparisons of the accuracies of the ESSFHs and certain state-of-the-art flexure hinges verify that the proposed ESSFHs can not only significantly improve the motion accuracy but also decrease the inherent parasitic motions of conventional flexure hinges. Based on the established analytical models, influences of the dimensional parameters on the compliances and the motion accuracy of the ESSFHs are well revealed. Finally, performances of the ESSFH and the efficiency of the analytical model are well investigated by means of experimental tests.

  19. A perturbation method to the tent map based on Lyapunov exponent and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lv-Chen; Luo, Yu-Ling; Qiu, Sen-Hui; Liu, Jun-Xiu

    2015-10-01

    Perturbation imposed on a chaos system is an effective way to maintain its chaotic features. A novel parameter perturbation method for the tent map based on the Lyapunov exponent is proposed in this paper. The pseudo-random sequence generated by the tent map is sent to another chaos function — the Chebyshev map for the post processing. If the output value of the Chebyshev map falls into a certain range, it will be sent back to replace the parameter of the tent map. As a result, the parameter of the tent map keeps changing dynamically. The statistical analysis and experimental results prove that the disturbed tent map has a highly random distribution and achieves good cryptographic properties of a pseudo-random sequence. As a result, it weakens the phenomenon of strong correlation caused by the finite precision and effectively compensates for the digital chaos system dynamics degradation. Project supported by the Guangxi Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 2014GXNSFBA118271), the Research Project of Guangxi University, China (Grant No. ZD2014022), the Fund from Guangxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Multi-source Information Mining & Security, China (Grant No. MIMS14-04), the Fund from the Guangxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Wireless Wideband Communication & Signal Processing, China (Grant No. GXKL0614205), the Education Development Foundation and the Doctoral Research Foundation of Guangxi Normal University, the State Scholarship Fund of China Scholarship Council (Grant No. [2014]3012), and the Innovation Project of Guangxi Graduate Education, China (Grant No. YCSZ2015102).

  20. Large temperature renormalization of anomalous Luttinger exponent in Li0.9Mo6O17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Mo, S.-K.; Allen, J. W.; Alvarez, J. V.; Gweon, G.-H.; He, J.; Jin, R.; Mandrus, R.; Höchst, H.

    2006-03-01

    Li0.9Mo6O17 is unique as a quasi-1 dimensional metal for which both photoemission spectroscopy (PES) [1] and tunneling [2] find Luttinger liquid (LL) power law behaviors in spectra near the Fermi energy EF, albeit with differing values of the anomalous exponent α, 0.9 at temperature 300K and 0.6 below 50K, respectively. New T-dependent PES spectra from T = 300K down to 15K can be well fit by finite-T LL theory, with α varying continuously from 0.9 to 0.6, showing consistency of PES and tunneling. We find that its incommensurate Fermi wavevector would preclude such a large renormalization of α with T for Li0.9Mo6O17 were it not for interband dynamics and residual interaction scattering that can occur only because there are two (nearly degenerate) bands crossing EF. We also discuss implications of the theory for further experiments. [1] G.-H. Gweon et al, Phys. Rev. B 68, 195117 (2003). [2] J. Hager et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 186402 (2005).

  1. Critical exponents of dynamical conductivity in 2D percolative superconductor-insulator transitions: three universality classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Pragalv; Loh, Yen Lee

    2016-11-01

    We simulate three types of random inductor-capacitor (LC) networks on 6000× 6000 square lattices. We calculate the dynamical conductivity using an equation-of-motion method in which timestep error is eliminated and windowing error is minimized. We extract the critical exponent a such that σ ≤ft(ω \\right)\\propto {ω-a} at low frequencies. The results suggest that there are three different universality classes. The {{L}ij}{{C}i} model, with capacitances from each site to ground, has a  =  0.314(4). The {{L}ij}{{C}ij} model, with capacitances along bonds, has a  =  0. The {{L}ij}{{C}i}{{C}ij} model, with both types of capacitances, has a  =  0.304(1). This implies that classical percolative 2D superconductor-insulator transitions (SITs) generically have σ ≤ft(ω \\right)\\to ∞ as ω \\to 0 . Therefore, any experiments that give a constant conductivity as ω \\to 0 must be explained in terms of quantum effects.

  2. Precise estimate of correlation length exponents from simple real-space renormalization group analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubica, Aleksander; Yoshida, Beni

    2014-03-01

    We invent a novel real-space renormalization group (RG) scheme which accurately estimates correlation length exponents ν near criticality of quantum Ising and clock models in higher dimensions. The method, based on a recent proposal by Miyazaki et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 051103 (2011), is remarkably simple (often analytical), grouping only a few spins into a block spin so that renormalized Hamiltonian has a closed form. A previous difficulty of spatial anisotropy and unwanted terms arising in higher-dimensional RG schemes is avoided by incorporating rotational invariance and internal Zq symmetries of the Hamiltonian. By applying this scheme to (2+1)-dim Ising model on a triangular lattice, we obtained ν = 0 . 6300 which is within statistical error of the current best Monte-Carlo result and ϕ4 theory estimation with seven-loop corrections. We also apply the scheme to higher-dimensional clock (Potts) models for which ordinary Monte-Carlo methods are not efficient due to suppression of quantum fluctuation in first-order phase transition.

  3. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, André E.

    2016-07-01

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators – certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed.

  4. A unified econophysics explanation for the power-law exponents of stock market activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabaix, Xavier; Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Plerou, Vasiliki; Stanley, Eugene

    2007-08-01

    We survey a theory (first sketched in Nature in 2003, then fleshed out in the Quarterly Journal of Economics in 2006) of the economic underpinnings of the fat-tailed distributions of a number of financial variables, such as returns and trading volume. Our theory posits that they have a common origin in the strategic trading behavior of very large financial institutions in a relatively illiquid market. We show how the fat-tailed distribution of fund sizes can indeed generate extreme returns and volumes, even in the absence of fundamental news. Moreover, we are able to replicate the individually different empirical values of the power-law exponents for each distribution: 3 for returns, 3/2 for volumes, 1 for the assets under management of large investors. Large investors moderate their trades to reduce their price impact; coupled with a concave price impact function, this leads to volumes being more fat-tailed than returns but less fat-tailed than fund sizes. The trades of large institutions also offer a unified explanation for apparently disconnected empirical regularities that are otherwise a challenge for economic theory.

  5. Stability of a cubic fixed point in three dimensions: Critical exponents for generic N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnashev, K. B.

    2000-06-01

    The detailed analysis of the global structure of the renormalization-group (RG) flow diagram for a model with isotropic and cubic interactions is carried out in the framework of the massive field theory directly in three dimensions (3D) within an assumption of isotropic exchange. Perturbative expansions for RG functions are calculated for arbitrary N up to four-loop order and resummed by means of the generalized Padé-Borel-Leroy technique. Coordinates and stability matrix eigenvalues for the cubic fixed point are found under the optimal value of the transformation parameter. Critical dimensionality of the model is proved to be equal to Nc=2.89+/-0.02 that agrees well with the estimate obtained on the basis of the five-loop ɛ expansion [H. Kleinert and V. Schulte-Frohlinde, Phys. Lett. B 342, 284 (1995)] resummed by the above method. As a consequence, the cubic fixed point should be stable in 3D for N>=3, and the critical exponents controlling phase transitions in three-dimensional magnets should belong to the cubic universality class. The critical behavior of the random Ising model being the nontrivial particular case of the cubic model when N=0 is also investigated. For all physical quantities of interest the most accurate numerical estimates with their error bounds are obtained. The results achieved in the work are discussed along with the predictions given by other theoretical approaches and experimental data.

  6. Phenomenological study of irregular cellular automata based on Lyapunov exponents and Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baetens, Jan M.; De Baets, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    Originally, cellular automata (CA) have been defined upon regular tessellations of the n-dimensional Euclidean space, while CA on irregular tessellations have received only little attention from the scientific community, notwithstanding serious shortcomings are associated with the former manner of subdividing Rn. In this paper we present a profound phenomenological study of two-state, two-dimensional irregular CA from a dynamical systems viewpoint. We opted to exploit properly defined quantitative measures instead of resorting to qualitative methods for discriminating between behavioral classes. As such, we employ Lyapunov exponents, measuring the divergence rate of close trajectories in phase space, and Jacobians, formulated using Boolean derivatives and expressing the sensitivity of a cellular automaton to its inputs. Both are stated for two-state CA on irregular tessellations, enabling us to characterize these discrete dynamical systems, and advancing us to propose a classification scheme for this CA family. In addition, a relationship between these quantitative measures is established in extension of the insights already developed for the classical CA paradigm. Finally, we discuss the repercussions on the CA dynamics that arise when the geometric variability of the spatial entities is taken into account during the CA simulation.

  7. Stability analysis via the concept of Lyapunov exponents: a case study in optimal controlled biped standing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuming; Wu, Christine Qiong

    2012-12-01

    Balancing control is important for biped standing. In spite of large efforts, it is very difficult to design balancing control strategies satisfying three requirements simultaneously: maintaining postural stability, improving energy efficiency and satisfying the constraints between the biped feet and the ground. In this article, a proportional-derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a standing biped, which is simplified as a two-link inverted pendulum with one additional rigid foot-link. The genetic algorithm (GA) is used to search for the control gain meeting all three requirements. The stability analysis of such a deterministic biped control system is carried out using the concept of Lyapunov exponents (LEs), based on which, the system stability, where the disturbance comes from the initial states, and the structural stability, where the disturbance comes from the PD gains, are examined quantitively in terms of stability region. This article contributes to the biped balancing control, more significantly, the method shown in the studied case of biped provides a general framework of systematic stability analysis for certain deterministic nonlinear dynamical systems.

  8. Hurst exponents and linear regression with an application to low-power beta characterization in meditation EEG.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kang-Ming; Lo, Pei-Chen

    2005-06-01

    A lever-like EEG feature-extraction method based on the Hurst exponent and regression-fitting errors is proposed for identifying beta rhythms. The proposed method is superior to most methods using the time- and frequency-domain feature extraction parameters for identifying beta rhythms.

  9. Orbital Exponent Optimization in Elementary VB Calculations of the Chemical Bond in the Ground State of Simple Molecular Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2008-01-01

    Orbital exponent optimization in the elementary ab-initio VB calculation of the ground states of H[subscript 2][superscript +], H[subscript 2], He[subscript 2][superscript +], He[subscript 2] gives a fair description of the exchange-overlap component of the interatomic interaction that is important in the bond region. Correct bond lengths and…

  10. Evolution of the Intuitive Mastery of the Relationship between Base, Exponent, and Number Magnitude in High-school Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Mullet, Etienne

    1998-01-01

    Investigates how students familiar with exponentiation intuitively combined information about bases and exponents in expressions of the type a(carot)n to estimate the magnitude of these expressions. Qualitative and quantitative analyses conducted on the data revealed at least five different models of magnitude estimation. Contains 17 references.…

  11. Horton laws for hydraulic-geometric variables and their scaling exponents in self-similar Tokunaga river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. K.; Mesa, O. J.

    2014-09-01

    An analytical theory is developed that obtains Horton laws for six hydraulic-geometric (H-G) variables (stream discharge Q, width W, depth D, velocity U, slope S, and friction n') in self-similar Tokunaga networks in the limit of a large network order. The theory uses several disjoint theoretical concepts like Horton laws of stream numbers and areas as asymptotic relations in Tokunaga networks, dimensional analysis, the Buckingham Pi theorem, asymptotic self-similarity of the first kind, or SS-1, and asymptotic self-similarity of the second kind, or SS-2. A self-contained review of these concepts, with examples, is given as "methods". The H-G data sets in channel networks from three published studies and one unpublished study are summarized to test theoretical predictions. The theory builds on six independent dimensionless river-basin numbers. A mass conservation equation in terms of Horton bifurcation and discharge ratios in Tokunaga networks is derived. Assuming that the H-G variables are homogeneous and self-similar functions of stream discharge, it is shown that the functions are of a power law form. SS-1 is applied to predict the Horton laws for width, depth and velocity as asymptotic relationships. Exponents of width and the Reynolds number are predicted and tested against three field data sets. One basin shows deviations from theoretical predictions. Tentatively assuming that SS-1 is valid for slope, depth and velocity, corresponding Horton laws and the H-G exponents are derived. Our predictions of the exponents are the same as those previously predicted for the optimal channel network (OCN) model. In direct contrast to our work, the OCN model does not consider Horton laws for the H-G variables, and uses optimality assumptions. The predicted exponents deviate substantially from the values obtained from three field studies, which suggests that H-G in networks does not obey SS-1. It fails because slope, a dimensionless river-basin number, goes to 0 as network

  12. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  13. Experimentally determined growth exponents during the late stage of spinodal demixing in binary liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, Jonathan; Kajimoto, Shinji; Takamizawa, Atsushi; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Spinodal demixing was initiated in two systems, with critical and off-critical compositions, using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced temperature jumps (T-jumps) of various magnitude. In this way, deep quenches could be imposed on the systems. One system was the simple triethylamine (TEA)/water mixture and the other was the ionic mixture of 2-butoxyethanol (2BE)/water/KCl. The demixing process was followed using the technique of nanosecond time-resolved microscopic shadowgraphy. The growth of the evolving phase-separated domains followed a simple power law with respect to time in every case. For a given composition, the magnitude of the T-jump had little effect on the growth exponent, however the composition was found to influence the rate of domain growth. At off-critical mole fractions of 0.2 with respect to TEA, the domains grew according to the following expression: L(t)=t0.70 (where L(t)=the domain size) whereas at the critical TEA mole fraction of 0.08 the domains grew as L(t)=t0.52 . 2BE/water/KCl mixtures quenched at the just off-critical composition of 0.05mole fraction with respect to 2BE evolved as L(t)=t0.63 . These results will be compared to theoretical models and simulations and discussed in terms of estimated Reynolds numbers as well as the consumption and conversion of the available surface energy that fuels the demixing process.

  14. A set oriented definition of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and coherent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallapragada, Phanindra; Ross, Shane D.

    2013-05-01

    The problem of phase space transport, which is of interest from both the theoretical and practical point of view, has been investigated extensively using geometric and probabilistic methods. Two important tools to study this problem that have emerged in recent years are finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) and the Perron-Frobenius operator. The FTLE measures the averaged local stretching around reference trajectories. Regions with high stretching are used to identify phase space transport barriers. One probabilistic method is to consider the spectrum of the Perron-Frobenius operator of the flow to identify almost-invariant densities. These almost-invariant densities are used to identify almost invariant sets. In this paper, a set-oriented definition of the FTLE is proposed which is applicable to phase space sets of finite size and reduces to the usual definition of FTLE in the limit of infinitesimal phase space elements. This definition offers a straightforward connection between the evolution of probability densities and finite-time stretching experienced by phase space curves. This definition also addresses some concerns with the standard computation of the FTLE. For the case of autonomous and periodic vector fields we provide a simplified method to calculate the set-oriented FTLE using the Perron-Frobenius operator. Based on the new definition of the FTLE we propose a simple definition of finite-time coherent sets applicable to vector fields of general time-dependence, which are the analogues of almost-invariant sets in autonomous and time-periodic vector fields. The coherent sets we identify will necessarily be separated from one another by ridges of high FTLE, providing a link between the framework of coherent sets and that of codimension one Lagrangian coherent structures. Our identification of coherent sets is applied to three examples.

  15. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent-based analysis for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    González, D R; Speth, R L; Gaitonde, D V; Lewis, M J

    2016-08-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) technique has shown substantial success in analyzing incompressible flows by capturing the dynamics of coherent structures. Recent applications include river and ocean flow patterns, respiratory tract dynamics, and bio-inspired propulsors. In the present work, we extend FTLE to the compressible flow regime so that coherent structures, which travel at convective speeds, can be associated with waves traveling at acoustic speeds. This is particularly helpful in the study of jet acoustics. We first show that with a suitable choice of integration time interval, FTLE can extract wave dynamics from the velocity field. The integration time thus acts as a pseudo-filter separating coherent structures from waves. Results are confirmed by examining forward and backward FTLE coefficients for several simple, well-known acoustic fields. Next, we use this analysis to identify events associated with intermittency in jet noise pressure probe data. Although intermittent events are known to be dominant causes of jet noise, their direct source in the turbulent jet flow has remained unexplained. To this end, a Large-Eddy Simulation of a Mach 0.9 jet is subjected to FTLE to simultaneously examine, and thus expose, the causal relationship between coherent structures and the corresponding acoustic waves. Results show that intermittent events are associated with entrainment in the initial roll up region and emissive events downstream of the potential-core collapse. Instantaneous acoustic disturbances are observed to be primarily induced near the collapse of the potential core and continue propagating towards the far-field at the experimentally observed, approximately 30° angle relative to the jet axis.

  16. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent-based analysis for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, D. R.; Speth, R. L.; Gaitonde, D. V.; Lewis, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) technique has shown substantial success in analyzing incompressible flows by capturing the dynamics of coherent structures. Recent applications include river and ocean flow patterns, respiratory tract dynamics, and bio-inspired propulsors. In the present work, we extend FTLE to the compressible flow regime so that coherent structures, which travel at convective speeds, can be associated with waves traveling at acoustic speeds. This is particularly helpful in the study of jet acoustics. We first show that with a suitable choice of integration time interval, FTLE can extract wave dynamics from the velocity field. The integration time thus acts as a pseudo-filter separating coherent structures from waves. Results are confirmed by examining forward and backward FTLE coefficients for several simple, well-known acoustic fields. Next, we use this analysis to identify events associated with intermittency in jet noise pressure probe data. Although intermittent events are known to be dominant causes of jet noise, their direct source in the turbulent jet flow has remained unexplained. To this end, a Large-Eddy Simulation of a Mach 0.9 jet is subjected to FTLE to simultaneously examine, and thus expose, the causal relationship between coherent structures and the corresponding acoustic waves. Results show that intermittent events are associated with entrainment in the initial roll up region and emissive events downstream of the potential-core collapse. Instantaneous acoustic disturbances are observed to be primarily induced near the collapse of the potential core and continue propagating towards the far-field at the experimentally observed, approximately 30° angle relative to the jet axis.

  17. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent-based analysis for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    González, D R; Speth, R L; Gaitonde, D V; Lewis, M J

    2016-08-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) technique has shown substantial success in analyzing incompressible flows by capturing the dynamics of coherent structures. Recent applications include river and ocean flow patterns, respiratory tract dynamics, and bio-inspired propulsors. In the present work, we extend FTLE to the compressible flow regime so that coherent structures, which travel at convective speeds, can be associated with waves traveling at acoustic speeds. This is particularly helpful in the study of jet acoustics. We first show that with a suitable choice of integration time interval, FTLE can extract wave dynamics from the velocity field. The integration time thus acts as a pseudo-filter separating coherent structures from waves. Results are confirmed by examining forward and backward FTLE coefficients for several simple, well-known acoustic fields. Next, we use this analysis to identify events associated with intermittency in jet noise pressure probe data. Although intermittent events are known to be dominant causes of jet noise, their direct source in the turbulent jet flow has remained unexplained. To this end, a Large-Eddy Simulation of a Mach 0.9 jet is subjected to FTLE to simultaneously examine, and thus expose, the causal relationship between coherent structures and the corresponding acoustic waves. Results show that intermittent events are associated with entrainment in the initial roll up region and emissive events downstream of the potential-core collapse. Instantaneous acoustic disturbances are observed to be primarily induced near the collapse of the potential core and continue propagating towards the far-field at the experimentally observed, approximately 30° angle relative to the jet axis. PMID:27586608

  18. Optimization of UV absorptivity of layered double hydroxide by intercalating organic UV-absorbent molecules.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Sumaiyah Megat Nabil; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Sarijo, Siti Halimah; Fakurazi, Sharida; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2014-08-01

    Intercalation of Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) with benzophenone 9 (B9), a strong ultraviolet (UV) absorber, had been carried out by two different routes; co-precipitation and ion exchange method. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns of co-precipitated (ZB9C) and ion exchanged product (ZB91) showed basal spacing of 15.9 angstrom and 16.6 angstrom, respectively, as a result of the intercalation of B9 anions into the lamellae spaces of LDH. Intercalation was further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur (CHNS) and thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric (TGA/DTG) studies. UV-vis absorption properties of the nanocomposite was investigated with diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectrometer and showed broader UV absorption range. Furthermore, stability of sunscreen molecules in LDH interlayer space was tested in deionized water, artificial sea water and skin pH condition to show slow deintercalation and high retention in host. Cytotoxicity study of the synthesized nanocomposites on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells shows no significant cytotoxicity after 24 h exposure for test concentrations up to 25 microg/mL. PMID:25016649

  19. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  20. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  1. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  2. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  3. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  4. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  5. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  6. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  7. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Mn Coordination in Doped Perovskite SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V; Woicik, J; Tkach, A; Vilarinho, P

    2010-01-01

    The coordination of Mn in doped SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics having nominal compositions SrTi{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} and Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} was analyzed using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. As expected, Mn{sup 4+} substitution for Ti{sup 4+} leads to Mn occupancy of the octahedral B-sites of ABO{sub 3} perovskite lattice with a Mn-O bond distance of 1.902 {angstrom} (compared to 1.953 {angstrom} for Ti-O) and no significant local distortions around the Mn atoms. In contrast, for the composition Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sup 0.02}TiO{sub 3}, Mn segregates to both the A-sites (as Mn{sup 2+}) and the B-sites (predominantly as Mn{sup 4+}). Extended XAFS confirms strong ({approx} 0.77 {angstrom}) displacements of Mn{sup 2+} cations off the ideal A-site positions along <001> directions with a significant distortion of several coordination shells around the dopant atoms.

  8. Revisiting the localization of Zn2+ cations sorbed on pathological apatite calcifications made through X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazin, D.; Carpentier, X.; Brocheriou, I.; Dorfmuller, P.; Aubert, S.; Chappard, C.; Thiaudiere, D.; Reguer, S.; Waychunas, G.; Jungers, P.; Daudon, M.

    2009-04-01

    The role of oligo-elements such as Zn in the genesis of pathological calcifications is widely debated in the literature. An essential element of discussion is given by their localization either at the surface or within the Ca apatite crystalline network. To determine the localization, X-ray absorption experiments have been performed at SOLEIL. The Exafs results suggest that Zn atoms, present in the Zn{sup 2+} form, are bound to about 4 O atoms at a distance of 2.00{angstrom}, while the interatomic distance R{sub CaO} ranges between 2.35 {angstrom} and 2.71 {angstrom}. Taking into account the content of Zn (around 1000 ppm) and the difference in ionic radius between Zn{sup 2+} (0.074 nm) and Ca{sup 2+} (0.099 nm), a significant longer interatomic distance would be expected in the case of Zn replacing Ca within the apatite crystalline network. We thus conclude that Zn atoms are localized at the surface and not in the apatite nanocrystal structure. Such structural result has essential biological implications for at least two reasons. Some oligoelements have a marked effect on the transformation of chemical phases, and may modify the morphology of crystals. These are both major issues because, in the case of kidney stones, the medical treatment depends strongly on the precise chemical phase and on the morphology of the biological entities at both macroscopic and mesoscopic scales.

  9. Transient super-ballistic spreading of wave packets with large spreading exponents in some hybrid ordered-quasiperiodic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ba Phi; Ngo, Quang Minh; Kim, Kihong

    2016-02-01

    We consider the spreading of an initially localized wave packet in one-dimensional hybrid ordered-quasiperiodic lattices. We consider two diffrent kinds of quasiperiodic sequences, which are the Cantor and the period-doubling sequences. From numerical calculations based on the discrete Schrödinger equation, we demonstrate that hybrid ordered-quasiperiodic lattices can support the super-ballistic spreading of a wave packet with very large spreading exponents for certain transient time windows. Remarkably, in the case of the sublattice with the on-site potential obeying the period-doubling quasiperiodic sequence, we find that the super-ballistic exponent can be larger than six. We also point out that previous explanations of this phenomenon based on a generalized version of the point source model are incorrect.

  10. Lyapunov exponent and surrogation analysis of patterns of variability: profiles in new walkers with and without down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Beth A; Stergiou, Nick; Ulrich, Beverly D

    2010-01-01

    In previous studies we found that preadolescents with Down syndrome (DS) produce higher amounts of variability (Smith et al., 2007) and larger Lyapunov exponent (LyE) values (indicating more instability) during walking than their peers with typical development (TD) (Buzzi & Ulrich, 2004). Here we use nonlinear methods to examine the patterns that characterize gait variability as it emerges, in toddlers with TD and with DS, rather than after years of practice. We calculated Lyapunov exponent (LyE) values to assess stability of leg trajectories. We also tested the use of 3 algorithms for surrogation analysis to investigate mathematical periodicity of toddlers' strides. Results show that toddlers' LyE values were not different between groups or with practice and strides of both groups become more periodic with practice. The underlying control strategies are not different between groups at this point in developmental time, although control strategies do diverge between the groups by preadolescence.

  11. The basis property of the Legendre polynomials in the variable exponent Lebesgue space L^{p(x)}(-1,1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapudinov, Idris I.

    2009-02-01

    The paper looks at the problem of determining the conditions on a variable exponent p=p(x) so that the orthonormal system of Legendre polynomials \\{\\widehat P_n(x)\\}_{n=0}^\\infty is a basis in the Lebesgue space L^{p(x)}(-1,1) with norm \\displaystyle \\Vert f\\Vert _{p(\\,\\cdot\\,)}=\\inf\\biggl\\{\\alpha>0:\\int_{-1}^1\\biggl\\vert{\\frac{f(x)}{\\alpha}}\\biggr\\vert^{p(x)}\\,dx \\le1\\biggr\\}. Conditions on the exponent p=p(x), that are definitive in a certain sense, are obtained and guarantee that the system \\{\\widehat P_n(x)\\}_{n=0}^\\infty has the basis property in L^{p(x)}(-1,1). Bibliography: 31 titles.

  12. Backward and covariant Lyapunov vectors and exponents for hard-disk systems with a steady heat current.

    PubMed

    Truant, Daniel P; Morriss, Gary P

    2014-11-01

    The covariant Lyapunov analysis is generalized to systems attached to deterministic thermal reservoirs that create a heat current across the system and perturb it away from equilibrium. The change in the Lyapunov exponents as a function of heat current is described and explained. Both the nonequilibrium backward and covariant hydrodynamic Lyapunov modes are analyzed and compared. The movement of the converged angle between the hydrodynamic stable and unstable conjugate manifolds with the free flight time of the dynamics is accurately predicted for any nonequilibrium system simply as a function of their exponent. The nonequilibrium positive and negative LP mode frequencies are found to be asymmetrical, causing the negative mode to oscillate between the two functional forms of each mode in the positive conjugate mode pair. This in turn leads to the angular distributions between the conjugate modes to oscillate symmetrically about π/2 at a rate given by the difference between the positive and negative mode frequencies. PMID:25493858

  13. Theoretical estimates of the critical exponents of the superfluid transition in {sup 4}He by lattice methods

    SciTech Connect

    Campostrini, Massimo; Hasenbusch, Martin; Vicari, Ettore; Pelissetto, Andrea

    2006-10-01

    We improve the theoretical estimates of the critical exponents for the three-dimensional XY universality class that apply to the superfluid transition in {sup 4}He along the {lambda} line of its phase diagram. We obtain the estimates {alpha}=-0.0151(3), {nu}=0.6717(1), {eta}=0.0381(2), {gamma}=1.3178(2), {beta}=0.3486(1), and {delta}=4.780(1). Our results are obtained by finite-size scaling analyses of high-statistics Monte Carlo simulations up to lattice size L=128 and resummations of 22nd-order high-temperature expansions of two improved models with suppressed leading scaling corrections. We note that our result for the specific-heat exponent {alpha} disagrees with the most recent experimental estimate {alpha}=-0.0127(3) at the superfluid transition of {sup 4}He in a microgravity environment.

  14. Computation of finite-time Lyapunov exponents from time-resolved particle image velocimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raben, Samuel G.; Ross, Shane D.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents two new methods for computing finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) from noisy spatiotemporally resolved experimentally measured image data of the type used for particle image velocimetry (PIV) or particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). These new approaches are based on the simple insight that the particle images recorded during PIV experiments represent Lagrangian flow tracers whose trajectories lend themselves to the direct computation of flow maps, and related quantities such as flow map gradients and FTLEs. We show that using this idea we can improve the reliability and accuracy of FTLE calculation through the use of either direct pathline flow map (PFM) calculation, where individual particle pathlines over a fixed period of time are used to determine the flow map, or particle tracking flow map compilation (FMC), where instantaneous tracking results are used to estimate small snapshots of the flow map which are then compiled to describe the complete flow map. Comparisons of the traditional velocity field integration (VFI) method for computing FTLE fields with these new methods show that FMC produces significantly more accurate estimates of the FTLE field for both synthetic data and experimental data especially in cases where the particle number density is low. This is because the VFI estimates particle motion while PTV directly measures particle motion and therefore generates a more accurate flow map. Overall, our results suggest that VFI is not always a reliable approach when applied to noisy experimental PIV data. For cases where particle loss between frames is minimal, the PFM can also produce better results, but the final field is susceptible to error due to the unstructured nature of the raw flow maps. When comparing the ability to match the true separatrix of a flow, FMC is shown to be a far superior method. The separatrix from FMC has an 80 % overlap with the true solution as compared to approximately 25 % for the PFM and only 1 % for

  15. Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Retrieving Aerosol Ångström Exponents from Calipso Measurements of Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yong-Xiang; Powell, Kathleen; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Hunt, William; Kar, Jayanta; Tackett, Jason; Getzewich, Brian; Lee, Kam-Pui

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter and extinction from water clouds are well-understood, both theoretically and experimentally, and thus changes to the expected measurement of layer-integrated attenuated backscatter can be used to infer the optical properties of overlying layers. In this paper we offer a first look at a new retrieval technique that uses CALIPSO measurements of opaque water clouds to derive optical depths and Ångström exponents for overlying aerosol layers.

  16. Asymptotic uniqueness of ground states for a class of quasilinear Schrödinger equations with H1-supercritical exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Shinji; Watanabe, Tatsuya

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we obtain the asymptotic uniqueness of ground states for a class of quasilinear Schrödinger equations with H1-supercritical exponent. To this aim, the uniqueness and the non-degeneracy of positive solutions of the corresponding limit equation, which is a zero mass problem, play important roles. Thus we also show the uniqueness and non-degeneracy result for a class of zero mass problems by applying ODE techniques.

  17. The computation of finite-time Lyapunov exponents on unstructured meshes and for non-Euclidean manifolds.

    PubMed

    Lekien, Francois; Ross, Shane D

    2010-03-01

    We generalize the concepts of finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) and Lagrangian coherent structures to arbitrary Riemannian manifolds. The methods are illustrated for convection cells on cylinders and Mobius strips, as well as for the splitting of the Antarctic polar vortex in the spherical stratosphere and a related point vortex model. We modify the FTLE computational method and accommodate unstructured meshes of triangles and tetrahedra to fit manifolds of arbitrary shape, as well as to facilitate dynamic refinement of the FTLE mesh.

  18. Quantifying the degree of persistence in random amoeboid motion based on the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarava, Natallia; Menz, Stephan; Theves, Matthias; Huisinga, Wilhelm; Beta, Carsten; Holschneider, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Amoebae explore their environment in a random way, unless external cues like, e.g., nutrients, bias their motion. Even in the absence of cues, however, experimental cell tracks show some degree of persistence. In this paper, we analyzed individual cell tracks in the framework of a linear mixed effects model, where each track is modeled by a fractional Brownian motion, i.e., a Gaussian process exhibiting a long-term correlation structure superposed on a linear trend. The degree of persistence was quantified by the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion. Our analysis of experimental cell tracks of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum showed a persistent movement for the majority of tracks. Employing a sliding window approach, we estimated the variations of the Hurst exponent over time, which allowed us to identify points in time, where the correlation structure was distorted ("outliers"). Coarse graining of track data via down-sampling allowed us to identify the dependence of persistence on the spatial scale. While one would expect the (mode of the) Hurst exponent to be constant on different temporal scales due to the self-similarity property of fractional Brownian motion, we observed a trend towards stronger persistence for the down-sampled cell tracks indicating stronger persistence on larger time scales.

  19. Quantifying the degree of persistence in random amoeboid motion based on the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Makarava, Natallia; Menz, Stephan; Theves, Matthias; Huisinga, Wilhelm; Beta, Carsten; Holschneider, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Amoebae explore their environment in a random way, unless external cues like, e.g., nutrients, bias their motion. Even in the absence of cues, however, experimental cell tracks show some degree of persistence. In this paper, we analyzed individual cell tracks in the framework of a linear mixed effects model, where each track is modeled by a fractional Brownian motion, i.e., a Gaussian process exhibiting a long-term correlation structure superposed on a linear trend. The degree of persistence was quantified by the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion. Our analysis of experimental cell tracks of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum showed a persistent movement for the majority of tracks. Employing a sliding window approach, we estimated the variations of the Hurst exponent over time, which allowed us to identify points in time, where the correlation structure was distorted ("outliers"). Coarse graining of track data via down-sampling allowed us to identify the dependence of persistence on the spatial scale. While one would expect the (mode of the) Hurst exponent to be constant on different temporal scales due to the self-similarity property of fractional Brownian motion, we observed a trend towards stronger persistence for the down-sampled cell tracks indicating stronger persistence on larger time scales.

  20. Autocorrelation analysis for the unbiased determination of power-law exponents in single-quantum-dot blinking.

    PubMed

    Houel, Julien; Doan, Quang T; Cajgfinger, Thomas; Ledoux, Gilles; Amans, David; Aubret, Antoine; Dominjon, Agnès; Ferriol, Sylvain; Barbier, Rémi; Nasilowski, Michel; Lhuillier, Emmanuel; Dubertret, Benoît; Dujardin, Christophe; Kulzer, Florian

    2015-01-27

    We present an unbiased and robust analysis method for power-law blinking statistics in the photoluminescence of single nanoemitters, allowing us to extract both the bright- and dark-state power-law exponents from the emitters' intensity autocorrelation functions. As opposed to the widely used threshold method, our technique therefore does not require discriminating the emission levels of bright and dark states in the experimental intensity timetraces. We rely on the simultaneous recording of 450 emission timetraces of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots at a frame rate of 250 Hz with single photon sensitivity. Under these conditions, our approach can determine ON and OFF power-law exponents with a precision of 3% from a comparison to numerical simulations, even for shot-noise-dominated emission signals with an average intensity below 1 photon per frame and per quantum dot. These capabilities pave the way for the unbiased, threshold-free determination of blinking power-law exponents at the microsecond time scale.

  1. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  2. Crystallisation kinetics of some archetypal ionic liquids: isothermal and non-isothermal determination of the Avrami exponent.

    PubMed

    Pas, Steven J; Dargusch, Matthew S; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2011-07-01

    The properties of ionic liquids give rise to applications in diverse technology areas including mechanical engineering, mining, aerospace and defence. The arbitrary physical property that defines an ionic liquid is a melting point below 100 °C, and as such, an understanding of crystallisation phenomena is extremely important. This is the first report dealing with the mechanism of crystallisation in ionic liquids. Assuming crystallisation of the ionic liquids is a thermal or mass diffusion-controlled process, the values of the isothermal Avrami exponent obtained from three different ionic liquids with three different anions and cations all indicate that growth occurs with a decreasing nucleation rate (n=1.8-2.2). For one of the ionic liquids it was possible to avoid crystallisation by fast cooling and then observe a devitrification upon heating through the glass transition. The isothermal Avrami exponent of devitrification suggested growth with an increasing nucleating rate (n=4.1), compared to a decreasing nucleation rate when crystallisation occurs on cooling from the melt (n=2.0). Two non-isothermal methods were employed to determine the Avrami exponent of devitrification. Both non-isothermal Avrami exponents were in agreement with the isothermal case (n=4.0-4.15). The applicability of JMAK theory suggests that the nucleation event in the ionic liquids selected is a random stochastic process in the volume of the material. Agreement between the isothermal and non-isothermal techniques for determining the Avrami exponent of devitrification suggests that the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy are independent of thermal history. The heating rate dependence of the glass transition enabled the calculation of the fragility index, which suggests that the ionic liquid is a "strong" glass former. This suggests that the temperature dependence of the rate constant could be close to Arrhenius, as assumed by JMAK theory. More generally, therefore, it can be

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 {Angstrom}. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 {Angstrom}. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  5. The confines of triple oxygen isotope exponents in elemental and complex mass-dependent processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2015-12-01

    Small differences in triple isotope relationships, or Δ17O in the case of oxygen, have been increasingly used to study a range of problems including hydrological cycles, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, biogeochemical pathways and fluxes, and the Moon's origin in the geochemical and cosmochemical communities. A Δ17O value depends on the triple isotope exponent θ of involved reaction steps. However, the probabilistic distribution of the intrinsic and apparent θ values has not been examined for elemental processes and for processes that are out of equilibrium or bearing reservoir-transport complexities. A lack of knowledge on the confines of θ may hamper our understanding of the subtle differences among mass-dependent processes and may result in mischaracterization of a set of mass-dependent processes as being in violation of mass-dependent rules. Here we advocate a reductionist approach and explore θ confines starting from kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) within the framework of transition state theory (TST). The advantage of our KIE approach is that any elemental or composite, equilibrium or non-equilibrium process can be reduced to a set of KIEs with corresponding θKIE. We establish that the KIE between a reactant and a transition state (TS) is intrinsic. Given a range of KIEs known for Earth processes involving oxygen, we use a Monte Carlo calculation method and a range of oxygen-bonded molecular masses to obtain a distribution of θKIE values and subsequently that of θeq. Next, complexities are examined by looking into expected effects due to reaction progress, unbalanced fluxes, and reference frame. Finally, compounded reservoir-transport effects are examined using two simple processes - Rayleigh Distillation (RD) and Fractional Distillation (FD). Our results show that the apparent θ values between two species or two states of the same evolving species have much broader confines than the commonly used "canonical" confines of 0.51-0.53, particularly

  6. Power spectral density and scaling exponent of high frequency global solar radiation sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calif, Rudy; Schmitt, François G.; Huang, Yongxiang

    2013-04-01

    invariance: Iq(f) ~ f-?(q) , ?(q) is the scaling exponent. This allows to characterize the scaling behavior of a process: fractal or multifractal with intermittent properties. For q = 2, the Hilbert spectrum is defined. In this work, The data are collected at the University site of Guadeloupe, an island in the West Indies, located at 16°15 N latitude 60°30 W longitude. Our measurements sampled at 1 Hz were performed during one year period. The analyzed data present a power spectral density E(f) displaying a power law of the form E(f) ~ f-β with 1.6 ˜ β ˜ 2.2 for frequencies f ˜ 0.1 Hz, corresponding to time scales T × 10 s. Furthermore, global solar radiation data possesses multifractal properties. For comparison, other multifractal analysis techniques such as structure functions, MDFA, wavelet leaders are also used. This preliminary work set the basis for further investigation dedicated to simulate and forecast a sequence of solar energy fluctuation under different meteorological conditions, in the multifractal framework.

  7. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  8. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  9. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  10. Cholesterol Absorption and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howles, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol absorption and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol absorption research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol absorption is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091

  11. Sensitivity of Particle Extinction and Backscattering Calculation from Mie-Raman Lidar Measurements to the Choice of Ångström Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorina, Anastasia; Veselovskii, Igor; Whiteman, David N.; Korenskiy, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Vibrational Raman scattering from nitrogen is commonly used in Mie-Raman lidars for evaluation of particle backscattering (β) and extinction (α) coefficients. However, vibrational scattering is characterized by significant frequency shift of the Raman component, so for the calculation of α and β the assumption about the extinction Ångström exponent is needed. Simulation results presented in this study demonstrate that ambiguity in the choice of this exponent can be the significant source of uncertainty in the calculation of backscattering coefficients when optically thick aerosol layers are considered. Examples of lidar measurements and optical data calculated for different values of Ångström exponent are given.

  12. On the Putative Detection ofz>0 X-ray Absorption Featuresin the Spectrum of Mrk 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew; Kahn, S. M.; Paerels, F.; den Herder, J.; Kaastra, J.; de Vries, C.

    2006-09-01

    In a series of papers, Nicastro et al. have reported the detection of z>0 OVII absorption features in the spectrum of Mrk421 obtained with the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS). We evaluate this result in the context of a high quality spectrum of the same source obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) on XMM-Newton. The data comprise over 955ks of usable exposure time and more than 26000 counts per 50 milliAngstrom at 21.6 Angstroms. We concentrate on the spectrally clean region (21.3 < lambda < 22.5 Angstroms) where sharp features due to the astrophysically abundant OVII may reveal an intervening, warm--hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). We do not confirm detection of any of the intervening systems claimed to date. Rather, we detect only three unsurprising, astrophysically expected features down to the Log(N_i) 14.6 (3 sigma) sensitivity level. Each of the two purported WHIM features is rejected with a statistical confidence that exceeds that reported for its initial detection. While we can not rule out the existence of fainter, WHIM related features in these spectra, we suggest that previous discovery claims were premature. A more recent paper by Williams et al. claims to have demonstrated that the RGS data we analyze here do not have the resolution or statistical quality required to confirm or deny the LETGS detections. We show that our careful analysis resolves the issues encountered by Williams et al. and recovers the full resolution and statistical quality of the RGS data. We highlight the differences between our analysis and those published by Williams et al. as this may explain our disparate conclusions.

  13. Determination of wood burning and fossil fuel contribution of black carbon at Delhi, India using aerosol light absorption technique.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, S; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, A K; Bisht, D S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive measurement program of effective black carbon (eBC), fine particle (PM2.5), and carbon monoxide (CO) was undertaken during 1 December 2011 to 31 March 2012 (winter period) in Delhi, India. The mean mass concentrations of eBC, PM2.5, and CO were recorded as 12.1 ± 8.7 μg/m(3), 182.75 ± 114.5 μg/m(3), and 3.41 ± 1.6 ppm, respectively, during the study period. Also, the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) was estimated from eBC and varied from 0.38 to 1.29 with a mean value of 1.09 ± 0.11. The frequency of occurrence of AAE was ~17 % less than unity whereas ~83 % greater than unity was observed during the winter period in Delhi. The mass concentrations of eBC were found to be higher by ~34 % of the average value of eBC (12.1 μg/m(3)) during the study period. Sources of eBC were estimated, and they were ~94 % from fossil fuel (eBCff) combustion whereas only 6 % was from wood burning (eBCwb). The ratio between eBCff and eBCwb was 15, which indicates a higher impact from fossil fuels compared to biomass burning. When comparing eBCff during day and night, a factor of three higher concentrations was observed in nighttime than daytime, and it is due to combustion of fossil fuel (diesel vehicle emission) and shallow boundary layer conditions. The contribution of eBCwb in eBC was higher between 1800 and 2100 hours due to burning of wood/biomass. A significant correlation between eBC and PM2.5 (r = 0.78) and eBC and CO (r = 0.46) indicates the similarity in location sources. The mass concentration of eBC was highest (23.4 μg/m(3)) during the month of December when the mean visibility (VIS) was lowest (1.31 km). Regression analysis among wind speed (WS), VIS, soot particles, and CO was studied, and significant negative relationships were seen between VIS and eBC (-0.65), eBCff (-0.66), eBCwb (-0.34), and CO (-0.65); however, between WS and eBC (-0.68), eBCff (-0.67), eBCwb (-0.28), and CO (-0.53). The regression analysis indicated

  14. Determination of wood burning and fossil fuel contribution of black carbon at Delhi, India using aerosol light absorption technique.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, S; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, A K; Bisht, D S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive measurement program of effective black carbon (eBC), fine particle (PM2.5), and carbon monoxide (CO) was undertaken during 1 December 2011 to 31 March 2012 (winter period) in Delhi, India. The mean mass concentrations of eBC, PM2.5, and CO were recorded as 12.1 ± 8.7 μg/m(3), 182.75 ± 114.5 μg/m(3), and 3.41 ± 1.6 ppm, respectively, during the study period. Also, the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) was estimated from eBC and varied from 0.38 to 1.29 with a mean value of 1.09 ± 0.11. The frequency of occurrence of AAE was ~17 % less than unity whereas ~83 % greater than unity was observed during the winter period in Delhi. The mass concentrations of eBC were found to be higher by ~34 % of the average value of eBC (12.1 μg/m(3)) during the study period. Sources of eBC were estimated, and they were ~94 % from fossil fuel (eBCff) combustion whereas only 6 % was from wood burning (eBCwb). The ratio between eBCff and eBCwb was 15, which indicates a higher impact from fossil fuels compared to biomass burning. When comparing eBCff during day and night, a factor of three higher concentrations was observed in nighttime than daytime, and it is due to combustion of fossil fuel (diesel vehicle emission) and shallow boundary layer conditions. The contribution of eBCwb in eBC was higher between 1800 and 2100 hours due to burning of wood/biomass. A significant correlation between eBC and PM2.5 (r = 0.78) and eBC and CO (r = 0.46) indicates the similarity in location sources. The mass concentration of eBC was highest (23.4 μg/m(3)) during the month of December when the mean visibility (VIS) was lowest (1.31 km). Regression analysis among wind speed (WS), VIS, soot particles, and CO was studied, and significant negative relationships were seen between VIS and eBC (-0.65), eBCff (-0.66), eBCwb (-0.34), and CO (-0.65); however, between WS and eBC (-0.68), eBCff (-0.67), eBCwb (-0.28), and CO (-0.53). The regression analysis indicated

  15. Design, development, and operation of a fiber-based Cherenkov beam loss monitor at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maréchal, X.-M.; Asano, Y.; Itoga, T.

    2012-05-01

    A fiber-based Cherenkov beam loss monitor (CBLM) consisting of large core (400 μm), long (≥150 m) multimode fibers, has been developed as an online long-range detection tool with high sensitivity and good position resolution for the 8 GeV SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser: primarily designed for radiation safety in order to limit the dose outside the shielding of the machine, this monitor also serves as an early warning tool to avoid radiation damages done by lost electrons to the undulator magnets. This paper presents the approach chosen to insure that the required sensitivity (≤1 pC) could be obtained over more than 100 m. A beam-based approach was used to characterize (attenuation and signal strength) different fibers (diameter, index profile, and numerical aperture) and to select the most appropriate one. The response of the detector has also been studied numerically for different geometries (vacuum pipe and in-vacuum type undulators), beam energies, and beam loss scenarios, to determine the optimum number of fibers and their position in order to achieve the required detection limit. The results of the first few months of operation show that the SPring-8 CBLM can detect beam losses of less than 0.5 pC over the full 150 m length of the fiber.

  16. X-ray crystal structure of the Fe-only hydrogenase (CpI) from Clostridium pasteurianum to 1.8 angstrom resolution.

    PubMed

    Peters, J W; Lanzilotta, W N; Lemon, B J; Seefeldt, L C

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional structure for the monomeric iron-containing hydrogenase (CpI) from Clostridium pasteurianum was determined to 1.8 angstrom resolution by x-ray crystallography using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing. CpI, an enzyme that catalyzes the two-electron reduction of two protons to yield dihydrogen, was found to contain 20 gram atoms of iron per mole of protein, arranged into five distinct [Fe-S] clusters. The probable active-site cluster, previously termed the H-cluster, was found to be an unexpected arrangement of six iron atoms existing as a [4Fe-4S] cubane subcluster covalently bridged by a cysteinate thiol to a [2Fe] subcluster. The iron atoms of the [2Fe] subcluster both exist with an octahedral coordination geometry and are bridged to each other by three non-protein atoms, assigned as two sulfide atoms and one carbonyl or cyanide molecule. This structure provides insights into the mechanism of biological hydrogen activation and has broader implications for [Fe-S] cluster structure and function in biological systems.

  17. The 2.6 Angstrom Crystal Structure of a Human A[subscript 2A] Adenosine Receptor Bound to an Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Griffith, Mark T.; Hanson, Michael A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Lane, J. Robert; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2009-01-15

    The adenosine class of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediates the important role of extracellular adenosine in many physiological processes and is antagonized by caffeine. We have determined the crystal structure of the human A{sub 2A} adenosine receptor, in complex with a high-affinity subtype-selective antagonist, ZM241385, to 2.6 angstrom resolution. Four disulfide bridges in the extracellular domain, combined with a subtle repacking of the transmembrane helices relative to the adrenergic and rhodopsin receptor structures, define a pocket distinct from that of other structurally determined GPCRs. The arrangement allows for the binding of the antagonist in an extended conformation, perpendicular to the membrane plane. The binding site highlights an integral role for the extracellular loops, together with the helical core, in ligand recognition by this class of GPCRs and suggests a role for ZM241385 in restricting the movement of a tryptophan residue important in the activation mechanism of the class A receptors.

  18. Subpicosecond and Sub-Angstrom Time and Space Studies by Means of Light, X-ray, and Electron Interaction with Matter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    This Perspective article considers an experimental system that consists of ultrafast optical, electron, and X-ray time-resolved components. These techniques are used simultaneously on the same sample to study, in real time, the events that occur immediately upon disturbance with an ultrafast optical pulse. Excited states and metastable species are generated on the surface, and the electrical and mechanical waves propagating through the sample are recorded with subpicosecond and sub-Angstrom resolution. The characteristic of each technique is briefly described as a means of introducing the experimental system that intergrates these techniques. The processes evolved after femtosecond excitation of a Au single crystal have been monitored by these techniques. The data presented show changes with a resolution of 0.3 ± 0.1 ps in optical thermoreflectance, 1.0 ± 0.2 ps in electron Bragg diffraction, and 0.6 ± 0.1 ps in X-ray diffraction intensity accompanying shift and broadening.

  19. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  20. Critical exponents, hyperscaling, and universal amplitude ratios for two- and three-dimensional self-avoiding walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Madras, Neal; Sokal, Alan D.

    1995-08-01

    We make a high-precision Monte Carlo study of two- and three-dimensional self-avoiding walks (SAWs) of length up to 80,000 steps, using the pivot algorithm and the Karp-Luby algorithm. We study the critical exponents v and 2 Δ 4 - γ as well as several universal amplitude ratios; in particular, we make an extremely sensitive test of the hyperscaling relation dv = 2 Δ 4 - γ. In two dimensions, we confirm the predicted exponent v=3/4 and the hyperscaling relation; we estimate the universal ratios < R {/g 2}>/< R {/e 2}>=0.14026±0.00007, < R {/m 2}>/< R {/e 2}>=0.43961±0.00034, and Ψ*=0.66296±0.00043 (68% confidence limits). In three dimensions, we estimate v=0.5877±0.0006 with a correctionto-scaling exponent Δ 1=0.56±0.03 (subjective 68% confidence limits). This value for v agrees excellently with the field-theoretic renormalization-group prediction, but there is some discrepancy for Δ 1. Earlier Monte Carlo estimates of v, which were ≈0.592, are now seen to be biased by corrections to scaling. We estimate the universal ratios < R {/g 2}>/< R {/e 2}>=0.1599±0.0002 and Ψ*=0.2471±0.0003; since Ψ*>0, hyperscaling holds. The approach to Ψ* is from above, contrary to the prediction of the two-parameter renormalization-group theory. We critically reexamine this theory, and explain where the error lies. In an appendix, we prove rigorously (modulo some standard scaling assumptions) the hyperscaling relation dv = 2 Δ 4 - γ for two-dimensional SAWs.

  1. Quantum quench of Kondo correlations in optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Absorption spectra of individual semiconductor quantum dots tunnel-coupled to a degenerate electron gas in the Kondo regime have recently become accessible to the experiment. The absorption of a single photon leads to an abrupt change in the system Hamiltonian, which can be tailored such that it results in a quantum quench of the Kondo correlations. This is accompanied by a clear signature in the form of an Anderson orthogonality catastrophe, induced by a vanishing overlap between initial and final many-body wave functions and with power-law exponents that can be tuned by an applied magnetic field. We have modeled the experiment in terms of an Anderson impurity model undergoing an optically induced quench, and studied this Kondo exciton in detail using both analytical methods and the Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG). Our NRG results reproduce the measured absorption line shapes very well, showing that NRG is ideally suited for the study of Kondo excitons. In summary, the experiments demonstrate that optical measurements on single artificial atoms offer new perspectives on many-body phenomena previously studied using transport spectroscopy only. Co-authors: Andreas Weichselbaum, Markus Hanl, and Jan von Delft, Ludwig Maximilians University.

  2. Barriers in the transition to global chaos in collisionless magnetic reconnection. I. Ridges of the finite time Lyapunov exponent field

    SciTech Connect

    Borgogno, D.; Grasso, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Schep, T. J.

    2011-10-15

    The transitional phase from local to global chaos in the magnetic field of a reconnecting current layer is investigated. Regions where the magnetic field is stochastic exist next to regions where the field is more regular. In regions between stochastic layers and between a stochastic layer and an island structure, the field of the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) shows a structure with ridges. These ridges, which are special gradient lines that are transverse to the direction of minimum curvature of this field, are approximate Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) that act as barriers for the transport of field lines.

  3. A simple method of calculating power-law velocity profile exponents from experimental data. [for boundary layer shape factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the effects of compressibility and heat transfer on laminar and turbulent shape factors H have been developed. Solving the turbulent equation for the power law velocity profile exponent N has resulted in a simple technique by which the N values of experimental turbulent profiles can be calculated directly from the integral parameters. Thus the data plotting, curve fitting, and slope measuring, which is the normal technique of obtaining experimental N values, is eliminated. The N values obtained by this method should be within the accuracy with which they could be measured.

  4. Profiled Roller Stress/Fatigue Life Analysis Methodology and Establishment of an Appropriate Stress/Life Exponent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the three dimensional volumetric stress field, surface pressure distribution and actual contact area between a 0.50" square roller with different crown profiles and a flat raceway surface using Finite Element Analysis. The 3-dimensional stress field data was used in conjunction with several bearing fatigue life theories to extract appropriate values for stress-life exponents. Also, results of the FEA runs were used to evaluate the laminated roller model presently used for stress and life prediction.

  5. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for threshold detection of stimulus-response curves.

    PubMed

    Duc, Luu Hoang; Chávez, Joseph Páez; Son, Doan Thai; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical networks transient dynamics plays a fundamental role, since the activation of signalling pathways is determined by thresholds encountered during the transition from an initial state (e.g. an initial concentration of a certain protein) to a steady-state. These thresholds can be defined in terms of the inflection points of the stimulus-response curves associated to the activation processes in the biochemical network. In the present work, we present a rigorous discussion as to the suitability of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for the detection of inflection points of stimulus-response curves with sigmoidal shape. PMID:27416142

  6. On the effects of surrogacy of energy dissipation in determining the intermittency exponent in fully developed turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleve, J.; Greiner, M.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2003-03-01

    The two-point correlation function of the energy dissipation, obtained from a one-point time record of an atmospheric boundary layer, reveals a rigorous power law scaling with intermittency exponent μ approx 0.20 over almost the entire inertial range of scales. However, for the related integral moment, the power law scaling is restricted to the upper part of the inertial range only. This observation is explained in terms of the operational surrogacy of the construction of energy dissipation, which influences the behaviour of the correlation function for small separation distances.

  7. Vaginal Absorption of Penicillin.

    PubMed

    Rock, J; Barker, R H; Bacon, W B

    1947-01-01

    Except during the last two months of pregnancy, penicillin is easily absorbed from cocoa butter suppositories in the vagina, ordinarily to give therapeutic blood levels for from 4 to 6 hours. Penicillin in the dosage used seems to have a good effect on vaginal infections. In nonpregnant women, during the ovulation phase, considered as including days 14 +/- 2 in the ordinary menstrual cycle of about 28 days, absorption seemed to be somewhat diminished. Higher levels were found in patients who were near the end of their menstrual cycles and in two patients who were menopausal. Patients who were very near term absorbed little or no penicillin, whereas patients 10 days post partum showed excellent absorption.

  8. Photothermal absorption correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Octeau, Vivien; Cognet, Laurent; Duchesne, Laurence; Lasne, David; Schaeffer, Nicolas; Fernig, David G; Lounis, Brahim

    2009-02-24

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a popular technique, complementary to cell imaging for the investigation of dynamic processes in living cells. Based on fluorescence, this single molecule method suffers from artifacts originating from the poor fluorophore photophysics: photobleaching, blinking, and saturation. To circumvent these limitations we present here a new correlation method called photothermal absorption correlation spectroscopy (PhACS) which relies on the absorption properties of tiny nano-objects. PhACS is based on the photothermal heterodyne detection technique and measures akin FCS, the time correlation function of the detected signals. Application of this technique to the precise determination of the hydrodynamic sizes of different functionalized gold nanoparticles are presented, highlighting the potential of this method. PMID:19236070

  9. THE ABSORPTION OF ADRENALIN

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, D. Murray

    1923-01-01

    1. Adrenalin solution given subcutaneously is usually rapidly absorbed, probably by lymphatic channels. 2. The speed of this process may be influenced by the circulation rate. 3. The relative amounts of adrenalin at any moment unabsorbed at the site of inoculation, carried in the circulating fluids, and taken up by the reacting tissues can be calculated from figures extracted from the curve of the blood pressure changes. The relative rates of transference of adrenalin into the blood and from the circulation into the tissues can also be estimated. 4. When absorption takes place rapidly a large quantity of the drug comes into action at once and the maximum occurs early, the curve of blood pressure reaches a considerable height, and subsides quickly. When absorption is slow the apex appears later and does not reach so high a level. 5. The response to adrenalin bears a logarithmic relationship to the dose employed and a method of allowing for this is indicated. PMID:19868816

  10. Universality of high-energy absorption cross sections for black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Decanini, Yves; Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Folacci, Antoine

    2011-02-15

    We consider the absorption problem for a massless scalar field propagating in static and spherically symmetric black holes of arbitrary dimension endowed with a photon sphere. For this wide class of black holes, we show that the fluctuations of the high-energy absorption cross section are totally and very simply described from the properties (dispersion relation and damping) of the waves trapped near the photon sphere and therefore, in the eikonal regime, from the characteristics (orbital period and Lyapunov exponent) of the null unstable geodesics lying on the photon sphere. This is achieved by using Regge pole techniques. They permit us to make an elegant and powerful resummation of the absorption cross section and to extract then all the physical information encoded in the sum over the partial wave contributions. Our analysis induces moreover some consequences concerning Hawking radiation which we briefly report.

  11. The dynamic critical exponent in optimally doped Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4 as a function of film inhomoegneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, R. A.; Olson, J. B.; Sousa, J.; Salvaggio, M.; Sullivan, M. C.; Greene, R. L.

    2009-03-01

    Scaling analysis of voltage vs. current isotherms is a good tool to study the normal-superconducting phase transition in cuprate conductors. This measurement has never been performed on the optimally doped cuprate conductor Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4. If we take the finite thickness of the films into account,ootnotetextSullivan et al., Phys. Rev B 69, 214524 (2004) we can find the critical isotherm and determine the dynamic critical exponent z in our Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4 films. We find that the critical exponent varies as a function of transition width, from which we can infer the effect of sample inhomogeneity on the dynamic critical exponent. We present our results of the critical exponent as a function of sample inhomogeneity and compare it to the hole-doped cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ.

  12. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  13. Robust, angstrom level circularity profilometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A noncontacting approach is presented which involves measuring the local circumferential curvature of the test piece by simultaneously measuring its circumferential slope at two slightly displaced locations. A pair of sensing beams is scanned along the circumference, and a profile of curvature is built, from which the circularity profile is deduced. The sensing of curvature makes the approach insensitive to all types of vibration and drift and runout errors in the relative rotation. The special qualities of the approach are summarized which make it well suited to measuring cylindrical optics and enable it to accommodate radii as small as twenty millimeters.

  14. Ultrafast holography and transient absorption spectroscopy in charge-transfer polymers

    SciTech Connect

    McBranch, D.W.; Maniloff, E.S.; Vacar, D.; Heeger, A.J.

    1997-10-01

    Charge-transfer polymers are a new class of nonlinear optical materials which can be used for generating femtosecond holographic gratings. Using semiconducting polymers sensitized with varying concentrations of C{sub 60}, holographic gratings were recorded by individual ultrafast laser pulses; the diffraction efficiency and time decay of the gratings were measured using non-degenerate four-wave mixing. Using a figure of merit for dynamic data processing, the temporal diffraction efficiency, this new class of materials exhibits between two and 12 orders of magnitude higher response than previous reports. The charge transfer range at polymer/C{sub 60} interfaces was further studied using transient absorption spectroscopy. The fact that charge-transfer occurs in the picosecond-time scale in bilayer structures (thickness 200 {angstrom}) implies that diffusion of localized excitations to the interface is not the dominant mechanism; the charge transfer range is a significant fraction of the film thickness. From analysis of the excited state decay curves, we estimate the charge transfer range to be 80 {angstrom} and interpret that range as resulting from quantum delocalization of the photoexcitations.

  15. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  16. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Xu, M.; Pollard, A.; Mi, J.

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/De < 40, where De denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50 000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number Rλ varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=mt+(lnγ-0.0173)1/2, where mt denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions.

  17. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Xu, M; Pollard, A; Mi, J

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/D(e) < 40, where D(e) denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50,000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number R(λ) varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=m(t)+(lnγ(-0.0173))(1/2), where m(t) denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions. PMID:23767622

  18. Characterizing Submonolayer Growth of 6P on Mica: Capture Zone Distributions vs. Growth Exponents and the Role of Hot Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Morales-Cifuentes, Josue; Pimpinelli, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    Analyzing capture-zone distributions (CZD) using the generalized Wigner distribution (GWD) has proved a powerful way to access the critical nucleus size i. Of the several systems to which the GWD has been applied, we consider 6P on mica, for which Winkler's group found i ~ 3 . Subsequently they measured the growth exponent α (island density ~Fα , for flux F) of this system and found good scaling but different values at small and large F, which they attributed to DLA and ALA dynamics, but with larger values of i than found from the CZD analysis. We investigate this result in some detail. The third talk of this group describes a new universal relation between α and the characteristic exponent β of the GWD. The second talk reports the results of a proposed model that takes long-known transient ballistic adsorption into account, for the first time in a quantitative way. We find several intermediate scaling regimes, with distinctive values of α and an effective activation energy. One of these, rather than ALA, gives the best fit of the experimental data and a value of i consistent with the CZD analysis. Work at UMD supported by NSF CHE 13-05892.

  19. Multiple ionization of helium and krypton by electron impact close to threshold: appearance energies and Wannier exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denifl, S.; Gstir, B.; Hanel, G.; Feketeova, L.; Matejcik, S.; Becker, K.; Stamatovic, A.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2002-11-01

    We determined appearance energy (AE) values AE(Xn+/X) for the formation of singly (He+) and doubly charged (He2+) He ions and multiply charged Kr ions Krn+ up to n = 6 following electron impact on He and Kr atoms using a high-resolution electron impact ionization mass spectrometer. The data analysis employs an iterative, non-linear least-squares fitting routine, the Marquart-Levenberg algorithm, in conjunction with either a 2-function or a 3-function fit based on a power threshold law. This allows us to extract the relevant AEs and also the corresponding exponents for a Wannier-type power law from the measured near-threshold data. The values of the AEs determined in this work are compared with other available experimental and with spectroscopic AE values and the extracted exponents p are compared with other available experimental data and with the predictions of the various Wannier-type power law models. One observation is particularly noteworthy, namely the fact that none of the available experimental data seem to support the large values of 'p' predicted by the Wannier-Geltman and the generalized Wannier law for n > 3.

  20. Electron impact multiple ionization of neon, argon and xenon atoms close to threshold: appearance energies and Wannier exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gstir, B.; Denifl, S.; Hanel, G.; Rümmele, M.; Fiegele, T.; Cicman, P.; Stano, M.; Matejcik, S.; Scheier, P.; Becker, K.; Stamatovic, A.; Märk, T. D.

    2002-07-01

    We report the results of the experimental determination of the appearance energy values AE(Xn + /X) for the formation of multiply charged Ne, Ar and Xe ions up to n = 4 (Ne), n = 6 (Ar) and n = 8 (Xe) following electron impact on Ne, Ar and Xe atoms using a dedicated high-resolution electron impact ionization mass spectrometer. The data analysis uses the Marquart-Levenberg algorithm, which is an iterative, nonlinear least-squares-fitting routine, in conjunction with either a two-function or a three-function fit based on a power threshold law. This allows us to extract the relevant AEs and corresponding exponents for a Wannier-type power law from the measured near-threshold data. The values of the AEs determined in this work are compared with other available experimental and spectroscopic values of the AEs and the extracted exponents are compared with other available experimental data and with the predictions of the various Wannier-type power law models.