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Sample records for absorption atomic fluorescence

  1. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  2. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rey-Raap, Natalia

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New treatments for CFL are required considering the aim of Directive 202/96/CE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is shown that most of the mercury introduced into a CFL is in the phosphor powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental conditions for microwave-assisted sample digestion followed by AAS measurements are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By washing the glass it is possible to reduce the concentration below legal limits. - Abstract: In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52 {+-} 0.4 ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16 {+-} 8.9 ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74 {+-} 0.5 ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.

  3. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J.

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  4. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J.; Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic oxygen number density [O] is measured in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Gas flow is fixed at 8 slpm, the RF power coupled into the plasma jet varied between 5 W and 20 W, and the resulting changes in atomic oxygen density measured. Photolysis of molecular oxygen is employed to allow in situ calibration of the TALIF system. During calibration, O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting oxygen atoms are achieved within the same laser pulse. The atomic oxygen density produced by photolysis is time varying and spatially non-uniform which needs to be corrected for to calibrate the TALIF system for measurement of atomic oxygen density in plasma. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I 0(t), wavelength, and focal spot size allows correction factors to be determined using a rate equation model. Atomic oxygen is used for calibration and measurement, so the laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power dependence region without affecting the calibration reliability as the laser power dependence will still be the same for both. The atomic O density results obtained are not directly benchmarked against other known density measurement techniques. The results show that the plasma jet atomic oxygen content increases as the RF power coupled into the plasma increases.

  5. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    PubMed Central

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  6. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  7. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  8. Do Atoms Really "Emit" Absorption Lines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecher, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Presents three absorption line sources that enhance student understanding of the phenomena associated with the interaction of light with matter and help dispel the misconception that atoms "emit" absorption lines. Sources include neodymium, food coloring and other common household liquids, and fluorescent materials. (MDH)

  9. Hot tube atomic absorption spectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Woodriff, R; Stone, R W

    1968-07-01

    A small, commercially available atomic absorption instrument is used with a heated graphite tube for the atomic absorption analysis of liquid and solid silver samples. Operating conditions of the furnace are described and a sensitivity of about 5 ng of silver is reported. PMID:20068797

  10. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-09-15

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas. -- Highlights: •The absorption rates of a pair of identical atoms in product and (anti)symmetrized states are different. •The modifications of the optical properties are essentially determined by the overlapping between the atoms. •The absorption properties differ, in some cases, for bosons and fermions.

  11. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  12. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas.

  13. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  14. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    A self-powered smartphone-based field-portable "dual" spectrometer has been developed for both absorption and fluorescence measurements. The smartphone's existing flash LED has sufficient optical irradiance to undertake absorption measurements within a 3D-printed case containing a low cost nano-imprinted polymer diffraction grating. A UV (λex ~ 370 nm) and VIS (λex ~ 450 nm) LED are wired into the circuit of the flash LED to provide an excitation source for fluorescence measurements. Using a customized app on the smartphone, measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using pH-sensitive and Zn2+-responsive probes. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel spectral resolution is demonstrated. Despite the low cost and small size of the portable spectrometer, the results compare well with bench top instruments.

  15. Continuum source tungsten coil atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiyan; Donati, George L; Young, Carl G; Jones, Bradley T

    2011-04-01

    A simple continuum source tungsten coil atomic fluorescence spectrometer is constructed and evaluated. The heart of the system is the atomizer: a low-cost tungsten filament extracted from a 150 W light bulb. The filament is resistively heated with a small, solid-state, constant-current power supply. The atomizer is housed in a glass chamber and purged with a 1 L/min flow of a conventional welding gas mixture: 10% H(2)/Ar. A 25 μL sample aliquot is pipetted onto the tungsten coil, the liquid is dried at low current, and then the atomic vapor is produced by applying a current in the range 3.5-5.5 A. The atomization current does not produce temperatures high enough to excite atomic emission. Radiation from a 300 W xenon lamp is focused through the atomic vapor, exciting atomic fluorescence. Fluorescence signals are collected using a hand-held charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. Simultaneous determination of ten elements (Ag, Bi, Cr, Cu, Ga, In, Mg, Mn, and Tl) results in detection limits in the range 0.3 to 10 ng. The application of higher atomization currents (10 A) leads to straightforward detection of atomic emission signals with no modifications to the instrument. PMID:21396184

  16. Absorption and fluorescent spectral studies of imidazophenazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ryazanova, O A; Zozulya, V N; Voloshin, I M; Karachevtsev, V A; Makitruk, V L; Stepanian, S G

    2004-07-01

    Absorption and fluorescent spectra as well as fluorescence polarization degree of imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F1) and its two modified derivatives, 2-trifluoridemethylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F2) and 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F3), were investigated in organic solvents of various polarities and hydrogen bonding abilities. Extinction coefficients of F2 and F3 are increased, their fluorescence Stokes shifts are reduced in comparison with those for unmodified imidazophenazine. For F3 a red shift of the longwave absorption band is observed by 15-20 nm. Modifications of imidazophenazine have led to a sufficient increase of fluorescence polarization degrees that enables to use F2 and F3 as promising fluorescent probes with polarization method application. The configuration, atomic charge distribution and dipole moments of the isolated dye molecules in the ground state were calculated by the DFT method. The computation has revealed that ground state dipole moments of F1, F2, and F3 differ slightly and are equal to 3.5, 3.2, and 3.7D, respectively. The changes in dipole moments upon the optical excitation for all derivatives estimated using Lippert equation were found to be Deltamu = 9 D. The energies of the electronic S1<--S0 transition in solvents of different proton donor abilities were determined, and energetic diagram illustrating the substituent effect was plotted. For nucleoside analogs of these compounds, covalently incorporated into a nucleotide chain, we have considered a possibility to use them as fluorescent reporters of hybridization of antisense oligonucleotides, as well as molecular anchors for its stabilization. PMID:15248979

  17. Detection of palladium by cold atom solution atomic absorption.

    PubMed

    Molloy, John L; Holcombe, James A

    2006-09-15

    One of the largest obstacles in miniaturizing traditional atomic spectroscopic sources is the need for a thermal/electrical source for free atom production. A single article in the literature has demonstrated atomic absorption detection of Ag, Cu, and Pd in solution at room temperature for atoms in the gas phase, which may ultimately permit miniaturization. Unfortunately, several laboratories have found that reproducing the phenomenon has been difficult. Without a sound fundamental explanation of the processes leading to the signal, one must conclude that it can be done, but some unsuspected and unknown design/methodological nuances are responsible for only a single reported success. Gas phase atoms could exist at room temperature "in solution" if the atoms were trapped in very small bubbles. In the current study, submicrometer-sized bubbles were created in a flow-through cell during the mixing of an alcohol-water solution containing a reducing agent with water containing the analyte. A repeatable atomic absorption signal was produced. Replacement of ethanol with 1-propanol and use of a surfactant increased the signal. Limits of detection of approximately 100 ppb in Pd were achieved, and it is estimated that approximately 0.4% of the Pd initially added is contained within the bubbles as gaseous atoms. The paper discusses the fundamental processes needed to achieve a repeatable signal. PMID:16970344

  18. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  19. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  20. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with high temperature flames.

    PubMed

    Willis, J B

    1968-07-01

    An account is given of the history of the development of high temperature flames for the atomic absorption measurement of metals forming refractory oxides. The principles governing the design of premix burners for such flames, and the relative merits of different types of nebulizer burner systems are described. After a brief account of the structure and emission characteristics of the premixed oxygen-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, the scope and limitations of the latter flame in chemical analysis are discussed. PMID:20068790

  1. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  2. Studies in atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy-V The fluorescence characteristics and determination of antimony.

    PubMed

    Dagnall, R M; Thompson, K C; West, T S

    1967-10-01

    Atomic-fluorescence of antimony may be generated in an air-propane flame by nebulizing aqueous solutions of antimony salts whilst irradiating the flame by means of a microwave-excited electrode-less discharge tube operating at 30 W. The strongest fluorescence is exhibited by the (4)S(11 2 ) --> (4)P(1 3 ) 2311 A resonance line and weaker signals are observed at the 2068 and 2176 A resonance lines and at four intercombination lines, at 2598, 2671, 2770 and 2878 A. A process of thermally assisted direct-line fluorescence is postulated to account for the otherwise inexplicable intensity of the 2598 A line emission. Atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy at 2176 A permits the determination of antimony in the range 0.1-120 ppm with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. With the same equipment and source, the range of measurement for atomic-absorption was 6-120 ppm and the detection limit was 1 ppm. No interferences were observed from 100-fold molar amounts of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, NH(4), Pb and Zn or from arsenate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate. PMID:18960212

  3. Far wing depolarization of light - Generalized absorption profiles. [in laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Sr vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, P.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1981-01-01

    An absorption (and/or emission) event which takes place during a strong collision is called a 'correlated event'. It is discussed how correlated events affect the far red wing depolarization of fluorescence. Attention is given to an atomic vapor which is irradiated by linearly polarized light of a frequency on the red side of the resonance line. Two limiting cases are considered, corresponding to excitation in the impact region and in the quasi-static wing. In the quasi-static wing, absorption of a photon followed by fluorescence (rather than Rayleigh scattering), occurs mostly during a collision. Correlated events dominate the scattering process. Expressions derived for the polarization of the fluorescent light are applied to far red wing depolarization. It is found that the polarization of the fluorescent light does not go to zero in the far wing, but depends crucially on the detailed nature of the anisotropy in the long-range part of the interatomic potential.

  4. Absorption Reconstruction Improves Biodistribution Assessment of Fluorescent Nanoprobes Using Hybrid Fluorescence-mediated Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gremse, Felix; Theek, Benjamin; Kunjachan, Sijumon; Lederle, Wiltrud; Pardo, Alessa; Barth, Stefan; Lammers, Twan; Naumann, Uwe; Kiessling, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT) holds potential for accelerating diagnostic and theranostic drug development. However, for proper quantitative fluorescence reconstruction, knowledge on optical scattering and absorption, which are highly heterogeneous in different (mouse) tissues, is required. We here describe methods to assess these parameters using co-registered micro Computed Tomography (µCT) data and nonlinear whole-animal absorption reconstruction, and evaluate their importance for assessment of the biodistribution and target site accumulation of fluorophore-labeled drug delivery systems. Methods: Besides phantoms with varying degrees of absorption, mice bearing A431 tumors were imaged 15 min and 48 h after i.v. injection of a fluorophore-labeled polymeric drug carrier (pHPMA-Dy750) using µCT-FMT. The outer shape of mice and a scattering map were derived using automated segmentation of the µCT data. Furthermore, a 3D absorption map was reconstructed from the trans-illumination data. We determined the absorption of five interactively segmented regions (heart, liver, kidney, muscle, tumor). Since blood is the main near-infrared absorber in vivo, the absorption was also estimated from the relative blood volume (rBV), determined by contrast-enhanced µCT. We compared the reconstructed absorption with the rBV-based values and analyzed the effect of using the absorption map on the fluorescence reconstruction. Results: Phantom experiments demonstrated that absorption reconstruction is possible and necessary for quantitative fluorescence reconstruction. In vivo, the reconstructed absorption showed high values in strongly blood-perfused organs such as the heart, liver and kidney. The absorption values correlated strongly with the rBV-based absorption values, confirming the accuracy of the absorption reconstruction. Usage of homogenous absorption instead of the reconstructed absorption map resulted in reduced values in the heart, liver and kidney, by

  5. 2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. AIR FILTERS AND SWIPES ARE DISSOLVED WITH ACIDS AND THE REMAINING RESIDUES ARE SUSPENDED IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTION. THE SOLUTION IS PROCESSED THROUGH THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER TO DETECT THE PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF BERYLLIUM. - Rocky Flats Plant, Health Physics Laboratory, On Central Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  6. Flameless atomic-absorption determination of gold in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Gold in geologic material is dissolved using a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine, extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone, and determined using an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a graphite furnace atomizer. A comparison of results obtained by this flameless atomic-absorption method on U.S. Geological Survey reference rocks and geochemical samples with reported values and with results obtained by flame atomic-absorption shows that reasonable accuracy is achieved with improved precision. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the method allows acquisition of data on the distribution of gold at or below its crustal abundance. ?? 1980.

  7. Determination of iridium in mafic rocks by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Schnepfe, M.M.

    1970-01-01

    Iridium is determined in mineralized mafic rocks by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed and Ir sensitivity is increased by buffering the solutions with a mixture of copper and sodium sulphates. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated in the atomic-absorption determination. The sensitivity and detection limits are 3.2 and 0.25 ppm of Ir, respectively. ?? 1970.

  8. A fluorescent benzothiazole probe with efficient two-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, Lorenzo; Moreno, Iván; Camacho, José; Salazar, Mary Carmen; Hernández, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we report the two-photon absorption of 2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-1,3-benzothiazole-6-carbonitrile (DBC) in DMSO solution pumping at 779 nm with a 10 ns pulse laser-Nd:YAG system. The obtained two-photon absorption cross-section in DBC (407 ± 18 GM) is considerably high. Because DBC is a novel compound and have high values of fluorescence quantum yield, this result is expected to have an impact in biomolecules detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Similar structures have previously been reported to show remarkable antitumour effects.

  9. Novel laser atomic fluorescence spectrometer for environmental and biomedical analyses of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dergachev, Alex Y.; Mirov, Sergey B.; Pitt, Robert E.; Parmer, Keith D.

    1997-05-01

    We report on the development of a novel experimental set-up using laser atomic fluorescence for detection and concentration measurements of heavy metal atoms for environmental and biomedical analyses. This spectrometer is based on the application of tunable LiF:F2+** and LiF:F2- color center and alexandrite lasers with nonlinear converters for narrowband excitation of atomic fluorescence and the use of gated multichannel CCD detectors for fluorescence measurements. A standard graphite furnace module was used for sample atomization. The laser sources used provide narrowband selective laser excitation continuously tunable in the 200 - 400 nm range and are therefore suitable for resonant excitation of atomic transitions in practically all known heavy metal atoms. In the first experiments, water samples containing Cu, Pb and Fe impurities were studied and detection levels of less than 1 ppb were observed. Comparison of the results of atomic laser fluorescence analysis and traditional atomic absorption spectrometry showed good qualitative agreement between these two methods. It is projected that full optimization of our experimental set up will allow for improved detection levels of several orders of magnitude. Possible optimization and simplification of the spectrometer are discussed in the context of developing a portable instrument for field use.

  10. Absorption and Transport of Fluorescent Brighteners by Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Darken, Marjorie A.

    1962-01-01

    The absorption of brighteners by living cells and their transport to subsequent growth is described. Brighteners are highly fluorescent, ultraviolet-absorbing compounds which appear to be essentially nontoxic, stable biological markers. They have been effectively absorbed by growing cultures of bacteria, yeasts, actinomycetes, and higher fungi, with active growth centers evidencing the greatest flourescence. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10-11 PMID:14025111

  11. Diagnostics of a see-through hollow cathode discharge by emission, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nicholas

    Atomic line filters have been suggested to be attractive in areas of Doppler velocimetry, resonance fluorescence detection, and resonance ionization detection. They are based on the resonant absorption of photons by an atomic vapor, and allow all other radiation to pass. This allows the detection of very low levels of light superimposed on a large optical background. Several elements have been studied for use as atomic line filters, such as the alkali metals, alkaline earths, and thallium. As previously recognized, thallium is especially attractive since the 535.046 nm metastable transition overlaps with the second harmonic output of an Nd:La2Be2O 5 (BEL) laser (1070 nm). This makes thallium ideal for certain applications as an atomic line filter. Recently a see-through hollow cathode lamp, or galvatron (Hamamatsu), was made commercially available. The galvatron geometry is unique compared to traditional hollow cathode lamps since the cathode and cell are oriented in a T-shape, with the cathode bored completely through to allow the propagation of a light source through the cathode. This allows multi-step excitation of the atomic vapor, not easily accomplished with a traditional hollow cathode lamp. The advantages that a galvatron offers over conventional atomic reservoirs make it an attractive candidate for the application as an atomic line filter; however, little spectroscopic data have been found in the literature. For this reason, Doppler temperatures, number densities, quantum efficiencies, and lifetimes have been determined in order to characterize this atomic reservoir as a potential atomic line filter. These parameters are determined by use of various spectroscopic techniques which include emission, absorption, time-resolved fluorescence, and time-resolved laser-induced saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. From these measurements, it has been demonstrated that a galvatron is an attractive atomic reservoir for applications as an atomic line filter. The

  12. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  13. Vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence on a Si atomic beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    A broadly applicable vacuum ultraviolet experiment is described for measuring radiative lifetimes of neutral and singly-ionized atoms in a beam environment to 5-percent accuracy using laser induced fluorescence. First results for neutral Si are reported.

  14. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies.

  15. Resonance fluorescence from an atom in a squeezed vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, H. J.; Lane, A. S.; Walls, D. F.

    1987-06-01

    The fluorescent spectrum for a two-level atom which is damped by a squeezed vacuum shows striking differences from the spectrum for ordinary resonance fluorescence. For strong coherent driving fields the Mollow triplet depends on the relative phase of the driving field and the squeezed vacuum field. The central peak may have either subnatural linewidth or supernatural linewidth depending on this phase. The mean atomic polarization also shows a phase sensitivity.

  16. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence techniques were developed for the containerless study of high temperature processes, material properties, levitation, and heating techniques for containerless earth-based experimentation. Experiments were performed in which fluorescence of atomic aluminum, mercury, or tungsten were studied. These experiments include measurements of: (1) Al atom evaporation from CW CO2 laser heated and aerodynamically levitated sapphire and alumina spheres, and self-supported sapphire filaments, (2) Al atom reaction with ambient oxygen in the wake of a levitated specimen, (3) Hg atom concentrations in the wake of levitated alumina and sapphire spheres, relative to the ambient Hg atom concentration, (4) Hg atom concentrations in supersonic levitation jets, and (5) metastable, electronically excited W atom concentrations produced by evaporation of an electrically heated tungsten filament.

  17. Perfect electromagnetic absorption at one-atom-thick scale

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sucheng; Duan, Qian; Li, Shuo; Yin, Qiang; Lu, Weixin; Li, Liang; Hou, Bo; Gu, Bangming; Wen, Weijia

    2015-11-02

    We experimentally demonstrate that perfect electromagnetic absorption can be realized in the one-atom thick graphene. Employing coherent illumination in the waveguide system, the absorbance of the unpatterned graphene monolayer is observed to be greater than 94% over the microwave X-band, 7–13 GHz, and to achieve a full absorption, >99% in experiment, at ∼8.3 GHz. In addition, the absorption characteristic manifests equivalently a wide range of incident angle. The experimental results agree very well with the theoretical calculations. Our work accomplishes the broadband, wide-angle, high-performance absorption in the thinnest material with simple configuration.

  18. Resonance Fluorescence from an Artificial Atom in Squeezed Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyli, D. M.; Eddins, A. W.; Boutin, S.; Puri, S.; Hover, D.; Bolkhovsky, V.; Oliver, W. D.; Blais, A.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-07-01

    We present an experimental realization of resonance fluorescence in squeezed vacuum. We strongly couple microwave-frequency squeezed light to a superconducting artificial atom and detect the resulting fluorescence with high resolution enabled by a broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifier. We investigate the fluorescence spectra in the weak and strong driving regimes, observing up to 3.1 dB of reduction of the fluorescence linewidth below the ordinary vacuum level and a dramatic dependence of the Mollow triplet spectrum on the relative phase of the driving and squeezed vacuum fields. Our results are in excellent agreement with predictions for spectra produced by a two-level atom in squeezed vacuum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2539 (1987)], demonstrating that resonance fluorescence offers a resource-efficient means to characterize squeezing in cryogenic environments.

  19. Atomic-absorption determination of rhodium in chromite concentrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Rhodium is determined in chromite concentrates by atomic absorption after concentration either by co-precipitation with tellurium formed by the reduction of tellurite with tin(II) chloride or by fire assay into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed by buffering the solutions with lanthanum sulphate (lanthanum concentration 1%). Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated. A lower limit of approximately 0.07 ppm Rh can be determined in a 3-g sample. ?? 1969.

  20. Determination of palladium and platinum by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Palladium and platinum are determined by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. The limit of determination is ~0??06 ppm in a 20-g sample. Serious depressive interelement interferences are removed by buffering the solutions with a mixture of cadmium and copper sulphates with cadmium and copper concentrations each at 0??5%. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn, and the platinum metals do not interfere in the atomic-absorption determination. ?? 1969.

  1. Speciation of mercury compounds by differential atomization - atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.W.; Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the dual stage atomization technique which allows speciation of several mercury-containing compounds in aqueous solution and in biological fluids. The technique holds great promise for further speciation studies. Accurate temperature control, expecially at temperatures less than 200/sup 0/C, is needed to separate the extremely volatile mercury halides and simple organomercurials from each other. Studies with mercury salts and EDTA, L-cysteine and dithioxamide demonstrate that this technique may be used to study the extent of complex formation. Investigations of biological fluids indicate that there is a single predominant form of mercury in sweat and a single predominant form of mercury in urine. The mercury compound in urine is more volatile than that in sweat. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses are possible with this technique.

  2. Theoretical investigations of absorption and fluorescence spectra of protonated pyrene.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2016-05-25

    The equilibrium geometry and 75 vibrational normal-mode frequencies of the ground and first excited states of protonated pyrene isomers were calculated and characterized in the adiabatic representation by using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method. Electronic absorption spectra of solid neon matrixes in the wavelength range 495-415 nm were determined by Maier et al. and they were analyzed using time-dependent density functional theory calculations (TDDFT). CASSCF calculations and absorption and emission spectra simulations by one-photon excitation equations were used to optimize the excited and ground state structures of protonated pyrene isomers. The absorption band was attributed to the S0 → S1 electronic transition in 1H-Py(+), and a band origin was used at 20580.96 cm(-1). The displaced harmonic oscillator approximation and Franck-Condon approximation were used to simulate the absorption spectrum of the (1) (1)A' ← X[combining tilde](1)A' transition of 1H-Py(+), and the main vibronic transitions were assigned for the first ππ* state. It shows that the vibronic structures were dominated by one of the eight active totally symmetric modes, with ν15 being the most crucial. This indicates that the electronic transition of the S1((1)A') state calculated in the adiabatic representation effectively includes a contribution from the adiabatic vibronic coupling through Franck-Condon factors perturbed by harmonic oscillators. The present method can adequately reproduce experimental absorption and fluorescence spectra of a gas phase. PMID:27181017

  3. COMPUTER-ASSISTED FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of furnace atomic absorption instrumentation with a turnkey chromatography data system is described. A simple addition of relays to the furnace power supply allows for automatic start-up of A/D conversion and spectrophotometer zeroing at the proper time. Manipulations inv...

  4. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  5. A COMPUTER CONTROL AND ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR ATOMIC ABSORPTION DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A system is presented that controls and acquires data from a Perkin-Elmer 603 or similar atomic absorption spectrophotometer operating in the flame mode and equipped with a 200 place auto-sampler. The hardware consists of a PDP11 computer with minimum peripheral equipment and a s...

  6. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  7. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  8. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    2012-05-01

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  9. Velocity measurements by laser resonance fluorescence. [single atom diffusional motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The photonburst correlation method was used to detect single atoms in a buffer gas. Real time flow velocity measurements with laser induced resonance fluorescence from single or multiple atoms was demonstrated and this method was investigated as a tool for wind tunnel flow measurement. Investigations show that single atoms and their real time diffusional motion on a buffer gas can be measured by resonance fluorescence. By averaging over many atoms, flow velocities up to 88 m/s were measured in a time of 0.5 sec. It is expected that higher flow speeds can be measured and that the measurement time can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more by careful experimental design. The method is clearly not ready for incorporation in high speed wind tunnels because it is not yet known whether the stray light level will be higher or lower, and it is not known what detection efficiency can be obtained in a wind tunnel situation.

  10. Photon statistics of atomic fluorescence after {pi}-pulse excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, Kazuyoshi; Koshino, Kazuki

    2010-09-15

    The photon statistics of atomic fluorescence after {pi}-pulse excitation is investigated in a system in which the input and output ports are connected to an atom. Since spontaneous decay during input pulse excitation occurs, the output pulse generally contains a multiphoton component with a certain probability. We quantitatively evaluate the probability of the output pulse containing multiple photons and determine the conditions for ideal single-photon generation.

  11. Coherent Enhanced Absorption in an Intracavity Atomic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David D.; Myneni, Krishna; Chang, Hongrok; Odutola, Jamiu A.

    2011-05-01

    The conditions for coherent enhanced absorption of an intracavity atomic medium are discussed. For a symmetric cavity, a specific amplitude and phase relationship between two oppositely oriented input beams results in coherent perfect absorption by the medium. In contrast, for a single input beam, perfect absorption requires a perfectly asymmetric, i.e., single port, cavity. Even when the cavity is not perfectly asymmetric or lossless, we find that enhanced absorption can occur. For a single input to an asymmetric cavity, as the input intensity is increased and the medium saturates, the cavity passes from the over-coupled to the under-coupled regime. We find the counterintuitive result that the cavity absorptance can increase with increasing input intensity in the over-coupled regime, i.e., the atom-cavity system behaves as a reverse saturable absorber. These results were compared with measurements performed using a tunable laser incident on a Fabry-Perot cavity containing an Rb87 cell, taking into account the effects of saturation and beam divergence.

  12. [Application of atomic absorption spectrometry in the engine knock detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Dan

    2013-02-01

    Because existing human experience diagnosis method and apparatus for auxiliary diagnosis method are difficult to diagnose quickly engine knock. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to detect the automobile engine knock in in innovative way. After having determined Fe, Al, Cu, Cr and Pb content in the 35 groups of Audi A6 engine oil whose travel course is 2 000 -70 000 kilometers and whose sampling interval is 2 000 kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the database of primary metal content in the same automobile engine at different mileage was established. The research shows that the main metal content fluctuates within a certain range. In practical engineering applications, after the determination of engine oil main metal content and comparison with its database value, it can not only help to diagnose the type and location of engine knock without the disintegration and reduce vehicle maintenance costs and improve the accuracy of engine knock fault diagnosis. PMID:23697150

  13. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Bismuth concentrations as low as 10 ng g-1 in 100-mg samples of geological materials can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. After HF-HClO4 decomposition of the sample, bismuth is extracted as the iodide into methyl isobutyl ketone and is then stripped with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into the aqueous phase. Aliquots of this solution are pipetted into the graphite furnace and dried, charred, and atomized in an automated sequence. Atomic absorbance at the Bi 223.1-nm line provides a measure of the amount of bismuth present. Results are presented for 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. ?? 1979.

  14. A benzo-15-crown-5-modifying ratiometric-absorption and fluorescent OFF-ON chemosensor for Cu(2.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuting; Wang, Xinxin; Wang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiuling

    2016-05-15

    One new benzo-15-crown-5-modifying fluorene Schiff base (FBC), together with the CN-linked fluorene-3,4-dimethoxybenzene (FBDMO) and fluorene-benzene (FB) references, has been designed and facilely synthesized. The binding of Cu(2+) with nitrogen atom of CN moiety in these three compounds can inhibit the photo-induced electronic transition process and induce the ratiometric-absorption and fluorescent OFF-ON response to Cu(2+). Whereas the employment of benzo-15-crown-5 moiety in FBC as additional binding platform for Cu(2+) not only amplifies the fluorescent enhancement of FBCvia preventing the isomerization of CN moiety, but also endows this compound high selectivity and rapid response towards Cu(2+) over the references FB and FBDMO. These results render FBC highly sensitive ratiometric-absorption and fluorescent OFF-ON detecting potential for Cu(2+) with the detection limit of 3.91×10(-6)M. PMID:26971023

  15. A benzo-15-crown-5-modifying ratiometric-absorption and fluorescent OFF-ON chemosensor for Cu2 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuting; Wang, Xinxin; Wang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiuling

    2016-05-01

    One new benzo-15-crown-5-modifying fluorene Schiff base (FBC), together with the Cdbnd N-linked fluorene-3,4-dimethoxybenzene (FBDMO) and fluorene-benzene (FB) references, has been designed and facilely synthesized. The binding of Cu2 + with nitrogen atom of Cdbnd N moiety in these three compounds can inhibit the photo-induced electronic transition process and induce the ratiometric-absorption and fluorescent OFF-ON response to Cu2 +. Whereas the employment of benzo-15-crown-5 moiety in FBC as additional binding platform for Cu2 + not only amplifies the fluorescent enhancement of FBCvia preventing the isomerization of Cdbnd N moiety, but also endows this compound high selectivity and rapid response towards Cu2 + over the references FB and FBDMO. These results render FBC highly sensitive ratiometric-absorption and fluorescent OFF-ON detecting potential for Cu2 + with the detection limit of 3.91 × 10- 6 M.

  16. Solvent-induced multicolour fluorescence of amino-substituted 2,3-naphthalimides studied by fluorescence and transient absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mayu; Namba, Misa; Yamaji, Minoru; Okamoto, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    A series of amino-2,3-naphthalimide derivatives having the amino functionality at 1-, 5- and 6-positions (, and , respectively) were prepared, and their photophysical properties were systematically investigated based on the measurements of steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence lifetimes as well as transient absorption spectra. The s efficiently fluoresced in solution, and the emission spectra appreciably shifted depending on the solvent polarity. displayed only a slight fluorescence red-shift upon increasing the solvent polarity. In contrast, and showed marked positive solvatofluorochromism with large Stokes shifts displaying multicolour fluorescence; the fluorescence colours of and varied from violet-blue in hexane to orange-red in methanol. and , thus, serve as micro-environment responding fluorophores. In methanol, the intensity of the fluorescence emission band of and significantly reduced. Based on the fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and transient absorption measurements, it has been revealed that internal conversion from the S1 state of s to the ground state was accelerated by the protic medium, resulting in a reduction in their fluorescence efficiency, while intersystem crossing from the S1 state to a triplet state was not responsible for the decrease of fluorescence intensity. PMID:27251860

  17. Investigation of the statistical properties of fluorescence from single atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hodapp, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies were made of the time correlations in the spontaneous light emitted from neutral {sup 138}Ba atoms illuminated by laser light at or near resonance for the 6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} - 6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1} transition. The fluorescence was observed from more than 2.5 million individual atoms using a high-sensitivity light collection/detection system. Time correlations are conveniently characterized by Mandel's Q parameter. Previous measurements of Q for fluorescence from single atoms have been limited to a single intensity at resonance. The improved light collector in the present experiment enabled a wider range of conditions (both off-resonance and on-resonance at various powers) to be evaluated, and imposed a more complete test of the predictions of the quantum electrodynamical treatment of resonance fluorescence. This work presents the first thorough exploration of the changes in the statistical properties of this light. Negative (sub-Poisson), zero (Poisson) and positive (super-Poisson) values for Q were found depending on the intensity and the frequency. Although negative values of Q are associated with antibunching, the results clearly show that zero and positive values are possible for antibunched light under suitable off-resonance conditions. The experimental results agree well with two-level atomic theory and lend additional support to the belief that quantum jumps effectively isolate two-level systems. 3 refs.

  18. Optimization of electrothermal atomization parameters for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harnly, J.M.; Kane, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the acid matrix, the measurement mode (height or area), the atomizer surface (unpyrolyzed and pyrolyzed graphite), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the atomization temperature on the simultaneous electrothermal atomization of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn was examined. The 5% HNO3 matrix gave rise to severe irreproducibility using a pyrolyzed tube unless the tube was properly "prepared". The 5% HCl matrix did not exhibit this problem, and no problems were observed with either matrix using an unpyrolized tube or a pyrolyzed platform. The 5% HCl matrix gave better sensitivities with a pyrolyzed tube but the two matrices were comparable for atomization from a platform. If Mo and V are to be analyzed with the other seven elements, a high atomization temperature (2700??C or greater) is necessary regardless of the matrix, the measurement mode, the atomization mode, or the atomizer surface. Simultaneous detection limits (peak height with pyrolyzed tube atomization) were comparable to those of conventional atomic absorption spectrometry using electrothermal atomization above 280 nm. Accuracies and precisions of ??10-15% were found in the 10 to 120 ng mL-1 range for the analysis of NBS acidified water standards.

  19. A thin-walled metallic hollow cathode as an atomizer for Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeyev, A. A.; Sholupov, S. E.

    1998-03-01

    A new kind of glow discharge atomizer, a thin-walled metallic hollow cathode (TMHC) combined with Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry using high frequency modulated light polarization (ZAAS-HFM), is studied. A theoretically suggested, and experimentally confirmed, model of the atom confinement in the TMHC yields the appearance of the diffusion traps for atoms at both ends of the cathode, which increases the residence time of the analyte atoms in the analysis volume. The high atomization efficiency in the glow discharge atomizer (caused by the ionic-thermal mechanism of sputtering) and the high selectivity of ZAAS-HFM are demonstrated in the analysis of complex matrix samples such as whole blood and urine. The analytical system TMHC + ZAAS-HFM is characterized by low detection limits, which are comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Owing to its rather low average power consumption (30-50 W) the TMHC can be used in a portable and mobile spectrometer, and is therefore suitable for the in situ analysis of various sample materials.

  20. Absorption of twisted light by a mesoscopic atomic target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkov, A. A.; Serbo, V. G.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation of a hydrogen-atom target by a twisted Bessel light beam is investigated. The atoms are assumed to have a Gaussian spatial distribution in the target. Theoretical analysis is performed within a nonrelativistic framework using a first-order perturbation approach and density matrix formalism. By using this theory, we derive the expressions for excitation cross sections and for alignment parameters of the excited atomic state. In particular, we make calculations for the 1s\\to 2p transition caused by the interaction of Bessel beams with the atomic target. For this transition, we analyze the population of magnetic sublevels for the excited 2p state and study how it is affected by the projection of the total angular momentum of incident light. The calculations indicate that the projection of the total angular momentum of the incident Bessel beam affects the alignment of atoms for sufficiently small targets with size less than 200 nm. This can be observed experimentally by measuring the linear polarization of the subsequent fluorescent light.

  1. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  2. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  3. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  4. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  5. Development of temperature imaging using two-line atomic fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Medwell, Paul R; Chan, Qing N; Kalt, Peter A M; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dally, Bassam B; Nathan, Graham J

    2009-02-20

    This work aims to advance understanding of the coupling between temperature and soot. The ability to image temperature using the two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) technique is demonstrated. Previous TLAF theory is extended from linear excitation into the nonlinear fluence regime. Nonlinear regime two-line atomic fluorescence (NTLAF) provides superior signal and reduces single-shot uncertainty from 250 K for conventional TLAF down to 100 K. NTLAF is shown to resolve the temperature profile across the stoichiometric envelope for hydrogen, ethylene, and natural gas flames, with deviation from thermocouple measurements not exceeding 100 K, and typically ≲30 K. Measurements in flames containing soot demonstrate good capacity of NTLAF to exclude interferences that hamper most two-dimensional thermometry techniques. PMID:23567586

  6. Solvent effects on two-line atomic fluorescence of indium.

    PubMed

    Chan, Qing N; Medwell, Paul R; Kalt, Peter A M; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dally, Bassam B; Nathan, Graham J

    2010-03-10

    We aim to investigate the potential of four different organic solvents, namely, acetone, ethanol, methanol, and isopropanol, and the organic-solvent-water mixtures as a seeding medium for the two-line atomic fluorescence technique. Water is used as the reference case. Indium, which has been previously shown to have suitable spectroscopic attributes, is chosen as the thermometry species in the present study. Acetone and methanol are shown to enhance the fluorescence signal intensity the most (approximately threefold to fivefold at stoichiometric conditions) when used. Acetone and methanol are shown to improve the fluorescence emission over the entire stoichiometric envelope of flame, most significantly in the rich combustion region, as well as a twofold enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:20220881

  7. Microwave-assisted synthesis of water-soluble, fluorescent gold nanoclusters capped with small organic molecules and a revealing fluorescence and X-ray absorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, C.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frank, W.

    2015-03-01

    Colourless solutions of blue light-emitting, water-soluble gold nanoclusters (AuNC) were synthesized from gold colloids under microwave irradiation using small organic molecules as ligands. Stabilized by 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (TPA) or l-glutamine (GLU), fluorescence quantum yields up to 5% were obtained. AuNC are considered to be very promising for biological labelling, optoelectronic devices and light-emitting materials but the structure-property relationships have still not been fully clarified. To expand the knowledge about the AuNC apart from their fluorescent properties they were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy elucidating the oxidation state of the nanoclusters' gold atoms. Based on curve fitting of the XANES spectra in comparison to several gold references, optically transparent fluorescent AuNC are predicted to be ligand-stabilized Au5+ species. Additionally, their near edge structure compared with analogous results of polynuclear clusters known from the literature discloses an increasing intensity of the feature close to the absorption edge with decreasing cluster size. As a result, a linear relationship between the cluster size and the X-ray absorption coefficient can be established for the first time.Colourless solutions of blue light-emitting, water-soluble gold nanoclusters (AuNC) were synthesized from gold colloids under microwave irradiation using small organic molecules as ligands. Stabilized by 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (TPA) or l-glutamine (GLU), fluorescence quantum yields up to 5% were obtained. AuNC are considered to be very promising for biological labelling, optoelectronic devices and light-emitting materials but the structure-property relationships have still not been fully clarified. To expand the knowledge about the AuNC apart from their fluorescent properties they were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy elucidating the oxidation state of the nanoclusters' gold atoms. Based on curve fitting of the XANES

  8. Laser-excited fluorescence spectra of atomic uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Songyue; Jin Changtai; Shen Mingtao; Wang Xiulan

    1987-05-01

    Using a dc-supply hollow-cathode lamp as a source of uranium vapor and a rhodamine 6G dye laser to excite the vapor optically, it was simple and convenient to detect fluorescence from uranium atoms at 753.393, 763.175, and 763.954 nm. We give a detailed discussion of how we eliminated the intense background emissions, which were principally due to the lamp.

  9. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC. PMID:15910814

  10. A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Bautista, M. A.; Hasoglu, M. F.; Garcia, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kallman, T. R.; Manson, S. T.; Mendoza, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; de Vries, C. P.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of atomic Oxygen for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects, that accurately predict the absorption oscillator strengths below threshold and merge consistently and continuously to the above-threshold cross section. Further, minor adjustments are made to the threshold energies in order to reliably align the atomic Rydberg resonances after consideration of both experimental and observed line positions. At energies far below or above the K-edge region, the formulation is based on both outer- and inner-shell direct photoionization, including significant shake-up and shake-off processes that result in photoionization-excitation and double-photoionization contributions to the total cross section. The ultimate purpose for developing a definitive model for oxygen absorption is to resolve standing discrepancies between the astronomically observed and laboratory-measured line positions, and between the inferred atomic and molecular oxygen abundances in the interstellar medium from XSTAR and SPEX spectral models.

  11. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  12. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He){sub 200}, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe{sub 200} studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  13. Communication: angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He)200, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe200 studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments. PMID:24329048

  14. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  15. Performance characteristics of an S-600 portable atomic absorption spectrophotometer

    SciTech Connect

    Pelieva, L.A.; Dyndar, Zh.I.

    1995-12-01

    Performance characteristics of an S-600 portable atomic absorption spectrophotometer are discussed. The optimum analysis conditions, characteristic mass, and detection limit for determining Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in solutions and in powders are specified. Direct analysis of solid-state samples (standard soil samples) is described. The relative error of measurement by the calibration graph method lies, with few exceptions, within 7-30%, and by the addition method, within 4-20%. The time needed for a single element determination is 10-20 min.

  16. A heated chamber burner for atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venghiattis, A A

    1968-07-01

    A new heated chamber burner is described. The burner is of the premixed type, and burner heads of the types conventionally used in atomic absorption may be readily adapted to it. This new sampling system has been tested for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Ti, and Zn in aqueous solutions. An improvement of the order of ten times has been obtained in sensitivity, and in detection limits as well, for the elements determined. Interferences controllable are somewhat more severe than in conventional burners but are controllable. PMID:20068792

  17. Fluorescence during Doppler cooling of a single trapped atom

    SciTech Connect

    Wesenberg, J. H.; Epstein, R. J.; Leibfried, D.; Blakestad, R. B.; Britton, J.; Home, J. P.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, E.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Seidelin, S.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-11-15

    We investigate the temporal dynamics of Doppler cooling of an initially hot single trapped atom in the weak-binding regime using a semiclassical approach. We develop an analytical model for the simplest case of a single vibrational mode for a harmonic trap, and show how this model allows us to estimate the initial energy of the trapped particle by observing the time-dependent fluorescence during the cooling process. The experimental implementation of this temperature measurement provides a way to measure atom heating rates by observing the temperature rise in the absence of cooling. This method is technically relatively simple compared to conventional sideband detection methods, and the two methods are in reasonable agreement. We also discuss the effects of rf micromotion, relevant for a trapped atomic ion, and the effect of coupling between the vibrational modes on the cooling dynamics.

  18. Measuring Microwaves via Absorption and Dispersion in Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Daniel; Kunz, Paul; Meyer, David; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Weak microwave frequency electromagnetic fields can be difficult to detect and fully characterize with traditional methods. However it is possible to transduce the measurement of these fields from the microwave domain to the optical domain via resonant transitions between Rydberg levels in atomic vapors using electromagnetically-induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for sensitive measurements of the microwave field amplitude, polarization, and spatial waveform (via the position of the probe and coupling laser beams) as compared to measurements performed with dipole antennas. We are able to obtain these quantities by monitoring the properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a rubidium vapor cell. Previous experiments using Rydberg spectroscopy have typically relied on measuring the absorption of the probe laser as it passed through the atomic system. We report on progress to use the polarization rotation of the probe as it passes through the atoms in a static magnetic field, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility of the atomic medium, for measuring the characteristics of a microwave frequency signal. This effect is known as Nonlinear Magneto Optical Rotation (NMOR) and has been used for sensitive magnetometry.

  19. Spectroscopy of α,ω-dithienyl polyenes: evidence for two-photon absorption states from fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Lalgudi V.; Kirkpatrick, Sean M.; Sutherland, Richard L.; Sowards, Laura A.; Spangler, Charles W.; Fleitz, Paul A.; Cooper, Thomas M.

    1998-10-01

    The photophysics of a series (alpha) ,(omega) -dithienyl polyenes was studied. Both one photon excited fluorescence and fluorescence originating from two photon absorption states were investigated. There is strong evidence of two photon absorption from fluorescence studies in agreement with our earlier studies involving nonlinear absorption.

  20. Studies on external electric field effects on absorption and fluorescence spectra of NADH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Islam, Md. Serajul; Li, Liming; Yasuda, Masahide; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Electric field effects on absorption and fluorescence spectra have been investigated for NADH that is a representative autofluorescent chromophore in cells. The change in electric dipole moment following absorption is significant in the electroabsorption spectrum, indicating charge transfer character in the excited state. The fluorescence intensity decreases in the presence of an electric field, which arises from the field-induced increase in the rate of the non-radiative process. The blue shift of the fluorescence spectrum and the increase in the fluorescence lifetime of NADH are measured in yeast cells, which is discussed in terms of a local electric field around NADH.

  1. Oscillator strength measurements of atomic absorption lines from stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, Alex

    2011-05-01

    Herein we develop a new method to determine oscillator strength values of atomic absorption lines with state-of-the-art detailed spectral synthesis calculations of the optical spectrum of the Sun and of standard spectral reference stars. We update the log(gf) values of 911 neutral lines observed in the KPNO-FTS flux spectrum of the Sun and high-resolution echelle spectra (R = 80 000) of Procyon (F5 IV-V) and Eps Eri (K2 V) observed with large signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of 2000 using the new Mercator-Hermes spectrograph at La Palma Observatory (Spain). We find for 483 Fe I, 85 Ni I, and 51 Si I absorption lines in the sample a systematic overestimation of the literature log(gf) values with central line depths below 15%. We employ a curve-of-growth analysis technique to test the accuracy of the new oscillator strength values and compare calculated equivalent line widths to the Moore, Minnaert, and Houtgast atlas of the Sun. The online SpectroWeb database at http://spectra.freeshell.org interactively displays the observed and synthetic spectra and provides the new log(gf) values together with important atomic line data. The graphical database is under development for stellar reference spectra of every spectral sub-class observed with large spectral resolution and S/N ratios.

  2. A comprehensive X-ray absorption model for atomic oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Bautista, M. A.; Mendoza, C.; Hasoglu, M. F.; García, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Raassen, A. J. J.; De Vries, C. P.; Kallman, T. R.; Manson, S. T.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-12-10

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of O I for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects, that accurately predict the absorption oscillator strengths below threshold and merge consistently and continuously to the above-threshold cross section. Further, minor adjustments are made to the threshold energies in order to reliably align the atomic Rydberg resonances after consideration of both experimental and observed line positions. At energies far below or above the K-edge region, the formulation is based on both outer- and inner-shell direct photoionization, including significant shake-up and shake-off processes that result in photoionization-excitation and double-photoionization contributions to the total cross section. The ultimate purpose for developing a definitive model for oxygen absorption is to resolve standing discrepancies between the astronomically observed and laboratory-measured line positions, and between the inferred atomic and molecular oxygen abundances in the interstellar medium from XSTAR and SPEX spectral models.

  3. Organic solvents as interferents in arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Dědina, Jiri; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Onor, Massimo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2006-05-01

    Interference effects of various organic solvents miscible with water on arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry have been studied. Arsine was chemically generated in continuous flow hydride generation system and atomized by using a flame atomizer able to operate in two modes: miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-flame. The effects of experimental variables and atomization mode were investigated: tetrahydroborate and hydrochloric acid concentrations, argon, hydrogen and oxygen supply rates for the microflame, and the distance from the atomization region to the observation zone. The nature of the species formed in the flame due to the pyrolysis of organic solvent vapors entering the flame volume together with arsine is discussed. The observed signal depression in the presence of organic solvents has been mainly attributed to the atomization interference due to heterogeneous gas-solid reaction between the free arsenic atoms and finely dispersed carbon particles formed by carbon radicals recombination. The best tolerance to interferences was obtained by using flame-in-flame atomization (5-10 ml min - 1 of oxygen flow rate), together with higher argon and hydrogen supply rates and elevated observation heights.

  4. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  5. Direct analysis of solids by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a second surface atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rettberg, T.M.; Holcombe, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    The direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of solids using the second surface atomizer has been investigated. The atomizer features a gas-cooled Ta insert within the graphite furnace onto which the analyte can be condensed, after which atomization is performed by raising the furnace to a higher temperature and shutting off the coolant gas. The analyses were conducted on standard reference material fly ash, river sediment, and citrus leaves, in addition to filter paper samples. All analyses were conducted without sample pretreatment or use of matrix modifiers. Quantitation was done by using simple aqueous standards. By use of peak heights, the recoveries varied from 81% to 127%, although several determinations were within the certified concentration range. The procedures typically gave low background absorbances and peak shapes that were relatively independent of the original sample matrix.

  6. The role of atomic absorption spectrometry in geochemical exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the principles of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and the basic hardware components necessary to make measurements of analyte concentrations. Then we discuss a variety of methods that have been developed for the introduction of analyte atoms into the light path of the spectrophotometer. This section deals with sample digestion, elimination of interferences, and optimum production of ground-state atoms, all critical considerations when choosing an AAS method. Other critical considerations are cost, speed, simplicity, precision, and applicability of the method to the wide range of materials sampled in geochemical exploration. We cannot attempt to review all of the AAS methods developed for geological materials but instead will restrict our discussion to some of those appropriate for geochemical exploration. Our background and familiarity are reflected in the methods we discuss, and we have no doubt overlooked many good methods. Our discussion should therefore be considered a starting point in finding the right method for the problem, rather than the end of the search. Finally, we discuss the future of AAS relative to other instrumental techniques and the promising new directions for AAS in geochemical exploration. ?? 1992.

  7. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, R. A.; Walker, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties was studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. Included are the development of an apparatus and its use in the studies of (1) chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, tungsten and LaB6 specimens, (2) methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, (3) levitation jet properties and (4) radiative lifetime and collisional energy transfer rates for electronically excited atoms.

  8. Preconcentration and Atomization of Arsane in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge with Detection by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Novák, Petr; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Atomization of arsane in a 17 W planar quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized, and its performance was compared to that of a multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (MMQTA) for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Argon, at a flow rate of 60 mL min(-1), was the best DBD discharge gas. Free As atoms were also observed in the DBD with nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium discharge gases but not in air. A dryer tube filled with NaOH beads placed downstream from the gas-liquid separator to prevent residual aerosol and moisture transport to the atomizer was found to improve the response by 25%. Analytical figures of merit were comparable, reaching an identical sensitivity of 0.48 s ng (-1) As in both atomizers and limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 ng mL(-1) As in MMQTA and 0.16 ng mL(-1) As in DBD, respectively. Compared to MMQTA, DBD provided 1 order of magnitude better resistance to interference from other hydride-forming elements (Sb, Se, and Bi). Atomization efficiency in DBD was estimated to be 100% of that reached in the MMQTA. A simple procedure of lossless in situ preconcentration of arsane was developed. Addition of 7 mL min(-1) O2 to the Ar plasma discharge resulted in a quantitative retention of arsane in the optical arm of the DBD atomizer. Complete analyte release and atomization was reached as soon as oxygen was switched off. Preconcentration efficiency of 100% was observed, allowing a decrease of the LOD to 0.01 ng mL(-1) As employing a 300 s preconcentration period. PMID:27159266

  9. Fluorescence Quenching of Benzaldehyde in Water by Hydrogen Atom Abstraction.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Katharyn; Bunz, Uwe H F; Dreuw, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We computed the mechanism of fluorescence quenching of benzaldehyde in water through relaxed potential energy surface scans. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations along the protonation coordinate from water to benzaldehyde reveal that photoexcitation to the bright ππ* (S3 ) state is immediately followed by ultrafast decay to the nπ* (S1 ) state. Evolving along this state, benzaldehyde (BA) abstracts a hydrogen atom, resulting in a BAH(.) and OH(.) radical pair. Benzaldehyde does not act as photobase in water, but abstracts a hydrogen atom from a nearby solvent molecule. The system finally decays back to the ground state by non-radiative decay and an electron transfers back to the OH(.) radical. Proton transfer from BAH(+) to OH(-) restores the initial situation, BA in water. PMID:27305520

  10. Simultaneous Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Cadmium and Lead Determination in Wastewater: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead by multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with electrochemical atomization is proposed by employing a problem-based approach. The reports indicate that the students assimilated the principles of the simultaneous atomic absorption spectrometry (SIMAAS), the role of the chemical modifier, the…

  11. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry determination of molybdenum in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguera, J. L.; Rondón, C.; Burguera, M.; Roa, M. E.; Petit de Peña, Y.

    2002-03-01

    A method for the determination of molybdenum in whole blood by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was developed and evaluated. Erbium (25 μg) was chosen from several potential chemical modifiers (Sm, Lu, Ho, Eu and Pd+Mg) as the most appropriate for the sensitive and reliable determination of molybdenum in such sample. The process used was direct dilution of the sample in a ratio 1:2 with a 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100 solution. The injection of 20 μl of a solution of 15% (w/v) hydrogen peroxide and running the temperature program after 5 firings greatly reduced the effect of build-up of carbonaceous residues within the atomizer. The limit of detection and working ranges, respectively, were 0.6 and 2.0-100.0 μg l -1, and the characteristic mass was 7.2 pg. The relative standard deviation varied from 0.8 to 1.5% for within and between batch determinations, respectively. The determination of molybdenum in Seronorm™ Trace Elements in Whole Blood with known added amounts of the analyte was performed to asses the accuracy. The optimized procedure has been applied to the determination of molybdenum in whole blood specimens of 20 subjects taken before and 10-12 h after receiving an over-supply of 1 mg of molybdenum. The molybdenum concentrations (±S.D.) were 10.9±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 9.9-11.6 μg Mo l -1) and 15.4±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 13.1-16.9 μg Mo l -1) for the individuals before and after the administration of molybdenum.

  12. Modular L-design of hydride atomizers for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řezáčová, Olga; Dědina, Jiří

    2009-07-01

    A novel modular L-shaped design of hydride atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry is described. It makes it possible to replace the optical tube of the atomizer and, mainly, to employ optical tubes made also from other materials than fused quartz. The design is useful mainly for further improvement of hydride atomizers based on the multiatomizer concept. Employing selenium hydride as the analyte and arsine as the interferent, a preliminary evaluation of performance of three types of L-shaped multiatomizers based on various optical tubes in terms of sensitivity, linearity of calibration graph and resistance to atomization interferences is made. The "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer was employed as a reference. The L-shaped multiatomizer with the optical tube analogous to that employed in the "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer offers virtually the same performance as the reference multiatomizer. Optical tube made of fused quartz with holes with smaller diameters does not offer significantly better performance compared to the reference T-shaped multiatomizer. However, the L-shaped multiatomizer with optical tube fabricated from porous quartz glass overpowers all the other multiatomizers substantially in terms of the resistance against interferences: even the maximum As interferent concentration of 5 µg ml - 1 does not significantly influence the observed signal. This should be compared with multiatomizers based on plain fused quartz tubes with holes: tolerance limit around 0.5 µg ml - 1 ; interferent concentration of 1 µg ml - 1 causing 20% signal depression.

  13. pH-Induced changes in electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of phenazine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazanova, O. A.; Voloshin, I. M.; Makitruk, V. L.; Zozulya, V. N.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2007-04-01

    The visible electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence polarization degrees of imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F1), 2-methylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F2), 2-trifluoridemethylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F3), 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F4) and their glycosides, imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine-N1-β- D-ribofuranoside (F1rib), 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine-N1-β- D-glucopyranoside (F4gl), were investigated in aqueous buffered solutions over the pH range of 0-12, where the spectral transformations were found to be reversible. The effects of protonation and deprotonation on spectral properties of these dyes were studied. We have determined the ranges of pH, where individual ionic species are predominant. In aqueous buffered solutions the fluorescence was found only for neutral species of F1, F1rib, F2, and F4gl dyes, whereas for the ionic forms of these dyes, as well as for F3 and F4 ones, the fluorescence has not been detected. The concentrational deprotonation p Ka values were evaluated from experimental data. It was shown that donor-acceptor properties of the substituent group in the second position of the pentagonal ring substantially affect the values of the deprotonation constants and the character of protonation for chromophore. The substitution of a hydrogen atom in the NH-group by the sugar residue blocks the formation of the anionic species, and results in enhancement of the dye emission intensity. The steep emission dependence for F1 and F1rib over pH range of 0-7 with intensities ratio of IpH 7/ IpH 1 = 60 allows us to propose them as possible indicator dyes in luminescence based pH sensors for investigation of processes accompanied by acidification, e.g. as gastric pH-sensors. A comparative analysis of the studied dyes has shown that F4gl is the most promising compound to be used as a fluorescent probe for investigation of molecular hybridization of nucleic acids.

  14. Evidence for excitation of fluorescence in RPE melanin by multiphoton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Denton, Michael L.

    2002-06-01

    Previously, we reported that ultrashort, near infrared (NIR) laser pulses caused more DNA breakage in cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells than did CW, NIR laser radiation delivering a similar radiant exposure. We hypothesized that this difference was due to multiphoton absorption in an intracellular chromophore such as the RPE melanin. We investigated two-photon excitation of fluorescence in a suspension of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes exposed to a 1-KHz train of approximately 50- fsec laser pulses at 810 nm from a Ti:Sapphire laser, and compared this to the fluorescence excited by CW exposures at 406 nm from a Krypton ion laser. Fluorescence was measured with a PC-based spectrometer. The CW sources excited fluorescence with a peak at 525 nm. The fluorescence intensity depended on the irradiance of the sample, as well as the melanosome concentration. Peak fluorescence was obtained with a suspension of ~2 x 107 melanin granules/ml. The 810-nm, ultrashort pulses also excited fluorescence, but with a broader, lower-amplitude peak. The weaker fluorescence signal excited by the 810-nm ultrashort pulse laser for a given melanosome concentration, compared to 406-nm CW excitation, is possibly due to the smaller two- photon absorption cross-section. These results indicate the involvement of multiphoton absorption in DNA damage.

  15. Quantitative absorption and fluorescence studies of NO between 1060 and 2000 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, J. A.; Lee, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation in the 1060 to 2000 A region was used to measure the average absorption and fluorescence cross sections of NO and to determine approximate photodissociation quantum yields. Several vibrational levels of the D(2) sigma(+), E(2) sigma(+), and B(2) delta states have high fluorescence quantum yields. The C(2) and B(2) states do not fluoresce when the excitation energies are above the first dissociation limit, in accord with previous experiments. In general, the fluorescence yields decrease with increasing photon energy. The quantitative measurements are compared with spectroscopic observations and are found to be reasonably consistent.

  16. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l- 1 and 1.0 ng l- 1, respectively.

  17. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  18. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific, real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of the sensors are strongly affected by the long-term and short term baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability which has not been previously considered or corrected by existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5%, which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  19. Photoadaptation in marine phytoplankton: changes in spectral absorption and excitation of chlorophyll a fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Neori, A.; Holm-Hansen, O.; Mitchell, B.G.; Kiefer, D.A.

    1984-10-01

    The optical properties of marine phytoplankton were examined by measuring the absorption spectra and fluorescence excitation spectra of chlorophyll a for natural marine particles collected on glass fiber filters. Samples were collected at different depths from stations in temperate waters of the Southern California Bight and in polar waters of the Scotia and Ross Seas. At all stations, phytoplankton fluorescence excitation and absorption spectra changed systematically with depth and vertical stability of the water columns. In samples from deeper waters, both absorption and chlorophyll a fluorescence excitation spectra showed enhancement in the blue-to-green portion of the spectrum (470-560 nm) relative to that at 440 nm. Since similar changes in absorption and excitation were induced by incubating sea water samples at different light intensities, the changes in optical properties can be attributed to photoadaptation of the phytoplankton. The data indicate that in the natural populations studied, shade adaptation caused increases in the concentration of photosynthetic accessory pigments relative to chlorophyll a. These changes in cellular pigment composition were detectable within less than 1 day. Comparisons of absorption spectra with fluorescence excitation spectra indicate an apparent increase in the efficiency of sensitization of chlorophyll a fluorescence in the blue and green spectral regions for low light populations. 30 references, 6 figures.

  20. Characterization and measurement results of fluorescence in absorption optical filter glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichel, S.; Biertümpfel, R.; Engel, A.

    2015-09-01

    Optical filter glasses (absorption filters) are for example used for spectroscopy. The filter glass absorbs the unwanted light and has a nearly angle independent spectral characteristic. The absorbed light can lead to (self-) fluorescence, i. e. the filter glass itself re-emits fluorescence light at a different wavelength - compared to the incident (excitation) light. This fluorescence light can disturb the measurement signal. In order to obtain an optimized optical design the fluorescence properties of the glasses must be known. By knowing fluorescence properties one can design a system with a good signal-to-noise ratio. We will present our measurement set-up for fluorescence measurements of optical filter glass. This set-up was used to obtain fluorescence measurement results for different optical filter glasses. For the first time we present results on the fluorescence level for different optical filter glasses. In addition the effect of excitation wavelength on the fluorescence level will be studied. Besides other factors, fluorescence depends on impurities of the raw material of the glass melt. Due to small fluctuations of the raw material used for the glass production the fluorescence of the same filter glass type can fluctuate from melt-to-melt. Thus, results from different melts will be shown for the same filter glass type.

  1. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge with excitation of high current and microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp: Ca atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhen-bin; Liang, Feng; Yang, Peng-yuan; Jin, Qin-han; Huang, Ben-li

    2002-02-01

    A system of atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch (MPT) discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL) has been developed. The operation conditions for Ca atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry have been optimized. Compared with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in argon microwave induced plasma (MIP) and MPT with the excitation of direct current and conventional pulsed HCL, the system with HCMP HCL excitation can improve AFS and ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) detection limits in MPT atomizer and ionizer. Detection limits (3 sigma) with HCMP HCL-MPT-AFS/IFS are 10.1 ng.mL-1 for Ca I 422.7 nm, 14.6 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 393.4 nm, and 37.4 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 396.8 nm, respectively. PMID:12940030

  2. Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Samuel M.; Richardson, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  3. Determination of total tin in environmental biological and water samples by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Dogan, S; Haerdi, W

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of traces of tin using several analytical techniques (X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, polarographic techniques and atomic absorption) have been tested. Parameters such as simplicity, rapidity, sensitivity and interferences are compared in order to choose the most useful method for practical purpose. Finally, flameless atomic absorption was chosen for the determination of total tin concentration in different natural samples. Digestion of biological samples (plant, plankton, fish, etc.) was achieved by using Lumatom (a trade organic chemical). Thus, the digested sample is directly injected into the graphite furnace. This digestion technique is suitable and rapid with a minimum of error (contamination and losses). For tin analysis in water samples, a preconcentration of tin is carried out by coprecipitation with 1, 10-phenanthroline and tetraphenyl boron. The precipitate is separated and dissolved in alcohol or in Lumatom. The sensitivity of this method is 0.1 ng absolute tin. PMID:7451013

  4. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities. PMID:17059261

  5. Vibronic Structures in Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of Firefly Oxyluciferin in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Miyabi; Noguchi, Yoshifumi; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Yamada, Kenta; Koga, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the factors determining the spectral shapes and widths of the absorption and fluorescence spectra for keto and enol oxyluciferin and their conjugate bases in aqueous solutions, the intensities of vibronic transitions between their ground and first electronic excited states were calculated for the first time via estimation of the vibrational Franck-Condon factors. The major normal modes, overtones and combination tones in absorption and fluorescence spectra are similar for all species. The theoretical full widths at half maximum of absorption spectra are 0.4-0.7 eV and those for the fluorescence spectra are 0.4-0.5 eV, except for phenolate-keto that exhibits exceptionally sharp peak widths due to the dominance of the 0-0' or 0'-0 band. These spectral shapes and widths explain many relevant features of the experimentally observed spectra. PMID:25946599

  6. Determination of gold in geologic materials by solvent extraction and atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Claude; Mensik, J.D.; Riley, L.B.

    1967-01-01

    The two methods presented for the determination of traces of gold in geologic materials are the cyanide atomic-absorption method and the fire-assay atomic-absorption method. In the cyanide method gold is leached with a sodium-cyanide solution. The monovalent gold is then oxidized to the trivalent state and concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to estimation by atomic absorption. In the fire-assay atomic-absorption method, the gold-silver bead obtained from fire assay is dissolved in nitric and hydrochloric acids. Gold is then concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to determination by atomic absorption. By either method concentrations as low as 50 parts per billion of gold can be determined in a 15-gram sample.

  7. Shape of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of condensed phases and transition energies.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Miguel; Paredes, Rodrigo

    2014-11-13

    General integral expressions for the temperature-dependent profile of the spectral lines of photon absorption and emission by atomic or molecular species in a condensed environment are derived with no other hypothesis than: (a) The acoustic vibrational modes of the condensed host medium constitute the thermodynamic energy reservoir at a given constant temperature, and local electronic transitions modifying the equilibrium configuration of the surroundings are multiphonon events, regardless of the magnitude of the transition energy. (b) Electron-phonon coupling is linear in the variations of the bond length. The purpose is to develop a theoretical tool for the analysis of the spectra, allowing us to grasp highly accurate information from fitting the theoretical line shape function to experiment, including those spectra displaying wide features. The method is illustrated by applying it to two dyes, Lucifer Yellow CH and Coumarin 1, which display fluorescence maxima of 0.41 and 0.51 eV fwhm. Fitting the theoretical curves to the spectra indicates that the neat excitation energies are 2.58 eV ± 2.5% and 3.00 eV ± 2.0%, respectively. PMID:25321927

  8. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cozzo, Cedric; Martin, Matthias; Grolimund, Daniel; Mieszczynski, Cyprian

    2013-06-01

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg-1) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (˜0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am3+ species within an [AmO8]13- coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (<10%) Am(IV) or (V) can be detected in the rim zone. The occurrence of americium dioxide is avoided by the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix.

  9. Absorption-free Bragg reflector using Zeeman sublevels in atomic vapor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongjie; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2014-06-30

    Absorption-free Bragg reflector has been studied in ions doped in crystals. We propose a new scheme using Zeeman sublevels of atoms to construct an absorption-free Bragg reflector with practical laser power. Its spatial period of refractive index equals half of the wavelength of the incident standing-wave coupling light. The proposal is simulated in a helium atom scheme, and can be extended to alkali earth atoms. PMID:24977814

  10. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W; Marzouk, A; Crisostomo, M C; Weatherby, D R

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use of a "Stomacher" blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15 percent, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8 percent (mean +/- SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung greater than heart greater than bone greater than kidney greater than brain greater than testis greater than fat greater than liver greater than spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl2 (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 micrograms per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 micrograms per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl2-treated rats rank as follows: kidney much greater than lung greater than spleen greater than testis greater than heart greater than fat greater than liver greater than bone greater than brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4037701

  11. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Marzouk, A.; Crisostomo, M.C.; Weatherby, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use by a Stomacher blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15%, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8% (mean +/-SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung > heart > bone > kidney > brain > testis > fat > liver > spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 ..mu..g per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 ..mu..g per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl/sub 2/-treated rats rank as follows: kidney >> lung > spleen > testis > heart > fat > liver > bone > brain. The present method fills the need for an accurate, sensitive, and practical technique to determine tissue Ni concentrations, with stringent precautions to minimize Ni contamination during tissue sampling and processing. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  12. Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements of neutral density in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, M. E.; Magee, R. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup −1}) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. Here, we describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the DIII-D tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished with a single lens through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and we present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible. Time resolved measurements also allow us to explore the evolution of the neutral hydrogen density and temperature and effects of wall recycling. We find that the atomic neutral density grows rapidly at the initiation of the discharge, reaching the steady-state value within 1 ms. Additionally, we find that neutral hydrogen atoms are born with 0.08 eV temperatures, not 2 eV as is typically assumed.

  13. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M.; Specht, Christian G.; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  14. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M; Specht, Christian G; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  15. Self-absorption Effects on Alpha-Induced Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelor, Paula P.; Jordan, David V.; Harper, Warren W.; Cannon, Bret D.; Finn, Erin C.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrogen fluorescence induced by alpha, beta and gamma radiation can be used to detect the presence of radioactive contamination in the environment. Successful measurement of fluorescence yield involves a number of factors, including: known fluorescence signal rate during the measurement; the effective alpha spectrum of the radioactive sources used in the measurement; optical attenuation length of the fluorescence signal in air during the measurement; the absolute throughput of the instrumentation; calibration of the instrumentation; and radiation transport modeling of the "effective" array exposure rate given the spectrum of the alpha particles. Field testing of optical instrumentation was conducted to measure the nitrogen fluorescence yield from the alpha radiation generated from americium-241 (241Am) decay. The 241Am test sources were prepared by direct evaporation of ~1 mCi in nitric acid solution, and some solids were visible on the surface of the sources. A laboratory study was conducted with lower activities of 241Am to determine whether the presence of solids on the surface of the sources prepared both by direct evaporation and by electrodeposition onto stainless steel disks produced sufficient self-absorption to cause a decrease in expected fluorescence. Alpha spectroscopy was used to determine the apparent activity of the sources versus the known activity deposited on the surface. Results from the self-absorption laboratory studies were used to correct the activity values in the model and calculate the nitrogen fluorescence generated by the 241Am during the field experiments.

  16. Atomic-fluorescence analysis of materials using a lamp-pumped dye LZhI laser as an excitation source

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, L.K.; Loshin, A.F.; Nikiforov, V.G.; Sterlyadkina, E.A.

    1987-12-01

    The use of frequency-tunable dye lasers in atomic-fluorescence analysis has made it possible to lower significantly the limits of detection for most elements. In this work the commercially produced lamp-pumped dye lasers of the type LZhI were used as the excitation source, which made it possible, first of all, to simplify the design of the atomic-fluorescence spectrometer by eliminating the frequency doubling of the laser radiation and, second, to study the analytical possibilities of commercially produced dye lasers with microsecond lasing. The authors studied solutions of sodium, barium, potassium, calcium, nickel, cobalt, copper, and molybdenum salts. These elements were chosen based on the fact that they have absorption lines with different degrees of intensity in the region of generation of the most efficient rhodamine 6G dye laser.

  17. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  18. Uranium isotopes quantitatively determined by modified method of atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. H.

    1967-01-01

    Hollow-cathode discharge tubes determine the quantities of uranium isotopes in a sample by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dissociation of the uranium atoms allows a large number of ground state atoms to be produced, absorbing the incident radiation that is different for the two major isotopes.

  19. Near resonant absorption by atoms in intense fluctuating laser fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this program was to make quantitative measurements of the effects of higher-order phase/frequency correlations in a laser beam on nonlinear optical absorption processes in atoms. The success of this program was due in large part to a unique experimental capability for modulating the extracavity beam of a stabilized ({approx_lt}200 kHz) continuous-wave laser with statistically-well-characterized stochastic phase (or frequency) fluctuations, in order to synthesize laser bandwidths to {approximately}20 MHz (depending on noise amplitude), with profiles variable between Gaussian and Lorentzian (depending on noise bandwidth). Laser driven processes investigated included the following: (1) the optical Autler-Towns effect in the 3S{sub 1/2} (F = 2, M{sub F} = 2) {yields} 3P{sub 3/2} (F = 3, M{sub F} = 3) two- level Na resonance, using a weak probe to the 4D{sub 5/2} level; (2) the variance and spectra of fluorescence intensity fluctuations in the two-level Na resonance; (3) the Hanle effect in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {minus} {sup 3}P{sub 1}, transition at {lambda} = 555.6 nm in {sup 174} Yb; (4) absorption (and gain) of a weak probe, when the probe is a time-delayed replica of the resonant (with the two-level Na transition) pump laser; and (5) four-wave-mixing in a phase-conjugate geometry, in a sodium cell, and, finally, in a diffuse atomic sodium beam. The experimental results from these several studies have provided important confirmation of advanced theoretical methods.

  20. Fluorescence, Absorption, and Excitation Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Figueroa, A. M.; Ramazan, K. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of the interplay between absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is conducted. The study of five PAH displays the correlation of the above-mentioned properties along with the associated molecular changes.

  1. [The measurement and analysis of visible-absorption spectrum and fluorescence spectrum of lycopene].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-zhan; Li, Ping; Dai, Song-hui; Wu, Da-cheng; Li, Rui-xia; Yang, Jian-hui; Xiao, Hai-bo

    2005-11-01

    Using ICCD spectral detection system, the absorbency of lycopene-carbon bisulfide solution with different concentration was measured, and the result shows that in a specified range the absorption rule of lycopene solution agrees with Lambert-Beer Law. Absorption spectral wavelength shifts were measured respectively when lycopene was dissolved in acetone, normal hexane, petroleum ether, benzene, ethyl acetate, and carbon bisulfide, and comparing to acetone, different red-shift appeared when lycopene was dissolved in benzene, ethyl acetate, and carbon bisulfide when water was added in lycopene-acetone solution, t he absorbency of lycopene dropped, the fine structure of absorption spectrum became indistinct, and a new absorption peak appeared in UV. The reason for these phenomena is that the solvent molecule had different effect on lycopene molecule when lycopene was dissolved in different solvent. Using fluorecence spectrophotometer, fluorescence spectra of lycopene in different concentrations were collected, and the results show that the fluorescence spectra of lycopene were mainly in 500-680 nm. When concentration was lower than 50 microg x mL(-1), the fluorescence intensity linearly increased with increasing concentration, and when concentration was higher than 60 microg x mL(-1), the fluorescence intensity dropped because of the interaction between lycopene molecules. PMID:16499057

  2. Orthogonal spectra and cross sections: Application to optimization of multi-spectral absorption and fluorescence lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the problem of selection of lidar parameters, namely wavelengths for absorption lidar and excitation fluorescence pairs for fluorescence lidar, for optimal detection of species. Orthogonal spectra and cross sections are used as mathematical representations which provide a quantitative measure of species distinguishability in mixtures. Using these quantities, a simple expression for the absolute error in calculated species concentration is derived and optimization is accomplished by variation of lidar parameters to minimize this error. It is shown that the optimum number of wavelengths for detection of a species using absorption lidar (excitation fluorescence pairs for fluorescence lidar) is the same as the number of species in the mixture. Each species present in the mixture has its own set of optimum wavelengths. There is usually some overlap in these sets. The optimization method is applied to two examples, one using absorption and the other using fluorescence lidar, for analyzing mixtures of four organic compounds. The effect of atmospheric attenuation is included in the optimization process. Although the number of optimum wavelengths might be small, it is essential to do large numbers of measurements at these wavelengths in order to maximize canceling of statistical errors.

  3. Evaluation of electrochemical generation of volatile zinc hydride by heated quartz tube atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad-Hossein; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Youssefi, Abbas; Aliakbari, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG) as a sample introduction system for determination of zinc was developed. It was directly coupled to an electrically heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) system. The hydride generator is a laboratory-made semi-batch electrolytic cell that consists of a lead-tin alloy cathode and a platinum anode. The effects of typical parameters on the generation efficiency of the technique, such as types of cathode material and catholyte and anolyte solutions, were studied. The influences of numerical experimental operating parameters on the analytical signal were evaluated in detail and optimum conditions were obtained. The analytical figures of merit for the developed method were determined. The calibration curve was linear up to 300 ng mL(-1) of Zn. A concentration detection limit (3σ, n = 9) of 11 ng mL(-1) Zn and a relative standard deviation of 5.0% (RSD, n = 9) for 200 ng mL(-1) Zn were accessed. In addition, the susceptibility of interference from various ions was evaluated. The accuracy of the method was verified by determination of Zn in a certified reference material and in tap water. The achieved concentrations were found to be in good agreement with both the certified value and the data obtained using flame AAS. PMID:22790376

  4. Atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials by use of electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, E.Y.; Simon, F.O.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for the atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials, that utilizes electrothermal atomization after a separation by solvent extraction. Samples are decomposed with hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid in Teflon-lined pressure decomposition vessels. Beryllium is isolated by its extraction as beryllium acetylacetonate at pH 8 into xylene and back-extraction in 3M hydrochloric acid. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of beryllium in 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. Four subsamples from four bottles of each standard sample were analysed in random order. The mean beryllium contents (ppm) are: AGV-1, 1.98; PCC-1, 0.024; MAG-1, 2.84; BHVO-1, 0.90; DTS-1, 0.026; SCo-1, 1.74; SDC-1, 2.52; BCR-1, 1.44; GSP-1, 1.22; SGR-1, 0.86; QLO-1, 1.83; RGM-1, 2.21; STM-1, 8.75; G-2, 2.29. An analysis of variance shows that all the samples may be considered homogeneous at F0.95 except AGV-1 and DTS-1 which may be considered homogeneous at F0.99. ?? 1978.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  6. Experimental recovery of intrinsic fluorescence and fluorophore concentration in the presence of hemoglobin: spectral effect of scattering and absorption on fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Patterson, Michael S.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Fang, Qiyin

    2015-12-01

    The ability to recover the intrinsic fluorescence of biological fluorophores is crucial to accurately identify the fluorophores and quantify their concentrations in the media. Although some studies have successfully retrieved the fluorescence spectral shape of known fluorophores, the techniques usually came with heavy computation costs and did not apply for strongly absorptive media, and the intrinsic fluorescence intensity and fluorophore concentration were not recovered. In this communication, an experimental approach was presented to recover intrinsic fluorescence and concentration of fluorescein in the presence of hemoglobin (Hb). The results indicated that the method was efficient in recovering the intrinsic fluorescence peak and fluorophore concentration with an error of 3% and 10%, respectively. The results also suggested that chromophores with irregular absorption spectra (e.g., Hb) have more profound effects on fluorescence spectral shape than chromophores with monotonic absorption and scattering spectra (e.g., black India ink and polystyrene microspheres).

  7. DETERMINATION OF TOTAL MERCURY IN FISH TISSUES USING PYROLYSIS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH GOLD AMALGAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid procedure for measuring total mercury in fish tissues is evaluated and
    compared with conventional techniques. Using an automated instrument incorporating combustion, preconcentration by amalgamation with gold, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), mill...

  8. THE STANDARD CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER. PART III: PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains complete documentation for the 15 programs and 11 data files of the EPA Atomic Absorption Instrument Automation System. The system incorporates the following major features: (1) multipoint calibration using first, second, or third degree regression or linear ...

  9. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan; Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  10. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Geon Joon Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-14

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  11. The photophysics of phenylenevinylene oligomers and self-absorption of their fluorescence in polymer films.

    PubMed

    Winch, Nicola M; Smith, Gerald J; Breukers, Robert D; Bhuiyan, Delower H; Kay, Andrew J; Smith, Trevor A; Ghiggino, Kenneth P; Raymond, Sebastiampillai G

    The fluorescence spectra, quantum yields and lifetimes of a series of alkoxy-substituted phenylenevinylene molecules, which serve as short chain oligomer models for poly(p-phenylenevinylene), have been determined in fluid solvents and in a high viscosity polymer matrix. The effects of solvent polarity and a high viscosity molecular environment on the fluorescence yields and spectral shapes have been established. Alkoxy group substitution on the phenyl ring moieties of the molecules has an important effect on the vibronic structures and profiles of the absorption spectra. This was interpreted in terms of hot-band, ground to excited singlet state transitions from energetically closely-spaced torsional vibrational levels of the vinylene double bond in the ground state. The shapes of the absorption bands affect the overlaps of the absorption and fluorescence spectra. This has been quantified as the probability of fluorescence reabsorption in solid polymer films as a function of pathlength. This is an important determinant of the efficacies of these compounds for "harvesting" solar energy in luminescent solar concentrator systems. The reabsorption probabilities of these compounds are lower for all pathlengths than those determined in the same polymer film for the fluorophores, perylene and perylene diimide, which have been considered for concentrating spatially diffuse sunlight. PMID:27480331

  12. In situ phytoplankton absorption, fluorescence emission, and particulate backscattering spectra determined from reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roesler, Collin S.; Pery, Mary Jane

    1995-01-01

    An inverse model was developed to extract the absortion and scattering (elastic and inelastic) properties of oceanic constituents from surface spectral reflectance measurements. In particular, phytoplankton spectral absorption coefficients, solar-stimulated chlorophyll a fluorescence spectra, and particle backscattering spectra were modeled. The model was tested on 35 reflectance spectra obtained from irradiance measurements in optically diverse ocean waters (0.07 to 25.35 mg/cu m range in surface chlorophyll a concentrations). The universality of the model was demonstrated by the accurate estimation of the spectral phytoplankton absorption coefficents over a range of 3 orders of magnitude (rho = 0.94 at 500 nm). Under most oceanic conditions (chlorophyll a less than 3 mg/cu m) the percent difference between measured and modeled phytoplankton absorption coefficents was less than 35%. Spectral variations in measured phytoplankton absorption spectra were well predicted by the inverse model. Modeled volume fluorescence was weakly correlated with measured chl a; fluorescence quantum yield varied from 0.008 to 0.09 as a function of environment and incident irradiance. Modeled particle backscattering coefficients were linearly related to total particle cross section over a twentyfold range in backscattering coefficents (rho = 0.996, n = 12).

  13. Application of blood cadmium analysis to industry using an atomic fluorescence method.

    PubMed Central

    Fell, G S; Ottaway, J M; Hussein, F E

    1977-01-01

    A flame photometric method using atomic fluorescence (AFS) for cadmium (Cd) estimation is described and applied to the measurement of Cd in blood. The AFS system employs a modified, low cost atomic absorption spectrophotometer, with a high intensity Cd light source provided by an electrodeless discharge tube, excited in a thermostatted microwave cavity. The analytical sensitivity of the technique is sufficient to permit dilution (1 in 5) of blood, before aspiration into the air-hydrogen flame. The method is rapid (25 duplicates/hour), and gives acceptable precision (coefficient of variation within batch 2-5%, between batch 8-1%). The method was applied to a reference population and to three different groups of industrial workers. The reference population had a mean blood concentration of 35-1 nmol Cd/litre. Group 1 (general categories of worker) had 65-2 nmol Cd/1, Group 2 (demolition workers), 137-9 nmol Cd/1, and Group 3 (shipbreakers), 105-9 nmol Cd/1. There was a relationship between increases in blood Cd and in blood Pb which was statistically significant for Group 3. PMID:871440

  14. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3x10(exp 17) and 9x10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  15. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  16. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 times 10 ^{17} and 9 times 10^{17} cm ^{-3}. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  17. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  18. Absorption and Fluorescence Properties of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced by Algae.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tong; Lu, Xiao-lan; Su, Rong-guo; Zhang, Dong-mei

    2015-09-01

    Four kinds of diatom (Chaetoceros curvisetus, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima and Navicula halophile) and two kinds of dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum donghaiense and Gymnodinium) were cultured under laboratory conditions. Variations of optical properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were studied with absorption and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy(EEM) during growth of marine microalgae in incubation experiment. Absorption spectrum revealed absorption coefficient a(355) (CDOM absorption coefficients at 355 nm) of 6 kinds of marine microalgae above increased by 64.8%, 242.3%, 535.1%, 903.2%, 836% and 196.4%, respectively. Simultaneously, the absorption spectral slope (Sg), determined between 270 and 350 nm, representing the size of molecular weight of CDOM and humic-like composition, decreased by 8.7%, 34.6%, 39.4%, 53.1%, 46.7%, and 35.7%, respectively. Applying parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) together with EEM got four components of CDOM: C1(Ex/Em=350(260) nm/450 nm), C2 (Ex/Em=260(430) nm/525 nm), C3 (Ex/Em=325 nm/400 nm) and C4(Ex/Em=275 nm/325 nm), which were relative to three humic-like and one protein-like fluorescent components of Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima and Navicula halophile. In incubation experiment, fluorescence intensity of these four components during growth of Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima increased by, respectively, 8.68, 24.9, 7.19 and 39.8 times, and those of Navicula halophile increased by 2.64, 0.07, 4.39 and 12.4 times, respectively. Significant relationships were found between the fluorescence intensity of four components of CDOM, a(355) and Sg. All results demonstrated that both content and molecular weight of CDOM produced by diatom and dinoflagellate studied in incubation experiment increased, but these two parameters changed more obviously of the diatom than those of dinoflagellate; the proportion of humic-like components in the composition of CDOM

  19. Some interferences in atomic-absorption spectrometry and extraction of iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, M; Kihara, H; Suzuki, M; Takeuchi, T

    1970-09-01

    The effect of complexing agents on the atomic-absorption spectrometry of iron and copper extracts was investigated Thiocyanate complexes gave a marked depression of absorption by iron and copper, especially in fuel-rich flames. Chloride, diethyldithiocarbamate and hydroxyquinoline complexes of iron behaved alike, but differently from the thiocyanate complex. PMID:18960816

  20. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence on O and O{sub 3} in a dc plasma for oxidation of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Knechten, K.; Kniknie, B.J.; Engeln, R.; Swagten, H.J.M.; Koopmans, B.; Sanden, M.C.M. van de; Jonge, W.J.M. de

    2004-11-01

    It has been conjectured that atomic oxygen and ozone can have a great influence on the plasma oxidation of ultrathin aluminum for magnetic tunnel junctions. In order to measure the density of O and ozone, two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements are performed in the dc glow plasma that is used for the oxidation process. It was found that ozone is much more abundantly present compared to atomic oxygen. Using in situ, real-time ellipsometry measurements, we prove that ozone is not directly involved in the oxidation process.

  1. Measurement of aluminum in neuronal tissues using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, K.B.; Evenson, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    Studies characterizing aluminum complexes isolated from neuronal tissues require accurate and precise techniques for aluminum measurement. A solution of 0.01 M nitric acid containing 0.2% Triton X-100 was the optimal diluent for aluminum measurement under the experimental conditions used. Three National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials (SRM) were digested, and the aluminum concentration of each was measured with a Perkin-Elmer 503 atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a Perkin-Elmer HGA 2100 controller. The calculated detection limit of aluminum was 120 pg using 15-..mu..L sample injections (8 ..mu..g/L). Aluminum concentrations present in citrus leaves (SRM 1572), pine needles (SRM 1575), and tomato leaves (SRM 1573) were 100 +- 12 (certified value, 92 +- 15), 522 +- 45 (certified value, 454 +- 30), and 1273 +- 112 (provisional value, 1200) ..mu..g/g, respectively. The within- and between-day precision had coefficients of variation for citrus leaves, pine needles, and tomato leaves of 18 and 12%, 6.3 and 8.6%, and 3.7 and 8.7%, respectively. Aluminum absorbance was enhanced at high pH values and by zinc.

  2. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Degueldre, Claude Cozzo, Cedric; Martin, Matthias; Grolimund, Daniel; Mieszczynski, Cyprian

    2013-06-01

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O₂ lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg⁻¹) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (~0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am³⁺ species within an [AmO₈]¹³⁻ coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (<10%) Am(IV) or (V) can be detected in the rim zone. The occurrence of americium dioxide is avoided by the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix. - Graphical abstract: Americium LIII XAFS spectra recorded for the irradiated MOX sub-sample in the rim zone for a 300 μm×300 μm beam size area investigated over six scans of 4 h. The records remain constant during multi-scan. The analysis of the XAFS signal shows that Am is found as trivalent in the UO₂ matrix. This analytical work shall open the door of very challenging analysis (speciation of fission product and actinides) in irradiated nuclear fuels. - Highlights: • Americium was characterized by microX-ray absorption spectroscopy in irradiated MOX fuel. • The americium redox state as determined from XAS data of irradiated fuel material was Am(III). • In the sample, the Am³⁺ face an AmO₈¹³⁻coordination environment in the (Pu,U)O₂ matrix. • The americium dioxide is reduced by the uranium dioxide matrix.

  3. A high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for near edge absorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stojanoff, V.; Hamalainen, K.; Siddons, D.P.; Hastings, J.B.; Berman, L.E.; Cramer, S.; Smith, G.

    1991-01-01

    A high resolution fluorescence spectrometer using a Johann geometry in a back scattering arrangement was developed. The spectrometer, with a resolution of 0.3 eV at 6.5 keV, combined with an incident beam, with a resolution of 0.7 eV, form the basis of a high resolution instrument for measuring x-ray absorption spectra. The advantages of the instrument are illustrated with the near edge absorption spectrum of dysprosium nitrate. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  4. A high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for near edge absorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stojanoff, V.; Hamalainen, K.; Siddons, D.P.; Hastings, J.B.; Berman, L.E.; Cramer, S.; Smith, G.

    1991-12-31

    A high resolution fluorescence spectrometer using a Johann geometry in a back scattering arrangement was developed. The spectrometer, with a resolution of 0.3 eV at 6.5 keV, combined with an incident beam, with a resolution of 0.7 eV, form the basis of a high resolution instrument for measuring x-ray absorption spectra. The advantages of the instrument are illustrated with the near edge absorption spectrum of dysprosium nitrate. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  5. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF PHOSPHORUS IN GASOLINE BY FLAMELESS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new method is presented for the determination of phosphorus in gasoline using flameless atomic absorption. Lanthanum nitrate solution is inserted in a graphite furnace prior to direct addition of gasoline. The organic matrix is charred prior to atomization of the phosphorus. Th...

  6. Spectral signatures of fluorescence and light absorption to identify crude oils found in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2014-08-01

    To protect the natural marine ecosystem, it is necessary to continuously enhance knowledge of environmental contamination, including oil pollution. Therefore, to properly track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the natural components of seawater, a description of the essential spectral features describing petroleum products is necessary. This study characterises two optically-different types of crude oils (Petrobaltic and Romashkino) - substances belonging to multi-fluorophoric systems. To obtain the spectral features of crude oils, the excitation-emission spectroscopy technique was applied. The fluorescence and light absorption properties for various concentrations of oils at a stabilised temperature are described. Both excitation-emission spectra (EEMs) and absorption spectra of crude oils are discussed. Based on the EEM spectra, both excitation end emission peaks for the wavelengthindependent fluorescence maximum (Exmax/ Emmax) - characteristic points for each type of oil - were identified and compared with the literature data concerning typical marine chemical structures.

  7. Dicyanostilbene-derived two-photon fluorescence dyes with large two-photon absorption cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chibao; Lin, Changhua; Ren, Anxiang; Yang, Nianfa

    2011-12-01

    Four dicyanostilbene-derived two-photon fluorescence (TPF) dyes were synthesized as the model compounds to systematically study the effect of the dicyano and the terminal substituent on the two-photon absorption (TPA). These four compounds ( DSO, DCY, DTO and DPH) exhibit very large two-photon absorption cross sections ( δ). DCY (A- π-A) with the terminal cyano group has especially high fluorescence quantum yield (0.71) and relatively large δ (1480 GM), while DPH (D- π-A) with the substitutedamino group at its terminus possesses the largest δ (2800 GM) and the longest emission wavelength (620 nm). The idealest terminal substituent should not be the alkoxy group but the substitutedamino group. This class of dicyanostilbene dyes possess small molecule size, large δ (830-2800 GM), long-wavelength emission (459-620 nm) and large Stokes shift (80-206 nm), and are ideal chromophores for TPF labels and probes.

  8. Relationship of CDOM fluorescence and absorption on the South West Florida Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conmy, R. N.; Coble, P. G.; Hastings, R. H.

    2005-12-01

    The WFS is a complex subtropical coastal region affected by multiple river systems. In recent years, the southern portion of the shelf has been the focus of much study due to the initiation of persistent harmful algal blooms. During this time, great effort has been put forth in collecting seasonal measurements of CDOM (Colored Dissolved Organic Matter) inherent optical properties via in situ and discrete sampling techniques. This sizeable dataset now allows for establishing robust regional relationships of CDOM fluorescence and absorption. Discussed here will be factors affecting that relationship and how it covaries with chlorophyll and DOC (Dissolve Organic Carbon). This relationship also demonstrates the potential for using in situ CDOM fluorescence measurements from moored locations to provide reliable CDOM absorption values for current bio-optical models.

  9. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (<100W), the helium microwave plasma has been applied to aqueous sample determinations at higher applied powers (>500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as

  10. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  11. Femtosecond, two-photon laser-induced-fluorescence imaging of atomic oxygen in an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jacob B.; Sands, Brian L.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Scofield, James; Gord, James R.

    2015-06-01

    Femtosecond, two-photon-absorption laser-induced-fluorescence (fs-TALIF) spectroscopy is employed to measure space- and time-resolved atomic-oxygen distributions in a nanosecond, repetitively pulsed, externally grounded, atmospheric-pressure plasma jet flowing helium with a variable oxygen admixture. The high-peak-intensity, low-average-energy femtosecond pulses result in increased TALIF signal with reduced photolytic inferences. This allows 2D imaging of absolute atomic-oxygen number densities ranging from 5.8   ×   1015 to 2.0   ×   1012cm-3 using a cooled CCD with an external intensifier. Xenon is used for signal and imaging-system calibrations to quantify the atomic-oxygen fluorescence signal. Initial results highlight a transition in discharge morphology from annular to filamentary, corresponding with a change in plasma chemistry from ozone to atomic oxygen production, as the concentration of oxygen in the feed gas is changed at a fixed voltage-pulse-repetition rate. In this configuration, significant concentrations of reactive oxygen species may be remotely generated by sustaining an active discharge beyond the confines of the dielectric capillary, which may benefit applications that require large concentrations of reactive oxygen species such as material processing or biomedical devices.

  12. Fluorescence upconversion properties of a class of improved pyridinium dyes induced by two-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guibao; Hu, Dawei; Zhao, Xian; Shao, Zongshu; Liu, Huijun; Tian, Yupeng

    2007-06-01

    We report the fluorescence upconversion properties of a class of improved pyridinium toluene- p-sulfonates having donor- π-acceptor (D- π-A) structure under two-photon excitation at 1064 nm. The experimental results show that both the two-photon excited (TPE) fluorescence lifetime and the two-photon pumped (TPP) energy upconversion efficiency were increased with the enhancement of electron-donating capability of the donor in the molecule. It is also indicated that an overlong alkyl group tends to result in a weakened molecular conjugation, leading to a decreased two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section. By choosing the donor, we can obtain a longest fluorescence lifetime of 837 ps, a highest energy upconversion efficiency of ˜6.1%, and a maximum TPA cross-section of 8.74×10 -48 cm 4 s/photon in these dyes.

  13. Arc Jet Flow Properties Determined from Laser- Induced Fluorescence of Atomic Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1997-01-01

    Flow property measurements that were recently acquired in the Ames Research Center Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) arc jet using two-photon Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of atomic nitrogen and oxygen are reported. The measured properties, which include velocity, translational temperature, and species concentration, cover a wide range of facility operation for the 30 cm nozzle. During the tests, the arc jet pressure and input stream composition were maintained at fixed values and the arc current was varied to vary the flow enthalpy. As part of this ongoing effort, a measurement of the two-photon absorption coefficient for the 3p4D(left arrow)2p4S transition of atomic nitrogen was performed, and the measured value is used to convert the relative concentration measurements to absolute values. A flow reactor is used to provide a known temperature line shape profile to deconvolve the laser line width contribution to the translational temperature measurements. Results from the current experiments are compared with previous results obtained using NO-beta line profiles at room temperature and the problem of multimode laser oscillation and its impact on the two-photon excitation line shape are discussed. One figure is attached, and this figure show relative N atom concentration measurements as a function of the arc power. Other measurements have already been acquired and analyzed. The arc jet flow facilities are heavily used in thermal protection material development and evaluation. All hypersonic flight and planetary atmospheric entry vehicles will use materials tested in these arc jet facilities. This poster represents an application of laser-spectroscopic measurements in an important test facility.

  14. Arcjet Flow Properties Determined from Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Atomic Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1997-01-01

    Flow property measurements that were recently acquired in the Ames Research Center Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) arc jet using two-photon Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of atomic nitrogen and oxygen are reported. The measured properties, which include velocity, translational temperature, and species concentration, cover a wide range of facility operation for the 30 cm nozzle. During the tests, the arc jet pressure and input stream composition were maintained at fixed values and the arc current was varied to vary the flow enthalpy. As part of this ongoing effort, a measurement of the two-photon absorption coefficient for the 3p4D<-2p4S transition of atomic nitrogen was performed, and the measured value is used to convert the relative concentration measurements to absolute values. A flow reactor is used to provide a known temperature line shape profile to deconvolve the laser line width contribution to the translational temperature measurements. Results from the current experiments are compared with previous results obtained using NO-Beta line profiles at room temperature and the problem of multimode laser oscillation and its impact on the two-photon excitation line shape are discussed. One figure is attached, and this figure shows relative N atom concentration measurements as a function of the arc power. Other measurements have already been acquired and analyzed. This poster represents an application of laser-spectroscopic measurements in an important test facility. The arc jet flow facilities are heavily used in thermal protection material development and evaluation. All hypersonic flight and planetary atmospheric entry vehicles will use materials tested in these arc jet facilities.

  15. Targeting Inaccurate Atomic Data in the Eta Car Ejecta Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. Vieira; Gull, T. R.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.

    2006-01-01

    The input from the laboratory spectroscopist community has on many occasions helped the analysis of the eta Car spectrum. Our analysis has targeted spectra where improved wavelengths and oscillator strengths are needed. We will demonstrate how experimentally derived atomic data have improved our spectral analysis, and illuminate where more work still is needed.

  16. Determination of cadmium in biodiesel using microemulsion and electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, Adriana S; Silva, Deise G; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare biodiesel microemulsions for the subsequent quantification of cadmium via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The biodiesel samples were prepared using n-propanol as an emulsifier, 10% (v/v) nitric acid as the aqueous phase, and biodiesel. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to determine the microemulsion region with the specified components. The optimized conditions for microemulsion formation were 57.6% (v/v) n-propanol, 21.2% (v/v) biodiesel, and 21.2% (v/v) nitric acid solution. The stability of the microemulsified system was investigated using aqueous and organic standards, and the system was found to be stable for at least 240 min. The applied pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800 and 2000 °C, respectively, and 5 μg of aluminum was used as the chemical modifier. The obtained limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5 μg kg(-1), respectively, and the characteristic mass was 1.6 pg. The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (% R.S.D., n = 10), was 2.5% for a sample with a cadmium concentration of 6.5 μg kg(-1). The accuracy was determined from addition and recovery experiments, with results varying from 93 to 108% recovery. This study demonstrates that the proposed method based on the use of a microemulsion formation in sample preparation can be applied as an efficient alternative for the determination of cadmium in biodiesel by GFAAS. Cadmium determination in biodiesel samples of different origins (soybean, corn, cotton, and sunflower) was evaluated after acid digestion using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, and the obtained results were compared to the results obtained using the proposed method. The paired t test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences. The concentrations of cadmium found ranged from 5.3 to 8.0 μg kg(-1). PMID:25381584

  17. Absorption of infrared radiation by electrons in the field of a neutral hydrogen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical expression for the absorption coefficient is developed from a relationship between the cross-section for inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and the cross-section for electron-atom momentum transfer; it is accurate for those photon frequencies v and temperatures such that hv/kT is small. The determination of the absorption of infrared radiation by free-free transitions of the negative hydrogen ion has been extended to higher temperatures. A simple analytical expression for the absorption coefficient has been derived.

  18. In situ measurement of reactive neutral constituents in the thermosphere by atomic and molecular resonance fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System in combination with in situ atomic and molecular resonance fluorescence techniques can treat the problem of simultaneously determining the absolute density of atomic and molecular species known to control the photochemical structure of the upper atmosphere. Two familities of reactants which can be treated by these techniques are the nitrogen oxygen family and the hydrogen oxygen family.

  19. Optical Resonance Shifts in the Fluorescence of Thermal and Cold Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, S. D.; Ruostekoski, J.; Javanainen, J.; Bourgain, R.; Jennewein, S.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in the fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in a steady-state response in light propagation.

  20. Optical Resonance Shifts in the Fluorescence of Thermal and Cold Atomic Gases.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S D; Ruostekoski, J; Javanainen, J; Bourgain, R; Jennewein, S; Sortais, Y R P; Browaeys, A

    2016-05-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in the fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in a steady-state response in light propagation. PMID:27203321

  1. Experimental and theoretical comparison between absorption, total electron yield, and fluorescence spectra of rare-earth M{sub 5} edges

    SciTech Connect

    Pompa, M.; Flank, A.M.; Lagarde, P.; Rife, J.C.; Stekhin, I.; Nakazawa, M.; Ogasawara, H.; Kotani, A.

    1997-07-01

    Besides the now well-known self-absorption effect, several phenomena related to the multiplet structure of the intermediate state may occur which render x-ray fluorescence different from the true absorption in 3d transition metals at the L edge and at the M{sub 4,5} edges of rare earths. Special selection rules of the radiative de-excitation process play an important role there. We have measured the absorption coefficient of thin films of lanthanum, samarium, and thulium deposited on an aluminum foil, at room temperature, through the simultaneous detection of the transmission, total electron yield, and 150-eV bandwidth fluorescence yield. The latter result shows differences as compared to the other two, and exhibits polarization effects depending upon the angle between incident and outgoing photons. The resonant x-ray fluorescence spectrum is calculated using an atomic model, and then integrated over the emitted energy, to predict the fluorescence yield spectrum. Very good agreement is obtained between the theory and experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Polarized fluorescence and absorption of macroscopically aligned Light Harvesting Complex II.

    PubMed Central

    van Amerongen, H; Kwa, S L; van Bolhuis, B M; van Grondelle, R

    1994-01-01

    Polarized absorption and fluorescence measurements have been performed at 77 K on isotropic and anisotropic preparations of trimeric Light Harvesting Complex II (LHC-II) from spinach. The results enable a decomposition of the absorption spectrum into components parallel and perpendicular to the trimeric plane. For the first time, it is shown quantitatively that the strong absorption band around 676 nm is polarized essentially parallel to the plane of the trimer, i.e., the average angle between the corresponding transition dipole moments and this plane is at most 12 degrees. The different absorption bands for LHC-II should not be considered as corresponding to individual pigments but to collective excitations of different pigments. Nevertheless, the average angle between the Qy transition dipole moments of all chlorophyll a pigments in LHC-II and the trimeric plane could be determined and was found to be 17.5 degrees +/- 2.5 degrees. For the chlorophyll b pigments, this angle is significantly larger (close to 35 degrees). At 77 K, most of the fluorescence stems from a weak band above 676 nm and the corresponding transition dipole moments are oriented further out of plane than the dipole moments corresponding to the 676-nm band. The results are shown to be of crucial significance for understanding the relation between the LHC-II structure and its spectroscopy. PMID:7948696

  3. Resonance fluorescence and quantum jumps in single atoms: Testing the randomness of quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Erber, T.; Hammerling, P.; Hockney, G.; Porrati, M.; Putterman, S.

    1989-03-01

    When a single trapped /sup 198/Hg/sup +/ ion is illuminated by two lasers,each tuned to an approximate transition, the resulting fluorescence switches/ital on/ and /ital off/ in a series of pulses resembling a bistable telegraph.This intermittent fluorescence can also be obtained by optical pumpingwith a single laser. Quantum jumps between successive atomic levels may betraced directly with multiple-resonance fluorescence. Atomic transition ratesand photon antibunching distributions can be inferred from the pulse statisticsand compared with quantum theory. Stochastic tests also indicate that thequantum telegraphs are good random number generators. During periods whenthe fluorescence is switched /ital off/, the radiationless atomic currentsthat generate the telegraph signals can be adjusted by varying the laserillumination: if this coherent evolution of the wave functions is sustainedover sufficiently long time intervals, novel /ital interactive/ precisionmeasurements, near the limits of the time-energy uncertainty relations, arepossible./copyright/ 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

  4. Gold volatile species atomization and preconcentration in quartz devices for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Yasin; Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Kratzer, Jan; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The on-line atomization of gold volatile species was studied and the results were compared with thermodynamic calculations in several quartz atomizers, namely: diffusion flame, flame-in-gas-shield, flame-in-plain-tube, externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. Atomization mechanism in the explored devices is proposed, where volatile species are converted to thermodynamically stable AuH at elevated temperature over 500 °C and then atomized by an interaction with a cloud of hydrogen radicals. Because of its inherent simplicity and robustness, diffusion flame was employed as a reference atomizer. It yielded atomization efficiency of 70 to 100% and a very good long time reproducibility of peak area sensitivity: 1.6 to 1.8 s μg- 1. Six and eleven times higher sensitivity, respectively, was provided by atomizers with longer light paths in the observation volume, i.e. externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. The latter one, offering limit of detection below 0.01 μg ml- 1, appeared as the most prospective for on-line atomization. Insight into the mechanism of atomization of gold volatile species, into the fate of free atoms and into subsequent analyte transfer allowed to assess possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species: it is unfeasible with quartz atomizers but a sapphire tube atomizer could be useful in this respect.

  5. Real-time atomic absorption mercury continuous emission monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamzow, Daniel S.; Bajic, Stanley J.; Eckels, David E.; Baldwin, David P.; Winterrowd, Chris; Keeney, Robert

    2003-08-01

    A continuous emission monitor (CEM) for mercury (Hg) in combustor flue gas streams has been designed and tested for the detection of Hg by optical absorption. A sampling system that allows continuous introduction of stack gas is incorporated into the CEM, for the sequential analysis of elemental and total Hg. A heated pyrolysis tube is used in the system to convert oxidized Hg compounds to elemental Hg for analysis of total Hg; the pyrolysis tube is bypassed to determine the elemental Hg concentration in the gas stream. A key component of the CEM is a laboratory-designed and -assembled echelle spectrometer that provides simultaneous detection of all of the emission lines from a Hg pen lamp, which is used as the light source for the optical absorption measurement. This feature allows for on-line spectroscopic correction for interferent gases such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, typically present in combustion stack gas streams, that also absorb at the Hg detection wavelength (253.65 nm). This article provides a detailed description of the CEM system, the characteristics and performance of the CEM, and the results of field tests performed at the Environmental Protection Agency-Rotary Kiln at Research Triangle Park, NC.

  6. Chlorine analysis by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Koch, J; Zybin, A; Niemax, K

    2000-04-01

    The general characteristics of Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (DLAAS) in low pressure plasmas particularly with respect to the detection of non-metals are comprehensively recapitulated and discussed. Furthermore, a detector, which is based on DLAAS in a microwave-induced low pressure plasma as an alternative technique for halogene-specific analysis of volatile compounds and polymeric matrices is described. The analytical capability of the technique is demonstrated on the chlorine-specific analysis of ablated polymer fragments as well as gas chromatographically separated hydrocarbons. Since the measurements were carried out by means of a balanced-heterodyne detection scheme, different technical noise contributions, such as laser excess and RAM noise could efficiently be suppressed and the registered absorption was limited only by the principal shot noise. Thus, in the case of the polymer analysis a chlorine-specific absolute detection limit of 10 pg could be achieved. Furthermore, fundamental investigations concerning the influence of hydrocarbons on the dissociation capability of the microwave induced plasma were performed. For this purpose, the carbon-, chlorine- and hydrogen-specific stoichiometry of the compounds were empirically determined. Deviations from the expected proportions were found to be insignificant, implying the possibility of internal standardization relative to the response of a reference sample. PMID:12953476

  7. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. S.; Debefve, L. M.; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, A.; Ouldchikh, S.; Bare, Simon R.; Basset, J.-M.; Gates, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  8. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, A S; Debefve, L M; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, A; Ouldchikh, S; Bare, Simon R; Basset, J-M; Gates, B C

    2016-07-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities-to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions-to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported. PMID:27475549

  9. Fluorescence and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy studies on polymer blend films for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stam, Jan; Lindqvist, Camilla; Hansson, Rickard; Ericsson, Leif; Moons, Ellen

    2015-08-01

    The quinoxaline-based polymer TQ1 (poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5- diyl]) is a promising candidate as electron donor in organic solar cells. In combination with the electron acceptor [6,6]- phenyl-C71- butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM), TQ1 has resulted in solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 7 %. We have studied TQ1 films, with and without PC70BM, spin-casted from different solvents, by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. We used chloroform (CF), chlorobenzene (CB), and odichlorobenzene (o-DCB) as solvents for the coating solutions and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) as solvent additive. CN addition has been shown to enhance photo-conversion efficiency of these solar cells. Phase-separation causes lateral domain formation in the films and the domain size depends on the solvent . These morphological differences coincide with changes in the spectroscopic patterns of the films. From a spectroscopic point of view, TQ1 acts as fluorescent probe and PC70BM as quencher. The degree of fluorescence quenching is coupled to the morphology through the distance between TQ1 and PC70BM. Furthermore, if using a bad solvent for PC70BM, morphological regions rich in the fullerene yield emission characteristic for aggregated PC70BM. Clear differences were found, comparing the TQ1:PC70BM blend films casted from different solvents and at different ratios between the donor and acceptor. The morphology also influences the UV/VIS absorption spectra, yielding further information on the composition. The results show that fluorescence and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy can be used to detect aggregation in blended films and that these methods extend the morphological information beyond the scale accessible with microscopy.

  10. Absorption spectra and spectral-kinetic characteristics of the fluorescence of Sanguinarine in complexes with polyelectrolytes and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevich, I. G.; Strekal, N. D.; Nowicky, J. W.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    The absorption spectra and stationary and time resolved fluorescence spectra of the isoquinoline alkaloid sanguinarine are studied in aqueous media and during interactions with synthetic polyelectrolytes (polystyrene sulfonate and polyallylamine) and a natural polyelectrolyte (DNA).

  11. Absorption and fluorescence of alexandrite and of titanium in sapphire and glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Hess, R. V.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    The fluorescence and absorption data for titanium in crystalline sapphire and titanium doped into two silicate and one phosphate glass structures are analyzed. It is observed that the Ti-doped silicate glass sample exhibits no absorption related to the Ti(III) ion, the Ti-doped phosphate glass is deep blue, the absorption line width of the glass samples are a factor of two larger than that of sapphire, and the absorption peak for the Ti in the glass shifted about 100 nm to the red from the Ti:sapphire absorption peak. This shift reveals that the Ti(III) ion is sensitive to the crystalline environment and not to the glass environment. The photoluminescence spectra for Ti-doped sapphire and alexandrite are compared. It is detected that the Ti:sapphire exhibits a broader spectrum than that for alexandrite with a peak at 750 nm. The three zero phonon transitions of Ti:Al2O3 at liquid nitrogen temperatures are studied.

  12. Problems affecting performance of the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption test for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, E F; Adams, M R; Orrison, L H; Pender, B J; Larsen, S A

    1979-01-01

    Immunofluorescent staining of Treponema pallidum was studied to clarify the effect of three factors on the results of the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption test: (i) heat inactivation of sera at 56 degrees C for 30 min before testing, (ii) use of multicircle slides, and (iii) tungsten illumination to visualize and assess unstained treponemes on reactive as well as nonreactive smears. It was found that serum inactivation before testing was not necessary for detection of immunoglobin G antibody, but an immunoglobulin M prozone was detected in unheated serum. On multicircle slides, it was demonstrated that a false-positive reaction could be obtained in 30 s at 37 and 25 degrees C if a smear where a nonreactive serum had been placed was crossed by a strongly reactive serum from another circle. Tungsten illumination proved necessary for correct assessment of unstained treponemes on all fluorescent treponemal antibody-aborption test smears, reactive or nonreactive. The possible role of these factors in incorrect fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption test results is discussed. PMID:372219

  13. Double tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer based on an acousto-optic tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jora, M. Z.; Nóbrega, J. A.; Rohwedder, J. J. R.; Pasquini, C.

    2015-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometer based on a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) monochromator operating in the 271-453 nm range, is described. The instrument was tailored to study the formation and evolution of electrothermal atomic cloud induced either by one or two tungsten coils. The spectrometer also includes a fast response programmable photomultiplier module for data acquisition, and a power supply capable of driving two parallel tungsten coils independently. The atomization cell herein described was manufactured in PTFE and presents a new design with reduced size. Synchronization between the instant of power delivering to start the atomization process and the detection was achieved, allowing for monitoring the atomization and thermal events synchronously and in real time. Absorption signals can be sampled at a rate of a few milliseconds, compatible with the fast phenomena that occur with electrothermal metallic atomizers. The instrument performance was preliminarily evaluated by monitoring the absorption of radiation of atomic clouds produced by standard solutions containing chromium or lead. Its quantitative performance was evaluated by using Cr aqueous solutions, resulting in detection limits as low as 0.24 μg L- 1, and a relative standard deviation of 3%.

  14. Transient dispersion and absorption in a V-shaped atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahrai, M.; Maleki, A.; Hemmati, R.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of the dispersion and the absorption in a V-type three level atomic system. It is shown that in the presence of decay-induced interference the probe dispersion and absorption are phase dependent. We find that an incoherent pumping field provides an additional control parameter for switching the group velocity of a light pulse. The required switching times for switching the group velocity of a probe field from subluminal to superluminal pulse propagation is then discussed.

  15. Laboratory atomic transition data for precise optical quasar absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Berengut, Julian C.

    2014-02-01

    Quasar spectra reveal a rich array of important astrophysical information about galaxies which intersect the quasar line of sight. They also enable tests of the variability of fundamental constants over cosmological time- and distance-scales. Key to these endeavours are the laboratory frequencies, isotopic and hyperfine structures of various metal-ion transitions. Here, we review and synthesize the existing information about these quantities for 43 transitions which are important for measuring possible changes in the fine-structure constant, α, using optical quasar spectra, i.e. those of Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Zn. We also summarize the information currently missing that precludes more transitions being used. We present an up-to-date set of coefficients, q, which define the sensitivity of these transitions to variations in α. New calculations of isotopic structures and q-coefficients are performed for Si II and Ti II, including Si II λ1808 and Ti IIλλ1910.6/1910.9 for the first time. Finally, simulated absorption-line spectra are used to illustrate the systematic errors expected if the isotopic/hyperfine structures are omitted from profile fitting analyses. To ensure transparency, repeatability and currency of the data and calculations, we supply a comprehensive data base as Supporting Information. This will be updated as new measurements and calculations are performed.

  16. Determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins by carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, J M; Campbell, W C

    1976-01-01

    A carbon furnace atomic absorption procedure is described for the determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins, fratercula arctica. Samples are dried and weighed and 2 to 100 mg are dissolved in sulphuric and nitric acids. These solutions are analysed directly in the carbon furnace against aqueous standards and provide accurate results in the range 0-1 to 100 micrograms/g dry weight. The method is simple and rapid and requires much less of the small total sample than would be required for flame atomic absorption. PMID:1030692

  17. Comparison of liposome entrapment parameters by optical and atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Yoss, N L; Popescu, O; Pop, V I; Porutiu, D; Kummerow, F A; Benga, G

    1985-01-01

    Methods for the complete characterization of liposomes prepared by ether-injection are described in detail. The validity of atomic absorption spectrophotometry for measuring markers of trapped volume was checked by comparative determinations of markers with established optical spectrophotometrical methods. The favorable results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry to quantitate the marker Mn2+ are of particular relevance as manganese ion is also the paramagnetic probe in n.m.r. measurements of water permeability of liposomes; our results indicate that in such measurements no other marker need be incorporated. PMID:3986305

  18. Effective Atomic Numbers of Lanthanides with Gamma Radiation for Photon Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, ZPEA,eff have been calculated for photon from 1 keV to 20 MeV for selected oxides of lanthanides, such as Lanthanum oxide, Cerium oxide, Samarium oxide, Europium oxide, Dysprosium oxide, Thulium oxide, Ytterbium oxide. The ZPEA,eff values then compared with ZPI,eff for photon interaction. The ZPEA,eff values have been found to change with energy and composition of selected lanthanides. Oxides of lanthanides are considered as better shielding materials to the exposure of gamma radiation. The values of effective atomic number for photon energy absorption help in the calculation of absorbed dose.

  19. Methods for analysis of selected metals in water by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Downs, Sanford C.

    1966-01-01

    This manual describes atomic-absorption-spectroscopy methods for determining calcium, copper, lithium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, strontium and zinc in atmospheric precipitation, fresh waters, and brines. The procedures are intended to be used by water quality laboratories of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Detailed procedures, calculations, and methods for the preparation of reagents are given for each element along with data on accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. Other topics discussed briefly are the principle of atomic absorption, instrumentation used, and special analytical techniques.

  20. Near resonant absorption by atoms in intense, fluctuating fields: (Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    During the present grant period preparations for photon echo studies of the role of phase fluctuations of an optical driving field resonant with the /sup 1/S/sub 0/ - /sup 3/P/sub 1/ transition in /sup 174/Yb are moving forward. This experimental study emphasizes the role of fluctuations as a decorrelating mechanism on a phased array of excited atoms. Improvements in laser stabilization and in the quality of the fluctuation spectrum have been carried out and the first spectroscopic measurements will be carried out during this grant year. In response to an important recent theoretical study we have also applied the phase fluctuation synthesizing capability to the study of the atomic sodium resonance fluorescence line profile, driven by a phase fluctuating laser. The measured fluctuations in the fluorescence, characterized in terms of the standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity, have an unexpected and strong dependence on detuning of the driving laser.

  1. Do fluorescence and transient absorption probe the same intramolecular charge transfer state of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile?

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Fujiwara, Takashige; Lim, Edward C.

    2009-07-21

    We present here the results of time-resolved absorption and emission experiments for 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile in solution, which suggest that the fluorescent intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state may differ from the twisted ICT (TICT) state observed in transient absorption.

  2. Serial Femtosecond Crystallography and Ultrafast Absorption Spectroscopy of the Photoswitchable Fluorescent Protein IrisFP.

    PubMed

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Sliwa, Michel; Gallat, François-Xavier; Sugahara, Michihiro; Guillon, Virginia; Schirò, Giorgio; Coquelle, Nicolas; Woodhouse, Joyce; Roux, Laure; Gotthard, Guillaume; Royant, Antoine; Uriarte, Lucas Martinez; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Joti, Yasumasa; Byrdin, Martin; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Adam, Virgile; Cammarata, Marco; Schlichting, Ilme; Bourgeois, Dominique; Weik, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins find growing applications in cell biology, yet mechanistic details, in particular on the ultrafast photochemical time scale, remain unknown. We employed time-resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy on the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein IrisFP in solution to study photoswitching from the nonfluorescent (off) to the fluorescent (on) state. Evidence is provided for the existence of several intermediate states on the pico- and microsecond time scales that are attributed to chromophore isomerization and proton transfer, respectively. Kinetic modeling favors a sequential mechanism with the existence of two excited state intermediates with lifetimes of 2 and 15 ps, the second of which controls the photoswitching quantum yield. In order to support that IrisFP is suited for time-resolved experiments aiming at a structural characterization of these ps intermediates, we used serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free electron laser and solved the structure of IrisFP in its on state. Sample consumption was minimized by embedding crystals in mineral grease, in which they remain photoswitchable. Our spectroscopic and structural results pave the way for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography aiming at characterizing the structure of ultrafast intermediates in reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins. PMID:26866390

  3. Observing random walks of atoms in buffer gas through resonant light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Takahisa

    2016-07-01

    Using resonant light absorption, random-walk motions of rubidium atoms in nitrogen buffer gas are observed directly. The transmitted light intensity through atomic vapor is measured, and its spectrum is obtained, down to orders of magnitude below the shot-noise level to detect fluctuations caused by atomic motions. To understand the measured spectra, the spectrum for atoms performing random walks in a Gaussian light beam is computed, and its analytical form is obtained. The spectrum has 1 /f2 (f is frequency) behavior at higher frequencies, crossing over to a different, but well-defined, behavior at lower frequencies. The properties of this theoretical spectrum agree excellently with the measured spectrum. This understanding also enables us to obtain the diffusion constant, the photon cross section of atoms in buffer gas, and the atomic number density from a single spectral measurement. We further discuss other possible applications of our experimental method and analysis.

  4. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications. PMID:23171130

  5. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of microgram quantities of copper in tea after solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Aziz-Alrahman, A M

    1985-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrophotometric method is described for determining trace amounts of copper in tea. The method is based on the solvent extraction of the metal as tetraiodocuprate (I), from 2 M HCl solutions of tea samples which contain 12% (w/v) KI, into methylisobutyl ketone. The organic extracts, containing the ion-association complex of copper are atomized into an air-acetylene flame. The limit of detection is 1.14 micrograms g-1 Cu. PMID:4077371

  6. Thermochromic Absorption, Fluorescence Band Shifts and Dipole Moments of BADAN and ACRYLODAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2002-08-01

    Using the thermochromic shift method of absorption and fluorescence bands, the electric dipole moments in the ground (μg) and excited (μe) state are simultaneously determined for BADAN (6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene) and ACRYLODAN (6-acrylolyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene) in ethyl acetate. For these compounds the same ratio μe/μg = 2.9 was found, which is similar to that of PRODAN (6-propionyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene). The estimated empirical Onsager radii afor BADAN and ACRYLODAN are the same, and they are somewhat smaller than the calculated geometrical values.

  7. Picosecond kinetic absorption and fluorescence studies of bovine rhodopsin with a fixed 11-ene.

    PubMed Central

    Buchert, J; Stefancic, V; Doukas, A G; Alfano, R R; Callender, R H; Pande, J; Akita, H; Balogh-Nair, V; Nakanishi, K

    1983-01-01

    A synthetic retinal having a fixed 11-cis geometry has been used to prepare a nonbleachable analogue of bovine rhodopsin. Marked differences in the picosecond absorption and fluorescence behavior of this analogue at room temperature, compared with that of natural rhodopsin, were observed. This not only indicates that the 11-cis to trans isomerization of the retinal moiety is the crucial primary event in the photolysis of rhodopsin, but also it establishes that this isomerization must occur on the picosecond time scale or faster. PMID:6626668

  8. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  9. Transient absorption spectroscopy detection of sensitized delayed fluorescence in chiral benzophenone/naphthalene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonancía, Paula; Jiménez, M. Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2011-10-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to investigate the formation and decay of excited singlet states upon triplet-triplet annihilation, following T-T energy transfer from a selectively excited sensitizer. Thus, upon selective excitation of benzophenone (BZP) by laser flash photolysis (LFP) at λ = 355 nm in the presence of naphthalene (NPT), a negative band centered at 340 nm has been detected, with growth and decay in the microsecond timescale. It has been assigned to the P-type NPT delayed-fluorescence. In the case of chiral BZP/NPT systems, stereodifferentiation has been observed in the kinetics of the involved photophysical processes.

  10. Determination of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in the elements between Tm( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, N.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Apaydın, G.

    2008-04-01

    The K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios have been measured in the elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) without having any mass attenuation coefficient at the upper and lower energy branch of the K absorption edge. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements have been determined by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters such as the total atomic absorption cross-sections, the K α X-ray production cross-sections, the intensity ratio of the K β and K α X-rays and the K shell fluorescence yields. We have performed the measurements for the calculations of these values in attenuation and direct excitation experimental geometry. The K X-ray photons are excited in the target using 123.6 keV gamma-rays from a strong 57Co source, and detected with an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution 0.15 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values have been compared with theoretical and others' experimental values. The results have been plotted versus atomic number.

  11. Investigations on Freon-assisted atomization of refractory analytes (Cr, Mo, Ti, V) in multielement electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hans-Joachim; Matschat, Ralf

    2007-08-01

    Premixed 1% Freon in argon inner gas of various composition (CCl 2F 2, CHClF 2, CHF 3) was applied to graphite furnace atomizer to minimize unfavorable effects of carbide formation, such as signal tailing and memory effects in the simultaneous determination of Cr, Mo, Ti and V refractory analytes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a multielement atomic absorption spectrometer. The effect of these gaseous additives was investigated when applied separately in atomization, pyrolysis and clean-out steps. The halogenation effects were analytically useful only under the precondition of using Ar-H 2 outer gas to the furnace to all heating steps, and also using this gas in the pre-atomization (drying, pyrolysis) steps. Optimum analytical performance was obtained when mixtures of 1% Freon in argon were applied just before and during the atomization step at a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 and 2% hydrogen was used as purge gas. Using optimum conditions, signal tailings and carry-over contamination were reduced effectively and good precision (relative standard deviation below 1%) could be attained. Applying 1% CHClF 2 and an atomization temperature of 2550 °C, the characteristic masses obtained for simple aqueous solutions were 8.8 pg for Cr, 17 pg for Mo, 160 pg for Ti, and 74 pg for V. The limits of detection were 0.05, 0.2, 2.3 and 0.5 μg L - 1 for Cr, Mo, Ti and V, respectively. The developed method was applied to the analysis of digests of advanced ceramics. The accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by analyzing the certified reference material ERM-ED 102 (Boron Carbide Powder) and a silicon nitride powder distributed in the inter-laboratory comparison CCQM-P74.

  12. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The use of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties is studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in Earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. The work to date includes development of an apparatus and its use in studies of chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, and tungsten specimens, novel methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, and levitation jet properties. Brief summaries of these studies are given. The apparatus is described and detailed results for the current reporting period are presented.

  13. Investigation of two-photon absorption properties in new A-D-A compounds emitting blue and yellow fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Fan; Cai, Zhi-Bin; Huang, Jiu-Qiang; Li, Sheng-Li; Tian, Yu-Peng

    2015-08-01

    Three new acceptor-donor-acceptor compounds (LBQ, DBQ, BYQ) were synthesized and characterized by infrared, hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. Their photophysical properties were investigated including linear absorption, single-photon excited fluorescence, fluorescence quantum yield and two-photon absorption. These compounds in CH2Cl2 exhibit good fluorescence quantum yield which are 0.36, 0.26, and 0.25 and the largest two-photon absorption cross-section which are 48, 36, and 181 GM respectively. Under the excitation of Ti: sapphire laser with a pulse width of 140 fs, LBQ and DBQ emit blue two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), while BYQ emits bright yellow TPEF. BYQ has a good solubility in water and the σ can be as large as 130 GM, so it shows promising applications in many pharmaceutical and biological fields.

  14. Instantaneous temperature imaging of diffusion flames using two-line atomic fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Medwell, Paul R; Chan, Qing N; Kalt, Peter A M; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dally, Bassam B; Nathan, Graham J

    2010-02-01

    This work investigates the first demonstration of nonlinear regime two-line atomic fluorescence (NTLAF) thermometry in laminar non-premixed flames. The results show the expediency of the technique in the study of the reaction zone and reveals interesting findings about the indium atomization process. Indium fluorescence is observed to be strongest at the flame-front, where the temperature exceeds 1000 K. The uncertainty in the deduced temperature measurement is approximately 6%. The temperature profile across the reaction zone shows good agreement with laminar flame calculations. The advantages and inherent limitations of the technique are discussed. PMID:20149278

  15. The stationary resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom in a cat-state field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomilin, V. A.; Il'ichov, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom placed in non-classical field which is a superposition of Glauber coherent states. The source of this superposition known under the common name of 'Schrödinger cat'-states is explicitly incorporated into the model. This let us to explore the stationary regime. In the strong (multiphoton) field limit the steady-state of the atom+photons system is found. We evaluated the spectrum of the resonance fluorescence. It appears to be one-component in contrast to the case with the classical external field.

  16. (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence of spin-polarized hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Everest, Michael A; Alexander, Andrew J; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2010-11-01

    We report the measurement of the spin polarization of hydrogen (SPH) atoms by (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence, produced via the photodissociation of thermal HBr molecules with circularly polarized 193 nm light. This scheme, which involves two-photon laser excitation at 205 nm and fluorescence at 656 nm, offers an experimentally simpler polarization-detection method than the previously reported vacuum ultraviolet detection scheme, allowing the detection of SPH atoms to be performed more straightforwardly, from the photodissociation of a wide range of molecules and from a variety of collision experiments. PMID:21054033

  17. Picosecond-TALIF and VUV absorption measurements of absolute atomic nitrogen densities from an RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew; Niemi, Kari; Schröter, Sandra; Bredin, Jerome; Gans, Timo; Wagenaars, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen species (RONS) from RF atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are important in biomedical applications as well as industrial plasma processing such as surface modification. Atomic oxygen has been well studied, whereas, despite its importance in the plasma chemistry, atomic nitrogen has been somewhat neglected due to its difficulty of measurement. We present absolute densities of atomic nitrogen in APPJs operating with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures in open air, using picosecond Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (ps-TALIF) and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. In order to apply the TALIF technique in complex, He/O2/N2 mixtures, we needed to directly measure the collisional quenching effects using picosecond pulse widths (32ps). Traditional calculated quenching corrections, used in nanosecond TALIF, are inadequate due to a lack of quenching data for complex mixtures. Absolute values for the densities were found by calibrating against a known density of Krypton. The VUV absorption experiments were conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Atomic nitrogen densities were on the order of 1020 m-3 with good agreement between TALIF and VUV absorption. UK EPSRC grant EP/K018388/1.

  18. A COMPUTER INTERFACE FOR A PERKIN-ELMER 5000 ATOMIC ABSORPTION INSTRUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document contains a detailed description of an ASCII Character Buffer Interface designed to store and forward serial ASCII data received from an EIA RS-232C Interface. The particular application described herein concerns a Perkin-Elmer Model 5000 Atomic Absorption instrument...

  19. [Determination of lead in beard hair by atomic absorption spectrometry (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Graef, V

    1976-04-01

    The lead content of hair from the electric razor can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, using the micro-sampling technique of Delves. 1--5 mg of the washed and dried hair are partially oxidized with hydrogen peroxide prior to analysis. The method is simple and quick and therefore suited for the serial investigation of persons exposed to lead. PMID:1271019

  20. Determination of arsenic and selenium in environmental and agricultural samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hershey, J.W.; Oostdyk, T.S.; Keliher, P.N.

    1988-11-01

    Agricultural and environmental samples are digested with acid, and arsenic and selenium are determined using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Interelement interferences are eliminated by high acid concentrations or cation-exchange resins. Agreement with standard reference material is excellent. The technique is also applied to actual samples.

  1. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ARSENICALS BY PH-SELECTIVE HYDRIDE GENERATION-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory


    A method based on pH-selective generation and separation of arsines is commonly used for analysis of inorganic, methylated, and dimethylated trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). We have optimized this method to pe...

  2. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  3. THE STANDARD CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER. PART I: FUNCTIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document contains a project definition, a set of functional requirements, and a functional design for the automation of flameless atomic absorption (AA) spectrophotometers. The system is a real-time data acquisition system with 'on line' data reduction, quality control and r...

  4. The Use of an Air-Natural Gas Flame in Atomic Absorption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melucci, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Points out that excellent results are obtained using an air-natural gas flame in atomic absorption experiments rather than using an air-acetylene flame. Good results are obtained for alkali metals, copper, cadmium, and zinc but not for the alkaline earths since they form refractory oxides. (Author/JN)

  5. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  6. [Determination of sulfur in plant using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Jia-xi

    2009-05-01

    A method for the analysis of sulfur (S) in plant by molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide (CS) using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer (CS AAS) with a fuel-rich air/acetylene flame has been devised. The strong CS absorption band was found around 258 nm. The half-widths of some absorption bands were of the order of picometers, the same as the common atomic absorption lines. The experimental procedure in this study provided optimized instrumental conditions (the ratio of acetylene to air, the burner height) and parameters, and researched the spectral interferences and chemical interferences. The influence of the organic solvents on the CS absorption signals and the different digestion procedures for the determination of sulfur were also investigated. The limit of detection achieved for sulfur was 14 mg x L(-1), using the CS wavelength of 257. 961 nm and a measurement time of 3 s. The accuracy and precision were verified by analysis of two plant standard reference materials. The major applications of this method have been used for the determination of sulfur in plant materials, such as leaves. Compared to the others, this method for the analysis of sulfur is rapid, easy and simple for sulfur determination in plant. PMID:19650504

  7. Multielement continuum-source atomic-absorption spectrometry with an echelle-spectrometer/image-dissector system.

    PubMed

    Masters, R; Hsiech, C; Pardue, H L

    1989-01-01

    The continued development of the echelle-spectrometer/image-dissector system for multielement determination by continuum-source atomic-absorption spectrometry is presented. Modifications of the instruments include the use of a 20-groove/mm echelle grating blazed at 76 degrees , and the removal of the magnetic shield from the image dissector. The spectral range is from 300 to 430 nm and the observed resolution is better than 0.005 nm at 400 nm. Calibration curves are linear up to an absorbance of 0.2, and absorption sensitivities are up to 4-fold better than with the previous design. Fundamental characteristics of the detector limit the application of the instrument to sequential single-element quantifications with the electrothermal atomizer, and to sequential multielement quantification with the flame atomizer. The further development of the instrument for simultaneous multielement qualification is discussed. PMID:18964682

  8. Enhanced Reverse Saturable Absorption and Optical Limiting in Heavy-Atom Substituted Phthalocyanines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. W.; Mansour, K.; Marder, S. R.; Alvarez, D., Jr.; Perry, K. J.; Choong, I.

    1994-01-01

    The reverse saturable absorption and optical limiting response of metal phthalocyaninies can be enhanced by using the heavy-atom effect. Phthalocyanines containing heavy metal atoms, such as In, Sn, and Pb show nearly a factor of two enhancement in the ratio of effective excited-state to ground-state absorption cross sections compared to those containing lighter atoms, such as Al and Si. In an f/8 optical geometry, homogeneous solutions of heavy metal phthalocyanines, at 30% linear transmission, limit 8-ns, 532-nm laser pulses to less than or equal to 3 (micro)J (the energy for 50% probability of eye damage) for incident pulses up to 800 (micro)J.

  9. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  10. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma atomizer for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry-Performance evaluation for selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duben, Ondřej; Boušek, Jaroslav; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Atomization of selenium hydride in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized and its performance was compared to that of the externally heated quartz multiatomizer. Argon was found as the best DBD discharge gas employing a flow rate of 75 ml min- 1 Ar while the DBD power was optimized at 14 W. The detection limits reached 0.24 ng ml- 1 Se in the DBD and 0.15 ng ml- 1 Se in the multiatomizer. The tolerance of DBD to interferences is even better than with the multiatomizer.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source.

  12. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  13. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  14. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Shiffman, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Containerless high temperature processing and material property measurements are discussed. Researchers developed methods for non-contact suspension, heating, and property measurement for materials at temperatures up to 3,680K, the melting point of tungsten. New, scientifically interesting results were obtained in Earth-based research. These results and the demonstration of new methods and techniques form a basis for further advances under the low gravity environment of space where containerless conditions are more easily achieved. Containerless high temperature material property investigations that have been completed in this and our earlier projects include measurements of fluorine LaB sub 6 reaction kinetics at 1,000 to 1,500K; optical property measurements on sapphire (Al2O3) at temperatures up to the melting point (2,327K); and vapor pressure measurements for LaB sub 6 at 2,000 to 2,500K, for molybdenum up to 2,890K and for tungsten up to 3,680K. Gas jet levitation which is applicable to any solid material, and electromagnetic levitation of electrical conductors were used to suspend the materials of interest. Non-contact heating and property measurements were achieved by optical techniques, i.e., laser heating, laser induced fluorescence measurements of vapor concentrations, and optical pyrometry for specimen temperatures.

  15. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor. PMID:26938713

  16. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing. PMID:9684401

  17. Nitric oxide γ band fluorescent scattering and self-absorption in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.

    1995-08-01

    The fluorescent scattering of UV sunlight and self-absorption by the nitric oxide (NO) γ bands between 2000-2500 Å are quantified for the purpose of inferring NO density profiles as a function of altitude in the mesosphere and above. Rotational line emission rate factors and cross sections are calculated at a variety of temperatures. The observed variation of the solar spectrum across the γ bands and its effect on emission rate factors are explored by using irradiance measurements that resolve features down to 0.1 Å. The model also includes quenching by O2 and N2, multiple scattering, temperature effects, attenuation of the solar irradiance by O2 and ozone, and self-absorption with the summation of adjacent rotational features. Results indicate that for resonant γ bands, the rotational structure in emission is not symmetric to that in absorption so that as self-absorption increases the shape of the observed emission envelope changes. For γ(1,0) this is largely characterized by an increase in the integrated emission observed longward of 2151 Å compared to shortward. It is found that solar irradiances measured at 0.1 Å resolution decrease the calculated γ(1,0) and γ(0,0) band emission rate factors by less than 3% compared to those measured at 2 Å resolution. However, more Fraunhofer structure included in the calculation is reflected in the relative intensities of the rotational features. It is also found that extinction of the solar irradiance by ozone and quenching by O2 rapidly reduce the γ(1,0) emission rate factor with decreasing altitude below 60 km.

  18. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.

    2005-07-15

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications.

  1. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Metastable Atoms in Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Tung Do; Hippler, Rainer

    2008-09-07

    Spatial density profile of neon metastable produced in dusty plasma was investigated by means of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The line averaged measured density drops about 30% with the presence of dust particles. The observations provide evidence for a significant interaction between atoms and powder particles which are important for energy transfer from plasma to particles. The power per unit area absorbed by dust particles due to the collision of metastable atoms with dust particle surface is about some tens of mW/m{sup 2}.

  2. Atomic calculations and search for variation of the fine-structure constant in quasar absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    A brief review of the search for variation of the fine structure constant in quasar absorption spectra is presented. Special consideration is given to the role of atomic calculations in the analysis of the observed data. A range of methods which allow to perform calculations for atoms or ions with different electron structure and which cover practically all periodic table of elements is discussed. Critical compilation of the results of the calculations as well as a review of the most recent results of the analysis are presented.

  3. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzan, Ezequiel; Piano, Ornela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel

    2012-11-01

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 μg mL- 1, sensitivity: 0.306 (μg mL- 1)- 1, RSD% (n = 10, 1 μg mL- 1): 2.5, linear range: 0.01-4 μg mL- 1 and sample throughput: 72 h- 1. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided.

  4. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  5. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  6. New Approaches for Correction of Interlayer Absorption Effects in X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Paintings.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Paweł M; Frączek, Piotr; Lankosz, Marek

    2016-02-01

    The X-ray fluorescence imaging technique allows not only the imaging itself but also the identification of the hidden paint layers what makes it much more versatile as compared with X-ray radiography. One of the main disadvantages of the former method is the fact that the characteristic X-rays from the deeper paint layers are absorbed in the covering layers. This effect is manifested by some artifacts that impede a proper interpretation of the acquired images. In this work, it is shown that the methodology for correction of the interlayer absorption effects can be extended to the case of polychromatic excitation. Additionally, a new approach for determination of the optimal correction parameters has also been presented. The methodology was verified using either the test painting or the mock-up painting both measured with a table-top micro-XRF setup. PMID:26708500

  7. Absorption, fluorescence, and acid-base equilibria of rhodamines in micellar media of sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Obukhova, Elena N; Mchedlov-Petrossyan, Nikolay O; Vodolazkaya, Natalya A; Patsenker, Leonid D; Doroshenko, Andrey O; Marynin, Andriy I; Krasovitskii, Boris M

    2017-01-01

    Rhodamine dyes are widely used as molecular probes in different fields of science. The aim of this paper was to ascertain to what extent the structural peculiarities of the compounds influence their absorption, emission, and acid-base properties under unified conditions. The acid-base dissociation (HR(+)⇄R+H(+)) of a series of rhodamine dyes was studied in sodium n-dodecylsulfate micellar solutions. In this media, the form R exists as a zwitterion R(±). The indices of apparent ionization constants of fifteen rhodamine cations HR(+) with different substituents in the xanthene moiety vary within the range of pKa(app)=5.04 to 5.53. The distinct dependence of emission of rhodamines bound to micelles on pH of bulk water opens the possibility of using them as fluorescent interfacial acid-base indicators. PMID:27423469

  8. Characterization of energetic and thermalized sputtered atoms in pulsed plasma using time-resolved tunable diode-laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Desecures, M.; Poucques, L. de; Easwarakhanthan, T.; Bougdira, J.

    2014-11-03

    In this work, a time-resolved tunable diode-laser (DL) induced fluorescence (TR-TDLIF) method calibrated by absorption spectroscopy has been developed in order to determine atom and flux velocity distribution functions (AVDF and FVDF) of the energetic and the thermalized atoms in pulsed plasmas. The experimental set-up includes a low-frequency (∼3 Hz) and high spectral-resolution DL (∼0.005 pm), a fast rise-time pulse generator, and a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system. The induced TR-TDLIF signal is recorded every 0.5 μs with a digital oscilloscope of a second-long trace. The technique is illustrated with determining the AVDF and the FVDF of a metastable state of the sputtered neutral tungsten atoms in the HiPIMS post-discharge. Gaussian functions describing the population of the four W isotopes were used to fit the measured TR-TDLIF signal. These distribution functions provide insight into transition from the energetic to thermalized regimes from the discharge onset. This technique may be extended with appropriate DLs to probe any species with rapidly changing AVDF and FVDF in pulsed and strongly oscillating plasmas.

  9. Solvent dependence of two-photon absorption spectra of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Haruko; Tayama, Ryo; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-06-01

    Two-photon absorption spectra of 4‧-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone, a model chromophore of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), were measured in various solvents. The two-photon absorption band of its anionic form is markedly blue-shifted from the corresponding one-photon absorption band in all solvents. Moreover, the magnitude of the blue shift varies largely depending on the solvent, which does not accord with the assignment of the two-photon absorption band to the transitions to the vibrationally excited S1 state. Our finding is readily rationalized by considering overlapping contributions of the S1 ← S0 and S2 ← S0 transitions, suggesting the involvement of the S2 state also in two-photon fluorescence of eGFP.

  10. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a pressure-controlled electrothermal atomizer.

    PubMed

    Lonardo, R F; Yuzefovsky, A I; Irwin, R L; Michel, R G

    1996-02-01

    A theoretical model was developed to describe the loss of analyte atoms in graphite furnaces during atomization. The model was based on two functions, one that described the supply of analyte by vaporization, and another that described the removal of the analyte by diffusion. Variation in working pressure was shown to affect the competition between these two processes. Optimal atomization efficiency was predicted to occur at a pressure where the supply of the analyte was maximized, and gas phase interactions between the analyte and matrix were minimized. Experiments to test the model included the direct determination of phosphorus and tellurium in nickel alloys and of cobalt in glass. In all cases, reduction in working pressure from atmospheric pressure to 7 Pa decreased sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude, but improved temporal peak shape. For the atomization of tellurium directly from a solid nickel alloy, and the atomization of cobalt from an aqueous solution, no change in sensitivity was observed as the working pressure was reduced from atmospheric pressure to approximately 70 kPa. If a reduction in working pressure affected only the diffusion of the analyte, poorer sensitivity should have been obtained. Only a commensurate increase in analyte vaporization could account for maintained sensitivity at lower working pressures. Overall, analyte vaporization was not dramatically improved at reduced working pressures, and maximum atomization efficiency was found to occur near atmospheric pressure. PMID:8712359

  11. Deconvolution of C-phycocyanin beta-84 and beta-155 chromophore absorption and fluorescence spectra of cyanobacterium Mastigocladus laminosus.

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, A A; Mimuro, M

    1995-01-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the C-phycocyanin beta-subunit were quantitatively deconvoluted into component spectra of the beta-84 and beta-155 chromophores. The deconvolution procedure was based on a theoretical treatment of polarization properties. Four kinds of spectra (absorption, emission, emission polarization, and excitation polarization) measured on C-phycocyanin isolated from the cyanobacterium Mastigocladus laminosus were used as the experimental data set. Without any assumption of spectral shape, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of both chromophores were unambiguously resolved and their fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated. By combining the spectra of the alpha-subunit, independently measured, with the resolved spectra of the beta-subunit, the fluorescence and fluorescence polarization spectra and the fluorescence quantum yield of the monomer were estimated; they agree with experimental values to within an acceptable error. Further, the matrix of energy transfer rates in the monomer was estimated; it gave a significantly different result (by up to 40%) from previously estimated ones. PMID:7787035

  12. Airborne intercomparison of vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence and tunable diode laser absorption measurements of tropospheric carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, John S.; Jakoubek, Roger O.; Parrish, David D.; Gerbig, Christoph; Volz-Thomas, Andreas; Schmitgen, Sandra; Fried, Alan; Wert, Brian; Henry, Bruce; Drummond, James R.

    2000-01-01

    During the fall 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE 97), two separate intercomparisons of aircraft-based carbon monoxide measurement instrumentation were conducted. On September 2, CO measurements were simultaneously made aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3 by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) fluorescence and by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). On September 18, an intercomparison flight was conducted between two separate instruments, both employing the VUV fluorescence method, on the NOAA WP-3 and the U.K. Meteorological Office C-130 Hercules. The results indicate that both of the VUV fluorescence instruments and the TDLAS system are capable of measuring ambient CO accurately and precisely with no apparent interferences in 5 s. The accuracy of the measurements, based upon three independent calibration systems, is indicated by the agreement to within 11% with systematic offsets of less than 1 ppbv. In addition, one of the groups participated in the Measurement of Air Pollution From Satellite (MAPS) intercomparison [Novelli et al., 1998] with a different measurement technique but very similar calibration system, and agreed with the accepted analysis to within 5%. The precision of the measurements is indicated by the variability of the ratio of simultaneous measurements from the separate instruments. This variability is consistent with the estimated precisions of 1.5 ppbv and 2.2 ppbv for the 5 s average results of the C-130 and the WP-3 instruments, respectively, and indicates a precision of approximately 3.6% for the TDLAS instrument. The excellent agreement of the instruments in both intercomparisons demonstrates that significant interferences in the measurements are absent in air masses that ranged from 7 km in the midtroposphere to boundary layer conditions including subtropical marine air and continental outflow with embedded urban plumes. The intercomparison of the two VUV instruments that differed widely

  13. Determination of iodine in seaweed and table salt by an indirect atomic-absorption method.

    PubMed

    Wifladt, A M; Lund, W; Bye, R

    1989-03-01

    Decomposition methods based on fusion with alkali are discussed, with respect to the determination of iodine in biological material. It is shown that sodium hydroxide can be used for the decomposition of seaweed without loss of iodine. In spite of the oxidizing conditions, the iodine will be present as iodide in the final ash. The iodide can be determined by an indirect atomic-absorption method, based on the reaction between iodide and mercury(II), with determination of mercury by cold vapour atomic-absorption spectrometry. The basis of the method is discussed, and it is shown that the use of tin(II) as reductant is essential. The effect of the oxidation state of the iodine on the sensitivity of the method is pointed out. High concentrations of chloride interfere, but it is still possible to determine iodide in iodinated table salt. PMID:18964724

  14. Determination of tetraalkyllead compounds in gasoline by liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messman, J.D.; Rains, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry (LC-AAS) hybrid analytical technique is presented for metal speciation measurements on complex liquid samples. The versatility and inherent metal selectivity of the technique are Illustrated by the rapid determination of five tetraalkyllead compounds in commercial gasoline. Separation of the individual tetraalkyllead species is achieved by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using an acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The effluent from the liquid Chromatograph Is introduced directly into the aspiration uptake capillary of the nebulizer of an air/acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Spectral interferences due to coeluting hydrocarbon matrix constituents were not observed at the 283.3-nm resonance line of lead used for analysis. Detection limits of this LC-AAS hydrid analytical technique, based on a 20-??L injection, are approximately 10 ng Pb for each tetraalkyllead compound.

  15. Heavy Metals Effect on Cyanobacteria Synechocystis aquatilis Study Using Absorption, Fluorescence, Flow Cytometry, and Photothermal Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowiak, A.; Olejarz, B.; Łukasiewicz, J.; Banaszek, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiktorowicz, K.

    2011-04-01

    The toxic effect of six heavy metals on cyanobacteria Synechocystis aquatilis was studied by absorption, fluorescence, flow cytometry, and photothermal measurements. This study indicates that at the concentration used, the cyanobacteria are more sensitive to silver, copper, and mercury than to cadmium, lead, and zinc metals. Disregarding the decrease in the yields of the related radiative processes caused by photochemical processes and/or damage to phycobilisomes, no changes were detected in the efficiency of thermal deactivation processes within a few microseconds, which can indicate the lack of disturbances in the photosynthetic light reaction and the lack of damage to the photosystem caused by the heavy metal ions in the concentrations used. The results demonstrate that the relative values of fluorescence yield as well as promptly generated heat calculated for the metal-affected and unaffected (reference) bacteria are sensitive indicators of environmental pollution with heavy metal ions, whereas the complementary methods proposed could be used as a noninvasive and fast procedure for in vivo assessment of their toxicity.

  16. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladhaf, Bibifatima M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2015-04-01

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  17. Observation of an electromagnetically induced change of absorption in multilevel rubidium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Qing; Jin, Shao-Zheng; Xiao, Min

    1995-03-01

    A 64.4% reduction in absorption at the rubidium D2 line is observed when a pumping field at 775.8 nm is tuned on resonance to the transition between the excited states 5P3/2 and 5D5/2. As the pumping field is tuned off resonance, an absorption peak appears at the side of the Doppler-broadened D2 line. This modification in absorption is related to pumping-induced atomic coherence in this three-level ladder-type system. This experiment is done in a Rb vapor cell at room temperature and with cw diode lasers for both pumping and probe beams in a Doppler-free configuration.

  18. Describing two-photon absorptivity of fluorescent proteins with a new vibronic coupling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Drobizhev, M; Makarov, N S; Tillo, S E; Hughes, T E; Rebane, A

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are widely used in two-photon microscopy as genetically encoded probes. Understanding the physical basics of their two-photon absorption (2PA) properties is therefore crucial for creation of two-photon brighter mutants. On the other hand, it can give us better insight into molecular interactions of the FP chromophore with a complex protein environment. It is known that, compared to the one-photon absorption spectrum, where the pure electronic transition is the strongest, the 2PA spectrum of a number of FPs is dominated by a vibronic transition. The physical mechanism of such intensity redistribution is not understood. Here, we present a new physical model that explains this effect through the "Herzberg-Teller"-type vibronic coupling of the difference between the permanent dipole moments in the ground and excited states (Δμ) to the bond-length-alternating coordinate. This model also enables us to quantitatively describe a large variability of the 2PA peak intensity in a series of red FPs with the same chromophore through the interference between the "Herzberg-Teller" and Franck-Condon terms. PMID:22224830

  19. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  20. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao; Zhang Duo

    2011-10-15

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  2. Determination of ytterbium in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, E C; Krug, F J; Nóbrega, J A; Nogueira, A R

    1998-11-01

    A method for ytterbium determination in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (TCAAS) was developed. Faeces were dry-ashed in a muffle furnace, the ashes were treated with hydrochloric acid, and 10 mul of sample solution were delivered into 150-W tungsten coil atomizer. A matrix-matching procedure employing a 66-s heating program proved to be efficient for obtaining accurate results. Characteristic mass and detection limit were 7.1 pg and 0.35 mug g(-1) Yb, respectively. The tungsten coil atomizer lifetime exceeded 300 firings with digested solutions and R.S.D. of measurements was 1.9% after ten consecutive injections of 10.0 mug l(-1) Yb. Accuracy of the proposed method was assessed by employing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure. Application of the paired t-test did not reveal any significant difference for ytterbium contents determined by both methods at 95% confidence level. It was demonstrated that the proposed procedure can successfully be used for evaluation of kinetic passage rate of feed through digestive tract of animals. PMID:18967363

  3. Energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms: A time-resolved fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Schroeder, W.; Kolb, D. M.

    1988-03-01

    The fluorescence from optically excited Ag atoms in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices has been investigated in a time-resolved synchrotron-radiation study. A detailed energy dissipation model could be established from a systematic analysis of rise and decay times of all the observed fluorescence bands after pulsed excitation into the Ag (4d105p)2P1/2,3/2 levels, and by setting time windows between the excitation pulses in emission and emission-yield spectroscopy. Although the overall wavelength dependence of the decay time follows the λ3 law, the decay time is independent of λ within a given emission band. Finally, the role of energy transfer between Ag atoms and dimers for the evaluation of decay times is briefly addressed.

  4. A metallic furnace atomizer in hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry: Determination of bismuth and selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Aline; Kim, Manuela Leticia; Tudino, Mabel Beatriz; Baccan, Nivaldo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2008-08-01

    A flow injection hydride generation system with a metal furnace atomizer (Inconel 600® alloy) was employed for Bi and Se determination. The presented methods have linear ranges up to 200 and 500 μg L - 1 for Bi and Se, respectively, with good linearities ( r2 = 0.9997 and 0.9974, respectively). The limits of quantification obtained according to IUPAC recommendations were 2.3 μg L - 1 for Bi and 6 μg L - 1 for Se, and the relative standard deviations ( N = 6) based on Bi and Se analytical responses from real samples were 2.7% and 10%, respectively. Accuracy evaluations were based on certified materials such as SRM 361, SRM 363, and SRM 364 (steel alloys) for Bi, Mess-3 (marine sediment), SRM 397 (human hair), and Bio-Rad2 — 69042 (urine) for Se. Good agreements between the results were obtained at the 95% confidence level, according to the t-test.

  5. Determination of selenium using atomically imprinted polymer (AIP) and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Grazielle Cabral; do Lago, Ayla Campos; Chaves, Arley Alves; Fadini, Pedro Sergio; Luccas, Pedro Orival

    2013-03-20

    This paper describes selenium determination based on Se(0) preconcentration in the imprinted polymer (synthesized with 2.25mmol SeO2, 4-vinylpyridine and 1-vinylimidazole) with subsequent detection on-line in HG-FAAS. During the synthesis, SeO2 is reduced to Se (0). Therefore, there are no MIP neither IIP in the present work, thus we denominated: AIP, i.e., atomically imprinted polymers. For the optimization of analytical parameters Doehlert design was used. The method presented limit of detection and limit of quantification of 53 and 177ngL(-1), respectively, and linear range from 0.17 up to 6μgL(-1) (r=0.9936). The preconcentration factor (PF), consumptive index (CI) and concentration efficiency (CE) were 232; 0.06mL and 58min(-1) respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine Se in Brazil nuts (0.33±0.03mgkg(-1)), apricot (0.46±0.02mgkg(-1)), white bean (0.47±0.03mgkg(-1)), rice flour (0.47±0.02mgkg(-1)) and milk powder (0.22±0.01mgkg(-1)) samples. It was possible to do 12 analyzes per hour. Accuracy was checked and confirmed by analyzing certified reference material (DORM-2, dogfish muscle), and samples precision was satisfactory with RSD lower than 10%. PMID:23473247

  6. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  7. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2007-03-01

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation — integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H 2Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an "integrated trap") was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3 σ), was 0.9 ng mL - 1 for Te. For a 2 min in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation — atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% ( n = 6) for Te. The designs studied include slotted tube, single silica tube and integrated atom trap-cooled atom traps. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  8. Nonlinear reconstruction of absorption and fluorescence contrast from measured diffuse transmittance and reflectance of a compressed-breast-simulating phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Ronny; Nielsen, Tim; Koehler, Thomas; Grosenick, Dirk; Steinkellner, Oliver; Hagen, Axel; Macdonald, Rainer; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2009-08-20

    We report on the nonlinear reconstruction of local absorption and fluorescence contrast in tissuelike scattering media from measured time-domain diffuse reflectance and transmittance of laser as well as laser-excited fluorescence radiation. Measurements were taken at selected source-detector offsets using slablike diffusely scattering and fluorescent phantoms containing fluorescent heterogeneities. Such measurements simulate in vivo data that would be obtained employing a scanning, time-domain fluorescence mammograph, where the breast is gently compressed between two parallel glass plates, and source and detector optical fibers scan synchronously at various source-detector offsets, allowing the recording of laser and fluorescence mammograms. The diffusion equations modeling the propagation of the laser and fluorescence radiation were solved in frequency domain by the finite element method simultaneously for several modulation frequencies using Fourier transformation and preprocessed experimental data. To reconstruct the concentration of the fluorescent contrast agent, the Born approximation including higher-order reconstructed photon densities at the excitation wavelength was used. Axial resolution was determined that can be achieved by various detection schemes. We show that remission measurements increase the depth resolution significantly.

  9. Determination of trace and minor elements in alloys by atomic-absorption spectroscopy using an induction-heated graphite-well furnace as atom source-II.

    PubMed

    Ashy, M A; Headridge, J B; Sowerbutts, A

    1974-06-01

    Results are presented for the atomic-absorption spectrophotometric determination of zinc in aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloys, and aluminium, antimony and tin in steels, by means of solid samples dropped into an induction-heated graphite-well furnace to produce the atomic vapour. PMID:18961510

  10. Microplasmas as vacuum ultraviolet source for Cl-atom density measurements by resonance absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Virginie; Bauville, Gérard; Sadeghi, Nader; Puech, Vincent

    2011-11-01

    A micro-hollow cathode discharge was used to generate radiation on the chlorine atom resonance lines. Such radiation could be used to measure, by resonance absorption spectroscopy, the density of chlorine atoms in either ground state (3p5 2P3/2) or in the fine structure metastable state (3p5 2P1/2), which is located at 882.35 cm-1. Among the nine analysed lines in the 132-142 nm spectral region, only those at 137.953 and 139.653 nm, which are strong enough and are not affected by the self-absorption, can be used for the resonance absorption diagnostic of the ground state and the metastable state, respectively. The best operating conditions of the lamp source are 0.5% of Cl2 in argon at 150 mbar and 4 mA discharge current. The measured 800 ± 30 K gas temperature of the microplasma, indicates that under these specific conditions, these two lines are dominantly Doppler broadened. So their profile is Gaussian shaped with full widths at half maximum of (4.7 ± 0.1) × 10-4 nm.

  11. ADVANCED APPROACHES TO ARSINE ATOMIZATION FOR AS SPECIATION BY CRYOFOCUSING WITH ATOMIC ABSORPTION AND ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE DETECTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) yields methylated arsenicals that contain arsenic in +3 or +5 oxidation state. Trivalent methylated arsenicals are significantly more toxic than their pentavalent counterparts. Therefore, determination of tri- and pentavalent forms of m...

  12. Method 200.12 - Determination of Trace Elements in Marine Waters by StabilizedTemperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total recoverable elements by graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) in marine waters, including estuarine, ocean and brines with salinities of up to 35 ppt.

  13. Determination of Mercury in Aqueous and Geologic Materials by Continuous Flow-Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (CVAFS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    New methods for the determination of total mercury in geologic materials and dissolved mercury in aqueous samples have been developed that will replace the methods currently (2006) in use. The new methods eliminate the use of sodium dichromate (Na2Cr2O7 ?2H2O) as an oxidizer and preservative and significantly lower the detection limit for geologic and aqueous samples. The new methods also update instrumentation from the traditional use of cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. At the same time, the new digestion procedures for geologic materials use the same size test tubes, and the same aluminum heating block and hot plate as required by the current methods. New procedures for collecting and processing of aqueous samples use the same procedures that are currently (2006) in use except that the samples are now preserved with concentrated hydrochloric acid/bromine monochloride instead of sodium dichromate/nitric acid. Both the 'old' and new methods have the same analyst productivity rates. These similarities should permit easy migration to the new methods. Analysis of geologic and aqueous reference standards using the new methods show that these procedures provide mercury recoveries that are as good as or better than the previously used methods.

  14. Spectro web: oscillator strength measurements of atomic absorption lines in the sun and procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.

    2008-10-01

    We update the online SpectroWeb database of spectral standard reference stars with 1178 oscillator strength values of atomic absorption lines observed in the optical spectrum of the Sun and Procyon (α CMi A). The updated line oscillator strengths are measured with best fits to the disk-integrated KPNO-FTS spectrum of the Sun observed between 4000 Å and 6800 Å using state-of-the-art detailed spectral synthesis calculations. A subset of 660 line oscillator strengths is validated with synthetic spectrum calculations of Procyon observed with ESO-UVES between 4700 Å and 6800 Å. The new log(gf)-values in SpectroWeb are improvements upon the values offered in the online Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD). We find for neutral iron-group elements, such as Fe I, Ni I, Cr I, and Ti I, a statistically significant over-estimation of the VALD log((gf)-values for weak absorption lines with normalized central line depths below 15 %. For abundant lighter elements (e.g. Mg I and Ca I) this trend is statistically not significantly detectable, with the exception of Si I for which the log(gf)-values of 60 weak and medium-strong lines are substantially decreased to best fit the observed spectra. The newly measured log(gf)-values are available in the SpectroWeb database at http://spectra.freeshell.org, which interactively displays the observed and computed stellar spectra, together with corresponding atomic line data.

  15. [Microsecond Pulsed Hollow Cathode Lamp as Enhanced Excitation Source of Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo

    2015-09-01

    The spectral, electrical and atomic fluorescence characteristics of As, Se, Sb and Pb hollow cathode lamps (HCLs) powered by a laboratory-built high current microsecond pulse (HCMP) power supply were studied, and the feasibility of using HCMP-HCLs as the excitation source of hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) was evaluated. Under the HCMP power supply mode, the As, Se, Sb, Pb HCLs can maintain stable glow discharge at frequency of 100~1000 Hz, pulse width of 4.0~20 μs and pulse current up to 4.0 A. Relationship between the intensity of characteristic emission lines and HCMP power supply parameters, such as pulse current, power supply voltage, pulse width and frequency, was studied in detail. Compared with the conventional pulsed (CP) HCLs used in commercial AFS instruments, HCMP-HCLs have a narrower pulse width and much stronger pulse current. Under the optimized HCMP power supply parameters, the intensity of atomic emission lines of As, Se, Sb HCLs had sharp enhancement and that indicated their capacity of being a novel HG-AFS excitation source. However, the attenuation of atomic lines and enhancement of ionic lines negated such feasibility of HCMP-Pb HCL. Then the HG-AFS analytical capability of using the HCMP-As/Se/Sb HCLs excitation source was established and results showed that the HCMP-HCL is a promising excitation source for HG-AFS. PMID:26669140

  16. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices--CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Barry M; McCaffrey, John G

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y(1)P ← a(1)S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm(-1)). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications. PMID:26827218

  17. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices—CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Barry M.; McCaffrey, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ṡ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y1P←a1S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ṡ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm-1). All of the M ṡ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  18. Possible atomic structures responsible for the sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ke-Fan; Shao, Hezhu; Liu, Kong; Qu, Shengchun E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn; Wang, Zhanguo; Wang, Yuanxu E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    Single-crystal silicon was hyperdoped with sulfur, selenium, and tellurium using ion implantation and nanosecond laser melting. The hyperdoping of such chalcogen elements led to strong and wide sub-bandgap light absorption. Annealing the hyperdoped silicon, even at low temperatures (such as 200–400 °C), led to attenuation of the sub-bandgap absorption. To explain the attenuation process, we modeled it as chemical decomposition reaction from an optically absorbing structure to a non-absorbing structure. Attenuation of the experimental absorption coefficient was fit using the Arrhenius equation. From the fitted data, we extracted the reaction activation energies of S-, Se-, and T-hyperdoped silicon as 0.338 ± 0.029 eV, 0.471 ± 0.040 eV, and 0.357 ± 0.028 eV, respectively. We discuss these activation energies in terms of the bond energies of chalcogen–Si metastable bonds, and suggest that several high-energy interstitial sites, rather than substitutional sites, are candidates for the atomic structures that are responsible for the strong sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen hyperdoped silicon.

  19. Alternative approaches to correct interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasias, I. N.; Pappa, Ch.; Katsarou, V.; Τhomaidis, N. S.; Piperaki, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to propose alternative techniques and methods in combination with the classical chemical modification to correct the major matrix interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps. The performance of an internal standard (Ge) for the determination of boron by the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry was tested. The use of internal standardization increased the recovery from 85.9% to 101% and allowed a simple correction of errors during sampling preparation and heating process. Furthermore, a new preparation procedure based on the use of citric acid during digestion and dilution steps improved the sensitivity of the method and decreased the limit of detection. Finally, a comparative study between the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with a longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction system, equipped with a transversely-heated graphite atomizer and the single element atomic absorption spectrometry with a D2 background correction system, equipped with an end-heated graphite atomizer was undertaken to investigate the different behavior of boron in both techniques. Different chemical modifiers for the determination of boron were tested with both techniques. Ni-citric acid and Ca were the optimal chemical modifiers when simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry and single-element atomic absorption spectrometry were used, respectively. By using the single-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the calculated characteristic mass was 220 pg and the calculated limit of detection was 370 μg/kg. On the contrary, with simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the characteristic mass was 2200 pg and the limit of detection was 5.5 mg/kg.

  20. Coherent population trapping on 87Rb atoms in small-size absorption cells with buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) on 87Rb atoms in neon atmosphere has been studied in small-size glass absorption cells under conditions of pumping with narrow-band laser radiation at the D2 line of the main doublet. Parameters of the absorption signal have been measured in 3-mm-diameter cells at buffer gas (Ne) pressures varied within 200-400 Torr, cell temperatures within 65-120°C, and pumping radiation power densities within 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimum values of the buffer gas pressures, cell temperature, and pumping power are determined at which the short-term instability of the resonance line is at minimum. Orientational shifts of the CPT resonance signal in gas-filled cells and small-size cells with antirelaxation coating have been compared.

  1. The physical basis for absorption of light. [effects on wave functions of gas molecules and atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of light absorption on the wave functions of gas-phase molecules and atoms are investigated by high resolution spectral measurements of radiation emerging from a sample. A Stark-modulated sample of methyl fluoride was irradiated at the 102 GHz rotational transition and the emergent radiation was resolved by means of a spectrum analyzer. For signal oscillator frequencies below or above the molecular resonance by one modulation frequency, the amplitudes of the upper and lower modulation sidebands are found to be of nonuniform intensity, which is inconsistent with amplitude modulation. Emission due to polarization is, however, calculated to be consistent with the results observed, indicating that light absorption should be considered as a subtractive stimulated emission.

  2. Ablation-initiated Isotope-selective Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy of Lanthanide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Wakaida, I.; Watanabe, K.

    2009-03-17

    For remote isotope analysis of low-decontaminated trans-uranium (TRU) fuel, absorption spectroscopy has been applied to a laser-ablated plume of lanthanide elements. To improve isotopic selectivity and detection sensitivity of the ablated species, various experimental conditions were optimized. Isotope-selective absorption spectra were measured by observing the slow component of the plume produced under low-pressure rare-gas ambient. The measured minimum line width of about 0.9 GHz was close to the Doppler width of the Gd atomic transition at room temperature. The relaxation rate of high-lying metastable state was found to be higher than that of the ground state, which suggests that higher analytical sensitivity can be obtained using low-lying state transition. Under helium gas environment, Doppler splitting was caused from particle motion. This effect was considered for optimization for isotope selection and analysis. Some analytical performances of this method were determined under optimum conditions and were discussed.

  3. Plasma jet desorption atomization-atomic fluorescence spectrometry and its application to mercury speciation by coupling with thin layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhifu; Zhu, Zhenli; Zheng, Hongtao; Hu, Shenghong

    2012-12-01

    A novel plasma jet desorption atomization (PJDA) source was developed for atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) and coupled on line with thin layer chromatography (TLC) for mercury speciation. An argon dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, which is generated inside a 300 μm quartz capillary, interacts directly with the sample being analyzed and is found to desorb and atomize surface mercury species rapidly. The effectiveness of this PJDA surface sampling technique was demonstrated by measuring AFS signals of inorganic Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg), and phenylmercury (PhHg) deposited directly on TLC plate. The detection limits of the proposed PJDA-AFS method for inorganic Hg(2+), MeHg, and PhHg were 0.51, 0.29, and 0.34 pg, respectively, and repeatability was 4.7%, 2.2%, and 4.3% for 10 pg Hg(2+), MeHg, and PhHg. The proposed PJDA-AFS was also successfully coupled to TLC for mercury speciation. Under optimized conditions, the measurements of mercury dithizonate (Hg-D), methylmercury dithizonate (MeHg-D), and phenylmercury dithizonate (PhHg-D) could be achieved within 3 min with detection limits as low as 8.7 pg. The combination of TLC with PJDA-AFS provides a simple, cost-effective, relatively high-throughput way for mercury speciation. PMID:23153091

  4. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, J.J.; Allen, P.G.; Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Madden, N.W.; Cork, C.; Luke, P.; Pehl, D.; Malone, D.

    1995-03-01

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm{sup 2} pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is < 10% for 5.9 keV photons that fall within 0.5 mm of the pixel boundaries. The detector electronics system uses pre-amplifiers built at LBNL with commercial Tennelec Model TC 244 amplifiers. Using an {sup 55}Fe test source (MnK{sub {alpha}}, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 {mu}sec peaking time. At 0.5 {mu}sec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting.

  5. New aspects concerning the energy transfer in carotenoids by measuring intracavity absorption spectra and delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettermann, Hans; Bouschen, Werner; Ulrich, Lars; Domnick, Gabriele; Martin, H. D.

    1999-05-01

    The first excited singlet state and the lower energetic triplet states of carotenoids are considered to be involved in the light-harvesting as well as in the photochemical protection of cells, respectively. For this reason, the symmetry-forbidden S 0-S 1 (1 1A g-2 1A g) transitions and the multiplicity-forbidden S 0-T 2 (1 1A g-2 3A g) transition of the model carotenoid 8,13-dimethyl-2,2,19,19-tetramethoxy-icosa-4,6,8,10,12,14,16-heptaene-3,18-dione were investigated by intracavity absorption spectroscopy from low-concentrated ethanolic solutions. Both transitions are shaped by promoting modes caused by Herzberg-Teller coupling and the sequence of these modes allows the precise determination of the non-visible S 0-S 1 (0-0)- and S 0-T 2 (0-0)-transitions. The assignments of the singlet-triplet transitions were additionally supported by measuring delayed fluorescence from crystalline samples by directly exciting vibronic triplet states. The vibronic coupling is promoted by C-H bending vibrations of the chain and mainly by deformation modes of the terminating groups of the carotenoid.

  6. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1988--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies.

  7. Neutral atomic absorption lines and far-UV extinction: Possible implications for depletions and grain parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Daniel E.

    1990-07-01

    Researchers examine nine lines of sight within the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) for which data on both neutral atomic absorption lines (Snow 1984; White 1986; Welty, Hobbs, and York 1989) and far UV extinction (Bless and Savage 1972; Jenkins, Savage, and Spitzer 1986) are available, in order to test the assumption that variations in gamma/alpha will cancel in taking ratios of the ionization balance equation, and to try to determine to what extent that assumption has affected the aforementioned studies of depletions and grain properties.

  8. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  9. Refraction and absorption of x rays by laser-dressed atoms.

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, C.; Santra, R.; Young, L.

    2010-06-01

    X-ray refraction and absorption by neon atoms under the influence of an 800 nm laser with an intensity of 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} is investigated. For this purpose, we use an ab initio theory suitable for optical strong-field problems. Its results are interpreted in terms of a three-level model. On the Ne 1s {yields} 3p resonance, we find electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for x rays. Our work opens novel perspectives for ultrafast x-ray pulse shaping.

  10. [Electrothermal atomic absorption determination of arsenic in plants and plant products].

    PubMed

    Karpova, E A; Malysheva, A G; Ermakov, A A; Sidorenkova, N K

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed the optimal temperature-time parameters of electrothermal atomic absorption determination of arsenic in plants after their acid predigestion. The matrix modifier is 1% nickel nitrate or palladium nitrate solution. Cuvettes (ovens) are simple, made of porous or pyrolytic graphite. The analytical program is suitable for both spectrometers with Zeeman and deuterium background correction. The correctness of the procedure has been estimated from the results of analysis of state reference samples certified for their arsenic content. The coefficient of variation was 20-35% for the concentration range of 0.02-0.2 mg/kg. PMID:22712335

  11. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  12. Telecom-heralded single-photon absorption by a single atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhard, Andreas; Bock, Matthias; Becher, Christoph; Kucera, Stephan; Brito, José; Eich, Pascal; Müller, Philipp; Eschner, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We present, characterize, and apply the architecture of a photonic quantum interface between the near infrared and telecom spectral regions. A singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) operated below threshold, in combination with external filters, generates high-rate (>2.5 ×106s-1 ) narrowband photon pairs (˜7 MHz bandwidth); the signal photons are tuned to resonance with an atomic transition in Ca+, while the idler photons are at telecom wavelength. Interface operation is demonstrated through high-rate absorption of single photons by a single trapped ion (˜670 s-1 ), heralded by coincident telecom photons.

  13. Automated atomic absorption spectrometric determination of total arsenic in water and streambed materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, M.

    1977-01-01

    An automated method to determine both inorganic and organic forms of arsenic In water, water-suspended mixtures, and streambed materials Is described. Organic arsenic-containing compounds are decomposed by either ultraviolet radiation or by suHurlc acid-potassium persulfate digestion. The arsenic liberated, with Inorganic arsenic originally present, is reduced to arsine with sodium borohydrlde. The arable Is stripped from the solution with the aid of nitrogen and Is then decomposed In a tube furnace heated to 800 ??C which Is placed in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. Thirty samples per hour can be analyzed to levels of 1 ??g arsenic per liter.

  14. Determination of traces of silver in waters by anion exchange and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Fishman, M. J.; Ball, J.W.

    1969-01-01

    A method has been developed for the accurate determination of 0.1-1 ??g of silver per liter of water. The method permits stabilization of silver in water without loss to container walls. Optimum conditions have been established for the complete recovery of silver from water with an anion-exchange column, for quantitative elution of silver from the resin, and for measurement of silver by atomic absorption spectrophotometry after chelation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and extraction of the chelate with MIBK. Silver in the 1-10 ??g 1 range can be determined by extraction without pre-concentration on an ion-exchange resin. ?? 1969.

  15. Determination of mercury in soils and sediments by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, Ignacio; Sánchez-Merlos, Mateo; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    1997-12-01

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure for the determination of mercury is presented, in which the samples are suspended in a solution containing hydrofluoric and nitric acids. Silver nitrate (4% m/v) and potassium permanganate (3%) are incorporated, in the order specified, and aliquots are directly introduced into the graphite furnace. A fast heating programme with no conventional pyrolysis step is used. The detection limit for mercury in a 125 mg ml -1 suspension is 0.1 μg g -1. Calibration is performed by using aqueous standards. The reliability of the procedure is proved by analysing certified reference materials.

  16. Neutral atomic absorption lines and far-UV extinction: Possible implications for depletions and grain parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers examine nine lines of sight within the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) for which data on both neutral atomic absorption lines (Snow 1984; White 1986; Welty, Hobbs, and York 1989) and far UV extinction (Bless and Savage 1972; Jenkins, Savage, and Spitzer 1986) are available, in order to test the assumption that variations in gamma/alpha will cancel in taking ratios of the ionization balance equation, and to try to determine to what extent that assumption has affected the aforementioned studies of depletions and grain properties.

  17. Saturable absorption dynamics in the triplet system and triplet excitation induced singlet fluorescence of some organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, H.; Penzkofer, A.

    2001-01-01

    The triplet saturable absorption behaviour of the xanthene dyes eosin Y, erythrosin B, and rose bengal and of the fullerene molecule C 70 is studied. The molecules are excited to the S 1-state by intense picosecond pulses (wavelength λP=527 nm). They relax dominantly to the triplet system by intersystem crossing. The triplet-triplet saturable absorption is investigated with time-delayed intense picosecond pulses (wavelength λL=1054 nm) in the transparency region of the molecules in the singlet ground state. Higher excited-state triplet absorption cross-sections and higher excited-state triplet relaxation times are determined by numerical simulation of the experimental results. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements reveal higher excited-state triplet to singlet back-intersystem-crossing and multi-step triplet photoionization. Additionally the two-photon absorption cross-sections at λL=1054 nm are determined by measurement of the fundamental pulse two-photon induced fluorescence relative to the second-harmonic pulse single-photon induced fluorescence.

  18. Analysis of lithium in deep basalt groundwaters using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.A.; Marcy, A.D.

    1986-05-01

    Lithium is under consideration for use as a reactive (sorptive) tracer in experiments designed to provide information regarding natural attenuation processes in a basalt-groundwater environment. In support of these activities, background lithium concentrations in samples obtained from a variety of test horizons have been determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Significant interference was observed in these determinations and was found to be due to the presence of silicate in the samples. It was found that these problems could be circumvented through the use of alkaline silicate or synthetic groundwater matrix modifiers. This matrix effect was examined in some detail. Results obtained using the graphite furnace were compared to results obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

  19. Atomic absorption determination of traces of cadmium in urine after electrodeposition onto a tungsten wire.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Li, J; Fu, D; Hao, D; Xiang, P

    1993-03-01

    A three-coil tungsten wire is used as electrode for the preconcentration of cadmium, which is then placed in a graphite tube for atomization and atomic absorption measurement. The heating parameters of the graphite furnace are optimized using the Modified and Weighted Centroid Simplex Method (MWCS), and computer program for automatic calculation. Sulphuric acid is selected as the supporting electrolyte for electrodeposition. The linear range of the calibration graph is 0.00-0.55 ng/ml. The detection limit is 0.01 ng/ml. For 0.1 ng/ml cadmium the coefficient of variation is 3.35% for ten parallel determinations. No interference occurs in the presence of more than 20 coexisting ions. Traces of cadmium in urine of normal people and in river water and the recoveries for cadmium are determined. The results are satisfactory. PMID:18965645

  20. Determination of vanadium in mussels by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Y; Fernández, P; González, A

    2004-05-01

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of total vanadium concentration in mussels via electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After the microwave digestion of the samples, a program using temperatures of 1600 degrees C and 2600 degrees C for ashing and atomization respectively, without any matrix modifiers, allowed us to obtain results that were satisfactory since they agreed closely with certified reference material values. The detection limit was 0.03 mg kg(-1) (dry weight), indicating that the method is suitable for the analysis of mussel samples. This determination was compared with matrix modifiers that have been reported previously. The method was applied to various cultivated and wild mussels from the Galician coast, yielding levels below 1 mg kg(-1) (wet weight). PMID:14745471

  1. Expressing self-absorption in the analytical function of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; Bartha, András

    2015-11-01

    The self-absorption of spectral lines was studied with up to date multi-element inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instrumentation using radial and axial viewing of the plasma, as well, performing line peak height and line peak area measurements. Two resonance atomic and ionic lines of Cd and Mg were studied, the concentration range was extended up to 2000 mg/L. At the varying analyte concentration, constant matrix concentration of 10,000 mg/L Ca was ensured in the pneumatically nebulized solutions. The physical and the phenomenological formulation of the emission analytical function is overviewed and as the continuity of the earlier results the following equation is offered:

  2. Determination of ruthenium in pharmaceutical compounds by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiujuan; Wang, Tiebang; Bu, Xiaodong; Tu, Qiang; Spencer, Sandra

    2006-04-11

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) spectrometric method for the determination of ruthenium (Rh) in solid and liquid pharmaceutical compounds has been developed. Samples are dissolved or diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) without any other treatment before they were analyzed by GFAA with a carefully designed heating program to avoid pre-atomization signal loss and to achieve suitable sensitivity. Various inorganic and organic solvents were tested and compared and DMSO was found to be the most suitable. In addition, ruthenium was found to be stable in DMSO for at least 5 days. Spike recoveries ranged from 81 to 100% and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 0.5 microg g(-1) for solid samples or 0.005 microg ml(-1) for liquid samples based a 100-fold dilution. The same set of samples was also analyzed by ICP-MS with a different sample preparation method, and excellent agreement was achieved. PMID:16314066

  3. Intercomparison of OH Radical Measurements by Long-Path Absorption and Laser Induced Fluorescence in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Greif, J.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Rupp, L.

    2003-04-01

    A striking advantage of the SAPHIR chamber is the availability of two spectroscopic detection instruments for OH radicals: Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) and Long-Path Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Both instruments have already been compared in 1994 during the field measurement campaign POPCORN. They agreed well with a correlation coefficient of r=0.90 and a weighted linear fit with a slope of 1.09 +- 0.12. However, OH measurements in the simulation chamber differ significantly from measurements in ambient air. While DOAS measures OH as an integral value along the central longitudinal axis of SAPHIR, LIF samples the air locally and close (2 cm) to the floor of the chamber. Thus, the LIF measurements might be possibly affected by local concentration gradients caused by insufficient mixing of the chamber air or by deposition to the wall. On the other hand, if turbulent mixing of the chamber air is weak and high concentrations of ozone are used in experiments, the DOAS instrument might be subject to artificial formation of OH radicals in the air volume which is illuminated by the detection laser. This interference results from laser induced photolysis of ozone and the subsequent reaction of water vapor with the excited oxygen atoms formed. Thus it is of decisive importance to compare OH measurements from both instruments in order to investigate potential disturbing effects due to the specific sampling properties of both instruments within SAPHIR. We report on OH measurements accomplished simultaneously with both instruments using different trace gas compositions and experimental conditions.

  4. Photodynamic cancer therapy: fluorescence localization and light absorption spectra of chlorophyll-derived photosensitizers inside cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Joerg G.; Rueck, Angelika C.; Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Westphal-Frosch, Christel

    1992-07-01

    The first prerequisite for an optimum effect of photodynamic therapy with chlorophyll- derived photosensitizers is irradiation at the S1 absorption maximum in the red spectral region. This absorption maximum changes its position due to molecular association by 20 to 100 nm depending on the subcellular environment, and must be determined by direct absorption spectrometry in the region of subcellular sensitizer localization. Fluorescence- intensifying video microscopy allows for localization of the sensitizer storage site at or near the Galgi apparatus of OAT 75 small-cell lung carcinoma cells. The absorption maximum at 760 nm taken from spectra of single cells and cell layers determines the postulated optimum condition for dye laser irradiation with bacteriopheophorbide-a-methyl-ester as the sensitizer.

  5. Determination of Copper by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: A Student Exercise in Instrumental Methods of Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a student exercise which requires the optimizing of the charring and atomization temperatures by producing a plot of absorbance versus temperature for each temperature parameter. Notes that although the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy technique has widespread industrial use, there are no published, structured experiments…

  6. Saturable absorption and two-photon absorption of 1,2,5-thiadiazolo[3,4-g]quinoxaline based derivatives with near-infrared fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yabing; Lin, Xiaodong; Jia, Tingjian; Dong, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Organic molecules with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence are extremely interesting for the applications in nonlinear optical devices and bioimaging. However, such kind of materials have been relatively rarely studied. In this work, the nonlinear optical properties of 1,2,5-thiadiazolo[3,4-g]quinoxaline based derivatives with NIR fluorescence emission have been investigated for the first time. Under the excitation of femtosecond pulses at 532 nm, the chromophore with dithienyl as donor (TQ2) presents saturable absorption (SA) behavior, while no SA has been observed in the derivative with biphenyl (TQ1) as donor. Moreover, TQ2 exhibits much larger two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections with strong NIR fluorescence in the second biological window. The larger nonlinear optical properties of TQ2 is due to the introduction of stronger electron-donating group (dithienyl) and the resultant enhanced intramolecular charge transfer properties. At the end, TPA based optical limiting behaviors of the molecules are demonstrated in THF solutions, thanks to their large solubility and strong TPA.

  7. Photochemistry on surfaces: Fluorescence emission of monomers and dimers and triplet state absorption of acridine orange adsorbed on microcrystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, F.; Worrall, D. R.; Ferreira, L. F. Vieira

    1992-02-01

    Prompt fluorescence as well as delayed fluorescence emission of acridine orange was detected at room temperature from samples where this dye is adsorbed on microcrystalline cellulose. Ground state absorption studies provided evidence for dimer formation of the dye when adsorbed on cellulose, and the equilibrium constant for dimerisation was determined as 1.6±0.1 × 10 6mol -1g. At low loadings of acridine orange on cellulose (<1 μmol g -1) the fluorescence emission is mainly due to the monomer and is similar to that observed in ethanolic solutions where little aggregation occurs, and peaks at 530 nm. A linear dependence of the fluorescence intensity on the amount of light absorbed by the dye was established for these "diluted" samples. However, at higher loadings (>20 μmol g -1), the fluorescence intensity decreases, and the emission is broad with its maximum at 620 nm, and is mainly due to the dimer. By assuming that the excited monomer and dimer of acridine orange are the only emitting species, it was possible to determine the fluorescence quantum yields for these two species when adsorbed on microcrystalline cellulose as 0.95±0.05 and 0.40±0.10, respectively. Pulsed emission studies at room temperature in the millisecond time-range also revealed monomer and dimer emissions on this longer time-scale. These are shown to be due to thermally activated delayed fluorescence arising from the triplet states of monomer and dimer acridine orange as confirmed by diffuse reflectance transient absorption studies.

  8. Investigation of artifacts caused by deuterium background correction in the determination of phosphorus by electrothermal atomization using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Lepri, Fábio G.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Márcia M.; Heitmann, Uwe

    2008-02-01

    The artifacts created in the measurement of phosphorus at the 213.6-nm non-resonance line by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using line source atomic absorption spectrometry (LS AAS) and deuterium lamp background correction (D 2 BC) have been investigated using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS). The absorbance signals and the analytical curves obtained by LS AAS without and with D 2 BC, and with HR-CS AAS without and with automatic correction for continuous background absorption, and also with least-squares background correction for molecular absorption with rotational fine structure were compared. The molecular absorption due to the suboxide PO that exhibits pronounced fine structure could not be corrected by the D 2 BC system, causing significant overcorrection. Among the investigated chemical modifiers, NaF, La, Pd and Pd + Ca, the Pd modifier resulted in the best agreement of the results obtained with LS AAS and HR-CS AAS. However, a 15% to 100% higher sensitivity, expressed as slope of the analytical curve, was obtained for LS AAS compared to HR-CS AAS, depending on the modifier. Although no final proof could be found, the most likely explanation is that this artifact is caused by a yet unidentified phosphorus species that causes a spectrally continuous absorption, which is corrected without problems by HR-CS AAS, but which is not recognized and corrected by the D 2 BC system of LS AAS.

  9. High-speed laser-induced fluorescence and spark plug absorption sensor diagnostics for mixing and combustion studies in engines.

    PubMed

    Cundy, Michael; Schucht, Torsten; Thiele, Olaf; Sick, Volker

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous high-speed in-cylinder measurements of laser-induced fluorescence of biacetyl as a fuel tracer and mid-infrared broadband absorption of fuel and combustion products (water and carbon dioxide) using a spark plug probe are compared in an optical engine. The study addresses uncertainties and the applicability of absorption measurements at a location slightly offset to the spark plug when information about mixing at the spark plug is desired. Absorbance profiles reflect important engine operation events, such as valve opening and closing, mixing, combustion, and outgassing from crevices. PMID:19183588

  10. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; LeBrun, T.; Southworth, S.H.; Jung, M.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    Argon L{sub 2.3}-M{sub 2.3}M{sub 2.3} Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with K{alpha} fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons.

  11. Determination of elements by atomic absorption spectrometry in medicinal plants employed to alleviate common cold symptoms.

    PubMed

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Kuyumcu, Ebru

    2014-09-01

    Eleven important medicinal plants generally used by the people of Turkey for the treatment of common cold have been studied for their mineral contents. Eleven minor and major elements (essential, non-essential and toxic) were identified in the Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L. , Althaea officinalis L. , Verbascum phlomoides L., Euphorbia chamaesyce L., Zizyphus jujube Miller, Peganum harmala L., Arum dioscoridis Sm., Sambucus nigra L., Piperlongum L., Tussilago farfara L. and Elettaria cardamomum Maton by employing flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry and electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Microwave digestion procedure for total concentration was applied under optimized conditions for dissolution of medicinal plants. Plant based biological certified reference materials (CRMs) served as standards for quantification. These elements are found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied plants. The baseline data presented in this work can be used in understanding the role of essential, non-essential and toxic elements in nutritive, preventive and therapeutic properties of medicinal plants. PMID:25532362

  12. [The application of atomic absorption spectrometry in automatic transmission fault detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-dan; Chen, Kai-kao

    2012-01-01

    The authors studied the innovative applications of atomic absorption spectrometry in the automatic transmission fault detection. After the authors have determined Fe, Cu and Cr contents in the five groups of Audi A6 main metal in automatic transmission fluid whose travel course is respectively 10-15 thousand kilometers, 20-26 thousand kilometers, 32-38 thousand kilometers, 43-49 thousand kilometers, and 52-58 thousand kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the authors founded the database of primary metal content in the Audi A6 different mileage automatic transmission fluid (ATF). The research discovered that the main metal content in the automatic transmission fluid increased with the vehicles mileage and its normal metal content level in the automatic transmission fluid is between the two trend lines. The authors determined the main metal content of automatic transmission fluid which had faulty symptoms and compared it with its database value. Those can not only judge the wear condition of the automatic transmission which had faulty symptoms but also help the automobile detection and maintenance personnel to diagnose automatic transmission failure reasons without disintegration. This reduced automobile maintenance costs, and improved the quality of automobile maintenance. PMID:22497168

  13. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16–42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  14. Multi-element analysis of manganese nodules by atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.; Harnly, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Five manganese nodules, including the USGS reference nodules A-1 and P-1, were analyzed for Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn without prior chemical separation by using a simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometer with an air-cetylene flame. The nodules were prepared in three digestion matrices. One of these solutions was measured using sixteen different combinations of burner height and air/acetylene ratios. Results for A-1 and P-1 are compared to recommended values and results for all nodules are compared to those obtained with an inductively coupled plasma. The elements Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn are simultaneously determined with a composite recovery for all elements of 100 ?? 7%, independent of the digestion matrices, heights in the flame, or flame stoichiometries examined. Individual recoveries for Co, K, and Ni are considerably poorer in two digests than this composite figure, however. The optimum individual recoveries of 100 ?? 5% and imprecisions of 1-4%, except for zinc, are obtained when Co, K, Mn, Na and Ni are determined simultaneously in a concentrated digest, and in another analytical sequence, when Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn are measured simultaneously after dilution. Determination of manganese is equally accurate in the two sequences; its measurement in both assures internal consistency between the two measurement sequences. This approach improves analytical efficiency over that for conventional atomic absorption methods, while minimizing loss of accuracy or precision for individual elements. ?? 1982.

  15. Determination of maduramicin by liquid chromatography with atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N A

    1989-01-01

    A liquid chromatograph was interfaced to an atomic absorption spectrometer for the detection and quantitation of maduramicin in feed matrixes at the 1-8 ppm level. Ionophores in general form strong 1:1 products with various metal cations, yielding complexes that are insoluble in water but very soluble in organic solvents. Maduramicin, a carboxylic, polyalcohol, polyether antibiotic, is labeled with the sodium cation and analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The lower limit of detection is approximately 100-200 ng maduramicin sodium salt. Feeds containing 1-8 ppm maduramicin are extracted with acetone, the extract is passed through an alumina column, the column is eluted with acetonitrile-water (90 + 10), and the eluate is analyzed for maduramicin by liquid chromatography-AAS after concentration and conversion of maduramicin to the sodium salt. Recoveries of maduramicin averaged 89.5%. Liquid chromatography with AAS detection has been shown to be a sensitive and highly specific technique for the determination of ionophores in general and maduramicin in particular. PMID:2708270

  16. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of some fluoroquinolone antibacterials using ammonium reineckate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghannam, Sheikha M.

    2008-04-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of gatifloxacin (GTF), moxifloxacin (MXF) and sparfloxacin (SPF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. Optimum concentration ranges for the determination of GTF, MXF and SPF were 5.0-150, 40-440 μg mL -1 and 0.10-1.5 mg mL -1 using atomic absorption (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods, respectively. Detection and quantification limits are ranges from 1.5 to 2.3 μg mL -1 using AAS method or 30-45 μg mL -1 using colorimetric method. The proposed procedures have been applied successfully to the analysis of these drugs in pharmaceutical formulations and the results are favourably comparable to the reference methods.

  17. Local atomic structure around Ni, Nb, and Zr atoms in Ni-Nb-Zr-H glassy alloys studied by x-ray absorption fine structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oji, H.; Handa, K.; Ide, J.; Honma, T.; Yamaura, S.; Inoue, A.; Umesaki, N.; Emura, S.; Fukuhara, M.

    2009-06-01

    To elucidate hydrogen effects on the atomic configuration of Ni-Nb-Zr-H glassy alloys exhibiting proton-tunneling-induced Coulomb oscillation, we investigated the local atomic configuration around the Ni, Nb, and Zr atoms by x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) method. The analysis of the XAFS spectra indicates that there is the significant difference in structural response between the Zr 30 and the Zr 40 at. % alloys when hydrogen atoms are charged; charging the hydrogen atoms basically does not alter the local structures around the three atoms for the Zr 30 at. % alloy but induces the elongation of the Zr-Zr, Zr-Nb, and Nb-Ni distances for the Zr 40 at. % alloy. The distorted icosahedral Zr5Ni5Nb3 clusters assembled in randomly packed manners for the possible models in the Ni-Nb-Zr glassy alloy are proposed. The sites where hydrogen atoms occupy are also inferred.

  18. Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of rainwater CDOM and contribution to Lake Taihu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Gao, Guang; Shi, Kun; Niu, Cheng; Zhou, Yongqiang; Qin, Boqiang; Liu, Xiaohan

    2014-12-01

    We characterized the composition and sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in rainwater, and assessed the relative contribution of rainwater CDOM to lake water in Lake Taihu based on rainwater collected during 35 rainfall events in 2012. Chemical analysis, ultraviolet-visible absorbance, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize CDOM. The CDOM absorption coefficient at 254 nm (a254) had a significant seasonal variation, with a mean of 3.67 ± 1.69 m-1 in the wet season (from April to early August), which was significantly lower than the means in the two dry seasons (8.26 ± 2.94 m-1 from January to March, and 7.60 ± 3.80 m-1 from late August to December). The mean humification index and the mean index of recent autochthonous contribution were 0.74 ± 0.48 and 1.31 ± 0.35, respectively, indicating that rainwater CDOM was dominated by an atmospheric microbial origin component. We identified four fluorescence components using parallel factor analysis modeling in the rainwater CDOM, i.e., two protein-like components (C1 and C2) and two fulvic-like components (C3 and C4), which had characteristics similar to those of protein and humic-like substances, respectively. The a254 was significantly and positively (p < 0.001) correlated with each of the five nutrient parameters: total dissolved nitrogen (r2 = 0.76), ammonium (r2 = 0.65), nitrate (r2 = 0.36), total dissolved phosphorus (r2 = 0.55), and phosphate (r2 = 0.50) showing the tightly coupling between CDOM and nutrients. Based on the deposition of the rainwater CDOM and the storage of the CDOM in Lake Taihu, the annual relative contribution of rainwater CDOM to the lake water was 11.7% in 2012. The results showed the important effect of wet deposition on CDOM sources in Lake Taihu, which is located in a region with severe air pollution in the Yangtze River Delta.

  19. Vibrationally Resolved Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of Firefly Luciferin: A Theoretical Simulation in the Gas Phase and in Solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Firefly bioluminescence has been applied in several fields. However, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the substrate, luciferin, have not been observed at the vibrational level. In this study, the vibrationally resolved absorption and fluorescence spectra of firefly luciferin (neutral form LH2 , phenolate ion form LH(-) and dianion form L(2-) ) are simulated using the density functional method and convoluted by a Gaussian function, with displacement, distortion and Duschinsky effects in the framework of the Franck-Condon approximation. Both neutral and anionic forms of the luciferin are considered in the gas phase and in solution. The simulated spectra have desired band maxima with the experimental ones. The vibronic structure analysis reveals that the features of the most contributive vibrational modes coincide with the key geometry-changing region during transition between the ground state and the first singlet excited state. PMID:27165852

  20. Direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Éder C.; Krug, Francisco José; Arruda, Marco A. Z.

    1998-04-01

    A simplified method for direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks, syrups and honeys by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without sample digestion is proposed. Samples were dissolved in water, acidified to 0.2% (v/v) HNO 3, and directly injected into an end-capped transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). Building up of carbonaceous residue inside the atomizer was effectively precluded for sugar solutions not exceeding 8.0% (m/v) when a heating program with two pyrolysis steps (600 and 1000°C) was carried out without air-ashing. Under these conditions one atomizer supported about 250 firings. Among various chemical modifiers tested, better recovery and repeatability results were obtained with a 5 μg Pd + 3 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 mixture. Tests carried out with individual concomitants containing up to 1.0 μg Na, K, Ca or Cl, and up to 10.0 μg phosphate or sulphate, and several mixtures of these six concomitants, did not reveal significant interferences on lead atomization. Characteristic mass and detection limit based on integrated absorbance were 15 and 11 pg Pb, respectively. The relative standard deviation based on 10 measurements for typical samples (20-60 ng g -1 Pb) was always lower than 5.5%. The detection limit of 7.0 ng g -1 Pb attained the Codex recommendation for the maximum allowed lead contents in the sugar samples. Application of t-test to the results obtained by the proposed direct analysis, and the official method adopted by Food Chemical Codex, demonstrated that there were no significant differences at the 5% probability level.

  1. Precise intensity correlation measurement for atomic resonance fluorescence from optical molasses.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kazuyuki; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Hisatoshi; Torii, Yoshio; Kuga, Takahiro

    2010-03-29

    We measured the intensity correlation of true thermal light scattered from cold atoms in an optical molasses. Using a single-mode fiber as a transverse mode filter, measurement with maximally high spatial coherence was realized, allowing us to observe ideal photon bunching with unprecedented precision. The measured intensity correlation functions showed a definite bimodal structure with fast damped oscillation from the maximum value of 2.02(3) and slow monotonic decay toward unity. The oscillation can be understood as an interference between elastic and inelastic scattering fields in resonance fluorescence. PMID:20389684

  2. Excitation energy dependence of excited states dynamics in all- trans-carotenes determined by femtosecond absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2005-06-01

    Ultrafast relaxation kinetics in β-carotene and lycopene has been investigated by femtosecond absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies using tunable excitation pulses. The transient signals induced by the photoexcitation with larger excess energy have broader bands and longer lifetimes both in the 11Bu+and21Ag- excited states. The excess vibrational energy remains longer than several picoseconds and slows the relaxation kinetics in carotenoids.

  3. Laser line illumination scheme allowing the reduction of background signal and the correction of absorption heterogeneities effects for fluorescence reflectance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Frédéric; Hervé, Lionel; Poher, Vincent; Gioux, Sylvain; Mars, Jérôme I; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging in reflectance geometry is an attractive imaging modality as it allows to noninvasively monitor the fluorescence targeted tumors located below the tissue surface. Some drawbacks of this technique are the background fluorescence decreasing the contrast and absorption heterogeneities leading to misinterpretations concerning fluorescence concentrations. We propose a correction technique based on a laser line scanning illumination scheme. We scan the medium with the laser line and acquire, at each position of the line, both fluorescence and excitation images. We then use the finding that there is a relationship between the excitation intensity profile and the background fluorescence one to predict the amount of signal to subtract from the fluorescence images to get a better contrast. As the light absorption information is contained both in fluorescence and excitation images, this method also permits us to correct the effects of absorption heterogeneities. This technique has been validated on simulations and experimentally. Fluorescent inclusions are observed in several configurations at depths ranging from 1 mm to 1 cm. Results obtained with this technique are compared with those obtained with a classical wide-field detection scheme for contrast enhancement and with the fluorescence by an excitation ratio approach for absorption correction. PMID:26442963

  4. Franck-Condon factors perturbed by damped harmonic oscillators: Solvent enhanced X {sup 1}A{sub g} ↔ A{sup 1}B{sub 1u} absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chen-Wen; Zhu, Chaoyuan Lin, Sheng-Hsien; Yang, Ling; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-28

    Damped harmonic oscillators are utilized to calculate Franck-Condon factors within displaced harmonic oscillator approximation. This is practically done by scaling unperturbed Hessian matrix that represents local modes of force constants for molecule in gaseous phase, and then by diagonalizing perturbed Hessian matrix it results in direct modification of Huang–Rhys factors which represent normal modes of solute molecule perturbed by solvent environment. Scaling parameters are empirically introduced for simulating absorption and fluorescence spectra of an isolated solute molecule in solution. The present method is especially useful for simulating vibronic spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in which hydrogen atom vibrations in solution can be scaled equally, namely the same scaling factor being applied to all hydrogen atoms in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present method is demonstrated in simulating solvent enhanced X {sup 1}A{sub g} ↔ A{sup 1}B{sub 1u} absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene (medium-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) in benzene solution. It is found that one of six active normal modes v{sub 10} is actually responsible to the solvent enhancement of spectra observed in experiment. Simulations from all functionals (TD) B3LYP, (TD) B3LYP35, (TD) B3LYP50, and (TD) B3LYP100 draw the same conclusion. Hence, the present method is able to adequately reproduce experimental absorption and fluorescence spectra in both gas and solution phases.

  5. Rhodium as permanent modifier for atomization of lead from biological fluids using tungsten filament electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Parsons, Patrick J.; Aldous, Kenneth M.; Brockman, Paul; Slavin, Walter

    2002-04-01

    Rhodium (Rh) was investigated as a permanent modifier for the atomization of Pb from biological fluids in W-filament atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Heating the W-filament with a Rh solution provided a protective coating for subsequent determinations of Pb in blood and urine matrices. The W-filament AAS instrumentation used was based on a prototype design that utilized self-reversal background correction scheme and peak area measurements. We found that Rh not only stabilized Pb during the pyrolysis step, but also facilitated the removal of carbonaceous residues during the cleaning step, requiring much less power than with phosphate modifier. Thus, the filament lifetime was greatly extended to over 300 firings. Periodic reconditioning with Rh was necessary every 30 firings or so. Conditioning the filament with Rh also permitted direct calibration using simple aqueous Pb standards. The method detection limit for blood Pb was approximately 1.5 μg dl -1, similar to that reported previously. Potential interferences from concomitants such as Na, K, Ca and Mg were evaluated. Accuracy was verified using lead reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the New York State Department of Health. Blood lead results below 40 μg dl -1 were within ±1 μg dl -1 of certified values, and within ±10% above 40 μg dl -1; within-run precision was ±10% or better. Additional validation was reported using proficiency test materials and human blood specimens. All blood lead results were within the acceptable limits established by regulatory authorities in the US. When measuring Pb in urine, sensitivity was reduced and matrix-matched calibration became necessary. The method of detection limit was 27 μg l -1 for urine Pb. Urine lead results were also validated using an acceptable range comparable to that established for blood lead by US regulatory agencies.

  6. Study on the interaction between fluoroquinolones and erythrosine by absorption, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra and their application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Jiangtao; Liu, Shaopu; Shen, Wei

    2008-03-01

    In pH 4.4-4.5 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FLQs) including ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NOR), levofloxacin (LEV) and lomefloxacin (LOM) could react with erythrosine (Ery) to form 1:1 ion-association complexes, which not only resulted in the changes of the absorption spectra and the quenching of fluorescence, but also resulted in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). These offered some indications of the determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by spectrophotometric, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering methods. The detection limits for fluoroquinolone antibiotics were in the range of 0.097-0.265 μg/mL for absorption methods, 0.022-0.100 μg/mL for fluorophotometry and 0.014-0.027 μg/mL for RRS method, respectively. Among them, the RRS method had the highest sensitivity. In this work, the spectral characteristics of the absorption, fluorescence and RRS, the optimum conditions of the reactions and the properties of the analytical chemistry were investigated. The methods have been successfully applied to determination of some fluoroquinolone antibiotics in human urine samples and tablets. Taking CIP-Ery system as an example, the charge distribution, the enthalpy of formation and the mean polarizability were calculated by density function theory (DFT) method. In addition, the reasons for the enhancement of scattering spectra were discussed.

  7. Log spiral of revolution highly oriented pyrolytic graphite monochromator for fluorescence x-ray absorption edge fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, D. M.; Daniel, M.; Budnick, J. I.; Rhodes, T.; Hammes, M.; Potrepka, D. M.; Sills, K.; Nelson, C.; Heald, S. M.; Brewe, D. I.

    2000-09-01

    We have constructed an x-ray monochromator based on a log spiral of revolution covered with highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Such a monochromator is used for obtaining x-ray absorption edge fine structure by the fluorescence method, and is particularly useful for measuring the fine structure of dilute element A in a concentrated matrix of element B, where B is to the left of A in the Periodic Table. Using the log spiral monochromator, we measure good Cr x-ray fine structure in an alloy of 1% Cr in a V matrix, whereas the corresponding spectrum is severely distorted by the V background if nonmonochromatized fluorescence is used. We also obtain excellent rejection of Mn fluorescence relative to Cr fluorescence in a Cr{sub 80}Mn{sub 20} alloy, and can tune the monochromator such that the entire Mn step height is significantly smaller than the Cr x-ray absorption edge fine structure oscillations for this system. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: determination of trace metals in mineral coal.

    PubMed

    Silva, M M; Goreti, M; Vale, R; Caramão, E B

    1999-12-01

    A procedure for lead, cadmium and copper determination in coal samples based on slurry sampling using an atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer is proposed. The slurries were prepared by weighing the samples directly into autosampler cups (5-30 mg) and adding a 1.5 ml aliquot of a diluent mixture of 5% v/v HNO(3), 0.05% Triton X-100 and 10% ethanol. The slurry was homogenized by manual stirring before measurement. Slurry homogenization using ultrasonic agitation was also investigated for comparison. The effect of particle size and the use of different diluent compositions on the slurry preparation were investigated. The temperature programmes were optimized on the basis of pyrolysis and atomization curves. Absorbance characteristics with and without the addition of a palladium-magnesium modifier were compared. The use of 0.05% m/v Pd and 0.03% m/v Mg was found satisfactory for stabilizing Cd and Pb. The calibration was performed with aqueous standards. In addition, a conventional acid digestion procedure was applied to verify the efficiency of the slurry sampling. Better recoveries of the analytes were obtained when the particle size was reduced to <37 mum. Several certified coal reference materials (BCR Nos. 40, 180, and 181) were analyzed, and good agreement was obtained between the results from the proposed slurry sampling method and the certificate values. PMID:18967798

  9. Reduction of matrix interferences in furnace atomic absorption with the L'vov Platform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, M.L.; Koirtyohann, S.R.; Hinderberger, E.J.; Taylor, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    Use of a modified L'vov Platform and ammonium phosphate as a matrix modifier greatly reduced matrix interferences in a commercial Massmann-type atomic absorption furnace. Platforms were readily fabricated from furnace tubes and, once positioned in the furnace, caused no inconvenience in operation. Two volatile elements (Pb, Cd), two of intermediate volatility (Co, Cr) and two which form stable oxides (Al, Sn) were tested in natural water and selected synthetic matrices. In every case for which there was a significant matrix effect during atomization from the tube wall, the platform and platform plus modifier gave improved performance. With lead, for example, an average ratio of 0.48 ?? 0.11 was found when the slope of the standard additions plot for six different natural water samples was compared to the slope of the standard working curve in dilute acid. The average slope ratio between the natural water matrices and the dilute acid matrix was 0.94 ?? 0.03 with the L'vov Platform and 0.96 ?? 0.03 with the platform and matrix modifier. In none of the cases studied did the use of the platform or platform plus modifier cause an interference problem where none existed while atomizing from the tube wall. An additional benefit of the platform was a factor of about two improvement in peak height precision. ?? 1981.

  10. Permanent modification in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry — advances, anticipations and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Georgieva, Rositsa

    2000-05-01

    Permanent modification is an important recent development in chemical modification techniques which is promising in view of increasing sample throughput with 'fast' programs, reducing reagent blanks, preliminary elimination of unwanted modifier components, compatibility with on-line and in situ enrichment, etc. An overview of this approach based on the authors' recent research and scarce literature data is given, revealing both success and failure in studies with permanently modified surfaces (carbides, non-volatile noble metals, noble metals on carbide coatings, etc.), as demonstrated in examples of direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) applications to biological and environmental matrices and vapor generation (VG)-ETAAS coupling with in-atomizer trapping of hydrides and other analyte vapors. Permanent modifiers exhibit certain drawbacks and limitations such as: poorly reproducible treatment technologies — eventually resulting in poor tube-to-tube repeatability and double or multiple peaks; impaired efficiency compared with modifier addition to each sample aliquot; relatively short lifetimes; limitations imposed on temperature programs, the pyrolysis, atomization and cleaning temperatures being set somewhat lower to avoid excessive loss of modifier; applicability to relatively simple sample solutions rather than to high-salt matrices and acidic digests; side effects of overstabilization, etc. The most important niches of application appear to be the utilization of permanently modified surfaces in coupled VG-ETAAS techniques, analysis of organic solvents and extracts, concentrates and fractions obtained after enrichment and/or speciation separations and direct ETAAS determinations of highly volatile analytes in relatively simple sample matrices.

  11. Direct determination of lead in wine materials by atomic absorption spectrometry using an electrothermal atomizer with a graphite filter-insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharia, A. N.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Chebotarev, A. N.; Arabadgi, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The operational parameters of an atomizer with a graphite filter-insert and a Pd-Mg matrix modifier are optimized for direct electrothermal atomic absorption determination of lead in some wines and associated materials. A method is proposed for eliminating interferences from mineral and organic components, as well as from nonatomic absorption, and for increasing the detection sensitivity for the element by up to a factor of two. The lower limit for determining the amount of lead in wines is 0.0025 mg/dm3. The relative standard deviation ( S r) does not exceed 10%.

  12. Effects of annealing treatment and gamma irradiation on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of Cr:GSGG laser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. L.; Luo, J. Q.; Xiao, J. Z.; Zhang, Q. L.; Jiang, H. H.; Yin, S. T.; Wang, Y. F.; Ge, X. W.

    2008-09-01

    The influence of annealing treatments and gamma-ray irradiation on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of Cr:GSGG crystals grown by the Czochralski method has been investigated. Two absorption bands located near 686 nm and 1050 nm were weakened markedly after the crystal was re-annealed in H2 atmosphere, which is due to the Cr4+ ions being de-oxidized into Cr3+ ions. The other two weak additional absorption bands induced by gamma-ray irradiation appearing near 310 nm and 480 nm are ascribed to the Fe2+ ions and F-type color centers, respectively. In particular, the gamma-ray irradiation with a dose of 100 Mrad has an effect of improving slightly the luminescence properties of Cr:GSGG crystals. The improvement mechanism is analyzed and discussed.

  13. Development and Validation of Spectrophotometric, Atomic Absorption and Kinetic Methods for Determination of Moxifloxacin Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Abdellaziz, Lobna M.; Hosny, Mervat M.

    2011-01-01

    Three simple spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods are developed and validated for the determination of moxifloxacin HCl in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations. Method (A) is a kinetic method based on the oxidation of moxifloxacin HCl by Fe3+ ion in the presence of 1,10 o-phenanthroline (o-phen). Method (B) describes spectrophotometric procedures for determination of moxifloxacin HCl based on its ability to reduce Fe (III) to Fe (II), which was rapidly converted to the corresponding stable coloured complex after reacting with 2,2′ bipyridyl (bipy). The formation of the tris-complex formed in both methods (A) and (B) were carefully studied and their absorbance were measured at 510 and 520 nm respectively. Method (C) is based on the formation of ion- pair associated between the drug and bismuth (III) tetraiodide in acidic medium to form orange—red ion-pair associates. This associate can be quantitatively determined by three different procedures. The formed precipitate is either filtered off, dissolved in acetone and quantified spectrophotometrically at 462 nm (Procedure 1), or decomposed by hydrochloric acid, and the bismuth content is determined by direct atomic absorption spectrometric (Procedure 2). Also the residual unreacted metal complex in the filtrate is determined through its metal content using indirect atomic absorption spectrometric technique (procedure 3). All the proposed methods were validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines, the three proposed methods permit the determination of moxifloxacin HCl in the range of (0.8–6, 0.8–4) for methods A and B, (16–96, 16–96 and 16–72) for procedures 1–3 in method C. The limits of detection and quantitation were calculated, the precision of the methods were satisfactory; the values of relative standard deviations did not exceed 2%. The proposed methods were successfully applied to determine the drug in its pharmaceutical

  14. Development and Deployment of a Field Instrument for the Detection of Iodine Atoms Using Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, C. S.; Ingham, T.; Commane, R.; Heard, D. E.; Bloss, W. J.

    2007-12-01

    Recently there have been several measurements of I2, alkyl iodides (CH3I, CH2I2), iodine monoxide (IO) and OIO at sites including coastal, polar and open ocean environments. I2 and the alkyl iodides are rapidly photolysed in the atmosphere to liberate iodine atoms which may then react with ozone to form iodine monoxide (IO) radicals. Subsequent reactions of IO lead to the catalytic depletion of tropospheric ozone, affect OH:HO2 and NO:NO2 ratios, oxidise dimethyl sulphide and result in the formation of new particles. While the IO radical and its stable precursors have previously been detected and measured in the marine boundary layer, little is known about the levels of reactive inorganic halogen species, or the local distribution of iodine activity at coastal sites such as Mace Head (Ireland). We have developed an instrument which employs vacuum UV resonance-fluorescence using a microwave discharge lamp to detect atomic iodine via the (5p5) \\ 2P3/2 ← \\ 2P3/2 \\ (6s1) transition near 178 nm. The instrument is calibrated by generating a known concentration of iodine atoms from the photolysis of I2 at 185 nm. The system can be operated in two modes; either to measure ambient iodine atoms (in photochemical steady state with their precursors and IO), or to measure the total photolabile iodine loading, through broadband visible photolysis of ambient air, with detection of the iodine atoms formed. This technique allows for the in-situ measurement of the species detected, which is advantageous for gathering information about their local distribution and source. The instrument was deployed for the first time in August 2007 at Mace Head on the west coast of Ireland. We present initial results from this field trial, which represent the first observation of ambient iodine atoms in the marine atmosphere. The results will be compared with the measurements of IO obtained from the University of Leeds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument.

  15. Interactions between fluorescence of atomically layered graphene oxide and metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Shao-Sian; Yeh, Yun-Chieh; Yu, Chen-Chieh; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) demonstrates interesting photoluminescence (PL) because of its unique heterogeneous atomic structure, which consists of variable sp2- and sp3-bonded carbons. In this study, we report the interaction between the luminescence of GO ranging from a single atomic layer to few-layered thin films and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photoluminescence of GO in the vicinity of the Ag NPs is enhanced significantly due to the near-field plasmonic effect by coupling electron-hole pairs of GO with oscillating electrons in Ag NPs, leading to an increased PL intensity and a decreased PL decay lifetime. The maxima 30-fold enhancement in PL intensity is obtained with an optimized film thickness of GO, and the luminescence image from a single atomic layer GO sheet is successfully observed with the assistance of the LSPR effect. The results provide an ideal platform for exploring the interactions between the fluorescence of two-dimensional layered materials and the LSPR effect.Graphene oxide (GO) demonstrates interesting photoluminescence (PL) because of its unique heterogeneous atomic structure, which consists of variable sp2- and sp3-bonded carbons. In this study, we report the interaction between the luminescence of GO ranging from a single atomic layer to few-layered thin films and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photoluminescence of GO in the vicinity of the Ag NPs is enhanced significantly due to the near-field plasmonic effect by coupling electron-hole pairs of GO with oscillating electrons in Ag NPs, leading to an increased PL intensity and a decreased PL decay lifetime. The maxima 30-fold enhancement in PL intensity is obtained with an optimized film thickness of GO, and the luminescence image from a single atomic layer GO sheet is successfully observed with the assistance of the LSPR effect. The results provide an ideal platform for exploring the

  16. Atomic Oxygen Abundance in Molecular Clouds: Absorption Toward Sagittarius B2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Keene, Jocelyn; Phillips, T. G.; Schilke, P.; Werner, M. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 35 km/s) spectra toward the molecular cloud Sgr B2 at 63 micrometers, the wavelength of the ground-state fine-structure line of atomic oxygen (O(I)), using the ISO-LWS instrument. Four separate velocity components are seen in the deconvolved spectrum, in absorption against the dust continuum emission of Sgr B2. Three of these components, corresponding to foreground clouds, are used to study the O(I) content of the cool molecular gas along the line of sight. In principle, the atomic oxygen that produces a particular velocity component could exist in any, or all, of three physically distinct regions: inside a dense molecular cloud, in the UV illuminated surface layer (PDR) of a cloud, and in an atomic (H(I)) gas halo. For each of the three foreground clouds, we estimate, and subtract from the observed O(I) column density, the oxygen content of the H(I) halo gas, by scaling from a published high-resolution 21 cm spectrum. We find that the remaining O(I) column density is correlated with the observed (13)CO column density. From the slope of this correlation, an average [O(I)]/[(13)CO] ratio of 270 +/- 120 (3-sigma) is derived, which corresponds to [O(I)]/[(13)CO] = 9 for a CO to (13)CO abundance ratio of 30. Assuming a (13)CO abundance of 1x10(exp -6) with respect to H nuclei, we derive an atomic oxygen abundance of 2.7x10(exp -4) in the dense gas phase, corresponding to a 15% oxygen depletion compared to the diffuse ISM in our Galactic neighborhood. The presence of multiple, spectrally resolved velocity components in the Sgr B2 absorption spectrum allows, for the first time, a direct determination of the PDR contribution to the O(I) column density. The PDR regions should contain O(I) but not (13)CO, and would thus be expected to produce an offset in the O(I)-(13)CO correlation. Our data do not show such an offset, suggesting that within our beam O(I) is spatially coexistent with the molecular gas, as traced by (13)CO

  17. An atomic-absorption method for the determination of gold in large samples of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanSickle, Gordon H.; Lakin, Hubert William

    1968-01-01

    A laboratory method for the determination of gold in large (100-gram) samples has been developed for use in the study of the gold content of placer deposits and of trace amounts of gold in other geologic materials. In this method the sample is digested with bromine and ethyl ether, the gold is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone, and the determination is made by atomicabsorption spectrophotometry. The lower limit of detection is 0.005 part per million in the sample. The few data obtained so far by this method agree favorably with those obtained by assay and by other atomic-absorption methods. About 25 determinations can be made per man-day.

  18. Automation of preparation of nonmetallic samples for analysis by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmann, A.; Willay, G.

    1986-01-01

    For a rapid preparation of solutions intended for analysis by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, an automatic device called Plasmasol was developed. This apparatus used the property of nonwettability of glassy C to fuse the sample in an appropriate flux. The sample-flux mixture is placed in a composite crucible, then heated at high temperature, swirled until full dissolution is achieved, and then poured into a water-filled beaker. After acid addition, dissolution of the melt, and filling to the mark, the solution is ready for analysis. The analytical results obtained, either for oxide samples or for prereduced iron ores show that the solutions prepared with this device are undistinguished from those obtained by manual dissolutions done by acid digestion or by high temperature fusion. Preparation reproducibility and analytical tests illustrate the performance of Plasmasol.

  19. Determination of total mercury in human hair and animal fur by combustion atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cizdziel, J V; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2004-11-15

    A commercially available mercury (Hg) analyzer based on sample combustion, gold amalgamation, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was evaluated for the direct determination of Hg in composites of human hair and individual samples of horse fur. Results for human hair reference material (NIES No. 13) were within the certified range. Analyses of "blind" samples from an international interlaboratory (n>16) comparison study produced results within 1S.D. of the consensus means. Precision (%R.S.D.) was found to be <5% and total analyses time per sample was <10min. This study demonstrated that analyzers based on combustion-AAS are suitable for wide-scale monitoring of Hg in human hair and animal fur. PMID:18969690

  20. Liquid-phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    de la Calle, Inmaculada; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2016-09-14

    An overview of the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is reported herein. The high sensitivity of GFAAS is significantly enhanced by its association with a variety of miniaturized solvent extraction approaches. LPME-GFAAS thus represents a powerful combination for determination of metals, metalloids and organometallic compounds at (ultra)trace level. Different LPME modes used with GFAAS are briefly described, and the experimental parameters that show an impact in those microextraction processes are discussed. Special attention is paid to those parameters affecting GFAAS analysis. Main issues found when coupling LPME and GFAAS, as well as those strategies reported in the literature to solve them, are summarized. Relevant applications published on the topic so far are included. PMID:27566338

  1. Removal of iron interferences by solvent extraction for geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Iron is a common interferent in the determination of many elements in geochemical samples. Two approaches for its removal have been taken. The first involves removal of iron by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from hydrochloric acid medium, leaving the analytes in the aqueous phase. The second consists of reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) by ascorbic acid to minimize its extraction into MIBK, so that the analytes may be isolated by extraction. Elements of interest can then be determined using the aqueous solution or the organic extract, as appropriate. Operating factors such as the concentration of hydrochloric acid, amounts of iron present, number of extractions, the presence or absence of a salting-out agent, and the optimum ratio of ascorbic acid to iron have been determined. These factors have general applications in geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1985.

  2. [Preliminary study on using acousto-optic tunable filter as wavelength selector for atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-wei; Zhang, Yi-hua; Wang, Mei-jia; Song, Da-qian; Zhang, Han-qi; Jin, Qin-han

    2002-06-01

    An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is an all-solid-state, electronic monochromator that is based on the diffraction of light by an acoustic wave in an anisotropic crystal. It is a new kind of tunable small filter with narrow band compared with traditional unicolor filter. The filter can diffract incident white light at a specific wavelength when a specific radio frequency is applied into it. An AAS experimental setup using a microwave plasma torch (MPT) as the atomizer, and a visible AOTF as the wavelength selector was developed and the analytical performance was evaluated by determination of Na. The effect on the absorption signal of some operating conditions, including the observation height, the microwave forward power and the carrier and support gas flow rates for MPT, were investigated. The detection limit for Na was shown to be 0.23 microgram.mL-1 and the relative standard deviation was 2.6% (n = 6). PMID:12938338

  3. Indirect determination of trace phenol in water by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Bo-Xing, X; Tong-Ming, X; Ming-Neng, S; Yu-Zhi, F

    1985-03-01

    An indirect method for determination of trace phenol in water by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) is described. The phenol is brominated in acidic solution with KBrO(3)-KBr solution at room temperature. The excess of bromine is reacted with KI and the I(2) produced is extracted into cyclohexane and then reduced back to I(-) with ascorbic acid. The I(-) is then complexed with Cd(2+) in sulphuric acid medium and the complex extracted into MIBK. The extract is analysed by flame AAS for Cd (and hence indirectly for phenol). The linear concentration range for determination of phenol is 6 x 10(-7)-0.9 x 10(-5)M in aqueous solution. Several foreign ions and organic substances do not interfere. PMID:18963829

  4. The direct determination of HgS by thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufalík, Pavel; Zvěřina, Ondřej; Komárek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    This research was aimed at the direct determination of HgS in environmental samples by means of thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry. Operating parameters of the apparatus used for thermal desorption (including a prototype desorption unit) are described in this work, as well as the procedure for measuring mercury release curves together with an evaluation of the analytical signal including two methods of peak integration. The results of thermal desorption were compared with HgS contents obtained by sequential extraction. The limits of quantification of the proposed method for the selective determination of the black and red forms of HgS were 4 μg kg- 1 and 5 μg kg- 1, respectively. The limit of quantification of red HgS in soils was 35 μg kg- 1. The developed analytical procedure was applied to soil and sediment samples from historical mining areas.

  5. Arsenic Speciation of Waters from the Aegean Region, Turkey by Hydride Generation: Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Tülin Deniz; Henden, Emur

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a serious problem for human health. Since the toxicity of arsenic species As(III) and As(V) is different, it is important to determine the concentrations separately. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an accurate and sensitive method for the speciation of arsenic. It was intended with this work to determine the concentrations of arsenic species in water samples collected from Izmir, Manisa and nearby areas. A batch type hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer was used. As(V) gave no signal under the optimal measurement conditions of As(III). A certified reference drinking water was analyzed by the method and the results showed excellent agreement with the reported values. The procedure was applied to 34 water samples. Eleven tap water, two spring water, 19 artesian well water and two thermal water samples were analyzed under the optimal conditions. PMID:27236436

  6. Determination of butyltin metabolites in the mouse liver by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Uneo, S; Susa, N; Furukawa, Y

    1995-08-01

    A new analytical method for observation of the metabolic status of butyltin compounds in the mouse liver was devised by a combination of extraction, purification and separation followed by quantitative analysis of each butyltin compound. After the extraction of all tin compounds from liver homogenate with ethyl acetate, these compounds were purified by combination of the fractional extract with organic solvents and column chromatography. The purified fraction was also analyzed by thin-layer chromatography, identifying each tin compound from differences in mobility on a silica gel plate. The tin content in the each separated spot on the plates was measured by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry after extraction by acid treatment. About 90% of tin was recovered by this method from the liver of mice which had been administered tri- or dibutyltin compound orally. This method will be useful for quantification of each metabolic product formed from butyltin compounds in vivo. PMID:8519922

  7. A summary of transition probabilities for atomic absorption lines formed in low-density clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. C.; Smith, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A table of wavelengths, statistical weights, and excitation energies is given for 944 atomic spectral lines in 221 multiplets whose lower energy levels lie below 0.275 eV. Oscillator strengths were adopted for 635 lines in 155 multiplets from the available experimental and theoretical determinations. Radiation damping constants also were derived for most of these lines. This table contains the lines most likely to be observed in absorption in interstellar clouds, circumstellar shells, and the clouds in the direction of quasars where neither the particle density nor the radiation density is high enough to populate the higher levels. All ions of all elements from hydrogen to zinc are included which have resonance lines longward of 912 A, although a number of weaker lines of neutrals and first ions have been omitted.

  8. Determination of trace amounts of tin in geological materials by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsch, E.P.; Chao, T.T.

    1976-01-01

    An atomic absorption method is described for the determination of traces of tin in rocks, soils, and stream sediments. A dried mixture of the sample and ammonium iodide is heated to volatilize tin tetraiodide -which is then dissolved in 5 % hydrochloric acid, extracted into TOPO-MIBK, and aspirated into a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The limit of determination is 2 p.p.m. tin and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2 to 14 %. Up to 20 % iron and 1000 p.p.m. Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Hg, Mo, V, or W in the sample do not interfere. As many as 50 samples can be easily analyzed per man-day. ?? 1976.

  9. Laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostics of helium metastable atoms generated in dielectric barrier discharge cryoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Stauss, Sven; Sakai, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Cryoplasmas, which are plasmas whose gas temperatures are below room temperature (RT), have shown dynamic changes in their physical and chemical characteristics when the gas temperature in the plasmas (Tgp) was decreased from RT. In this study, we measured the temporal behavior of helium metastable (Hem) atoms generated in a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge at ambient gas temperatures (Tga) of 300, 100, and 14 K and with a gas density similar to atmospheric conditions by laser absorption spectroscopy. The increments of Tgp to Tga were less than 20 K. We found from the results that the Hem lifetime and maximum density become longer and larger over one order of magnitude for lower Tga. The reasons for the long Hem lifetime at low Tga are decreases in the rate coefficients of three-body Hem quenching reactions and in the amounts of molecular impurities with boiling points higher than that of He.

  10. Development of mixed-waste analysis capability for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D.A.; TenKate, L.B.; Wroblewski, A.

    1995-03-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS) are typically configured with ventilation to capture potentially toxic and corrosive gases emitted from the vaporization of sample aliquots. When radioactive elements are present, additional concerns (such as meeting safety guidelines and ALARA principles) must be addressed. This report describes a modification to a GFAAS that provides additional containment of vaporized sample aliquots. The modification was found to increase containment by a factor of 80, given expected operating conditions. The use of the modification allows more mixed-waste samples to be analyzed, permits higher levels of radioactive samples to be analyzed, or exposes the analyst to less airborne radioactivity. The containment apparatus was attached to a Perkin-Elmer Zeeman 5000 spectrophotometer for analysis of mixed-waste samples; however, it could also be used on other systems and in other applications where greater containment of vaporized material is desired.

  11. Determination of Hg, Cd, Mn, Pb and Sn in seafood by solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detcheva, A.; Grobecker, K. H.

    2006-04-01

    Direct solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometric methods were developed and applied to the determination of mercury, cadmium, manganese, lead and tin in seafood. All elements but mercury were measured by a third generation Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry combined with an automatic solid sampler. In 3-field- and dynamic mode the calibrations concentration range was substantially extended and high amounts of analyte were detectable without laborious dilution of solid samples. The measurements were based on calibrations using certified reference materials of organic matrices. In case solid certified reference materials were not available calibration by aqueous standard solutions was proved to be an alternative. No matrix effects were observed under the optimized conditions. Results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. Solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry proved to be a reliable, rapid and low-cost method for the control of trace elements in seafood.

  12. Free-free absorption of infrared radiation in collisions of electrons with neutral rare-gas atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A relationship between the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption cross section and the electron neutral momentum transfer cross section has been utilized to determine the infrared free-free continuum absorption coefficient for the negative ions of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. The values of the momentum transfer cross section for this calculation have been obtained from experimental measurements. Analytical expressions for the absorption coefficient have also been developed. From the results of this calculation, it is possible to determine the absorption coefficient per unit electron density per neutral atom for temperatures in the range from 2500 to 25,000 K. The results are compared with those from tabulations of previous calculations and those computed from theoretical values of the phase shifts for the elastic scattering of electrons by neutral atoms.

  13. Graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of palladium in soil.

    PubMed

    Patel, K S; Sharma, P C; Hoffmann, P

    2000-08-01

    A new and sensitive procedure for the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometric (GF-AAS) determination of Pd in soil at nanogram level is described. The method is based on prior separation and enrichment of the metal as Pd(II)-SnCl3- -N-butylacetamide (BAA) complex into 1-pentanol (PN) by solvent extraction method. The value of the molar absorptivity of the complex in three solvents, i.e. ethyl acetate, 1-pentanol, chloroform, lie in the range of (0.70-2.75) x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) at lambda(max) 360-440 nm. The metal could be enriched into organic solvent, i.e. PN, up to 10-folds. The sensitivity (A = 0.0044) of the method in the term of the peak height was 0.5 ng Pd/mL of the aqueous solution at an enrichment factor (EF) of 5. Optimization of analytical variables during enrichment and GF-AAS determination of the metal are discussed. The method has been applied for the analysis of Pd to soil samples derived from roads and highways in Germany. PMID:11220609

  14. ARECIBO MULTI-EPOCH H I ABSORPTION MEASUREMENTS AGAINST PULSARS: TINY-SCALE ATOMIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Stanimirovic, S.; Weisberg, J. M.; Pei, Z.; Tuttle, K.; Green, J. T.

    2010-09-01

    We present results from multi-epoch neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption observations of six bright pulsars with the Arecibo telescope. Moving through the interstellar medium (ISM) with transverse velocities of 10-150 AU yr{sup -1}, these pulsars have swept across 1-200 AU over the course of our experiment, allowing us to probe the existence and properties of the tiny-scale atomic structure (TSAS) in the cold neutral medium (CNM). While most of the observed pulsars show no significant change in their H I absorption spectra, we have identified at least two clear TSAS-induced opacity variations in the direction of B1929+10. These observations require strong spatial inhomogeneities in either the TSAS clouds' physical properties themselves or else in the clouds' galactic distribution. While TSAS is occasionally detected on spatial scales down to 10 AU, it is too rare to be characterized by a spectrum of turbulent CNM fluctuations on scales of 10{sup 1}-10{sup 3} AU, as previously suggested by some work. In the direction of B1929+10, an apparent correlation between TSAS and interstellar clouds inside the warm Local Bubble (LB) indicates that TSAS may be tracing the fragmentation of the LB wall via hydrodynamic instabilities. While similar fragmentation events occur frequently throughout the ISM, the warm medium surrounding these cold cloudlets induces a natural selection effect wherein small TSAS clouds evaporate quickly and are rare, while large clouds survive longer and become a general property of the ISM.

  15. DETERMINATION OF LEAD AND CADMIUM IN FISH AND CLAM TISSUE BY ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH A MOLYBDENUM AND LANTHANUM TREATED PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE ATOMIZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A molybdenum and lanthanum treated pyrolytically coated graphite tube is employed for the furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of lead and cadmium directly in nitric-perchloric acid tissue digests. Lanthanum tends to promote the formation of a smooth lead atomiza...

  16. Determination of silicon in serum and urine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhuo-er

    1995-09-01

    A sensitive, simple and accurate method for the routine determination of trace silicon in serum and urine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The samples are directly determined after 20-fold dilution of serum and 100-fold dilution of urine. No L'vov platform is used. The signal enhancement of silicon atomization in pyrolytic graphite coated graphite tubes is achieved by using a mixture of calcium chloride and lanthanum nitrate as chemical modifier. The interferences arising from the biological matrices have been eliminated by the addition of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate in the sample solutions. The aqueous calibration curve is linear to at least 300 μg l -1, the characteristic mass is 37 pg (integrated absorbance signal), whereas the detection limit (3SD) is 1.5 μg l -1 for silicon in both diluted serum and urine samples. The recoveries of silicon added to the diluted samples are 101 ± 1.8% for sera and 98.2 ± 3.5% for the urine specimens, independent of the dilution ratio. The silicon measurement results for the serum and urine from healthy adults and for the serum from the patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis are presented.

  17. Direct analysis of silica by means of solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Mozas, E.; Crespo, C.; Pérez, J.; García-Ruiz, E.; Belarra, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports on the use of solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct analysis of synthetic amorphous silica. In particular, determination of hazardous elements such As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sb is investigated, as required by regulations of the food industry. The conclusion of the work is that, after proper optimization of the working conditions, paying particular attention to the atomization temperature and the use of proper modifiers (graphite powder, HNO3 or Pd), it is possible to develop suitable procedures that rely on the use of aqueous standard solutions to construct the calibration curves for all the elements investigated. The proposed method shows important benefits for the cost-effective analysis of such difficult samples in routine labs, permitting fast screening of those elements that are very rarely present in this type of sample, but also accurate quantification of those often found, while offering low limits of detection (always below 0.1 mg g- 1) that comply well with legal requirements, and precision levels that are fit for the purpose (approx. 6-9% R.S.D.).

  18. Determination of tellurium in indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shiue, M Y; Sun, Y C; Yang, M H

    2001-08-01

    A method for the determination of the dopant concentration of tellurium in dissolved indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Efforts were made to investigate the optimal conditions of the furnace heating program and the effect of palladium modifier on the variation of tellurium and the background absorbance. According to the results obtained, the presence of palladium chemical modifier in the analysis of indium antimonide allowed the successful retention of tellurium in the graphite tube, and the optimum mass of palladium modifier was found to be dependent on the sample matrix concentration. The absorbance profile of tellurium and the background level were significantly improved when a pyrolysis temperature of 1100 degrees C and an atomization temperature of 2200 degrees C were employed in the optimized heating program. With the use of this method, a detection limit of 0.8 microg g(-1) tellurium in indium antimonide could be achieved. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated by comparison with two independent methods, i.e. slurry sampling-ETAAS and ICP-MS. From the good agreement between the results, it was demonstrated that the proposed method is suitable for the determination of typical dopant concentrations of tellurium in indium antimonide. PMID:11534624

  19. Preconcentration and determination of tellurium in garlic samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Marcos M; Cerutti, Soledad; Salonia, José A; Gásquez, José A; Martinez, Luis D

    2005-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of traces of total tellurium (Te) in garlic (Allium sativa) is described that combines hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with preconcentration of the analyte by coprecipitation. The samples, each spiked with lanthanum nitrate (20 mg/L), are introduced into an Amberlite XAD-4 resin and mixed with ammonium buffer (pH 9.1). Te is preconcentrated by coprecipitation with the generated lanthanum hydroxide precipitate. The precipitate is quantitatively collected in the resin, eluted with hydrochloric acid, and then transferred into the atomizer device. Considering a sample consumption of 25 mL, an enrichment factor of 10 was obtained. The detection limit (3sigma) was 0.03 microg/L, and the precision (relative standard deviation) was 3.5% (n = 10) at the 10 microg/L level. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for Te was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993. Satisfactory results were obtained for the analysis of Te in garlic samples. PMID:16152948

  20. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction.

    PubMed

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz

    2006-11-01

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 mug g(-1) and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. PMID:16896613

  1. Determination of trace elements in automotive fuels by filter furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Anna; Tittarelli, Paolo; Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2002-03-01

    The determination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Ni was performed in gasoline and diesel fuel samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using the Transverse Heated Filter Atomizer (THFA). Thermal conditions were experimentally defined for the investigated elements. The elements were analyzed without addition of chemical modifiers, using organometallic standards for the calibration. Forty-microliter samples were injected into the THFA. Gasoline samples were analyzed directly, while diesel fuel samples were diluted 1:4 with n-heptane. The following characteristic masses were obtained: 0.8 pg Cd, 6.4 pg Cr, 12 pg Cu, 17 pg Pb and 27 pg Ni. The limits of determination for gasoline samples were 0.13 μg/kg Cd, 0.4 μg/kg Cr, 0.9 μg/kg Cu, 1.5 μg/kg Pb and 2.5 μg/kg Ni. The corresponding limit of determination for diesel fuel samples was approximately four times higher for all elements. The element recovery was performed using the addition of organometallic compounds to gasoline and diesel fuel samples and was between 85 and 105% for all elements investigated.

  2. Quantitative time-averaged gas and liquid distributions using x-ray fluorescence and radiography in atomizing sprays.

    PubMed

    Radke, Christopher D; McManamen, J Patrick; Kastengren, Alan L; Halls, Benjamin R; Meyer, Terrence R

    2015-05-01

    A method for quantitative measurements of gas and liquid distributions is demonstrated using simultaneous x-ray fluorescence and radiography of both phases in an atomizing coaxial spray. Synchrotron radiation at 10.1 keV from the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is used for x-ray fluorescence of argon gas and two tracer elements seeded into the liquid stream. Simultaneous time-resolved x-ray radiography combined with time-averaged dual-tracer fluorescence measurements enabled corrections for reabsorption of x-ray fluorescence photons for accurate, line-of-sight averaged measurements of the distribution of the gas and liquid phases originating from the atomizing nozzle. PMID:25927776

  3. Interactions between fluorescence of atomically layered graphene oxide and metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Shao-Sian; Yeh, Yun-Chieh; Yu, Chen-Chieh; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2013-02-21

    Graphene oxide (GO) demonstrates interesting photoluminescence (PL) because of its unique heterogeneous atomic structure, which consists of variable sp(2)- and sp(3)-bonded carbons. In this study, we report the interaction between the luminescence of GO ranging from a single atomic layer to few-layered thin films and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photoluminescence of GO in the vicinity of the Ag NPs is enhanced significantly due to the near-field plasmonic effect by coupling electron-hole pairs of GO with oscillating electrons in Ag NPs, leading to an increased PL intensity and a decreased PL decay lifetime. The maxima 30-fold enhancement in PL intensity is obtained with an optimized film thickness of GO, and the luminescence image from a single atomic layer GO sheet is successfully observed with the assistance of the LSPR effect. The results provide an ideal platform for exploring the interactions between the fluorescence of two-dimensional layered materials and the LSPR effect. PMID:23340692

  4. X-ray fluorescence from the element with atomic number Z=120.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, M O; Jacquet, D; Morjean, M; Bonnet, E; Chbihi, A; Frankland, J D; Rivet, M F; Tassan-Got, L; Dechery, F; Drouart, A; Nalpas, L; Ledoux, X; Parlog, M; Ciortea, C; Dumitriu, D; Fluerasu, D; Gugiu, M; Gramegna, F; Kravchuk, V L; Marchi, T; Fabris, D; Corsi, A; Barlini, S

    2012-03-23

    An atomic clock based on x-ray fluorescence yields has been used to estimate the mean characteristic time for fusion followed by fission in reactions 238U + 64Ni at 6.6  MeV/A. Inner shell vacancies are created during the collisions in the electronic structure of the possibly formed Z=120 compound nuclei. The filling of these vacancies accompanied by a x-ray emission with energies characteristic of Z=120 can take place only if the atomic transitions occur before nuclear fission. Therefore, the x-ray yield characteristic of the united atom with 120 protons is strongly related to the fission time and to the vacancy lifetimes. K x rays from the element with Z=120 have been unambiguously identified from a coupled analysis of the involved nuclear reaction mechanisms and of the measured photon spectra. A minimum mean fission time τ(f)=2.5×10(-18)  s has been deduced for Z=120 from the measured x-ray multiplicity. PMID:22540578

  5. Direct determination and speciation of mercury compounds in environmental and biological samples by carbon bed atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for the direct determination of mercury in water and biological samples using a unique carbon bed atomizer for atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method avoided sources of error such as loss of volatile mercury during sample digestion and contamination of samples through added reagents by eliminating sample pretreatment steps. The design of the atomizer allowed use of the 184.9 nm mercury resonance line in the vacuum ultraviolet region, which increased sensitivity over the commonly used spin-forbidden 253.7 nm line. The carbon bed atomizer method was applied to a study of mercury concentrations in water, hair, sweat, urine, blood, breath and saliva samples from a non-occupationally exposed population. Data were collected on the average concentration, the range and distribution of mercury in the samples. Data were also collected illustrating individual variations in mercury concentrations with time. Concentrations of mercury found were significantly higher than values reported in the literature for a ''normal'' population. This is attributed to the increased accuracy gained by eliminating pretreatment steps and increasing atomization efficiency. Absorption traces were obtained for various solutions of pure and complexed mercury compounds. Absorption traces of biological fluids were also obtained. Differences were observed in the absorption-temperatures traces of various compounds. The utility of this technique for studying complexation was demonstrated.

  6. Picosecond time-resolved absorption and fluorescence dynamics in the artificial bacteriorhodopsin pigment BR6.11.

    PubMed Central

    Brack, T. L.; Delaney, J. K.; Atkinson, G. H.; Albeck, A.; Sheves, M.; Ottolenghi, M.

    1993-01-01

    The picosecond molecular dynamics in an artificial bacteriorhodopsin (BR) pigment containing a structurally modified all-trans retinal chromphore with a six-membered ring bridging the C11=C12-C13 positions (BR6.11) are measured by picosecond transient absorption and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Time-dependent intensity and spectral changes in absorption in the 570-650-nm region are monitored for delays as long as 5 ns after the 7-ps, 573-nm excitation of BR6.11. Two intermediates, J6.11 and K6.11/1, both with enhanced absorption to the red (> 600 nm) of the BR6.11 spectrum are observed within approximately 50 ps. The J6.11 intermediate decays with a time constant of 12 +/- 3 ps to form K6.11/1. The K6.11/1 intermediate decays with an approximately 100-ps time constant to form a third intermediate, K6.11/2, which is observed through diminished 650-nm absorption (relative to that of K6.11/1). No other transient absorption changes are found during the remainder of the initial 5-ns period of the BR6.11 photoreaction. Fluorescence in the 650-900-nm region is observed from BR6.11, K6.11/1, and K6.11/2, but no emission assignable to J6.11 is found. The BR6.11 fluroescence spectrum has a approximately 725-nm maximum which is blue-shifted by approximately 15 nm relative to that of native BR-570 and is 4.2 +/- 1.5 times larger in intensity (same sample optical density). No differences in the profile of the fluorescence spectra of BR6.11 and the intermediates K6.11/1 and K6.11/2 are observed. Following ground-state depletion of the BR6.11 population, the time-resolved fluroescence intensity monitored at 725 nm increases with two time constants, 12 +/- 3 and approximately 100 ps, both of which correlate well with changes in the picosecond transient absorption data. The resonance Raman spectrum of ground-state BR6.11, measured with low-energy, 560-nm excitation, is significantly different from the spectrum of native BR-570, thus confirming that the

  7. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of arsenic in essential lavender and rose oils.

    PubMed

    Karadjova, Irina B; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Tsalev, Dimiter L

    2005-02-28

    Analytical procedures for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) determination of arsenic in essential oils from lavender (Lavendula angustifolia) and rose (Rosa damascena) are described. For direct ETAAS analysis, oil samples are diluted with ethanol or i-propanol for lavender and rose oil, respectively. Leveling off responses of four different arsenic species (arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate) is achieved by using a composite chemical modifier: l-cysteine (0.05gl(-1)) in combination with palladium (2.5mug) and citric acid (100mug). Transverse-heated graphite atomizer (THGA) with longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction and 'end-capped' graphite tubes with integrated pyrolytic graphite platforms, pre-treated with Zr-Ir for permanent modification are employed as most appropriate atomizer. Calibration with solvent-matched standard solutions of As(III) is used for four- and five-fold diluted samples of lavender and rose oil, respectively. Lower dilution factors required standard addition calibration by using aqueous (for lavender oil) or i-propanol (for rose oil) solutions of As(III). The limits of detection (LOD) for the whole analytical procedure are 4.4 and 4.7ngg(-1) As in levender and rose oil, respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for As at 6-30ngg(-1) levels is between 8 and 17% for both oils. As an alternative, procedure based on low temperature plasma ashing in oxygen with ETAAS, providing LODs of 2.5 and 2.7ngg(-1) As in levender and rose oil, respectively, and R.S.D. within 8-12% for both oils has been elaborated. Results obtained by both procedures are in good agreement. PMID:18969904

  8. Matrix elimination method for the determination of precious metals in ores using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bekir; Celikbiçak, Omür; Döker, Serhat; Doğan, Mehmet

    2007-03-28

    Poly(N-(hydroxymethyl)methacrylamide)-1-allyl-2-thiourea) hydrogels, poly(NHMMA-ATU), were synthesized by gamma radiation using (60)Co gamma source in the ternary mixture of NHMMA-ATU-H(2)O. These hydrogels were used for the specific gold, silver, platinum and palladium recovery, pre-concentration and matrix elimination from the solutions containing trace amounts of precious metal ions. Elimination of inorganic matrices such as different transition and heavy metal ions, and anions was performed by adjusting the solution pH to 0.5 that was the selective adsorption pH of the precious metal ions. Desorption of the precious metal ions was performed by using 0.8 M thiourea in 3M HCl as the most efficient desorbing agent with recovery values more than 95%. In the desorption medium, thiourea effect on the atomic signal was eliminated by selecting proper pyrolysis and atomization temperatures for all precious metal ions. Precision and the accuracy of the results were improved in the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) measurements by applying the developed matrix elimination method performing the adsorption at pH 0.5. Pre-concentration factors of the studied precious metal ions were found to be at least 1000-fold. Detection limits of the precious metal ions were found to be less than 10 ng L(-1) of the all studied precious metal ions by using the proposed pre-concentration method. Determination of trace levels of the precious metals in the sea-water, anode slime, geological samples and photographic fixer solutions were performed using GFAAS clearly after applying the adsorption-desorption cycle onto the poly(NHMMA-UTU) hydrogels. PMID:17386783

  9. Tributyl phosphate as a sensitivity-enhancing solvent for organotin in carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Gong, B; Matsumoto, K

    1996-07-01

    Tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been found to be a sensitivity-enhancing solvent for organotin compounds in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry; (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CCH(3))(2), (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CC(11)H(23))(2), (C(4)H(9))(3)SnCl, and (C(4)H(9))(4)Sn all give 1 order of magnitude higher sensitivities in TBP than in toluene or ethyl acetate. The sensitivities are enhanced further 1-2 orders of magnitude in TBP, when PdCl(2)(CH(3)CN)(2) is added as a matrix modifier in the organic solvent. Among the four organotin compounds, (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CCH(3))(2) and (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CC(11)H(23))(2) give better sensitivities than (C(4)H(9))(3)SnCl and (C(4)H(9))(4)Sn in the absence of palladium in any organic solvent, which suggests that the oxygen atom in the tin compound might form tin oxides that are resistant to volatilization loss during ashing. Scanning electron microscopic, electrothermal vaporization ICPMS, and powder X-ray diffraction studies show that the final products before atomization include phosphorus-containing compounds Sn(2)P(2)O(7), SnP(2)O(7), and Pd(9)P(2), besides tin-palladium alloys, PdSn, Pd(3)Sn, Pd(2)Sn, Pd(3)Sn(2), and PdSn(3). These phosphorus-containing compounds would more efficiently stabilize tin and suppress tin vaporization loss during ashing, to give higher sensitivity. PMID:21619315

  10. Spectroscopy of 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atom in an external absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Baraulya, V. I.; Bonert, A. E.; Goncharov, A. N.; Seydaliev, M. R.

    2001-09-01

    The results of saturated absorption spectroscopy of the intercombination 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atoms at 457 nm in an external absorption cell are presented. A laser system based on a Ti:Sa laser with frequency doubling in a LBO nonlinear crystal was used in these experiments. Saturated absorption resonances of magnesium in an external cell at the 1S0- 3P1 transition have been obtained for the first time. Pressure broadening of resonances equal to 12.5±1.5 kHz/mTorr has been measured.

  11. Atomic Transition Frequencies, Isotope Shifts, and Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine Structure Constant for Studies of Quasar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest spatial and temporal variation of fundamental "constants" in the Universe. A change in the fine structure constant, α = {e}2/hslash c , could be detected via shifts in the frequencies of atomic transitions in quasar absorption systems. Recent studies using 140 absorption systems from the Keck telescope and 153 from the Very Large Telescope, suggest that α varies spatially (61). That is, in one direction on the sky α seems to have been smaller at the time of absorption, while in the opposite direction it seems to have been larger.

  12. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  13. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed excitation of inner-shell transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, T.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Schriever, U.; Kolb, D. M.

    1990-02-01

    The energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excitation of 4d-5p transitions has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The decay behavior of the various fluorescence bands has been analyzed and a model for the relaxation process proposed within the framework of a two-dimensional configuration-coordinate diagram. If minute quantities of Ag2 are present in the matrix, the analysis requires consideration of energy transfer between silver atoms and dimers.

  14. Enhanced optical properties of heterostructured ZnO/CeO2 nanocomposite fabricated by one-pot hydrothermal method: Fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption and visible light transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Geping; Fan, Huiqing; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-12-01

    Many researchers investigated the properties of either discrete metal oxide CeO2 or ZnO materials. However, less attention has been paid to the various nanostructure and performances of CeO2 and ZnO nanocomposite up to now. In this paper, a facile and low cost one-pot hydrothermal synthesis method has been adopted to obtained directly precursors of CeCO3OH and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6 with different Ce atom molar ratios to Zn, which are transformed into their corresponding metal oxide to form the ZnO/CeO2 heterostructure nanocomposites (HSNCs) by pyrolysis. The heterostructure is composed of ZnO and CeO2 monocrystals, simultaneously, CeO2 monocrystals are well dispersed on the surface of ZnO monocrystal for cosmetics. Bing dependent on the analysis results of XRD and TEM for the obtained precursors before and after pyrolysis, the formation mechanism of HSNCs was proposed. To the best of our knowledge, the paper first reported heterostructured ZnO/CeO2 nanocomposite grown in one-pot mixed aqueous solution of cerium nitrate, zinc acetate and urea without other extra surfactant. Additionally, the influence of various Ce/Zn molar ratios on the heterostructure, fluorescence emission and UV-visible absorption properties of HSNCs was investigated in detail. ZnO/CeO2 HSNCs display higher fluorescence emission with the increasing Ce/Zn molar ratio. Meanwhile, the larger Ce/Zn molar ratio of ZnO/CeO2 HSNCs, the stronger transparency in the visible light region and the weaker UV absorption. The results are due to the fact that the band gap of ZnO/CeO2 HSNCs will decrease from 3.25 to 3.08 eV when Ce/Zn atom molar ratio is increased from 0 to 0.08. By the comprehensive analysis on the optical performances of HSNCs with the different Ce/Zn atom molar ratios, ZnO/CeO2-0.04 HSNCs could become UV absorber materials and transparent material in the visible region. ZnO/CeO2-0.04 HSNCs with the UV-filtering and Vis-transparent properties is appropriate for personal-care cosmetics.

  15. Direct determination of fluorescent whitening agents by absorption measurement in situ on thin layer chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Theidel, H

    1975-01-01

    The measuring technique for the chromatogram spectrophotometer (Zeiss) to determine the reflectance curves, the analysis according to the Kubelka-Munck function, and the basic outlines of the quantitative determination of stilbene fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) are explained. PMID:1064527

  16. Spectroscopy in an extremely thin vapor cell: Comparing the cell-length dependence in fluorescence and in absorption techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, D.; Varzhapetyan, T.; Sarkisyan, A.; Malakyan, Yu.; Papoyan, A.; Lezama, A.; Bloch, D.; Ducloy, M.

    2004-06-01

    We compare the behavior of absorption and of resonance fluorescence spectra in an extremely thin Rb vapor cell as a function of the ratio of L/λ , with L the cell thickness (L˜150 1800 nm) and λ the wavelength of the Rb D2 line (λ=780 mn) . The Dicke-type coherent narrowing [

    G. Dutier et al., Europhys. Lett. 63, 35 (2003)
    ] is observed only in transmission measurements, in the linear regime, with its typical collapse and revival, which reaches a maximum for L= (2n+1) λ/2 ( n integer). It is shown not to appear in fluorescence, whose behavior-amplitude, and spectral width, is more monotonic with L . Conversely, at high-intensity, the sub-Doppler saturation effects are shown to be the most visible in transmission around L=nλ .

  17. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Linearization of the calibration curves within a broad concentration range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Hlongwane, Miranda; Heitmann, Uwe; Florek, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    The calculation algorithm suggested provides linearization of the calibration curves in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The algorithm is based on the modification of the function wavelength-integrated absorbance vs. concentration of analyte vapor in the absorption volume. According to the suggested approach, the absorption line is represented by a triangle for low and trapezium for high analyte vapor concentration in the absorption volume. The respective semi-empirical formulas include two linearization parameters, which depend on properties of the absorption line and characteristics of the atomizer and spectrometer. The parameters can be approximately evaluated from the theory and determined in practice from the original broad-range calibration curve. The parameters were found and the proposed calculation algorithm verified in the experiments on direct determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the solutions within a concentration ranges from 0.15 to 625 μg·L- 1 using tube, platform tube and filter furnace atomizers. The use of various atomizers, lines, elements and atomization temperatures made possible the simulation of various practical analytical conditions. It was found that the algorithm and optimal linearization parameters made it possible to obtain for each line and atomizer linear approximations of the calibration curves within 3-4 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients close to 0.999. The algorithm makes possible to employ a single line for the direct element determination over a broad concentration range. The sources of errors and the possibility of a priori theoretical evaluation of the linearization parameters are discussed.

  18. Arc Jet Flow Properties Determined from Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Atomic Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas; Wercinski, Paul F. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An laser-spectroscopic investigation of the thermocheMical state of arcjet flows is currently being conducted in the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) Circlet at NASA Ames Research Center. Downstream of the nozzle exit, but upstream of the test article, Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of atomic nitrogen is used to assess the nonequilibriuM distribution of flow enthalpy in the free stream. The two-photon LIF technique provides simultaneous measurements of free stream velocity, translational temperature, and nitrogen number density on the flow centerline. Along with information from facility instrumentation, these measurements allow a determination of the free stream total enthalpy, and its apportionment in to thermal, kinetic, and chemical mode contributions. Experimental results are presented and discussed for two different niti-ogen/argon test gas flow runs during which the current is varied while the pressure remains constant .

  19. Atomic force fluorescence microscopy in the characterization of amyloid fibril assembly and oligomeric intermediates.

    PubMed

    Ostapchenko, Valeriy; Gasset, Maria; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a conventional tool for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of protein aggregation and, specifically, for analysis of assembly pathways, architecture, aggregation state, and heterogeneity of oligomeric intermediates or mature fibrils. AFM imaging provides useful information about particle dimensions, shape, and substructure with nanometer resolution. Conventional AFM methods have been very helpful in the analysis of polymorphic assemblies formed in vitro from homogeneous proteins or peptides. However, AFM imaging on its own provides limited insight into conformation or composition of assemblies produced in the complex environment of a cell, or prepared from a mixture of proteins as a result of cross-seeding. In these cases, its combination with fluorescence microscopy (AFFM) increases its resolution. PMID:22528089

  20. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Depero, Laura E.

    2015-12-01

    We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co-Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO2. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO2 layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  1. Velocity and electronic state distributions of sputtered Fe atoms by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    Velocity distributions and relative populations in the fine-structure levels of the a/sup 5/D/sub J/ ground state of Fe atoms, produced by sputtering with 3 keV argon ions, have been investigated by Doppler shifted laser induced fluorescence. The laser system employs a single-mode, scanning ring dye laser, amplified by a sequence of three excimer-pumped flowing-dye cells. Frequency doubling in a KD*P crystal was used to produce high energy (> .5 mJ) pulses of narrowband tunable UV output near 300 nm. Laser power influence on effective velocity bandwidth was investigated. Favorable light-collection geometry minimized distortion of the velocity spectra from apparatus-averaging effects. In impurity flux diagnostic applications in fusion devices, substantial spatial averaging may occur. In the latter case, the narrow velocity bandwidth (70 m/s, transform limit) of the present laser system is particularly useful.

  2. Atomic Force Fluorescence Microscopy in the Characterization of Amyloid Fibril Assembly and Oligomeric Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Ostapchenko, Valeriy; Gasset, Maria; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a conventional tool for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of protein aggregation and, specifically, for analysis of assembly pathways, architecture, aggregation state, and heterogencity of oligomeric intermediates or mature fibrils. AFM imaging provides useful information about particle dimensions, shape, and substructure with nanometer resolution. Conventional AFM methods have been very helpful in the analysis of polymorphic assemblies formed in vitro from homogeneous proteins or peptides. However, AFM imaging on its own provides limited insight into conformation or composition of assemblies produced in the complex environment of a cell, or prepared from a mixture of proteins as a result of cross-seeding. In these cases, its combination with fluorescence microscopy (AFFM) increases its resolution. PMID:22528089

  3. Tracking Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Living Neurons via Combined Atomic Force and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedden, Elise; Kaplan, David; Staii, Cristian

    2013-03-01

    Living cells are active mechanical structures which evolve within and in response to their local microenvironments. Various cell types possess different mechanical properties and respond uniquely to growth, environmental changes, and the application of chemical stimuli. Here we present a powerful approach which combines high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to systematically obtain real-time micrometer and sub-micrometer resolution elasticity maps for live neuronal cells cultured on glass substrates. Through this approach we measure the topography, the elastic properties, and the dynamics of neuronal cells, and identify changes in cytoskeletal components during axonal growth, chemical modification, and changes in ambient temperature. We will also show high resolution elasticity measurements of the cell body and of axons/dendrites during growth, as well as identification of cytoskeletal components during cell growth and environmental changes.

  4. [Determination of trace mercury in coal by microwave digestion and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zheng, Chu-guang; Xu, Jie-ying

    2004-09-01

    A method of determining trace Hg in coal by microwave digestion and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry is reported. The digestion system of HNO3-HCl-HF was evaluated. The experimental conditions of microwave digestion, including pressure, temperature, power and time of digestion were evaluated. The operating conditions such as flow rate of carrier gas, flow rate of shield gas and negative high voltage, and interference were also investigated. Testing results show that the detection limit is 0.03 ng x mL(-1) and RSD (n = 7) is below 5%. This method is simple and rapid. The treatment method was applicable to determining trace Hg in coal and gave results that were in good agreement with the certified values of the standard reference material. PMID:15762543

  5. Photonic nanowires investigated by single molecule fluorescence and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, Jordi; van Dijk, Erik M. H. P.; van Hulst, Niek F.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; de Witte, Pieter A. J.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Rowan, Alan E.

    2004-03-01

    Natural multichromophoric systems such as light-harvesting antennas display valuable optical properties due to excitonic interactions. Artificial systems mimicking those properties may become the building blocks of future molecular photonic devices. We present here the synthesis and characterization at the single molecule level of a new type of chromophoric polymer intended to act as such synthetic antenna. Long well-ordered perylene arrays have been obtained using polyisocianide polymers as rigid scaffold. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements have shown rigid chromophoric fibers up to micrometers long and containing up to ten thousand perylene dye units. Combined AFM and single molecule confocal fluorescence measurements on polymer samples have revealed the existence of two different emissive species: monomer-like behavior arising from short oligomers, while long polymer fibers show excimer emission. Such powerful technique provides unique insights into the complex optical behavior of the system.

  6. Simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead in wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freschi, Gian P. G.; Dakuzaku, Carolina S.; de Moraes, Mercedes; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Gomes Neto, José A.

    2001-10-01

    A method has been developed for the direct simultaneous determination of Cd and Pb in white and red wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) using a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer (THGA) with longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction. The thermal behavior of both analytes during pyrolysis and atomization stages were investigated in 0.028 mol l -1 HNO 3 and in 1+1 v/v diluted wine using mixtures of Pd(NO 3) 2+Mg(NO 3) 2 and NH 4H 2PO 4+Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifiers. With 5 μg Pd+3 μg Mg as the modifiers and a two-step pyrolysis (10 s at 400°C and 10 s at 600°C), the formation of carbonaceous residues inside the atomizer was avoided. For 20 μl of sample (wine+0.056 mol l -1 HNO 3, 1+1, v/v) dispensed into the graphite tube, analytical curves in the 0.10-1.0 μg l -1 Cd and 5.0-50 μg l -1 Pb ranges were established. The characteristic mass was approximately 0.6 pg for Cd and 33 pg for Pb, and the lifetime of the tube was approximately 400 firings. The limits of detection (LOD) based on integrated absorbance (0.03 μg l -1 for Cd, 0.8 μg l -1 for Pb) exceeded the requirements of Brazilian Food Regulations (decree #55871 from Health Department), which establish the maximum permissible level for Cd at 200 μg l -1 and for Pb at 500 μg l -1. The relative standard deviations ( n=12) were typically <8% for Cd and <6% for Pb. The recoveries of Cd and Pb added to wine samples varied from 88 to 107% and 93 to 103%, respectively. The accuracy of the direct determination of Cd and Pb was checked for 10 table wines by comparing the results with those obtained for digested wine using single-element ET-AAS, which were in agreement at the 95% confidence level.

  7. Inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of six elements in a variety of geological materials. Sixteen reference materials are analysed by this technique to demonstrate its use in geochemical exploration. Samples are decomposed with nitric, hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, and the residue dissolved in hydrochloric acid and diluted to volume. The elements are determined in two groups based on compatibility of instrument operating conditions and consideration of crustal abundance levels. Cadmium, Cu, Pb and Zn are determined as a group in the 50-ml sample solution under one set of instrument conditions with the use of scatter correction. Limitations of the scatter correction technique used with the fluorescence instrument are discussed. Iron and Mn are determined together using another set of instrumental conditions on a 1-50 dilution of the sample solution without the use of scatter correction. The ranges of concentration (??g g-1) of these elements in the sample that can be determined are: Cd, 0.3-500; Cu, 0.4-500; Fe, 85-250 000; Mn, 45-100 000; Pb, 5-10 000; and Zn, 0.4-300. The precision of the method is usually less than 5% relative standard deviation (RSD) over a wide concentration range and acceptable accuracy is shown by the agreement between values obtained and those recommended for the reference materials.

  8. Chromatography, Absorption, and Fluorescence: A New Instrumental Analysis Experiment on the Measurement of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Cigarette Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingen, Lisa M.; Low, Jason C.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    1998-12-01

    The recent approval by the American Chemical Society of an undergraduate chemistry degree with an option in environmental chemistry requires the development of new experiments that teach fundamental chemistry in the context of environmental issues. We present an experiment suitable for an undergraduate junior/senior-level instrumental analysis laboratory which illustrates the principles of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and its application to the identification and measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in tobacco smoke. Absorption and fluorescence detection methods for PAH, especially the differences in sensitivity and selectivity of these methods, are clearly demonstrated along with the basic principles of HPLC.

  9. Two-Photon Absorption and Fluorescence with Quadrupolar and Branched CHROMOPHORES—EFFECT of Structure and Branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porrès, Laurent; Mongin, Olivier; Katan, Claudine; Charlot, Marina; Bhatthula, Bharath Kumar Goud; Jouikov, Viatcheslav; Pons, Thomas; Mertz, Jerome; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    The photophysical and two-photon absorption (TPA) properties of three homologous quadrupolar and one related three-branched chromophores were investigated. Design of the quadrupoles is based on the symmetrical functionalization of a biphenyl core. Modulation of the nonlinear absorptivity/transparency/photostability trade-off can be achieved by playing with the twist angle of the core and on the spacers (phenylene-vinylene versus phenylene-ethynylene). The quadrupolar chromophores combine high TPA cross-sections, high fluorescence quantum yield and solvent sensitive photoluminescence properties. The branched structure exhibits spectrally broadened TPA in the NIR region (up to 3660 GM at 740 nm measured in the femtosecond regime) but reduced sensitivity to the environment.

  10. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  11. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  12. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

    2000-03-20

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  13. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  14. Manganese dioxide causes spurious gold values in flame atomic-absorption readings from HBr-Br2 digestions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    False readings, apparently caused by the presence of high concentrations of manganese dioxide, have been observed in our current flame atomic-absorption procedure for the determination of gold. After a hydrobromic acid (HBr)-bromine (Br2) leach, simply heating the sample to boiling to remove excess Br2 prior to extraction with methyl-isobutyl-ketone (MIBK) eliminates these false readings. ?? 1981.

  15. Assessing the Engagement, Learning, and Overall Experience of Students Operating an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Remote Access Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The use of internet-based technologies in the teaching of laboratories has emerged as a promising education tool. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using remote access technology to operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer in analyzing the iron content in a crude myoglobin extract. Sixty-two students were surveyed on their level of…

  16. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM(IV) AND SELENIUM(VI) USING COUPLED ION CHROMATOGRAPHY: HYDRIDE GENERATION ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple method was developed to speciate inorganic selenium in the microgram per liter range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determination of the redox states selenite, Se(IV), and s...

  17. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Analysis of Trace Elements in Degenerated Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Frankowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Czabak-Garbacz, Róża; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek; Gasik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated trace elements (TE) in human intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue. Trace element presence can have diverse meanings: essential TE show the metabolic modalities of the tissue, while environmentally-related TE indicate pollution and tissue-specific absorption and accumulation. IVD is a highly specific compartment with impaired communication with adjacent bone. Analysis of TE in IVD provides new insights regarding tissue metabolism and IVD communication with other tissues. Material/Methods Thirty intervertebral discs were acquired from 22 patients during surgical treatment for degenerative disease. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to evaluate the concentrations of Al, Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Mo, Mg, and Zn. Results Al, Pb, Cu, Mg, and Zn were detected in all samples. Pb was significantly positively correlated with age, and Ni concentration was weakly correlated with population count in the patient’s place of residence. Only Cu was observed in higher concentrations in IVD compared to in other tissues. Significant positive correlations were observed between the following pairs: Mg/Zn, Mg/Al, Mg/Pb, Zn/Al, Zn/Pb, and Al/Pb. Negative correlations were observed between Mg/Cd, Zn/Cd, Mg/Mo, and Mo/Pb. Conclusions This study is one of few to profile the elements in intervertebral discs in patients with degenerative changes. We report significant differences between trace element concentrations in intervertebral discs compared to in other tissues. Knowledge of the TE accumulation pattern is vital for better understanding intervertebral disc nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25366266

  18. Morphological and spectroscopic investigation of the behavior of permanent iridium modifier deposited on pyrolytic graphite coated and zirconium treated platforms in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Sabbatini, L.

    1997-12-01

    In order to better characterise a permanent modifier based on iridium deposited on zirconium or tungsten treated platforms of transversely heated graphite atomizer, and to gain additional information about its chemical behavior directed to an eventual further optimization, a series of experiments were carried out, both by surface techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry on the iridium release from unmodified and various other modified pyrolytic graphite platforms. Special attention was paid to the influence of the amount of iridium, zirconium carbide coating of the platform surface and the presence of citric acid on the iridium vaporization during pyrolysis and atomization. The processes of iridium losses during pyrolysis and atomization and peak maximum alignment depend on the amount of the iridium deposited on the pyrolytic graphite coated platforms in the presence of nitric acid. A fractional order of release which suggests an atom vaporization from the surface or edges of the iridium islands was estimated. In the presence of citric acid, mass independence and zero order of the atom release were found. The zirconium treatment of the platform results in change of the spatial distribution of iridium and hence its vaporization. Vaporization temperatures as high as 2100°C, and first order of the process of atom generation were obtained. While it was possible to study the iridium atomization from uncoated and zirconium coated surfaces, evidencing a different order for the release process, the same was not possible for the tungsten coated platforms due to an 'overstabilization' that brought the iridium atomization temperature out of the working range of the instrument used. The different chemical behavior of tungsten and zirconium was also confirmed by XPS investigations. With tungsten, evidence of both WC and WO bonding

  19. [Determination of nine mineral elements in hulless barley by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Zhang, Huai-Gang

    2010-04-01

    The contents of nine mineral elements, including sulphur, zinc, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, iron, copper and manganese in five hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. nudum Hook. f.) lines were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flames atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). For the determination of sulphur, the samples were dissolved by magnesia and anhydrous sodium carbonate at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 3 h in the muffle furnace, and then a certain amount of barium chloride was put into the sample solution for colorimetry of the UV-Vs spectrophotometer. For the determination of other eight mineral elements, all of the samples were dissolved by a kind of incinerating method: first, the sample was put into the muffle furnace at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 2.5 h, then two droplets of 50%HNO3 were distributed into each sample, and the last step was putting the sample into the muffle furnace at 550 degrees C for 0.5 h. And then all of the ash was dissolved by 50%HNO3 to 50 milliliter and determined by flames atomic absorption spectrometry. The precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability of the method were discussed too. The results showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 1.2% and 3.7%; The average recoveries were 97.44%-101.52% and the relative standard deviations (RSD) of sample determination were 1.3%-3.8%. The repeatability experiment showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were 2.6%-6.1%. And the content of each mineral element was the same after 24 hours; All these showed that the method has a good precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability. In all the hulless barley samples, the average contents were in the order of K > S > Mg > Ca > Fe > Na > Zn > Mn > Cu, and the contents of zinc, iron and manganese closely related to people's health were relatively higher than other crops. The data of the experiment could provide an accurate and credible evidence

  20. Determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, Alexandre; Zmozinski, Ariane Vanessa; Damin, Isabel Cristina Ferreira; Silva, Márcia Messias; Vale, Maria Goreti Rodrigues

    2012-05-01

    In this work, a direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil samples. The samples were weighed directly on the solid sampling platforms and introduced into the graphite tube for analysis. The chemical modifier used for both analytes was a mixture of 0.1% Pd + 0.06% Mg + 0.06% Triton X-100. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were obtained for both analytes using standards and samples. Calibration curves with aqueous standards could be used for both analytes. The limits of detection obtained were 5.1 μg kg- 1 for arsenic and 0.2 μg kg- 1 for cadmium, calculated for the maximum amount of sample that can be analyzed (8 mg and 10 mg) for arsenic and cadmium, respectively. Relative standard deviations lower than 20% were obtained. For validation purposes, a calibration curve was constructed with the SRM 1634c and aqueous standards for arsenic and the results obtained for several crude oil samples were in agreement according to paired t-test. The result obtained for the determination of arsenic in the SRM against aqueous standards was also in agreement with the certificate value. As there is no crude oil or similar reference material available with a certified value for cadmium, a digestion in an open vessel under reflux using a "cold finger" was adopted for validation purposes. The use of paired t-test showed that the results obtained by direct sampling and digestion were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. Recovery tests were carried out with inorganic and organic standards and the results were between 88% and 109%. The proposed method is simple, fast and reliable, being appropriated for routine analysis.

  1. Mapping atomic and diffuse interstellar band absorption across the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Sarre, Peter J.; Beckman, John E.

    2015-12-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) trace warm neutral and weakly ionized diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Here we present a dedicated, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of two of the strongest DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 Å, in optical spectra of 666 early-type stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, along with measurements of the atomic Na I D and Ca II K lines. The resulting maps show for the first time the distribution of DIB carriers across large swathes of galaxies, as well as the foreground Milky Way ISM. We confirm the association of the 5797 Å DIB with neutral gas, and the 5780 Å DIB with more translucent gas, generally tracing the star-forming regions within the Magellanic Clouds. Likewise, the Na I D line traces the denser ISM whereas the Ca II K line traces the more diffuse, warmer gas. The Ca II K line has an additional component at ˜200-220 km s-1 seen towards both Magellanic Clouds; this may be associated with a pan-Magellanic halo. Both the atomic lines and DIBs show sub-pc-scale structure in the Galactic foreground absorption; the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs show very little correlation on these small scales, as do the Ca II K and Na I D lines. This suggests that good correlations between the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs, or between Ca II K and Na I D, arise from the superposition of multiple interstellar structures. Similarity in behaviour between DIBs and Na I in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Milky Way suggests the abundance of DIB carriers scales in proportion to metallicity.

  2. High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Llorens, Isabelle; Lahera, Eric; Delnet, William; Proux, Olivier; Dermigny, Quentin; Gelebart, Frederic; Morand, Marc; Shukla, Abhay; Bardou, Nathalie; Ulrich, Olivier; and others

    2012-06-15

    Fluorescence detection is classically achieved with a solid state detector (SSD) on x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamlines. This kind of detection however presents some limitations related to the limited energy resolution and saturation. Crystal analyzer spectrometers (CAS) based on a Johann-type geometry have been developed to overcome these limitations. We have tested and installed such a system on the BM30B/CRG-FAME XAS beamline at the ESRF dedicated to the structural investigation of very dilute systems in environmental, material and biological sciences. The spectrometer has been designed to be a mobile device for easy integration in multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamlines or even with a laboratory x-ray source. The CAS allows to collect x-ray photons from a large solid angle with five spherically bent crystals. It will cover a large energy range allowing to probe fluorescence lines characteristic of all the elements from Ca (Z = 20) to U (Z = 92). It provides an energy resolution of 1-2 eV. XAS spectroscopy is the main application of this device even if other spectroscopic techniques (RIXS, XES, XRS, etc.) can be also achieved with it. The performances of the CAS are illustrated by two experiments that are difficult or impossible to perform with SSD and the complementarity of the CAS vs SSD detectors is discussed.

  3. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  4. Study of the Many Fluorescent Lines and the Absorption Variability in GX 301-2 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerst, F.; Suchy, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Barragan, L.; Wilms, J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Caballero, I.; Kretschmar, P.; Ferrigno, C.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present an in-depth study of the High Mass X-ray Binary (HMXB) GX 301-2 during its pre-periastron flare using data from the XMM-Newton satellite. The energy spectrum shows a power law continuum absorbed by a large equivalent hydrogen column on the order of 10(exp 24)/ sq cm and a prominent Fe K-alpha fluorescent emission line. Besides the Fe K-alpha line, evidence for Fe K-Beta, Ni K-alpha, Ni K-Beta, S K-alpha, Ar K-alpha, Ca K-alpha, and Cr K-alpha fluorescent lines is found. The observed line strengths are consistent with fluorescence in a cold absorber. This is the first time that Cr K-alpha is seen in emission in the X-ray spectrum of a HMXB. In addition to the modulation by the strong pulse period of approx 685 sec the source is highly variable and shows different states of activity. We perform time-resolved as well as pulse-to-pulse resolved spectroscopy to investigate differences between these states of activity. We find that fluorescent line fluxes are strongly variable and generally follow the overall flux. The N-H value is variable by a factor of 2, but not correlated to continuum normalization. We find an interval of low flux in the light curve in which the pulsations cease almost completely, without any indication of an increasing absorption column. We investigate this dip in detail and argue that it is most likely that during the dip the accretion ceased and the afterglow of the fluorescent iron accounted for the main portion of the X-ray flux. A similar dip was found earlier in RXTE data, and we compare our findings to these results.

  5. Germanium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: an increased vapor pressure-chloride generation system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Volkan, Mürvet

    2011-03-15

    A new chloride generation system was designed for the direct, sensitive, rapid and accurate determination of the total germanium in complex matrices. It was aimed to improve the detection limit of chloride generation technique by increasing the vapor pressure of germanium tetrachloride (GeCl(4)). In order to do so, a novel joint vapor production and gas-liquid separation unit equipped with a home-made oven was incorporated to an ordinary nitrous oxide-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Several variables such as reaction time, temperature and acid concentration have been investigated. The linear range for germanium determination was 0.1-10 ng mL(-1) for 1 mL sampling volume with a detection limit (3s) of 0.01 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4% for nine replicates of a 1 ng mL(-1) germanium solution. The method was validated by the analysis of one non-certified and two certified geochemical reference materials, respectively, CRM GSJ-JR-2 (Rhyolite), and GSJ-JR-1 (Rhyolite), and GBW 07107 (Chinese Rock). Selectivity of the method was investigated for Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), and Zn(2+) ions and ionic species of As(III), Sb(III), Te(IV), and Se(IV). PMID:21315908

  6. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  7. Determination of arsenic in a nickel alloy by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, C. P.; Tyson, J. F.; Offley, S. G.

    1992-08-01

    The development of a method for the direct determination of trace arsenic quantities in nickel alloy digests, by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, is described. An optimization study of the manifold and chemical parameters produced system performance, in terms of tolerance of the nickel matrix and sensitivity, such that matrix removal and pre-reduction of As(V) to As (III) prior to arsine generation were eliminated. Full recovery of the As(V) signal from a solution containing 5 ng ml -1 in the presence of 60 μg ml -1 nickel was obtained. Validation of the method was achieved by analyzing a British Chemical Standard (BCS) Certified Reference Material (CRM) #346 IN nickel alloy containing arsenic at a concentration of 50 μg g -1. Following dissolution in nitric and hydrofluoric acids by a microwave assisted procedure, the only subsequent preparation required was dilution by the appropriate factor. Up to 60 injections h -1 may be made, with a detection limit of 0.5 ng ml -1 arsenic (250 pg absolute) as As(V) in a 500 μl sample. The peak height characteristic concentration is 0.46 ng ml -1, with a relative standard deviation of 3.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 As(V) standard ( n = 6).

  8. Cadmium accumulation in the crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Mayans, J.; Hernandez, F.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Torreblanca, A.

    1986-11-01

    Lake Albufera and the surrounding rice-field waters are being subject to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals and pesticides) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. The American red crayfish Procambarus clarkii is native to the Louisiana marshes (USA). In 1978, the crayfish appeared in Lake Albufera near Valencia (Spain), and presently, without adequate sanitary controls, the crayfish is being fished commercially for human consumption. In view of this interest, it is important to have accurate information on concentrations of cadmium in natural waters and cadmium levels of tissues of freshwaters animals used as human food, as well as the accumulation rates of this metal in this animal. In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of cadmium in several tissues of the red crayfish, P clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following cadmium exposure. Determinations of cadmium were made by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy and the standard additions method. Digestion of samples was made by wet ashing in open flasks with concentrated HNO/sub 3/ at 80-90/sup 0/C.

  9. Analysis of the Release Characteristics of Cu-Treated Antimicrobial Implant Surfaces Using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zietz, Carmen; Fritsche, Andreas; Finke, Birgit; Stranak, Vitezslav; Haenle, Maximilian; Hippler, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    New developments of antimicrobial implant surfaces doped with copper (Cu) ions may minimize the risk of implant-associated infections. However, experimental evaluation of the Cu release is influenced by various test parameters. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Cu release characteristics in vitro according to the storage fluid and surface roughness. Plasma immersion ion implantation of Cu (Cu-PIII) and pulsed magnetron sputtering process of a titanium copper film (Ti-Cu) were applied to titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) samples with different surface finishing of the implant material (polished, hydroxyapatite and corundum blasted). The samples were submersed into either double-distilled water, human serum, or cell culture medium. Subsequently, the Cu concentration in the supernatant was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. The test fluid as well as the surface roughness can alter the Cu release significantly, whereby the highest Cu release was determined for samples with corundum-blasted surfaces stored in cell medium. PMID:22162672

  10. Slurry sampling for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination of arsenic in cigarette tobaccos.

    PubMed

    Mierzwa, J; Adeloju, S B; Dhindsa, H S

    1997-06-01

    The development of a slurry sampling hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric (HGAAS) method for the determination of arsenic in cigarette tobacco samples is described. The method is relatively simple and has been shown to give values of total arsenic close to those obtained using methods requiring total dissolution and decomposition of all vegetable matter before analysis. Pre-treatment of samples slurried in nitric acid by ultrasonication permitted the extraction of about 90% of the total arsenic from tobacco samples. Further improvement in the recovery efficiency (up to 93-94%) was accomplished by the use of an additional step of short microwave-accelerated treatment. L-Cysteine was used as a pre-reduction agent. The accuracy and precision of the slurry sampling HGAAS method were studied using the certified reference material (CRM) CTA-OTL-1 Oriental Tobacco Leaves. Under the optimum conditions, as little as 2.6 ng of arsenic can be detected. The relative standard deviation of the overall procedure was calculated to be below 7.6% at arsenic concentration levels of 0.5-0.9 mg kg-1 and the analytical results obtained for the CRM agreed with the certified value. The main factors that influenced the reliability of the method were sample homogeneity, particle size and slurry concentration. PMID:9282401

  11. Speciation of methylmercury in market seafood by thermal degradation, amalgamation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-de-Cenzano, Manuela; Rochina-Marco, Arancha; Cervera, M Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Sample thermal decomposition followed by mercury amalgamation and atomic absorption has been employed for the determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in fish. The method involves HBr leaching of MeHg, extraction into toluene, and back-extraction into an aqueous l-cysteine solution. Preliminary studies were focused on the extraction efficiency, losses, contaminations, and species interconversion prevention. The limit of detection was 0.018µgg(-1) (dry weight). The intraday precision for three replicate analysis at a concentration of 4.2µgg(-1) (dry weight) was 3.5 percent, similar to the interday precision according to analysis of variance (ANOVA). The accuracy was guaranteed by the use of fortified samples involving 83-105 percent recoveries, and certified reference materials TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas) and DORM-3 (dogfish liver), providing 107 and 98 percent recovery of certified values. The greenness of the method was also evaluated with the analytical eco-scale being obtained a final score of 73 points which means an acceptable green analysis. The method was applied to fifty-seven market samples of different fish acquired from local markets in several sampling campaigns. The content of MeHg found varied between 0.0311 and 1.24µgg(-1) (wet weight), with values that involve 33-129 percent of the total mercury content. Some considerations about food safety were also done taking into account data about Spanish fish consume and Tolerable Weekly Intake (TWI) established for MeHg. PMID:24927385

  12. Acid effects on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adeloju, S.B.; Mann, T.F.

    1987-07-01

    The influence of nitric, hydrochloric and sulfuric acids on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry has been investigated. Small pre-reduction peaks associated with the instability of mercury were observed in solutions containing less than or equal to 12.5, < 2 and less than or equal to 12.5% v/v of each acid, respectively. Mercury was found to be most stable in greater than or equal to 2% v/v hydrochloric acid and the measured absorbance was not greatly influenced by varying concentration of the acid. The mercury absorbance measurements were more sensitive in solutions containing less than or equal to 6.3% v/v hydrochloric acid than in similar concentrations of nitric and sulfuric acids. The use of the three acids as a digestion mixture result in serious interference from nitrogen oxides. The interference was removed by use of expelling agents such as urea and sulfamic acid or overcome by use of excess stannous chloride, prior to the reduction of mercury(II) ions. The determination of mercury in NBS albacore tuna using both of these approaches to overcome the interference problem proved to be successful.

  13. Determination of gold in geological materials by carbon slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Kuryło, Michał; Otto, Magdalena; Mróz, Agnieszka

    2012-09-15

    A simple and cost effective preconcentration method on modified activated carbons is described for the determination of traces of gold (Au) in geological samples by carbon slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The basic parameters affecting the adsorption capacity of Au(III) ions on modified activated carbons were studied in detail and the effect of activated carbons modification has been determined by studying the initial runs of adsorption isotherms. The influence of chlorides and nitrates on adsorption ability of Au(III) ions onto the modified activated carbons for diluted aqueous solution was also studied in detail in respect to the determination of gold in solid materials after digestion steps in the analytical procedure, which usually involves the application of aqua regia. SEM-EDX and XPS studies confirmed that the surface reduction of Au(III) ions to Au(0) is the main gold adsorption mechanism on the activated carbon. Determination of gold after its preconcentration on the modified activated carbon was validated by applying certified reference materials. The experimental results are in good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of Au in real samples using aqueous standards. PMID:22967620

  14. Determination of cobalt in samples containing cobalt and tungsten carbide by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Firriolo, J.M.; Kutzman, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    A method has been developed to determine the amount of cobalt (Co) in atmospheric dust samples which include free and sintered Co. Cobalt and tungsten carbide (WC) mixtures ranging from 0-100% Co were prepared for atomic absorption analysis by dissolving the Co in aqua regia. Using this method, the amount of Co in the samples assayed ranged from 90.9-100.1% of that gravimetrically added to the mixtures. The results of this aqua regia dissolution procedure for Co were compared to a hydrofluoric acid method which solubilized both the Co and the WC. Application of the aqua regia dissolution method to samples of sintered WC and Co dust resulted in complete recovery of the Co from these materials. These results were supported by x-ray analysis of the samples before and after dissolution of the Co with aqua regia. The described procedure is advantageous because it avoids the use of highly-caustic hydrofluoric acid and the results are quickly available.

  15. Stabilizing Agents for Calibration in the Determination of Mercury Using Solid Sampling Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zelinková, Hana; Červenka, Rostislav; Komárek, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (TMDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and thiourea were investigated as stabilizing agents for calibration purposes in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS). These agents were used for complexation of mercury in calibration solutions and its thermal stabilization in a solid sampling platform. The calibration solutions had the form of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extracts or MIBK-methanol solutions with the TMDTC and DEDTC chelates and aqueous solutions with thiourea complexes. The best results were obtained for MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of 2.5 g L−1 TMDTC. The surface of graphite platforms for solid sampling was modified with palladium or rhenium by using electrodeposition from a drop of solutions. The Re modifier is preferable due to a higher lifetime of platform coating. A new SS-ETAAS procedure using the direct sampling of solid samples into a platform with an Re modified graphite surface and the calibration against MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of TMDTC is proposed for the determination of mercury content in solid environmental samples, such as soil and plants. PMID:22654606

  16. Atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper, zinc, and lead in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1976-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometric method is described for the determination of copper, zinc, and lead in geological materials. The sample is digested with HF-HCl-H2O2; the final solution for analysis is in 10 % (v/v) HCl. Copper and zinc are determined directly by aspirating the solution into an air-acetylene flame. A separate aliquot of the solution is used for determination of lead; lead is extracted into TOPO-MIBK from the acidic solution in the presence of iodide and ascorbic acid. For a 0.50-g sample, the limits of determination are 10-2000 p.p.m. for Cu and Zn, and 5-5000 p.p.m. for Pb. As much as 40 % Fe or Ca. and 10 % Al, Mg, or Mn in the sample do not interfere. The proposed method can be applied to the determination of copper, zinc, and lead in a wide range of geological materials including iron- and manganese-rich, calcareous and carbonate samples. ?? 1976.

  17. Analysis of the release characteristics of cu-treated antimicrobial implant surfaces using atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fritsche, Andreas; Finke, Birgit; Stranak, Vitezslav; Haenle, Maximilian; Hippler, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    New developments of antimicrobial implant surfaces doped with copper (Cu) ions may minimize the risk of implant-associated infections. However, experimental evaluation of the Cu release is influenced by various test parameters. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Cu release characteristics in vitro according to the storage fluid and surface roughness. Plasma immersion ion implantation of Cu (Cu-PIII) and pulsed magnetron sputtering process of a titanium copper film (Ti-Cu) were applied to titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) samples with different surface finishing of the implant material (polished, hydroxyapatite and corundum blasted). The samples were submersed into either double-distilled water, human serum, or cell culture medium. Subsequently, the Cu concentration in the supernatant was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. The test fluid as well as the surface roughness can alter the Cu release significantly, whereby the highest Cu release was determined for samples with corundum-blasted surfaces stored in cell medium. PMID:22162672

  18. Direct determination of Cd, Pb and Cr in honey by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Camila Kulek; dos Anjos, Vanessa Egéa; Felsner, Maria Lurdes; Torres, Yohandra Reyes; Quináia, Sueli Pércio

    2014-03-01

    Slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was used for direct determination of Cr, Pb and Cd in honey without sample pretreatment. The honey slurries were prepared in aqueous solution containing hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid. The slurries were directly introduced in the pyrolytic graphite tubes. Pd-Mg was used as a chemical modifier only for Cd determination. Analytical curves were performed with aqueous standards for Pb and Cr and with addition of fructose for Cd. The quantification limits for Cd, Pb and Cr were 2.0, 5.4 and 9.4ngg(-1), respectively. Acceptable precision of the methodology was obtained through repeatability and intermediate precision. In the accuracy study, recoveries were satisfactory (94-101%) for the three elements. The methodology was applied in honey from Paraná (Brazil). The concentrations of Pb, Cd and Cr ranged from 141 to 228ngg(-1), <2.0 to 8ngg(-1) and 83 to 94ngg(-1), respectively. PMID:24176328

  19. Stabilizing agents for calibration in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zelinková, Hana; Červenka, Rostislav; Komárek, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (TMDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and thiourea were investigated as stabilizing agents for calibration purposes in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS). These agents were used for complexation of mercury in calibration solutions and its thermal stabilization in a solid sampling platform. The calibration solutions had the form of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extracts or MIBK-methanol solutions with the TMDTC and DEDTC chelates and aqueous solutions with thiourea complexes. The best results were obtained for MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of 2.5 g L(-1) TMDTC. The surface of graphite platforms for solid sampling was modified with palladium or rhenium by using electrodeposition from a drop of solutions. The Re modifier is preferable due to a higher lifetime of platform coating. A new SS-ETAAS procedure using the direct sampling of solid samples into a platform with an Re modified graphite surface and the calibration against MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of TMDTC is proposed for the determination of mercury content in solid environmental samples, such as soil and plants. PMID:22654606

  20. Determination of rhodium: Since the origins until today Atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bosch Ojeda, C; Sánchez Rojas, F

    2006-02-28

    Rhodium is present at about 0.001ppm in the earths crust. Rhodium metal is known for its stability in corrosive environments, physical beauty and unique physical and chemical properties. Recent interest in the medical and industrial significance of platinum and to a lesser extent palladium and rhodium has been accompanied by an increasing interest in their determination at low levels. Platinum group elements (PGEs: Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os) play a decisive role in the performance of catalytic converters, world-wide applied in vehicles and in some household utensils, to reduce the emission of gaseous pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons. Since then, approximately 73% of the world production of rhodium is consumed in the production of autocatalyst. However, the hot exhaust gases flowing through the converter cause abrasion of these units, leading to the emission of these elements to the environment. The concentration level of rhodium (also platinum and palladium) is still very low in the nature; accordingly, their determination in environmental samples specially appears to be a challenging task for analytical chemists. In recent years, the development of analytical methods for the determination of rhodium has increased. The aim of the present review is to evaluate the utility of atomic absorption spectrometry, applied for the quantification of rhodium in different materials, such as environmental, biological, metallurgical and geological samples. PMID:18970480

  1. Atomic Structure of Pt3Ni Nanoframe Electrocatalysts by in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Nigel; Kang, Yijin; Chen, Chen; Resasco, Joaquin; Kornienko, Nikolay; Guo, Jinghua; Markovic, Nenad M; Somorjai, Gabor A; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-12-23

    Understanding the atomic structure of a catalyst is crucial to exposing the source of its performance characteristics. It is highly unlikely that a catalyst remains the same under reaction conditions when compared to as-synthesized. Hence, the ideal experiment to study the catalyst structure should be performed in situ. Here, we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as an in situ technique to study Pt3Ni nanoframe particles which have been proven to be an excellent electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The surface characteristics of the nanoframes were probed through electrochemical hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide electrooxidation, which showed that nanoframe surfaces with different structure exhibit varying levels of binding strength to adsorbate molecules. It is well-known that Pt-skin formation on Pt-Ni catalysts will enhance ORR activity by weakening the binding energy between the surface and adsorbates. Ex situ and in situ XAS results reveal that nanoframes which bind adsorbates more strongly have a rougher Pt surface caused by insufficient segregation of Pt to the surface and consequent Ni dissolution. In contrast, nanoframes which exhibit extremely high ORR activity simultaneously demonstrate more significant segregation of Pt over Ni-rich subsurface layers, allowing better formation of the critical Pt-skin. This work demonstrates that the high ORR activity of the Pt3Ni hollow nanoframes depends on successful formation of the Pt-skin surface structure. PMID:26652294

  2. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry in assessment of biomonitor plants for lead, cadmium and copper pollution.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Kaya; Mehmet, Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Eleven plant species were collected from the vicinity of lead-battery plant in the city of Gaziantep, Turkey. Lead, cadmium and copper concentrations in the soil and leaves of plants were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead, Cd and Cu concentrations in the soil samples taken from battery area were found to be in the ranges of 304-602, 0.4-0.44 and 31-37 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Significantly increased lead concentration up to 2 750 mg x kg(-1) was found in the leaves of Eleagnus angustifolia L. plant. The lead concentrations in the other plant leaves taken from 50 m around battery factory followed the order Ailanthus altissima > Morus sp. > Juglans regia L. > Ficus carica L. > Cydonia oblonga Miller > Prunus x domestica L. The plants, Populus nigra L. , Eleagnus angustifolia L. and Salix sp. were found useful for Cd, and the plant, Eleagnus angusti folia L. for Pb, to be considered as potential biomonitor. Especially, leaves of trees and plants taken from the distance of 50 m from battery plant have relatively higher Pb concentrations. Therefore, people who and animals which live in this area and benefit from these soil and plants have vital risks. PMID:22497165

  3. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum. PMID:27427698

  4. Evaluation of metal contents of household detergent samples from Turkey by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Unsal, Yunus Emre; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-11-01

    The concentrations of cadmium, copper, chromium, cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc in detergent samples from Kayseri, Turkey were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. HClO₄ (10 mL)/HNO₃ (10 mL) mixture was used for the digestion of household detergent samples. The correctness of the analytical procedures was checked with standard addition-recovery tests in different detergent samples for the investigated metal ions. The concentration ranges of the elements in the detergent samples were found as 17.2-60.1, 11.1-40.1, 2.5-32.3, 8.1-10.5, 7.2-21.6, 9.8-17.9, 1.7-3.8, 12.5-22.5, and 2.0-5.8 μg/g for iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, cadmium, nickel, and chromium, respectively. The values found in this work were compared with some other studies around the world conducted on detergent samples. PMID:23722641

  5. Stability of low concentration calibration standards for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D A; TenKate, L B

    1993-11-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS) is used for determination of ultra-trace metals in environmentally important samples. In the generation of GFAAS calibration curves for many environmental applications, low concentration calibration standards must be prepared dally, as required by the Statement of Work (SOW) for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Contract Laboratory Program (CLP). This results in significant time and work for the analyst and significant cost to the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) for chemicals and waste management. While EPA SW 846 is less prescriptive than the CLP SOW, ACL has been following the CLP guidelines because in-house criteria regarding the stability of GFAAS standards have not been established. A study was conducted to determine the stability of GFAAS standards for analytes commonly used in the ACL (single and mixed) as a function of time. Data were collected over nine months. The results show that GFAAS standards for Sb, Pb, Se, Ag, and TI are stable for a longer period of time than currently assumed by the CLP SOW. Reducing the frequency of preparing these standards will increase efficiency, decrease the handling of hazardous the quantity of hazardous waste generated, and decrease the quantity of hazardous substances to be ordered and stocked by the laboratory. These benefits will improve GFAAS analysis quality, reduce costs, enhance safety, and lower environmental concerns.

  6. Determination of chromium and molybdenum in medical foods by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Phifer, E C

    1995-01-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to determine chromium and molybdenum in 7 medical foods from 5 manufacturers. Linear standard curves were obtained for both elements for concentrations between 5 and 25 ng/mL. Detection limits were 0.24 ng/mL for Cr and 0.67 ng/mL for Mo. Characteristic masses were 3.1 and 14.7 pg for Cr and Mo, respectively. No difference was detected between wet and dry ashing methods, and dry ashing was used to complete the study. The method was validated by assaying various National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials. Analysis of these products for Cr and Mo were within certified values. One product was evaluated by this method for reproducibility (n = 5). Relative standard deviations were 6.8 and 4.8% for Cr and Mo, respectively. This product contained 0.31 +/= 0.02 micrograms Cr/g and 0.63 +/- 0.03 micrograms Mo/g. The remaining products contained 0.09-1.28 micrograms Cr/g and 0.07-2.3 micrograms Mo/g. Mean recovery values were 98 +/- 14% (n = 14) for Cr at spike levels of 0.20-1.89 micrograms/g and 102 +/- 24% (n = 10) for Mo at spike levels of 0.30-1.89 micrograms/g. PMID:8664588

  7. Determination of nickel in active pharmaceutical ingredients by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bubnič, Zoran; Urleb, Uroš; Kreft, Katjuša; Veber, Marjan

    2010-03-01

    An electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric procedure for the determination of nickel in active pharmaceutical ingredients was developed. Since the recoveries of nickel by the direct dissolution of samples in diluted nitric acid were low and caused errors in the determination of Ni in pharmaceutical samples, different approaches for sample pre-treatment were examined. It was found that the microwave digestion was the most suitable way for sample preparation. Various combinations of digestion agents and different microwave conditions were tested. The combination of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide was found to be the most appropriate. The validity of the method was evaluated by recovery studies of spiked samples and by the comparison of the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The recovery ranged from 87.5 to 104.0% and a good agreement was achieved between both methods. The detection limit and the limit of quantification were 0.6 and 2.1 µg g-1 respectively. The precision of the method was confirmed by the determination of Ni in the spiked samples and was below 4%, expressed in terms of a relative standard deviation. The method was applied to the determination of nickel in production samples of active pharmaceutical ingredients and intermediates. PMID:24061653

  8. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as an Adsorbent for Preconcentration and Determination of Trace Amount of Nickel in Environmental Samples by Atom Trap Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhanloo, H.; Falahnejad, M.; Zavvar Mousavi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A rapid enrichment method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been established for preconcentration and separation of trace Ni(II) ions in water samples prior to their determination by atom trap flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A column filled with bulky NH2-UVM7 was used as the novel adsorbent. Under optimal conditions, the linear range, limit of detection (LOD), and preconcentration factor (PF) were 3-92 μg/L, 0.8 μg/L, and 100, respectively. The validity of the method was checked by the standard reference material.

  9. Atomic Emission, Absorption and Fluorescence in the Laser-induced Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J. D.

    2009-01-22

    The main result of our efforts is the development and successful application of the theoretical model of laser induced plasma (LIP) that allows a back-calculation of the composition of the plasma (and the condensed phase) based on the observable plasma spectrum. The model has an immediate experimental input in the form of LIP spectra and a few other experimentally determined parameters. The model is also sufficiently simple and, therefore, practical. It is conveniently interfaced in a graphical user-friendly form for using by students and any laboratory personnel with only minimal training. In our view, the model opens up the possibility for absolute analysis, i.e. the analysis which requires no standards and tedious calibration. The other parts of this proposal (including plasma diagnostics) were somewhat subordinate to this main goal. Plasma diagnostics provided the model with the necessary experimental input and led to better understanding of plasma processes. Another fruitful direction we pursued was the use of the correlation analysis for material identification and plasma diagnostics. Through a number of computer simulations we achieved a clear understanding of how, where and why this approach works being applied to emission spectra from a laser plasma. This understanding will certainly improve the quality of forensic and industrial analyses where fast and reliable material identification and sorting are required.

  10. Probing Membrane Order and Topography in Supported Lipid Bilayers by Combined Polarized Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence-Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oreopoulos, John; Yip, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    Determining the local structure, dynamics, and conformational requirements for protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in membranes is critical to understanding biological processes ranging from signaling to the translocating and membranolytic action of antimicrobial peptides. We report here the application of a combined polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy-in situ atomic force microscopy platform. This platform's ability to image membrane orientational order was demonstrated on DOPC/DSPC/cholesterol model membranes containing the fluorescent membrane probe, DiI-C20 or BODIPY-PC. Spatially resolved order parameters and fluorophore tilt angles extracted from the polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were in good agreement with the topographical details resolved by in situ atomic force microscopy, portending use of this technique for high-resolution characterization of membrane domain structures and peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:19254557

  11. Selective determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and dithizone by atomic-absorption spectrometry with a carbon-tube atomizer.

    PubMed

    Kamada, T; Yamamoto, Y

    1977-05-01

    The extraction behaviour of antimony(III) and antimony(V) with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and dithizone in organic solvents has been investigated by means of frameless atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with a carbon-tube atomizer. The selective extraction of antimony(III) and differential determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) have been developed. With ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and methyl isobutyl ketone, when the aqueous phase/solvent volume ratio is 50 ml/10 ml and the injection volume in the carbon tube is 20 mul, the sensitivity for antimony is 0.2 ng/ml for 1% absorption. The relative standard deviations are ca. 2%. Interferences by many metal ions can be prevented by masking with EDTA. The proposed methods have been applied satisfactorily to determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) in various types of water. PMID:18962096

  12. One trinucleus dimethine cyanine dye: Experimental and theoretical studies on molecular structure as well as absorption and fluorescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D. D.; Wang, L. Y.; Su, J. J.; Zhang, X. F.; Lei, Y. B.; Zhai, G. H.; Wen, Z. Y.

    2013-05-01

    A kind of trinucleus dimethine cyanine dye: 1-methyl-2,6-bis[2-(furan-2-yl)vinyl]pyridinium iodide (1) was synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR, MS, UV-Vis spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The crystals of dye 1, obtained from slow evaporation of solvent acetone, crystallized in the triclinic space group P - 1 with a = 9.6501(16) Å, b = 10.2308(17) Å, c = 10.7341(17) Å, V = 887.2(3) Å3, and Z = 2 (at 298(2) K), and it was stabilized by the hydrogen bonds and intermolecular face-to-face π⋯π aromatic stacking interactions. Crystallographic, IR, 1H NMR and UV-Vis data of dye 1 were compared with the results of density functional theory (DFT) method, and the calculated molecular geometries, vibrational bands, 1H NMR chemical shifts and UV-Vis maximum absorption were consistent with the experimental results. The fluorescence spectra were predicted in four different solvents with CIS/PCM methods. Compared with experimental values, the absolute deviations of emission maxima were -17.4 nm in chloroform, 6.3 nm in DMSO, 4.9 nm in methanol, and 6.8 nm in water, respectively. And the experimental fluorescence spectra were nicely reproduced by the simulated fluorescence spectra for each solvent.

  13. Absorption spectrophotometric, fluorescence and theoretical investigations on supramolecular interaction of a designed bisporphyrin with C 60 and C 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debabrata; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2011-08-01

    The present article reports the spectroscopic and theoretical investigations on supramolecular interaction between fullerenes (C 60 and C 70) and a designed bisporphyrin, namely 1, in toluene. Job's method of continuous variation establishes 1:1 stoichiometry of the fullerene/ 1 complexes. Both absorption spectrophotometric and steady-state fluorescence studies reveal effective and selective interaction between fullerenes and 1 as average binding constants ( K) for the C 60/ 1 and C 70/ 1 complexes are enumerated to be 34,700 and 359,925 dm 3 mol -1, respectively. Large selectivity ratio in K, i.e., K/K, indicates that 1 acts as an effective molecular tweezers for C 70 in solution. Time-resolved fluorescence study evokes that the quenching of fluorescence of 1 by fullerenes is of static type in nature. Molecular mechanics calculations in vacuo determine the energies and single projection structures of the supramolecular systems, which provide very good support in favor of strong binding between C 70 and 1.

  14. Attosecond transient absorption of argon atoms in the vacuum ultraviolet region: line energy shifts versus coherent population transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Warrick, Erika R.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Using attosecond transient absorption, the dipole response of an argon atom in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region is studied when an external electromagnetic field is present. An isolated attosecond VUV pulse populates Rydberg states lying 15 eV above the argon ground state. A synchronized few-cycle near infrared (NIR) pulse modifies the oscillating dipoles of argon impulsively, leading to alterations in the VUV absorption spectra. As the NIR pulse is delayed with respect to the VUV pulse, multiple features in the absorption profile emerge simultaneously including line broadening, sideband structure, sub-cycle fast modulations, and 5-10 fs slow modulations. These features indicate the coexistence of two general processes of the light-matter interaction: the energy shift of individual atomic levels and coherent population transfer between atomic eigenstates, revealing coherent superpositions. An intuitive formula is derived to treat both effects in a unifying framework, allowing one to identify and quantify the two processes in a single absorption spectrogram.

  15. The Growth and Mechanical Properties of Living Neurons Measured via Atomic Force and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedden, Elise

    In this thesis we explore specific properties of the cytoskeleton and growth of living neurons via atomic force and fluorescence microscopies. We make the first comparative elastic modulus measurements on three types of neuronal cells plated on three types of substrate adhesion factors. We discover that during phases of active neurite extension the soma of cortical neurons stiffens reversibly due to changes in microtubule aggregation. Additionally, we demonstrate that mechanical properties of cortical neurons measured near physiological temperatures are primarily dependent on the microtubule component of the cytoskeleton. We further explore the response of the neuronal cytoskeleton to changes in ambient temperature. The elastic modulus of cortical neuron somas is discovered to increase dramatically upon a drop in ambient temperature. We determine through fluorescent staining and chemical modification of the cytoskeleton that this stiffening is due primarily to a change in the mechanically dominant component of the cytoskeleton from microtubules at 37ºC to actin at 25ºC precipitated by changes in myosin II dynamics within the cell. We make the first direct mechanical measurements of the pericellular brush layer on living neurons, demonstrating that the traditionally observed viscoelastic behavior of the neuronal soma is due to the properties of this brush layer. When the brush layer is excluded, the underlying soma is discovered to be both stiffer than previously observed, and elastic, with no loading-speed dependence to the elastic modulus under the test conditions. We additionally demonstrate that the soma elastic modulus, brush length, and brush density are all dependent on the ambient temperature. Finally, through fluorescent and bright field microscopies we track the outgrowth of living neurons on patterned directional surfaces, demonstrating that asymmetrical ratchet topographies unidirectionally bias axonal outgrowth. We model the outgrowth of the neurons

  16. Oxygen vacancy mediated enhanced photo-absorption from ZnO(0001) nanostructures fabricated by atom beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Joshi, Shalik R.; Mishra, Indrani; Kabiraj, D.; Mishra, N. C.; Avasthi, D. K.; Varma, Shikha

    2016-08-01

    The nanoscale patterns created on the ZnO(0001) surfaces during atom beam irradiation have been investigated here for their photo absorption response. Preferential sputtering, during irradiation, promotes Zn-rich zones that serve as the nucleation centers for the spontaneous creation of nanostructures. Nanostructured surfaces with bigger (78 nm) nanodots, displaying hexagonal ordering and long ranged periodic behavior, show higher photo absorption and a ˜0.09 eV reduced bandgap. These nanostructures also demonstrate higher concentration of oxygen vacancies which are crucial for these results. The enhanced photo-response, as observed here, has been achieved in the absence of any dopant elements.

  17. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  18. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  19. Achieving 100% Efficient Postcolumn Hydride Generation for As Speciation Analysis by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2016-04-01

    An experimental setup consisting of a flow injection hydride generator coupled to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer was optimized in order to generate arsanes from tri- and pentavalent inorganic arsenic species (iAs(III), iAs(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MAs(V)), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)) with 100% efficiency with the use of only HCl and NaBH4 as the reagents. The optimal concentration of HCl was 2 mol L(-1); the optimal concentration of NaBH4 was 2.5% (m/v), and the volume of the reaction coil was 8.9 mL. To prevent excessive signal noise due to fluctuations of hydride supply to an atomizer, a new design of a gas-liquid separator was implemented. The optimized experimental setup was subsequently interfaced to HPLC and employed for speciation analysis of arsenic. Two chromatography columns were tested: (i) ion-pair chromatography and (ii) ion exchange chromatography. The latter offered much better results for human urine samples without a need for sample dilution. Due to the equal hydride generation efficiency (and thus the sensitivities) of all As species, a single species standardization by DMAs(V) standard was feasible. The limits of detection for iAs(III), iAs(V), MAs(V), and DMAs(V) were 40, 97, 57, and 55 pg mL(-1), respectively. Accuracy of the method was tested by the analysis of the standard reference material (human urine NIST 2669), and the method was also verified by the comparative analyses of human urine samples collected from five individuals with an independent reference method. PMID:26938848

  20. Temperature-controlled electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry using a pyrometric feedback system in conjunction with a background monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deijck, W.; Roelofsen, A. M.; Pieters, H. J.; Herber, R. F. M.

    The construction of a temperature-controlled feedback system for electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) using an optical pyrometer applied to the atomization stage is described. The system was used in conjunction with a fast-response background monitoring device. The heating rate of the furnace amounted to 1400° s -1 with a reproducibility better than 1%. The precision of the temperature control at a steady state temperature of 2000°C was 0.1%. The analytical improvements offered by the present system have been demonstrated by the determination of cadmium and lead in blood and finally by the determination of lead in serum. Both the sensitivity and the precision of the method have been improved. The accuracy of the method was checked by determining the lead content for a number of scrum samples both by ETA-AAS and differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry (DPASV) and proved to be satisfactory.

  1. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of selenium in foods and diets.

    PubMed

    Kumpulainen, J; Raittila, A M; Lehto, J; Koivistoinen, P

    1983-09-01

    The validity of 2 electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric methods for determination of selenium in foods and diets was tested. By using 0.5% Ni(II) as a matrix modifier to prevent selenium losses during the ashing step, it was shown that selenium can be determined in samples containing greater than or equal to 1 microgram Se/g dry wt without organic extraction. The mean recovery tested, using NBS Bovine Liver, was 98%; recovery of added inorganic selenium in Bovine Liver matrix was 100%. In addition, this method gave values closest to the median value of all participating laboratories using hydride generation AAS or the spectrofluorometric method in a collaborative study on high selenium wheat, flour, and toast samples. For samples with concentrations less than 1 microgram Se/g dry wt, separation of selenium from interfering Fe and P ions by organic extraction was necessary. Using inorganic 75Se in meat and human milk matrixes, an ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-methyl isobutyl ketone-extraction system with added Cu(II) as a matrix modifier yielded the best extraction recoveries, 97 and 98%, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method were tested using several official and unofficial biological standard materials. The mean accuracy was within 4% of the certified or best values of the standard materials and the day-to-day variation was 9%. The Se/Fe or Se/P interference limits proved to be low enough not to affect selenium determinations in practically all foods or diets. The practical detection limit of the method was 3 ng Se/g dry wt for 1.0 g dry wt samples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6630125

  2. Determination of calcium, magnesium and strontium in soils by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Z; Tyson, J F

    1999-12-01

    Several procedures for the determination of Ca, Mg and Sr in soils have been compared on the basis of the accuracy of analysis of two NIST reference materials (Montana Soils SRM 2710 and SRM 2711). Samples were dissolved in a mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids in sealed vessels in a microwave oven and in teflon beakers on a hot plate. The digests obtained from both dissolution methods were evaporated to dryness in an attempt to remove silicon. Boric acid was added to prevent the precipitation of the lanthanum releasing agent (as lanthanum fluoride) and potassium was added as an ionization buffer. Determinations were made by flame atomic absorption spectrometry with both the nitrous oxide-acetylene flame and the air-acetylene flame, with calibration either by standard additions or against external standards matrix matched with respect to nitric acid, boric acid, lanthanum and potassium. The silicon remaining in the solution was also determined by external calibration. A single-line flow injection manifold was used to overcome any problems due to the presence of high dissolved solids. A volume of 300 mul was injected into a water carrier stream flowing at 8 ml min(-1). To determine Ca in the air-acetylene flame, it was necessary to remove silicon. Magnesium was determined in either flame without complete removal of the silicon, however, for the determination of Sr, it was necessary to remove the silicon and use the nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The indicative value for Sr in SRM 2710 was too low: the value determined was 360+/-30 mug g(-1). PMID:18967785

  3. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood. PMID:27432235

  4. Methods of calibration in the direct analysis of solid samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, M.; Baxter, D. C.

    1992-12-01

    One of the major problems involved in the direct analysis of solid samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) lies in the calibration step because non-spectral interference effects are often pronounced. Three standardization techniques have been described and used in solid sampling-ETAAS: (i) standard additions method; (ii) calibration relative to a certified reference material; and (iii) calibration curve technique. However, an adequate statistical evaluation of the uncertainty in the analyte concentration in the solid sample is most frequently neglected, and reported errors may be seriously underestimated. This can be attributed directly to the complexity of the statistical expressions required to accurately account for errors in each of the calibration techniques mentioned above, and the general lack of relevant reference literature. The object of this work has been to develop a computer package which will perform the necessary statistical analyses of solid sampling-ETAAS data; the result is the program "SOLIDS" described here in the form of an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica, the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B. The program could also be useful in other analytical fields where similar calibration methods are used. The hard copy text, outlining the calibration models and their associated errors, is accompanied by a diskette containing the program, some data files, and a manual. Use of the program is exemplified in the text, with some of the data files discussed included on the diskette which, together with the manual, should enable the reader to become familiarized with the operation of the program, and the results generated.

  5. Determination of mercury in phosphate fertilizers by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Robson M; Silva, Laiana O B; Castro, Jacira T; de Azevedo Neto, Andre D; de Jesus, Raildo M; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, a method for the determination of mercury in phosphate fertilizers using slurry sampling and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV QT AAS) is proposed. Because mercury (II) ions form strong complexes with phosphor compounds, the formation of metallic mercury vapor requires the presence of lanthanum chloride as a release agent. Thiourea increases the amount of mercury that is extracted from the solid sample to the liquid phase of the slurry. The method is established using two steps. First, the slurry is prepared using the sample, lanthanum chloride, hydrochloric acid solution and thiourea solution and is sonicated for 20 min. Afterward, mercury vapor is generated using an aliquot of the slurry in the presence of the hydrochloric acid solution and isoamylic alcohol with sodium tetrahydroborate solution as the reducing agent. The experimental conditions for slurry preparation were optimized using two-level full factorial design involving the factors: thiourea and lanthanum chloride concentrations and the duration of sonication. The method allows the determination of mercury by external calibration using aqueous standards with limits of detection and quantification of 2.4 and 8.2 μg kg(-1), respectively, and precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, of 6.36 and 5.81% for two phosphate fertilizer samples with mercury concentrations of 0.24 and 0.57 mg kg(-1), respectively. The accuracy was confirmed by the analysis of a certified reference material of phosphate fertilizer that was provided by the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST). The method was applied to determine mercury in six commercial samples of phosphate fertilizers. The mercury content varied from 33.97 to 209.28 μg kg(-1). These samples were also analyzed employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results were consistent with the results from our proposed method. PMID:23598130

  6. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bin

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. Themore » remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.« less

  7. Imaging Electronic Trap States in Perovskite Thin Films with Combined Fluorescence and Femtosecond Transient Absorption Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bin; Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. The remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps. PMID:27103096

  8. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  9. [Research on optimization of mathematical model of flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Xue-Hong; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Ya-Bing; Jiang, Xue-Hui; Dai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry was a widely used method in the industries of health, environmental, geological and metallurgical fields for the merit of high sensitivity, wide measurement range and fast analytical speed. However, optimization of this method was too difficult as there exist so many parameters affecting the sensitivity and broadening. Generally, the optimal conditions were sought through several experiments. The present paper proposed a mathematical model between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients using the law of conservation of mass according to the characteristics of hydride chemical reaction and the composition of the system, which was proved to be accurate as comparing the theoretical simulation and experimental results through the test of arsanilic acid standard solution. Finally, this paper has put a relation map between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients, and summarized that GLS volume, carrier solution flow rate and sample loop volume were the most factors affecting sensitivity and broadening coefficients. Optimizing these three factors with this relation map, the relative sensitivity was advanced by 2.9 times and relative broadening was reduced by 0.76 times. This model can provide a theoretical guidance for the optimization of the experimental conditions. PMID:24783570

  10. Matrix effects on the determination of manganese in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry under different flame conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    Suppression caused by five of the seven matrix elements studied (Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg) was observed in the atomic-absorption determination of manganese in geological materials, when synthetic solutions and the recommended oxidizing air-acetylene flame were used. The magnitude of the suppression effects depends on (1) the kind and concentration of the interfering elements, (2) the type of acid medium, and (3) the concentration of manganese to be determined. All interferences noted are removed or alleviated by using a reducing nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The atomic-absorption method using this flame can be applied to the determination of total and extractable manganese in a wide range of geological materials without interferences. Analyses of six U.S. Geological Survey rock standards for manganese gave results in agreement with the reported values. ?? 1978.

  11. Chromium speciation by solid phase extraction on Dowex M 4195 chelating resin and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saygi, Kadriye Ozlem; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif

    2008-05-30

    A solid phase extraction procedure has been established for chromium speciation in natural water samples prior to determination by atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the solid phase extraction of the Cr(VI)- Dowex M 4195 chelating resin. After oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) by using H2O2, the presented method was applied to the determination of the total chromium. The level of Cr(III) is calculated by difference of total chromium and Cr(VI) levels. The procedure was optimized for some analytical parameters including pH, eluent type, flow rates of sample and eluent, matrix effects, etc. The presented method was applied for the speciation of chromium in natural water samples with satisfactory results (recoveries >95%, RSDs <10%). In the determinations of chromium species, flame atomic absorption spectrometer was used. The results were checked by using NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07603 Bush branched and leaves. PMID:17951001

  12. Identifying student and teacher difficulties in interpreting atomic spectra using a quantum model of emission and absorption of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-06-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two questionnaires, one for teachers and the other for students. By analyzing the responses, we conclude that (i) teachers lack a quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation capable of explaining the spectra, (ii) teachers and students share the same difficulties, and (iii) these difficulties concern the model of the atom, the model of radiation, and the model of the interaction between them.

  13. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant ( Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae ( Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 °C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 °C and atomization temperature 2100 °C) with 1.5 μg Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 μmol of zirconium and then with 0.10 μmol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely overcome by standard additions technique. Calibration by means of CRMs has

  14. Atom formation processes in the presence of ammonium thiocyanate in a thin-wall tungsten tube atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kiyohisa; Mizuno, Takayuki

    Processes of atom formation of Ag, Al, As, Bi, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr and Te in the presence of ammonium thiocyanate in a thin-wall tungsten tube atomizer are described. It was found from a thermodynamic approach that AI, Bi, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ni and Te formed complexes with ammonium thiocyanate and are atomized through the sulfides in argon-hydrogen atmosphere. Atom formation processess for the other elements are different.

  15. Hydride generation in-atomizer collection atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of antimony in acetic acid leachates from pewter cups.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; Kratzer, Jan; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Dědina, Jiří

    2011-12-15

    Antimony is one of the constituents of pewter, an alloy composed of a minimum of 90% tin with the balance being made up with copper, antimony and perhaps some bismuth. A method has been developed to determine Sb in acetic acid leachates from pewter cups. The employed instrumentation, an atomic absorption spectrometer, equipped with a quartz trap-and-atomizer device, is simple and relatively inexpensive with low running costs. Interferences due to the presence of tin and ways to control them were investigated in detail. The applied approach made possible to overcome potentially serious interference of Sn leached from the cup material (which was shown to take place in the atomizer), by a combination of (i) high concentration of HCl, which decreases the efficiency of stannane generation and (ii) in-atomizer collection. The resulting Sn tolerance limit was between 10 and 20 mg L(-1). The advantages of the in-atomizer collection are a lower tin interference in the atomizer, and a much better limit of detection (LOD), which makes possible reducing the atomization interference further by working with more diluted sample solutions. Besides the Sn interference, an interference of an unknown volatile compound transported to the atomizer together with stibine was identified in the measured sample solutions. This interference could be controlled using the analyte addition technique. The applicability of the method was tested on solutions containing a wide range of interferents leached from the pewter cups, obtained at leaching times between 1 and 24h. The LOD in the sample solutions was found to be 0.03 μg L(-1) Sb. PMID:22099676

  16. Determination of lithium isotopes at natural abundance levels by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li hollow cathode lamp emissions are used to determine lithium isotopic composition in the natural abundance range of geologic materials. Absorption was found to have a nonlinear dependence upon total lithium concentration and isotopic composition. A method using nonlinear equations to describe the relationship of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li lamp radiation is proposed as a means of calculating isotopic composition that is independent of total lithium concentration.

  17. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione studied by ultrafast absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pramod Kumar; Steinbacher, Andreas; Schmiedel, Alexander; Nuernberger, Patrick; Brixner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We employ transient absorption from the deep-UV to the visible region and fluorescence upconversion to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer dynamics in a biologically relevant drug molecule, 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione. The molecule is a ß-diketone which in the electronic ground state exists as exocyclic enol with an intramolecular H-bond. Upon electronic excitation at 300 nm, the first excited state of the exocyclic enol is initially populated, followed by ultrafast proton transfer (≈160 fs) to form the vibrationally hot endocyclic enol. Subsequently, solvent-induced vibrational relaxation takes place (≈10 ps) followed by decay (≈390 ps) to the corresponding ground state. PMID:26798837

  18. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centomo, P.; Meneghini, C.; Zecca, M.

    2013-05-01

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 °C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O2, H2, H2O2, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  19. Absorption and Luminescence Studies of Some Highly Fluorescent Derivatives of Vitamin B1; Solvent and pH Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, B.; Koput, J.; Kozubek, H.

    1990-08-01

    The influence of solvent on the UV-visible absorption and luminescence spectra of some highly fluorescent vitamin B1 derivatives, the products of the reaction of N-methylated vitamin B1 with cytidine (I), adenosine (II) and 2-amino-4-methylpyridine (III) is studied. Spectroscopic manifestations of protonation of I and II are also investigated using a semiempirical INDO/S CI method. Singlet and triplet energy levels of the free ion and several protonated species are calculated, and transition energies and oscillator strengths are compared with the experimental spectra. Calculated charge densities on heteroatoms in the ground and excited singlet and triplet states are correlated with changes of the experimental pKa values with excitation. The results for I and II are compared with those for the trimethylated pyrichrominium ion (III) previously studied

  20. Reverse micelles in supercritical fluids. (2) Fluorescence and absorption spectral probes of adjustable aggregation in the two-phase region

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdi, P.; McFann, G.J.; Fox, M.A.; Johnston, K.P. )

    1990-09-06

    The properties of bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles and microemulsions in supercritical fluid (SCF) ethane, liquid propane, and other alkanes are reported. The microscopic environment inside the reverse micelles was investigated with the absorption probe pyridine N-oxide and the fluorescence probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). The microscopic behavior is related directly to a macroscopic property, the water-to-surfactant ratio W{sub o}. In the one-phase region, a reverse micelle in a SCF is much like that in a liquid solvent. However, in the two-phase region, both the microscopic and macroscopic properties may be adjusted with pressure in ethane and propane, because of changes in the partitioning of the components between the phases.

  1. Rational molecular design towards Vis/NIR absorption and fluorescence by using pyrrolopyrrole aza-BODIPY and its highly conjugated structures for organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Soji; Iino, Taku; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2015-02-01

    Pyrrolopyrrole aza-BODIPY (PPAB) developed in our recent study from diketopyrrolopyrrole by titanium tetrachloride-mediated Schiff-base formation reaction with heteroaromatic amines is a highly potential chromophore due to its intense absorption and fluorescence in the visible region and high fluorescence quantum yield, which is greater than 0.8. To control the absorption and fluorescence of PPAB, particularly in the near-infrared (NIR) region, further molecular design was performed using DFT calculations. This results in the postulation that the HOMO-LUMO gap of PPAB is perturbed by the heteroaromatic moieties and the aryl-substituents. Based on this molecular design, a series of new PPAB molecules was synthesized, in which the largest redshifts of the absorption and fluorescence maxima up to 803 and 850 nm, respectively, were achieved for a PPAB consisting of benzothiazole rings and terthienyl substituents. In contrast to the sharp absorption of PPAB, a PPAB dimer, which was prepared by a cross-coupling reaction of PPAB monomers, exhibited panchromatic absorption across the UV/Vis/NIR regions. With this series of PPAB chromophores in hand, a potential application of PPAB as an optoelectronic material was investigated. After identifying a suitable PPAB molecule for application in organic photovoltaic cells based on evaluation using time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements, a maximized power conversion efficiency of 1.27 % was achieved. PMID:25533757

  2. Attosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states in helium atoms dressed by a time-delayed femtosecond infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. Q.; Ye, D. F.; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fu, L. B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states of helium atoms by solving the time-dependent two-electron Schrödinger equation numerically based on a one-dimensional model. The helium atoms are subjected to an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse and a time-delayed infrared (IR) few-cycle laser pulse. A superposition of doubly excited states populated by the XUV pulse is identified, which interferes with the direct ionization pathway leading to Fano resonance profiles in the photoabsorption spectrum. In the presence of an IR laser, however, the Fano line profiles are strongly modified: A shifting, splitting, and broadening of the original absorption lines is observed when the XUV attosecond pulse and infrared few-cycle laser pulse overlap in time, which is in good agreement with recent experimental results. At certain time delays, we observe symmetric Lorentz, inverted Fano profiles, and even negative absorption cross sections indicating that the XUV light can be amplified during the interaction with atoms. We further prove that the above pictures are general for different doubly excited states by suitably varying the frequency of the IR field to coherently couple the corresponding states.

  3. On-line ion-exchange preconcentration and determination of traces of platinum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González García, M M; Sánchez Rojas, F; Bosch Ojeda, C; García de Torres, A; Cano Pavón, J M

    2003-04-01

    A method to determine trace amounts of platinum in different samples based on electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The preconcentration step is performed on a chelating resin microcolumn [1,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-3-sulfophenyl methylene thiocarbonohydrazide (PSTH) immobilized on an anion-exchange resin (Dowex 1x8-200)] placed in the autosampler arm. The combination of a peristaltic pump for sample loading and the atomic absorption spectrometer pumps for elution through a selection valve simplifies the hardware. The peristaltic pump and the selection valve are easily controlled electronically with two switches placed in the autosampler, which are activated when the autosampler arm is down. Thus, the process is fully automated without any modification of the software of the atomic absorption spectrometer. Under the optimum conditions with a 60-s preconcentration time, a sample flow rate of 2.4 mL min(-1), and an injection volume of eluent of 40 microL, a linear calibration graph was obtained in the range 0-100 ng mL(-1). The enrichment factor was 14. The detection limit under these conditions is 1 ng mL(-1), and the relative standard deviation (RSD) is 1.6% for 10 ng mL(-1) of Pt. The method has been applied to the determination of platinum in catalyst, vegetation, soil, and natural water samples. The results showed good agreement with the certified value and the recoveries of Pt added to samples were 98-105%. PMID:12733043

  4. Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiyuan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Hou, Jun; Ao, Yanhui

    2014-03-01

    The Yangtze Estuary is heavily influenced by coast-continent geochemical processes and anthropogenic activity; thus, the source and distribution of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the estuary are strongly impacted by these processes. Here, a series of samples were collected from across the Yangtze Estuary to investigate the source and spatial dynamics of CDOM and its components throughout the system. Three indices (a(355), spectral slope, and fluorescence) were then calculated and interpreted. The results indicated that the distribution of CDOM was dominated by allochthonous input, conservative mixing, and phase transfer. The contribution of biogenic CDOM to total CDOM increased with salinity, and three individual CDOM components were identified upon fluorescence excitation emission matrix spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis of the water samples: C1, corresponding to humic substance-like CDOM, C2, corresponding to tryptophan-like CDOM, and C3, corresponding to tyrosine-like CDOM. C1 primarily originated from a terrestrial source, C2 had widespread origins, none of which played a dominant role, and C3 mainly originated from allochthonous input in the medium salinity area. Unexpectedly, no marine humic-like component was found in the surface water of the Yangtze Estuary, possibly because turbidity decreased the depth of sunlight penetration, limiting production of this component. PMID:24243263

  5. Novel Technique for Improving the Signal-to-Background Ratio of X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure Spectrum in Fluorescence Mode and Its Application to the Chemical State Analysis of Magnesium Doped in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Takumi; Iihara, Junji; Saito, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Masaki

    2013-12-01

    A novel measurement technique for an X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) for magnesium (Mg) doped in gallium nitride (GaN) has been developed. XANES spectra from Mg at very low concentrations of 1 ×1018/cm3 doped in GaN have successfully been obtained by optimizing the region of interest (ROI) and by using highly brilliant synchrotron radiation X-rays of SPring-8. The ROI is the limited energy region from an X-ray fluorescence spectrum to elicit signals of particular atoms. Using this new technique, we have investigated the effect of the annealing process for Mg-doped GaN on the XANES spectra. It has been found that the XANES spectra of Mg significantly changed as the annealing temperature increased. This indicates that the local structure around Mg atoms in GaN was modified by the annealing process.

  6. Hydrological and biogeochemical Controls on Absorption and Fluorescence of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weidong; Wang, Chao; Li, Yan; Li, Yizhen; Song, Guodong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Yuanyue

    2016-04-01

    Absorption and fluorescence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were investigated in the northern South China Sea (SCS) and adjacent Kuroshio section of the West Philippine Sea (WPS). Two humic-like (C1, C2) and three protein-like (C3-C5) fluorescent components were identified using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). chromophoric DOM (CDOM) and fluorescent DOM (FDOM) in the northern SCS showed similar distribution patterns to the adjacent Kuroshio section and global open ocean, yet exhibited higher values in the whole water column. An isopycnal mixing model was adopted to quantify the difference in CDOM and FDOM in the euphotic zone between the northern SCS and WPS. Results showed that CDOM and humic-like FDOM were mainly modulated by Kuroshio intrusion, while protein-like FDOM were more affected by biological activities. At mid-depth, significant linear relationships between a350, C1, C2 and apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) suggested that CDOM and humic-like FDOM were produced in situ coupled to remineralization of biogenic sinking particle. Excess humic-like FDOM in the intermediate water of northern SCS were determined and more proportion of high molecular weight organic carbon was exported to the open ocean interior. In addition, regional distribution patterns of CDOM and FDOM were also tuned by mesoscale processes in the northern SCS. Different CDOM and FDOM components in the euphotic zone have apparently different responses for changes of biological activity and vertical mixing driven by eddies. Moreover, cold eddy could capture more sinking particles and finally increase the accumulation of bio-refractory CDOM and humic-like FDOM in the dark ocean. Finally, we demonstrated that the ratio of two humic-like FDOM (C1:C2, or peak C:M) may be a good indicator of water mixing, evolution of mesoscale eddies, photochemistry in the upper water and remineralization in the deeper layer.

  7. A passive measurement of dissociated atom densities in atmospheric pressure air discharge plasmas using vacuum ultraviolet self-absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Laity, George; Fierro, Andrew; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas; Frank, Klaus

    2014-03-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the dissociation degree of atmospheric pressure air discharges by measuring the self-absorption characteristics of vacuum ultraviolet radiation from O and N atoms in the plasma. The atom densities are determined by modeling the amount of radiation trapping present in the discharge, without the use of typical optical absorption diagnostic techniques which require external sources of probing radiation into the experiment. For an 8.0 mm spark discharge between needle electrodes at atmospheric pressure, typical peak O atom densities of 8.5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} and peak N atom densities of 9.9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} are observed within the first ∼1.0 mm of plasma near the anode tip by analyzing the OI and NI transitions in the 130.0–132.0 nm band of the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum.

  8. A two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Boivin, R. L.; Brooks, N. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Hill, D. N.; Porter, G. D.

    2012-10-15

    The quality of plasma produced in a magnetic confinement fusion device is influenced to a large extent by the neutral gas surrounding the plasma. The plasma is fueled by the ionization of neutrals, and charge exchange interactions between edge neutrals and plasma ions are a sink of energy and momentum. Here we describe a diagnostic capable of measuring the spatial distribution of neutral gas in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. A high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup -1}) laser is injected into a hydrogen plasma to excite the Lyman {beta} transition via the simultaneous absorption of two 205 nm photons. The absorption rate, determined by measurement of subsequent Balmer {alpha} emission, is proportional to the number of particles with a given velocity. Calibration is performed in situ by filling the chamber to a known pressure of neutral krypton and exciting a transition close in wavelength to that used in hydrogen. We present details of the calibration procedure, including a technique for identifying saturation broadening, measurements of the neutral density profile in a hydrogen helicon plasma, and discuss the application of the diagnostic to plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak.

  9. [Study on determination of eight metal elements in Hainan arecanut leaf by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-yun; Wang, Ping; Feng, Mei-li; Dong, Zhi-guo; Li, Jie

    2008-12-01

    Arecanut is a sort of palm that is important economic crop for the farmers in Hainan province of China, wherein there are many kinds of metal elements such as K, Ca, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn etc. These elements are important nutrition for the growth of arecanut. It is very valuable to study on the content of these metal elements in arecanut leaf in terms of plant nutriology of arecanut. The arecanut leaf in Wangling county, Hainan province of China was sampled by diagonal-field-sampling method. Refering to other plant sample determination by FAAS, the detailed studies are done with different digestion and determination methods. In the present paper the effects of mixed acid of HNO3-HClO4 digestion method on determining the amount of metal elements in the arecanut leaf by FAAS is reported, and another one is incineration digestion method. FAAS method was established for the determination of K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn The samples were incinerated or heated with HNO3-HClO4 (4:1). In the meantime, the optimum parameters of FAAS and effects of different digestion methods on the results were discussed. The recovery rate of standard addition is 98.36%-102.38% in the first method; RSD is 0.42%-2.328% (n=6); The recovery rate of standard addition is 99.22%-103.72% in the second method; RSD is 0.58%-1.283 (n=6). The metal amount determined by the first method is lower than the second method, the ratio is 0.9703-0.9934. The two methods are satisfied, but the latter is better. It is precise enough to common experiment to use flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry with digestion by incineration If the especially precise experiment is required, the digestion methods with mixed acid of HNO3-HClO4 may be introduced. The paper introduced methods dependable for determination of some metal elements in order to study on some nutrient effects of these metal elements in arecanut. PMID:19248529

  10. Inherent optical properties of the ocean: retrieval of the absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter from airborne laser spectral fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Vodacek, Anthony; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Blough, Neil V.

    1995-10-01

    The absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) at 355 nm has been retrieved from airborne laser-induced and water Raman-normalized CDOM fluorescence. Four combined airborne and ship field experiments have demonstrated that (1) the airborne CDOM fluorescence-to--water Raman ratio is linearly related to concurrent quinine-sulfate-standardized CDOM shipboard fluorescence measurements over a wide range of water masses (coastal to blue water); (2) the vicarious calibration of the airborne fluorosensor in units traceable to a fluorescence standard can be established and then maintained over an extended time period by tungsten lamp calibration; (3) the vicariously calibrated airborne CDOM fluorescence-to-water Raman ratio can be directly applied to previously developed

  11. Determination of yttrium and rare-earth elements in rocks by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J G

    1981-01-01

    With use of synthetic solutions and several international standard reference materials a method has been developed for determining traces of Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu in rocks by electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytically-coated graphite furnace. Depending on the element, the sensitivity is of the order of 10(-9)-10(-12) g at 2500 degrees . To avoid matrix interferences the lanthanides are separated from the common elements by co-precipitation with calcium and iron as carriers. The data for Canadian reference rock SY-2 (syenite), U.S.G.S. reference rocks W-2 (diabase), DNC-1 (diabase) and BIR-1 (basalt), and South African reference rock NIM-18/69 (carbonatite) obtained by graphite-furnace atomization are compared with the values obtained by flame atomic-absorption. The results are in good agreement with literature values. PMID:18962852

  12. Direct determination of selenium in rat blood plasma by Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kabirov, K K; Kapetanovic, I M; Lyubimov, A V

    2008-01-30

    The method was developed to be applied for direct determination of selenium in rat plasma by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction. Blood was obtained from CD rats of both sexes 2h after dosing in weeks 7 and 13 in order to acquire data on the levels of selenium in these animals during 13-week gavage administration of l-seleno-methylselenocysteine (SeMC), a new candidate chemopreventive agent under development. Application of the commonly used method of standard addition was found to be unsuitable to calculate the selenium content in rat plasma (within-run and between-run accuracy and precision parameters were less than 85%). Therefore, a new analytical method was developed. In this method, samples of rat plasma (50 microL) were diluted 10-fold with a reducing agent containing l-ascorbic acid, a modifier solution containing palladium chloride and Triton X-100. Samples were atomized in pyrolytically coated graphite tubes and peak height signals were measured. Selenium concentrations were determined by linear least squares regression analysis based on the standard curve generated in pooled rat blank plasma. Since selenium is normally present in plasma, a three-step approach was used to calculate selenium plasma levels. Initially selenium levels were determined based on the standard curve with selenium-spiked pool plasma. In the second step, background selenium levels in the pooled plasma were determined based on the same standard curve. In the third step, background level was added to the previously derived number. The relative errors were in the range from -4.6 to 11.4% (intra-day assay) and from -0.4 to 8.8% (inter-day assay) which proved good accuracy. The relative standard deviations were in the range from 1.88 to 4.70% (intra-day precision) and from 3.28 to 5.38% (inter-day precision). In rat plasma, the following dose-dependent selenium levels (mean+/-S.D.) in males and females, respectively, were observed at 13 weeks

  13. Investigating ligand-receptor interactions at bilayer surface using electronic absorption spectroscopy and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Navneet; Li, Xuelian; Kohli, Punit

    2012-01-01

    We investigate interactions between receptors and ligands at bilayer surface of polydiacetylene (PDA) liposomal nanoparticles using changes in electronic absorption spectroscopy and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). We study the effect of mode of linkage (covalent versus non-covalent) between the receptor and liposome bilayer. We also examine the effect of size dependent interactions between liposome and analyte through electronic absorption and FRET responses. Glucose (receptor) molecules were either covalently or non-covalently attached at the bilayer of nanoparticles, and they provided selectivity for molecular interactions between glucose and glycoprotein ligands of E. coli. The receptor-ligand interactions between glucose and ligand on E. Coli surface induced stress on conjugated PDA chain which resulted in changes (blue to red) in the absorption spectrum of PDA. The changes in electronic absorbance also led to changes in FRET efficiency between conjugated PDA chains (acceptor) and fluorophores (Sulphorhodamine-101) (donor) attached to the bilayer surface. Interestingly, we did not find significant differences in UV-Vis and FRET responses for covalently- and non-covalently-bound glucose to liposomes following their interactions with E. Coli. We attributed these results to close proximity of glucose receptor molecules to the liposome bilayer surface such that induced stress were similar in both the cases. We also found that PDA emission from direct excitation mechanism was ~ 2 - 10 times larger than that of FRET based response. These differences in emission signals were attributed to three major reasons: non-specific interactions between E. Coli and liposomes; size differences between analyte and liposomes; and a much higher PDA concentration with respect to sulpho-rhodamine (SR-101). We have proposed a model to explain our experimental observations. Our fundamental studies reported here will help in enhancing our knowledge regarding interactions

  14. [Using atomic fluorescence spectrometry to study the spatial distribution of As and Hg in orchard soils].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi-Mei; Lü, Chun-Yan; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Xi-Cun

    2014-02-01

    Aqua regia digestion, double channels-atomic fluorescence spectrometry method was used to determine the concentrations of As and Hg in orchard soils of Qixia City - the main apple production area of Shandong province. Validate The detection limitation, accuracy and precision of the method were validated, the spatial distribution was analyzed, and the characteristics of As and Hg pollution in Qixia orchard soils were assessed. The results showed that the range of As concentration in Qixia soils is between 2.79 and 20.93 mg x kg(-1), the average concentration is 10.59 mg x kg(-1), the range of Hg concentration in Qixia soil is between 0.01 and 0.79 mg x kg(-1), the average concentration is 0.12 mg x kg(-1). The variation of As concentration in soils is small, whereas that of Hg concentration is large. Frequency distribution graphics of As and Hg showed that the concentration of As in soils is according with the normal distribution approximately and the concentrations are mostly between 7 and 15 mg x kg(-1), the concentration of Hg in soil isn't according with the normal distribution and the concentrations are mostly between 0.03 and 0.21 mg x kg(-1). The correlations between the concentrations of As or Hg in soils and the nutrient are not significant and there is no significant correlation even between As and Hg. Based on the environmental technical terms for green food production area, the As concentration in orchard soil of Qixia City is at clean level, but there are 4.76% of sample points with Hg pollution index exceeding 1, and this should be attracted the attention of the administrators. PMID:24822435

  15. Ultratrace determination of mercury in water following EN and EPA standards using atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Labatzke, Thomas; Schlemmer, Gerhard

    2004-02-01

    Chemical vapour generation has been used in combination with atomic fluorescence spectrometry to determine mercury at ultratrace concentrations down to 0.1 ng L(-1). A time-based injection of 1 mL of solution for measurement was sufficient to generate a steady-state detector response in the direct mode of measurement. The detection limit calculated from a ten-point calibration curve according to DIN 32645 was 0.26 ng L(-1). Instrument noise is limited by reflected radiation from the light source rather than by the dark current of the photomultiplier. The detection limit is directly influenced by the reagent blank which was 2 ng L(-1) in the experiments described. Focusing by amalgamation and subsequent thermal desorption generates a detector response which is about eight times higher in peak intensity and about twice as large in integrated intensity. The detection limit under these conditions is 0.09 ng L(-1) which can be further improved by preconcentration of larger volumes of solution for measurement. The cycle time for one individual reading is about 40 s without amalgamation and 125 s with amalgamation. The linear dynamic range of the system is five orders of magnitude with a single photomultiplier gain setting. The carry-over is less than 0.3% in direct measurement mode. Reference water samples and a surface water containing approximately 5 ng L(-1) were used to prove the validity of the method for real samples. Good accuracy and recoveries of 103% were calculated using the fast direct determination technique. PMID:14673566

  16. Chemotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometric method as a field method for volatile arsenic in natural gas.

    PubMed

    Uroic, M Kalle; Krupp, Eva M; Johnson, Charlie; Feldmann, Jörg

    2009-12-01

    Volatile arsenic compounds in natural gas, existing in the form of trimethylarsine (TMAs), have been determined using gas cryo-trapping gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (CT-GC-ICP-MS). The results from a number of different gas wells revealed a huge concentration spread ranging from below the detection limit of 0.2 up to 1800 microg/m(3) TMAs (as As) in the gas. Due to the toxicity and corrosive nature of these arsines, they need near real time monitoring via a method that can easily be implemented on site, i.e. during gas exploitation. Here, we introduce a novel method which utilises silver nitrate impregnated silica gel tubes for quantitative chemotrapping of trimethylarsine (TMAs) from a natural gas matrix. Subsequent elution with hot nitric acid followed by online photo-oxidation hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) is used for the determination of TMAs gas standards in nitrogen and natural gas samples, respectively. The chemotrapping method was validated using CT-GC-ICP-MS as a reference method. The recovery of arsenic from nitrogen or natural gas matrix ranged from 85 to 113% for a range of 20 to 2000 ng As. Trapping efficiency was >98%, from the methods LOD of 20 ng to 4.8 microg (absolute amount As) with sample sizes of 0.02 and 2 L gas. Method performance was established by comparing the results obtained for eight natural gas samples containing between 1 and 140 microg As/m(3) with those achieved by the reference method (CT-GC-ICP-MS). PMID:20024020

  17. Data of fluorescence, UV-vis absorption and FTIR spectra for the study of interaction between two food colourants and BSA.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian; Cheng, Zhengjun; Cao, Lijun; Jiang, Xiaohui; Fan, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this data article, the fluorescence, UV-vis absorption and FTIR spectra data of BSA-AR1/AG50 system were presented, which were used for obtaining the binding characterization (such as binding constant, binding distance, binding site, thermodynamics, and structural stability of protein) between BSA and AR1/AG50. PMID:27508228

  18. Two-photon absorption of fluorescent protein chromophores incorporating non-canonical amino acids: TD-DFT screening and classical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Alaraby Salem, M; Brown, Alex

    2015-10-14

    Two-photon spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins is a powerful bio-imaging tool characterized by deep tissue penetration and little damage. However, two-photon spectroscopy has lower sensitivity than one-photon microscopy alternatives and hence a protein with a large two-photon absorption cross-section is needed. We use time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory to screen twenty-two possible chromophores that can be formed upon replacing the amino-acid Tyr66 that forms the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore with a non-canonical amino acid. A proposed chromophore with a nitro substituent was found to have a large two-photon absorption cross-section (29 GM) compared to other fluorescent protein chromophores as determined at the same level of theory. Classical molecular dynamics are then performed on a nitro-modified fluorescent protein to test its stability and study the effect of the conformational flexibility of the chromophore on its two-photon absorption cross-section. The theoretical results show that the large cross-section is primarily due to the difference between the permanent dipole moments of the excited and ground states of the nitro-modified chromophore. This large difference is maintained through the various conformations assumed by the chromophore in the protein cavity. The nitro-derived protein appears to be very promising as a two-photon absorption probe. PMID:26370051

  19. Study of the roles of chemical modifiers in determining boron using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and optimization of the temperature profile during atomization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuhei; Shirasaki, Toshihiro; Yonetani, Akira; Imai, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The measurement conditions for determining boron using graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) were investigated. Differences in the boron absorbance profiles were found using three different commercially available GF-AAS instruments when the graphite atomizers in them were not tuned. The boron absorbances found with and without adjusting the graphite atomizers suggested that achieving an adequate absorbance for the determination of boron requires a sharp temperature profile that overshoots the target temperature during the atomization process. Chemical modifiers that could improve the boron absorbance without the need for using coating agents were tested. Calcium carbonate improved the boron absorbance but did not suppress variability in the peak height. Improvement of boron absorbance was comparatively less using iron nitrate or copper nitrate than using calcium carbonate, but variability in the peak height was clearly suppressed using iron nitrate or copper nitrate. The limit of detection was 0.0026 mg L(-1) when iron nitrate was used. It appears that iron nitrate is a useful new chemical modifier for the quick and simple determination of boron using GF-AAS. PMID:25958863

  20. Determination of Ca, Mg, Na, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Li and Zn in acid mine and reference water samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Meier, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric (ICP-AFS) method was used for the determination of nine elements in natural water. Reference and acid mine water samples were analysed by this method to demonstrate its usefulness for hydrogeochemical exploration. The elements were determined in two groups based on the compatibility of operating conditions and consideration of element abundance levels in natural water. Ca, Mg and Na were determined as a group using one set of instrumental conditions and a 1 + 99 dilution of the sample, and Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Li and Zn were determined using another set of conditions and the undiluted sample. The detection limits for the elements are as follows: Ca, 1.4; Mg, 1.7; Na, 2.0; Cd, 1.8; Cu, 6.2; Fe, 15.8; K, 3.5; Li, 0.3; and Zn, 1.2 ng m1-1. Each element has a linear range spanning about four orders of magnitude. The method has good precision and accuracy, as shown by statistics on replicate analyses and by the agreement between values obtained and those recommended for the reference water samples, and also those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry for the acid mine water samples.

  1. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-07

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  2. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Erikat, I A; Hamad, B A

    2013-11-01

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir-C and Ir-Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule. PMID:24206318

  3. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-01

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir-C and Ir-Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  4. DETERMINATION OF TRACE AMOUNTS OF SELENIUM IN CORN, LETTUCE, POTATOES, SOYBEANS, AND WHEAT BY HYDRIDE GENERATION/CONDENSATION AND FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the nutritional and toxicological significance of low selenium concentrations in agricultural crops, a procedure utilizing wet digestion followed by hydride generation/condensation-flame atomic absorption was developed for the routine analysis of selenium in different ...

  5. AN INTRALABORATORY COMPARATIVE STUDY OF HYDRIDE GENERATION AND GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES FOR DETERMINING ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENIC IN COMPLEX WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed intralaboratory comparison of the determination of arsenic in complex wastewater samples by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption techniques has been conducted. Two hydride generation techniques were employed. One consisted of the use of sodium boro...

  6. Highly uniform holographic microtrap arrays for single atom trapping using a feedback optimization of in-trap fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Hikaru; Unakami, Tomoyuki; He, Jun; Miyamoto, Yoko; Nakagawa, Ken'ichi

    2016-04-18

    We report on the novel optimization method to realize highly uniform microtrap arrays for single atom trapping with a spatial light modulator (SLM). This method consists of two iterative feedback loops with the measurements of both diffracted light intensities and in-trap fluorescence intensities from each microtrap. By applying this method to the single 87Rb atom trapping, we can reduce the variance of trap depths from 20.8% to 1.7% for 4 × 4 square arrays and less than 4% for various arrays with up to 62 sites. The detection error of individual single atoms is also reduced from 1.7% to 0.0054% on average. PMID:27137252

  7. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry — An analytical and diagnostic tool for trace analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Lepri, Fábio G.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Heitmann, Uwe

    2007-09-01

    The literature about applications of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) with electrothermal atomization is reviewed. The historic development of HR-CS AAS is briefly summarized and the main advantages of this technique, mainly the 'visibility' of the spectral environment around the analytical line at high resolution and the unequaled simultaneous background correction are discussed. Simultaneous multielement CS AAS has been realized only in a very limited number of cases. The direct analysis of solid samples appears to have gained a lot from the special features of HR-CS AAS, and the examples from the literature suggest that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standards. Low-temperature losses of nickel and vanadyl porphyrins could be detected and avoided in the analysis of crude oil due to the superior background correction system. The visibility of the spectral environment around the analytical line revealed that the absorbance signal measured for phosphorus at the 213.6 nm non-resonance line without a modifier is mostly due to the PO molecule, and not to atomic phosphorus. The future possibility to apply high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption for the determination of non-metals is discussed.

  8. A highly sensitive method for the determination of mercury using vapor generation gold wire microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Payman; Rahimi, Akram

    2007-04-01

    The study introduces a new simple and highly sensitive method for headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mercury. In the proposed method, a gold wire, mounted in the headspace of a sample solution in a sealed bottle, is used for collection of mercury vapor generated by addition of sodium tetrahydroborate. The gold wire is then simply inserted in the sample introduction hole of a graphite furnace of an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry instrument. By applying an atomization temperature of 600 °C, mercury is rapidly desorbed from the wire and determined with high sensitivity. Factorial design and response surface analysis methods were used for optimization of the effect of five different variables in order to maximize the mercury signal. By using a 0.75 mm diameter gold wire, a sample volume of about 8 ml and an extraction time of 11 min, the sensitivity of mercury determination was enhanced up to 10 4 times in comparison to its ordinary ETAAS determination with direct injection of 10 μl sample solutions. A detection limit of 0.006 ng ml - 1 and a precision better than 4.6% (relative standard deviation) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in industrial wastewaters and tuna fish samples.

  9. An experimental study of the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles and their electrosynthesized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, A. K. D.; Gningue-Sall, D.; Yassar, A.; Brochon, J.-C.; Henry, E.; Aaron, J.-J.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles (N-PhPys), including HOPhPy, MeOPhPy, ThPhPy, PhDPy, DPhDPy, PyPhThThPhPy, and their available, electrosynthesized polymers were investigated. Electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yields (ΦF) and lifetimes (τF), and other photophysical parameters of these N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers were measured in DMF, DMSO diluted solutions and/or solid state at room temperature. The electronic absorption spectra of N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers included one to several bands, located in the 270-395 nm region, according to the p-phenyl substituent electron-donating effect and conjugated heteroaromatic system length. The fluorescence excitation spectra were characterized by one broad main peak, with, in most cases, one (or more) poorly resolved shoulder (s), appearing in the 270-405 nm region, and their emission spectra were generally constituted of several bands located in the 330-480 nm region. No significant shift of the absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra wavelengths was found upon going from the monomers to the corresponding polymers. ΦF values were high, varying between 0.11 and 0.63, according to the nature of substituents(s) and to the conjugated system extension. Fluorescence decays were mono-exponential for the monomers and poly-exponential for PyPhThThPhPy and for polymers. τF values were relatively short (0.35-5.17 ns), and markedly decreased with the electron-donor character of the phenyl group p-substituent and the conjugated system extension.

  10. An experimental study of the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles and their electrosynthesized polymers.

    PubMed

    Diaw, A K D; Gningue-Sall, D; Yassar, A; Brochon, J-C; Henry, E; Aaron, J-J

    2015-01-25

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles (N-PhPys), including HOPhPy, MeOPhPy, ThPhPy, PhDPy, DPhDPy, PyPhThThPhPy, and their available, electrosynthesized polymers were investigated. Electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yields (ΦF) and lifetimes (τF), and other photophysical parameters of these N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers were measured in DMF, DMSO diluted solutions and/or solid state at room temperature. The electronic absorption spectra of N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers included one to several bands, located in the 270-395 nm region, according to the p-phenyl substituent electron-donating effect and conjugated heteroaromatic system length. The fluorescence excitation spectra were characterized by one broad main peak, with, in most cases, one (or more) poorly resolved shoulder (s), appearing in the 270-405 nm region, and their emission spectra were generally constituted of several bands located in the 330-480 nm region. No significant shift of the absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra wavelengths was found upon going from the monomers to the corresponding polymers. ΦF values were high, varying between 0.11 and 0.63, according to the nature of substituents(s) and to the conjugated system extension. Fluorescence decays were mono-exponential for the monomers and poly-exponential for PyPhThThPhPy and for polymers. τF values were relatively short (0.35-5.17 ns), and markedly decreased with the electron-donor character of the phenyl group p-substituent and the conjugated system extension. PMID:25173528

  11. Determination of cobalt in biological samples by line-source and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using solid sampling or alkaline treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Anderson Schwingel; Vieira, Mariana Antunes; da Silva, Alessandra Furtado; Borges, Daniel L. Gallindo; Welz, Bernhard; Heitmann, Uwe; Curtius, Adilson José

    2005-06-01

    Two procedures for the determination of Co in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) were compared: solid sampling (SS) and alkaline treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using two different instruments for the investigation: a conventional line-source (LS) atomic absorption spectrometer and a prototype high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer. For the direct introduction of the solid samples, certified reference materials (CRM) were ground to a particle size ≤50 μm. Alkaline treatment was carried out by placing about 250 mg of the sample in polypropylene flasks, adding 2 mL of 25% m/v tetramethylammonium hydroxide and de-ionized water. Due to its unique capacity of providing a 3-D spectral plot, a high-resolution continuum source (HR-CS) graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used as a tool to evaluate potential spectral interferences, including background absorption for both sample introduction procedures, revealing that a continuous background preceded the atomic signal for pyrolysis temperatures lower than 700 °C. Molecular absorption bands with pronounced rotational fine structure appeared for atomization temperatures >1800 °C probably as a consequence of the formation of PO. After optimization had been carried out using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry, the optimized conditions were adopted also for line-source atomic absorption spectrometry. Six biological certified reference materials were analyzed, with calibration against aqueous standards, resulting in agreement with the certified values (according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level) and in detection limits as low as 5 ng g -1.

  12. Determination of Chlorine in Milk via Molecular Absorption of SrCl Using High-Resolution Continuum Source Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-07-20

    Total chlorine in milk was determined via the molecular absorption of diatomic strontium monochloride at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of coating the graphite furnace, using different modifiers, amount of molecule-forming element, and different calibrants were investigated and optimized. Chlorine concentrations in milk samples were determined in a Zr-coated graphite furnace using 25 μg of Sr as the molecule-forming reagent and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C and a molecule-forming temperature of 2300 °C. Linearity was maintained up to 500 μg mL(-1) of Cl. The method was tested by analyzing a certified reference wastewater. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified value. The limit of detection of the method was 1.76 μg mL(-1). The chlorine concentrations in various cow milk samples taken from the market were found in the range of 588-1472 mg L(-1). PMID:27345208

  13. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    PubMed

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  14. A comparison of simultaneous plasma, atomic absorption, and iron colorimetric determinations of major and trace constituents in acid mine waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three water samples collected during June to October 1982 from the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin were originally analyzed by simultaneous multielement direct-current plasma (DCP) atomic-emission spectrometry, flame atomic-absorption spectrometry, graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) (thallium only), ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry.Determinations were made for the following metallic and semi-metallic constituents: AI, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe(11), Fe(total), Li, Pb, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, K, Sb, Se, Si, Na, Sr, TI, V, and Zn. These samples were re-analyzed later by simultaneous multielement inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-emission spectrometry and Zeeman-corrected GFAAS to determine the concentrations of many of the same constituents with improved accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. The result of this analysis has been the generation of comparative concentration values for a significant subset of the solute constituents. Many of the more recently determined values replace less-than-detection values for the trace metals; others constitute duplicate analyses for the major constituents. The multiple determinations have yielded a more complete, accurate, and precise set of analytical data. They also have resulted in an opportunity to compare the performance of the plasma-emission instruments operated in their respective simultaneous multielement modes. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for Na and K and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for As because of their lower detection limit and relative freedom from interelement spectral effects. Colorimetric determination using ferrozine as the color agent was judged most accurate, precise, and sensitive for Fe. Cadmium, lead, and vanadium concentrations were too low in this set of samples to enable a determination of whether ICP or DCP is a more suitable technique. Of

  15. On the possibilities of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the simultaneous or sequential monitoring of multiple atomic lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Rello, L.; Flórez, M.; Belarra, M. A.

    2011-05-01

    This paper explores the potential of commercially available high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry instrumentation for the simultaneous or sequential monitoring of various atomic lines, in an attempt to highlight the analytical advantages that can be derived from this strategy. In particular, it is demonstrated how i) the monitoring of multiplets may allow for the simple expansion of the linear range, as shown for the measurement of Ni using the triplet located in the vicinity of 234.6 nm; ii) the use of a suitable internal standard may permit improving the precision and help in correcting for matrix-effects, as proved for the monitoring of Ni in different biological samples; iii) direct and multi-element analysis of solid samples may be feasible on some occasions, either by monitoring various atomic lines that are sufficiently close (truly simultaneous monitoring, as demonstrated in the determination of Co, Fe and Ni in NIST 1566a Oyster tissue) or, alternatively, by opting for a selective and sequential atomization of the elements of interest during every single replicate. Determination of Cd and Ni in BCR 679 White cabbage is attempted using both approaches, which permits confirming that both methods can offer very similar and satisfactory results. However, it is important to stress that the second approach provides more flexibility, since analysis is no longer limited to those elements that show very close atomic lines (closer than 0.3 nm in the ultraviolet region) with a sensitivity ratio similar to the concentration ratio of the analytes in the samples investigated.

  16. Prediction of two-photon absorption enhancement in red fluorescent protein chromophores made from non-canonical amino acids.

    PubMed

    Salem, M Alaraby; Twelves, Isaac; Brown, Alex

    2016-09-21

    Two-photon spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins is a powerful bio-imaging tool known for deep tissue penetration and little cellular damage. Being less sensitive than the one-photon microscopy alternatives, a protein with a large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section is needed. Here, we use time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) at the B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) levels of theory to screen twenty-two possible chromophores that can be formed upon replacing the amino-acid Tyr66 that forms the red fluorescent protein (RFP) chromophore with a non-canonical amino acid. The two-level model for TPA was used to assess the properties (i.e., transition dipole moment, permanent dipole moment difference, and the angle between them) leading to the TPA cross-sections determined via response theory. Computing TPA cross-sections with B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP yields similar overall trends. Results using both functionals agree that the RFP-derived model of the Gold Fluorescent Protein chromophore (Model 20) has the largest intrinsic TPA cross-section at the optimized geometry. TPA was further computed for selected chromophores following conformational changes: variation of both the dihedral angle of the acylimine moiety and the tilt and twist angles between the rings of the chromophore. The TPA cross-section assumed an oscillatory trend with the rotation of the acylimine dihedral, and the TPA is maximized in the planar conformation for almost all models. Model 21 (a hydroxyquinoline derivative) is shown to be comparable to Model 20 in terms of TPA cross-section. The conformational study on Model 21 shows that the acylimine angle has a much stronger effect on the TPA than its tilt and twist angles. Having an intrinsic TPA ability that is more than 7 times that of the native RFP chromophore, Models 20 and 21 appear to be very promising for future experimental investigation. PMID:27534378

  17. Speciation of methyl- and butyltin compounds and inorganic tin in oysters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.S.; Weber, J.H.

    1988-02-15

    Because of the toxicity of tributyltin originating from many antifouling marine paints, there is much concern about its effect on aquatic life and, particularly, on shellfish. This paper describes speciation of inorganic tin, methyltin compounds, and butyltin compounds from oyster samples. The authors validated the hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometric technique by demonstrating ca. 100% recovery from spiked samples and by the absence of any organotin decomposition products. Absolute detection limits (3sigma) are 1.1-2.5 ng for 0.1-g oyster samples (wet weight). This method is superior to published techniques because of careful validation, low limits of detection, and minimal sample manipulation.

  18. A photon counting and a squeezing measurement method by the exact absorption and dispersion spectrum of Λ-type Atoms.

    PubMed

    Naeimi, Ghasem; Alipour, Samira; Khademi, Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the master equations for the interaction of two-mode photons with a three-level Λ-type atom are exactly solved for the coherence terms. In this paper the exact absorption spectrum is applied for the presentation of a non-demolition photon counting method, for a few number of coupling photons, and its benefits are discussed. The exact scheme is also applied where the coupling photons are squeezed and the photon counting method is also developed for the measurement of the squeezing parameter of the coupling photons. PMID:27610321

  19. [Use of solubilization for the preparation of samples for determination of heavy metals in biological materials using atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Pfüller, U; Fuchs, V; Golbs, S; Ebert, E; Pfeifer, D

    1980-01-01

    Solubilisation was tested for its suitability to prepare organic samples for metal determination. Flameless atomic-absorption spectrophotometry was used as test method. Copper, manganese, zinc, and chromium levels were determined from various organ systems of Wistar rat, in response to "normal" feeding of pelletised standard feed. A comparison between experimentally established concentrations, on the one hand, and literature data, on the other, suggested that solubilisation was applicable with good success to the preparation of samples from which to determine reliable values, in ppm and ppb, of the above elements. PMID:7436671

  20. Determination of silver in soils, sediments, and rocks by organic-chelate extraction and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Ball, J.W.; Nakagawa, H.M.

    1971-01-01

    A useful method for the determination of silver in soil, sediment, and rock samples in geochemical exploration has been developed. The sample is digested with concentrated nitric acid, and the silver extracted with triisooctyl thiophosphate (TOTP) in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) after dilution of the acid digest to approximately 6 M. The extraction of silver into the organic extractant is quantitative and not affected by the nitric acid concentration from 4 M to 8 M, or by different volumes of TOTP-MIBK. The extracted silver is stable and remains in the organic phase up to several days. The silver concentration is determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1971.

  1. Optimisation of flame parameters for simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace elements in rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    A study is described that identifies the optimum operating conditions for the accurate determination of Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, Ag, Bi and Cd using simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry. Accuracy was measured in terms of the percentage recoveries of the analytes based on certified values in nine standard reference materials. In addition to identifying optimum operating conditions for accurate analysis, conditions resulting in serious matrix interferences and the magnitude of the interferences were determined. The listed elements can be measured with acceptable accuracy in a lean to stoicheiometric flame at measurement heights ???5-10 mm above the burner.

  2. [Determination of trace elements in Spirulina platensis (Notdst.) Geitl. by flame atomic absorption spectrometry combined with microsampling pulse nebulization technique].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cun-Gui; Hong, Qing-Hong; Li, Dan-Ting; Fan, Meng-Hai; Cai, Xiao-Dan

    2006-09-01

    The contents of trace elements Ni, Zn, Mn, Cu, Mg, Fe, Ca and Pb in Spirulina platensis (Notdst.) Geitl. were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry combined with microsampling pulse nebulization technique. The results of the determination show that Spirulina platensis (Notdst.) Geitl. are rich in the inorganic elements such as Mg, Zn, Fe, Ca and Cu. Its recovery ratio obtained by standard addition method ranged between 96.58% and 106.12%, and its RSD was lower than 4.26%. The result will provide scientific data for the study on the trace elements in Spirulina platensis (Notdst.) Geitl. and on their relativity of efficacy of medicine. PMID:17112058

  3. New method for determining relative oscillator strengths of atoms through combined absorption and emission measurements - Application to titanium /Ti I/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardon, B. L.; Smith, P. L.; Whaling, W.

    1979-01-01

    The paper introduces a procedure that combines measurements of absorption and emission by atoms to obtain relative oscillator strengths that are independent of temperature determination in the sources and of assumptions regarding local thermodynamic equilibrium. The experimental observations are formed into sets of transitions and required to satisfy defined ratios. The procedure is illustrated with the published data of Whaling et al. and Smith and Kuehne for 16 transitions in Ti I. It is shown that the relative oscillator strengths resulting from this procedure have calculated uncertainties between 5 and 17% (about 95% confidence level). Evidence is presented to suggest that these uncertainties have been overestimated.

  4. Nonlinear absorption in ionic liquids with transition metallic atoms in the anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nóvoa-López, José A.; López Lago, Elena; Seijas, Julio A.; Pilar Vázquez-Tato, M.; Troncoso, Jacobo; de la Fuente, Raúl; Salgueiro, José R.; Michinel, Humberto

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear absorption has been investigated by open aperture Z-scan in ionic liquids obtained by combination of 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium cations with anions containing a transition metal (Co, Zn, Cu or Ni) and thiocyanate groups. The laser source was a Ti:Sapphire oscillator (80-fs pulses, λ = 810 nm, repetition rate of 80.75 MHz). All liquids present quite low heat capacities that favor the development of strong thermal effects. Thermal effects and nonlinear absorption make them potential materials for optical limiting purposes.

  5. Absorption spectra of two-level atoms interacting with a strong polychromatic pump field and an arbitrarily intense probe field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Tai Hyun; Chung, Myung Sai; Lee, Hai-Woong

    1999-09-01

    A numerical method is introduced that solves the optical Bloch equations describing a two-level atom interacting with a strong polychromatic pump field with an equidistant spectrum and an arbitrarily intense monochromatic probe field. The method involves a transformation of the optical Bloch equations into a system of equations with time-independent coefficients at steady state via double harmonic expansion of the density-matrix elements, which is then solved by the method of matrix inversion. The solutions so obtained lead immediately to the determination of the polarization of the atomic medium and of the absorption and dispersion spectra. The method is applied to the case when the pump field is bichromatic and trichromatic, and the physical interpretation of the numerically computed spectra is given.

  6. Two Dimensional Spatially Resolved Two Photon Oxygen Atom Laser Induced Fluorescence Measurements in the Flow Field of the Arc Heated Facility L3K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, U.; Gülhan, A.; Esser, B.

    2005-02-01

    The arc heated facility LBK in Cologne is designed to characterize thermal protection materials for re-entry vehicles in high enthalpy flow fields. Models with dimensions of 300 * 300 mm can be studied with stable flow conditions for 1800 s in the L3K. Typical model surface temperatures are 2000 K at pressure levels of up to 350 hPa and enthalpy levels up to 25 MJ/kg. Infrared thermography, pyrometry, emission spectroscopy, absorption and diode laser absorption spectroscopy, Coherent Anti Stokes Raman Spectroscopy ( CARS ) and 2 Dimensional Laser Induced Fluorescence of Nitrous Oxide ( 2D-NO-LIF ) have been used to study the flow conditions in the free stream and in shock layers at moderate enthalpy levels. At high enthalpy levels above 12 MJ/kg it will not be possible to apply the well established NO-LIF technique to characterise flow conditions, because the NO-density in these flow fields becomes too low and the NO formed in the shock regions near the models appears in rotational non equilibrium. Two photon O-atom-LIF-technique was applied to study the relative O-atom density in the flow field of the arc heated facility at high enthalpy levels. The free stream electronic temperature of O-atoms agrees with roto-translational temperature from CFD calculations. Different flow velocities could be detected in the free stream and in the shock region by scanning the excitation wavelength. Measured flow velocities perpendicular to the model surface are in good agreement with the results from CFD-calculations. It has been noticed that he accuracy of the velocity values can be improved by lowering the line width of the excitation laser light with an etalon. The shock standoff distances for the IMENS model were determined from the intensity profiles for different angles of attack and different flow conditions. The results have been compared with CFD-calculations. The shock standoff distances from the measurements and the calculation agree very well. The determination of the

  7. CoxFey@C Composites with Tunable Atomic Ratios for Excellent Electromagnetic Absorption Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hualiang; Ji, Guangbin; Zhang, Haiqian; Li, Meng; Zuo, Zhongzheng; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Baoshan; Tang, Dongming; Du, Youwei

    2015-01-01

    The shell on the nano-magnetic absorber can prevent oxidation, which is very important for its practical utilization. Generally, the nonmagnetic shell will decrease the integral magnetic loss and thus weaken the electromagnetic absorption. However, maintaining the original absorption properties of the magnetic core is a major challenge. Here, we designed novel and facile CoxFey@C composites by reducing CoxFe3−xO4@phenolic resin (x = 1, 0.5 and 0.25). High saturation magnetization value (Ms) of CoxFey particle, as a core, shows the interesting magnetic loss ability. Meanwhile, the carbon shell may increase the integral dielectric loss. The resulting composite shows excellent electromagnetic absorption properties. For example, at a coating thickness of 2 mm, the RLmin value can reach to −23 dB with an effective frequency range of 7 GHz (11–18 GHz). The mechanisms of the improved microwave absorption properties are discussed. PMID:26659124

  8. CoxFey@C Composites with Tunable Atomic Ratios for Excellent Electromagnetic Absorption Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hualiang; Ji, Guangbin; Zhang, Haiqian; Li, Meng; Zuo, Zhongzheng; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Baoshan; Tang, Dongming; Du, Youwei

    2015-12-01

    The shell on the nano-magnetic absorber can prevent oxidation, which is very important for its practical utilization. Generally, the nonmagnetic shell will decrease the integral magnetic loss and thus weaken the electromagnetic absorption. However, maintaining the original absorption properties of the magnetic core is a major challenge. Here, we designed novel and facile CoxFey@C composites by reducing CoxFe3-xO4@phenolic resin (x = 1, 0.5 and 0.25). High saturation magnetization value (Ms) of CoxFey particle, as a core, shows the interesting magnetic loss ability. Meanwhile, the carbon shell may increase the integral dielectric loss. The resulting composite shows excellent electromagnetic absorption properties. For example, at a coating thickness of 2 mm, the RLmin value can reach to -23 dB with an effective frequency range of 7 GHz (11-18 GHz). The mechanisms of the improved microwave absorption properties are discussed.

  9. Photolytic-interference-free, femtosecond, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence imaging of atomic oxygen in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrashort-pulse lasers are well suited for nonlinear diagnostic techniques such as two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF) because the signals generated scale as the laser intensity squared. Furthermore, the broad spectral bandwidths associated with nearly Fourier-transform-limited ultrashort pulses effectively contribute to efficient nonlinear excitation by coupling through a large number of in-phase photon pairs, thereby producing strong fluorescence signals. Additionally, femtosecond (fs)-duration amplified laser systems typically operate at 1-10 kHz repetition rates, enabling high-repetition-rate imaging in dynamic environments. In previous experiments, we have demonstrated utilization of fs pulses for kilohertz (kHz)-rate, interference-free imaging of atomic hydrogen (H) in flames. In the present study, we investigate the utilization of fs-duration pulses to photolytic-interference-free TPLIF imaging of atomic oxygen (O). In TPLIF of O, photodissociation of vibrationally excited carbon dioxide (CO2) is known to be the prominent interference that produces additional O atoms in the medium. We have found that through the use of fs excitation, such interferences can be virtually eliminated in premixed laminar methane flames, which paves the way for two-dimensional imaging of O at kHz data rates. Such measurements can provide critical data for validating complex, multidimensional turbulent-combustion models as well as for investigating flame dynamics in practical combustion devices.

  10. Direct determination of mercury in white vinegar by matrix assisted photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingyang

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes the use of photochemical vapor generation with acetic acid as sample introduction for the direct determination of ultra-trace mercury in white vinegars by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under ultraviolet irradiation, the sample matrix (acetic acid) can reduce mercury ion to atomic mercury Hg 0, which is swept by argon gas into an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for subsequent analytical measurements. The effects of several factors such as the concentration of acetic acid, irradiation time, the flow rate of the carrier gas and matrix effects were discussed and optimized to give detection limits of 0.08 ng mL -1 for mercury. Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (3% v/v acetic acid, 30 s irradiation time and 20 W mercury lamp), the precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation, were 4.6% (one day) and 7.8% (inter-day) for mercury ( n = 9). Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the range of 92-98% for mercury. The method was also validated by analysis of vinegar samples without detectable amount of Hg spiked with aqueous standard reference materials (GBW(E) 080392 and GBW(E) 080393). The results were also compared with those obtained by acid digestion procedure and determination of mercury by ICP-MS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  11. Solvent Effects on the Electronic Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of HNP: Estimation of Ground and Excited State Dipole Moments.

    PubMed

    Desai, Vani R; Hunagund, Shirajahammad M; Basanagouda, Mahantesha; Kadadevarmath, Jagadish S; Sidarai, Ashok H

    2016-07-01

    We report the effect of solvents on absorption and fluorescence spectra of biologically active 3(2H)-pyridazinone namely 5-(2-hydroxy-naphthalen-1-yl)-2-phenyl-2H-pyridazin-3-one (HNP) in different solvents at room temperature. The ground and the excited state dipole moments of HNP molecule was estimated from Lippert's, Bakshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's equations using the solvatochromic shift method. The ground state dipole moment (μ g ) was also estimated by Guggenheim and Higasi method using the dielectric constant and refractive index of solute at different concentrations, the μ g value obtained from these two methods are comparable to the μ g value obtained by the solvatochromic shift method. The excited state dipole moment (μ e ) is greater than the ground state dipole moment (μ g ), which indicates that the excited state is more polar than the ground state. Further, we have evaluated the change in dipole moment (Δμ) from the solvatochromic shift method and on the basis of molecular-microscopic solvent polarity parameter[Formula: see text], later on the values were compared. PMID:27220623

  12. Curium analysis in plutonium uranium mixed oxide by x-ray fluorescence and absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, C; Borca, C; Cozzo, C

    2013-10-15

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are being used in commercial nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regards to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the local occurrence, speciation and next-neighbour environment of curium (Cm) in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice within an irradiated (60 MW d kg(-1) average burn-up) MOX sample was performed employing micro-x-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-x-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Cm (≈ 0.7 wt% in the rim and ≈ 0.03 wt% in the centre) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its centre and peripheral (rim) zones of the fuel. Curium occurrence is also reduced from the centre (hot) to the periphery (colder) because of the condensation of these volatile oxides. In the irradiated sample Cm builds up as Cm(3+) species (>90%) within a [CmO8](13-) or [CmO7](11-) coordination environment and no (<10%) Cm(IV) can be detected in the rim zone. Curium dioxide is reduced because of the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix and of its thermodynamic instability. PMID:24054692

  13. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Centomo, P.; Zecca, M.; Meneghini, C.

    2013-05-15

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 Degree-Sign C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  14. Absorption and fluorescence of hydrophobic components of dissolved organic matter in several Karelian lakes with stratified structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khundzhua, Daria A.; Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Krasnova, Elena D.; Gorshkova, Olga M.; Chevel, Kira A.; Yuzhakov, Viktor I.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic components of cromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) extracted from water samples and sediments taken in several relic basins located on Karelian shoreline of the White Sea were analyzed using spectroscopic techniques. Those water reservoirs exist at various stages of isolation from the White Sea and represent complex stratified systems of fresh and marine water layers not completely mixing trough the year. Basins separating from the White Sea are the unique natural objects for investigations of properties CDOM, its transformation in the process of turning the marine ecosystem into freshwater environment. CDOM occurring in all types of natural water represents a significant reservoir of organic carbon and plays a key role in the carbon cycle on the Earth. However, aquatic CDOM and nonliving organic matter in sediments from relic separating basins still have not been studied. The target of this work was to study absorption and fluorescence spectra of hydrophobic components of aquatic CDOM from different water depth and sediments in several separated basins of the Kandalaksha Gulf of the White Sea located near the N.A. Pertsov White Sea Biological Station.

  15. Theory of x-ray absorption by laser-dressed atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, Christian; Santra, Robin

    2007-03-15

    An ab initio theory is devised for the x-ray photoabsorption cross section of atoms in the field of a moderately intense optical laser (800 nm, 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}). The laser dresses the core-excited atomic states, which introduces a dependence of the cross section on the angle between the polarization vectors of the two linearly polarized radiation sources. We use the Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation to describe the atomic many-particle problem in conjunction with a nonrelativistic quantum-electrodynamic approach to treat the photon-electron interaction. The continuum wave functions of ejected electrons are treated with a complex absorbing potential that is derived from smooth exterior complex scaling. The solution to the two-color (x-ray plus laser) problem is discussed in terms of a direct diagonalization of the complex symmetric matrix representation of the Hamiltonian. Alternative treatments with time-independent and time-dependent non-Hermitian perturbation theories are presented that exploit the weak interaction strength between x rays and atoms. We apply the theory to study the photoabsorption cross section of krypton atoms near the K edge. A pronounced modification of the cross section is found in the presence of the optical laser.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements and kinetic analysis of Si atom formation in a rotating disk chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.; Coltrin, M.E.; Breiland, W.G. )

    1994-10-06

    An extensive set of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of Si atoms during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane and disilane in a research rotating disk reactor are presented. The experimental results are compared in detail with predictions from a numerical model of CVD from silane and disilane that treats the fluid flow coupled to gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry. The comparisons showed that the unimolecular decomposition of SiH[sub 2] could not account for the observed gas-phase Si atom density profiles. The H[sub 3]SiSiH [leftrightarrow] Si + SiH[sub 4] and H[sub 3]SiSiH + SiH[sub 2] [leftrightarrow] Si + Si[sub 2]H[sub 6] reactions are proposed as the primary Si atom production routes. The model is in good agreement with the measured shapes of the Si atom profiles and the trends in Si atom density with susceptor temperature, pressure, and reactant gas mixture. 33 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Atomic partial charges in condensed phase from an exact sum rule for infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2014-05-01

    A general sum rule for infrared intensities provides a definition of effective partial charges which can be experimentally obtained using isotopic substitutions and is valid in both gas and condensed phases. Of particular interest is the case of molecular liquids. We have, therefore, determined the hydrogen partial charges in liquid methanol and liquid water from the available literature. The resulting charges are 0.63 e and 0.14 e for hydrogen atoms bounded to the methanol oxygen and carbon atoms, respectively, and 0.55 e for hydrogen atoms in liquid water. The effective partial charges in liquid water were also computed from density functional based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and found in good agreement with experiment.

  18. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaba, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (mytilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were considered. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using spearmint oil and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard mixture as probes is discussed. The program is used for separation optimization and prediction of gas chromatographic parameters. The program produces a relative resolution map (RRM) which guides the analyst in selecting the most favorable temperature programming rate for the separation.

  19. Atomic absorption spectrometry for the automatic indirect determination of ascorbic acid based on-the reduction of manganese dioxide.

    PubMed

    Noroozifar, Meissam; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Akhavan, Kambiz

    2005-06-01

    A new and simple flow injection method followed by atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for the indirect determination of ascorbic acid. The proposed method is based on oxidation of ascorbic acid to dehydroascorbic acid using a solid-phase manganese dioxide (30% m/m suspended on silica gel beads) reactor. The flow of the sample through the column reduces the MnO2 to Mn(II) in an acidic carrier stream of 6.3 mM HNO3 (pH 2.2) with flow rate of 4.0 ml/min at room temperature; Mn(II) is measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The absorbance of Mn(II) is proportional to the concentration of ascorbic acid in the sample. The calibration curve was linear up to 30 mg/L, with a detection limit of 0.2 mg/L for a 220 microL injected sample volume. The developed procedure was found to be suitable for the determination of AsA in pharmaceuticals and foods with a relative standard deviation better than 1.09% and a sampling rate of about 95 h(-1). The results exhibit no interference from the presence of large amounts of organic compounds. The reliability of the method was established by parallel determination against the 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol methods. PMID:15984201

  20. Determination of some trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation with holmium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, Sibel; Soylak, Mustafa; Cabuk, Dilek; Topalak, Zeynep; Karagozlu, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    The determination of trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry was investigated. A coprecipitation procedure with holmium hydroxide was used for separation-preconcentration of trace elements. Trace amounts of copper(II), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(ll), chromium(lll), iron(Ill), cadmium(ll), and lead(ll) ions were coprecipitated with holmium hydroxide in 2.0 M NaOH medium. The optimum conditions for the coprecipitation process were investigated for several commonly tested experimental parameters, such as amount of coprecipitant, effect of standing time, centrifugation rate and time, and sample volume. The precision, based on replicate analysis, was lower than 10% for the analytes. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, the certified reference materials BCR 141 R calcareous loam soil and CRM 025-050 soil were analyzed. The procedure was successfully applied for separation and preconcentration of the investigated ions in various food and soil samples. An amount of the solid samples was decomposed with 15 mL concentrated hydrochloric acid-concentrated nitric acid (3 + 1). The preconcentration procedure was then applied to the final solutions. The concentration of trace elements in samples was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. PMID:22816279